Science.gov

Sample records for compact steam reformers

  1. Twenty kW fuel cell units of compact design. Part 5: Hydrogen production by steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grave, B.

    1980-09-01

    To assess its potential use in alkaline fuel cells, The production of hydrogen by steam reforming of methanol was studied analytically and experimentally. The reformer, the converter, and the purification system of a prototype installation were designed and the optimal operation parameters derived and experimentally confirmed. For comparison, hydrogen production by ammonia cracking was also studied. An estimate of the manufacturing costs for a fuel cell aggregate of 20 kW indicates economical operation only to be possible at very high duty cycles. As a result the project was terminated.

  2. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  3. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  4. Steam Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Qimin; Healey, T; Allen, Lloyd; Irving, Patricia M.

    2002-12-01

    has developed a proprietary catalyst formulation for the fuel processor that is being developed for use with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The catalyst has been tested for the steam reforming of various hydrocarbons such as natural gas, iso-octane, retail gasoline, and hexadecane. A 300h continuous test has shown that the catalyst has very stable performance for steam reforming of iso-octane at 800?C with a steam/C ratio of 3.6. The same catalyst was also tested for steam reforming hexadecane (a surrogate of diesel) for 73h as well as natural gas for over 150h continuously, without deactivation or carbon deposition. Sulfur tolerance of the catalyst was tested using iso-octane containing various concentrations of sulfur. There was no catalyst deactivation after a 220h continuous test using iso-octane with 100ppm sulfur. For comparison, a nickel catalyst (12wt.% Ni/Al2O3) was also tested using different levels of sulfur in iso-octane. The results indicated that the InnovaTek catalyst has a substantially improved sulfur resistance compared to the nickel catalysts currently used for steam reforming. In addition, a variation of the catalyst was also used to reduce CO concentration to < 1% by water gas shift reaction.

  5. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  6. Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.

    1990-01-01

    The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

  7. Steam reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kramarz, Kurt W.; Bloom, Ira D.; Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Wilkenhoener, Rolf; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel. A vapor of the hydrocarbon fuel and steam is brought in contact with a two-part catalyst having a dehydrogenation powder portion and an oxide-ion conducting powder portion at a temperature not less than about 770.degree.C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich. The H.sub.2 content of the hydrogen gas is greater than about 70 percent by volume. The dehydrogenation portion of the catalyst includes a group VIII metal, and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide from the group crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure and mixtures thereof. The oxide-ion conducting portion of the catalyst is a ceramic powder of one or more of ZrO.sub.2, CeO.sub.2, Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3, (BiVO).sub.4, and LaGaO.sub.3.

  8. Steam Reformer With Fibrous Catalytic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed steam-reforming reactor derives heat from internal combustion on fibrous catalyst. Supplies of fuel and air to combustor controlled to meet demand for heat for steam-reforming reaction. Enables use of less expensive reactor-tube material by limiting temperature to value safe for material yet not so low as to reduce reactor efficiency.

  9. Fuel cell integrated with steam reformer

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.; Whelan, James A.

    1987-01-01

    A H.sub.2 -air fuel cell integrated with a steam reformer is disclosed wherein a superheated water/methanol mixture is fed to a catalytic reformer to provide a continuous supply of hydrogen to the fuel cell, the gases exhausted from the anode of the fuel cell providing the thermal energy, via combustion, for superheating the water/methanol mixture.

  10. Supported metal catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Stephen; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-21

    Despite extensive studies on hydrogen production via steam reforming of alcohols and sugar alcohols, catalysts typically suffer a variety of issues from poor hydrogen selectivity to rapid deactivation. Here, we summarize recent advances in fundamental understanding of functionality and structure of catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming, and provide perspectives on further development required to design highly efficient steam reforming catalysts.

  11. Methanol Steam Reforming for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Daniel R.; Dagle, Robert A.; Holladay, Jamie D.

    2007-09-11

    Review article covering developments in methanol steam reforming in the context of PEM fuel cell power systems. Subjects covered include methanol background, use, and production, comparison to other fuels, power system considerations, militrary requirements, competing technologies, catalyst development, and reactor and system development and demonstration.

  12. Methanol steam reforming in a fuel cell drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, W.; Emonts, B.; Peters, R.

    Within the framework of the Joule III project a compact methanol reformer (CMR) with a specific weight of 2 kg/kW (lower heating value of H 2) was developed. This CMR contains a methanol and water vaporizer, a steam reformer, a heat carrier circuit and a catalytic burner unit. A laboratory fixed-bed reactor consisting of four tubes which could be filled with different amounts of catalyst was used to investigate the catalyst performance and the ageing behaviour. A hydrogen yield of 10 m N3/(h l Cat) can be achieved at 280°C. In this case, the methanol conversion rate is 95% and the dry product gas contains 0.9% CO. A linear decrease of the catalyst activity was observed which can be described by a loss of active catalyst mass of 5.5 mg/h. The catalyst was operated for more than 1000 h without having exhibited activity losses that made a catalyst change necessary. Besides, the stationary behaviour of the reforming reactor, the dynamic behaviour was studied. The time needed for start-up procedures has to be improved for reformers of a next generation. Moreover, the hydrogen production during reformer load changes will be discussed. Simulations of the power train in driving cycles show the different states of a reformer during dynamic operation.

  13. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  14. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Monica Mihet, Maria Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  15. Hydrogen generation utilizing integrated CO2 removal with steam reforming

    DOEpatents

    Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Chellappa, Anand S

    2013-07-23

    A steam reformer may comprise fluid inlet and outlet connections and have a substantially cylindrical geometry divided into reforming segments and reforming compartments extending longitudinally within the reformer, each being in fluid communication. With the fluid inlets and outlets. Further, methods for generating hydrogen may comprise steam reformation and material adsorption in one operation followed by regeneration of adsorbers in another operation. Cathode off-gas from a fuel cell may be used to regenerate and sweep the adsorbers, and the operations may cycle among a plurality of adsorption enhanced reformers to provide a continuous flow of hydrogen.

  16. Compatibility of selected ceramics with steam-methane reformer environments

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Howell, M.; Williams, J.J.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1996-04-01

    Conventional steam reforming of methane to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}) hasa conversion efficiency of about 85%. Replacement of metal tubes in the reformer with ceramic tubes offers the potential for operation at temperatures high enough to increase the efficiency to 98-99%. However, the two candidate ceramic materials being given strongest consideration, sintered alpha Si carbide and Si carbide particulate-strengthened alumina, have been shown to react with components of the reformer environment. Extent of degradation as a function of steam partial pressure and exposure time has been studied, and results suggest limits under which these structural ceramics can be used in advanced steam-methane reformers.

  17. Steam reforming of commercial ultra-low sulphur diesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Jurriaan; van Dijk, Eric; de Munck, Sander; van den Brink, Ruud

    Two main routes for small-scale diesel steam reforming exist: low-temperature pre-reforming followed by well-established methane steam reforming on the one hand and direct steam reforming on the other hand. Tests with commercial catalysts and commercially obtained diesel fuels are presented for both processes. The fuels contained up to 6.5 ppmw sulphur and up to 4.5 vol.% of biomass-derived fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Pre-reforming sulphur-free diesel at around 475 °C has been tested with a commercial nickel catalyst for 118 h without observing catalyst deactivation, at steam-to-carbon ratios as low as 2.6. Direct steam reforming at temperatures up to 800 °C has been tested with a commercial precious metal catalyst for a total of 1190 h with two catalyst batches at steam-to-carbon ratios as low as 2.5. Deactivation was neither observed with lower steam-to-carbon ratios nor for increasing sulphur concentration. The importance of good fuel evaporation and mixing for correct testing of catalysts is illustrated. Diesel containing biodiesel components resulted in poor spray quality, hence poor mixing and evaporation upstream, eventually causing decreasing catalyst performance. The feasibility of direct high temperature steam reforming of commercial low-sulphur diesel has been demonstrated.

  18. Performance tests for steam methane reformers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.I.; DiMartino, S.P.; Patel, N.M.; Smith, D.D.

    1982-08-01

    Most of the synthesis gas plants in operation in the United States for production of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methanol, and ammonia use steam methane reforming (SMR). Economic projections indicate that the SMR plant may continue to be the most favorable process choice through the 1980s or until partial oxidation or coal gasification processes are technically proven. The complexity of an efficiently designed SMR plant for production of these chemicals requires a thorough understanding of many unit operations to correctly evaluate the performance of an operating plant. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) owns and operates various types of SMR plants for production of hydrogen and carbon monoxide gases for pipe line sales, liquid hydrogen for merchant sale, methanol and ammonia. Over the past few years, APCI has developed guidelines and procedures for plant performance tests done at its major SMR plants. This article documents the plant test procedure used in conducting onsite SMR plant performance tests.

  19. TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.

    2003-05-21

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

  20. TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg

    2003-05-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

  1. Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) monolith formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2007-07-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or 'mineralized' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydro-ceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2 g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydro-ceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form. (authors)

  2. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C

    2006-12-22

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

  3. Steam reforming of DOE complex waste simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Kuehne, P.B.

    1995-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has worked with Synthetica Technologies and Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International (MTCl) to demonstrate the applicability of their commercial steam reforming technologies for treating DOE low-level mixed wastes. Previously, Synthetica successfully demonstrated destruction of a Sandia formulated lab trash simulant. During November 1994 Synthetica did not adequately process the aqueous halogenated organic liquid mixed waste simulant (MWTP-2110) formulated by the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Testing at MTCl is ongoing and initial results appear to be favorable. Approximately 200 lbs each of the MWIP aqueous halogenated organic liquids (MWTP-2110), and absorbed aqueous and organic liquids (MWTP-3113/3114) simulants have been processed. At 1650{degree}F, destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were obtained for tetrachloroethylene, toluene, and 1,2 dichlorobenzene. Product cases consisted primarily of H{sub 2}, C0{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4} and had higher heating values of up to 355 BTU/SCF. Conclusions concerning the suitability of the MTCI process for treating DOE mixed wastes will be drawn upon the completion of testing.

  4. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  5. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs. Cormos, C. C. Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  6. Biomass to hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Chornet, E.; Wang, D.; Montane, D.

    1995-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass results in a pyrolytic oil which is a mixture of (a) carbohydrate-derived acids, aldehydes and polyols, (b) lignin-derived substituted phenolics, and (c) extractives-derived terpenoids and fatty acids. The conversion of this pyrolysis oil into H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} is thermodynamically favored under appropriate steam reforming conditions. Our efforts have focused in understanding the catalysis of steam reforming which will lead to a successful process at reasonable steam/carbon ratios arid process severities. The experimental work, carried out at the laboratory and bench scale levels, has centered on the performance of Ni-based catalysts using model compounds as prototypes of the oxygenates present in the pyrolysis oil. Steam reforming of acetic acid, hydroxyacetaldehyde, furfural and syringol has been proven to proceed rapidly within a reasonable range of severities. Time-on-stream studies are now underway using a fixed bed barometric pressure reactor to ascertain the durability of the catalysts and thus substantiate the scientific and technical feasibility of the catalytic reforming option. Economic analyses are being carried out in parallel to determine the opportunity zones for the combined fast pyrolysis/steam reforming approach. A discussion on the current state of the project is presented.

  7. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  8. CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: METHLYCHLORIDE. (R822721C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effective destruction of trichloroethane, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene by steam reforming with a commercial nickel catalyst has been demonstrated. Conversion levels of up to 0.99999 were attained in both laboratory and semi-pilot experiments, with the products c...

  9. Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    Under DOE Contract No. DE-AR21-95MC32091, Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste, ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 500- lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area published April 1997.1 The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfidly tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium- contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (>99.9999oA) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radlonuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Cost studies have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of acetic acid steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Saioa; Ehrich, Heike; Arias, Pedro L.; Kockmann, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen generation by acetic acid steam reforming has been carried out with respect to applications in solid oxide fuel cells. The effect of operating parameters on equilibrium composition has been examined focusing especially on hydrogen and carbon monoxide production, which are the fuels in this type of fuel cell. The temperature, steam to acetic acid ratio, and to a lesser extent pressure affect significantly the equilibrium product distribution due to their influence on steam reforming, thermal decomposition and water-gas shift reaction. The study shows that steam reforming of acetic acid with a steam to acetic acid ratio of 2 to 1 is thermodynamically feasible with hydrogen, carbon monoxide and water as the main products at the equilibrium at temperatures higher than 700 °C, and achieving CO/CO2 ratios higher than 1. Thus, it can be concluded that within the operation temperature range of solid oxide fuel cells - between 700 °C and 1000 °C - the production of a gas rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide is promoted.

  11. Steam methane reforming in molten carbonate salt. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the work accomplished on the project {open_quotes}Steam Methane Reforming in Molten Carbonate Salt.{close_quotes}. This effort has established the conceptual basis for molten carbonate-based steam reforming of methane. It has not proceeded to prototype verification, because corrosion concerns have led to reluctance on the part of large hydrogen producers to adopt the technology. Therefore the focus was shifted to a less corrosive embodiment of the same technology. After considerable development effort it was discovered that a European company (Catalysts and Chemicals Europe) was developing a similar process ({open_quotes}Regate{close_quotes}). Accordingly the focus was shifted a second time, to develop an improvement which is generic to both types of reforming. That work is still in progress, and shows substantial promise.

  12. Biomass-to-hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Chornet, E.; Wang, D.; Czernik, S.

    1996-10-01

    Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and reforming the pyroligneous oils is being studied as a strategy for producing hydrogen. Novel technologies for the rapid pyrolysis of biomass have been developed in the past decade. They provide compact and efficient systems to transform biomass into vapors that are condensed to oils, with yields as high as 75-80 wt.% of the anhydrous biomass. This {open_quotes}bio-oil{close_quotes} is a mixture of aldehydes, alcohols, acids, oligomers from the constitutive carbohydrates and lignin, and some water derived from the dehydration reactions. Hydrogen can be produced by reforming the bio-oil or its fractions with steam. A process of this nature has the potential to be cost competitive with conventional means of producing hydrogen. The reforming facility can be designed to handle alternate feedstocks, such as natural gas and naphtha, if necessary. Thermodynamic modeling of the major constituents of the bio-oil has shown that reforming is possible within a wide range of temperatures and steam-to-carbon ratios. Existing catalytic data on the reforming of oxygenates have been studied to guide catalyst selection. Tests performed on a microreactor interfaced with a molecular beam mass spectrometer showed that, by proper selection of the process variables: temperature, steam-to-carbon ratio, gas hourly space velocity, and contact time, almost total conversion of carbon in the feed to CO and CO{sub 2} could be obtained. These tests also provided possible reaction mechanisms where thermal cracking competes with catalytic processes. Bench-scale, fixed bed reactor tests demonstrated high hydrogen yields from model compounds and carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis oil fractions. Reforming bio-oil or its fractions required proper dispersion of the liquid to avoid vapor-phase carbonization of the feed in the inlet to the reactor. A special spraying nozzle injector was designed and successfully tested with an aqueous fraction of bio-oil.

  13. Application of Flexible Micro Temperature Sensor in Oxidative Steam Reforming by a Methanol Micro Reformer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Shen, Chia-Chieh; Yeh, Chuin-Tih; Chang, Chi-Chung; Lo, Yi-Man

    2011-01-01

    Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM), with the relevant parameters optimized as well. PMID:22319407

  14. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  15. STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: CHLORINATED AROMATICS. (R826694C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective dechlorination of chloroaromatics, such as C6H5Cl, 1,2-C6H4Cl2, 1,3-C6H4Cl2 and 1,2,4-C6H3Cl3, using catalytic steam reforming has been confirmed ...

  16. Hydrogen production by sorption-enhanced steam reforming of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Dou, Binlin; Dupont, Valerie; Rickett, Gavin; Blakeman, Neil; Williams, Paul T; Chen, Haisheng; Ding, Yulong; Ghadiri, Mojtaba

    2009-07-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of glycerol for H(2) production has been evaluated experimentally in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor. The experiments were carried out under atmospheric pressure within a temperature range of 400-700 degrees C. A commercial Ni-based catalyst and a dolomite sorbent were used for the steam reforming reactions and in situ CO(2) removal. The product gases were measured by on-line gas analysers. The results show that H(2) productivity is greatly increased with increasing temperature and the formation of methane by-product becomes negligible above 500 degrees C. The results suggest an optimal temperature of approximately 500 degrees C for the glycerol steam reforming with in situ CO(2) removal using calcined dolomite as the sorbent, at which the CO(2) breakthrough time is longest and the H(2) purity is highest. The shrinking core model and the 1D-diffusion model describe well the CO(2) removal under the conditions of this work. PMID:19318245

  17. Steam reforming of low-level mixed waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design, construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 300-lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area and published in April 1997. The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfully tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium-contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (> 99.9999%) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radionuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Economic evaluations have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  18. Steam Methane Reformation Testing for Air-Independent Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mwara, Kamwana N.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, NASA has been looking into utilizing landers that can be propelled by LOX-CH (sub 4), to be used for long duration missions. Using landers that utilize such propellants, also provides the opportunity to use solid oxide fuel cells as a power option, especially since they are able to process methane into a reactant through fuel reformation. One type of reformation, called steam methane reformation, is a process to reform methane into a hydrogen-rich product by reacting methane and steam (fuel cell exhaust) over a catalyst. A steam methane reformation system could potentially use the fuel cell's own exhaust to create a reactant stream that is hydrogen-rich, and requires less internal reforming of the incoming methane. Also, steam reformation may hold some advantages over other types of reforming, such as partial oxidation (PROX) reformation. Steam reformation does not require oxygen, while up to 25 percent can be lost in PROX reformation due to unusable CO (sub 2) reformation. NASA's Johnson Space Center has conducted various phases of steam methane reformation testing, as a viable solution for in-space reformation. This has included using two different types of catalysts, developing a custom reformer, and optimizing the test system to find the optimal performance parameters and operating conditions.

  19. THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Shaber

    2003-05-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

  20. THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

    2003-05-21

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of carbon formation boundary and reforming performance for steam reforming of dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Kikuchi, Ryuji; Eguchi, Koichi

    Thermodynamic analysis of dimethyl ether steam reforming (DME SR) was investigated for carbon formation boundary, DME conversion, and hydrogen yield for fuel cell application. The equilibrium calculation employing Gibbs free minimization was performed to figure out the required steam-to-carbon ratio (S/C = 0-5) and reforming temperature (25-1000 °C) where coke formation was thermodynamically unfavorable. S/C, reforming temperature and product species strongly contributed to the coke formation and product composition. When chemical species DME, methanol, CO 2, CO, H 2, H 2O and coke were considered, complete conversion of DME and hydrogen yield above 78% without coke formation were achieved at the normal operating temperatures of molten carbonate fuel cell (600 °C) and solid oxide fuel cell (900 °C), when S/C was at or above 2.5. When CH 4 was favorable, production of coke and that of hydrogen were significantly suppressed.

  2. Syngas Generation from Organic Waste with Plasma Steam Reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, G.; Leal-Quiros, E.; Smith, R. A.; Elliott, J.; Unruh, D.

    2014-05-01

    A plasma steam reforming system to process waste is in the process of being set up at the University of California, Merced. The proposed concept will use two different plasma regimes, i.e. glow discharge and arc torches to process a percentage of the total liquid waste stream generated at the campus together with shredded local organic solid waste. One of the main advantages of the plasma technology to be utilized is that it uses graphite electrodes that can be fed to the reactor to achieve continuous operation, thus, electrode or nozzle life is not a concern. The waste to energy conversion process consists of two stages, one where a mixture of steam and hydrogen is generated from the liquid in a glow-discharge cell, and a second stage where the mixture of exhaust gases coming out of the first device are mixed with solid waste in a reactor operating in steam reforming mode interacting with a plasma torch to generate high-quality syngas. In this paper, the results of a thermodynamic model developed for the two stages are shown. The syngas composition obtained indicates that the fraction of CO2 present decreases with increasing temperature and the molar fractions of hydrogen and carbon monoxide become dominant. The fraction of water vapour present in the product gases coming out of the second stage needs to be condensed before the syngas can be utilized in a prime mover.

  3. Thermodynamic evaluation of hydrogen production via bioethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zsolt; Cormos, Ana-Maria; Imre-Lucaci, Árpád; Cormos, Călin C.

    2013-11-13

    In this article, a thermodynamic analysis for bioethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production is presented. Bioethanol is a newly proposed renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Reforming of bioethanol provides a promising method for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) takes place under the action of a metal catalyst capable of breaking C-C bonds into smaller molecules. A large domain for the water/bioethanol molar ratio as well as the temperature and average pressure has been used in the present work. The interval of investigated temperature was 100-800°C, the pressure was in the range of 1-10 bar and the molar ratio was between 3-25. The variations of gaseous species concentration e.g. H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} were analyzed. The concentrations of the main products (H{sub 2} and CO) at lower temperature are smaller than the ones at higher temperature due to by-products formation (methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene etc.). The concentration of H2 obtained in the process using high molar ratio (>20) is higher than the one at small molar ratio (near stoichiometric). When the pressure is increased the hydrogen concentration decreases. The results were compared with literature data for validation purposes.

  4. Thermodynamic evaluation of hydrogen production via bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zsolt; Cormos, Ana-Maria; Imre-Lucaci, Árpád; Cormos, Cǎlin C.

    2013-11-01

    In this article, a thermodynamic analysis for bioethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production is presented. Bioethanol is a newly proposed renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Reforming of bioethanol provides a promising method for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) takes place under the action of a metal catalyst capable of breaking C-C bonds into smaller molecules. A large domain for the water/bioethanol molar ratio as well as the temperature and average pressure has been used in the present work. The interval of investigated temperature was 100-800°C, the pressure was in the range of 1-10 bar and the molar ratio was between 3-25. The variations of gaseous species concentration e.g. H2, CO, CO2, CH4 were analyzed. The concentrations of the main products (H2 and CO) at lower temperature are smaller than the ones at higher temperature due to by-products formation (methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene etc.). The concentration of H2 obtained in the process using high molar ratio (>20) is higher than the one at small molar ratio (near stoichiometric). When the pressure is increased the hydrogen concentration decreases. The results were compared with literature data for validation purposes.

  5. Fuel cell hydrogen production by catalytic ethanol-steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Amphlett, J.C.; Leclerc, S.; Mann, R.F.; Peppley, B.A.; Roberge, P.R.

    1998-07-01

    It is clear that the reaction network that results from catalytic reaction of ethanol, with and without steam, is very complex and involves over a dozen potential products. Reactions to avoid are any that lead to CP{sub 4} species and ethylene, the former representing a more difficult challenge for subsequent steam reforming and the latter providing what is probably the major route to carbon production and coking of the catalyst. Dehydration reactions, therefore, should generally be avoided. Dehydrogenation catalysts would seem to be most appropriate, especially since the production of hydrogen is the main goal. Copper-based catalysts have been long-established for this function so that they are commercially available and therefore lower cost. CuO/ZnO, CuO/SiO{sub 2}, CuO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or CuO/NiO/SiO{sub 2} may be the best catalyst candidates. Reaction pressures should be relatively low (1 to a few atm) and the best reaction temperature could be in the range 350 to 450 C. Insufficient experimental work has been reported to give a clear idea of the required water-to-ethanol mole ratio. The stoichiometric value of this ratio is three and it is likely that excess water, although presenting some process complications, will be necessary to minimize yields of CO and CH{sub 4}. A major new aspect of catalyst selection and operation, when comparing ethanol to methanol steam reforming, will be catalyst deactivation due to temperature. The methanol process works well on CuO/ZnO around 250 to 260 C, just on the threshold of fairly rapid catalyst deactivation. If the ethanol process is to work at or above 300 C, the present CuO/ZnO catalysts will be operating at an activity well below that obtainable in methanol-steam reformers. This means that larger reformers (i.e. more catalyst) will be necessary or that Cu-based (or other) catalysts with slower deactivation in the 300 C-plus range will have to be developed.

  6. Modified Ni-Cu catalysts for ethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, M.; Mihet, M.; Almasan, V.; Borodi, G.; Katona, G.; Muresan, L.; Lazar, M. D.

    2013-11-13

    Three Ni-Cu catalysts, having different Cu content, supported on γ-alumina were synthesized by wet co-impregnation method, characterized and tested in the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. The catalysts were characterized for determination of: total surface area and porosity (N{sub 2} adsorption - desorption using BET and Dollimer Heal methods), Ni surface area (hydrogen chemisorption), crystallinity and Ni crystallites size (X-Ray Diffraction), type of catalytic active centers (Hydrogen Temperature Programmed Reduction). Total surface area and Ni crystallites size are not significantly influenced by the addition of Cu, while Ni surface area is drastically diminished by increasing of Cu concentration. Steam reforming experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure, temperature range 150-350°C, and ethanol - water molar ration of 1 at 30, using Ar as carrier gas. Ethanol conversion and hydrogen production increase by the addition of Cu. At 350°C there is a direct connection between hydrogen production and Cu concentration. Catalysts deactivation in 24h time on stream was studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) on used catalysts. Coke deposition was observed at all studied temperatures; at 150°C amorphous carbon was evidenced, while at 350°C crystalline, filamentous carbon is formed.

  7. Modified Ni-Cu catalysts for ethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, M.; Mihet, M.; Almasan, V.; Borodi, G.; Katona, G.; Muresan, L.; Lazar, M. D.

    2013-11-01

    Three Ni-Cu catalysts, having different Cu content, supported on γ-alumina were synthesized by wet co-impregnation method, characterized and tested in the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. The catalysts were characterized for determination of: total surface area and porosity (N2 adsorption - desorption using BET and Dollimer Heal methods), Ni surface area (hydrogen chemisorption), crystallinity and Ni crystallites size (X-Ray Diffraction), type of catalytic active centers (Hydrogen Temperature Programmed Reduction). Total surface area and Ni crystallites size are not significantly influenced by the addition of Cu, while Ni surface area is drastically diminished by increasing of Cu concentration. Steam reforming experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure, temperature range 150-350°C, and ethanol - water molar ration of 1 at 30, using Ar as carrier gas. Ethanol conversion and hydrogen production increase by the addition of Cu. At 350°C there is a direct connection between hydrogen production and Cu concentration. Catalysts deactivation in 24h time on stream was studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) on used catalysts. Coke deposition was observed at all studied temperatures; at 150°C amorphous carbon was evidenced, while at 350°C crystalline, filamentous carbon is formed.

  8. In silico search for novel methane steam reforming catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Lausche, Adam C.; Wang, Shengguang; Khan, Tuhin S.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix; Nørskov, Jens K.; Bligaard, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a method for screening transition metal and metal alloy catalysts based on their predicted rates and stabilities for a given catalytic reaction. This method involves combining reaction and activation energies (available to the public via a web-based application ‘CatApp’) with a microkinetic modeling technique to predict the rates and selectivities of a prospective material. This paper illustrates this screening technique using the steam reforming of methane to carbon monoxide and hydrogen as a test reaction. While catalysts are already commercially available for this process, the method demonstrated in this paper is very general and could be applied to a wide range of catalytic reactions. Following the steps outlined herein, such an analysis could potentially enable researchers to understand reaction mechanisms on a fundamental level and, on this basis, develop leads for new metal alloy catalysts.

  9. Catalytic deactivation on methane steam reforming catalysts. 2. Kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Ponzi, E.N.; Yeramian, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The kinetics of methane steam reforming reaction over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst was investigated at a temperature range of 640-740/sup 0/C in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed varying the inlet concentration of methane, hydrogen, and water. A kinetic scheme of the Houghen-Watson type was satisfactorily proposed assuming the dissociative adsorption of CH/sub 4/ as the rate-limiting step, but this kinetic scheme can be easily replaced by a first-order kinetics (r/sub CH/4/sub / = kapparho/sub CH/4/sub /) for engineering purposes. Catalyst activation with H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ mixtures or with the reactant mixture results in the same extent of reaction.

  10. Evaluation of dissociated and steam-reformed methanol as automotive engine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalk, T. R.; Mccall, D. M.; Mccanlies, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Dissociated and steam reformed methanol were evaluated as automotive engine fuels. Advantages and disadvantages in using methanol in the reformed rather than liquid state were discussed. Engine dynamometer tests were conducted with a four cylinder, 2.3 liter, spark ignition automotive engine to determine performance and emission characteristics operating on simulated dissociated and steam reformed methanol (2H2 + CO and 3H2 + CO2 respectively), and liquid methanol. Results are presented for engine performance and emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, at various throttle settings and engine speeds. Operation on dissociated and steam reformed methanol was characterized by flashback (violent propagation of a flame into the intake manifold) which limited operation to lower power output than was obtainable using liquid methanol. It was concluded that: an automobile could not be operated solely on dissociated or steam reformed methanol over the entire required power range - a supplementary fuel system or power source would be necessary to attain higher powers; the use of reformed mechanol, compared to liquid methanol, may result in a small improvement in thermal efficiency in the low power range; dissociated methanol is a better fuel than steam reformed methanol for use in a spark ignition engine; and use of dissociated or steam reformed methanol may result in lower exhaust emissions compared to liquid methanol.

  11. Integrated solar thermochemical reaction system for steam methane reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Feng; Diver, Rich; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Cameron, Richard J.; Humble, Paul H.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Dagle, Robert A.; Wegeng, Robert S.

    2015-06-05

    Solar-aided upgrade of the energy content of fossil fuels, such as natural gas, can provide a near-term transition path towards a future solar-fuel economy and reduce carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel consumption. Both steam and dry reforming a methane-containing fuel stream have been studied with concentrated solar power as the energy input to drive the highly endothermic reactions but the concept has not been demonstrated at a commercial scale. Under a current project with the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL is developing an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system that combines solar concentrators with micro- and meso-channel reactors and heat exchangers to accomplish more than 20% solar augment of methane higher heating value. The objective of our three-year project is to develop and prepare for commercialization such solar reforming system with a high enough efficiency to serve as the frontend of a conventional natural gas (or biogas) combined cycle power plant, producing power with a levelized cost of electricity less than 6¢/kWh, without subsidies, by the year 2020. In this paper, we present results from the first year of our project that demonstrated a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency as high as 69% with a prototype reaction system.

  12. Integrated solar thermochemical reaction system for steam methane reforming

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Feng; Diver, Rich; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Cameron, Richard J.; Humble, Paul H.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Dagle, Robert A.; Wegeng, Robert S.

    2015-06-05

    Solar-aided upgrade of the energy content of fossil fuels, such as natural gas, can provide a near-term transition path towards a future solar-fuel economy and reduce carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel consumption. Both steam and dry reforming a methane-containing fuel stream have been studied with concentrated solar power as the energy input to drive the highly endothermic reactions but the concept has not been demonstrated at a commercial scale. Under a current project with the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL is developing an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system that combines solar concentrators with micro- and meso-channel reactors and heatmore » exchangers to accomplish more than 20% solar augment of methane higher heating value. The objective of our three-year project is to develop and prepare for commercialization such solar reforming system with a high enough efficiency to serve as the frontend of a conventional natural gas (or biogas) combined cycle power plant, producing power with a levelized cost of electricity less than 6¢/kWh, without subsidies, by the year 2020. In this paper, we present results from the first year of our project that demonstrated a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency as high as 69% with a prototype reaction system.« less

  13. Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Black Liquor Steam Reformer

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this research is to address critical issues that inhibit successful commercialization of low-temperature BLG systems, including the steam reforming technology developed by Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc.

  14. Durability Testing of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Products

    SciTech Connect

    JANTZEN, CAROL M.; PAREIZS, JOHN M.; LORIER, TROY H.; MARRA, JAMES C.

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes but especially aqueous high sodium wastes at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The FBSR technology converts organic compounds to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, converts nitrate/nitrite species to N{sub 2}, and produces a solid residue through reactions with superheated steam, the fluidizing media. If clay is added during processing a ''mineralized'' granular waste form can be produced. The mineral components of the waste form are primarily Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The cage and ring structured minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc{sup 99} and Cs{sup 137} and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals appear to stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Durability testing of the FBSR products was performed using ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The FBSR mineral products (bed and fines) evaluated in this study were found to be two orders of magnitude more durable than the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass requirement of 2 g/m{sup 2} release of Na{sup +}. The PCT responses for the FBSR samples tested were consistent with results from previous FBSR Hanford LAW product testing. Differences in the response can be explained by the minerals formed and their effects on PCT leachate chemistry.

  15. Steam Reforming on Transition-metal Carbides from Density-functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2012-05-11

    A screening study of the steam reforming reaction on clean and oxygen covered early transition-metal carbides surfaces is performed by means of density-functional theory calculations. It is found that carbides provide a wide spectrum of reactivities, from too reactive via suitable to too inert. Several molybdenum-based systems are identified as possible steam reforming catalysts. The findings suggest that carbides provide a playground for reactivity tuning, comparable to the one for pure metals.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell steam reforming power system

    DOEpatents

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Whyatt, Greg A.

    2013-03-12

    The present invention is a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Reforming Power System that utilizes adiabatic reforming of reformate within this system. By utilizing adiabatic reforming of reformate within the system the system operates at a significantly higher efficiency than other Solid Oxide Reforming Power Systems that exist in the prior art. This is because energy is not lost while materials are cooled and reheated, instead the device operates at a higher temperature. This allows efficiencies higher than 65%.

  17. Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation from Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Kesavan, Sathees

    2006-01-01

    An economically viable and environmental friendly method of generating hydrogen for fuel cells is by the reaction of certain metals with steam, called metal-steam reforming (MSR). This technique does not generate any toxic by-products nor contributes to the undesirable greenhouse effect. From the standpoint of favorable thermodynamics, total…

  18. DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) WASTE FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C

    2006-01-06

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium aqueous radioactive wastes. The addition of clay and a catalyst as co-reactants converts high sodium aqueous low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford and Idaho DOE sites to a granular ''mineralized'' waste form that may be made into a monolith form if necessary. Simulant Hanford and Idaho high sodium wastes were processed in a pilot scale FBSR at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The durability of the FBSR waste form products was tested in order to compare the measured durability to previous FBSR waste form testing on Hanford Envelope C waste forms that were made by THOR Treatment Technologies (TTT) and to compare the FBSR durability to vitreous LAW waste forms, specifically the Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass known as the Low-activity Reference Material (LRM). The durability of the FBSR waste form is comparable to that of the LRM glass for the test responses studied.

  19. Steam reforming of low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Voelker, G.E.; Steedman, W.G.; Chandran, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the treatment and disposal of an inventory of approximately 160,000 tons of Low-Level Mixed Waste (LLMW). Most of this LLMW is stored in drums, barrels and steel boxes at 20 different sites throughout the DOE complex. The basic objective of low-level mixed waste treatment systems is to completely destroy the hazardous constituents and to simultaneously isolate and capture the radionuclides in a superior final waste form such as glass. The DOE is sponsoring the development of advanced technologies that meet this objective while achieving maximum volume reduction, low-life cycle costs and maximum operational safety. ThermoChem, Inc. is in the final stages of development of a steam-reforming system capable of treating a wide variety of DOE low-level mixed waste that meets these objectives. The design, construction, and testing of a nominal 1 ton/day Process Development Unit is described.

  20. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  1. Steam reforming as a method to treat Hanford underground storage tank (UST) wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Kuehne, P.B.

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes a Sandia program that included partnerships with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Synthetica Technologies, Inc. to design and test a steam reforming system for treating Hanford underground storage tank (UST) wastes. The benefits of steam reforming the wastes include the resolution of tank safety issues and improved radionuclide separations. Steam reforming destroys organic materials by first gasifying, then reacting them with high temperature steam. Tests indicate that up to 99% of the organics could be removed from the UST wastes by steam exposure. In addition, it was shown that nitrates in the wastes could be destroyed by steam exposure if they were first distributed as a thin layer on a surface. High purity alumina and nickel alloys were shown to be good candidates for materials to be used in the severe environment associated with steam reforming the highly alkaline, high nitrate content wastes. Work was performed on designing, building, and demonstrating components of a 0.5 gallon per minute (gpm) system suitable for radioactive waste treatment. Scale-up of the unit to 20 gpm was also considered and is feasible. Finally, process demonstrations conducted on non-radioactive waste surrogates were carried out, including a successful demonstration of the technology at the 0.1 gpm scale.

  2. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) PRODUCT: MONOLITH FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C

    2006-09-13

    The most important requirement for Hanford's low activity waste (LAW) form for shallow land disposal is the chemical durability of the product. A secondary, but still essential specification, is the compressive strength of the material with regards to the strength of the material under shallow land disposal conditions, e.g. the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations, because the term ''near-surface disposal'' indicates disposal in the uppermost portion, or approximately the top 30 meters, of the earth's surface. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) mineral waste form for LAW is granular in nature because it is formed by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). As a granular product it has been shown to be as durable as Hanford's LAW glass during testing with ASTM C-1285-02 known as the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and with the Single Pass Flow Through Test (SPFT). Hanford Envelope A and Envelope C simulants both performed well during PCT and SPFT testing and during subsequent performance assessment modeling. This is partially due to the high aluminosilicate content of the mineral product which provides a natural aluminosilicate buffering mechanism that inhibits leaching and is known to occur in naturally occurring aluminosilicate mineral analogs. In order for the TTT Na-Al-Si (NAS) granular mineral product to meet the compressive strength requirements (ASTM C39) for a Hanford waste form, the granular product needs to be made into a monolith or disposed of in High Integrity Containers (HIC's). Additionally, the Hanford intruder scenario for disposal in the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) trench is mitigated as there is reduced intruder exposure when a waste form is in a monolithic form. During the preliminary testing of a monolith binder for TTT's FBSR mineral product, four parameters were monitored: (1) waste loading (not optimized for each waste form tested); (2) density; (3) compressive strength; and (4) durability

  3. Production of synthetic fuels using syngas from a steam hydrogasification and reforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Arun Satheesh Kumar

    This thesis is aimed at the research, optimization and development of a thermo-chemical process aimed at the production of synthesis gas (mixture of H2 and CO) with a flexible H2 to CO ratio using coupled steam hydrogasification and steam reforming processes. The steam hydrogasification step generates a product gas containing significant amounts of methane by gasifying a carbonaceous feed material with steam and internally generated H2. This product gas is converted to synthesis gas with an excess H2 to CO using the steam reformer. Research involving experimental and simulation work has been conducted on steam hydrogasification, steam reforming and the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The Aspen Plus simulation tool has been used to develop a process model that can perform heat and mass balance calculations of the whole process using built-in reactor modules and an empirical FT model available in the literature. This model has been used to estimate optimum feed ratios and process conditions for specific feedstocks and products. Steam hydrogasification of coal and wood mixtures of varying coal to wood ratios has been performed in a stirred batch reactor. The carbon conversion of the feedstocks to gaseous products is around 60% at 700°C and 80% at 800°C. The coal to wood ratio of the feedstock does not exert a significant influence on the carbon conversion. The rates of formation of CO, CO 2 and CH4 during gasification have been calculated based on the experimental results using a simple kinetic model. Experimental research on steam reforming has been performed. It has been shown that temperature and the feed CO2/CH4 ratio play a dominant role in determining the product gas H2/CO ratio. Reforming of typical steam hydrogasification product-gas stream has been investigated over a commercial steam reforming catalyst. The results demonstrate that the combined use of steam hydrogasification process with a reformer can generate a synthesis gas with a predetermined H2/CO ratio

  4. New Insights into Reaction Mechanisms of Ethanol Steam Reforming on Co-ZrO2

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Mei, Donghai; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The reaction pathway of ethanol steam reforming on Co-ZrO2 has been identified and the active sites associated with each step are proposed. Ethanol is converted to acetaldehyde and then to acetone, followed by acetone steam reforming. More than 90% carbon was found to follow this reaction pathway. N2-Sorption, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), in situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Transmission Electron Microscopy, as well as theoretical Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been employed to identify the structure and functionality of the catalysts, which was further used to correlate their performance in ESR. It was found that metallic cobalt is mainly responsible for the acetone steam reforming reactions; while, CoO and basic sites on the support play a key role in converting ethanol to acetone via dehydrogenation and condensation/ketonization reaction pathways. The current work provides fundamental understanding of the ethanol steam reforming reaction mechanisms on Co-ZrO2 catalysts and sheds light on the rational design of selective and durable ethanol steam reforming catalysts.

  5. In-Space Propulsion, Logistics Reduction, and Evaluation of Steam Reformer Kinetics: Problems and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Palaszewski, B. A.; Kulis, M. J.; Gokoglu, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Human space missions generate waste materials. A 70-kg crewmember creates a waste stream of 1 kg per day, and a four-person crew on a deep space habitat for a 400+ day mission would create over 1600 kg of waste. Converted into methane, the carbon could be used as a fuel for propulsion or power. The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project is investing in space resource utilization with an emphasis on repurposing logistics materials for useful purposes and has selected steam reforming among many different competitive processes as the preferred method for repurposing organic waste into methane. Already demonstrated at the relevant processing rate of 5.4 kg of waste per day, high temperature oxygenated steam consumes waste and produces carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen which can then be converted into methane catalytically. However, the steam reforming process has not been studied in microgravity. Data are critically needed to understand the mechanisms that allow use of steam reforming in a reduced gravity environment. This paper reviews the relevant literature, identifies gravity-dependent mechanisms within the steam gasification process, and describes an innovative experiment to acquire the crucial kinetic information in a small-scale reactor specifically designed to operate within the requirements of a reduced gravity aircraft flight. The experiment will determine if the steam reformer process is mass-transport limited, and if so, what level of forced convection will be needed to obtain performance comparable to that in 1-g.

  6. Steam-Reforming Characteristics of Heavy and Light Tars Derived from Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirotatsu; Morinaga, Yosuke; Okazaki, Ken

    In this study, tar formation and steam-reforming mechanisms are discussed by separating the tars into heavy, middle, and light tars. Cellulose was heated in a drop-tube furnace under an Ar or Ar/steam atmosphere. After the tars were passed through the furnace for thermal cracking and polymerization, they were trapped by filters set at different temperatures (573, 393, and 273 K), and were respectively defined as heavy, middle, and light tars. Incondensable volatiles and gaseous products were measured using gas chromatography with thermal conductivity (GC-TCD), and flame ionization (GC-FID) detectors. The middle and light tars obtained under an Ar atmosphere were first characterized using time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The analysis showed that the middle tar did not contain any low-boiling-point light tar components, while the light tar did contain them. It was also found that complex species in the tars were separated to a certain degree by changing the trap temperature. Moreover, the formation of heavy tar was quite different from that of the light tar. With increasing temperature, the formation of heavy tar was inhibited, while that of the light tar was enhanced during pyrolysis. The steam-reforming characteristics of these tars were also different. The heavy tar was barely reformed at a low temperature of 873 K, even with a long residence time, while the middle tar was well reformed by steam. While it was difficult to describe the tar formation and steam-reforming characteristics when the tar was considered as a single condensable matter, the tar formation and steam-reforming characteristics were clarified by separating the tars. This study shows that, to prevent tar emissions, the formation of heavy tar, which barely reacts with steam, should be inhibited during pyrolysis by controlling the heating.

  7. Developing an energy efficient steam reforming process to produce hydrogen from sulfur-containing fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simson, Amanda

    Hydrogen powered fuel cells have the potential to produce electricity with higher efficiency and lower emissions than conventional combustion technology. In order to realize the benefits of a hydrogen fuel cell an efficient method to produce hydrogen is needed. Currently, over 90% of hydrogen is produced from the steam reforming of natural gas. However, for many applications including fuel cell vehicles, the use of a liquid fuel rather than natural gas is desirable. This work investigates the feasibility of producing hydrogen efficiently by steam reforming E85 (85% ethanol/15% gasoline), a commercially available sulfur-containing transportation fuel. A Rh-Pt/SiO2-ZrO2 catalyst has demonstrated good activity for the E85 steam reforming reaction. An industrial steam reforming process is often run less efficiently, with more water and at higher temperatures, in order to prevent catalyst deactivation. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a process that can operate without catalyst deactivation at more energy efficient conditions. In this study, the steam reforming of a sulfur-containing fuel (E85) was studied at near stoichiometric steam/carbon ratios and at 650C, conditions at which catalyst deactivation is normally measured. At these conditions the catalyst was found to be stable steam reforming a sulfur-free E85. However, the addition of low concentrations of sulfur significantly deactivated the catalyst. The presence of sulfur in the fuel caused catalyst deactivation by promoting ethylene which generates surface carbon species (coke) that mask catalytic sites. The amount of coke increased during time on stream and became increasingly graphitic. However, the deactivation due to both sulfur adsorption and coke formation was reversible with air treatment at 650°C. However, regenerations were found to reduce the catalyst life. Air regenerations produce exotherms on the catalyst surface that cause structural changes to the catalyst. During regenerations the

  8. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING DL

    2010-08-03

    This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

  9. The Effects of PdZn Crystallite Size on Methanol Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Robert A.; Chin, Ya-Huei; Wang, Yong

    2007-11-30

    Exceptional activity and selectivity of Pd/ZnO catalysts for methanol steam reforming have been attributed to the formation of PdZn alloy. In this paper, we evaluated the crystallite size effects of PdZn alloy on methanol steam reforming. An organic preparation method was used to avoid the complexity from the alteration of ZnO morphology typically associated with the conventional aqueous preparation method. Both Pd loading and reduction temperature (>350ºC) were used to vary the crystallite size of PdZn alloy. Experimental activity studies and transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterizations indicated that formation of large sized PdZn crystallites exhibit high reactivity and low CO selectivity during methanol steam reforming.

  10. Heterogeneous Reactor Model for Steam Reforming of Methane in a Microchannel Reactor with Microstructured Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong; Rozmiarek, Robert T.

    2005-12-15

    Microstructured catalysts used for methane steam reforming in microchannel reactors are mathematically described and experimentally demonstrated under realistic process conditions. A heterogeneous model has been developed with a graphical interface to represent the three dimensions of the microchannel reactor. Porous metal substrates (FeCrAlY) were used to form engineered catalysts with active precious metal (Rh) for methane steam reforming. Two types of structures were evaluated in the microchannel reactors and simulated with the developed heterogeneous reactor model. Local temperature and methane concentration profiles within the structures are illustrated to show the correlation of the catalyst structure and its performance. Such a modeling technique provides a convenient and flexible method to evaluate variables in designing more efficient catalysts for the highly endothermic steam reforming reactions, as the desired mass and heat transfer characteristics are achieved.

  11. Steam Reforming Technology for Denitration and Immobilization of DOE Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J. B.; McKibbin, J.; Ryan, K.; Schmoker, D.

    2003-02-26

    THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (THOR) is a joint venture formed in June 2002 by Studsvik, Inc. (Studsvik) and Westinghouse Government Environmental Services Company LLC to further develop, market, and deploy Studsvik's patented THORSM non-incineration, steam reforming waste treatment technology. This paper provides an overview of the THORSM steam reforming process as applied to the denitration and conversion of Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes to an immobilized mineral form. Using the THORSM steam reforming technology to treat nitrate containing tank wastes could significantly benefit the DOE by reducing capital and life-cycle costs, reducing processing and programmatic risks, and positioning the DOE to meet or exceed its stakeholder commitments for tank closure. Specifically, use of the THORSM technology can facilitate processing of up to 75% of tank wastes without the use of vitrification, yielding substantial life-cycle cost savings.

  12. On-board reforming of biodiesel and bioethanol for high temperature PEM fuel cells: Comparison of autothermal reforming and steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stefan; Wörner, Antje

    2011-03-01

    In the 21st century biofuels will play an important role as alternative fuels in the transportation sector. In this paper different reforming options (steam reforming (SR) and autothermal reforming (ATR)) for the on-board conversion of bioethanol and biodiesel into a hydrogen-rich gas suitable for high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cells are investigated using the simulation tool Aspen Plus. Special emphasis is placed on thermal heat integration. Methyl-oleate (C19H36O2) is chosen as reference substance for biodiesel. Bioethanol is represented by ethanol (C2H5OH). For the steam reforming concept with heat integration a maximum fuel processing efficiency of 75.6% (76.3%) is obtained for biodiesel (bioethanol) at S/C = 3. For the autothermal reforming concept with heat integration a maximum fuel processing efficiency of 74.1% (75.1%) is obtained for biodiesel (bioethanol) at S/C = 2 and λ = 0.36 (0.35). Taking into account the better dynamic behaviour and lower system complexity of the reforming concept based on ATR, autothermal reforming in combination with a water gas shift reactor is considered as the preferred option for on-board reforming of biodiesel and bioethanol. Based on the simulation results optimum operating conditions for a novel 5 kW biofuel processor are derived.

  13. Hydrogen production from the steam reforming of Dinethyl Ether and Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Semelsberger, T. A.; Borup, R. L.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds for fuel cell applications. Methanol has long been considered as a fuel for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds due to its high energy density, low reforming temperature, and zero impurity content. However, it has not been accepted as the fuel of choice due its current limited availability, toxicity and corrosiveness. While methanol steam reforming for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds has been extensively studied, the steam reforming of DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + 3H{sub 2}O = 2CO{sub 2} + 6H{sub 2}, has had limited research effort. DME is the simplest ether (CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}) and is a gas at ambient conditions. DME has physical properties similar to those of LPG fuels (i.e. propane and butane), resulting in similar storage and handling considerations. DME is currently used as an aerosol propellant and has been considercd as a diesel substitute due to the reduced NOx, SOx and particulate emissions. DME is also being considered as a substitute for LPG fuels, which is used extensively in Asia as a fuel for heating and cooking, and naptha, which is used for power generation. The potential advantages of both methanol and DME include low reforming temperature, decreased fuel proccssor startup energy, environmentally benign, visible flame, high heating value, and ease of storage and transportation. In addition, DME has the added advantages of low toxicity and being non-corrosive. Consequently, DME may be an ideal candidate for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds for both automotive and portable power applications. The steam reforming of DME has been demonstrated to occur through a pair of reactions in series, where the first reaction is DME hydration followed by MeOH steam reforming to produce a hydrogen rich stream.

  14. Durable Cu composite catalyst for hydrogen production by high temperature methanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Yasuyuki

    2014-12-01

    Durable catalysts are necessitated for the high temperature methanol steam reforming in compact hydrogen processors. The high durability at 400 °C can be obtained with a composite Cu catalyst where a small amount of Cu-ZnO-ZrO2-Y2O3-In2O3 is coprecipitated on a zirconia support. The lifetime of the composite catalyst containing 3 wt.% Cu is estimated to be as long as 53 × 102 h at 400 °C to produce the full conversion at a contact time of 250 g h m-3. The deactivation rate empirically relates to the cube of the activity. The gradual deactivation is caused by the gradual reduction of the Cu surface amount and also by the reduction of the surface activity which is believed to decrease with an increase in the Cu particle size. The interaction between the thin layer of the coprecipitate and the support surface probably suppresses the aggregation of the coprecipitate leading to Cu sintering.

  15. Intrinsic reaction kinetics of methane steam reforming on a nickel/zirconia anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicks, A. L.; Pointon, K. D.; Siddle, A.

    For the purposes of optimising important system parameters in direct internally reforming (DIR) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, a detailed knowledge of the methane steam reforming rate on the anode is needed. In order to shed light on the present poorly understood kinetics, a study of the methane steam reforming rate given by a typical thin electrolyte-supported nickel/zirconia SOFC anode has been carried out using a tubular plug flow differential reactor. These tests were essentially gradientless. The reaction rate was studied as a function of temperature (700-1000°C) and the partial pressure of methane (2-40 kPa), hydrogen (10-70 kPa) and steam (10-70 kPa). The total pressure was nominally 1 atm. The reaction was first order in methane with a weak positive effect of hydrogen, and a stronger negative effect of steam. The kinetics were complicated by the fact that reaction orders in hydrogen and steam were either temperature dependent and/or depended on the partial pressures of other components in the gas mixture. Furthermore, Arrhenius-type plots gave gradients which were dependent on the steam partial pressure. It is clear from this study that the reaction cannot be represented as simply as is generally attempted in the literature. An improved rate equation has been derived.

  16. Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.E.; Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-07-13

    A fuel cell is described capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

  17. Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.; Young, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel cell capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

  18. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell grade hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming: A comparative multiple reactor modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Nisha; Kumar, Shashi; Kumar, Surendra

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of a fuel processor based on methanol steam reforming has been carried out to produce fuel cell grade H2. Six reactor configurations namely FBR1 (fixed bed reactor), MR1 (H2 selective membrane reactor with one reaction tube), MR2 (H2 selective membrane reactor with two reaction tubes), FBR2 (FBR1 + preferential CO oxidation (PROX) reactor), MR3 (MR1 + PROX), and MR4 (MR2 + PROX) are evaluated by simulation to identify the suitable processing scheme. The yield of H2 is significantly affected by H2 selective membrane, residence time, temperature, and pressure conditions at complete methanol conversion. The enhancement in residence time in MR2 by using two identical reaction tubes provides H2 yield of 2.96 with 91.25 mol% recovery at steam/methanol ratio of 1.5, pressure of 2 bar and 560 K temperature. The exit retentate gases from MR2 are further treated in PROX reactor of MR4 to reduce CO concentration to 4.1 ppm to ensure the safe discharge to the environment. The risk of carbon deposition on reforming catalyst is highly reduced in MR4, and MR4 reactor configuration generates 7.4 NL min-1 of CO free H2 from 0.12 mol min-1 of methanol which can provide 470 W PEMFC feedstock requirement. Hence, process scheme in MR4 provides a compact and innovative fuel cell grade H2 generating unit.

  19. CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: TRICHLOROETHANE, TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND PERCHLOROETHYLENE. (R826694C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effective destruction of trichloroethane, trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene by steam reforming with a commercial nickel catalyst has been demonstrated. Conversion levels of up to 0.99999 were attained in both laboratory and semi-pilot experiments, with the products c...

  20. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING FOR TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HEWITT WM

    2011-04-08

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of fluidized bed steam reforming and its possible application to treat and immobilize Hanford low-activity waste.

  1. CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS). (R826694C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments with commercial askarals (Aroclors 1221, 1248 and 1254) have confirmed the feasibility of catalytic steam reforming as a method for destroying polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Rhodium, platinum and nickel supported on CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: CATALYST COMPARISONS. (R822721C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catalyst candidates for steam reforming chlorocarbons have been screened for activity using methyl chloride as a model reactant. At 500°C, a H2O/C ratio of about 10 and a GHSV of 254 000 h-1, catalysts comprising 0.5% loading of the metals o...

  2. CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: CATALYST DEACTIVATION. (R826694C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deactivation of 0.5 wt.% Pt/small gamma, Greek-Al2O3 catalysts during trichloroethylene (TCE)–steam reforming was studied with experiments at 700°C, H

  3. CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: CATALYST COMPARISONS. (R826694C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catalyst candidates for steam reforming chlorocarbons have been screened for activity using methyl chloride as a model reactant. At 500°C, a H2O/C ratio of about 10 and a GHSV of 254 000 h-1, catalysts comprising 0.5% loading of the metals ...

  4. Hierarchically structured catalysts for cascade and selective steam reforming/hydrodeoxygenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Rainbolt, James; Kovarik, Libor; Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Yong

    2015-12-01

    We report a hierarchically structured catalyst with steam reforming and hydrodeoxygenation functionalities being deposited in the micropores and macropores, respectively. The catalyst is highly efficient to upgrade the pyrolysis vapors of pine forest product residual, resulting in a dramatically decreased acid content and increased hydrocarbon yield without external H2 supply. PMID:26462032

  5. Hierarchically structured catalysts for cascade and selective steam reforming/hydrodeoxygenation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Rainbolt, James E.; Kovarik, Libor; Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Yong

    2015-09-29

    We report a hierarchically structured catalyst with steam reforming and hydrodeoxygenation functionalities being deposited in the micropores and macropores, respectively. The catalyst is highly efficient to upgrade the pyrolysis vapors of pine forest product residual, resulting in a dramatically decreased acid content and increased hydrocarbon yield without external H2 supply.

  6. Thermal analysis of cylindrical natural-gas steam reformer for 5 kW PEMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Taehyun; Han, Junhee; Koo, Bonchan; Lee, Dohyung

    2016-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of a natural-gas based cylindrical steam reformer coupled with a combustor are investigated for the use with a 5 kW polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. A reactor unit equipped with nickel-based catalysts was designed to activate the steam reforming reaction without the inclusion of high-temperature shift and low-temperature shift processes. Reactor temperature distribution and its overall thermal efficiency depend on various inlet conditions such as the equivalence ratio, the steam to carbon ratio (SCR), and the fuel distribution ratio (FDR) into the reactor and the combustor components. These experiments attempted to analyze the reformer's thermal and chemical properties through quantitative evaluation of product composition and heat exchange between the combustor and the reactor. FDR is critical factor in determining the overall performance as unbalanced fuel injection into the reactor and the combustor deteriorates overall thermal efficiency. Local temperature distribution also influences greatly on the fuel conversion rate and thermal efficiency. For the experiments, the operation conditions were set as SCR was in range of 2.5-4.0 and FDR was in 0.4-0.7 along with equivalence ratio of 0.9-1.1; optimum results were observed for FDR of 0.63 and SCR of 3.0 in the cylindrical steam reformer.

  7. On the origin of reactivity of steam reforming of ethylene glycol on supported Ni catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuirong; Zhang, Chengxi; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Gaowei; Ma, Xinbin; Gong, Jinlong

    2012-03-28

    This paper describes a strategy for producing hydrogen via steam reforming of ethylene glycol over supported nickel catalysts. Nickel plays a crucial role in conversion of ethylene glycol and production of hydrogen, while oxide supports affect product distribution of carbonaceous species. A plausible reaction pathway is proposed based on our results and the literature. PMID:22246195

  8. Production of hydrogen from biomass by catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis oil

    SciTech Connect

    Czernik, S.; Wang, D.; Chornet, E.

    1998-08-01

    Hydrogen is the prototype of the environmentally cleanest fuel of interest for power generation using fuel cells and for transportation. The thermochemical conversion of biomass to hydrogen can be carried out through two distinct strategies: (a) gasification followed by water-gas shift conversion, and (b) catalytic steam reforming of specific fractions derived from fast pyrolysis and aqueous/steam processes of biomass. This paper presents the latter route that begins with fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce bio-oil. This oil (as a whole or its selected fractions) can be converted to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming followed by a water-gas shift conversion step. Such a process has been demonstrated at the bench scale using model compounds, poplar oil aqueous fraction, and the whole pyrolysis oil with commercial Ni-based steam reforming catalysts. Hydrogen yields as high as 85% have been obtained. Catalyst initial activity can be recovered through regeneration cycles by steam or CO{sub 2} gasification of carbonaceous deposits.

  9. Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Production from Dimethyl Ether Steam Reforming and Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Semelsberger

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the process of dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming were investigated as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0-4), temperature (100 C-600 C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species: acetylene, ethanol, methanol, ethylene, methyl-ethyl ether, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, n-propanol, ethane and isopropyl alcohol. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether with steam indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure was observed to shift the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 atm to 5 atm decreased the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5% to 76.2%. The order of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction was methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol--formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. The optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occurred at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.5, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 C. Modeling the thermodynamics of dimethyl ether hydrolysis (with methanol as the only product considered), the equilibrium conversion of dimethyl ether is limited. The equilibrium conversion was observed to increase with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio, resulting in a maximum dimethyl ether conversion of approximately 68% at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 4.5 and a processing temperature of 600 C. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with steam can produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds--with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. This substantiates dimethyl ether as a viable source of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells.

  10. Process and apparatus for the production of hydrogen by steam reforming of hydrocarbon

    DOEpatents

    Sircar, Shivaji; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Nataraj, Shankar

    2000-01-01

    In the steam reforming of hydrocarbon, particularly methane, under elevated temperature and pressure to produce hydrogen, a feed of steam and hydrocarbon is fed into a first reaction volume containing essentially only reforming catalyst to partially reform the feed. The balance of the feed and the reaction products of carbon dioxide and hydrogen are then fed into a second reaction volume containing a mixture of catalyst and adsorbent which removes the carbon dioxide from the reaction zone as it is formed. The process is conducted in a cycle which includes these reactions followed by countercurrent depressurization and purge of the adsorbent to regenerate it and repressurization of the reaction volumes preparatory to repeating the reaction-sorption phase of the cycle.

  11. The Engine of Reform Gathers Steam: Kentucky Starts from Scratch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1990-01-01

    Charged with overhauling the state's educational system, the Kentucky General Assembly last spring devised a landmark reform scheme that mandates site-based management, abolishes the existing state board of education, and institutes an ambitious system of rewards and sanctions aimed at holding schools accountable for student performance. A sidebar…

  12. Compact methanol reformer test for fuel-cell powered light-duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emonts, B.; Bøgild Hansen, J.; Lœgsgaard Jørgensen, S.; Höhlein, B.; Peters, R.

    On-board production of hydrogen from methanol based on a steam reformer in connection with the use of low-temperature fuel-cells (PEMFC) is an attractive option as energy conversion unit for light-duty vehicles. A steam reforming process at higher pressures with an external burner offers advantages in comparison to a steam reformer with integrated partial oxidation in terms of total efficiency for electricity production. The main aim of a common project carried out by the Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), Haldor Topsøe A/S (HTAS) and Siemens AG is to design, to construct and to test a steam reformer reactor concept (HTAS) with external catalytic burner (FZJ) as heat source as well as catalysts for heterogeneously catalyzed hydrogen production (HTAS), concepts for gas treatment (HTAS, FZJ) and a low-temperature fuel cell (Siemens). Based on the experimental results obtained so far concerning methanol reformers, catalytic burners and gas conditioning units, our report describes the total system, a test unit and preliminary test results related to a hydrogen production capacity of 50 kW (LHV) and dynamic operating conditions. This hydrogen production system is aimed at reducing the specific weight (<2 kg/kWth or 4 kg/kWel) combined with high efficiency for net electricity generation from methanol (about 50%) and low specific emissions. The application of Pd-membranes as gas cleaning unit fulfill the requirements with high hydrogen permeability and low cost of the noble metal.

  13. Evaluation of the feasibility of ethanol steam reforming in a molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.; Passalacqua, E.; Maggio, G.; Patti, A.; Freni, S.

    1996-12-31

    The molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) utilizing traditional fuels represent a suitable technological progress in comparison with pure hydrogen-fed MCFCs. The more investigated fuel for such an application is the methane, which has the advantages of low cost and large availability; besides, several authors demonstrated the feasibility of a methane based MCFC. In particular, the methane steam-reforming allows the conversion of the fuel in hydrogen also inside the cell (internal reforming configuration), utilizing the excess heat to compensate the reaction endothermicity. In this case, however, both the catalyst and the cell materials are subjected to thermal stresses due to the cold spots arising near to the reaction sites MCFC. An alternative, in accordance with the recent proposals of other authors, may be to produce hydrogen from methane by the partial oxidation reaction, rather than by steam reforming. This reaction is exothermic ({Delta}H{degrees}=-19.1 kJ/mol H{sub 2}) and it needs to verify the possibility to obtain an acceptable distribution of the temperature inside the cell. The alcohols and, in particular, methanol shows the gas reformed compositions as a function of the steam/ethanol molar ratio, ranging from 1.0 to 3.5. The hydrogen production enhances with this ratio, but it presents a maximum at S/EtOH of about 2.0. Otherwise, the increase of S/EtOH depresses the production of CO and CH{sub 4}, and ethanol may be a further solution for the hydrogen production inside a MCFC. In this case, also, the reaction in cell is less endothermic compared with the methane steam reforming with the additional advantage of a liquid fuel more easily storable and transportable. Aim of the present work is to perform a comparative evaluation of the different solutions, with particular reference to the use of ethanol.

  14. Biomass gasification with air in fluidized bed: Reforming of the gas composition with commercial steam reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Corella, J.; Orio, A.; Aznar, P.

    1998-12-01

    Four commercial catalysts for steam reforming of higher hydrocarbons (naphthas) and three for steam reforming of light hydrocarbons are tested for hot gas clean up and upgrading in biomass gasification with air in fluidized bed. The catalysts used originate from four manufacturers: BASF, AG, ICI-Katalco, Haldor Topsoe a/s, and United Catalysts Inc. The work is performed in a small pilot plant (1--2 kg of biomass fed/h) with three reactors in series: gasifier, guard bed of dolomite, and full flow catalytic bed. Samples of gas are taken before and after the catalytic bed at different times-on-stream. It is shown how the H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and steam contents in the flue gas change because of the catalytic bed approaching contents near to the ones corresponding to the equilibrium state. Variations in the heating value of the gas and gas yield as a result of the catalytic bed are also reported.

  15. Glycerol Steam Reforming Over Ni-Fe-Ce/Al2O3 Catalyst: Effect of Cerium.

    PubMed

    Go, Gwang-Sub; Go, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Hong-Joo; Moon, Dong-Ju; Park, Nam-Cook; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-02-01

    In this work, hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming was studied using Ni-metal oxide catalysts. Ni-based catalyst becomes deactivated during steam reforming reactions because of coke deposits and sintering. Therefore, the aim of this study was to reduce carbon deposits and sintering on the catalyst surface by adding a promoter. Ni-metal oxide catalysts supported on Al2O3 were prepared via impregnation method, and the calcined catalyst was reduced under H2 flow for 2 h prior to the reaction. The characteristics of the catalysts were examined by XRD, TPR, TGA, and SEM. The Ni-Fe-Ce/Al2O3 catalyst, which contained less than 2 wt% Ce, showed the highest hydrogen selectivity and glycerol conversion. Further analysis of the catalysts revealed that the Ni-Fe-Ce/Al2O3 catalyst required a lower reduction temperature and produced minimum carbon deposit. PMID:27433687

  16. Steam reforming of ethanol on Ni/MgO catalysts: H 2 production for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, S.; Cavallaro, S.; Mondello, N.; Spadaro, L.; Frusteri, F.

    H 2 production by ethanol steam reforming in simulating molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) conditions was explored. Ni/MgO catalysts exhibit very high selectivity to H 2 and CO 2 as a consequence of their low tendency to promote carbon monoxide methanation and ethanol decomposition reactions. Coke formation is strongly depressed due to the benefits induced by the use of basic carrier which positively modify the electronic properties of supported Ni.

  17. Hydrogen production from glucose and sorbitol by sorption-enhanced steam reforming: challenges and promises.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Chen, De

    2012-03-12

    Concerning energy and environmental sustainability, it is appealing to produce hydrogen from sugars or sugar alcohols that are readily obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. Nevertheless, the conversion of such compounds for hydrogen production poses great technical challenges. In this paper, we report that hydrogen purity and yield can be significantly improved by integrating in situ CO(2) capture into the steam reforming reaction of the model compounds-glucose and sorbitol. The experimental assessment was conducted at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.8 for sorbitol and 6 for glucose from 450-625 °C. As predicted by thermodynamic analysis, combining CO(2) capture and reforming reactions at favorable operating conditions yielded very high purity hydrogen, for instance, 98.8 mol % from sorbitol and 99.9 mol % from glucose. However, there are trade-offs between hydrogen purity and yield in practice. The lower operating temperatures in the examined range helped to increase the hydrogen purity and reduce the CO content in the gas product, whereas a high hydrogen yield was more likely to be obtained at higher temperatures. Coupling CO(2) capture lowered the risk of coke formation during the steam reforming of glucose. Coke accumulated in the reactor for the sorption-enhanced steam reforming of glucose was mostly from the slow pyrolysis of glucose before it came into contact with the catalyst-acceptor bed. This problem may be solved by improving heat transfer or reconstructing the reactor, for instance, by using a fluidized-bed reactor. PMID:22378630

  18. Development and life evaluation of a steam reforming process for PAFC

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, S.; Takami, S.; Masuda, M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports a life evaluation method for a carbon monoxide (CO) shift process in the steam reforming process for PAFC. A CO shift reactor simulation was developed to evaluate the whole performance of the CO shift process. The calculation results of the simulation almost coincide with the experimental data obtained from a demonstration plant. By evaluating and grasping the sintering trend of the catalyst, and by simulation calculation of the reactor, it became possible to evaluate the performance at targeted operation hours.

  19. Studies of potassium-promoted nickel catalysts for methane steam reforming: Effect of surface potassium location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiecki, Tadeusz; Denis, Andrzej; Rawski, Michał; Gołębiowski, Andrzej; Stołecki, Kazimierz; Dmytrzyk, Jaromir; Kotarba, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    The effect of potassium addition to the Ni/Al2O3 steam reforming catalyst has been investigated on several model systems, including K/Al2O3 with various amounts of alkali promoters (1-4 wt% of K2O), a model catalyst 90%NiO-10%Al2O3 promoted with potassium and a commercial catalyst. The potassium surface state and stability were investigated by means of the Species Resolved Thermal Alkali Desorption method (SR-TAD). The activity of the catalysts in the steam reforming of methane and their coking-resistance were also evaluated. The results reveal that the beneficial effect of potassium addition is strongly related to its location in the catalysts. The catalyst surface should be promoted with potassium in order to obtain high coking-resistant catalysts. Moreover, the catalyst preparation procedure should ensure a direct interaction of potassium with the Al2O3 support surface. Due to the low stability of potassium on θ-Al2O3 this phase is undesirable during the preparation of a stable steam reforming catalyst.

  1. Heat-transfer simulation in a furnace for steam reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, K.; Taniguchi, H.; Guo, K. . Faculty of Engineering); Katayama, T.; Nagata, T. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses three-dimensional combined radiative and convective heat-transfer process in a furnace for LPG reforming which is simulated by introducing the radiosity concept into the radiative heat ray method for accurate radiative heat-transfer analysis. Together with an analysis of the chemical reaction in the reactor tubes of the furnace, the heat-transfer simulation gives the three-dimensional profile of the combustion gas temperature in the furnace, the tube-surface heat-flux distribution and the composition of the product gas obtained from the forming. The results obtained are as follows: increasing the jet angle of the heating burner raises the gas temperature and the tube surface heat flux near the burner entrance; the flame shape is the most important factor for deciding the heat flux distribution of the tube surface because the heat transferred by flame radiation is much more than they by convection of the combustion gas.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY AND BED PERFORMANCE IN A FLUIDIZED BED BLACK LIQUOR STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Whitty

    2003-12-01

    The University of Utah project ''Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer'' (DOE award number DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation for projects to provide technical support for black liquor and biomass gasification. The primary focus of the project is to provide support for a DOE-sponsored demonstration of MTCI's black liquor steam reforming technology at Georgia-Pacific's paper mill in Big Island, Virginia. A more overarching goal is to improve the understanding of phenomena that take place during low temperature black liquor gasification. This is achieved through five complementary technical tasks: (1) construction of a fluidized bed black liquor gasification test system, (2) investigation of bed performance, (3) evaluation of product gas quality, (4) black liquor conversion analysis and modeling and (5) computational modeling of the Big Island gasifier. Four experimental devices have been constructed under this project. The largest facility, which is the heart of the experimental effort, is a pressurized fluidized bed gasification test system. The system is designed to be able to reproduce conditions near the black liquor injectors in the Big Island steam reformer, so the behavior of black liquor pyrolysis and char gasification can be quantified in a representative environment. The gasification test system comprises five subsystems: steam generation and superheating, black liquor feed, fluidized bed reactor, afterburner for syngas combustion and a flue gas cooler/condenser. The three-story system is located at University of Utah's Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility, and all resources there are available to support the research.

  3. Plasma steam reforming of E85 for hydrogen rich gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xinli; Hoang, Trung; Lobban, Lance L.; Mallinson, Richard G.

    2011-07-01

    E85 (85 vol% ethanol and 15 vol% gasoline) is a partly renewable fuel that is increasing in supply availability. Hydrogen production from E85 for fuel cell or internal combustion engine applications is a potential method for reducing CO2 emissions. Steam reforming of E85 using a nonthermal plasma (pulse corona discharge) reactor has been exploited at low temperature (200-300 °C) without external heating, diluent gas, oxidant or catalyst in this work. Several operational parameters, including the discharge current, E85 concentration and feed flow rate, have been investigated. The results show that hydrogen rich gases (63-67% H2 and 22-29% CO, with small amounts of CO2, C2 hydrocarbons and CH4) can be produced by this method. A comparison with ethanol reforming and gasoline reforming under identical conditions has also been made and the behaviour of E85 reforming is found to be close to that of ethanol reforming with slightly higher C2 hydrocarbons yields.

  4. Process Options Description for Steam Reforming Flowsheet Model of INEEL Tank Farm Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Barnes, C.M.; Nichols, T.T.

    2002-05-21

    Technical information is provided herein that is required for development of a steady-state process simulation of a baseline steam reforming treatment train for Tank Farm waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This document supercedes INEEL/EXT-2001-173, produced in FY2001 to support simulation of the direct vitrification treatment train which was the previous process baseline. A process block flow diagram for steam reforming is provided, together with a list of unit operations which constitute the process. A detailed description of each unit operation is given which includes its purpose, principal phenomena present, expected pressure and temperature ranges, key chemical species in the inlet steam, and the proposed manner in which the unit operation is to be modeled in the steady state process simulation. Models for the unit operations may be mechanistic (based on first principles), empirical (based solely on pilot test data without extrapolation) , or by correlations (based on extrapolative or statistical schemes applied to pilot test data). Composition data for the expected process feed streams is provided.

  5. Hydrogen production by ethanol steam reforming on Ni/oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Mihaela D.; Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Borodi, George; Almasan, Valer

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen production from bio-fuels such as bio-ethanol provides significant environmental benefits since the resulted CO2 is consumed again for biomass growth, offering a carbon dioxide neutral energy source. In the actual conditions of increasing energy demand and atmosphere pollution, clean produced hydrogen can be an alternative option for a clean energy vector. In this paper we present the results obtained in hydrogen production by steam reforming of ethanol using oxide supported nickel catalysts. Although Ni is not the most active catalyst for this process, economically is the most attractive one, due to the high price and low availability of noble metals. Ni was dispersed on several oxides: ZrO2, Al2O3, Cr2O3, SiO2 with a target metal concentration of 8 wt%. using impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized using several techniques: N2 adsorption desorption isotherms to determine total surface area and porosity, XRD to determine oxide crystallinity and Ni crystallite size. Each catalyst was tested in steam reforming of ethanol at temperatures ranging from 150 to 350°C, at atmospheric pressure and a ethanol: steam ratio of 1:9. The best ethanol conversion and catalyst stability was obtained for Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst selectivity for H2 production depends on the support nature. The best H2 selectivity was obtained for Ni/ZrO2 catalyst.

  6. Bio-ethanol steam reforming: Insights on the mechanism for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, M.; Sanz, J. L.; Isabel, R.; Padilla, R.; Arjona, R.; Daza, L.

    New catalysts for hydrogen production by steam reforming of bio-ethanol have been developed. Catalytic tests have been performed at laboratory scale, with the reaction conditions demanded in a real processor: i.e. ethanol and water feed, without a diluent gas. Catalyst ICP0503 has shown high activity and good resistance to carbon deposition. Reaction results show total conversion, high selectivity to hydrogen (70%), CO 2, CO and CH 4 being the only by-products obtained. The reaction yields 4.25 mol of hydrogen by mol of ethanol fed, close to the thermodynamic equilibrium prediction. The temperature influence on the catalytic activity for this catalyst has been studied. Conversion reaches 100% at temperature higher than 600 °C. In the light of reaction results obtained, a reaction mechanism for ethanol steam reforming is proposed. Long-term reaction experiments have been performed in order to study the stability of the catalytic activity. The excellent stability of the catalyst ICP0503 indicates that the reformed stream could be fed directly to a high temperature fuel cell (MCFC, SOFC) without a further purification treatment. These facts suggest that ICP0503 is a good candidate to be implemented in a bio-ethanol processor for hydrogen production to feed a fuel cell.

  7. Diesel steam reforming with a nickel-alumina spinel catalyst for solid oxide fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauteux-Lefebvre, Clémence; Abatzoglou, Nicolas; Braidy, Nadi; Achouri, Ines Esma

    Liquid hydrocarbons (LC) are considered as fuel cells feed and, more particularly, as solid oxide fuel cell feed. Cost-effective LC-reforming catalysts are critically needed for the successful commercialization of such technologies. An alternative to noble metal catalysts, proposed by the authors in a previous publication, has been proven efficient for diesel steam reforming (SR). Nickel, less expensive and more readily available than noble metals, was used in a form that prevents deactivation. The catalyst formulation is a Ni-alumina spinel (NiAl 2O 4) supported on alumina (Al 2O 3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). SR of commercial diesel was undertaken for more than 15 h at high gas hourly space velocities and steam-to-carbon ratios lower than 2. Constant diesel conversion and high hydrogen concentrations were obtained. Ni catalyst characterization revealed no detectable amounts of carbon on the spinel catalyst surface Ni. The effect of catalyst composition (Ni concentration and YSZ presence) was studied to understand and optimize the developed catalyst. Two phenomena were found to be influenced by relative catalyst composition: water-gas-shift vs reforming reaction extent, and concentration of light hydrocarbons in products.

  8. Structure and Reactivity Investigations on Supported Bimetallic Au-Ni Catalysts Used for Hydrocarbon Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Ya-Huei; King, David L.; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Wang, Yong; Heald, S.

    2006-12-10

    The addition of small quantities of gold to the surface of supported nickel catalysts has been described as a means to retard carbon formation during hydrocarbon steam reforming. Calculations by others have indicated that gold locates at the most catalytically active (step and edge) sites that also serve as nucleation sites for carbon formation. In this paper we describe experiments to characterize the Ni-Au interactions on bimetallic Au-Ni/MgAl2O4 catalysts at various Ni and Au loadings. The catalyst structure was investigated using EXAFS/XANES spectroscopy and adsorption-desorption measurements with H2 and N2O. Evidence for surface alloy formation is provided in the Ni K and Au LIII edge EXAFS measurements of Au-promoted 8.8%Ni/MgAl2O4, especially at Au loadings ?0.2 wt.%. At higher Au concentrations, there is evidence for a combination of alloy and segregated Au species. H2 chemisorption and N2O temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements showed a significant decrease in total surface sites, or surface site reactivity, on Au modified Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst. The XANES structure is consistent with perturbation of the electronic structure of both the Ni and Au atoms as a result of alloy formation. TGA studies with steam/n-butane feed confirmed the ability of Au to retard coke deposition under low S/C reforming conditions, although carbon formation was not fully suppressed. When testing for methane steam reforming, a lower initial activity and deactivation rate resulted from Au promotion of the Ni catalyst. However, both catalysts showed a declining activity with time. The lack of a direct correlation between the surface characterization results and catalytic activity is most likely a result of decreasing effectiveness of the surface alloy with increasing temperature.

  9. Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Whitty

    2007-06-30

    University of Utah's project entitled 'Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer' (DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation released by the U.S. Department of Energy in December 2001, requesting proposals for projects targeted towards black liquor/biomass gasification technology support research and development. Specifically, the solicitation was seeking projects that would provide technical support for Department of Energy supported black liquor and biomass gasification demonstration projects under development at the time.

  10. Metal catalysts for steam reforming of tar derived from the gasification of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Li, Dalin; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    Biomass gasification is one of the most important technologies for the conversion of biomass to electricity, fuels, and chemicals. The main obstacle preventing the commercial application of this technology is the presence of tar in the product gas. Catalytic reforming of tar appears a promising approach to remove tar and supported metal catalysts are among the most effective catalysts. Nevertheless, improvement of catalytic performances including activity, stability, resistance to coke deposition and aggregation of metal particles, as well as catalyst regenerability is greatly needed. This review focuses on the design and catalysis of supported metal catalysts for the removal of tar in the gasification of biomass. The recent development of metal catalysts including Rh, Ni, Co, and their alloys for steam reforming of biomass tar and tar model compounds is introduced. The role of metal species, support materials, promoters, and their interfaces is described. PMID:25455089

  11. STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138

    SciTech Connect

    Burket, P

    2009-02-24

    This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

  12. Phase 2 TWR Steam Reforming Test for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas R. Soelberg; Doug Marshall; Dean Taylor; Steven Bates

    2004-01-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste (SBW) is stored in stainless steel tanks a the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the SBW into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. Fluidized bed steam reforming technology, licensed to ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC (TWR) by Manufacturing Technology Conversion International, was tested in two phases using an INEEL (Department of Energy) fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, reductant stoichiometry, and process temperature were varied to identify and demonstrate how the process might be optimized to improve operation and product characteristics. The first week of testing was devoted primarily to process chemistry and the second week was devoted more toward bed stability and particle size control.

  13. Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at INL for ICP

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bradley Mason; Kevin Ryan; Scott Roesener; Michael Cowen; Duane Schmoker; Pat Bacala; Bill Landman

    2006-03-01

    The patented THOR® steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR® steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR® technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR® can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR® can also produce a final endproduct that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR® process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU.

  14. Non-syngas direct steam reforming of methanol to hydrogen and carbon dioxide at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai Man Kerry; Tong, Weiyi; West, Adam; Cheung, Kevin; Li, Tong; Smith, George; Guo, Yanglong; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2012-01-01

    A non-syngas direct steam reforming route is investigated for the conversion of methanol to hydrogen and carbon dioxide over a CuZnGaO(x) catalyst at 150-200 °C. This route is in marked contrast with the conventional complex route involving steam reformation to syngas (CO/H2) at high temperature, followed by water gas shift and CO cleanup stages for hydrogen production. Here we report that high quality hydrogen and carbon dioxide can be produced in a single-step reaction over the catalyst, with no detectable CO (below detection limit of 1 ppm). This can be used to supply proton exchange membrane fuel cells for mobile applications without invoking any CO shift and cleanup stages. The working catalyst contains, on average, 3-4 nm copper particles, alongside extremely small size of copper clusters stabilized on a defective ZnGa2O4 spinel oxide surface, providing hydrogen productivity of 393.6 ml g(-1)-cat h(-1) at 150 °C. PMID:23187630

  15. Kinetics, simulation and optimization of methanol steam reformer for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    To evaluate reaction rates for making hydrogen from methanol, kinetic studies of methanol decomposition, methanol steam reforming, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation have been performed. These reactions were studied in a microreactor testing unit using a commercial Cu-ZnO/Al 2O 3 catalyst for the first three reactions and Pt-Fe/γ-alumina catalyst for the last reaction. The activity tests were performed between 120 and 325 °C at atmospheric pressure with a range of feed rates and compositions. For methanol decomposition, a simplified reaction network of five elementary reactions was proposed and parameters for all five rate expressions were obtained using non-linear least squares optimization, numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model, and extensive experimental data. Similar numerical analysis was carried out to obtain the rate expressions for methanol steam reaction, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation. Combining the three reactors with several heat exchange options, an integrated methanol reformer system was designed and simulated using MATLAB. Using this simulation, the product distribution, the effects of reactor volume and temperature, and the options of water and air injection rates were studied. Also, a series of optimization tests were conducted to give maximum hydrogen yield and/or maximum economic profit.

  16. Bimetallic PtSn/C catalysts obtained via SOMC/M for glycerol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Pérez, Laura; Merlo, Andrea; Buitrago-Sierra, Robison; Casella, Mónica; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study on the preparation of bimetallic PtSn/C catalysts using surface-controlled synthesis methods, and on their catalytic performance in the glycerol steam reforming reaction has been carried out. In order to obtain these well-defined bimetallic phases, techniques derived from Surface Organometallic Chemistry on Metals (SOMC/M) were used. The preparation process involved the reaction between an organometallic compound ((C4H9)4Sn) and a supported transition metal (Pt) in a H2 atmosphere. Catalysts with Sn/Pt atomic ratios of 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 were obtained, and characterized using several techniques: ICP, H2 chemisorption, TEM and XPS. These systems were tested in the glycerol steam reforming varying the reaction conditions (glycerol concentration and reaction temperature). The best performance was observed for the catalysts with the lowest tin contents (PtSn0.2/C and PtSn0.3/C). It was observed that the presence of tin increased the catalysts' stability when working under more severe reaction conditions. PMID:26283100

  17. Phase 2 THOR Steam Reforming Tests for Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas R. Soelberg

    2004-01-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste is stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the waste into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. A steam reforming technology patented by Studsvik, Inc., and licensed to THOR Treatment Technologies has been tested in two phases using a Department of Energy-owned fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier in 2003. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, stoichiometry, and chemistry were varied to identify and demonstrate process operation and product characteristics under different operating conditions. Two test series were performed. During the first series, the process chemistry was designed to produce a sodium carbonate product. The second series was designed to produce a more leach-resistant, mineralized sodium aluminosilicate product. The tests also demonstrated the performance of a MACT-compliant off-gas system.

  18. Characterization of the activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Marcelo S.; Santos, Rudye K. S.; Assaf, Elisabete M.; Assaf, José M.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    This paper reports results of studies of the catalytic activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for steam reforming of ethanol. Co/Al 2O 3, Co/SiO 2, and Co/MgO catalysts were prepared by an impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen. The results showed the presence of Co 3O 4 and CoO x species interacting with Al 2O 3 or MgO and formed after a calcination step. It was evident that only Co 0 sites are active for the steam reforming of ethanol. All materials showed high levels of ethanol conversion, with molar yields of about 70% of hydrogen and 30% of CO+CO 2+CH 4 in the gaseous mixture. The Co/Al 2O 3 catalyst also produced ethylene through a dehydration reaction of ethanol. It is proposed that the methane formation on Co/SiO 2 catalysts occurs by methanation of CO and by ethanol decomposition. After 9 h of reaction, 14-24% (w/w) of carbon was deposited on all catalysts, indicating that a well characterized deactivation of the materials is due to coke deposition.

  19. Effectiveness of heat-integrated methanol steam reformer and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack systems for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotrič, A.; Sekavčnik, M.; Hočevar, S.

    2014-12-01

    Efficiently combining proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack with methanol steam reformer (MSR) into a small portable system is still quite a topical issue. Using methanol as a fuel in PEMFC stack includes a series of chemical processes where each proceeds at a unique temperature. In a combined MSR-PEMFC-stack system with integrated auxiliary fuel processors (vaporizer, catalytic combustor, etc.) the processes are both endothermic and exothermic hence their proper thermal integration can help raising the system efficiency. A concept of such fully integrated and compact system is proposed in this study. Three separate systems are designed based on different PEMFC stacks and MSR. Low-temperature (LT) and conventional high-temperature (cHT) PEMFC stack characteristics are based on available data from suppliers. Also, a novel high-temperature (nHT) PEMFC stack is proposed because its operating temperature coincides with that of MSR. A comparative study of modelled systems is performed using a mass and energy balances zero-dimensional model, which is interdependently coupled to a physical model based on finite element method (FEM). The results indicate that a system with nHT PEMFC stack is feasible and has the potential to reach higher system efficiencies than systems with LT or cHT PEMFC stacks.

  20. Methanol steam reforming in microreactor with constructal tree-shaped network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongping; Zhang, Chengbin; Wu, Rui; Shi, Mingheng

    2011-08-01

    The construcal tree-shaped network is introduced into the design of a methanol steam microreactor in the context of optimization of the flow configuration. A three-dimensional model for methanol steam reaction in this designed microreactor is developed and numerically analyzed. The methanol conversion, CO concentration in the product and the total pressure drop of the gases in the microreactor with constructal tree-shaped network are evaluated and compared with those in the serpentine reactor. It is found that the reaction of methanol steam reforming is enhanced in the constructal tree-shaped microreactor, since the tree-shaped reactor configuration, which acts an optimizer for the reactant distribution, provides a reaction space with larger surface-to-volume ratio and the reduction of reactant velocities in the branches. Compared with the serpentine microreactor, the constructal reactor possesses a higher methanol conversion rate accompanied with a higher CO concentration. The conversion rate of the constructal microreactor is more than 10% over that of serpentine reactor. More particularly, the reduction of flow distance makes the constructal microreactor still possess almost the same pressure drop as the corresponding serpentine reactor, despite that the bifurcations induce extra local pressure loss, and the reduction of channel size in branches also causes pressure losses.

  1. Engineering Study for a Full Scale Demonstration of Steam Reforming Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific's Mill in Big Island, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Robert De Carrera; Mike Ohl

    2002-03-19

    Georgia-Pacific Corporation performed an engineering study to determine the feasibility of installing a full-scale demonstration project of steam reforming black liquor chemical recovery at Georgia-Pacific's mill in Big Island, Virginia. The technology considered was the Pulse Enhanced Steam Reforming technology that was developed and patented by Manufacturing and Technology Conversion, International (MTCI) and is currently licensed to StoneChem, Inc., for use in North America. Pilot studies of steam reforming have been carried out on a 25-ton per day reformer at Inland Container's Ontario, California mill and on a 50-ton per day unit at Weyerhaeuser's New Bern, North Carolina mill.

  2. Hydrogen generation for fuel-cell power systems by high-pressure catalytic methanol-steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Peppley, B.A.; Amphlett, J.C.; Kearns, L.M.; Mann, R.F.; Roberge, P.R.

    1997-12-31

    Results of kinetic studies of methanol-steam reforming on a commercial low-temperature shift catalyst, BASF K3-110, are reported. A comprehensive Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model of methanol-steam reforming on Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was used to simulate a methanol-steam reformer operating at pressures up to 45 bar. At constant temperature and steam-to-methanol ratio, increasing the pressure results in an increase in the initial rate of the reaction and a corresponding improvement in reformer performance. This is partially offset as the equilibrium conversion decreases with increasing pressure. The rate of reaction is highest at low conversion. The result is that there is a large heat demand near the entrance of the catalyst bed which causes a strong endothermic effect and a corresponding temperature minimum. In the worst case, this temperature minimum can be below the dewpoint temperature of the operating fluid causing a loss in reformer performance due to condensation in the pores of the catalyst. The situation is exacerbated by the potential for thermal damage to other regions of the catalyst bed if the heating temperature is increased to overcome the endothermic effect. Catalyst deactivation at elevated pressures was also studied in an 80 hour experiment at 260 C. Increasing the operating pressure did not accelerate the rate of deactivation for the typical gas compositions encountered during normal reformer operation. No catalyst fouling was observed for experimental pressures as high as 40 bar at steam-to-methanol ratios greater than unity even though the tendency for carbon formation increases with pressure. Catalyst selectivity improved at lower conversion due to kinetic effects. The equilibrium CO concentration, however, does not vary significantly with pressure because of the stoichiometry of the water-gas shift reaction.

  3. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming of INEEL SBW Using THORsm Mineralizing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Arlin L. Olson; Nicholas R. Soelberg; Douglas W. Marshall; Gary L. Anderson

    2004-12-01

    Sodium bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Office’s (NE-ID) and State of Idaho’s top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Many studies have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. DOE desired further experimental data, with regard to steam reforming technology, to make informed decisions concerning selection of treatment technology for SBW. Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was performed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel September 27 through October 1, 2004. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, and located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Personnel from Science Applications International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, operated the pilot plant. The pilot scale test was terminated as planned after achieving a total of 100 hrs of cumulative/continuous processing operation. About 230 kg of SBW surrogate were processed that resulted in about 88 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 62

  4. Steam Reforming of Ethylene Glycol over MgAl₂O₄ Supported Rh, Ni, and Co Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Xing, Rong; Albrecht, Karl O.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2015-11-25

    Steam reforming of ethylene glycol (EG) over MgAl₂O₄ supported metal (15 wt.% Ni, 5 wt.% Rh, and 15 wt.% Co) catalysts were investigated using combined experimental and theoretical methods. Compared to highly active Rh and Ni catalysts with 100% conversion, the steam reforming activity of EG over the Co catalyst is comparatively lower with only 42% conversion under the same reaction conditions (500°C, 1 atm, 119,000 h⁻¹, S/C=3.3 mol). However, CH₄ selectivity over the Co catalyst is remarkably lower. For example, by varying the gas hour space velocity (GHSV) such that complete conversion is achieved for all the catalysts, CH₄ selectivity for the Co catalyst is only 8%, which is much lower than the equilibrium CH₄ selectivity of ~ 24% obtained for both the Rh and Ni catalysts. Further studies show that varying H₂O concentration over the Co catalyst has a negligible effect on activity, thus indicating zero-order dependence on H₂O. These experimental results suggest that the supported Co catalyst is a promising EG steam reforming catalyst for high hydrogen production. To gain mechanistic insight for rationalizing the lower CH₃ selectivity observed for the Co catalyst, the initial decomposition reaction steps of ethylene glycol via C-O, O-H, C-H, and C-C bond scissions on the Rh(111), Ni(111) and Co(0001) surfaces were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Despite the fact that the bond scission sequence in the EG decomposition on the three metal surfaces varies, which leads to different reaction intermediates, the lower CH₄ selectivity over the Co catalyst, as compared to the Rh and Ni catalysts, is primarily due to the higher barrier for CH₄ formation. The higher S/C ratio enhances the Co catalyst stability, which can be elucidated by the facile water dissociation and an alternative reaction path to remove the CH species as a coking precursor via the HCOH formation. This work was financially supported by the United

  5. Hydrogen Production by Low-temperature Steam Reforming of Bio-oil over Ni/HZSM-5 Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Song-bai; Gong, Lu; Liu, Lu; Hong, Cheng-gui; Yuan, Li-xia; Li, Quan-xin

    2011-04-01

    We investigated high catalytic activity of Ni/HZSM-5 catalysts synthesized by the impregnation method, which was successfully applied for low-temperature steam reforming of bio-oil. The influences of the catalyst composition, reforming temperature and the molar ratio of steam to carbon fed on the stream reforming process of bio-oil over the Ni/HZSM-5 catalysts were investigated in the reforming reactor. The promoting effects of current passing through the catalyst on the bio-oil reforming were also studied using the electrochemical catalytic reforming approach. By comparing Ni/HZSM-5 with commonly used Ni/Al2O3 catalysts, the Ni20/ZSM catalyst with Ni-loading content of about 20% on the HZSM-5 support showed the highest catalytic activity. Even at 450 °C, the hydrogen yield of about 90% with a near complete conversion of bio-oil was obtained using the Ni20/ZSM catalyst. It was found that the performance of the bio-oil reforming was remarkably enhanced by the HZSM-5 supporter and the current through the catalyst. The features of the Ni/HZSM-5 catalysts were also investigated via X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma and atomic emission spectroscopy, hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller methods.

  6. An attempt to minimize the temperature gradient along a plug-flow methane/steam reforming reactor by adopting locally controlled heating zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozdzierz, M.; Brus, G.; Sciazko, A.; Komatsu, Y.; Kimijima, S.; Szmyd, J. S.

    2014-08-01

    Plug flow reactors are very common in the chemical process industry, including methane/steam reforming applications. Their operation presents many challenges, such as a strong dependence of temperature and composition distribution on the inlet conditions. The strongly endothermic methane/steam reforming reaction might result in a temperature drop at the inlet of the reactor and consequently the occurrence of large temperature gradients. The strongly non-uniform temperature distribution due to endothermic chemical reaction can have tremendous consequences on the operation of the reactor, such as catalyst degradation, undesired side reactions and thermal stresses. To avoid such unfavorable conditions, thermal management of the reactor becomes an important issue. To carry out thermal management properly, detailed modeling and corresponding numerical analyses of the phenomena occurring inside the reforming system is required. This paper presents experimental and numerical studies on the methane/steam reforming process inside a plug-flow reactor. To optimize the reforming reactors, detailed data about the entire reforming process is required. In this study the kinetics of methane/steam reforming on the Ni/YSZ catalyst was experimentally investigated. Measurements including different thermal boundary conditions, the fuel flow rate and the steam- to-methane ratios were performed. The reforming rate equation derived from experimental data was used in the numerical model to predict gas composition and temperature distribution along the steam-reforming reactor. Finally, an attempt was made to control the temperature distribution by adopting locally controlled heating zones.

  7. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Pierce, E. M.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Crawford, C. L.; Daniel, W. E.; Fox, K. M.; Herman, C. C.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.; Brown, C. F.; Qafoku, N. P.; Neeway, J. J.; Valenta, M. M.; Gill, G. A.; Swanberg, D. J.; Robbins, R. A.; Thompson, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  8. A Ni@ZrO2 nanocomposite for ethanol steam reforming: enhanced stability via strong metal-oxide interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuirong; Zhang, Chengxi; Huang, Zhiqi; Wu, Gaowei; Gong, Jinlong

    2013-05-14

    This communication describes the synthesis of a nanocomposite Ni@ZrO2 catalyst with enhanced metal-support interaction by introducing metal nanoparticles into the framework of the oxide support. The catalyst shows high catalytic activity and stability for hydrogen production via steam reforming of ethanol. PMID:23124111

  9. Superior reactivity of skeletal Ni-based catalysts for low-temperature steam reforming to produce CO-free hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengxi; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shuirong; Wu, Gaowei; Ma, Xinbin; Gong, Jinlong

    2012-03-14

    This paper describes the utilization of skeletal Ni-based catalysts for steam reforming of ethanol to produce CO-free hydrogen, which could be superior in the application of fuel cells. Assistant metals play different roles in the reaction; Pt and Cu suppress the methanation and enhance H(2) production, while Co promotes the methanation. PMID:22297434

  10. Hydrogen from methanol for fuel cells in mobile systems: development of a compact reformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhlein, B.; Boe, M.; Bøgild-Hansen, J.; Bröckerhoff, P.; Colsman, G.; Emonts, B.; Menzer, R.; Riedel, E.

    On-board generation of hydrogen from methanol with a reformer in connection with the use of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is an attractive option for a passenger car drive. Special considerations are required to obtain low weight and volume. Furthermore, the PEMFC of today cannot tolerate more than 10 ppm of carbon monoxide in the fuel. Therefore a gas conditioning step is needed after the methanol reformer. Our main research activities focus on the conceptual design of a drive system for a passenger car with methanol reformer and PEMFC: engineering studies with regard to different aspects of this design including reformer, catalytic burner, gas conditioning, balances of the fuel cycles and basic design of a compact methanol reformer. The work described here was carried out within the framework of a JOULE II project of the European Union (1993-1995). Extensive experimental studies have been carried out at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (KFA) in Germany and at Haldor Topsøe A/S in Denmark.

  11. Stable hydrogen production by methane steam reforming in a two zone fluidized bed reactor: Experimental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Moreno, L.; Soler, J.; Herguido, J.; Menéndez, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Two Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor concept is proposed for hydrogen production via the steam reforming of methane (SRM) including integrated catalyst regeneration. In order to study the effect of the contact mode, the oxidative SRM has been carried out over a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst using a fixed bed reactor (fBR), a conventional fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and the proposed two-zone fluidized bed reactor (TZFBR). The technical feasibility of these reactors has been studied experimentally, investigating their performance (CH4 conversion, CO and H2 selectivity, and H2 global yield) and stability under different operating conditions. Coke generation in the process has been verified by several techniques. A stable performance was obtained in the TZFBR, where coke formation was counteracted with continuous catalyst regeneration. The viability of the TZFBR for carrying out this process with a valuable global yield to hydrogen is demonstrated.

  12. Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

    2012-10-22

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

  13. Steam reforming of glycerol for hydrogen production over supported nickel catalysts on alumina.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ga Young; Kim, Young Chul; Moon, Dong Ju; Seo, Gon; Park, Nam Cook

    2013-01-01

    The experiment was carried out to produce hydrogen through steam reforming of glycerol over nano-sized Ni catalysts supported on alumina (Al2O3). The catalysts were characterized by BET surface area, metal dispersion, XRD, TPR, NH3-TPD and SEM. 15 wt% Ni/Al2O3 catalysts presented carbon nano fiber after the catalyst was used. However, when the Ni loading was higher than that of 15 wt%, the catalytic activity reduced, and the increase of the Ni particle size and the formation of graphitic carbon occurred. The Ni/SiO2(70)-Al2O3 with the high surface area and the small Ni particle size promoted the catalytic activity and could easily reduce from NiO to Ni, inhibiting the formation of NiAl2O4. PMID:23646792

  14. MTCI/ThermoChem steam reforming process for solid fuels for combined cycle power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, M.N.; Voelker, G.; Dural-Swamy, K.

    1995-12-31

    Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc. (MTCI) has developed a novel technology to convert solid fuels including biomass, coal, municipal solid waste (MSW) and wastewater sludges into usable syngas by steam reforming in an indirectly heated, fluid-bed reactor. MTCI has licensed and patented the technology to ThermoChem, Inc. Both MTCI and ThermoChem have built two modular commercial-scale demonstration units: one for recycle paper mill rejects (similar to refuse-derived fuel [RDF]), and another for chemical recovery of black liquor. ThermoChem has entered into an agreement with Ajinkyatara Cooperative Sugar Factory, India, for building a 10 MW combined cycle power generation facility based on bagasse and agro-residue gasification.

  15. Cu-Al spinel oxide as an efficient catalyst for methanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongjuan; Hou, Xiaoning; Liu, Yajie; Qing, Shaojun; Gao, Zhixian

    2014-10-27

    Cu-Al spinel oxide, which contains a small portion of the CuO phase, has been successfully used in methanol steam reforming (MSR) without prereduction. The omission of prereduction not only avoids the copper sintering prior to the catalytic reaction, but also slows down the copper-sintering rate in MSR. During this process, the CuO phase can initiate MSR at a lower temperature, and CuAl2O4 releases active copper gradually. The catalyst CA2.5-900, calcined at 900 °C with n(Al)/n(Cu) = 2.5, has a higher CuAl2O4 content, higher BET surface area, and smaller CuAl2O4 crystal size. Its activity first increases and then decreases during MSR. Furthermore, both fresh and regenerated CA2.5-900 showed better catalytic performance than the commercial Cu-Zn-Al catalyst. PMID:25213737

  16. Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description

    SciTech Connect

    Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

    2002-08-01

    Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

  17. Steam reforming of glycerol over Pt-MCM-41 synthesized in a one-step process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Yan, Feng-Wen; Guo, Cun-Yue; Yuan, Guo-Qing

    2012-12-01

    Pt-MCM-41 materials were synthesized by a simple method via simultaneous self-assembling and Pt incorporation using cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) as a structure directing agent. Structural characterization of the sample was carried out by N2 sorption, XRD and TEM measurements. The highly ordered structure of MCM-41 was not appreciably affected by the formation of the Pt particles. Unlike related results, the Pt nanoparticles were incorporated into the mesopores and embedded into the pore walls as framework. The Pt-MCM-41 sample was tested as a catalyst in the steam reforming of glycerol in which it exhibited moderate activity, high selectivity to hydrogen, and very low selectivity to light alkanes.

  18. Disposition of Tank 48H Organics by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2003-12-02

    In order to make space in the Savannah River Site Tank farm, the Tank 48H waste must be removed. Therefore, the Tank 48H waste must be processed to reduce or eliminate levels of nitrates, nitrites, and sodium tetraphenyl borate in order to reduce impacts of these species before it is vitrified. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming is being considered as a candidate technology for destroying the nitrates and the NaTPB prior to melting. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was tasked to perform a proof-of-concept steam reforming test to evaluate the technical feasibility for pretreating the Tank 48H waste. The crucible (bench scale) tests conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center were initiated to optimize and augment the parameters subsequently tested at the pilot scale at INEEL. The purposes of the current study, organic destruction and downstream processing of T48H waste slurry were fulfilled. TPB was destroyed in all 19 samples tested with the simulated FB SR process at operational temperatures 650-725 degrees Celsius. A test temperature of 650 degrees Celsius optimized NO3 destruction during the formation of an Na2CO3 FBSR product. A test temperature of 725 degrees Celsius optimized NO3 destruction during formation of a sodium silicate FBSR product. Destruction of nitrate at greater than 99 per cent was achieved with addition of sugar as a reductant at 1X stoichiometry and total organic carbon analyses indicated that excess reductant was not present in the FBSR product. The use of sugar at 1X stoichiometry appears to ensure that excess reductant is not contained in the FBSR product that would alter the REDuction/OXidation equilibrium of the DWPF melter, while simultaneously assuring that NO3 is destroyed adequately. Destruction of antifoam with the simulated FBSR process was also achieved at operating temperatures between 650-725 degrees Celsius. based on measured total organic carbon.

  19. Radioactive Bench-scale Steam Reformer Demonstration of a Monolithic Steam Reformed Mineralized Waste Form for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste - 12306

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Brent; Olson, Arlin; Mason, J. Bradley; Ryan, Kevin; Jantzen, Carol; Crawford, Charles

    2012-07-01

    Hanford currently has 212,000 m{sup 3} (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive mixed waste stored in the Hanford tank farm. This waste will be processed to produce both high-level and low-level activity fractions, both of which are to be vitrified. Supplemental treatment options have been under evaluation for treating portions of the low-activity waste, as well as the liquid secondary waste from the low-activity waste vitrification process. One technology under consideration has been the THOR{sup R} fluidized bed steam reforming process offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (TTT). As a follow-on effort to TTT's 2008 pilot plant FBSR non-radioactive demonstration for treating low-activity waste and waste treatment plant secondary waste, TTT, in conjunction with Savannah River National Laboratory, has completed a bench scale evaluation of this same technology on a chemically adjusted radioactive surrogate of Hanford's waste treatment plant secondary waste stream. This test generated a granular product that was subsequently formed into monoliths, using a geo-polymer as the binding agent, that were subjected to compressibility testing, the Product Consistency Test and other leachability tests, and chemical composition analyses. This testing has demonstrated that the mineralized waste form, produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay using the TTT process, is as durable as low-activity waste glass. Testing has shown the resulting monolith waste form is durable, leach resistant, and chemically stable, and has the added benefit of capturing and retaining the majority of Tc-99, I-129, and other target species at high levels. (authors)

  20. Process for alternately steam reforming sulfur containing hydrocarbons that vary in oxygen content

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieur, R.R.; Setzer, H.J.; Hawkins, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    In the hydrotreating and steam reforming of an oxygen and sulfur bearing hydrocarbon fuel, the oxygen is first removed in an oxidizer containing a bed of platinum catalyst, the inlet temperature being well below 1000/sup 0/F and preferably on the order of 300/sup 0/F. The sulfur in the fuel does not harm the oxidizer catalyst and may be removed downstream by known hydrodesulfurization techniques prior to reforming. A process is described for removing oxygen from an oxygen and sulfur bearing hydrocarbon fuel, such as peak shared natural gas, upstream in the process so that sulfur can be removed later. The fuel and some hydrogen are introduced into an oxidizer at a temperature of 350/sup 0/F or less down to the minimum ignition temperature. The oxidizer consists of a platinum bed catalyst which catalyzes the oxidation of the oxygen to water with accompanying heat release to raise the exit gas temperature to less than 650/sup 0/F. The temperature desorbs the sulfur from the catalyst, and the exit gases are passed downstream to nickel subsulfide or molybdenum desfulfide catalysts where the hydrosulfurization process takes place. (BLM)

  1. Fluidized Bed Steam Reformed (FBSR) Mineral Waste Forms: Characterization and Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Lorier, Troy H.; Pareizs, John M.; Marra, James C.

    2007-07-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a mineralizing technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of wastes that are high in organics, nitrates-nitrites, halides, and/or sulfates. These wastes include the decontaminated High Level Waste (HLW) supernates referred to as low activity waste (LAW) at Department of Energy (DOE) sites in the United States and waste streams that may be generated by the advanced nuclear fuel cycle flowsheets that are being considered by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. The organics are pyrolyzed into CO{sub 2} and steam in the absence of air. The FBSR mineral waste form is a granular but can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals (sodalite, nosean, and nepheline) with cage and ring structures that sequester radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. Iron bearing spinel minerals are also formed and these phases stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Dissolution rates ({eta}) and activation energies of dissolution are parameters needed for Performance Assessments (PA) to be completed on the FBSR mineral waste form. These parameters are defined in this study by Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) testing. The dissolution rate ({eta}) and the activation energies for dissolution calculated in this study agree with the available rate and activation energy data for natural single crystal nepheline. (authors)

  2. Steam reforming of tar model compound using Pd catalyst on alumina tube.

    PubMed

    Nisamaneenate, Jurarat; Atong, Duangduen; Sricharoenchaikul, Viboon

    2012-12-01

    Gasification processing of biomass as a renewable energy source generates tar in the product gas. Tar leads to foul-up of the process equipment by corrosion and deposit formation. Catalytic elimination of tars is a crucial step to improve fuel gas quality from the process. In this study, a palladium catalyst on alumina (Pd/Al2O3) was used in steam reforming of benzene as a biomass gasification tar model compound. The reaction was carried out in a laboratory-scale tube reactor made of stainless steel to study the effect of reaction temperature, catalyst loading, quantity of palladium catalyst tubes, steam to carbon ratio (S/C), and residence time on catalytic performance and stability. Pd/Al2O3 showed high efficiency ofbenzene decomposition and enhanced the formation of fuel gas. Hydrogen and carbon conversions increased with reaction temperature. Although the benzene concentration increased from 2000 to 5000 mg/l, the catalytic performance at 600 degrees C and 800 degrees C was similar. 1.0 wt% Pd/Al2O3 showed excellent catalytic activity with the highest hydrogen and carbon conversions of 83% and 81%, respectively at 800 degrees C. This result is attributed to the smooth surface of the palladium, as noted from scanning electron microscopy imaging. An S/C of 2 provided the highest conversion. The addition of catalyst from four and seven tubes did not result in any great difference in terms of benzene cracking efficiency. The fourth cyclic usage of 1.0 wt% Pd/Al2O3 exhibited a higher conversion than that of 0.5 wt%. PMID:23437646

  3. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

    2006-12-06

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

  4. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

    2007-03-31

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

  5. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming of Hanford LAW Using THORsm Mineralizing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Arlin L.; Nicholas R Soelberg; Douglas W. Marshall; Gary L. Anderson

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented, in 2002, a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified steam reforming technology as a candidate for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was completed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel. The pilot scale facility was equipped with a highly efficient cyclone separator and heated sintered metal filters for particulate removal, a thermal oxidizer for reduced gas species and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for residual volatile species capture. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, but located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Pilot scale testing was performed August 2–5, 2004. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Science Application International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, personnel performed actual pilot scale operation. The pilot scale test achieved a total of 68.7 hrs of cumulative/continuous processing operation before termination in response to a bed de-fluidization condition. 178 kg of LAW surrogate were processed that resulted in 148 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 17%. The process

  6. Steam Reforming Solidification of Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Processing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Julia L. Tripp; T. G. Garn; R. D. Boardman; J. D. Law

    2006-02-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is conducting research on aqueous separations processes for the nuclear fuel cycle. This research includes development of solvent extraction processes for the separation of cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel solutions to reduce the short-term decay heat load. The cesium/strontium strip solution from candidate separation processes will require treatment and solidification for managed storage. Steam reforming is currently being investigated for stabilization of these streams because it can potentially destroy the nitrates and organics present in these aqueous, nitrate-bearing solutions, while converting the cesium and strontium into leach-resistant aluminosilicate minerals, such as pollucite. These ongoing experimental studies are being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of steam reforming for this application.

  7. Stable hydrogen production from ethanol through steam reforming reaction over nickel-containing smectite-derived catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Ryohei; Arai, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production through steam reforming of ethanol was investigated with conventional supported nickel catalysts and a Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst. The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition. Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite. The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2. PMID:25547495

  8. Stable Hydrogen Production from Ethanol through Steam Reforming Reaction over Nickel-Containing Smectite-Derived Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Ryohei; Arai, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen production through steam reforming of ethanol was investigated with conventional supported nickel catalysts and a Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst. The former is initially active, but significant catalyst deactivation occurs during the reaction due to carbon deposition. Side reactions of the decomposition of CO and CH4 are the main reason for the catalyst deactivation, and these reactions can relatively be suppressed by the use of the Ni-containing smectite. The Ni-containing smectite-derived catalyst contains, after H2 reduction, stable and active Ni nanocrystallites, and as a result, it shows a stable and high catalytic performance for the steam reforming of ethanol, producing H2. PMID:25547495

  9. Hydrogen Permeability of Palladium Membrane for Steam-Reforming of Bio-Ethanol Using the Membrane Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinouchi, Kouji; Katoh, Masahiro; Horikawa, Toshihide; Yoshikawa, Takushi; Wada, Mamoru

    A Palladium membrane was prepared by electro-less plating method on porous stainless steel. The catalytic hydrogen production by steam-reforming of biomass-derived ethanol (bio-ethanol) using a Pd membrane was analyzed by comparing it with those for the reaction using reagent ethanol (the reference sample). And the hydrogen permeability of the palladium membrane was investigated using the same palladium membrane (H2/He selectivity = 249, at ΔP = 0.10 MPa, 873 K). As a result, for bio-ethanol, deposited carbon had a negative influence on the hydrogen-permeability of the palladium membrane and hydrogen purity. The sulfur content in the bio-ethanol may have promoted carbon deposition. By using a palladium membrane, it was confirmed that H2 yield (%) was increased. It can be attributed that methane was converted from ethanol and produced more hydrogen by steam reforming, due to the in situ removal of hydrogen from the reaction location.

  10. Nickel-carbon nanocomposites prepared using castor oil as precursor: A novel catalyst for ethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, Neftalí L. V.; Garcia, Irene T. S.; Raubach, Cristiane W.; Krolow, Mateus; Santos, Cláudia C. G.; Probst, Luiz F. D.; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    A novel and simple method to prepare nickel-based catalysts for ethanol steam reforming is proposed. The present method was developed using castor oil as a precursor. The results clarify that the nickel-carbon (Ni/C) catalyst has a high activity for ethanol steam reforming. It was observed that the catalytic behavior could be modified according to the experimental conditions employed. Moreover, it is interesting to note that the increase in the catalytic activity of the Ni/C nanocomposite over time, at 500 and 600 °C of reaction temperature, may be associated with the formation of filamentous carbon. The preliminary results indicate that the novel methodology used, led to the obtainment of materials with important properties that can be extended to applications in different catalytic process.

  11. Stabilization of Savannah River National Laboartory (SRNL) Aqueous Waste by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C

    2004-11-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in Aiken, South Carolina. Research and development programs have been conducted at SRNL for {approx}50 years generating non-radioactive (hazardous and non-hazardous) and radioactive aqueous wastes. Typically the aqueous effluents from the R&D activities are disposed of from each laboratory module via the High Activity Drains (HAD) or the Low Activity Drains (LAD) depending on whether they are radioactive or not. The aqueous effluents are collected in holding tanks, analyzed and shipped to either H-Area (HAD waste) or the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) (LAD waste) for volume reduction. Because collection, analysis, and transport of LAD and HAD waste is cumbersome and since future treatment of this waste may be curtailed as the F/H-Area evaporators and waste tanks are decommissioned, SRNL laboratory operations requested several proof of principle demonstrations of alternate technologies that would define an alternative disposal path for the aqueous wastes. Proof of principle for the disposal of SRNL HAD waste using a technology known as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is the focus of the current study. The FBSR technology can be performed either as a batch process, e.g. in each laboratory module in small furnaces with an 8'' by 8'' footprint, or in a semi-continuous Bench Scale Reformer (BSR). The proof of principle experiments described in this study cover the use of the FBSR technology at any scale (pilot or full scale). The proof of principle experiments described in this study used a non-radioactive HAD simulant.

  12. Hydrogen production from steam reforming of acetic acid over Cu-Zn supported calcium aluminate.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pravakar; Patel, Madhumita; Pant, Kamal K

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by catalytic steam reforming (CSR) of biomass-derived oil. Typically bio oil contains 12-14% acetic acid; therefore, this acid was chosen as model compound for reforming of biooil with the help of a Cu-Zn/Ca-Al catalyst for high yield of H(2) with low CH(4) and CO content. Calcium aluminate support was prepared by solid-solid reaction at 1350°C. X-ray diffraction indicates 12CaO·7Al(2)O(3) as major, CaA(l4)O(7) and Ca(5)A(l6)O(14) as minor phases. Cu and Zn were loaded onto the support by wet-impregnation at 10 and 1wt.%, respectively. The catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy TEM and the surface area for both support and Cu-Zn were 10.5 and 5.8m(2)/g, respectively. CSR was carried out in a tubular fixed bed reactor (I.D.=19mm) at temperatures between 600 and 800°C with 3-g loadings and (H(2)O/acetic acid) wt. ratio of 9:1. Significantly high (80%) yield of hydrogen was obtained over Cu-Zn/Ca-Al catalyst, as incorporation of Zn enhanced the H(2) yield by reducing deactivation of the catalyst. The coke formation on the support (Ca-12/Al-7) surface was negligible due to the presence of excess oxygen in the 12CaO·7Al(2)O(3) phase. PMID:22944490

  13. A highly active and coke-resistant steam reforming catalyst comprising uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Koike, Mitsuru; Li, Dalin; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2012-12-01

    Doing fine with Ni-Fe: The calcination and reduction of a hydrotalcite precursor containing Ni and Fe ions gives uniform Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles mixed with Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O particles. The uniformity of the Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles is connected to the catalyst's high activity and resistance to coke formation in toluene and phenol steam reforming reactions. PMID:23135797

  14. Model biogas steam reforming in a thin Pd-supported membrane reactor to generate clean hydrogen for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iulianelli, A.; Liguori, S.; Huang, Y.; Basile, A.

    2015-01-01

    Steam reforming of a model biogas mixture is studied for generating clean hydrogen by using an inorganic membrane reactor, in which a composite Pd/Al2O3 membrane separates part of the produced hydrogen through its selective permeation. The characteristics of H2 perm-selectivity of the fresh membrane is expressed in terms of H2/N2 ideal selectivity, in this case equal to 4300. Concerning biogas steam reforming reaction, at 380 °C, 2.0 bar H2O:CH4 = 3:1, GHSV = 9000 h-1 the permeate purity of the recovered hydrogen is around 96%, although the conversion (15%) and hydrogen recovery (>20%) are relatively low; on the contrary, at 450 °C, 3.5 bar H2O:CH4 = 4:1, GHSV = 11000 h-1 the conversion is increased up to more than 30% and the recovery of hydrogen to about 70%. This novel work constitutes a reference study for new developments on biogas steam reforming reaction in membrane reactors.

  15. Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory for Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect

    Landman, W.; Roesener, S.; Mason, B.; Wolf, K.; Amaria, N.

    2007-07-01

    The patented THOR{sup R} steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) as the technology of choice for treatment of about one million gallons of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid and alkali and aluminum nitrates with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium. The steam reforming process will convert the SBW into dry, solid, carbonate and aluminate minerals supporting a preferred path for disposal as remote handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) will design, build, and operate an Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that will comprise an integrated THOR{sup R} process system that will utilize dual fluidized bed steam reformers (FBSR) for treatment of the SBW. Design of the IWTU is nearing completion. The IWTU will be constructed at INTEC, immediately east of the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF), with planned fabrication and construction to start in early 2007 upon receipt of needed permits and completion of design and engineering. This paper provides a project and process overview of the IWTU and discusses the design and construction status. IWTU equipment and facility designs and bases will be presented. (authors)

  16. Promotion effect of cobalt-based catalyst with rare earth for the ethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, Josh Y. Z.; Chen, Ya-Ping; Yu, Shen-Wei; Wang, Chen-Bin

    2013-12-16

    Catalytic performance of ethanol steam reforming (ESR) was investigated on praseodymium (Pr) modified ceria-supported cobalt oxide catalyst. The ceria-supported cobalt oxide (Ce-Co) catalyst was prepared by co-precipitation-oxidation (CPO) method, and the doped Pr (5 and 10 wt% loading) catalysts (Pr{sub 5}−Ce−Co and Pr{sub 10}−Ce−Co) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method. The reduction pretreatment under 250 and 400 °C (H250 and H400) was also studied. All samples were characterized by XRD, TPR and TEM. Catalytic performance of ESR was tested from 250 to 500 °C in a fixed-bed reactor. The doping of Pr into the ceria lattice has significantly promoted the activity and reduced the coke formation. The products distribution also can be influenced by the different reduction pretreatment. The Pr{sub 10}−Ce−Co−H400 sample is a preferential ESR catalyst, where the hydrogen distribution approaches 73% at 475 °C with less amounts (< 2%) of CO and CH{sub 4}.

  17. Highly loaded Ni-based catalysts for low temperature ethanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Ma, Hongyan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Di; Tian, Hao; Xiao, Shengning; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-05-21

    This paper describes the design of high-loading Ni/Al2O3 catalysts (78 wt% Ni) for low temperature ethanol steam reforming. The catalysts were synthesized via both co-precipitation (COP) and impregnation (IMP) methods. All the catalysts were measured by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, H2-TPR, and H2 pulse chemisorption. The characterization results demonstrated that the preparation method and the loading significantly affected the nickel particle size, active nickel surface area and catalytic performance. Over COP catalysts, large nickel particles were presented in nickel aluminum mixed oxides. In comparison, IMP catalysts gained more "free" NiO particles with weak interaction with the aluminum oxide. Consequently, COP catalysts yielded smaller nickel particles and larger active nickel surface areas than those of IMP catalysts. High loading is beneficial for obtaining sufficient active nickel sites when nickel particles are dispersed via COP, whereas excessive nickel content is not desired for catalysts prepared by IMP. Specifically, the 78 wt% nickel loaded catalyst synthesized by COP possessed small nickel particles (∼6.0 nm) and an abundant active nickel area (35.1 m(2) gcat(-1)). Consequently, COP-78 achieved superior stability with 92% ethanol conversion and ∼35% H2 selectivity at 673 K for 30 h despite the presence of a considerable amount of coke. PMID:27122228

  18. Mechanistic Insights into Catalytic Ethanol Steam Reforming Using Isotope-Labeled Reactants.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Stephen; Castaldi, Marco J

    2016-08-26

    The low-temperature ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction mechanism over a supported Rh/Pt catalyst has been investigated using isotope-labeled EtOH and H2 O. Through strategic isotope labeling, all nonhydrogen atoms were distinct from one another, and allowed an unprecedented level of understanding of the dominant reaction pathways. All combinations of isotope- and non-isotope-labeled atoms were detected in the products, thus there are multiple pathways involved in H2 , CO, CO2 , CH4 , C2 H4 , and C2 H6 product formation. Both the recombination of C species on the surface of the catalyst and preservation of the C-C bond within ethanol are responsible for C2 product formation. Ethylene is not detected until conversion drops below 100 % at t=1.25 h. Also, quantitatively, 57 % of the observed ethylene is formed directly through ethanol dehydration. Finally there is clear evidence to show that oxygen in the SiO2 -ZrO2 support constitutes 10 % of the CO formed during the reaction. PMID:27487203

  19. Carbon Deposition Onto Ni-Based Catalysts for Combined Steam/CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Park, Yoon Hwa; Moon, Dong Ju; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-02-01

    The present study was performed to suppress carbon deposition by Ce and Fe onto Ni-based catalysts in combined steam/CO2 reforming of methane (CSCRM), which is a process for producing synthesis gas (H2:CO = 2:1) for gas-to-liquids (GTL). The catalytic reaction was evaluated at 900 degrees C and 20 bar with a reactant feed ratio CH4:CO2:H20:Ar = 1:0.8:1.3:1 and gas hourly space velocity GHSV = 25,000 h(-1). The Ce and Fe modified Ni/gamma-A120, catalyst was characterized by BET surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), H2 chemisorption, CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and SEM. Ce- and Fe-modified Ni/Al2O3 catalysts exhibited remarkable activity and stability during the CSCRM over the course of 50 hours. It suggested that the Ni(12)-Ce(5)-Fe(5)/Al2O3 catalyst shows highly dispersed Ni particles with strong metal-to-support interaction (SMSI) as well as excellent catalytic activity. PMID:27433622

  20. Methanol steam reforming promoted by molten salt-modified platinum on alumina catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kusche, Matthias; Agel, Friederike; Ní Bhriain, Nollaig; Kaftan, Andre; Laurin, Mathias; Libuda, Jörg; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-09-01

    We herein describe a straight forward procedure to increase the performance of platinum-on-alumina catalysts in methanol steam reforming by applying an alkali hydroxide coating according to the "solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer" (SCILL) approach. We demonstrate by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies that potassium doping plays an important role in the catalyst activation. Moreover, the hygroscopic nature and the basicity of the salt modification contribute to the considerable enhancement in catalytic performance. During reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxides/carbonates forms on the catalyst/alumina surface, thus significantly enhancing the availability of water at the catalytically active sites. Too high catalyst pore fillings with salt introduce a considerable mass transfer barrier into the system as indicated by kinetic studies. Thus, the optimum interplay between beneficial catalyst modification and detrimental mass transfer effects had to be identified and was found on the applied platinum-on-alumina catalyst at KOH loadings around 7.5 mass%. PMID:25124120

  1. Steam reforming of methanol over copper loaded anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) prepared through electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga Reddy, E.; Karuppiah, J.; Lee, Hyun Chan; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to produce hydrogen for fuel cells, porous γ-alumina support is developed on Al substrate using anodic oxidation process and copper catalyst particles are deposited homogeneously over anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) surface by electrodeposition method. We investigated the effect of electrodeposition time and hot water treatment (HWT) on the activity of catalysts for SRM reaction in the temperature range between 160 and 360 °C. The experimental results indicate that the SRM activity, CO2 and dimethyl ether (DME) selectivity's over Cu catalysts increased as the electrodeposition time increased from 30 to 120 s, further increment in deposition time of Cu have no significant effect on it. The rates of SRM conversion are found to be higher for the catalysts made from the supports obtained after HWT, which may be due to the enhancement in the surface area of AAO support. It is found that the SRM activity and CO2 selectivity strongly depended upon the free exposed copper sites available for methanol adsorption and reaction, and DME in products is mainly observed in the reaction temperature range between 300 and 350 °C and it is higher for the catalysts with low Cu content.

  2. Methanol Steam Reforming Promoted by Molten Salt-Modified Platinum on Alumina Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Kusche, Matthias; Agel, Friederike; Ní Bhriain, Nollaig; Kaftan, Andre; Laurin, Mathias; Libuda, Jörg; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We herein describe a straight forward procedure to increase the performance of platinum-on-alumina catalysts in methanol steam reforming by applying an alkali hydroxide coating according to the “solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer” (SCILL) approach. We demonstrate by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies that potassium doping plays an important role in the catalyst activation. Moreover, the hygroscopic nature and the basicity of the salt modification contribute to the considerable enhancement in catalytic performance. During reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxides/carbonates forms on the catalyst/alumina surface, thus significantly enhancing the availability of water at the catalytically active sites. Too high catalyst pore fillings with salt introduce a considerable mass transfer barrier into the system as indicated by kinetic studies. Thus, the optimum interplay between beneficial catalyst modification and detrimental mass transfer effects had to be identified and was found on the applied platinum-on-alumina catalyst at KOH loadings around 7.5 mass %. PMID:25124120

  3. Characterization and Leaching Tests of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Form for LAW Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-10-01

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) have been evaluated. One such immobilization technology is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was involved in an extensive characterization campaign. This goal of this campaign was study the durability of the FBSR mineral product and the mineral product encapsulated in a monolith to meet compressive strength requirements. This paper gives an overview of results obtained using the ASTM C 1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT), the EPA Test Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the ASTMC 1662 Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) test. Along with these durability tests an overview of the characteristics of the waste form has been collected using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), microwave digestions for chemical composition, and surface area from Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) theory.

  4. Radionuclide and contaminant immobilization in the fluidized bed steam reforming waste products

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brown, Christopher F.; Jantzen, Carol; Pierce, Eric M.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process and resulting waste form. The first section of the chapter gives an overview of the potential need for FBSR processing in nuclear waste remediation followed by an overview of the engineering involved in the process itself. This is followed by a description of waste form production at a chemical level followed by a section describing different process streams that have undergone the FBSR process. The third section describes the resulting mineral product in terms of phases that are present and the ability of the waste form to encapsulate hazardous and radioactive wastes from several sources. Following this description is a presentation of the physical properties of the granular and monolith waste form product including and contaminant release mechanisms. The last section gives a brief summary of this chapter and includes a section on the strengths associated with this waste form and the needs for additional data and remaining questions yet to be answered. The reader is directed elsewhere for more information on other waste forms such as Cast Stone (Lockrem, 2005), Ceramicrete (Singh et al., 1997, Wagh et al., 1999) and geopolymers (Kyritsis et al., 2009; Russell et al., 2006).

  5. Promotion effect of cobalt-based catalyst with rare earth for the ethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Josh Y. Z.; Chen, Ya-Ping; Yu, Shen-Wei; Wang, Chen-Bin

    2013-12-01

    Catalytic performance of ethanol steam reforming (ESR) was investigated on praseodymium (Pr) modified ceria-supported cobalt oxide catalyst. The ceria-supported cobalt oxide (Ce-Co) catalyst was prepared by co-precipitation-oxidation (CPO) method, and the doped Pr (5 and 10 wt% loading) catalysts (Pr5-Ce-Co and Pr10-Ce-Co) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method. The reduction pretreatment under 250 and 400 °C (H250 and H400) was also studied. All samples were characterized by XRD, TPR and TEM. Catalytic performance of ESR was tested from 250 to 500 °C in a fixed-bed reactor. The doping of Pr into the ceria lattice has significantly promoted the activity and reduced the coke formation. The products distribution also can be influenced by the different reduction pretreatment. The Pr10-Ce-Co-H400 sample is a preferential ESR catalyst, where the hydrogen distribution approaches 73% at 475 °C with less amounts (< 2%) of CO and CH4.

  6. Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.; Wood, R.A.; Barnes, C.M.

    2002-08-15

    A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: (1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; (2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and (3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

  7. Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Wood, Richard Arthur; Barnes, Charles Marshall

    2002-08-01

    A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: 1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; 2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and 3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

  8. Ethanol Steam Reforming on Co/CeO2: The Effect of ZnO Promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Stephen; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2013-12-02

    A series of ZnO promoted Co/CeO2 catalysts were synthesized and characterized using XRD, TEM, H2-TPR, CO chemisorption, O2-TPO, IR-Py, and CO2-TPD. The effects of ZnO on the catalytic performances of Co/CeO2 were studied in ethanol steam reforming. It was found that the addition of ZnO facilitated the oxidation of Co0 via enhanced oxygen mobility of the CeO2 support which decreased the activity of Co/CeO2 in C–C bond cleavage of ethanol. 3 wt% ZnO promoted Co/CeO2 exhibited minimum CO and CH4 selectivity and maximum CO2 selectivity. This resulted from the combined effects of the following factors with increasing ZnO loading: (1) enhanced oxygen mobility of CeO2 facilitated the oxidation of CHx and CO to form CO2; (2) increased ZnO coverage on CeO2 surface reduced the interaction between CHx/CO and Co/CeO2; and (3) suppressed CO adsorption on Co0 reduced CO oxidation rate to form CO2. In addition, the addition of ZnO also modified the surface acidity and basicity of CeO2, which consequently affected the C2–C4 product distributions.

  9. Highly loaded Ni-based catalysts for low temperature ethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tuo; Ma, Hongyan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Di; Tian, Hao; Xiao, Shengning; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the design of high-loading Ni/Al2O3 catalysts (78 wt% Ni) for low temperature ethanol steam reforming. The catalysts were synthesized via both co-precipitation (COP) and impregnation (IMP) methods. All the catalysts were measured by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, H2-TPR, and H2 pulse chemisorption. The characterization results demonstrated that the preparation method and the loading significantly affected the nickel particle size, active nickel surface area and catalytic performance. Over COP catalysts, large nickel particles were presented in nickel aluminum mixed oxides. In comparison, IMP catalysts gained more ``free'' NiO particles with weak interaction with the aluminum oxide. Consequently, COP catalysts yielded smaller nickel particles and larger active nickel surface areas than those of IMP catalysts. High loading is beneficial for obtaining sufficient active nickel sites when nickel particles are dispersed via COP, whereas excessive nickel content is not desired for catalysts prepared by IMP. Specifically, the 78 wt% nickel loaded catalyst synthesized by COP possessed small nickel particles (~6.0 nm) and an abundant active nickel area (35.1 m2 gcat-1). Consequently, COP-78 achieved superior stability with 92% ethanol conversion and ~35% H2 selectivity at 673 K for 30 h despite the presence of a considerable amount of coke.

  10. Performance of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Rod, Kenton A.; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Christopher F.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2014-05-01

    Currently, several candidates for secondary waste immobilization at the Hanford site in the State of Washington, USA are being considered. To demonstrate the durability of the product in the unsaturated Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the site, a series of tests have been performed one of the candidate materials using the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) system. The material that was tested was the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) granular product and the granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix. The FBSR product is composed primarily of an insoluble sodium aluminosilicate matrix with the dominant phases being feldspathoid minerals mostly nepheline, sodalite, and nosean. The PUF test method allows for the accelerated weathering of materials, including radioactive waste forms, under hydraulically unsaturated conditions, thus mimicking the open-flow and transport properties that most likely will be present at the IDF. The experiments show a trend of decreasing tracer release as a function of time for several of the elements released from the material including Na, Si, Al, and Cs. However, some of the elements, notably I and Re, show a steady release throughout the yearlong test. This result suggests that the release of these minerals from the sodalite cage occurs at a different rate compared with the dissolution of the predominant nepheline phase.

  11. Inhibition of carbon formation during steam reforming of methane using thiol-coated nickel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudghiri-Hassani, H.; Rakass, S.; Abatzoglou, N.; Rowntree, P.

    n-Butanethiol-impregnated, micrometric, pristine Ni powder (Ni-C 4S) was tested as a catalyst for use in the steam reforming of methane, using X-Ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and mass spectrometry (MS). The catalytic activities of both the pristine Ni and the Ni-C 4S powders were measured at 700 °C, under conditions that favoured (molar CH 4:H 2O ratio of 2:1), and did not favour (molar CH 4:H 2O ratio of 1:2) formation of surface carbon. The results show that: (a) Ni-C 4S demonstrates both high catalytic activity and stability during the 21 h duration test; (b) under conditions favouring the deposition of surface carbon, the Ni-C 4S retained both its efficiency and structural integrity, while the catalytic activity of the Ni was reduced by ∼70% and the catalyst pellets lost their integrity; (c) the amount of deposited carbon in the case of the Ni-C 4S catalyst was significantly lower than that observed for the Ni catalyst, in spite of the longer testing duration. It was concluded that the thiols pre-treatment of Ni surfaces, to be subsequently used in the production of catalysts supported SOFC anodes, can considerably increase their "active life span" this being a critical attribute in respect of their eventual commercialization.

  12. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the steam reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Andrew R.; Silverwood, Ian P.; Norris, Elizabeth L.; Ormerod, R. Mark; Frost, Christopher D.; Parker, Stewart F.; Lennon, David

    2013-12-01

    An alumina-supported nickel catalyst, previously used in methane reforming experiments employing CO2 as the oxidant, is applied here in the steam reforming variant of the process. Micro-reactor experiments are used to discern an operational window compatible with sample cells designed for inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments. INS spectra are recorded after 6 h reaction of a 1:1 mixture of CH4 and H2O at 898 K. Weak INS spectra are observed, indicating minimal hydrogen retention by the catalyst in this operational regime. Post-reaction, the catalyst is further characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. In a comparable fashion to that seen for the ‘dry’ reforming experiments, the catalyst retains substantial quantities of carbon in the form of filamentous coke. The role for hydrogen incorporation by the catalyst is briefly considered.

  13. Characterization of ZrO 2-promoted Cu/ZnO/nano-Al 2O 3 methanol steam reforming catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Samuel D.; Neal, Luke M.; Everett, Michael L.; Hoflund, Gar B.; Hagelin-Weaver, Helena E.

    2010-10-01

    Three Cu/ZnO/ZrO 2/Al 2O 3 methanol reforming catalysts were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalysts which contained ZrO 2 from a monoclinic nanoparticle ZrO 2 precursor exhibit both a higher activity toward the methanol steam reforming reaction and a lower CO production rate compared to catalysts composed of an XRD-amorphous ZrO 2 produced by impregnation using a Zr(NO 3) 2 precursor. The presence of a monoclinic phase appears to result in an increased charge transfer between the Zr and Cu species, as evidenced by a relatively electron-rich ZrO 2 phase and a partially oxidized Cu species on reduced catalysts. This electron deficient Cu species is more reactive toward the methanol reforming reaction and partially suppresses CO formation through the reverse water gas shift or methanol decomposition reactions.

  14. Bi-reforming of methane from any source with steam and carbon dioxide exclusively to metgas (CO-2H2) for methanol and hydrocarbon synthesis.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Prakash, G K Surya

    2013-01-16

    A catalyst based on nickel oxide on magnesium oxide (NiO/MgO) thermally activated under hydrogen is effective for the bi-reforming with steam and CO(2) (combined steam and dry reforming) of methane as well as natural gas in a tubular flow reactor at elevated pressures (5-30 atm) and temperatures (800-950 °C). By adjusting the CO(2)-to-steam ratio in the gas feed, the H(2)/CO ratio in the produced syn-gas could be easily adjusted in a single step to the desired value of 2 for methanol and hydrocarbon synthesis. PMID:23256664

  15. Performance and economic assessments of a solid oxide fuel cell system with a two-step ethanol-steam-reforming process using CaO sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippawan, Phanicha; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2016-02-01

    The hydrogen production process is known to be important to a fuel cell system. In this study, a carbon-free hydrogen production process is proposed by using a two-step ethanol-steam-reforming procedure, which consists of ethanol dehydrogenation and steam reforming, as a fuel processor in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. An addition of CaO in the reformer for CO2 capture is also considered to enhance the hydrogen production. The performance of the SOFC system is analyzed under thermally self-sufficient conditions in terms of the technical and economic aspects. The simulation results show that the two-step reforming process can be run in the operating window without carbon formation. The addition of CaO in the steam reformer, which runs at a steam-to-ethanol ratio of 5, temperature of 900 K and atmospheric pressure, minimizes the presence of CO2; 93% CO2 is removed from the steam-reforming environment. This factor causes an increase in the SOFC power density of 6.62%. Although the economic analysis shows that the proposed fuel processor provides a higher capital cost, it offers a reducing active area of the SOFC stack and the most favorable process economics in term of net cost saving.

  16. Accelerated Weathering of Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation Material Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.

    2007-09-16

    To predict the long-term fate of low- and high-level waste forms in the subsurface over geologic time scales, it is important to understand the behavior of the corroding waste forms under conditions the mimic to the open flow and transport properties of a subsurface repository. Fluidized bed steam reformation (FBSR), a supplemental treatment technology option, is being considered as a waste form for the immobilization of low-activity tank waste. To obtain the fundamental information needed to evaluate the behavior of the FBSR waste form under repository relevant conditions and to monitor the long-term behavior of this material, an accelerated weathering experiment is being conducted with the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus. Unlike other accelerated weathering test methods (product consistency test, vapor hydration test, and drip test), PUF experiments are conducted under hydraulically unsaturated conditions. These experiments are unique because they mimic the vadose zone environment and allow the corroding waste form to achieve its final reaction state. Results from this on-going experiment suggest the volumetric water content varied as a function of time and reached steady state after 160 days of testing. Unlike the volumetric water content, periodic excursions in the solution pH and electrical conductivity have been occurring consistently during the test. Release of elements from the column illustrates a general trend of decreasing concentration with increasing reaction time. Normalized concentrations of K, Na, P, Re (a chemical analogue for 99Tc), and S are as much as 1 × 104 times greater than Al, Cr, Si, and Ti. After more than 600 days of testing, the solution chemistry data collected to-date illustrate the importance of understanding the long-term behavior of the FBSR product under conditions that mimic the open flow and transport properties of a subsurface repository.

  17. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND NITRATE SALT SUPERNATE

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Michael02 Smith, M

    2007-03-30

    About two decades ago a process was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remove Cs137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates so the supernates could be land disposed as low activity waste (LAW). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was used to precipitate Cs{sup 137} as CsTPB. The flowsheet called for destruction of the organic TPB by acid hydrolysis so that the Cs{sup 137} enriched residue could be mixed with other HLW sludge, vitrified, and disposed of in a federal geologic repository. The precipitation process was demonstrated full scale with actual HLW waste and a 2.5 wt% Cs137 rich precipitate containing organic TPB was produced admixed with 240,000 gallons of salt supernate. Organic destruction by acid hydrolysis proved to be problematic and other disposal technologies were investigated. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR), which destroys organics by pyrolysis, is the current baseline technology for destroying the TPB and the waste nitrates prior to vitrification. Bench scale tests were designed and conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to reproduce the pyrolysis reactions. The formation of alkali carbonate phases that are compatible with DWPF waste pre-processing and vitrification were demonstrated in the bench scale tests. Test parameters were optimized for a pilot scale FBSR demonstration that was performed at the SAIC Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003. An engineering scale demonstration was completed by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRNL in 2006 at the Hazen Research, Inc. test facility in Golden, CO. The same mineral carbonate phases, the same organic destruction (>99.99%) and the same nitrate/nitrite destruction (>99.99%) were produced at the bench scale, pilot scale, and engineering scale although different sources of carbon were used during testing.

  18. Pyrolysis/Steam Reforming Technology for Treatment of TRU Orphan Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J. B.; McKibbin, J.; Schmoker, D.; Bacala, P.

    2003-02-27

    Certain transuranic (TRU) waste streams within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex cannot be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) because they do not meet the shipping requirements of the TRUPACT-II or the disposal requirements of the Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) in the WIPP RCRA Part B Permit. These waste streams, referred to as orphan wastes, cannot be shipped or disposed of because they contain one or more prohibited items, such as liquids, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen gas, corrosive acids or bases, reactive metals, or high concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), etc. The patented, non-incineration, pyrolysis and steam reforming processes marketed by THOR Treatment Technologies LLC removes all of these prohibited items from drums of TRU waste and produces a dry, inert, inorganic waste material that meets the existing TRUPACT-II requirements for shipping, as well as the existing WAP requirements for disposal of TRU waste at WIPP. THOR Treatment Technologies is a joint venture formed in June 2002 by Studsvik, Inc. (Studsvik) and Westinghouse Government Environmental Services Company LLC (WGES) to further develop and deploy Studsvik's patented THORSM technology within the DOE and Department of Defense (DoD) markets. The THORSM treatment process is a commercially proven system that has treated over 100,000 cu. ft. of nuclear waste from commercial power plants since 1999. Some of this waste has had contact dose rates of up to 400 R/hr. A distinguishing characteristic of the THORSM process for TRU waste treatment is the ability to treat drums of waste without removing the waste contents from the drum. This feature greatly minimizes criticality and contamination issues for processing of plutonium-containing wastes. The novel features described herein are protected by issued and pending patents.

  19. Corrosion of SiC and oxide-composite ceramics by a simulated steam-reformer atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.; Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1991-09-01

    To achieve higher process efficiency by using pressurized reactants and/or heat transfer fluids, the US DOE is promoting development of high-pressure heat exchanger systems under cost-sharing agreements with industrial contractors. The steam reformer would contain more than 600 tubes. Because the combination of high temperature and pressure differential of 12.7 kg/cm{sup 2} (180 psig) across the tube wall is too severe for metallic tubes, ceramic materials are being considered for reformer tubes. Their use is expected to increase the efficiency of steam reformers by about 19%. At ORNL, four SiC ceramics, a SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite, a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-bonded SiC ceramic, and two alumina-matrix composites were selected as candidate materials for heat exchanger/steam-reformer tubes. These commercially available materials were exposed to a simulated steam-reformer atmosphere for up to 2000 h at 1260{degrees}C to assess their corrosion behavior and the effect of the exposure on their flexure strength (in air) at 20 and 1260{degrees}C. The approximate partial pressures of the constituents of the gas mixture at 1 atm total pressure were 0.54 H{sub 2}, 0.13 CO, 0.03 CO{sub 2}m 0.004 CH{sub 4}, and 0.30 H{sub 2}O. All but one material had net weight gains during the exposure test. The flexure strengths of the SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics and the SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite at 20 and 1260{degrees}C were not changed significantly by corrosion. The strengths of the alumina-matrix composites were decreased by corrosion; however, the strength of one of these (reinforced with SiC whiskers) was still higher than that of any other material after 500 h. The other alumina composite (containing SiC particles) exhibited the largest strength decrease of any material. The strength retention of the SiC ceramics and the SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite and the strength loss of the composites were associated with surface layers caused by corrosion. 12 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matt; Dagle, Robert A.

    2013-06-07

    In a combined experimental and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study, benzene steam reforming (BSR) over MgAl2O4 supported Rh and Ir catalysts was investigated. Experimentally, it has been found that both highly dispersed Rh and Ir clusters (1-2 nm) on the MgAl2O4 spinel support are stable during the BSR in the temperature range of 700-850°C. Compared to the Ir/MgAl2O4 catalyst, the Rh/MgAl2O4 catalyst is more active with higher benzene turnover frequency and conversion. At typical steam conditions with the steam-to-carbon ratio > 12, the benzene conversion is only a weak function of the H2O concentration in the feed. This suggests that the initial benzene decomposition step rather than the benzene adsorption is most likely the rate-determined step in BSR over supported Rh and Ir catalysts. In order to understand the differences between the two catalysts, we followed with a comparative DFT study of initial benzene decomposition pathways over two representative model systems for each supported metal (Rh and Ir) catalysts. A periodic terrace (111) surface and an amorphous 50-atom metal cluster with a diameter of 1.0 nm were used to represent the two supported model catalysts under low and high dispersion conditions. Our DFT results show that the decreasing catalyst particle size enhances the benzene decomposition on supported Rh catalysts by lowering both C-C and C-H bond scission. The activation barriers of the C-C and the C-H bond scission decrease from 1.60 and 1.61 eV on the Rh(111) surface to 1.34 and 1.26 eV on the Rh50 cluster. For supported Ir catalysts, the decreasing particle size only affects the C-C scission. The activation barrier of the C-C scission of benzene decreases from 1.60 eV on the Ir(111) surface to 1.35 eV on the Ir50 cluster while the barriers of the C-H scission are practically the same. The experimentally measured higher BSR

  1. A core-shell structured, metal-ceramic composite-supported Ru catalyst for methane steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Potapova, Yulia; Lee, Doohwan

    2012-10-01

    Methane steam reforming on a metal-ceramic composite-supported ruthenium catalyst is studied at high temperatures. The core-shell structured Al2O3@Al composite consisting primarily of an Al metal core with a high surface area γ-Al2O3 overlayer is obtained by hydrothermal oxidation. Under the synthesis condition, primary Al2O3@Al particles aggregate to form a hierarchal secondary structure with macrosize inter-pores. This core-shell composite support enhances the heat conductivity and provides a high surface area for fine dispersion of a catalytic Ru component on the γ-Al2O3 overlayer. The Ru/Al2O3@Al catalyst exhibits significantly higher CH4 conversion than the conventional Ru/Al2O3 catalyst, indicating its superior properties for methane steam reforming at high temperatures contributed due to the fine Ru dispersion and facilitated heat and mass transfer via the unique catalyst structure. This metal-ceramic composite catalyst is stable in the reforming reaction for an extended time, suggesting reasonable stability in its physicochemical properties.

  2. Mechanistic aspects of the ethanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production on Pt, Ni, and PtNi catalysts supported on gamma-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Sanchez, Maria Cruz; Navarro Yerga, Rufino M; Kondarides, Dimitris I; Verykios, Xenophon E; Fierro, Jose Luis G

    2010-03-25

    Mechanistic aspects of ethanol steam reforming on Pt, Ni, and PtNi catalysts supported on gamma-Al(2)O(3) are investigated from the analysis of adsorbed species and gas phase products formed on catalysts during temperature-programmed desorption of ethanol and during ethanol steam reforming reaction. DRIFTS-MS analyses of ethanol decomposition and ethanol steam reforming reactions show that PtNi and Ni catalysts are more stable than the Pt monometallic counterpart. Ethanol TPD results on Ni, Pt, and NiPt catalysts point to ethanol dehydrogenation and acetaldehyde decomposition as the first reaction pathways of ethanol steam reforming over the studied catalysts. The active sites responsible for the acetaldehyde decomposition are easily deactivated in the first minutes on-stream by carbon deposits. For Ni and PtNi catalysts, a second reaction pathway, consisting in the decomposition of acetate intermediates formed over the surface of alumina support, becomes the main reaction pathway operating in steam reforming of ethanol once the acetaldehyde decomposition pathway is deactivated. Taking into account the differences observed in the mechanism of ethanol decomposition, the better stability observed for PtNi catalyst is proposed to be related with a cooperative effect between Pt and Ni activities together with the enhanced ability of Ni to gasify the methyl groups formed by decomposition of acetate species. On the contrary, monometallic catalysts are believed to dehydrogenate these methyl groups forming coke that leads to deactivation of metal particles. PMID:19824680

  3. NiW and NiRu Bimetallic Catalysts for Ethylene Steam Reforming: Alternative Mechanisms for Sulfur Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan, M.; Yung, M. M.; Medlin, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    Previous investigations of Ni-based catalysts for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons have indicated that the addition of a second metal can reduce the effects of sulfur poisoning. Two systems that have previously shown promise for such applications, NiW and NiRu, are considered here for the steam reforming of ethylene, a key component of biomass derived tars. Monometallic and bimetallic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Ni and W catalysts were employed for ethylene steam reforming in the presence and absence of sulfur. The NiW catalysts were less active than Ni in the absence of sulfur, but were more active in the presence of 50 ppm H{sub 2}S. The mechanism for the W-induced improvements in sulfur resistance appears to be different from that for Ru in NiRu. To probe reasons for the sulfur resistance of NiRu, the adsorption of S and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} on several bimetallic NiRu alloy surfaces ranging from 11 to 33 % Ru was studied using density functional theory (DFT). The DFT studies reveal that sulfur adsorption is generally favored on hollow sites containing Ru. Ethylene preferentially adsorbs atop the Ru atom in all the NiRu (111) alloys investigated. By comparing trends across the various bimetallic models considered, sulfur adsorption was observed to be correlated with the density of occupied states near the Fermi level while C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adsorption was correlated with the number of unoccupied states in the d-band. The diverging mechanisms for S and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adsorption allow for bimetallic surfaces such as NiRu that enhance ethylene binding without accompanying increases in sulfur binding energy. In contrast, bimetallics such as NiSn and NiW appear to decrease the affinity of the surface for both the reagent and the poison.

  4. Kinetics for Steam and CO2 Reforming of Methane Over Ni/La/Al2O3 Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Hee; Choi, Bong Kwan; Park, Yoon Hwa; Moon, Dong Ju; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2015-07-01

    Kinetic studies of mixed (steam and dry) reforming of methane on Ni/La/Al2O3 and Ni/La-Co (1, 3 wt%)/Al2O3 catalysts were performed in an atmospheric fixed-bed reactor. Kinetic parameters for the mixed reforming over these catalysts were obtained under reaction conditions free from heat and mass transfer limitations. Variables for the mixed reforming were the reaction temperature and partial pressure of reactants. The fitting of the experimental data for the rate of methane conversion, rCH4, using the power law rate equation rCH4 = k(PrCH4)α(PCO2)β(PH2O)γ showed that the reaction orders α, β, and γ are steady and obtained values equal to α = 1, β = 0, and γ = 0. In other words, among CH4, CO2, H2O, and H2, only CH4 reaction orders were not zero and they were affected by the promoters. The apparent activation energy on catalysts Ni/La/Al2O3, Ni/La-Co (1)/Al2O3 and Ni/La-Co (3)/Al2O3 is 85.2, 93.8, and 99.4 kJ/mol, respectively. The addition of Co to Ni/La/Al2O3 was increased the apparent activation energy of the mixed reforming reaction. And the Ni/La-Co (3 wt%)/Al2O3 catalyst showed the highest reforming activity and apparent activation energy. The Co promoters can increase the apparent activation energy of mixed reforming of methane. PMID:26373118

  5. Preparation and initial characterization of fluidized bed steam reforming pure-phase standards

    SciTech Connect

    Missimer, D. M.; Rutherford, R. L.

    2013-03-21

    Hanford is investigating the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process for their Low Activity Waste. The FBSR process offers a low-temperature continuous method by which liquid waste can be processed with the addition of clay into a sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form. The NAS waste form is mainly comprised of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}), sodalite (Na{sub 8}[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}Cl{sub 2}), and nosean (Na{sub 8}[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}SO{sub 4}). Anions such as perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup -}), pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), and iodine (I{sup -}) are expected to replace sulfate in the nosean structure and/or chloride in the sodalite mineral structure (atomically bonded inside the aluminosilicate cages that these mineral structures possess). In the FBSR waste form, each of these phases can exist in a variety of solid solutions that differ from the idealized forms observed in single crystals in nature. The lack of understanding of the durability of these stoichiometric or idealized mineral phases complicates the ability to deconvolute the durability of the mixed phase FBSR product since it is a combination of different NAS phases. To better understand the behavior, fabrication and testing of the individual phases of the FBSR product is required. Analytical Development (AD) of the Science and Technology directorate of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to prepare the series of phase-pure standards, consisting of nepheline, nosean, and Cl, Re, and I sodalite. Once prepared, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to confirm the products were phase pure. These standards are being used for subsequent characterization studies consisting of the following: single-pass flow-through (SPFT) testing, development of thermodynamic data, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) calibration curves. In addition to the above mentioned phase-pure standards, AD was tasked with fabricating a mixed Tc-Re sodalite.

  6. Performance of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming product under hydraulically unsaturated conditions.

    PubMed

    Neeway, James J; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Williams, Benjamin D; Rod, Kenton; Bowden, Mark E; Brown, Christopher F; Pierce, Eric M

    2014-05-01

    Several candidates for supplemental low-activity waste (LAW) immobilization at the Hanford site in Washington State, USA are being considered. One waste sequestering technology considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The granular product resulting from the FBSR process is composed primarily of an insoluble sodium aluminosilicate matrix with the dominant phases being feldspathoid minerals with a 1:1:1 molar ratio of Na, Al and Si. To demonstrate the durability of the product, which can be disposed of at the unsaturated Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford, a series of tests has been performed using the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) system, which allows for the accelerated weathering of the solid materials. The system maintains hydraulically unsaturated conditions, thus mimicking the open-flow and transport properties that will be present at the IDF. Two materials were tested using the system: 1) the FBSR granular product and 2) the FBSR granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer to form a monolith. Results of the experiments show a trend of relatively constant effluent concentration of Na, Si, Al, and Cs as a function of time from both materials. The elements I and Re show a steady release throughout the yearlong test from the granular material but their concentrations seem to be increasing at one year from the monolith material. This result suggests that these two elements may be present in the sodalite cage structure rather than in the predominant nepheline phase because their release occurs at a different rate compared to nepheline phase. Also, these elements to not seem to reprecipitate when released from the starting material. Calculated one-year release rates for Si are on the order of 10(-6) g/(m(2) d) for the granular material and 10(-5) g/(m(2) d) for the monolith material while Re release is seen to be two orders of magnitude higher than Si release rates. SEM imaging and XRD analysis show how the alteration of the two

  7. Performance of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming product under hydraulically unsaturated conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J; Rod, Kenton A.; Bowden, Mark E; Pierce, Eric M; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D; Brown, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Several candidates for supplemental low-activity waste (LAW) immobilization at the Hanford site in Washington State, USA are being considered. One waste sequestering technology considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The granular product resulting from the FBSR process is composed primarily of an insoluble sodium aluminosilicate matrix with the dominant phases being feldspathoid minerals with a 1:1:1 molar ratio of Na, Al and Si. To demonstrate the durability of the product, which can be disposed of at the unsaturated Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford, a series of tests has been performed using the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) system, which allows for the accelerated weathering of the solid materials. The system maintains hydraulically unsaturated conditions, thus mimicking the open-flow and transport properties that will be present at the IDF. Two materials were tested using the system: 1) the FBSR granular product and 2) the FBSR granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer to form a monolith. Results of the experiments show a trend of relatively constant effluent concentration of Na, Si, Al, and Cs as a function of time from both materials. The elements I and Re show a steady release throughout the yearlong test from the granular material but their concentrations seem to be increasing at one year from the monolith material. This result suggests that these two elements may be present in the sodalite cage structure rather than in the predominant nepheline phase because their release occurs at a different rate compared to nepheline phase. Also, these elements to not seem to reprecipitate when released from the starting material. Calculated one-year release rates for Si are on the order of 10 6 g/(m2 d) for the granular material and 10 5 g/(m2 d) for the monolith material while Re release is seen to be two orders of magnitude higher than Si release rates. SEM imaging and XRD analysis show how the alteration of the two materials is

  8. Minimizing the formation of coke and methane on Co nanoparticles in steam reforming of biomass-derived oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-06-01

    Fundamental understanding and control of chemical transformations are essential to the development of technically feasible and economically viable catalytic processes for efficient conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach, we report high hydrogen selectivity and catalyst durability of acetone steam reforming (ASR) on inert carbon supported Co nanoparticles. The observed catalytic performance is further elucidated on the basis of comprehensive first-principles calculations. Instead of being considered as an undesired intermediate prone for catalyst deactivation during bioethanol steam reforming (ESR), acetone is suggested as a key and desired intermediate in proposed two-stage ESR process that leads to high hydrogen selectivity and low methane formation on Co-based catalysts. The significance of the present work also sheds a light on controlling the chemical transformations of key intermediates in biomass conversion such as ketones. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) project of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Computing time was granted by the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The EMSL is a U.S. DOE national scientific user facility located at PNNL, and sponsored by the U.S. DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  9. Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory for Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.B.; Wolf, K.; Ryan, K.; Roesener, S.; Cowen, M.; Schmoker, D.; Bacala, P.; Landman, B.

    2006-07-01

    The patented THOR{sup R} steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR{sup R} steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR{sup R} technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR{sup R} can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR{sup R} can also produce a final end-product that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR{sup R} process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU. (authors)

  10. Steam Reforming Technology Demonstration Program for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, K.; Mason, B.; Wolf, K.; Olson, A.

    2007-07-01

    The patented THOR{sup R} steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. The SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid and alkali and aluminum nitrates, along with many other inorganic compounds, including substantial levels of radionuclides. As part of the implementation of the THOR{sup R} process at INTEC, an engineering-scale test demonstration (ESTD) was conducted using a specially designed pilot plant located at Hazen Research, Inc. in Golden Colorado. The purpose of the ESTD was to confirm and optimize operation of the THOR{sup R} dual fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process for treating the SBW. The performance of the integrated FBSR thermal and off-gas systems was demonstrated while treating waste simulants representative of the actual SBW. Simulants were utilized that consisted of highly acidic nitrate solutions, with both dissolved and undissolved solids (UDS). The SBW simulant solutions were converted into a dry, granular solid, consisting of carbonate and aluminate product compounds. The successful performance of the integrated FBSR system was verified and demonstrated. (authors)

  11. Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R&D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

  12. Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

  13. Hydrogen generation having CO2 removal with steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Kandaswamy, Duraiswamy; Chellappa, Anand S.; Knobbe, Mack

    2015-07-28

    A method for producing hydrogen using fuel cell off gases, the method feeding hydrocarbon fuel to a sulfur adsorbent to produce a desulfurized fuel and a spent sulfur adsorbent; feeding said desulfurized fuel and water to an adsorption enhanced reformer that comprises of a plurality of reforming chambers or compartments; reforming said desulfurized fuel in the presence of a one or more of a reforming catalyst and one or more of a CO2 adsorbent to produce hydrogen and a spent CO2 adsorbent; feeding said hydrogen to the anode side of the fuel cell; regenerating said spent CO2 adsorbents using the fuel cell cathode off-gases, producing a flow of hydrogen by cycling between said plurality of reforming chambers or compartments in a predetermined timing sequence; and, replacing the spent sulfur adsorbent with a fresh sulfur adsorbent at a predetermined time.

  14. Multifunctional Pd/Ni-Co catalyst for hydrogen production by chemical looping coupled with steam reforming of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, Javier; Gil, María V; Rubiera, Fernando; Chen, De

    2014-11-01

    High yield of high-purity H2 from acetic acid, a model compound of bio-oil obtained from the fast pyrolysis of biomass, was produced by sorption-enhanced steam reforming (SESR). An oxygen carrier was introduced into a chemical loop (CL) coupled to the cyclical SESR process to supply heat in situ for the endothermic sorbent regeneration to increase the energy efficiency of the process. A new multifunctional 1 %Pd/20 %Ni-20 %Co catalyst was developed for use both as oxygen carrier in the CL and as reforming catalyst in the SESR whereas a CaO-based material was used as CO2 sorbent. In the sorbent-air regeneration step, the Ni-Co atoms in the catalyst undergo strong exothermic oxidation reactions that provide heat for the CaO decarbonation. The addition of Pd to the Ni-Co catalyst makes the catalyst active throughout the whole SESR-CL cycle. Pd significantly promotes the reduction of Ni-Co oxides to metallic Ni-Co during the reforming stage, which avoids the need for a reduction step after regeneration. H2 yield above 90 % and H2 purity above 99.2 vol % were obtained. PMID:25209388

  15. Catalytic roles of Co0 and Co2+ during steam reforming of ethanol on Co/MgO catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Ayman M.; Su, Yu; Engelhard, Mark H.; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

    2011-02-25

    Abstract: The catalytic roles of Co0 and Co2+ during steam reforming of ethanol were investigated over Co/MgO catalysts. Catalysts with different Co0/(Co0+Co2+) fraction were prepared through calcination and/or reduction at different temperatures, and the Co0 fraction was quantified by TPR and in-situ XPS. High temperature calcination of Co/MgO allowed us to prepare catalysts with more non-reducible Co2+ incorporated in the MgO lattice, while lower calcination temperatures allowed for the preparation of catalysts with higher Co0/(Co0+Co2+) fractions. The catalytic tests on Co0, non-reducible Co2+, and reducible Co2+ indicated that Co0 is much more active than either reducible or non-reducible Co2+ for C-C cleavage and water gas shift reaction. In addition, catalysts with a higher Co0 surface fraction exhibited a lower selectivity to CH4.

  16. Ethanol steam reforming on Ni/Al2O3 catalysts: effect of the addition of Zn and Pt.

    PubMed

    Buitrago-Sierra, R; Ruiz-Martínez, J; Serrano-Ruiz, J C; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F; Sepúlveda-Escribano, A

    2012-10-01

    Ni-based catalysts supported on Zn-modified alumina were investigated in the ethanol steam reforming reaction. A commercial γ-alumina was impregnated with different amounts of zinc nitrate (0, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 wt.% on Zn basis), calcined, and then impregnated with nickel nitrate aqueous solutions. The samples were characterized by a number of techniques: N(2) adsorption at 77 K, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR). Their catalytic behavior in the ethanol steam reforming reaction was studied at 873 K, with a H(2)O/ethanol ratio of 5:1. Two effects of the presence of Zn were detected. On the one hand, zinc modifies the surface structure and the surface chemistry of the catalysts by formation of zinc aluminates, and on the other hand, zinc oxide can be reduced to metallic zinc under reaction conditions, thus modifying the catalytic properties of the active phase. The presence of Zn increases the ethanol conversion to gaseous compounds as compared with the catalyst supported on the Zn-free commercial alumina. The addition of a small amount of Pt (1 wt.%) causes a beneficial effect in the reaction. When Ni catalysts were used without a previous reduction treatment, ethylene was formed in high amounts; however, the Pt-Ni catalysts need no reduction pre-treatment to achieve high H(2) yields (close to 70%) and showed a high stability versus time on stream because of the control of the production of ethylene, a coke precursor. PMID:22796067

  17. The production of pure pressurised hydrogen by the reformer-steam iron process in a fixed bed reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestl, Stephan; Voitic, Gernot; Lammer, Michael; Marius, Bernhard; Wagner, Julian; Hacker, Viktor

    2015-04-01

    In this paper a fixed bed chemical looping process for the decentralised production of pure pressurised hydrogen for fuel cell applications is described. CH4 is converted to a syngas using conventional steam reforming. The syngas is directly used for the reduction of an iron based oxygen carrier. A consecutive oxidation step using steam leads to the formation of pure pressurised hydrogen. A thermodynamic analysis was performed in order to investigate feasible conditions for the syngas generation and reduction step. Experiments using pure hydrogen as well as an artificial syngas mixture showed the feasibility of the process for the production of pressurised hydrogen. A stable hydrogen production at a pressure of 8-11 bar(g) was achieved and only minor impurities of 700 ppm of carbon dioxide but no signs of carbon monoxide were detected in the produced hydrogen. Although the active surface decreased from 7.5 m2 g-1 to 0.9 m2 g-1 only moderate losses of reactivity were measured in the fixed bed reactor. Thermogravimetric analysis showed a loss of 9% of reactive material over nine cycles, presumably due to sintering effects.

  18. A novel approach to the experimental study on methane/steam reforming kinetics using the Orthogonal Least Squares method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciazko, Anna; Komatsu, Yosuke; Brus, Grzegorz; Kimijima, Shinji; Szmyd, Janusz S.

    2014-09-01

    For a mathematical model based on the result of physical measurements, it becomes possible to determine their influence on the final solution and its accuracy. However, in classical approaches, the influence of different model simplifications on the reliability of the obtained results are usually not comprehensively discussed. This paper presents a novel approach to the study of methane/steam reforming kinetics based on an advanced methodology called the Orthogonal Least Squares method. The kinetics of the reforming process published earlier are divergent among themselves. To obtain the most probable values of kinetic parameters and enable direct and objective model verification, an appropriate calculation procedure needs to be proposed. The applied Generalized Least Squares (GLS) method includes all the experimental results into the mathematical model which becomes internally contradicted, as the number of equations is greater than number of unknown variables. The GLS method is adopted to select the most probable values of results and simultaneously determine the uncertainty coupled with all the variables in the system. In this paper, the evaluation of the reaction rate after the pre-determination of the reaction rate, which was made by preliminary calculation based on the obtained experimental results over a Nickel/Yttria-stabilized Zirconia catalyst, was performed.

  19. A passively-fed methanol steam reformer heated with two-stage bi-fueled catalytic combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Kai-Fan; Wong, Shwin-Chung

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents further progress on our simple novel passively-fed methanol steam reformer. The present study focuses on the development of a catalytic combustor workable with both hydrogen and methanol fuels. The aim is to reutilize the exhaust hydrogen from a fuel cell under stable operation but burn methanol during the start-up. On a copper plate, the catalytic combustor in a u-turn channel is integrally machined under a two-turn serpentine-channel reformer. To resolve the highly different fuel reactivities, a suitably diluted catalyst formula demonstrates uniform temperature distributions burning with either liquid methanol or an H2/CO2 mixture simulating the exhaust gas from a fuel cell. In a two-stage process, it first takes 25 min to reach 270 °C by burning methanol. After the fuel is switched to the H2/CO2 mixture, another 20 min is needed to attain an optimal steady state which yields a high methanol conversion of 95% and acceptably low CO fraction of 1.04% at a reaction temperature of 278 °C. The H2 and CO2 concentrations are 75.1% and 23.6%.

  20. Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

    2012-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

  1. Compact solar autoclave based on steam generation using broadband light-harvesting nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Oara; Feronti, Curtis; Neumann, Albert D.; Dong, Anjie; Schell, Kevin; Lu, Benjamin; Kim, Eric; Quinn, Mary; Thompson, Shea; Grady, Nathaniel; Nordlander, Peter; Oden, Maria; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of readily available sterilization processes for medicine and dentistry practices in the developing world is a major risk factor for the propagation of disease. Modern medical facilities in the developed world often use autoclave systems to sterilize medical instruments and equipment and process waste that could contain harmful contagions. Here, we show the use of broadband light-absorbing nanoparticles as solar photothermal heaters, which generate high-temperature steam for a standalone, efficient solar autoclave useful for sanitation of instruments or materials in resource-limited, remote locations. Sterilization was verified using a standard Geobacillus stearothermophilus-based biological indicator. PMID:23836642

  2. Compact solar autoclave based on steam generation using broadband light-harvesting nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Oara; Feronti, Curtis; Neumann, Albert D; Dong, Anjie; Schell, Kevin; Lu, Benjamin; Kim, Eric; Quinn, Mary; Thompson, Shea; Grady, Nathaniel; Nordlander, Peter; Oden, Maria; Halas, Naomi J

    2013-07-16

    The lack of readily available sterilization processes for medicine and dentistry practices in the developing world is a major risk factor for the propagation of disease. Modern medical facilities in the developed world often use autoclave systems to sterilize medical instruments and equipment and process waste that could contain harmful contagions. Here, we show the use of broadband light-absorbing nanoparticles as solar photothermal heaters, which generate high-temperature steam for a standalone, efficient solar autoclave useful for sanitation of instruments or materials in resource-limited, remote locations. Sterilization was verified using a standard Geobacillus stearothermophilus-based biological indicator. PMID:23836642

  3. Process And Apparatus To Accomplish Autothermal Or Steam Reforming Via A Reciprocating Compression Device

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, K. David; James, Robert; Berry, David A.; Gardner, Todd

    2004-09-21

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas from a variety of hydrocarbons. The apparatus (device) consists of a semi-batch, non-constant volume reactor to generate a synthesis gas. While the apparatus feeds mixtures of air, steam, and hydrocarbons into a cylinder where work is performed on the fluid by a piston to adiabatically raise its temperature without heat transfer from an external source.

  4. Process to Accomplish Autothermal or Steam Reforming Via a Reciprocating Compression Device

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, David K.; James, Robert; Berry, David A.; Gardern, Todd

    2004-09-21

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas from a variety of hydrocarbons. The apparatus (device) consists of a semi-batch, non-constant volume reactor to generate a synthesis gas. While the apparatus feeds mixtures of air, steam, and hydrocarbons into a cylinder where work is performed on the fluid by a piston to adiabatically raise its temperature without heat transfer from an external source.

  5. Development of a novel ceramic microchannel reactor for methane steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Danielle M.

    Microchannel heat exchanger and reactor technology has recently gained interest as an innovative way to improve heat-exchanger efficiency, reduce size and weight, and utilize thermal management capabilities to improve conversion, yield, selectivity, and catalyst life. Among many other possible applications, this technology is suitable for advanced recuperated engines, oxy-fired combustion processes for oxygen separation, gas-cooled nuclear reactors, recuperative heat exchanger and reformer units for solid oxide fuel cell systems, and chemical processing. This work presents the design, fabrication, and performance of novel ceramic microchannel reactors in heat-exchanger and fuel-reforming applications. Although most microchannel devices are made of metal materials, ceramics offer an alternative which enables significantly higher operating temperatures, improved tolerance to harsh chemical environments, and improved adherence of ceramic-based catalyst washcoats. Significant cost savings in materials and manufacturing methods for high-volume manufacturing can also be achieved. High-temperature performance of the ceramic microchannel reactor is measured through non-reactive heat-exchanger experiments within a dedicated test stand. Heat-exchanger effectiveness of up to 88% is experimentally established. After coating catalyst material over half of the reactor layers, use of the ceramic microchannel reactor in methane fuel-processing applications is demonstrated. As a fuel reformer, the ceramic microchannel reactor achieves process intensification by combining heat-exchanger and catalytic-reactor functions to produce syngas. Gas hourly space velocities (GHSV) up to 50,000 hr-1 with methane conversion higher than 85% are achieved. A complete computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, as well as a geometrically simplified hybrid CFD/chemical kinetics model, is used in conjunction with experimentation to examine heat transfer, fluid flow, and chemical kinetics within the

  6. The Business Community and School Reform: The Boston Compact at Five Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrar, Eleanor; Cipollone, Anthony

    This paper examines the success of the Boston (Massachusetts) Compact's business and public education agreements over the years 1985 through 1987. The Compact began in 1982 as a citywide public school improvement program. Business, university, and trade union leaders agreed to establish and meet measurable admission and hiring goals to increase…

  7. A New Compact for Higher Education: Funding and Autonomy for Reform and Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallison, James M., Jr.; Cohen, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades, America's social compact for higher education as a public good has effectively lapsed as government support of higher education has diminished. Given the need for a highly educated workforce in today's knowledge-based global economy, we propose a new compact for higher education that couples increased funding with…

  8. MINERALIZING, STEAM REFORMING TREATMENT OF HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE (a.k.a. INEEL/EXT-05-02526)

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Olson; N. R. Soelberg; D. W. Marshall; G. L. Anderson

    2005-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented, in 2002, a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified steam reforming technology as a candidate for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was completed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel. The pilot scale facility was equipped with a cyclone separator and heated sintered metal filters for particulate removal, a thermal oxidizer for reduced gas species and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for residual volatile species capture. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, but located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Pilot scale testing was performed August 2–5, 2004. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Science Application International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, personnel performed actual pilot scale operation. The pilot scale test achieved a total of 68.4 hours of cumulative/continuous processing operation before termination in response to a bed de-fluidization condition. 178 kg of LAW surrogate were processed that resulted in 148 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 17%. The process achieved

  9. CO(2)-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-11-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd-In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa.Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd(1)In(1) phase exhibits a similar "Cu-like" electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd(1)Zn(1) counterpart.Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd(1)In(1) phase in MSR yielded a CO(2)-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In(2)O(3)-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In(2)O(3), intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO(2) using this Pd(1)In(1) phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with "Pd-like" electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed.To achieve CO(2)-TOF values on the isolated Pd(1)In(1) intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In(2)O(3), at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO(2) conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd(1)In(1) inhibited inverse water-gas-shift reaction on In(2)O(3) and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO(2)-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  10. CO2-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd–In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa. Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd1In1 phase exhibits a similar “Cu-like” electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd1Zn1 counterpart. Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd1In1 phase in MSR yielded a CO2-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In2O3-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In2O3, intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO2 using this Pd1In1 phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with “Pd-like” electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed. To achieve CO2-TOF values on the isolated Pd1In1 intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In2O3, at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO2 conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd1In1 inhibited inverse water–gas-shift reaction on In2O3 and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO2-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  11. Statistical validation and an empirical model of hydrogen production enhancement found by utilizing passive flow disturbance in the steam-reformation process

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Paul A.; Liao, Chang-hsien

    2007-11-15

    A passive flow disturbance has been proven to enhance the conversion of fuel in a methanol-steam reformer. This study presents a statistical validation of the experiment based on a standard 2{sup k} factorial experiment design and the resulting empirical model of the enhanced hydrogen producing process. A factorial experiment design was used to statistically analyze the effects and interactions of various input factors in the experiment. Three input factors, including the number of flow disturbers, catalyst size, and reactant flow rate were investigated for their effects on the fuel conversion in the steam-reformation process. Based on the experimental results, an empirical model was developed and further evaluated with an uncertainty analysis and interior point data. (author)

  12. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-04-21

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using

  13. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-06-08

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using

  14. High Activity of Ce1-xNixO2-y for H2 Production through Ethanol Steam Reforming: Tuning Catalytic Performance through Metal-Oxide Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    G Zhou; L Barrio; S Agnoli; S Senanayake; J Evans; A Kubacka; M Estrella; J Hanson; A Martinez-Arias; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The importance of the oxide: Ce{sub 0.8}Ni{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-y} is an excellent catalyst for ethanol steam reforming. Metal-oxide interactions perturb the electronic properties of the small particles of metallic nickel present in the catalyst under the reaction conditions and thus suppress any methanation activity. The nickel embedded in ceria induces the formation of O vacancies, which facilitate cleavage of the OH bonds in ethanol and water.

  15. Deactivation Studies of Rh/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 Catalysts in Low Temperature Ethanol Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Platon, Alex; Roh, Hyun-Seog; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

    2007-10-30

    Rapid deactivation of Rh/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalysts in low temperature ethanol steam reforming was studied. A significant build-up of carbonaceous intermediate, instead of carbon deposit, was observed at a lower reaction temperature which was attributed to the rapid catalyst deactivation. Co-feed experiments indicated that acetone and ethylene caused more severe catalyst deactivation than other oxygenates such as acidic acid and acetaldehyde.

  16. Effects of preparation method on the performance of Ni/Al(2)O(3) catalysts for hydrogen production by bio-oil steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinbao; Wang, Shurong; Cai, Qinjie; Zhu, Lingjun; Yin, Qianqian; Luo, Zhongyang

    2012-09-01

    Steam reforming of bio-oil derived from the fast pyrolysis of biomass is an economic and renewable process for hydrogen production. The main objective of the present work has been to investigate the effects of the preparation method of Ni/Al(2)O(3) catalysts on their performance in hydrogen production by bio-oil steam reforming. The Ni/Al(2)O(3) catalysts were prepared by impregnation, co-precipitation, and sol-gel methods. XRD, XPS, H(2)-TPR, SEM, TEM, TG, and N(2) physisorption measurements were performed to characterize the texture and structure of the catalysts obtained after calcination and after their subsequent use. Ethanol and bio-oil model compound were selected for steam reforming to evaluate the catalyst performance. The catalyst prepared by the co-precipitation method was found to display better performance than the other two. Under the optimized reaction conditions, an ethanol conversion of 99% and a H(2) yield of 88% were obtained. PMID:21562805

  17. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic

  18. Application of multisection packing concept to sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming reaction for high-purity hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan Hyun; Mun, Sungyong; Lee, Ki Bong

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen has been gaining popularity as a new clean energy carrier, and bulk hydrogen production is achieved through the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Since hydrogen produced via the SMR reaction contains large amounts of impurities such as unreacted reactants and byproducts, additional purification steps are needed to produce high-purity hydrogen. By applying the sorption-enhanced reaction (SER), in which catalytic reaction and CO2 byproduct removal are carried out simultaneously in a single reactor, high-purity hydrogen can be directly produced. Additionally, the thermodynamic limitation of conventional SMR reaction is circumvented, and the SMR reaction process becomes simplified. To improve the performance of the SER, a multisection packing concept was recently proposed. In this study, the multisection packing concept is experimentally demonstrated by applying it to a sorption-enhanced SMR (SE-SMR) reaction. The experimental results show that the SE-SMR reaction is significantly influenced by the reaction temperature, owing to the conflicting dependence of the reaction rate and the CO2 sorption uptake on the reaction temperature. Additionally, it is confirmed that more high-purity hydrogen (<10 ppm of CO) can be produced by applying the multisection packing concept to the SE-SMR reactions operated at sufficiently high temperatures where the SMR reaction is not limited by rate.

  19. Carbon Deposition from the CO2-Steam Reforming of Methane Over Modified Ni/γ-Al2O3 Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bong Kwan; Ok, Hye Jeong; Moon, Dong Ju; Kim, Jong Ho; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the catalytic activity and suppression of carbon deposition in the CO2-Steam reforming of methane (SCR) to develop a high performance catalyst for GTL-FPSO application which is required to high pressure (20 bar) for F-T synthesis. Ni/La-X(6)/Al2O3 (X = Ce, Mg, Zr) catalysts were prepared by the impregnation method. The catalytic reaction was studied in a fixed bed reactor system at high pressure. X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET specific surface area and H2-temperature programmed reduction (TPR) were used to observe the characteristics of the prepared catalysts. The carbon deposition and the carbon amount in the used catalysts were examined by SEM and TGA, respectively. As a result, it was found that the Ni/La-Mg(6)/Al2O3 catalyst showed the highest activity and high carbon resistance. The highest activity in Ni/La-Mg(6)/Al2O3 was attributed to the proper Mg loading. It also had the lowest Ni particle and formed relatively stable MgAl2O4, which have an effect on the catalytic activity. PMID:26328367

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of Glycerol Steam Reforming for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogen and carbon dioxide separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Joel M.; Soria, M. A.; Madeira, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic study of Glycerol Steam Reforming (GSR) for hydrogen production with in situ carbon dioxide and hydrogen (reaction products) simultaneous removal was performed. The sorption-enhanced membrane reactor (SEMR) was divided into multiple sub-Gibbs reactors and the Gibbs free energy minimization method was employed. The effects of temperature (600-800 K), molar water-to-glycerol feed ratio (WGFR) (3-9), pressure (1-5 atm) and fraction of hydrogen and carbon dioxide removal (f, 0-0.99) on the GSR process were target of investigation. A hydrogen yield (total moles of hydrogen produced/mole of reacted glycerol) very close to the stoichiometric value of 7 was obtained at 700 K, WGFR of 9, 1 atm and for fCO2 = 0.99 and fH2 = 0.80. This corresponds to an enhancement of 217%, 47% and 22% in terms of hydrogen yield comparatively to the traditional reactor (TR), sorption-enhanced reactor (SER) with carbon dioxide capture (fCO2 = 0.99) and membrane reactor (MR) with hydrogen separation (fH2 = 0.80) , respectively. In terms of coke, its formation was only observed under WGFRs below the stoichiometric value of 3.

  1. Structure and Activity of Pt-Ni Catalysts Supported on Modified Al2O3 for Ethanol Steam Reforming.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R M; Sanchez-Sanchez, M C; Fierro, J L G

    2015-09-01

    Modification of alumina with La-, Ce-, Zr- and Mg-oxides was studied with the aim to use them as supports of bimetallic Pt-Ni catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol. Activity results showed that modifications of Al2O3 support with the incorporation of La, Ce, Zr or Mg oxides play an essential role in the catalytic behaviour of PtNi catalysts. Bimetallic PtNi catalyst supported on bare Al2O3 showed evolution of the reaction products with time on stream consisting in the increase of C2H4 production with concomitant decrease of CH4 and CO2 production. The addition of Mg or Zr to γ-A1203 did not inhibit the appearance of ethylene but delayed its production. In the case of Ce- or La-supported catalysts, the product selectivities were stable with time-on-stream, with no changes being observed in the product distribution for 24 h. Characterization results showed that La- and Ce-containing supports improves the Pt and Ni metal exposure values. The better stability achieved for Ce and La containing catalysts was inferred to be related with a participation/assistance of lanthanum and cerium entities in the gasification of coke deposits together with a modification of Pt and Ni dispersion which lower the probability of the nucleation of coke precursors on their surfaces. PMID:26716216

  2. Effect of Bimetallic Ni-Cr Catalysts for Steam-CO2 Reforming of Methane at High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bong Kwan; Park, Yoon Hwa; Moon, Dong Ju; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2015-07-01

    The present work was to carry out the development of high performance Ni-based catalyst for Steam-CO2 reforming of methane (SCR) which is suitable for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of GTL- FPSO (floating, production, storage and offloading) process. The bimetallic Ni-Cr catalysts were prepared by co-impregnation method. The Ni and Cr loading amount were fixed at 12 wt% and 3~7 wt%, respectively. The catalytic reaction was conducted at 900 °C and 20 bar with reactant feed ratio of CH4:CO2:H2O:Ar = 1:0.8:1.3:1 and GHSV = 25,000 h(-1). The Cr-modified Ni/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was characterized by BET surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2-temperature programmed reduction (TPR), H2-chmisorption, CO2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Transmission electron microscopy(TEM). To confirm the amount and type of the carbon deposition, the used catalysts were examined by Thermogravitic analysis (TGA) and Field emission-scanning microscopy/Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FE-SEM/EDX). It was found that the bimetallic Ni-Cr catalyst exhibits highly dispersed Ni particles with strong metal-to-support interaction (SMSI) as well as excellent catalytic activity, resulting in the suppression of Ni sintering and carbon deposition. PMID:26373119

  3. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-07-14

    Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

  4. Characterization and Leaching Tests of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Form for LAW Immobilization - 13400

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Peterson, Reid A.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2013-07-01

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) have been evaluated. One such immobilization technology is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was involved in an extensive characterization campaign. The goal of this campaign was to study the durability of the FBSR mineral product and the encapsulated FBSR product in a geo-polymer monolith. This paper gives an overview of results obtained using the ASTM C 1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT), the EPA Test Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the ASTMC 1662 Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) test. Along with these durability tests an overview of the characteristics of the waste form has been collected using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), microwave digestions for chemical composition, and surface area from Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) theory. (authors)

  5. Efficient utilization of greenhouse gases in a gas-to-liquids process combined with CO2/steam-mixed reforming and Fe-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chundong; Jun, Ki-Won; Ha, Kyoung-Su; Lee, Yun-Jo; Kang, Seok Chang

    2014-07-15

    Two process models for carbon dioxide utilized gas-to-liquids (GTL) process (CUGP) mainly producing light olefins and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthetic oils were developed by Aspen Plus software. Both models are mainly composed of a reforming unit, an F-T synthesis unit and a recycle unit, while the main difference is the feeding point of fresh CO2. In the reforming unit, CO2 reforming and steam reforming of methane are combined together to produce syngas in flexible composition. Meanwhile, CO2 hydrogenation is conducted via reverse water gas shift on the Fe-based catalysts in the F-T synthesis unit to produce hydrocarbons. After F-T synthesis, the unreacted syngas is recycled to F-T synthesis and reforming units to enhance process efficiency. From the simulation results, it was found that the carbon efficiencies of both CUGP options were successfully improved, and total CO2 emissions were significantly reduced, compared with the conventional GTL processes. The process efficiency was sensitive to recycle ratio and more recycle seemed to be beneficial for improving process efficiency and reducing CO2 emission. However, the process efficiency was rather insensitive to split ratio (recycle to reforming unit/total recycle), and the optimum split ratio was determined to be zero. PMID:24933030

  6. Studying the characteristics of a 5 kW power installation on solid-oxide fuel cells with steam reforming of natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munts, V. A.; Volkova, Yu. V.; Plotnikov, N. S.; Dubinin, A. M.; Tuponogov, V. G.; Chernishev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The results from tests of a 5 kW power plant on solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), in which natural gas is used as fuel, are presented. The installation's process circuit, the test procedure, and the analysis of the obtained results are described. The characteristics of the power plant developed by the Ural Industrial Company are investigated in four steady-state modes of its operation: with the SOFC nominal power capacity utilized by 40% (2 kW), 60% (3 kW), 90% (4.5 kW) and 110% (5.4 kW) (the peaking mode). The electrical and thermodynamic efficiencies are calculated for all operating modes, and the most efficient mode, in which the electrical efficiency reached almost 70%, is determined. The air excess coefficient and heat loss with flue gases q 2 are determined, and it is revealed that the heat loss q 5 decreases from 40 to 25% with increasing the load. Thermal balances are drawn up for the following components of the system the reformer, the SOFC battery, the catalytic burner for afterburning anode gases, the heat exchanger for heating the cathode air and the mixture of natural gas and steam, and the actual fuel utilization rates in the electrochemical generator are calculated. An equation for the resulting natural gas steam reforming reaction was obtained based on the results from calculating the equilibrium composition of reforming products for the achieved temperatures at the reformer outlet t 3.

  7. Effect of variable conditions on steam reforming and aqueous phase reforming of n-butanol over Ni/CeO2 and Ni/Al2O3 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, B.; Sullivan, H.; Leclerc, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    A comparison of aqueous phase reforming (APR) and steam reforming (SR) of n-butanol (n-BuOH) over Ni(20 wt%) loaded Al2O3 and CeO2 catalysts has been discussed in this paper. The BuOH conversion increases as the system pressure decreases in APR and SR. For both catalysts, the H2 and CO2 selectivity increased as the pressure increased in SR, reached a maximum at the bubble point pressure, and then decreased in the APR region. The Ni/CeO2 catalyst demonstrated higher selectivity for H2 and CO2than the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst during SR, which are consistent with the results of our previous publication on APR of n-butanol (n-BuOH) over similar catalysts. Unlike in APR, the Ni/CeO2 catalyst produced CO in SR. For both of the catalysts, the activation energies for H2 and CO2 production and BuOH conversion were lower in SR than that in APR. The proposed primary reaction pathway for reforming of BuOH on both catalysts is the same for APR and SR. The n-BuOH dehydrogenated to butaldehyde followed by decarbonylation to propane. Then the propane is steam reformed to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The CO converts to CO2 mostly through water gas shift.

  8. The Effect of Fe in Perovskite Catalysts for Steam CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun-Hyeok; Noh, Young-Su; Lim, Sung Soo; Ahn, Byoung Sung; Moon, Dong Ju

    2016-02-01

    In this work, La0.95Sr0.05Ni(1-x)Fe(x)O3 catalysts were prepared by modified EDTA-cellulose method and the catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as N2 physisorption, TPR, XRD, SEM, TEM-EDS and TG analysis. La00.95Sr0.05Ni0.5Fe0.5O3 catalyst showed better catalytic performance under the reaction conditions of 900 degrees C, 21 bar and feed molar ratio of CH4:CO2:H20 = 1:0.7:1.5. It is considered that the dilution effect on nickel prevented the formation of large monometallic ensembles that favour the carbon deposition in reforming reactions, and the mean metallic particle size of Ni decreased with increasing substitution rate in B site. Therefore, partial substitution of Fe in B site enhances the dilution effect and induces a reaction between CO2 and La2O3, thereby resisting the carbon deposition and increasing CO2 conversion. PMID:27433705

  9. Ethanol steam reforming in a molten carbonate fuel cell: a thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, S.; Maggio, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    The economy of the world energy sources is showing interest in the utilization of oxygenated products whose purpose is to improve the storage and the transfer of hydrogen as a non-polluting fuel with a high heat power density. An interesting field of utilization of these products is represented by the fuel cell systems for production of electricity. In this respect, the use of the water/ethanol mixture has been investigated as an alternative fuel for molten carbonate fuel cells. Some thermodynamic calculations have been carried out by a mathematical model to determine the energy and mass balances for a water/ethanol fuelled molten carbonate fuel cell. The thermodynamic efficiencies determined for this system have been correlated with the main operative parameters that give some interesting findings indicating encouraging aspects on the utilization of these systems to the production of electricity and heat. Lastly, attractive operative conditions have been determined and compared with that of a molten carbonate fuel cell with methane direct internal reforming.

  10. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

    2011-02-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides

  11. Sustainable production of syngas from biomass-derived glycerol by steam reforming over highly stable Ni/SiC.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Min; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2012-08-01

    The production of syngas was investigated by steam reforming glycerol over Ni/Al(2)O(3), Ni/CeO(2), and Ni/SiC (which have acidic, basic, and neutral properties) at temperatures below 773 K. The complete and stable conversion of glycerol with a yield (higher than 90 %) of gaseous products (mainly syngas) was achieved over Ni/SiC during a 60 h reaction, whereas the conversion of glycerol continually decreases over Ni/Al(2)O(3) (by 49.8 %) and Ni/CeO(2) (by 77.1 %). The deactivation of Ni/Al(2)O(3) and Ni/CeO(2) is mainly caused by coke deposition because of the C-C cleavage of the byproducts produced by dehydration over acidic sites and condensation over basic sites. Gaseous products with a 1.0-1.9 syngas ratio (H(2)/CO) are produced over Ni/SiC. This ratio is required for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. However, a syngas ratio of more than 3.0 was observed over Ni/Al(2)O(3) and Ni/CeO(2) because of the high activity of the water-gas-shift reaction. Any dissociative or associative adsorption of water on Al(2)O(3) and CeO(2) promotes a water-gas-shift reaction and produces a higher syngas ratio. H(2) and CO were mainly produced by decomposition of glycerol through dehydrogenation and decarbonylation over Ni sites. Thus, SiC promotes an intrinsic contribution of nickel (dehydrogenation, and decarbonylation) without any byproducts from the dehydration and condensation. PMID:22753307

  12. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

    2012-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

  13. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Mineralization for High Organic and Nitrate Waste Streams for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Williams, M.R.

    2008-07-01

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NOx in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 deg. C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 deg. C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {>=}1000 deg. C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NOx. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O. (authors)

  14. Hierarchical copper-decorated nickel nanocatalysts supported on La2O3 for low-temperature steam reforming of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jyong-Yue; Su, Wei-Nien; Rick, John; Yang, Sheng-Chiang; Cheng, Ju-Hsiang; Pan, Chun-Jern; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2014-02-01

    Copper/nickel nanocatalysts with a unique morphology were prepared by thermal reduction of a perovskite LaNix Cu1-x O3 precursor (x=1, 0.9, and 0.7). During thermal reduction, copper was first reduced and reacted with lanthanum to form metastable Cu5 La and Cu13 La. When the thermal reduction temperature was increased, the perovskite decomposed to Ni and La2 O3 , CuLa alloys disappeared, and Cu deposits on Ni nanoparticles were generated, thereby forming Cu/Ni nanocatalysts with hierarchical structures. Nanosized nickel, decorated with copper and supported on La2 O3 , could be produced at 520-550 °C. The steam reforming of ethanol was used as a model reaction to demonstrate the catalytic capability of the materials formed. The hierarchical structure of the Cu/Ni/La2 O3 catalysts confers synergetic effects that greatly favor the dehydrogenation of ethanol and which break the C-C bond to produce a higher yield of hydrogen at a low reaction temperature, whereas La2 O3 provides the required stability during the reaction. The reaction at 290 °C achieved almost 100 % conversion with a hydrogen yield reaching 2.21 molH2  mol(-1) EtOH thus indicating that this special structural feature can achieve high activity for the SRE at low temperatures. The proposed synthesis of nanocatalysts appears to be a good way to generate oxide-supported hierarchically structured nanoparticles that can also be applied to other reactions catalyzed by a heterogeneous metal oxide system. PMID:24307476

  15. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-01-11

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

  16. Steam reforming of methanol over a Cu/ZnO/Al 2O 3 catalyst: a kinetic analysis and strategies for suppression of CO formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrell, Johan; Birgersson, Henrik; Boutonnet, Magali

    Steam reforming of methanol (CH 3OH+H 2O→CO 2+3H 2) was studied over a commercial Cu/ZnO/Al 2O 3 catalyst for production of hydrogen onboard proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles. A simple power-law rate expression was fitted to experimental data in order to predict the rates of CO 2 and H 2 formation under various reaction conditions. The apparent activation energy ( Ea) was estimated to be 100.9 kJ mol -1, in good agreement with values reported in the literature. Appreciable amounts of CO by-product were formed in the reforming process at low contact times and high methanol conversions. Being a catalyst poison that deactivates the electrocatalyst at the fuel cell anode at concentrations exceeding a few ppm, special attention was paid to the pathways for CO formation and strategies for its suppression. It was found that increasing the steam-methanol ratio effectively decreases CO formation. Likewise, addition of oxygen or air to the steam-methanol mixture minimises the production of CO. By shortening the contact time and lowering the maximum temperature in the reactor, CO production can be further decreased by suppressing the reverse water-gas shift reaction.

  17. 2009 PILOT SCALE FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING TESTING USING THE THOR (THERMAL ORGANIC REDUCTION) PROCESS: ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR TANK 48H ORGANIC DESTRUCTION - 10408

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Jantzen, C.; Burket, P.; Crawford, C.; Daniel, G.; Aponte, C.; Johnson, C.

    2009-12-28

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) must empty the contents of Tank 48H, a 1.3 million gallon Type IIIA HLW storage tank, to return this tank to service. The tank contains organic compounds, mainly potassium tetraphenylborate that cannot be processed downstream until the organic components are destroyed. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) technology, herein after referred to as steam reforming, has been demonstrated to be a viable process to remove greater than 99.9% of the organics from Tank 48H during various bench scale and pilot scale tests. These demonstrations were supported by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and the Department of Energy (DOE) has concurred with the SRR recommendation to proceed with the deployment of the FBSR technology to treat the contents of Tank 48H. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and proved the concept with non-radioactive simulants for SRR beginning in 2003. By 2008, several pilot scale campaigns had been completed and extensive crucible testing and bench scale testing were performed in the SRNL Shielded Cells using Tank 48H radioactive sample. SRNL developed a Tank 48H non-radioactive simulant complete with organic compounds, salt, and metals characteristic of those measured in a sample of the radioactive contents of Tank 48H. FBSR Pilot Scaled Testing with the Tank 48H simulant has demonstrated the ability to remove greater than 98% of the nitrites and greater than 99.5% of the nitrates from the Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily alkali carbonate. The alkali carbonate is soluble and, thus, amenable to pumping as a liquid to downstream facilities for processing. The FBSR technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) pilot scale steam reformer at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. Additional ESTD tests were completed in 2008 and in 2009 that further demonstrated the

  18. Steam reforming of fast pyrolysis-derived aqueous phase oxygenates over Co, Ni, and Rh metals supported on MgAl2O4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xing, Rong; Dagle, Vanessa Lebarbier; Flake, Matthew; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Deshmane, Chinmay; Dagle, Robert A.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper we examine the feasibility of steam reforming the mixed oxygenate aqueous fraction derived from fast pyrolysis bio-oils. Catalysts selective towards hydrogen formation and resistant to carbon formation utilizing feeds with relatively low steam-to-carbon (S/C) ratios are desired. Rh (5 wt%), Pt (5 wt%), Ru (5 wt%), Ir (5 wt%), Ni (15 wt%), and Co (15 wt%) metals supported on MgAl2O4 were evaluated for catalytic performance at 500 °C and 1 atm using a complex feed mixture comprising acids, polyols, cycloalkanes, and phenolic compounds. The Rh catalyst was found to be the most active and resistant to carbonmore » formation. The Ni and Co catalysts were found to be more active than the other noble metal catalysts investigated (Pt, Ru, and Ir).« less

  19. Kinetic Study on the Effect of Chromium Addition to Ni-Based Catalysts for the Steam-CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Hwa; Li, Peng; Moon, Dong-Ju; Park, Nam-Cook; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, the kinetic effects of Ni-based catalysts containing various amounts of Cr on the steam-CO2 reforming (SCR) of methane were studied. Kinetic expressions for the SCR of methane over the Ni-based catalysts have been proposed using the power-law rate expression, based on the kinetic data obtained. In addition, the Arrhenius equation was used for calculating the activation energy. Analysis of the data revealed four simple results. Firstly, the partial pressure of CH4 exerts a major influence on the CH4 conversion rates. Secondly, the CH4 conversion rate is inversely proportional to the partial pressure of CO2. Thirdly, the partial pressure of steam has a very slight effect on the reaction rates. Finally, all the catalysts studied have similar apparent activation energies. PMID:27433614

  20. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG) over nickel catalysts supported on cationic surfactant-templated mesoporous aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Park, Sunyoung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Pil; Chung, Jin Suk; Song, In Kyu

    Two types of mesoporous γ-aluminas (denoted as A-A and A-S) are prepared by a hydrothermal method under different basic conditions using cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) as a templating agent. A-A and A-S are synthesized in a medium of ammonia solution and sodium hydroxide solution, respectively. Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 catalysts (Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S) are then prepared by an impregnation method, and are applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of a mesoporous γ-Al 2O 3 support on the catalytic performance of Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 is investigated. The identity of basic solution strongly affects the physical properties of the A-A and A-S supports. The high surface-area of the mesoporous γ-aluminas and the strong metal-support interaction of supported catalysts greatly enhance the dispersion of nickel species on the catalyst surface. The well-developed mesopores of the Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts prohibit the polymerization of carbon species on the catalyst surface during the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, both Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts give better catalytic performance than the nickel catalyst supported on commercial γ-Al 2O 3 (Ni/A-C). In addition, the Ni/A-A catalyst is superior to the Ni/A-S catalyst. The relatively strong metal-support interaction of Ni/A-A catalyst effectively suppresses the sintering of metallic nickel and the carbon deposition in the steam reforming of LNG. The large pores of the Ni/A-A catalyst also play an important role in enhancing internal mass transfer during the reaction.

  1. Steam reforming of n-hexane on pellet and monolithic catalyst beds. A comparative study on improvements due to heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts with higher available active surface areas and better thermal conductivity than conventional pellets beds, making possible the steam reforming of fuels heavier than naphtha, were examined. Performance comparisons were made between conventional pellet beds and honeycomb monolith catalysts using n-hexane as the fuel. Metal-supported monoliths were examined. These offer higher structural stability and higher thermal conductivity than ceramic supports. Data from two metal monoliths of different nickel catalyst loadings were compared to pellets under the same operating conditions. Improved heat transfer and better conversion efficiencies were obtained with the monolith having higher catalyst loading. Surface-gas interaction was observed throughout the length of the monoliths.

  2. Alleviating coking in ethanol steam reforming by co-loading binary oxides Ni-M (M=Ag, Cu, Mn) on peony-like ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, C. N.; Li, J. G.; Li, H.; Chen, L. Q.; Sun, J.; Lee, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Previously, hydrothermally prepared mesoporous peony-like ceria (PCO) material was shown to exhibit superior catalytic properties for CO oxidation and ethanol reforming. Ni supported PCO had been shown to have high activity for ethanol steam reforming at low temperature. In this work, Ag, Cu and Mn is co-loaded with Ni on PCO catalysts by impregnation method. The catalysts were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a combined thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, and mass spectrometry (TG-DSC-MS). It was found that all the catalysts gave 100% ethanol conversion above ca. 300°C and exhibited similar H2 yield. It is found that the severe coking problem for the Ni-loaded PCO catalyst was alleviated significantly if Ag, Cu or Mn is co-loaded. Among them, the addition of Mn is the most effective in reducing carbon formation.

  3. MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C

    2008-12-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to

  4. DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER WASTE FORMS FOR SODIUM BEARING WASTE AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C; Carol Jantzen, C

    2007-08-27

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) processing of Sodium Bearing Waste simulants was performed in December 2006 by THOR{sup sm} Treatment Technologies LLC (TTT) The testing was performed at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) pilot plant facilities in Golden, CO. FBSR products from these pilot tests on simulated waste representative of the SBW at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) were subsequently transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization and leach testing. Four as-received Denitration and Mineralization Reformer (DMR) granular/powder samples and four High Temperature Filter (HTF) powder samples were received by SRNL. FBSR DMR samples had been taken from the ''active'' bed, while the HTF samples were the fines collected as carryover from the DMR. The process operated at high fluidizing velocities during the mineralization test such that nearly all of the product collected was from the HTF. Active bed samples were collected from the DMR to monitor bed particle size distribution. Characterization of these crystalline powder samples shows that they are primarily Al, Na and Si, with > 1 wt% Ca, Fe and K. The DMR samples contained less than 1 wt% carbon and the HTF samples ranged from 13 to 26 wt% carbon. X-ray diffraction analyses show that the DMR samples contained significant quantities of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} startup bed. The DMR samples became progressively lower in starting bed alumina with major Na/Al/Si crystalline phases (nepheline and sodium aluminosilicate) present as cumulative bed turnover occurred but 100% bed turnover was not achieved. The HTF samples also contained these major crystalline phases. Durability testing of the DMR and HTF samples using the ASTM C1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT) 7-day leach test at 90 C was performed along with several reference glass samples. Comparison of the normalized leach rates for the various DMR and HTF components was made with the reference glasses and

  5. Superior performance of Ni–W–Ce mixed-metal oxide catalysts for ethanol steam reforming: Synergistic effects of W- and Ni-dopants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zongyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Yao, Siyu; Johnson-Peck, Aaron C.; Zhao, Fuzhen; Michorczyk, Piotr; Kubacka, Anna; Stach, Eric A.; Fernández-García, Marcos; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; et al

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction was examined over a series of Ni-W-Ce oxide catalysts. The structures of the catalysts were characterized using in-situ techniques including X-ray diffraction, Pair Distribution Function, X-ray absorption fine structure and transmission electron microscopy; while possible surface intermediates for the ESR reaction were investigated by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. In these materials, all the W and part of the Ni were incorporated into the CeO₂ lattice, with the remaining Ni forming highly dispersed nano NiO (< 2 nm) outside the Ni-W-Ce oxide structure. The nano NiO was reduced to Nimore » under ESR conditions. The Ni-W-Ce systeme exhibited a much larger lattice strain than those seen for Ni-Ce and W-Ce. Synergistic effects between Ni and W inside ceria produced a substantial amount of defects and O vacancies that led to high catalytic activity, selectivity and stability (i.e. resistance to coke formation) during ethanol steam reforming.« less

  6. Renewable H2 from glycerol steam reforming: effect of La2O3 and CeO2 addition to Pt/Al2O3 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Montini, Tiziano; Singh, Rakesh; Das, Piyali; Lorenzut, Barbara; Bertero, Nicolás; Riello, Pietro; Benedetti, Alvise; Giambastiani, Giuliano; Bianchini, Claudio; Zinoviev, Sergey; Miertus, Stanislav; Fornasiero, Paolo

    2010-05-25

    Glycerol is the main byproduct of biodiesel production and its increased production volume derives from the increasing demand for biofuels. The conversion of glycerol to hydrogen-rich mixtures presents an attractive route towards sustainable biodiesel production. Here we explored the use of Pt/Al(2)O(3)-based catalysts for the catalytic steam reforming of glycerol, evidencing the influence of La(2)O(3) and CeO(2) doping on the catalyst activity and selectivity. The addition of the latter metal oxides to a Pt/Al(2)O(3) catalyst is found to significantly improve the glycerol steam reforming, with high H(2) and CO(2) selectivities. A good catalytic stability is achieved for the Pt/La(2)O(3)/Al(2)O(3) system working at 350 degrees C, while the Pt/CeO(2)/Al(2)O(3) catalyst sharply deactivates after 20 h under similar conditions. Studies carried out on fresh and exhausted catalysts reveal that both systems maintain high surface areas and high Pt dispersions. Therefore, the observed catalyst deactivation can be attributed to coke deposition on the active sites throughout the catalytic process and only marginally to Pt nanoparticle sintering. This work suggests that an appropriate support composition is mandatory for preparing high-performance Pt-based catalysts for the sustainable conversion of glycerol into syngas. PMID:20422673

  7. Superior performance of Ni–W–Ce mixed-metal oxide catalysts for ethanol steam reforming: Synergistic effects of W- and Ni-dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zongyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Yao, Siyu; Johnson-Peck, Aaron C.; Zhao, Fuzhen; Michorczyk, Piotr; Kubacka, Anna; Stach, Eric A.; Fernández-García, Marcos; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Rodriguez, José A.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction was examined over a series of Ni-W-Ce oxide catalysts. The structures of the catalysts were characterized using in-situ techniques including X-ray diffraction, Pair Distribution Function, X-ray absorption fine structure and transmission electron microscopy; while possible surface intermediates for the ESR reaction were investigated by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. In these materials, all the W and part of the Ni were incorporated into the CeO₂ lattice, with the remaining Ni forming highly dispersed nano NiO (< 2 nm) outside the Ni-W-Ce oxide structure. The nano NiO was reduced to Ni under ESR conditions. The Ni-W-Ce systeme exhibited a much larger lattice strain than those seen for Ni-Ce and W-Ce. Synergistic effects between Ni and W inside ceria produced a substantial amount of defects and O vacancies that led to high catalytic activity, selectivity and stability (i.e. resistance to coke formation) during ethanol steam reforming.

  8. Potassium improved stability of Ni/MgO in the steam reforming of ethanol for the production of hydrogen for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frusteri, F.; Freni, S.; Chiodo, V.; Spadaro, L.; Bonura, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    The catalytic behavior of the bare and K-promoted 21% Ni/MgO catalyst in the ethanol steam reforming at MCFC operative conditions has been investigated. The effect of K loading (1-3 wt.%) on the catalytic activity, stability and coking rate have been addressed. K addition stabilizes Ni catalyst mainly by depressing the metal sintering, while coke formation does not seem to be influenced by alkali addition. Endurance test (500 h -1) performed at 20,000 h -1 allows foresee a very long catalyst life in the case of practical application. High H 2 productivity (>5 mol H 2/mol fed ethanol) was obtained. A change in the electronic properties of the active phase accounts for the effect of K addition on the catalytic behavior of the Ni/MgO catalyst.

  9. Stabilization of Hydrogen Production via Methanol Steam Reforming in Microreactor by Al2O3 Nano-Film Enhanced Catalyst Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heondo; Na, Jeong-Geol; Jang, Min Su; Ko, Chang Hyun

    2016-05-01

    In hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming reaction with microchannel reactor, Al2O3 thin film formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced on the surface of microchannel reactor prior to the coating of catalyst particles. Methanol conversion rate and hydrogen production rate, increased in the presence of Al2O3 thin film. Over-view and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy study showed that the adhesion between catalyst particles and the surface of microchannel reactor enhanced due to the presence of Al2O3 thin film. The improvement of hydrogen production rate inside the channels of microreactor mainly came from the stable fixation of catalyst particles on the surface of microchannels. PMID:27483762

  10. Preparation, structural characterization and catalytic properties of Co/CeO2 catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol and hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovón, Adriana S. P.; Lovón-Quintana, Juan J.; Almerindo, Gizelle I.; Valença, Gustavo P.; Bernardi, Maria I. B.; Araújo, Vinícius D.; Rodrigues, Thenner S.; Robles-Dutenhefner, Patrícia A.; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, Co/CeO2 catalysts, with different cobalt contents were prepared by the polymeric precursor method and were evaluated for the steam reforming of ethanol. The catalysts were characterized by N2 physisorption (BET method), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible diffuse reflectance, temperature programmed reduction analysis (TPR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM). It was observed that the catalytic behavior could be influenced by the experimental conditions and the nature of the catalyst employed. Physical-chemical characterizations revealed that the cobalt content of the catalyst influences the metal-support interaction which results in distinct catalyst performances. The catalyst with the highest cobalt content showed the best performance among the catalysts tested, exhibiting complete ethanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity close to 66% and good stability at a reaction temperature of 600 °C.

  11. Bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts with low amounts of Rh for the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane for fuel-cell applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandon, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Krause, T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-05-15

    Mono-metallic nickel and rhodium catalysts and bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeZrO{sub 2} and CeMgOx were prepared and evaluated for catalyzing the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane. The binary Ni-Rh supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with low weight loading of rhodium exhibited higher H{sub 2} yields than Ni or Rh alone. The Ni-Rh/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst exhibited higher performance and no coke formation, compared to the same metals on other supports. A NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase was obtained on all Ni and Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The presence of rhodium stabilized the spinel phase as well as NiOx species upon reforming while Ni alone was mostly reduced into metallic species. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis showed evidence of Ni-Rh alloy during preparation and even further after an accelerated aging at 900C in a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmosphere.

  12. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Kovarik, Libor; Wan, Haiying; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gerber, Mark A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2014-07-01

    In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of stable MgAl2O4 spinel-supported Rh and Ir catalysts for the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Firstly, catalytic performance for a series of noble metal catalysts supported on MgAl2O4 spinel was evaluated for SMR at 600-850°C. Turnover rate at 850°C follows the order: Pd > Pt > Ir > Rh > Ru > Ni. However, Rh and Ir were found to have the best combination of activity and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed ~2 nm Rh and ~1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the MgAl2O4 spinel support. Scanning Transition Electron Microscopy (STEM) images show that excellent dispersion was maintained even under challenging high temperature conditions (e.g. at 850°C in the presence of steam) while Ir and Rh catalysts supported on Al2O3 were observed to sinter at increased rates under the same conditions. These observations were further confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations which find that ~1 nm Rh and Ir particles (50-atom cluster) bind strongly to the MgAl2O4 surfaces via a redox process leading to a strong metal-support interaction, thus helping anchor the metal clusters and reduce the tendency to sinter. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that these supported smaller Rh and Ir particles have a lower work function than larger more bulk-like ones, which enables them to activate both water and methane more effectively than larger particles, yet have a minimal influence on the relative stability of coke precursors. In addition, theoretical mechanistic studies were used to probe the relationship between structure and reactivity. Consistent with the experimental observations, our theoretical modeling results also suggest that the small spinel-supported Ir particle catalyst is more active than the counterpart of Rh catalyst for SMR. This work was financially supported by the

  13. A study on methanol steam reforming to CO 2 and H 2 over the La 2CuO 4 nanofiber catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lizhen; Sun, Gebiao; Kawi, Sibudjing

    2008-01-01

    The La 2CuO 4 crystal nanofibers were prepared by using single-walled carbon nanotubes as templates under mild hydrothermal conditions. The steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to CO 2 and H 2 over such nanofiber catalysts was studied. At the low temperature of 150 °C and steam/methanol=1.3, methanol was completely (100%, 13.8 g/h g catalyst) converted to hydrogen and CO 2 without the generation of CO. Within the 60 h catalyst lifespan test, methanol conversion was maintained at 98.6% (13.6 g/h g catalyst) and with 100% CO 2 selectivity. In the meantime, for distinguishing the advantage of nanoscale catalyst, the La 2CuO 4 bulk powder was prepared and tested for the SRM reaction for comparison. Compared with the La 2CuO 4 nanofiber, the bulk powder La 2CuO 4 showed worse catalytic activity for the SRM reaction. The 100% conversion of methanol was achieved at the temperature of 400 °C, with the products being H 2 and CO 2 together with CO. The catalytic activity in terms of methanol conversion dropped to 88.7% (12.2 g/h g catalyst) in 60 h. The reduction temperature for nanofiber La 2CuO 4 was much lower than that for the La 2CuO 4 bulk powder. The nanofibers were of higher specific surface area (105.0 m 2/g), metal copper area and copper dispersion. The in situ FTIR and EPR experiments were employed to study the catalysts and catalytic process. In the nanofiber catalyst, there were oxygen vacancies. H 2-reduction resulted in the generation of trapped electrons [e] on the vacancy sites. Over the nanofiber catalyst, the intermediate H 2CO/HCO was stable and was reformed to CO 2 and H 2 by steam rather than being decomposed directly to CO and H 2. Over the bulk counterpart, apart from the direct decomposition of H 2CO/HCO to CO and H 2, the intermediate H 2COO might go through two decomposition ways: H 2COO=CO+H 2O and H 2COO=CO 2+H 2.

  14. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. Continuous separation of product hydrogen from the reforming gas mixture is expected to increase the yield of hydrogen significantly as predicted by model simulations. In the laboratory-scale experimental studies reported here steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, butane, methanol and Clearlite ® was conducted to produce pure hydrogen in a single step membrane reformer using commercially available Pd-Ag foil membranes and reforming/WGS catalysts. All of the experimental results demonstrated increase in hydrocarbon conversion due to hydrogen separation when compared with the hydrocarbon conversion without any hydrogen separation. Increase in hydrogen recovery was also shown to result in corresponding increase in hydrocarbon conversion in these studies demonstrating the basic concept. The experiments also provided insight into the effect of individual variables such as pressure, temperature, gas space velocity, and steam to carbon ratio. Steam reforming of butane was found to be limited by reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions used: catalysts used, average gas space velocity, and the reactor characteristics of surface area to volume ratio. Steam reforming of methanol in the presence of only WGS catalyst on the other hand indicated that the membrane reactor performance was limited by membrane permeation, especially at lower temperatures and lower feed pressures due to slower reconstitution of CO and H 2 into methane thus maintaining high hydrogen partial pressures in the reacting gas mixture. The limited amount of data collected with steam reforming of Clearlite ® indicated very good match between theoretical predictions and

  15. Single Step Bi-reforming and Oxidative Bi-reforming of Methane (Natural Gas) with Steam and Carbon Dioxide to Metgas (CO-2H2) for Methanol Synthesis: Self-Sufficient Effective and Exclusive Oxygenation of Methane to Methanol with Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Mathew, Thomas; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya

    2015-07-15

    Catalysts based on suitable metal oxide supports, such as NiO/MgO and CoO/MgO, were shown to be active for single step bi-reforming, the combined steam and dry reforming of methane or natural gas with H2O and CO2 exclusively to metgas (CO-2H2) for efficient methanol synthesis. Reactions were carried out in a tubular flow reactor under pressures up to 42 bar at 830-910 °C. Using a CH4 to steam to CO2 ratio of ∼3:2:1 in the gas feed, the H2/CO ratio of 2:1 was achieved, which is desired for subsequent methanol synthesis. The needed 2/1 steam/CO2 feed ratio together with the reaction heat for the endothermic bi-reforming can be conveniently obtained by the complete combustion of a quarter part of the overall used methane (natural gas) with oxygen of the air (oxidative bi-reforming). Complete combustion of a part of methane followed by bi-reforming leads to the production of metgas (H2/CO in 2:1 mol ratio) for self-sufficient exclusive methanol synthesis. The long sought after but elusive efficient and selective oxygenation of methane to methanol is thus achieved in an effective and economic way without any oxidation byproduct formation according to CH4 + 1/2O2 → CH3OH. PMID:26086090

  16. Vapor-liquid activity coefficients for methanol and ethanol from heat of solution data: application to steam-methane reforming.

    PubMed

    Kunz, R G; Baade, W F

    2001-11-16

    This paper presents equations and curves to calculate vapor-liquid phase equilibria for methanol and ethanol in dilute aqueous solution as a function of temperature, using activity coefficients at infinite dilution. These thermodynamic functions were originally derived to assess the distribution of by-product contaminants in the process condensate and the steam-system deaerator of a hydrogen plant [Paper ENV-00-171 presented at the NPRA 2000 Environmental Conference, San Antonio, TX, 10-12 September 2000], but have general applicability to other systems as well. The functions and calculation method described here are a necessary piece of an overall prediction technique to estimate atmospheric emissions from the deaerator-vent when the process condensate is recycled as boiler feed water (BFW) make-up. Having such an estimation technique is of particular significance at this time because deaerator-vent emissions are already coming under regulatory scrutiny in California [Emissions from Hydrogen Plant Process Vents, Adopted 21 January 2000] followed closely elsewhere in the US, and eventually worldwide. The overall technique will enable a permit applicant to estimate environmental emissions to comply with upcoming regulations, and a regulatory agency to evaluate those estimates. It may also be useful to process engineers as a tool to estimate contaminant concentrations and flow rates in internal process streams such as the steam-generating system. Metallurgists and corrosion engineers might be able to use the results for materials selection. PMID:11606240

  17. Activity and stability enhancement of copper-alumina catalysts using cerium and zinc promoters for the selective production of hydrogen via steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sanjay; Pant, K. K.

    The catalytic activity and hydrogen selectivity of cerium and zinc promoted copper-alumina catalysts have been investigated for the selective production of hydrogen via steam reforming of methanol (SRM). The SRM was carried out in a fixed bed tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure over a temperature range 200-300 °C. The major reaction products were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with traces of carbon monoxide. Catalysts of varying compositions were prepared by the wet impregnation method and characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), BET surface area, pore volume, pore size, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). Results revealed that the methanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity and carbon monoxide formation varied with the type of promoter and content of copper in the catalyst. Cerium promoted Cu-Zn-Ce-Al-oxide catalysts improved the activity and hydrogen selectivity greatly and also kept the CO formation very low. Using cerium the SRM could be carried out at lower temperature with high methanol conversion, results in suppression of methanol decomposition and reverse water gas shift reactions eventually end-up with the low carbon monoxide and hydrogen rich product stream. Cerium also stabilizes the copper-alumina catalysts effectively that was confirmed by deactivation studies in which cerium promoted Cu-Zn-Ce-Al-oxide catalysts gave the consistent performance for a long run-time compared to catalysts containing only zinc promoter. The optimum operating conditions for SRM have been investigated by detailed study of effects of reaction temperature, contact time and steam to methanol molar ratio on methanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity and CO formation. Reaction pathway has been proposed for the SRM based on results obtained.

  18. Enhancement of Glycerol Steam Reforming Activity and Thermal Stability by Incorporating CeO2 and TiO2 in Ni- and Co-MCM-41 Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dade, William N.

    Hydrogen (H2) has many applications in industry with current focus shifted to production of hydrocarbon fuels and valuable oxygenates using the Fischer-Tropsch technology and direct use in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Hydrogen is generally produced via steam reforming of natural gas or alcohols like methanol and ethanol. Glycerol, a by-product of biodiesel production process, is currently considered to be one of the most attractive sources of sustainable H2 due to its high H/C ratio and bio-based origin. Ni and Co based catalysts have been reported to be active in glycerol steam reforming (GSR); however, deactivation of the catalysts by carbon deposition and sintering under GSR operating conditions is a major challenge. In this study, a series of catalysts containing Ni and Co nanoparticles incorporated in CeO2 and TiO2 modified high surface area MCM-41 have been synthesized using one-pot method. The catalysts are tested for GSR (at H2O/Glycerol mole ratio of 12 and GHSV of 2200 h-1) to study the effect of support modification and reaction temperature (450 - 700 °C) on the product selectivity and long term stability. GSR results revealed that all the catalysts performed significantly well exhibiting over 85% glycerol conversion at 650 °C except Ni catalysts that showed better low temperature activities. Deactivation studies of the catalysts conducted at 650 °C indicated that the Ni-TiO2-MCM-41 and Ni-CeO 2-MCM-41 were resistant to deactivation with ˜100% glycerol conversion for 40 h. In contrast, Co-TiO2-MCM-41 perform poorly as the catalyst rapidly deactivated after 12 h to yield ˜20% glycerol conversion after 40 h. The WAXRD and TGA-DSC analyses of spent catalysts showed a significant amount of coke deposition that might explain catalysts deactivation. The flattening shape of the original BET type IV isotherm with drastic reduction of catalyst surface area can also be responsible for observed drop in catalysts activities.

  19. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Over Nickel-Phosphorus-Alumina Xerogel Catalyst Prepared by a Carbon-Templating Epoxide-Driven Sol-Gel Method.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yongju; Park, Seungwon; Han, Seung Ju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Jinwon; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    A nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was prepared by a carbon-templating epoxide-driven sol-gel method (denoted as CNPA catalyst), and it was applied to the hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). For comparison, a nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was also prepared by a similar method in the absence of carbon template (denoted as NPA catalyst). The effect of carbon template addition on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the catalysts in the steam reforming of LNG was investigated. Both CNPA and NPA catalysts showed excellent textural properties with well-developed mesoporous structure. However, CNPA catalyst retained a more reducible nickel aluminate phase than NPA catalyst. XRD analysis of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts revealed that nickel sintering on the CNPA catalyst was suppressed compared to that on the NPA catalyst. From H2-TPD and CH4-TPD measurements of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts, it was also revealed that CNPA catalyst with large amount of hydrogen uptake and strong hydrogen-binding sites showed larger amount of methane adsorption than NPA catalyst. In the hydrogen production by steam reforming of LNG, CNPA catalyst with large methane adsorption capacity showed a better catalytic activity than NPA catalyst. PMID:27483798

  20. Simple cerium-triethanolamine complex: Synthesis, characterization, thermal decomposition and its application to prepare ceria support for platinum catalysts used in methane steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wattanathana, Worawat; Nootsuwan, Nollapan; Veranitisagul, Chatchai; Koonsaeng, Nattamon; Laosiripojana, Navadol; Laobuthee, Apirat

    2015-06-01

    Cerium-triethanolamine complex was synthesized by simple complexation method in 1-propanol solvent using cerium(III) chloride as a metal source and triethanolamine as a ligand. The structures of the prepared complex were proposed based on FT-IR, FT-Raman and ESI-MS results as equimolar of triethanolamine and cerium chelated complex having monomeric tricyclic structure with and without chloride anion as another coordinating group known as ceratrane. The complex was used as a precursor for ceria material done by thermal decomposition. XRD result revealed that when calcined at 600 °C for 2 h, the cerium complex was totally turned into pure ceria with cubic fluorite structure. The obtained ceria was then employed to synthesize platinum doped ceria catalysts for methane steam reforming. Various amounts of platinum i.e. 1, 3, 5 and 10 mol percents were introduced on the ceria support by microwave-assisted wetness impregnation using ammonium tetrachloroplatinate(II). The platinum-impregnated ceria powders were subjected to calcination in 10% hydrogen/helium atmosphere at 500 °C for 3 h to reduce platinum(II) to platinum(0). XRD patterns of the catalysts confirmed that the platinum particles doped on the ceria support were in the form of platinum(0). Catalytic activity test showed that the catalytic activities got higher as the amounts of platinum doped increased. Besides, the portions of coke formation on the surface of catalysts were reduced as the amounts of platinum doped increased.

  1. Mechanistic Insights of Ethanol Steam Reforming over Ni–CeO x (111): The Importance of Hydroxyl Groups for Suppressing Coke Formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zongyuan; Duchoň, Tomáš; Wang, Huanru; Peterson, Erik W.; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Zhou, Jing; Matolín, Vladimir; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Rodriguez, José A.; et al

    2015-07-30

    We have studied the reaction of ethanol and water over Ni–CeO2-x(111) model surfaces to elucidate the mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. Our results provide insights about the importance of hydroxyl groups to the ESR reaction over Ni-based catalysts. Systematically, we have investigated the reaction of ethanol on Ni–CeO2-x(111) at varying Ce³⁺ concentrations (CeO1.8–2.0) with absence/presence of water using a combination of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Consistent with previous reports, upon annealing, metallic Ni formed on reduced ceria while NiO was the main component on fully oxidized ceria. Ni⁰ is themore » active phase leading to both the C–C and C–H cleavage of ethanol but is also responsible for carbon accumulation or coking. We have identified a Ni₃C phase that formed prior to the formation of coke. At temperatures above 600K, the lattice oxygen from ceria and the hydroxyl groups from water interact cooperatively in the removal of coke, likely through a strong metal–support interaction between nickel and ceria that facilitates oxygen transfer.« less

  2. Mechanistic Insights of Ethanol Steam Reforming over Ni–CeO x (111): The Importance of Hydroxyl Groups for Suppressing Coke Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zongyuan; Duchoň, Tomáš; Wang, Huanru; Peterson, Erik W.; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Zhou, Jing; Matolín, Vladimir; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Rodriguez, José A.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-07-30

    We have studied the reaction of ethanol and water over Ni–CeO2-x(111) model surfaces to elucidate the mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. Our results provide insights about the importance of hydroxyl groups to the ESR reaction over Ni-based catalysts. Systematically, we have investigated the reaction of ethanol on Ni–CeO2-x(111) at varying Ce³⁺ concentrations (CeO1.8–2.0) with absence/presence of water using a combination of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Consistent with previous reports, upon annealing, metallic Ni formed on reduced ceria while NiO was the main component on fully oxidized ceria. Ni⁰ is the active phase leading to both the C–C and C–H cleavage of ethanol but is also responsible for carbon accumulation or coking. We have identified a Ni₃C phase that formed prior to the formation of coke. At temperatures above 600K, the lattice oxygen from ceria and the hydroxyl groups from water interact cooperatively in the removal of coke, likely through a strong metal–support interaction between nickel and ceria that facilitates oxygen transfer.

  3. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105 And AN-103) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, Carol; Herman, Connie; Crawford, Charles; Bannochie, Christopher; Burket, Paul; Daniel, Gene; Cozzi, Alex; Nash, Charles; Miller, Donald; Missimer, David

    2014-01-10

    One of the immobilization technologies under consideration as a Supplemental Treatment for Hanford’s Low Activity Waste (LAW) is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The FBSR technology forms a mineral waste form at moderate processing temperatures thus retaining and atomically bonding the halides, sulfates, and technetium in the mineral phases (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite). Additions of kaolin clay are used instead of glass formers and the minerals formed by the FBSR technology offers (1) atomic bonding of the radionuclides and constituents of concern (COC) comparable to glass, (2) short and long term durability comparable to glass, (3) disposal volumes comparable to glass, and (4) higher Na2O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings than glass. The higher FBSR Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings contribute to the low disposal volumes but also provide for more rapid processing of the LAW. Recent FBSR processing and testing of Hanford radioactive LAW (Tank SX-105 and AN-103) waste is reported and compared to previous radioactive and non-radioactive LAW processing and testing.

  4. Ni/MgO-MgAl2O4 Catalysts with Bimodal Pore Structure for Steam-CO2-Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Yang, Eun-Hyeok; Moon, Dong Ju; Kim, Sang Woo

    2015-08-01

    The bead type MgO-MgAl2O4 catalyst supports with bimodal pore structures were fabricated via an extrusion molding of gels derived from the precursor mixture of mesoporous MgO particles and aluminum magnesium hydroxide, followed by heat treatment. To investigate the effect of macro pore structures on the catalytic activity of the Ni/MgO-MgAl2O4 catalysts in the steam and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (SCR), two kinds of the catalysts with largely different macro pore volumes and sizes but nearly the same meso pore volume and size were compared. The bimodal catalyst with a large macro pore size and volume exhibited a highly enhanced CO2 conversion from 22.3 to 37.1% but a slightly reduced CH4 conversion from 95.3 to 92.1% at the same feed ratio. The SCR results show that the large macro pores can lead to a highly enhanced mass transfer rate of CO2 absorption into the pore channels of the magnesium alumina spinel. PMID:26369180

  5. Where does methanol lose hydrogen to trigger steam reforming? A revisit of methanol dehydrogenation on the PdZn alloy model obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-02-01

    Pd/ZnO is a promising catalyst studied for methanol steam reforming (MSR) and the 1 : 1 PdZn alloy is demonstrated to be the active component. It is believed that MSR starts from methanol dehydrogenation to methoxy. Previous studies of methanol dehydrogenation on the ideal PdZn(111) surface show that methanol adsorbs weakly on the PdZn(111) surface and it is hard for methanol to transform into methoxy because of the high dehydrogenation barrier, indicating that the catalyst model is not appropriate for investigating the first step of MSR. Using the model derived from our recent kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we examined the process CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO. Compared with the ideal model, methanol adsorbs much more strongly and the barrier from CH3OH → CH3O is much lower on the kMC model. On the other hand, the C-H bond breaking of CH3O, CH2O and CHO becomes harder. We show that co-adsorbed water is important for refreshing the active sites. The present study shows that the first MSR step most likely takes place on three-fold hollow sites formed by Zn atoms, and the inhomogeneity of the PdZn alloy may exert significant influences on reactions. PMID:26771029

  6. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic - oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria

  7. Effect of Gold Particle Size on Steam Reforming of Methanol Over Au/CeO2-ZrO2 Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Pandian; Kim, Dong Ha; Park, Eun Duck

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effect of the particle size of gold on steam reforming of methanol over Au/CeO2-ZrO2 catalysts. Gold was loaded onto CeO2-ZrO2 through deposition-precipitation. The average particle size (2-12 nm) of the gold was controlled by thermal reduction under H2 at various temperatures and by chemical reduction with various reducing agents. The catalytic activity decreased significantly with increasing particle size of the gold. The turnover frequency at the interface between gold and a support appeared to be independent of particle size in the range 2-5 nm, which implies that the perimeter of the particle may be the active site for this reaction. Methanol adsorption and conversion over these catalysts were also investigated with in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. Analytical results for various adsorbed intermediate species during methanol conversion suggests that transformation of methoxy species is facilitated by use of smaller gold particles. PMID:27483761

  8. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic -more » oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria« less

  9. Deactivation of steam-reforming model catalysts by coke formation. II. Promotion with potassium and effect of water

    SciTech Connect

    Demicheli, M.C.; Duprez, D.; Barbier, J. ); Ferretti, O.A.; Ponzi, E.N. )

    1994-02-01

    The influence of potassium on the hydrogenolysis of cyclopentane and on the simultaneous carbon formation over a series of alumina-supported Ni catalysts was studied. With increasing potassium loadings at temperatures where either a deactivating two-dimensional carbon or a filamentary carbon was formed, the catalytic activity passed through a maximum and then decreased. With relatively high K-doses there was less coking in the presence of steam; the growth of filamentary carbon was then largely reduced. Characterization of the coked catalysts by temperature-programmed oxidation and SEM disclosed quite different roles of alkali: at lower contents, associated with alumina, potassium facilitates the formation of filamentary carbon and minimizes the generation of coke precursors, whereas at higher contents it acts as a poison for both hydrogenolysis and coking reactions. In all cases, the alkali promoted the catalytic oxidation of the carbon deposits. Because of its localization, the alkali could also modify the nickel-carbon interface in carbon filaments. 32 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Investigation of sulfur interactions on a conventional nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell anode during methane steam and dry reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Whitney S.

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are an attractive energy source because they do not have undesirable emissions, are scalable, and are feedstock flexible, which means they can operate using a variety of fuel mixtures containing H2 and hydrocarbons. In terms of fuel flexibility, most potential fuel sources contain sulfur species, which severely poison the nickel-based anode. The main objective of this thesis is to systematically evaluate sulfur interactions on a conventional Ni/YSZ anode and compare sulfur poisoning during methane steam and dry reforming (SMR and DMR) to a conventional catalyst (Sud Chemie, Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4). Reforming experiments (SMR and DMR) were carried out in a packed bed reactor (PBR), and it was demonstrated that Ni/YSZ is much more sensitive to sulfur poisoning than Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4 as evidenced by the decline in activity to zero in under an hour for both SMR and DMR. Adsorption and desorption of H2S and SO2 on both catalysts was evaluated, and despite the low amount of accessible nickel on Ni/YSZ (14 times lower than Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4), it adsorbs 20 times more H2S and 50 times more SO2 than Ni/K 2O-CaAl2O4. A one-dimensional, steady state PBR model (DetchemPBED) was used to evaluate SMR and DMR under poisoning conditions using the Deutschmann mechanism and a recently published sulfur sub-mechanism. To fit the observed deactivation in the presence of 1 ppm H2S, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant was increased by a factor 16,000 for Ni/YSZ and 96 for Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4. A tubular SAE reactor was designed and fabricated for evaluating DMR in a reactor that mimics an SOFC. Evidence of hydrogen diffusion through a supposedly impermeable layer indicated that the tubular SAE reactor has a major flaw in which gases diffuse to unintended parts of the tube. It was also found to be extremely susceptible to coking which leads to cell failure even in operating regions that mimic real biogas. These problems made it impossible to validate the tubular SAE

  11. Utilization of high specific surface area CuO-CeO2 catalysts for high temperature processes of hydrogen production: steam re-forming of ethanol and methane dry re-forming.

    PubMed

    Djinović, Petar; Batista, Jurka; Cehić, Benis; Pintar, Albin

    2010-03-25

    CuO-CeO(2) mixed oxide catalysts with 10, 15, and 20 mol % CuO content were prepared by the hard template method using KIT-6 silica as a template. The applied synthesis method yields solids with BET surface area in excess of 147 m(2)/g, highly porous nanocrystalline CeO(2) morphology and dispersion of CuO phase between 28 and 40%, corresponding to CuO particle size between 1.3 and 1.9 nm. Increasing the CuO content caused a decrease in dispersion of this phase and a further decrease of surface acid site abundance, determined by NH(3) chemisorption/TPD method, but improved the reducibility extent of CeO(2) (14.5, 16.1 and 24.5% for CuCe10, CuCe15, and CuCe20 catalyst, respectively) and oxygen mobility of prepared powders. It was discovered during ethanol steam re-forming experiments that increasing CuO content is favorable in terms of ethanol conversion but also causes quicker catalyst deactivation, primarily as a result of sintering and loss of CuO dispersion. Reaction temperatures in excess of 550 degrees C strongly promoted ethanol dehydratation reaction, leading to a rise in methane production and extensive coking of the catalyst surface. Coking was slower in the case of CuO-CeO(2) catalysts with a higher CuO content as a result of lower acid site abundance and more pronounced oxygen mobility. Temperatures in excess of 450 degrees C are required for any noticeable CO(2) and CH(4) conversion in methane dry re-forming reaction over CuO-CeO(2) materials. The examined materials displayed steady performance during stability tests at a reaction temperature of 650 degrees C, with catalysts containing 15 and 20 mol % CuO exhibiting the highest activity. Additionally, very low amounts of carbon were deposited on spent catalyst samples. PMID:19883056

  12. Sorption enhanced reaction process for direct production of fuel-cell grade hydrogen by low temperature catalytic steam-methane reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, Michael G.; Caram, Hugo S.; Sircar, Shivaji

    New experimental data are reported to demonstrate that a sorption enhanced reaction (SER) concept can be used to directly produce fuel-cell grade H 2 (<20 ppm CO) by carrying out the catalytic, endothermic, steam-methane reforming (SMR) reaction (CH 4 + 2H 2O ↔ CO 2 + 4H 2) in presence of a CO 2 selective chemisorbent such as K 2CO 3 promoted hydrotalcite at reaction temperatures of 520 and 550 °C, which are substantially lower than the conventional SMR reaction temperatures of 700-800 °C. The H 2 productivity of the sorption enhanced reactor can be large, and the conversion of CH 4 to H 2 can be very high circumventing the thermodynamic limitations of the SMR reaction due to the application of the Le Chetalier's principle in the SER concept. Mathematical simulations of a cyclic two-step SER concept showed that the H 2 productivity of the process (moles of essentially pure H 2 produced per kg of catalyst-chemisorbent admixture in the reactor per cycle) is much higher at a reaction temperature of 590 °C than that at 550 or 520 °C. On the other hand, the conversion of feed CH 4 to high purity H 2 product is relatively high (>99+%) at all three temperatures. The conversion is much higher than that in a conventional catalyst-alone reactor at these temperatures, and it increases only moderately (<1%) as the reaction temperature is increased from 520 to 590 °C. These results are caused by complex interactions of four phenomena. They are (a) favorable thermodynamic equilibrium of the highly endothermic SMR reaction at the higher reaction temperature, (b) faster kinetics of SMR reaction at higher temperatures, (c) favorable removal of CO 2 from the reaction zone at lower temperatures, and (d) higher cyclic working capacity for CO 2 chemisorption at higher temperature.

  13. Conversion of mill-scale waste to nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) for 'green' hydrogen generation via metal-steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, Sathees Kumar

    The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) are the most preferred and efficient energy conversion devices for automotive applications but demand high purity hydrogen which comes at a premium price. The currently pursued hydrogen generation methods suffer from issues such as, low efficiency, high cost, environmental non-benignity, and, in some cases, commercial non-viability. Many of these drawbacks including the CO contamination and, storage and delivery can be overcome by resorting to metal-steam reforming (MSR) using iron from steel industry's mill-scale waste. A novel solution-based room temperature technique using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as the reducing agent has been developed that produces highly active nanoscale (30-40 nm) iron particles. A slightly modified version of this technique using a surfactant and water oil microemulsion resulted in the formation of 5 nm Fe particles. By using hydrazine (N2H4) as an inexpensive and more stable (compared to NaBH4) reductant, body centered cubic iron particles with edge dimensions ˜5 nm were obtained under mild solvothermal conditions in ethanol. The nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) powder showed improved kinetics and greater propensity for hydrogen generation than the coarser microscale iron obtained through traditional reduction techniques. To initiate and sustain the somewhat endothermic MSR process, a solar concentrator consisting of a convex polyacrylic sheet with aluminum reflective coating was fabricated. This unique combination of mill-scale waste as iron source, hydrazine as the reductant, mild process conditions for nZVI generation and solar energy as the impetus for actuating MSR, obviates several drawbacks plaguing the grand scheme of producing, storing and delivering pure and humidified H2 to a PEMFC stack.

  14. A series of copper-free ternary oxide catalysts ZnAlCex used for hydrogen production via dimethyl ether steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijie; Meng, Ming; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhou, Shuang; Yang, Lijuan; Zhang, Tianyong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou

    2014-12-01

    Ce-substituted ternary oxide catalysts ZnAlCex were prepared and employed in dimethyl ether steam reforming (DME SR) to produce hydrogen. XRD, XAFS (XANES & EXAFS), H2O-TPD, CH3OH-TPD and TPSR techniques were used for catalyst characterization. It is found that the catalytic performance of these catalysts is dependent on Ce content. The catalyst containing 20 wt% CeO2 exhibits the best catalytic performance. Its calculated TOF (0.034 s-1) is nearly three times to that of ZnAlO. The kinetic results reveal that the addition of 20 wt% CeO2 to ZnAlCex greatly decreases the apparent activation energy (Ea) of DME SR, due to the formation of new reaction sites such as Ce4+-O-Zn2+ linkages. XRD and EXAFS analyses indicate that Ce addition can not only decrease the crystallite size of ZnO and ZnAl2O4, but also tune the relative contents of them. The results of H2O-TPD and CH3OH-TPD show that Ce addition can lower H2 desorption temperature, which accounts well for the better catalytic performance of ZnAlCex. It is worth noting that the Zn-based catalysts display much lower CO selectivity than the Cu-based one, especially the Ce-substituted ZnAlCex. Start-off durability tests demonstrate that this series of catalysts also possess high catalytic stability.

  15. Radioactive demonstration of final mineralized waste forms for Hanford waste treatment plant secondary waste (WTP-SW) by fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) using the bench scale reformer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137Cs, 129I, 99Tc, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW.

  16. Steam Reforming Technology Demonstration for Conversion of DOE Sodium-Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory into a Leach-Resistant Alkali Aluminosilicate Waste Form

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, K.; Bradley Mason, J.; Evans, B.; Vora, V.; Olson, A.

    2008-07-01

    The patented THOR{sup R} fluidized-bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), currently under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site.1 SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. The SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, and alkali and aluminum nitrates, along with many other inorganic compounds, including substantial levels of radionuclides. As part of the implementation of the THOR{sup R} process at INTEC, an engineering-scale technology demonstration (ESTD) was conducted using a specially designed pilot plant located at Hazen Research, Inc. in Golden Colorado. This ESTD confirmed the efficacy of the THOR{sup R} FBSR process to convert the SBW into a granular carbonate-based waste form suitable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE authorized, as a risk reduction measure, the performance of an additional ESTD to demonstrate the production of an insoluble mineralized product, in the event that an alternate disposition path is required. The additional ESTD was conducted at the Hazen Research facility using the THOR{sup R} process and the same SBW simulant employed previously. An alkali aluminosilicate mineral product was produced that exhibited excellent leach resistance and chemical durability. The demonstration established general system operating parameters for a full-scale facility; provided process off-gas data that confirmed operation within regulatory limits; determined that the mineralized product exhibits superior leach resistance and durability, compared to Environmental Assessment (EA) and Low-activity Reference Material (LRM) glasses, as indicated by the Product Consistency Test (PCT); ascertained that Cs and Re (a surrogate for Tc) were non

  17. The role of acidic sites and the catalytic reaction pathways on the Rh/ZrO2 catalysts for ethanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ziyi; Ang, Hanwee; Choong, Catherine; Chen, Luwei; Huang, Lin; Lin, Jianyi

    2009-02-01

    Rh catalysts supported on ZrO(2)-based oxides were studied for ethanol steam reforming (SR) reaction. Pure ZrO(2) as the support resulted in higher H(2) production yield compared to the ZrO(2) oxide decorated with CeO(2), Al(2)O(3), La(2)O(3) or Li(2)O at the reaction temperature of 300 degrees C. Above 450 degrees C, all the catalysts exhibited similar catalytic activity. However, at low reaction temperatures (below 400 degrees C), a significant enhancement in the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability was achieved by replacing the ZrO(2) support prepared by a precipitation method (ZrO(2)-CP) with that prepared by a hydrothermal method (ZrO(2)-HT). A deactivation was observed during the EtOH SR reaction at 300 degrees C on the two catalysts of Rh/ZrO(2)-CP and Rh/ZrO(2)-HT. NH(3)-TPD experiments confirmed that the ZrO(2)-HT support had two types of acidic sites while the ZrO(2)-CP support had only one type of weak acidic sites. DRIFTS studies showed that the absorption of EtOH molecules was strong on the Rh/ZrO(2)-HT catalyst and a number of C(2) oxygenates were accumulated on the catalyst surface. Meanwhile, the EtOH absorption on the Rh/ZrO(2)-CP catalyst was weak and the accumulation of CO, carbonate and CH(x) was observed. It is concluded that the relatively strong Lewis acidic sites in the Rh/ZrO(2)-HT catalyst is responsible for the strong absorption of EtOH molecules, and the subsequent C-H breakage step (formation of acetaldehyde or called as dehydrogenation reaction) is a fast reaction on it; on the Rh/ZrO(2)-CP catalyst, the EtOH adsorption was weak and the C-C breakage was the dominating reaction which led to the accumulation of surface CO, CH(x) and CO(2) species. Therefore, it is believed that, in order to promote the absorption of EtOH molecules and to reduce the formation of metastable carbonaceous species (C(2) oxygenates) during the reaction, the catalyst should be enhanced both with Lewis acidity and with C-C bond breakage function. Also

  18. Experimental Evaluation of SI Engine Operation Supplemented by Hydrogen Rich Gas from a Compact Plasma Boosted Reformer

    SciTech Connect

    J. B. Green, Jr.; N. Domingo; J. M. E. Storey; R.M. Wagner; J.S. Armfield; L. Bromberg; D. R. Cohn; A. Rabinovich; N. Alexeev

    2000-06-19

    It is well known that hydrogen addition to spark-ignited (SI) engines can reduce exhaust emissions and increase efficiency. Micro plasmatron fuel converters can be used for onboard generation of hydrogen-rich gas by partial oxidation of a wide range of fuels. These plasma-boosted microreformers are compact, rugged, and provide rapid response. With hydrogen supplement to the main fuel, SI engines can run very lean resulting in a large reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions relative to stoichiometric combustion without a catalytic converter. This paper presents experimental results from a microplasmatron fuel converter operating under variable oxygen to carbon ratios. Tests have also been carried out to evaluate the effect of the addition of a microplasmatron fuel converter generated gas in a 1995 2.3-L four-cylinder SI production engine. The tests were performed with and without hydrogen-rich gas produced by the plasma boosted fuel converter with gasoline. A one hundred fold reduction in NO x due to very lean operation was obtained under certain conditions. An advantage of onboard plasma-boosted generation of hydrogen-rich gas is that it is used only when required and can be readily turned on and off. Substantial NO x reduction should also be obtainable by heavy exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) facilitated by use of hydrogen-rich gas with stoichiometric operation.

  19. Bridging the Gap: From Model Surfaces to Nanoparticle Analogs for Selective Oxidation and Steam Reforming of Methanol and Selective Hydrogenation Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Matthew B.

    Most industrial catalysts are very complex, comprising of non-uniform materials with varying structures, impurities, and interaction between the active metal and supporting substrate. A large portion of the ongoing research in heterogeneous catalysis focuses on understanding structure-function relationships in catalytic materials. In parallel, there is a large area of surface science research focused on studying model catalytic systems for which structural parameters can be tuned and measured with high precision. It is commonly argued, however, that these systems are oversimplified, and that observations made in model systems do not translate to robust catalysts operating in practical environments; this discontinuity is often referred to as a "gap." The focus of this thesis is to explore the mutual benefits of surface science and catalysis, or "bridge the gap," by studying two catalytic systems in both ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and near ambient-environments. The first reaction is the catalytic steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The SRM reaction is a promising route for on-demand hydrogen production. For this catalytic system, the central hypothesis in this thesis is that a balance between redox capability and weak binding of reaction intermediates is necessary for high SRM activity and selectivity to carbon dioxide. As such, a new catalyst for the SRM reaction is developed which incorporates very small amounts of gold (<1 atomic %) supported on zinc oxide nanoparticles with controlled crystal structures. The performance of these catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed micro-reactor system at ambient pressures, and their structure was characterized by high-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Pre-existing oxygen defects in zinc oxide {0001} surfaces, and those created by a perturbation of the defect equilibrium by addition of gold, provide an anchoring site for highly dispersed gold species. By utilizing shape control of

  20. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is

  1. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) ORGANIC AND NITRATE DESTRUCTION PRIOR TO VITRIFICATION: CRUCIBLE SCALE TO ENGINEERING SCALE DEMONSTRATIONS AND NON-RADIOACTIVE TO RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M; Gene Daniel, G; Paul Burket, P; Charles Crawford, C

    2009-02-07

    Over a decade ago, an in-tank precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The full scale demonstration with actual HLW was performed in SRS Tank 48 (T48). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was added to enable Cs-137 extraction as CsTPB. The CsTPB, an organic, and its decomposition products proved to be problematic for subsequent processing of the Cs-137 precipitate in the SRS HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal in a HLW repository. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a technology for destroying the organics and nitrates in the T48 waste to render it compatible with subsequent HLW vitrification. During FBSR processing the T48 waste is converted into organic-free and nitrate-free carbonate-based minerals which are water soluble. The soluble nature of the carbonate-based minerals allows them to be dissolved and pumped to the vitrification facility or returned to the tank farm for future vitrification. The initial use of the FBSR process for T48 waste was demonstrated with simulated waste in 2003 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a specially designed sealed crucible test that reproduces the FBSR pyrolysis reactions, i.e. carbonate formation, organic and nitrate destruction. This was followed by pilot scale testing of simulants at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003-4 and then engineering scale demonstrations by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRS/SRNL at the Hazen Research, Inc. (HRI) test facility in Golden, CO in 2006 and 2008. Radioactive sealed crucible testing with real T48 waste was performed at SRNL in 2008, and radioactive Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was performed in the SRNL Shielded Cell Facility (SCF) in 2008.

  2. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, Paul W.; Bannister, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    A gas turbine system in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas.

  3. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, P.W.; Bannister, R.L.

    1995-07-11

    A gas turbine system is described in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas. 4 figs.

  4. Performance of Ni-Fe/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub2} anode supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells using steam reforming of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.; Suzuki, T.; Hamamoto, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Sumi, H.; Fujishiro, Y.; Ingram, B. J.; Carter, J. D.

    2012-03-15

    Iron nanoparticles (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added to NiO/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub 2} (GDC) anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) for the direct methane-water fuel operation. The cell was co-sintered at 1400 C, and the anode porosity is 31.8%. The main size corresponding to peak volume is around 1.5 {mu}m. When steam and methane directly fed to the cell, the power density is about 0.57 W cm{sup -2} at 650 C. It is the familiar performance for H{sub 2} operation (4 times of flow rate) with same fuel utilization. Compare with the testing temperature of 600 and 650 C, there is almost no carbon fiber deposition at 700 C with steam/methane (S/C) of 5. At the same time, fuel operation of high value of S/C (=3.3) resulted in fiber-like deposition and degradation of power performance based on loading test results.

  5. Combustion synthesized copper-ion substituted FeAl2O4 (Cu0.1Fe0.9Al2O4): A superior catalyst for methanol steam reforming compared to its impregnated analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Sayantani; Llorca, Jordi; Dominguez, Montserrat; Colussi, Sara; Trovarelli, Alessandro; Priolkar, Kaustubh R.; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Gayen, Arup

    2016-02-01

    A series of copper ion substituted MAl2O4 (M = Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn) spinels is prepared by a single step solution combustion synthesis (SCS) and tested for methanol steam reforming (MSR). The copper ion substituted Cu0.1Fe0.9Al2O4 appears to be the most active, showing ∼98% methanol conversion at 300 °C with ∼5% CO selectivity at GHSV = 30,000 h-1 and H2O:CH3OH = 1.1. The analogous impregnated catalyst, CuO (10 at%)/FeAl2O4, is found to be much less active. These materials are characterized by XRD, H2-TPR, BET, HRTEM, XPS and XANES analyses. Spinel phase formation is highly facilitated upon Cu-ion substitution and Cu loading beyond 10 at% leads to the formation of CuO as an additional phase. The ionic substitution of copper in FeAl2O4 leads to the highly crystalline SCS catalyst containing Cu2+ ion sites that are shown to be more active than the dispersed CuO nano-crystallites on the FeAl2O4 impregnated catalyst, despite its lower surface area. The as prepared SCS catalyst contains also a portion of copper as Cu1+ that increases when subjected to reforming atmosphere. The MSR activity of the SCS catalyst decreases with time-on-stream due to the sintering of catalyst crystallites as established from XPS and HRTEM analyses.

  6. Sulfur poisoning of CeO[subscript 2]-Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3]-supported mono- and bi-metallic Ni and Rh catalysts in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons at low and high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chao; Chen, Yongsheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop a better understanding on sulfur poisoning of reforming catalysts in fuel processing for hydrogen production, steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was performed over CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported monometallic Ni and Rh and bimetallic Rh-Ni catalysts at 550 and 800 C. XANES was used to identify the sulfur species in the used catalysts and to study their impacts on the metal surface properties probed by XPS. It was found that both monometallic catalysts rapidly deactivated at 550 C, and showed poor sulfur tolerance. Although ineffective for the Ni catalyst, increasing the temperature to 800 C dramatically improved the sulfur tolerance of the Rh catalyst. XANES revealed that metal sulfide and organic sulfide are the dominant sulfur species on the used Ni catalyst, while sulfonate and sulfate predominate on the used Rh catalyst. The presence of sulfur induced severe carbon deposition on the Ni catalyst at 800 C. The superior sulfur tolerance of the Rh catalyst at 800 C may be associated with its capability in sulfur oxidation. It is likely that the formation of the oxygen-shielded sulfur structure of sulfonate and sulfate can suppress the poisoning impact of sulfur on Rh by inhibiting direct rhodium-sulfur interaction. Moreover, XPS indicated that the metal surface properties of the Rh catalysts after the reaction without and with sulfur at 800 C are similar, suggesting that sulfur poisoning on Rh was mitigated under the high-temperature condition. Although the Rh-Ni catalyst exhibited better sulfur tolerance than the monometallic catalysts at 550 C, its catalytic performance was inferior compared with the Rh catalyst in the sulfur-containing reaction at 800 C probably due to the severe carbon deposition on the bimetallic catalyst.

  7. Compact hydrogen production systems for solid polymer fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledjeff-Hey, K.; Formanski, V.; Kalk, Th.; Roes, J.

    Generally there are several ways to produce hydrogen gas from carbonaceous fuels like natural gas, oil or alcohols. Most of these processes are designed for large-scale industrial production and are not suitable for a compact hydrogen production system (CHYPS) in the power range of 1 kW. In order to supply solid polymer fuel cells (SPFC) with hydrogen, a compact fuel processor is required for mobile applications. The produced hydrogen-rich gas has to have a low level of harmful impurities; in particular the carbon monoxide content has to be lower than 20 ppmv. Integrating the reaction step, the gas purification and the heat supply leads to small-scale hydrogen production systems. The steam reforming of methanol is feasible at copper catalysts in a low temperature range of 200-350°C. The combination of a small-scale methanol reformer and a metal membrane as purification step forms a compact system producing high-purity hydrogen. The generation of a SPFC hydrogen fuel gas can also be performed by thermal or catalytic cracking of liquid hydrocarbons such as propane. At a temperature of 900°C the decomposition of propane into carbon and hydrogen takes place. A fuel processor based on this simple concept produces a gas stream with a hydrogen content of more than 90 vol.% and without CO and CO2.

  8. Compact reactor for onboard hydrogen generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen, chemically stored as methanol, is promising internal-combustion fuel. Methanol is readily obtainable from natural products such as wood, compost, or various organic wastes. Steam reformation of methanol as source for hydrogen is relatively simple operation.

  9. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105, Tank AN-103, And AZ-101/102) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-09-18

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is a robust technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes. Applications have been tested at the pilot scale for the high sodium, sulfate, halide, organic and nitrate wastes at the Hanford site, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Due to the moderate processing temperatures, halides, sulfates, and technetium are retained in mineral phases of the feldspathoid family (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite, etc). The feldspathoid minerals bind the contaminants such as Tc-99 in cage (sodalite, nosean) or ring (nepheline) structures to surrounding aluminosilicate tetrahedra in the feldspathoid structures. The granular FBSR mineral waste form that is produced has a comparable durability to LAW glass based on the short term PCT testing in this study, the INL studies, SPFT and PUF testing from previous studies as given in the columns in Table 1-3 that represent the various durability tests. Monolithing of the granular product was shown to be feasible in a separate study. Macro-encapsulating the granular product provides a decrease in leaching compared to the FBSR granular product when the geopolymer is correctly formulated.

  10. Harnessing steam

    SciTech Connect

    Petroski, H.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the history of steam power, starting with the elements of the steam engine known to the Greeks. The story continues in the 17th century, goes through the late 18th century when steam engine use changed from use as pumps by Watt`s invention of a double acting cylinder which drove a piston, and followed both the way it shaped industry and society and the major questions posed by the hazards of steam energy. The article concludes with an explaination of the development and a summary of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code now in effect. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. A new alkali-resistant Ni/Al2O3-MSU-1 core-shell catalyst for methane steam reforming in a direct internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Xiongfu; Liu, Weifeng; Liu, Haiou; Qiu, Jieshan; Yeung, King Lun

    2014-01-01

    An alkali-resistant catalyst for direct internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell (DIR-MCFC) is prepared by growing a thin shell of mesoporous MSU-1 membrane on Ni/Al2O3 catalyst beads. The MSU-1 shell is obtained by first depositing a monolayer of colloidal silicalite-1 (Sil-1) on the catalyst bead as linkers and then using NaF stored in the beads to catalyze the growth of the MSU-1 layer. The resulting core-shell catalysts display excellent alkali-resistance and deliver stable methane conversion and hydrogen yield in an out-of-cell test simulating the operating conditions of an operating DIR-MCFC. Higher conversion and yield (i.e., up to over 70%) are obtained from the new core-shell catalyst with MSU-1 shell compared to the catalyst with microporous Sil-1 shell. A mathematical model of the reaction and poisoning of the core-shell catalyst is used to predict the optimum shell thickness for its reliable use in a DIR-MCFC.

  12. Steaming Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoverson, Rick

    2006-01-01

    Schools can provide a cleaner, more healthful school environment by simply combining heat and water. Steam vapor systems use only tap water with no chemicals added. Low-pressure (12 psi to 65 psi) steam vapor sanitizes and deodorizes. This process can then be used safely in many situations, but is especially suited for restrooms and food-service…

  13. Integrated solar reforming for thermochemical energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenman, T.

    1987-12-01

    This report presents a design study of two reforming processes as applied to the concept of solar thermochemical energy transport. Conceptual designs were carried out for steam-methane and CO2-methane reforming plants. A solar central receiver reformer was designed as an integrated reactor with the chemical reaction tubes placed inside the receiver cavity. The two plant designs were compared for their energy efficiency and capital cost. The CO2 reforming plant design results in higher energy efficiency but requires a catalyst which is still in an experimental stage of development. A third design was performed as a modification of the steam reforming plant utilizing a Direct Contact system, in which the process steam is generated by utilizing the heat of condensation. This system resulted in the highest energy efficiency. A comparison of the capital cost of these three plant designs shows them to be equivalent within the estimation accuracy of 25 percent.

  14. Ambient pressure XPS and IRRAS investigation of ethanol steam reforming on Ni-CeO2(111) catalysts: an in situ study of C-C and O-H bond scission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongyuan; Duchoň, Tomáš; Wang, Huanru; Grinter, David C; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Qiang; Jeong, Beomgyun; Crumlin, Ethan J; Matolín, Vladimír; Stacchiola, Dario J; Rodriguez, José A; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2016-06-22

    Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (AP-IRRAS) have been used to elucidate the active sites and mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming reaction (ESR) over Ni-CeO2(111) model catalysts. Our results reveal that surface layers of the ceria substrate are both highly reduced and hydroxylated under reaction conditions while the small supported Ni nanoparticles are present as Ni(0)/NixC. A multifunctional, synergistic role is highlighted in which Ni, CeOx and the interface provide an ensemble effect in the active chemistry that leads to H2. Ni(0) is the active phase leading to both C-C and C-H bond cleavage in ethanol and it is also responsible for carbon accumulation. On the other hand, CeOx is important for the deprotonation of ethanol/water to ethoxy and OH intermediates. The active state of CeOx is a Ce(3+)(OH)x compound that results from extensive reduction by ethanol and the efficient dissociation of water. Additionally, we gain an important insight into the stability and selectivity of the catalyst by its effective water dissociation, where the accumulation of surface carbon can be mitigated by the increased presence of surface OH groups. The co-existence and cooperative interplay of Ni(0) and Ce(3+)(OH)x through a metal-support interaction facilitate oxygen transfer, activation of ethanol/water as well as the removal of coke. PMID:27095305

  15. Steam Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Turbonetics Energy, Inc.'s steam turbines are used as power generating systems in the oil and gas, chemical, pharmaceuticals, metals and mining, and pulp and paper industries. The Turbonetics line benefited from use of NASA research data on radial inflow steam turbines and from company contact with personnel of Lewis Research Center, also use of Lewis-developed computer programs to determine performance characteristics of turbines.

  16. Integrated hydrocarbon reforming system and controls

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Dorson, Matthew H.; Mitchell, William L.; Nowicki, Brian J.; Thijssen, Johannes; Davis, Robert; Papile, Christopher; Rumsey, Jennifer W.; Longo, Nathan; Cross, III, James C.; Rizzo, Vincent; Kleeburg, Gunther; Rindone, Michael; Block, Stephen G.; Sun, Maria; Morriseau, Brian D.; Hagan, Mark R.; Bowers, Brian

    2003-11-04

    A hydrocarbon reformer system including a first reactor configured to generate hydrogen-rich reformate by carrying out at least one of a non-catalytic thermal partial oxidation, a catalytic partial oxidation, a steam reforming, and any combinations thereof, a second reactor in fluid communication with the first reactor to receive the hydrogen-rich reformate, and having a catalyst for promoting a water gas shift reaction in the hydrogen-rich reformate, and a heat exchanger having a first mass of two-phase water therein and configured to exchange heat between the two-phase water and the hydrogen-rich reformate in the second reactor, the heat exchanger being in fluid communication with the first reactor so as to supply steam to the first reactor as a reactant is disclosed. The disclosed reformer includes an auxiliary reactor configured to generate heated water/steam and being in fluid communication with the heat exchanger of the second reactor to supply the heated water/steam to the heat exchanger.

  17. Applications of solar reforming technology

    SciTech Connect

    Spiewak, I.; Tyner, C.E.; Langnickel, U.

    1993-11-01

    Research in recent years has demonstrated the efficient use of solar thermal energy for driving endothermic chemical reforming reactions in which hydrocarbons are reacted to form synthesis gas (syngas). Closed-loop reforming/methanation systems can be used for storage and transport of process heat and for short-term storage for peaking power generation. Open-loop systems can be used for direct fuel production; for production of syngas feedstock for further processing to specialty chemicals and plastics and bulk ammonia, hydrogen, and liquid fuels; and directly for industrial processes such as iron ore reduction. In addition, reforming of organic chemical wastes and hazardous materials can be accomplished using the high-efficiency destruction capabilities of steam reforming. To help identify the most promising areas for future development of this technology, we discuss in this paper the economics and market potential of these applications.

  18. Reformer Fuel Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    efficient configuration to incorporate into the specific compact jet he1 reformer test rig. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Reform in the garden.

    PubMed

    Wise, M Norton; Wise, Elaine M

    2002-12-01

    English gardens powered by steam engines offer an intriguing view of how technological and scientific progress was naturalized in the landscape of 19th-century Prussia, and in Prussian culture, during the early years of industrial modernization. One such garden is Peacock Island, in the Havel River near Potsdam. A product of the reform era that preceded and followed the Napoleonic Wars, it expressed the goal of Friedrich Wilhelm III and his government to enter into the British system of factory production and world trade. Modern science, as represented especially by Alexander von Humboldt, played a prominent role. PMID:12535923

  20. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  1. Demonstration of direct internal reforming for MCFC power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Aasberg-Petersen, K.; Christensen, P.S.; Winther, S.K.

    1996-12-31

    The conversion of methane into hydrogen for an MCFC by steam reforming is accomplished either externally or internally in the stack. In the case of external reforming the plant electrical efficiency is 5% abs. lower mainly because more parasitic power is required for air compression for stack cooling. Furthermore, heat produced in the stack must be transferred to the external reformer to drive the endothermic steam reforming reaction giving a more complex plant lay-out. A more suitable and cost effective approach is to use internal steam reforming of methane. Internal reforming may be accomplished either by Indirect Internal Reforming (DIR) and Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) in series or by DIR-only as illustrated. To avoid carbon formation in the anode compartment higher hydrocarbons in the feedstock are converted into hydrogen, methane and carbon oxides by reaction with steam in ail adiabatic prereformer upstream the fuel cell stack. This paper discusses key elements of the desire of both types of internal reforming and presents data from pilot plants with a combined total of more than 10,000 operating hours. The project is being carried out as part of the activities of the European MCFC Consortium ARGE.

  2. Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Parent, Yves O.; Magrini, Kim; Landin, Steven M.; Ritland, Marcus A.

    2011-03-29

    A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

  3. Steam Digest Volume IV

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  4. Development of large scale internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, A.; Shinoki, T.; Matsumura, M.

    1996-12-31

    Internal Reforming (IR) is a prominent scheme for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) power generating systems in order to get high efficiency i.e. 55-60% as based on the Higher Heating Value (HHV) and compact configuration. The Advanced Internal Reforming (AIR) technology has been developed based on two types of the IR-MCFC technology i.e. Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) and Indirect Internal Reforming (DIR).

  5. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  6. Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer

    DOEpatents

    Misage, Robert; Scheffler, Glenn W.; Setzer, Herbert J.; Margiott, Paul R.; Parenti, Jr., Edmund K.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

  7. Method for improving catalyst function in auto-thermal and partial oxidation reformer-based processors

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2014-08-26

    The invention provides a method for reforming fuel, the method comprising contacting the fuel to an oxidation catalyst so as to partially oxidize the fuel and generate heat; warming incoming fuel with the heat while simultaneously warming a reforming catalyst with the heat; and reacting the partially oxidized fuel with steam using the reforming catalyst.

  8. Effects of fuel cell anode recycle on catalytic fuel reforming

    SciTech Connect

    shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Gardner, T.; Haynes, D.; Spivey, J.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of steam in the reactant gas of a catalytic fuel reformer decreases the formation of carbon, minimizing catalyst deactivation. However, the operation of the reformer without supplemental water reduces the size, weight, cost, and overall complexity of the system. The work presented here examines experimentally two options for adding steam to the reformer inlet: (I) recycle of a simulated fuel cell anode exit gas (comprised of mainly CO2, H2O, and N2 and some H2 and CO) and (II) recycle of the reformate from the reformer exit back to the reformer inlet (mainly comprised of H2, CO, and N2 and some H2O and CO2). As expected, anode gas recycle reduced the carbon formation and increased the hydrogen concentration in the reformate. However, reformer recycle was not as effective due principally to the lower water content in the reformate compared to the anode gas. In fact, reformate recycle showed slightly increased carbon formation compared to no recycle. In an attempt to understand the effects of individual gases in these recycle streams (H2, CO, CO2, N2, and H2O), individual gas species were independently introduced to the reformer feed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Effects of Fuel Cell Anode Recycle on Catalytic Fuel Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, D.A.; Gardner, T.H.; Haynes, D.J.; Spivey, J.J.

    2007-06-01

    The presence of steam in the reactant gas of a catalytic fuel reformer decreases the formation of carbon, minimizing catalyst deactivation. However, the operation of the reformer without supplemental water reduces the size, weight, cost, and overall complexity of the system. The work presented here examines experimentally two options for adding steam to the reformer inlet: (I) recycle of a simulated fuel cell anode exit gas (comprised of mainly CO2, H2O, and N2 and some H2 and CO) and (II) recycle of the reformate from the reformer exit back to the reformer inlet (mainly comprised of H2, CO, and N2 and some H2O and CO2). As expected, anode gas recycle reduced the carbon formation and increased the hydrogen concentration in the reformate. However, reformer recycle was not as effective due principally to the lower water content in the reformate compared to the anode gas. In fact, reformate recycle showed slightly increased carbon formation compared to no recycle. In an attempt to understand the effects of individual gases in these recycle streams (H2, CO, CO2, N2, and H2O), individual gas species were independently introduced to the reformer feed.

  10. Microlith catalytic reactors for reforming iso-octane-based fuels into hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir; Castaldi, Marco; Lyubovsky, Maxim; LaPierre, Rene; Ahmed, Shabbir

    Recent advances in the development of short contact time (SCT) reactor design approaches allow reformers capable of overcoming current barriers of cost, size, weight, complexity and efficiency associated with conventional reactor design approaches. PCI has developed an SCT based approach using a patented substrate (trademarked Microlith ®) and proprietary coating technology [1]. The high heat and mass transport properties of the substrate have been shown to significantly reduce reactor size while improving performance. Resistance to coking, especially at low H 2O:C ratios, has also been observed with these reactors. This paper summarizes the results of auto thermal reforming (ATR) of an iso-octane-based liquid fuel. In addition Microlith-based water gas shift (WGS) and preferential CO oxidation (PROX) reactors were also examined for fuel processing applications. Surprisingly, selectivity advantages for these kinetically controlled reactions were observed [2]. Examples described here include low methanation selectivity in WGS applications and large operating windows for PROX at very high space velocities. A complete reformer system with Microlith ATR, WGS and PROX reactors has been identified. Sensitivity of system size with regard to steam:carbon ratios, and the resulting implications for reactor/heat exchanger sizes were documented and a compact system identified.

  11. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.; Doyle, Edward F.; DiBella, Francis A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

  12. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOEpatents

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

    1994-03-08

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

  13. Energy and exergy analysis of an ethanol reforming process for solid oxide fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Tippawan, Phanicha; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2014-04-01

    The fuel processor in which hydrogen is produced from fuels is an important unit in a fuel cell system. The aim of this study is to apply a thermodynamic concept to identify a suitable reforming process for an ethanol-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Three different reforming technologies, i.e., steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming, are considered. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are employed to determine an energy demand and to describe how efficiently the energy is supplied to the reforming process. Effect of key operating parameters on the distribution of reforming products, such as H2, CO, CO2 and CH4, and the possibility of carbon formation in different ethanol reformings are examined as a function of steam-to-ethanol ratio, oxygen-to-ethanol ratio and temperatures at atmospheric pressure. Energy and exergy analysis are performed to identify the best ethanol reforming process for SOFC applications. PMID:24561628

  14. High performance steam development

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1995-12-31

    DOE has launched a program to make a step change in power plant to 1500 F steam, since the highest possible performance gains can be achieved in a 1500 F steam system when using a topping turbine in a back pressure steam turbine for cogeneration. A 500-hour proof-of-concept steam generator test module was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. It has four once-through steam generator circuits. The complete HPSS (high performance steam system) was tested above 1500 F and 1500 psig for over 102 hours at full power.

  15. 4. STEAM PLANT MARINE BOILERS WEST OF STEAM PLANT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. STEAM PLANT MARINE BOILERS WEST OF STEAM PLANT AND SOUTH OF ORIGINAL STEAM PLANT BOILERS, FROM SOUTH. November 13, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. Liquid fuel reformer development.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.

    1999-07-30

    At Argonne National Laboratory we are developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to a clean hydrogen feed for a fuel cell. The process incorporates a partial oxidation/steam reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. We have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, low-sulfur diesel fuel, and a regular diesel fuel. We achieved complete conversion of the feed to products. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 800 C. For the two diesel fuels, higher temperatures, >850 C, were required to approach similar levels of hydrogen in the product stream. At 800 C, hydrogen yield of the low sulfur diesel was 32%, while that of the regular diesel was 52%. Residual products in both cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, ethylene, and methane.

  17. Steam plasmatron gasification of distillers grains residue from ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Shie, Je-Lueng; Tsou, Feng-Ju; Lin, Kae-Long

    2010-07-01

    In this study, a plasmatron reactor was used for gasifying the waste of distillers grains at different temperatures (773, 873, 973 K) and water flow rates (1, 2, 3 mL min(-1)), which were heated to produce steam. Among all the gas products, syngas was the major component (88.5 wt.% or 94.66 vol.%) with temperatures yielding maximum concentrations at 873 K with a relatively high reaction rate. The maximum concentrations regarding gaseous production occurring times are all below 1 min. With the increase of steam, the recovery mass yield of syngas also increases from 34.14 to 45.47 approximately 54.66 wt.% at 873 K. Water-gas reactions and steam-methane reforming reactions advance the production of syngas with the increase of steam. Furthermore, the water-shift reaction also increases in the context of steam gasification which leads to the decrease of CO(2) at the same time. PMID:20163957

  18. Steam Digest 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  19. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Muir, James F.; Wayland, Jr., J. Robert

    1987-01-01

    An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

  20. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Muir, J.F.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1985-06-19

    The present invention relates to an empirical electrical method for remote sensing of steam quality utilizing flow-through grids which allow measurement of the electrical properties of a flowing two-phase mixture. The measurement of steam quality in the oil field is important to the efficient application of steam assisted recovery of oil. Because of the increased energy content in higher quality steam it is important to maintain the highest possible steam quality at the injection sandface. The effectiveness of a steaming operation without a measure of steam quality downhole close to the point of injection would be difficult to determine. Therefore, a need exists for the remote sensing of steam quality.

  1. Project DEEP STEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. W.

    Development of technology for thermally efficient downhole delivery of surface generated steam and for downhole steam generators are the major elements of Project DEEP STEAM. Specific activities include development of advanced concept thermal packers, evaluation of the thermal performance of insulated tubing designs in a test tower and in a field environment, and development of downhole steam generator concepts. Field tests were performed in both technology areas and the results and status are presented.

  2. Project DEEP STEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Development of technology for thermally efficient downhole delivery of surface-generated steam and for downhole steam generators are the major elements of Project DEEP STEAM. Specific activities include development of advanced concept thermal packers, evaluation of the thermal performance of insulated tubing designs in a test tower and in a field environment, and development of downhole steam generator concepts. Field tests have been performed in both technology areas and the results and status are presented.

  3. The Invisibility of Steam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Almost everyone "knows" that steam is visible. After all, one can see the cloud of white issuing from the spout of a boiling tea kettle. In reality, steam is the gaseous phase of water and is invisible. What you see is light scattered from the tiny droplets of water that are the result of the condensation of the steam as its temperature…

  4. Strategies for steam

    SciTech Connect

    Hennagir, T.

    1996-03-01

    This article is a review of worldwide developments in the steam turbine and heat recovery steam generator markets. The Far East is driving the market in HRSGs, while China is driving the market in orders placed for steam turbine prime movers. The efforts of several major suppliers are discussed, with brief technical details being provided for several projects.

  5. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  6. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  7. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  8. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  9. Pouring on the steam

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1996-02-01

    Engineers at Solar Turbines Inc. in San Diego have achieved a breakthrough in steam power by using modern gas-turbine technology, high-temperature-resistant superalloys, advanced manufacturing technologies, and a new class of steam generators to build a high-performance steam system (HPSS). The system is a full-scale, 4-megawatt industrial prototype steam power plant that produces steam heated to 1,500 F and pressurized to 1,500 psig. In a cogeneration steam cycle, these temperatures and pressures can double the power generated using the same amount of steam, according to the US Department of Energy (DOE), which sponsored the project as part of the Advanced Turbine System Program.

  10. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  11. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  12. Combining steam-methane reforming, water-gas shift, and CO{sub 2} removal in a single-step process for hydrogen production. Final report for period March 15, 1997 - December 14, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandro Lopez Ortiz; Bhaskar Balasubramanian; Douglas P. Harrison

    2001-02-01

    The objective of the research project was to determine the feasibility of a simpler, more energy-efficient process for the production of 95+% H{sub 2} from natural gas, and to collect sufficient experimental data on the effect of reaction parameters to guide additional larger-scale process development. The overall objectives were accomplished. 95+% H{sub 2} was produced in a single reaction step by adding a calcium-based CO{sub 2} acceptor to standard Ni-based reforming catalyst. The spent acceptor was successfully regenerated and used in a number of reaction steps with only moderate loss in activity as the number of cycles increased. Sufficient experimental data were collected to guide further larger-scale experimental work designed to investigate the economic feasibility of the process.

  13. Synthesis gas and olefins from the catalytic autothermal reforming of volatile and non-volatile liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Bradon Justin

    2007-12-01

    of NOx traps and hydrogen into diesel engines has shown potential in reducing NOx emissions into the environment. Both concepts are dependent on synthesis gas generated from portable, compact fuel reformers, such as CPO reactors. Chapter 1 also reviews previous research in CPO, along with several important experimental parameters, and outlines the remaining research directions in the remaining chapters. In Chapter 2, steam addition to the CPO of higher hydrocarbons was explored over rhodium-coated ceramic foam supports at millisecond contact times. Steam addition to the CPO of n-decane and n-hexadecane in air produced considerably higher H2 and CO2 and lower olefin and CO selectivities than traditional CPO. For steam to carbon feed ratios from 0.0 to 4.0, the reactor operated autothermally, and the H2 to CO product ratio increased from ˜1.0 to ˜4.0, which is essentially the equilibrium product composition near synthesis gas stoichiometry (C/O ˜1) at contact times of ˜7 milliseconds. In fuel-rich feeds exceeding the synthesis gas ratio (C/O > 1), steam addition suppressed olefins, promoted synthesis gas and water-gas shift products, and reduced catalyst surface carbon. Furthermore, steam addition to the CPO of the military fuel JP-8 was performed successfully, also increasing H2 and suppressing olefins. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. What Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    A teacher explores the recent educational reform movement and discusses the studies of schools done by Sociologist Christopher Jencks in the 1970s. An important idea that can be extrapolated from Jencks' studies is that schools should function more like families than factories. This would empower teachers and make schooling more equitable,…

  15. Rethinking Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, James C.

    2010-01-01

    As president of Miami University of Ohio from 1996 until 2006, James C. Garland redefined the public institution as a "semi-private" university by implementing the same tuition for both in-state and out-of-state students. Students from Ohio with need received large scholarships--but those who could afford to pay more did so. The reform, which…

  16. Toothless Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smarick, Andy

    2010-01-01

    To many education reformers, the passage of the federal government's massive stimulus plan, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), appeared to be a final bright star falling into alignment. The ARRA seemed to complete the constellation: an astounding $100 billion of new federal funds--nearly twice the annual budget of the U.S.…

  17. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  18. Integrated reformer and shift reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Dorson, Matthew H.

    2006-06-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer for producing diatomic hydrogen gas is disclosed. The reformer includes a first reaction vessel, a shift reactor vessel annularly disposed about the first reaction vessel, including a first shift reactor zone, and a first helical tube disposed within the first shift reactor zone having an inlet end communicating with a water supply source. The water supply source is preferably adapted to supply liquid-phase water to the first helical tube at flow conditions sufficient to ensure discharge of liquid-phase and steam-phase water from an outlet end of the first helical tube. The reformer may further include a first catalyst bed disposed in the first shift reactor zone, having a low-temperature shift catalyst in contact with the first helical tube. The catalyst bed includes a plurality of coil sections disposed in coaxial relation to other coil sections and to the central longitudinal axis of the reformer, each coil section extending between the first and second ends, and each coil section being in direct fluid communication with at least one other coil section.

  19. Teaching Reform and Union Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerchner, Charles T.; Mitchell, Douglas E.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews present labor statutes and examines three alternatives to current practices; proposes that teaching, by its nature, is not well administered by industrial standards or well adjudicated through industrial unionism. Suggests "professional unionism" as a means of effecting educational reform. (DR)

  20. Steam generator performance degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, J.T.; Dow, B.L. )

    1991-09-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the range and severity of steam generator performance degradation effects experienced by PWRs in the United States. The survey results were tabulated and correlated with steam generator age and design. Operating experience at several PWRs was examined in detail. The operating experience at US PWRs was compared to that of PWRs in Japan and Germany. Possible causes for the performance degradation were postulated and evaluated. The sensitivity of steam generator output pressure to changes in various parameters (such as fouling factor, average reactor coolant temperature, and percentage of steam generator tubes plugged) was calculated. These calculations were used in the evaluation of possible causes of steam generator performance degradation. Several deposit exfoliation scenarios were evaluated in terms of the calculated effect on fouling factor trends and associated steam generator output pressure trends. 15 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, James E.

    1987-01-01

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

  2. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, J.E.

    1987-08-25

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

  3. The Invisibility of Steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2014-11-01

    Almost everyone "knows" that steam is visible. After all, one can see the cloud of white issuing from the spout of a boiling tea kettle. In reality, steam is the gaseous phase of water and is invisible. What you see is light scattered from the tiny droplets of water that are the result of the condensation of the steam as its temperature falls below 100 °C (under standard conditions).

  4. Downhole steam injector

    DOEpatents

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Hoke, Donald E.

    1983-01-01

    An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

  5. 5. STEAM PLANT COOLING TOWER LOCATED WEST OF STEAM PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. STEAM PLANT COOLING TOWER LOCATED WEST OF STEAM PLANT BUILDING, FROM SOUTH. SHOWS CURRENT LEVEL OF DISREPAIR. December 4, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. 14. MARINE STEAM BOILERS AT WEST SIDE OF CROSSCUT STEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. MARINE STEAM BOILERS AT WEST SIDE OF CROSSCUT STEAM PLANT BUILDING, FROM SOUTH. August 4, 1947 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. 8. TURBINE DECK (UPPER FLOOR) INSIDE STEAM PLANT, SHOWING STEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. TURBINE DECK (UPPER FLOOR) INSIDE STEAM PLANT, SHOWING STEAM TURBINES AND GENERATORS, LOOKING NORTH. November 13, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  9. Reforming Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donmoyer, Robert, Ed.; Merryfield, Merry M., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue highlights the diversity of reform initiatives in order to provide a deep understanding of the complexities associated with educational reform in general and the reform of science education in particular. Systemic reform initiatives at the national and state levels along with locally-inspired efforts at reform are outlined.…

  10. Interim report:feasibility of microscale glucose reforming for renewable hydrogen.

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Kirsten (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM)

    2007-03-01

    Micro-scale aqueous steam reforming of glucose is suggested as a novel method of H{sub 2} production for micro fuel cells. Compact fuel cell systems are a viable alternative to batteries as a portable electrical power source. Compared with conventional lithium polymer batteries, hydrocarbon powered fuel cells are smaller, weigh less, and have a much higher energy density. The goal of this project is to develop a hydrocarbon powered microfuel processor capable of driving an existing microfuel cell, and this interim report provides a summary of the engineering information for microscale reforming of carbohydrates and the summarizes the work completed as of September 2006. Work on this program will continue. Gas analysis of the gas evolved from glucose breakdown using a quadrupole mass spectrometer is now possible due do significant modifications to the vacuum chamber and to the mass spectrometer electronics. Effective adhesion of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to 316SS microstructured catalyst plates is still under investigation. Electrophoretic and dip coat methods of catalyst deposition have produced coatings with poor adhesion and limited available Pt surface area.

  11. STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kinyon, B.W.; Whitman, G.D.

    1963-07-16

    The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

  12. STEAM INJECTION TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The approach used is to inject steam into 1- dimensional columns that have been packed with contaminated soil from the site. Temperatures in the system are monitored aliquots of the effluent collected for analysis. A sample of the initial soil, the final steamed soil, the effluen...

  13. Steampunk: Full Steam Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Heather M.

    2010-01-01

    Steam-powered machines, anachronistic technology, clockwork automatons, gas-filled airships, tentacled monsters, fob watches, and top hats--these are all elements of steampunk. Steampunk is both speculative fiction that imagines technology evolved from steam-powered cogs and gears--instead of from electricity and computers--and a movement that…

  14. Running Out of Steam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Promod

    2000-01-01

    Explains why schools should evaluate whether their older steam-heating systems are still cost-effective, or need to be repaired or replaced. The symptoms of deterioration are listed along with discussions on repair or replacement decision making on three areas of steam heating systems: boilers; distribution system; and terminal equipment. (GR)

  15. Carbon-resistant Ni-Zr0.92Y0.08O2-δ supported solid oxide fuel cells using Ni-Cu-Fe alloy cermet as on-cell reforming catalyst and mixed methane-steam as fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Bin; Li, Meng; Luo, Jing-li; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Two types of anode-supported cell are fabricated by tape casting, screen printing and sintering processes. The first one is a conventional anode supported cell (ASC); and the other, namely CASC, contains an extra layer of Ni-Cu/Ni-Fe alloys-BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.1Yb0.1O3-δ (NCF-BZCYYb) cermet catalyst on the surface of the anode-support. Using CH4-3 mol. % H2O as the fuel, the initial performance of the CASC is moderately improved, compared with that of the ASC; the power density of the CASC and ASC at 500 mA cm-2 and 800 °C remain stable on the level of 470 mW cm-2 for approximately 11 and 0.8 h, respectively, before cell disintegration caused by carbon formation. The performances of the CASC in the fuel of CH4-33.3 mol. % H2O are significantly increased above the level of the ASC, demonstrating an initial peak power density ranging from 280 to 1638 mW cm-2 at temperatures between 600 and 800 °C and a stable power density of 485 mW cm-2 at 500 mA cm-2 and 800 °C for 48 h. Carbon deposition in the anode region of the tested CASC cell is not detected, as the NCF-BZCYYb is a more active catalyst than the Ni-Zr0.92Y0.08O2-δ (YSZ) anode-support for CH4 steam reforming.

  16. Solar central receiver reformer system for ammonia plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    An overview of a study to retrofit the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc., El Centro, California 600 ST/SD Ammonia Plant with Solar Central Receiver Technology is presented. The retrofit system consists of a solar central receiver reformer (SCRR) operating in parallel with the existing fossil fired reformer. Steam and hydrocarbon react in the catalyst filled tubes of the inner cavity receiver to form a hydrogen rich mixture which is the syngas feed for the ammonia production. The SCRR system will displace natural gas presently used in the fossil reformer combustion chamber.

  17. [Curricular reform].

    PubMed

    Fraga Filho, C; Rosa, A R

    1980-01-01

    Advocating the thesis that the planning of medical education must be oriented toward the articulastion of instruction with care, the authors note that the curricular reforms of the last 25 years, though reflected in the teaching-learning process, have led to no improvement in medical practice or in the health of the population. This failing, they assert, stems from the fact that these reforms begin and end within the educational institution itself, and ignore the interrelations between the education system and the user of the professional, and results in the production of physicians who are individualistic and of narrow vision. The article refers to the slight importance attached to the complementarity and interdependence of teaching and care work, and to the restriction of teaching to episodic contacts between specialized professors and groups of anonymous students, each in the limited confines of his own discipline, and the relegation of the student to the status of spectator and possible assistant in care work entrusted to him without any responsibility. PMID:7398573

  18. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  19. Ukraine Steam Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Gurvinder Singh

    2000-02-15

    The Ukraine Steam Partnership program is designed to implement energy efficiency improvements in industrial steam systems. These improvements are to be made by the private plants and local government departments responsible for generation and delivery of energy to end-users. One of the activities planned under this program was to provide a two-day training workshop on industrial steam systems focusing on energy efficiency issues related to the generation, distribution, and consumption of steam. The workshop was geared towards plant managers, who are not only technically oriented, but are also key decision makers in their respective companies. The Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology (ARENA-ECO), a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization founded to promote energy efficiency and environmental protection in Ukraine, in conjunction with the Alliance staff in Kiev sent out invitations to potential participants in all the regions of Ukraine. The purpose of this report is the describe the proceedings from the workshop and provide recommendations from the workshop's roundtable discussion. The workshop was broken down into two main areas: (1) Energy efficient boiler house steam generation; and Energy efficient steam distribution and consumption. The workshop also covered the following topics: (1) Ukrainian boilers; (2) Water treatment systems; (3) A profile of UKRESCO (Ukrainian Energy Services Company); (4) Turbine expanders and electricity generation; (5) Enterprise energy audit basics; and (6) Experience of steam use in Donetsk oblast.

  20. Compact Single-Stage Fuel Processor for PEM Fuel Cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rhine, Wendell E.; Ye, Neng

    2000-01-01

    Based on observations during the steam reforming of ethanol, the authors conclude that carbon was forming in the steam generator due to the thermal decomposition of ethanol. Since ethanol is being thermally decomposed, they were operating the steam generator at too high of a temperature. The thermal degradation of ethanol was confirmed by using a GC with a flame ionization detector. They observed trace amounts of additional hydrocarbons other than methane in the effluent which we assume maybe ethane and ethylene. We identified the operating conditions that allowed us to steam reform ethanol for an acceptable amount of time. These conditions were a steam temperature of 200 C and a wall temperature of 400 C at the center of the reactor. The calculated ratios of CO{sub 2}/CO indicate that we can lower the potential for carbon deposition from the Boudouard further by reducing the pressure.

  1. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  2. Refurbishing steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1997-12-01

    Power-plant operators are reducing maintenance costs of their aging steam turbines by using wire-arc spray coating and shot peening to prolong the service life of components, and by replacing outmoded bearings and seals with newer designs. Steam-turbine operators are pressed with the challenge of keeping their aging machines functioning in the face of wear problems that are exacerbated by the demand for higher efficiencies. These problems include intense thermal cycling during both start-up and shutdown, water particles in steam and solid particles in the air that pit smooth surfaces, and load changes that cause metal fatigue.

  3. Solar steam nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Polman, Albert

    2013-01-22

    Silica-gold core-shell nanoparticles that are immersed in water act as efficient nanoscale generators of steam when illuminated with sunlight. In their paper in this issue of ACS Nano, Halas, Nordlander, and co-workers demonstrate this intriguing phenomenon that results from the nucleation of steam at the surface of individual nanoparticles that are heated by the sun. The same effect is also used to demonstrate distillation of ethanol. The solar steam nanobubble generation phenomenon results from the complex interplay of many different phenomena that occur at the nanoscale, and can find a broad range of applications. PMID:23282196

  4. Materials Performance in USC Steam

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; N. M. Yanar

    2011-09-07

    Materials Performance in USC Steam: (1) pressure effects on steam oxidation - unique capability coming on-line; (2) hydrogen evolution - hydrogen permeability apparatus to determine where hydrogen goes during steam oxidation; and (3) NETL materials development - steam oxidation resource for NETL developed materials.

  5. Aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-08-12

    An aerodynamic heated steam generating apparatus is described which consists of: an aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator adapted to be located on the leading edge of an airframe of a hypersonic aircraft and being responsive to aerodynamic heating of water by a compression shock airstream to produce steam pressure; an expansion shock air-cooled condensor adapted to be located in the airframe rearward of and operatively coupled to the aerodynamic heat immersion coil steam generator to receive and condense the steam pressure; and an aerodynamic heated steam injector manifold adapted to distribute heated steam into the airstream flowing through an exterior generating channel of an air-breathing, ducted power plant.

  6. Compaction behavior of roller compacted ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-06-01

    The effect of roller compaction pressure on the bulk compaction of roller compacted ibuprofen was investigated using instrumented rotary tablet press. Three different roller pressures were utilized to prepare granules and Heckel analysis, Walker analysis, compressibility, and tabletability were performed to derive densification, deformation, course of volume reduction and bonding phenomenon of different pressure roller compacted granules. Nominal single granule fracture strength was obtained by micro tensile testing. Heckel analysis indicated that granules prepared using lower pressure during roller compaction showed lower yield strength. The reduction in tabletability was observed for higher pressure roller compacted granules. The reduction in tabletability supports the results of granule size enlargement theory. Apart from the granule size enlargement theory, the available fines and relative fragmentation during compaction is responsible for higher bonding strength and provide larger areas for true particle contact at constant porosity for lower pressure roller compacted granules. Overall bulk compaction parameters indicated that granules prepared by lower roller compaction pressure were advantageous in terms of tabletability and densification. Overall results suggested that densification during roller compaction affects the particle level properties of specific surface area, nominal fracture strength, and compaction behavior. PMID:18280716

  7. Reduction on synthesis gas costs by decrease of steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios in the feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Basini, L.; Piovesan, L.

    1998-01-01

    The costs for syngas production at low steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios have been analyzed for simplified process schemes of the main syngas production technologies (steam-CO{sub 2} reforming, autothermal reforming, and combined reforming) and different synthesis gas compositions. The broad analysis arises from experimental indication on the possibility of preventing carbon formation at low steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios in the feedstock by choosing an appropriate catalyst or by introducing small amounts of sulfur compounds in the reactant feed. The analysis is limited to the synthesis gas production step and does not include its downstream processes. The results indicate that technologies at low steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios would have a significant positive impact on synthesis gas costs.

  8. CORCO downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, B.

    1982-03-01

    The opening of a new frontier in steaming moved forward in Jan. 1982 when a CORCO (Chemical Oil Recovery Co.) generator described as the first commercial down-hole steam generator went into operation in Kern County's Devils Den field, 60 miles northwest of Bakersfield, CA. A major reason for selecting the down-hole generator for the Devils Den field is that along with steam the unit puts away flue gas resulting from combustion. There is no pressure to speak of in the escudo, and it is hoped that the inert gas will build up bottom-hole pressure to assist in oil recovery. Another reason is that the down-hole generator, rated for 7 million btu/hr, makes it possible to tailor steam injection to the well's requirements. The advantages and disadvantages of the CORCO generator are described, along with its application in the Kern River field.

  9. Continuous steam explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D.; Yu, E.K.C.

    1995-02-01

    StakeTech has focused on developing steam explosion on a commercial basis. The company essentially a biomass conversion company dealing with cellulosic biomass such as wood, crop residues and, more recently, wastepaper and municipal solid waste (MSW). They are faced with a tremendous opportunity to develop uses for the 50% of biomass that is currently wasted. The StakeTech steam explosion process is able to break the bonds using only high-pressure steam with no chemical additives. The continuous StakeTech System now has been installed in five countries and has proved effective in processing a wide variety of raw materials including wood chips, straw, sugarcane bagasse, and waste paper. End-use applications range from specialty chemicals to large-volume agricultural products. The increase of development activities in steam explosion should lead to expanded end-use applications, and acceptance of the technology by industry should accelerate in the years to come.

  10. Geothermal steam condensate reinjection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasteen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Geothermal electric generating plants which use condensing turbines and generate and excess of condensed steam which must be disposed of are discussed. At the Geysers, California, the largest geothermal development in the world, this steam condensate has been reinjected into the steam reservoir since 1968. A total of 3,150,000,000 gallons of steam condensate has been reinjected since that time with no noticeable effect on the adjacent producing wells. Currently, 3,700,000 gallons/day from 412 MW of installed capacity are being injected into 5 wells. Reinjection has also proven to be a satisfactory method of disposing of geothermal condensate a Imperial Valley, California, and at the Valles Caldera, New Mexico.

  11. Cost Reduction Strategies - Steam

    SciTech Connect

    2001-03-01

    Boilers play a particularly important role in integrated mills because they not only provide the steam needed for key processes but also consume by-product fuels generated in the coke ovens, blast furnace, and BOF.

  12. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  13. Steam Properties Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 10 NIST/ASME Steam Properties Database (PC database for purchase)   Based upon the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) 1995 formulation for the thermodynamic properties of water and the most recent IAPWS formulations for transport and other properties, this updated version provides water properties over a wide range of conditions according to the accepted international standards.

  14. Reforming Again: Now Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Educational reform responds to local and national pressures to improve educational outcomes, and reform efforts cycle as similar pressures recur. Currently, reform efforts focus on teachers, even though confidence in a host of American social institutions is dropping. One of the most widespread reforms regarding teachers is the…

  15. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  16. High purity H2 by sorption-enhanced chemical looping reforming of waste cooking oil in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Pimenidou, P; Rickett, G; Dupont, V; Twigg, M V

    2010-12-01

    High purity hydrogen (>95%) was produced at 600 degrees C and 1 atm by steam reforming of waste cooking oil at a molar steam to carbon ratio of 4 using chemical looping, a process that features redox cycles of a Ni catalyst with the in-situ carbonation/calcination of a CO(2) sorbent (dolomite) in a packed bed reactor under alternated feedstreams of fuel-steam and air. The fuel and steam conversion were higher with the sorbent present than without it. Initially, the dolomite carbonation was very efficient (100%), and 98% purity hydrogen was produced, but the carbonation decreased to around 56% with a purity of 95% respectively in the following cycles. Reduction of the nickel catalyst occurred alongside steam reforming, water gas shift and carbonation, with H(2) produced continuously under fuel-steam feeds. Catalyst and CO(2)-sorbent regeneration was observed, and long periods of autothermal operation within each cycle were demonstrated. PMID:20655199

  17. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Phase 1: Multi-fuel reformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  18. 32. 48' MILL STEAM ENGINE ADMISSION BOX (?), STEAM VALVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 48' MILL STEAM ENGINE ADMISSION BOX (?), STEAM VALVE, AND REVERSING MECHANISM LIFTING CYLINDER. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, 48" Plate Mill, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  19. 14. STEAM CABINETS & SITZ BATH IN STEAM ROOM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. STEAM CABINETS & SITZ BATH IN STEAM ROOM. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  20. Bench-Scale Monolith Autothermal Reformer Catalyst Screening Evaluations in a Micro-Reactor With Jet-A Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.; Yen, Judy C.H.; Budge, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell systems used in the aerospace or commercial aviation environment require a compact, light-weight and highly durable catalytic fuel processor. The fuel processing method considered here is an autothermal reforming (ATR) step. The ATR converts Jet-A fuel by a reaction with steam and air forming hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) to be used for production of electrical power in the fuel cell. This paper addresses the first phase of an experimental catalyst screening study, looking at the relative effectiveness of several monolith catalyst types when operating with untreated Jet-A fuel. Six monolith catalyst materials were selected for preliminary evaluation and experimental bench-scale screening in a small 0.05 kWe micro-reactor test apparatus. These tests were conducted to assess relative catalyst performance under atmospheric pressure ATR conditions and processing Jet-A fuel at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 3.5, a value higher than anticipated to be run in an optimized system. The average reformer efficiencies for the six catalysts tested ranged from 75 to 83 percent at a constant gas-hourly space velocity of 12,000 hr 1. The corresponding hydrocarbon conversion efficiency varied from 86 to 95 percent during experiments run at reaction temperatures between 750 to 830 C. Based on the results of the short-duration 100 hr tests reported herein, two of the highest performing catalysts were selected for further evaluation in a follow-on 1000 hr life durability study in Phase II.

  1. Steam-injected gas turbine analysis: Steam rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, I.G.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of steam rates in steam-injected gas turbines (simple and reheat). In considering a gas turbine of this type, the steam-injection flow is separated from the main gas stream for analysis. Dalton`s and Avogadro`s laws of partial pressure and gas mixtures are applied. Results obtained provide for the accurate determination of heat input, gas expansion based on partial pressures, and heat-rejection steam-enthalpy points.

  2. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER TREATABILITY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    BANNING DL

    2011-02-11

    This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Bench-Scale Reforming testing. The type, quantity, and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluidized bed steam reformer. A determination of the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used in a bench scale tests. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the shipping requirements and for comparison to the bench scale reformer (BSR) test sample selection requirements.

  3. Catalytic deactivation of methane steam reforming catalysts. I. Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Demicheli, M.C.; Ponzi, E.N.

    1987-08-01

    An alumina-supported catalyst was studied both in its original state and after activation and sintering. Chemical composition and textural properties were determined, and crystalline compounds were identified. Active-phase and support transformations occurring during activation were determined by differential thermoanalysis (DTA), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst activated by means of various procedures was characterized by measuring crystallite size.

  4. High performance steam development

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1995-10-01

    Over 30 years ago U.S. industry introduced the world`s highest temperature (1200{degrees}F at 5000 psig) and most efficient power plant, the Eddystone coal-burning steam plant. The highest alloy material used in the plant was 316 stainless steel. Problems during the first few years of operation caused a reduction in operating temperature to 1100{degrees}F which has generally become the highest temperature used in plants around the world. Leadership in high temperature steam has moved to Japan and Europe over the last 30 years.

  5. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  6. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  7. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  8. Plasma catalytic reforming of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A.; Alexeev, N.

    1998-08-01

    Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This paper describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius) and high degree of dissociation and substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (50% H{sub 2}, 17% CO and 33% N{sub 2}, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2--3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H{sub 2} with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content ({approximately} 1.5%) with power densities of {approximately} 30 kW (H{sub 2} HHV)/liter of reactor, or {approximately} 10 m{sup 3}/hr H{sub 2} per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

  9. A miniature fuel reformer system for portable power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolanc, Gregor; Belavič, Darko; Hrovat, Marko; Hočevar, Stanko; Pohar, Andrej; Petrovčič, Janko; Musizza, Bojan

    2014-12-01

    A miniature methanol reformer system has been designed and built to technology readiness level exceeding a laboratory prototype. It is intended to feed fuel cells with electric power up to 100 W and contains a complete setup of the technological elements: catalytic reforming and PROX reactors, a combustor, evaporators, actuation and sensing elements, and a control unit. The system is engineered not only for performance and quality of the reformate, but also for its lightweight and compact design, seamless integration of elements, low internal electric consumption, and safety. In the paper, the design of the system is presented by focussing on its miniaturisation, integration, and process control.

  10. Saloplastics: processing compact polyelectrolyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Pierre; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2015-04-17

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) are prepared by mixing solutions of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. These diffuse, amorphous precipitates may be compacted into dense materials, CoPECs, by ultracentrifugation (ucPECs) or extrusion (exPECs). The presence of salt water is essential in plasticizing PECs to allow them to be reformed and fused. When hydrated, CoPECs are versatile, rugged, biocompatible, elastic materials with applications including bioinspired materials, supports for enzymes and (nano)composites. In this review, various methods for making CoPECs are described, as well as fundamental responses of CoPEC mechanical properties to salt concentration. Possible applications as synthetic cartilage, enzymatically active biocomposites, self-healing materials, and magnetic nanocomposites are presented. PMID:25771881

  11. Internal reforming development for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. L.

    1987-02-01

    Internal reforming of natural gas within a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) should simplify the overall system design and make the SOFC an attractive means for producing electrical power. This program was undertaken to investigate the catalytic properties of nickel cermets, which are prime candidates for SOFC anodes. The initial task in this program was an extensive literature search for information on steam reforming of light hydrocarbons. The second task was to modify and calibrate the reactor systems that were used in the experimental kinetic studies. Two systems were used in this investigation; a continuously stirred tank reactor system (CSTR) and a plug flow reactor system (PFR). In the third task, 16 nickel-zirconia cermets were prepared using four procedures, tape casting, Westinghouse slurry, incorporation of performers, and granulation. The catalytic behavior of three cermets was determined in the fourth task. The reaction was first order with respect to methane and -1.25 for steam. Ethane and propane in the feed did not affect the methane conversion rate. The cermet has a higher initial tolerance for sulfur than standard nickel reforming catalysts. The final task was a mechanistic study of the steam reforming reaction on nickel and nickel-zirconia catalysts.

  12. Woody biomass and RPF gasification using reforming catalyst and calcium oxide.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Jun; Kawamoto, Katsuya; Fukushima, Ryutaro; Tanaka, Shingo

    2011-05-01

    This study focused on steam gasification and reforming of waste biomass using a reforming catalyst. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the durability of a commercial Ni reforming catalyst and the effect of CaO on the reforming behavior, and to clarify detailed factors of catalytic performance, as well as the effect of operating parameters on the characteristics of produced gas composition. Moreover, catalyst regeneration was carried out and the behavior of catalytic activity based on gas composition was investigated. Using a fluidized bed gasifier and a fixed bed reformer, gasification and reforming of waste biomass were carried out. Commercial Ni-based catalyst and calcined limestone (CaO) were applied to the reforming reaction. Temperature of the gasifier and reformer was almost 1023K. Ratio of steam to carbon in the feedstock [molmol(-1)] and equivalence ratio (i.e., ratio of actual to theoretical amount of oxygen) [-] were set at about 2 and 0.3, respectively. The feed rate of the feedstock into the bench-scale gasifier was almost 15kgh(-1). The results of waste biomass gasification confirmed the improvement in H(2) composition by the CO(2) absorption reaction using the reforming catalyst and CaO. In addition, CaO proved to be especially effective in decreasing the tar concentration in the case of woody biomass gasification. Catalytic activity was maintained by means of catalyst regeneration processing by hydrogen reduction after air oxidation when woody biomass was used as feedstock. PMID:21459406

  13. Reform before NCLB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desimone, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    The author compared NCLB-prompted standards-based reforms with earlier reforms and found that earlier manifestations of standards-based reforms may have been more productive and constructive. NCLB, with its emphasis on accountability through high-stakes testing, has produced many perverse results alongside documented achievement gains, the author…

  14. Sputnik Reform Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    Educational reforms being called for in the 1980's are compared to reforms of the 1950's. The Sputnik-inspired quest for quality called for reform in the content and structure of basic subjects. Current reports say that what educators are doing in the basic subjects is ok, but they need to do more. (RM)

  15. Reforming Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishkin, Anne S.; Sullivan, Michael

    This paper describes education reform as an integrated effort to modify not only the structure and elements of the education system but also the culture or belief structure of that system. Central to any discussion of school reform are the elements of restructuring, empowerment, and change. Current reform efforts in restructuring revolve around a…

  16. Anchors for Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alok, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Education reforms, considering their significance, deserve better methods than mere "trial and error." This article conceptualizes a network of six anchors for education reforms: education policy, education system, curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, and teacher education. It establishes the futility to reform anchors in isolation and anticipates…

  17. Beyond Reform: Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jill

    2007-01-01

    The Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is not a reform movement. To reform is to make a thing again; reformation implies a stasis that doesn't deliver enough for the educational future. This issue of Horace demonstrates that Essential schools and the districts and networks that support them are at various points in the journey of transformation,…

  18. R&D on Micro-pyrolyzer for Solid Wastes Using High Temperature Steam and Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    An innovative micro-gasification system for solid wastes is proposed in this paper, whose technical feasibility is demonstrated by using rubber chips as a fuel. In this system, a batch-type fixed-bed pyrolyzer combined with a high temperature steam/air reformer is employed. In the present investigation, it is shown that supply of high temperature air into the pyrolyzer significantly increases the heating value of the pyrolysis gas. With the use of high temperature steam/air mixture as an oxidant for reforming, almost complete reforming of the tar components can be done and they are decomposed into CO, H2 and other hydrocarbon gases with reasonable decrease of the heating value of the reformed gas compared with that of the pyrolysis gas. With packing ceramic balls in the reformer, reforming reactions can be accelerated. The experimental results demonstrate that almost soot and tar free clean reformed gas with the heating value of above 1000kcal/Nm3 can be generated from rubber chips.

  19. District steam and the St. Louis steam loop

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, T.M.; Sauer, H.J. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Owned and operated by large public electric utilities, district steam systems flourished in most northern US cities in the first half of this century. Following World War II, however, district steam systems became minor and, in some cases, unprofitable portions of the utilities' operations. Consequently, public utilities ceased promoting district steam to existing and potential customers, leading to the decline of their use. In recent years, district steam systems have been revitalized by independent enterprises that have the commitment and expertise to make these systems once again reliable and cost-effective energy sources. This paper reports on one such system, The St. Louis Steam Loop. The St. Louis steam loop consists of 22 miles of insulated underground steam piping encompassing a 400-square block area in the city's downtown business district. The loop is supplied with steam by the Ashley Plant, which was built in 1904 for the St. Louis World's Fair. Due to the rising cost of oil, which has been used to fuel the Ashley Plant since 1972, and the subsequent loss of customers, many people considered the steam system a dinosaur in the jet age. In 1982, Trigen-St. Louis Energy Corporation purchased the steam system and embarked on an aggressive campaign to upgrade all aspects of the system, including valves, piping, and meters. In 1999, Trigen-St. Louis will install an ISMW state-of-the-art combustion turbine cogenerator to provide 95% of the steam to the steam loop. A primary reason for the St. Louis Steam Loop's longevity is that it has reliably supplied steam to many downtown buildings for the better part of the 20th century.

  20. Steamer of steam circulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, M.

    1986-09-23

    A conveyor steamer is described which consists of: a room enclosed with heat-insulated walls, floor, and ceiling, the room having an entrance and an exit for goods to be steamed, a conveyor means for carrying the goods to be steamed, the conveyor means traversing into the entrance of the room, through the room, and out of the exit of the room; a source of heated primary steam; first pipe means, arranged beneath the conveyor means, for jetting the heated primary steam upwardly from across the floor of the room; second pipe means disposed across the entire ceiling of the room arranged above the conveyor means, for scavenging spent steam from across the entire ceiling of the room; and an ejector-condenser means, interconnected between the first pipe means, the source of primary heated steam and the second pipe means, for mixing the spent steam from the second pipe means with the heated primary steam in the first pipe means; whereby the spent steam mixed with the heated primary steam is caused to recirculate in the first pipe means through the room, thus saving energy and consuming less heated primary steam so that cost reductions will result.

  1. ADVANCED STEAM GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Geo. A.; Casleton, Kent H.; Lewis, Robie E.; Rogers, William A.; Woike, Mark R.; Willis; Brian P.

    2001-11-06

    Concerns about climate change have encouraged significant interest in concepts for ultra-low or ''zero''-emissions power generation systems. In some proposed concepts, nitrogen is removed from the combustion air and replaced with another diluent such as carbon dioxide or steam. In this way, formation of nitrogen oxides is prevented, and the exhaust stream can be separated into concentrated CO{sub 2} and steam or water streams. The concentrated CO{sub 2} stream could then serve as input to a CO{sub 2} sequestration process or utilized in some other way. Some of these concepts are illustrated in Figure 1. This project is an investigation of one approach to ''zero'' emission power generation. Oxy-fuel combustion is used with steam as diluent in a power cycle proposed by Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) [1,2]. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to produce nearly pure oxygen for combustion. In this particular concept, the combustion temperatures are moderated by steam as a diluent. An advantage of this technique is that water in the product stream can be condensed with relative ease, leaving a pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration. Because most of the atmospheric nitrogen has been separated from the oxidant, the potential to form any NOx pollutant is very small. Trace quantities of any minor pollutants species that do form are captured with the CO{sub 2} or can be readily removed from the condensate. The result is a nearly zero-emission power plant. A sketch of the turbine system proposed by CES is shown in Figure 2. NETL is working with CES to develop a reheat combustor for this application. The reheat combustion application is unusual even among oxy-fuel combustion applications. Most often, oxy-fuel combustion is carried out with the intent of producing very high temperatures for heat transfer to a product. In the reheat case, incoming steam is mixed with the oxygen and natural gas fuel to control the temperature of the output stream to about

  2. Crude oil steam distillation in steam flooding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.H.; Elder, R.B.

    1980-08-01

    Steam distillation yields of sixteen crude oils from various parts of the United States have been determined at a saturated steam pressure of 200 psig. Study made to investigate the effect of steam pressure (200 to 500 psig) on steam distillation yields indicates that the maximum yields of a crude oil may be obtained at 200 psig. At a steam distillation correlation factor (V/sub w//V/sub oi/) of 15, the determined steam distillation yields range from 12 to 56% of initial oil volume for the sixteen crude oils with gravity ranging from 12 to 40/sup 0/API. Regression analysis of experimental steam distillation yields shows that the boiling temperature (simulated distillation temperature) at 20% simulated distillation yield can predict the steam distillation yields reasonably well: the standard error ranges from 2.8 to 3.5% (in yield) for V/sub w//V/sub oi/ < 5 and from 3.5 to 4.5% for V/sub w//V/sub oi/ > 5. The oil viscosity (cs) at 100/sup 0/F can predict the steam distillation yields with standard error from 3.1 to 4.3%. The API gravity can predict the steam distillation yields with standard error from 4.4 to 5.7%. Characterization factor is an unsatisfactory correlation independent variable for correlation purpose.

  3. Development and Transient Analysis of a Helical-coil Steam Generator for High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Nolan A. Anderson; Piyush Sabharwall

    2011-08-01

    A high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is under development by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its design emphasizes electrical power production which may potentially be coupled with process heat for hydrogen production and other industrial applications. NGNP is considering a helical-coil steam generator for the primary heat transport loop heat exchanger based on its increased heat transfer and compactness when compared to other steam generators. The safety and reliability of the helical-coil steam generator is currently under evaluation as part of the development of NGNP. Transients, such as loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), are of interest in evaluating the safety of steam generators. In this study, a complete steam generator inlet pipe break (double ended pipe break) LOCA was simulated by an exponential loss of primary side pressure. For this analysis, a model of the helical-coil steam generator was developed using RELAP5-3D, an INL inhouse systems analysis code. The steam generator model behaved normally during the transient simulating the complete steam generator inlet pipe break LOCA. Further analysis is required to comprehensively evaluate the safety and reliability of the helical-coil steam generator design in the NGNP setting.

  4. Performance analysis of a SOFC under direct internal reforming conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardhanan, Vinod M.; Heuveline, Vincent; Deutschmann, Olaf

    This paper presents the performance analysis of a planar solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) under direct internal reforming conditions. A detailed solid-oxide fuel cell model is used to study the influences of various operating parameters on cell performance. Significant differences in efficiency and power density are observed for isothermal and adiabatic operational regimes. The influence of air number, specific catalyst area, anode thickness, steam to carbon (s/c) ratio of the inlet fuel, and extend of pre-reforming on cell performance is analyzed. In all cases except for the case of pre-reformed fuel, adiabatic operation results in lower performance compared to isothermal operation. It is further discussed that, though direct internal reforming may lead to cost reduction and increased efficiency by effective utilization of waste heat, the efficiency of the fuel cell itself is higher for pre-reformed fuel compared to non-reformed fuel. Furthermore, criteria for the choice of optimal operating conditions for cell stacks operating under direct internal reforming conditions are discussed.

  5. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  6. Project DEEP STEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschliman, D. P.; Clay, R. G.; Donaldson, A. B.; Eisenhawer, S. W.; Fox, R. L.; Johnson, D. R.; Mulac, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology to economically produce heavy oils from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this project are the development of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. During the period January 1-March 31, 1981, effort has continued on a low pressure combustion downhole generator (Rocketdyne), and on two high pressure designs (Foster-Miller Associates, Sandia National Laboratories). The Sandia design was prepared for deployment in the Wilmington Field at Long Beach, California. Progress continued on the Min-Stress II packer concept at L'Garde, Inc., and on the extruded metal packer at Foster-Miller. Initial bare string field data are reported on the insulated tubular test at Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, Canada.

  7. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  8. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  9. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  10. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  11. Autothermal and partial oxidation reformer-based fuel processor, method for improving catalyst function in autothermal and partial oxidation reformer-based processors

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon H. D.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2013-01-08

    The invention provides a fuel processor comprising a linear flow structure having an upstream portion and a downstream portion; a first catalyst supported at the upstream portion; and a second catalyst supported at the downstream portion, wherein the first catalyst is in fluid communication with the second catalyst. Also provided is a method for reforming fuel, the method comprising contacting the fuel to an oxidation catalyst so as to partially oxidize the fuel and generate heat; warming incoming fuel with the heat while simultaneously warming a reforming catalyst with the heat; and reacting the partially oxidized fuel with steam using the reforming catalyst.

  12. Enhanced oil recovery using direct downhole steam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    High pressure, direct contact steam generators are capable of producing high quality steam and inert combustion gas from a compact apparatus. The combination of steam and inert gas is attractive for many enhanced recovery operations. Direct contact steam generators can be utilized to produce steam with gases either on the surface or down hole. The utilization of these devices down hole can reduce capital and operating costs and eliminate delivery heat loss at the expense of a loss of accessibility. These devices are usually referred to as down-hole generators, even if operated on the surface. The current state of technology of these generators has evolved from a series of field test demonstrations to commercial deployment. The results obtained from demonstration tests conducted in reservoirs ranging from 250 to 800 m in depth showed that these devices could be operated successfully in the oil field for long periods of time. Subsequent to the successful demonstrations, commercial equipment has been deployed in various reservoir conditions. The results from both demonstration tests and current commercial operations are discussed.

  13. Steam drive recovery method utilizing a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Snavely, E. S.; Hopkins, D. N.

    1984-09-18

    Viscous oil is recovered from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation by a steam flooding technique wherein steam is generated in a downhole steam generator located in an injection well by spontaneous combustion of a pressurized mixture of a water-soluble fuel such as sugars and alcohols dissolved in water and substantially pure oxygen. The generated mixture of steam and combustion gases pass through the formation, displacing oil and reducing the oil's viscosity and the mobilized oil is produced from the formation via a spaced-apart production well.

  14. Steam drive oil recovery method utilizing a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nopkins, D. N.; Snavely, E. S.

    1984-10-23

    Viscous oil is recovered from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation by a steam flooding technique wherein steam is generated in a downhole steam generator located in an injection well by spontaneous combustion of a pressurized mixture of a water-soluble fuel such as sugars and alcohols dissolved in water or a stable hydrocarbon fuel-in-water emulsion and substantially pure oxygen. The generated mixture of steam and combustion gases pass through the formation, displacing oil and reducing the oil's viscosity and the mobilized oil is produced from the formation via a spaced-apart production well.

  15. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  16. Downhole steam generator shows merit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Production from a 5-spot pattern in Kern River Field reached 25,000 bbl during a 5-month test of a down-hole steam generator-equivalent to the amount of oil expected if steam injection from the conventional source had been continued. The test evaluated the down-hole generator as a steam source relatively free of atmospheric pollutants. The biggest objection to steam recovery of heavy crude is the volume of combustion products vented to the atmosphere, and these frequently contain small amounts of sulfur compounds. One big advantage of generating steam down hole is elimination of heat losses in the injection well. The practical limit for conventional steam injection is in a reservoir approximately 2,500 ft deep; the down-hole generator should operate economically to 6,000 ft. The test proved the feasibility of the method, and cleared the way for a series of down-hole generator installation and retrieval tests.

  17. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  18. Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

  19. Performance predictions of a tubular SOFC operating on a partially reformed JP-8 surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Gaurav K.; Marda, Jonathan R.; Dean, Anthony M.; Colclasure, Andrew M.; Zhu, Huayang; Kee, Robert J.

    This paper uses chemically reacting flow models to explore the effect of upstream JP-8 steam reforming on the performance of a tubular, anode-supported, solid-oxide fuel cell. In all cases studied in this paper, a steam-carbon ratio of 3 is used for the reformer inlet. However, by varying the reformer temperature, the methane concentration in the reformate stream can be varied. In this study methane mole fractions are varied between 0 and 20%, on a dry basis. The methane mole fraction is found to have a substantial effect on fuel-cell efficiency, power density, and heat-release profiles. The paper also explores the effects of internal reforming chemistry and electrochemical charge transfer on the gas-phase kinetics and propensity for deposit formation. A detailed reaction mechanism is used to describe methane steam reforming on Ni within the anode, while a detailed gas-phase mechanism is used to predict the gas-phase composition in the fuel channel.

  20. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.T.

    1980-04-01

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment of solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  1. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    DOEpatents

    Li, Charles T.

    1980-01-01

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  2. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    DOEpatents

    Li, C.T.

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  3. Steam distillation of crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, J.H.; Hsueh, L.

    1983-04-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to generate crude oil steam distillation data for the prediction of phase behavior in steamflood simulation and to correlate the steam distillation yields for a variety of crude oils. Thirteen steam distillation tests were run on 10 crude oils ranging in gravity from 9.4 to 37/sup 0/API (1.004 to 0.840 g/cm/sup 3/). In each test the crude was steam distilled sequentially at about 220, 300, 400, and 500/sup 0/F (104, 149, 204, and 260/sup 0/C). The cumulative steam distillation yields at 400/sup 0/F (204/sup 0/C) ranged from about 20 to 55 vol%. Experimental results showed that crude oil steam distillation yields at steamflood conditions are significant, even for heavy oils. The effects of differences in steam volume throughput and steam temperature were taken into account when comparing yields for different crudes or repeat runs on the same crude. Steam distillation yields show a high correlation with crude oil API gravity and wax content.

  4. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  5. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    PubMed

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  6. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  7. Mitigate NO{sub x} by steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, R.G.; Keck, B.R.; Repasky, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    In this case history, an existing steam-methane reformer (SMR) needed to expand production to meet greater customer demands. The SMR operator investigated several ways to achieve this expansion. However, within the scope of work, management wanted to minimize downtime. Also, the selected technologies must cost-effectively satisfy environmental regulatory requirements for NO{sub x}. To avoid re-permitting headaches, the designers investigated injecting steam into the existing burners to cut NO{sub x} emissions. Furthermore, the design team proposed using parameter monitoring of process variables instead of installing a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) on the flue-gas stack. The governing environmental agency accepted the parameter monitoring proposal. The project took 18 months from conception through process and hardware design to construction and startup. Demonstration of environmental compliance was conducted in September 1996.

  8. Thermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high temperature process heat. The overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. An overview of high temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic thermodynamics, experimental methods, heat and mass transfer phenomena, and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

  9. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION STEAM TECH ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steam Enhanced Remediation is a process in which steam is injected into the subsurface to recover volatile and semivolatile organic contaminants. It has been applied successfully to recover contaminants from soil and aquifers and at a fractured granite site. This SITE demonstra...

  10. Tools to Boost Steam System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    The Steam System Scoping Tool quickly evaluates your entire steam system operation and spots the areas that are the best opportunities for improvement. The tool suggests a range of ways to save steam energy and boost productivity.

  11. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  12. Modeling of On-Cell Reforming Reaction for Planar SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Choongmo; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Hwang, Soon Cheol; Kim, Dohyung; Lai, Canhai; Koeppel, Brian J.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-30

    Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack is known to suffer thermal problem from high stack temperature during operation to generate high current. On-Cell Reforming (OCR) phenomenon is often used to reduce stack temperature by an endothermic reaction of steam-methane reforming process. RIST conducted single-cell experiment to validate modeling tool to simulate OCR performance including temperature measurement. 2D modeling is used to check reforming rate during OCR using temperature measurement data, and 3D modeling is used to check overall thermal performance including furnace boundary conditions.

  13. Exploring strontium titanate as a reforming catalyst for dodecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hbaieb, K.

    2016-08-01

    Yttrium-doped strontium titanate (YST)-based perovskite has been explored as catalyst for reforming dodecane. Active metal elements such as ruthenium, nickel and cobalt were doped on the B-site of the perovskite to boost the catalyst activity. Commercial Ni-alumina catalyst has been used for benchmarking. Both steam and autothermal reforming schemes have been used at 800 and 850 °C. Irrespective of the doping elements, all catalysts performed well and had comparable activity and conversion as the commercial catalyst with slight advantage for ruthenium followed by nickel-based catalysts. Hydrogen and syngas yields fall into the range of 65-75 and 83-91 %, respectively. Conversion was consistently between 84 and 90 %. As such, the YST-based perovskite is a promising catalyst for reforming of heavy liquid hydrocarbon fuel.

  14. Educational Reform in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Bertha Orozco; Elizando Y Carr, Sandra

    1993-01-01

    Since the 1970s, each presidential regime has presented an educational modernization reform program for Mexico. Although the various reforms have widened educational opportunities, the quality of education has continued to deteriorate because of student and teacher desertion, a low scholastic progress index, accessibility problems, lack of an…

  15. Small Schools Reform Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Beth M.; Berghoff, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This study explored complicated personal narratives of school reform generated by participants in response to a particular small schools reform initiative. Narrative data was dialogically generated in interviews with nine past participants of an urban high school conversion project planned and implemented over a span of five years toward the goal…

  16. Orthographic Reform in Kope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifton, John M.

    The role of local attitudes in recent orthographic reform in Kope is examined. The previous Kope orthographic tradition is outlined, and two areas apparently requiring reform (nasal/fricative variation and vowel clusters versus semivowels). The concerns and the greater awareness among the locals regarding these orthographic changes are explored.…

  17. Educational Reform in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butorac, Marylin M.; First, Patricia F.

    1994-01-01

    Oklahoma's answer to the cry for reform and involvement in education emerged as House Bill 1017, a comprehensive $223 million school reform and tax act. This article reviews the HR 1017 story, focusing on its legislative enactment history and offering a content analysis of mandated changes in finance, personnel, governance, student assessment,…

  18. Reform: To What End?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The author looks at school reform in light of his experiences documenting effective public education in classrooms across the United States. Observing in an inner-city 1st grade classroom, he sees a teacher who is knowledgeable, resourceful, and particularly effective with her students. He notes that none of the current high-profile reform ideas…

  19. Steam drying -- Modeling and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmerstedt, R.; Hager, J.

    1996-08-01

    The concept of steam drying originates from the mid of the last century. However, a broad industrial acceptance of the technique has so far not taken place. The paper deals with modelling the steam drying process and applications of steam drying within certain industrial sectors where the technique has been deemed to have special opportunities. In the modelling section the mass and heat transfer processes are described along with equilibrium, capillarity and sorption phenomena occurring in porous materials during the steam drying process. In addition existing models in the literature are presented. The applications discussed involve drying of fuels with high moisture contents, cattle feed exemplified by sugar beet pulp, lumber, paper pulp, paper and sludges. Steam drying is compared to flue gas drying of biofuels prior to combustion in a boiler. With reference to a current installation in Sweden, the exergy losses, as manifested by loss of co-generation capacity, are discussed. The energy saving potential when using steam drying of sugar beet pulp as compared to other possible plant configurations is demonstrated. Mechanical vapor recompression applied to steam drying is analyzed with reference to reported data from industrial plants. Finally, environmental advantages when using steam drying are presented.

  20. IN SITU STEAM EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ steam extraction removes volatile and semivolatile hazardous contaminants from soil and groundwater without excavation of the hazardous waste. aste constituents are removed in situ by the technology and are not actually treated. he use of steam enhances the stripping of v...

  1. Development of Multi-Stage Steam Injector for Feedwater Heaters in Simplified Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narabayashi, Tadashi; Ohmori, Shuichi; Mori, Michitsugu; Asanuma, Yutaka; Iwaki, Chikako

    A steam injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater to heat up feedwater by using extracted steam from the turbine. To develop high performance compact feedwater heater, it is necessary to quantify the characteristics between physical properties of the flow field. Its performance depends on the phenomena of steam condensation onto the water jet surface and heat transfer in the water jet due to turbulence on to the phase-interface. The analysis was conducted by using CFD code embedded separate two-phase flow models that were confirmed by the experimental data. As the four-stage SI is compact heater, the system is expected to bring about great simplification and materials-saving effects, and high reliability of its operation. Therefore, it is confirmed that the simplification of the power plant by replacing all low-pressure feedwater heaters with the four-stage SI system, having steam extraction pressures equal to those for the existing ABWR system.

  2. Steam Digest 2001: Office of Industrial Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles Best Practices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  3. ACOUSTIC COMPACTION LAYER DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The depth and strength of compacted layers in fields have been determined traditionally using the ASAE standardized cone penetrometer method. However, an on-the-go method would be much faster and much less labor intensive. The soil measurement system described here attempts to locate the compacted...

  4. Steam generator tube integrity program

    SciTech Connect

    Dierks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Muscara, J.

    1996-03-01

    A new research program on steam generator tubing degradation is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at Argonne National Laboratory. This program is intended to support a performance-based steam generator tube integrity rule. Critical areas addressed by the program include evaluation of the processes used for the in-service inspection of steam generator tubes and recommendations for improving the reliability and accuracy of inspections; validation and improvement of correlations for evaluating integrity and leakage of degraded steam generator tubes, and validation and improvement of correlations and models for predicting degradation in steam generator tubes as aging occurs. The studies will focus on mill-annealed Alloy 600 tubing, however, tests will also be performed on replacement materials such as thermally-treated Alloy 600 or 690. An overview of the technical work planned for the program is given.

  5. Dynamical compactness and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Khilko, Danylo; Kolyada, Sergiĭ; Zhang, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    To link the Auslander point dynamics property with topological transitivity, in this paper we introduce dynamically compact systems as a new concept of a chaotic dynamical system (X , T) given by a compact metric space X and a continuous surjective self-map T : X → X. Observe that each weakly mixing system is transitive compact, and we show that any transitive compact M-system is weakly mixing. Then we discuss the relationships between it and other several stronger forms of sensitivity. We prove that any transitive compact system is Li-Yorke sensitive and furthermore multi-sensitive if it is not proximal, and that any multi-sensitive system has positive topological sequence entropy. Moreover, we show that multi-sensitivity is equivalent to both thick sensitivity and thickly syndetic sensitivity for M-systems. We also give a quantitative analysis for multi-sensitivity of a dynamical system.

  6. Technical and economic assessment of producing hydrogen by reforming syngas from the Battelle indirectly heated biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.K.

    1995-08-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass by means of indirectly heated gasification and steam reforming was studied. A detailed process model was developed in ASPEN Plus{trademark} to perform material and energy balances. The results of this simulation were used to size and cost major pieces of equipment from which the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen was made. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the process to study hydrogen price as a function of biomass feedstock cost and hydrogen production efficiency. The gasification system used for this study was the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) indirectly heated gasifier. The heat necessary for the endothermic gasification reactions is supplied by circulating sand from a char combustor to the gasification vessel. Hydrogen production was accomplished by steam reforming the product synthesis gas (syngas) in a process based on that used for natural gas reforming. Three process configurations were studied. Scheme 1 is the full reforming process, with a primary reformer similar to a process furnace, followed by a high temperature shift reactor and a low temperature shift reactor. Scheme 2 uses only the primary reformer, and Scheme 3 uses the primary reformer and the high temperature shift reactor. A pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system is used in all three schemes to produce a hydrogen product pure enough to be used in fuel cells. Steam is produced through detailed heat integration and is intended to be sold as a by-product.

  7. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  8. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Erickson

    2006-04-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the tenth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2006. This quarter saw progress in six areas. These areas are: (1) The effect of catalyst dimension on steam reforming, (2) Transient characteristics of autothermal reforming, (3) Rich and lean autothermal reformation startup, (4) Autothermal reformation degradation with coal derived methanol, (5) Reformate purification system, and (6) Fuel cell system integration. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

  10. On the Road to Reform: A Sociocultural Interpretation of Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I discuss how reform in science education is interpreted by Barma as she recounts the story of Catherine, a grade 9 biology teacher, who reforms her teaching practices in response to a national curriculum reform in Quebec, Canada. Unlike some cases in response to reform, this case is hopeful and positive. Also in this paper, I…

  11. Reforming Educational Reform: A Democratic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J.

    2005-05-01

    This essay examines the status of educational reform in the United States as represented by the current Bush administration's program titled "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB). Employing the techniques of critical theory and logical analysis, contemporary reform efforts are compared with other, more progressive, educational reform movements in an effort to gain perspective and conceptual "traction" as it were, in differentiating such movements. Criteria are established for the assessment and evaluation of reform movements. These are employed in judging the efficacy of NCLB's aim, content, and methods, as well as the results of its program following four years of implementation. The merits of the centrality of standardized testing, pre-ordained curricular content, and exclusively didactic teaching methodologies are criticized, along with the extra-school societal forces which ordain these and determine their prominence in the NCLB program. The essentialism adopted by NCLB is, moreover, evaluated in the light of pragmatic, phenomenological, and postmodern educational theory. Arguing that the school is always and inevitably an instrument of societal forces, interests, and groups, it is contended that these not only be acknowledged, but that avenues be formalized for a thorough going and continuous educational "conversation," to borrow Rorty's term, for an amicable resolution of the issues of education's aim(s), content, and methods.

  12. Evaluation of HiPHES convective reformer design alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    Phase I Stone Webster presented three potential design configurations for a ceramic-tubed steam-methane reformer. These were the Tube-Within-a-Tube (TWIT) design, the Once-Through design, and the Monolith design. Although the TWIT design configuration appeared to be the most viable, the inclusion of a more detailed examination of design alternatives for the HiPHES reformer was deemed appropriate for the Phase II program. Of particular concern was the length of the ceramic tubes required for the TWIT design. To assist in this evaluation, Stone Webster established a Development Team consisting of specialists in the areas of heat transfer, ceramic materials, exchanger design, vessel design, and potential users. Stone Webster reviewed the critical areas of concern for a ceramic convective reformer, evaluated competing design configurations, and presented the results to the Development Team. This report presents Stone Webster's evaluations and the comments and recommendations of the Development Team. This effort comprised the majority of Task 1 of Phase II of Stone Webster's HiPHES project. The design review was executed in parallel with the material coupon screening tests at BP America. The goal of both tasks was to confirm the materials selection and reformer design configuration so that the conditions for the tube and joint tests to be conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) could be specified. The ORNL tests are intended to evaluate the reformer design configuration and materials of construction used for the reformer design in Phase II, and to be used in the demonstration unit in Phase III. The Task 1 (Evaluation of Alternative Reformer Designs) effort has identified a preferred design configuration for the proposed ceramic reformer. Additional engineering and material evaluation work is necessary before an operating prototype can be designed.

  13. Hydrogen production aided solid oxide electrochemical reformer fed with octane: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashkina, A. A.; Maragou, V. I.; Demin, A. K.; Pikalova, E. Yu.; Tsiakaras, P. E.

    In the present work the possibility of pure hydrogen production by a solid oxide electrochemical reformer (SOER) is examined. Initial reagents are water steam, flowing into the cathode channel and octane flowing into the anode channel. Three modes of reforming are considered: (i) steam reforming (SR-mode), (ii) preliminary octane partial oxidation (PO-mode) and (iii) preliminary octane reforming by exhaust anode gas recycling (EAGR-mode). A parametric analysis is carried out that can be easily applied for various hydrocarbons. It was found that the electromotive force (EMF) value depends mainly on the ratio of steam moles' number supplied to the cathode space to the number of hydrogen output moles (k-parameter). It was also found that EMF increases with k increase, while is weakly affected from the temperature and the heat losses amount. Moreover, the EMF average value under the PO-mode is lower than that under the SR-mode. Finally, it is shown that the SOER optimum characteristics can be reached under the EAGR-mode, since it provides the most favorable combination of the reforming efficiency and the rate of the electrochemical process.

  14. Downhole steam generation: material studies

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, E.K.; Weirick, L.J.; Muir, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    One enhanced oil recovery technique for extracting heavy crude from deep reservoirs by steam at the bottom of an injection well. Development of a downhole steam generator that will produce steam and inject it into formations at depths greater than 2500 feet is one objective of a Department of Energy/Sandia National Laboratories development effort - Project DEEP STEAM. Extensive material studies have been performed in support of Project DEEP STEAM; current efforts are devoted primarily to the selection and evaluation of materials for use in downhole steam generators. This paper presents observations of the performance of candidate metals and refractory ceramics (combustor liners) during tests of two prototypic, high pressure, diesel/air combustion, direct contact, downhole steam generators. The first downhole test of such a generator provides data on the performance of various metals (304L, 310 and 316S stainless steels and plain carbon steel) exposed for several weeks to a warm, aerated saltwater environment. A number of corrosion mechanisms acted to cause severely degraded perforance of some of the metals. Several refractory liner designs were evaluated during ground level tests of a generator having a ceramic-lined combustion chamber. Of the two refractories employed, alumina and silicon carbide, the alumina liners exhibited more serious surface degradation and corrosion.

  15. ULTRA-SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Bullard, S.B.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2003-04-22

    Efficiency increases in fossil energy boilers and steam turbines are being achieved by increasing the temperature and pressure at the turbine inlets well beyond the critical point of water. To allow these increases, advanced materials are needed that are able to withstand the higher temperatures and pressures in terms of strength, creep, and oxidation resistance. As part of a larger collaborative effort, the Albany Research Center (ARC) is examining the steam-side oxidation behavior for ultrasupercritical (USC) steam turbine applications. Initial tests are being done on six alloys identified as candidates for USC steam boiler applications: ferritic alloy SAVE12, austenitic alloy Super 304H, the high Cr-high Ni alloy HR6W, and the nickel-base superalloys Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Inconel 740. Each of these alloys has very high strength for its alloy type. Three types of experiments are planned: cyclic oxidation in air plus steam at atmospheric pressure, thermogravimetric ana lysis (TGA) in steam at atmospheric pressure, and exposure tests in supercritical steam up to 650 C (1202 F) and 34.5 MPa (5000 psi). The atmospheric pressure tests, combined with supercritical exposures at 13.8, 20.7, 24.6, and 34.5 MPa (2000, 3000, 4000, and 5000 psi) should allow the determination of the effect of pressure on the oxidation process.

  16. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  17. Chicago School Reform as History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Michael B.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between Chicago's school reform and history, noting implications for current reform: (1) origins of bureaucracy and ascendance of experts and professionals; (2) educational reform as a social movement; (3) race and ethnicity; (4) revitalization of the public sphere; and (5) limits of educational reform. (SM)

  18. Atuarfitsialak: Greenland's Cultural Compatible Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tasha R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, Greenlandic reform leaders launched a comprehensive, nation-wide reform to create culturally compatible education. Greenland's reform work spans the entire educational system and includes preschool through higher education. To assist their efforts, reform leaders adopted the Standards for Effective Pedagogy developed at the Center for…

  19. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  20. Bioequivalent chemical steam sterilization indicators.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, A; Manne, S

    1984-01-01

    Biological indicators used to monitor steam sterilization cycles have two major shortcomings--the incubation period needed to determine if sterilization was accomplished, and the reliance on test packs for gathering information in each load. Chemical indicators do not suffer from these shortcomings. Chemical indicators can respond to time, temperature, and steam parameters to thus parallel the BI reaction. Nine commercially available chemical indicators and four biological indicators were evaluated under the conditions of dry heat, in a biological indicator-evaluator resistometer vessel, and in a hospital sterilizer. The results indicate that wider use of integrated chemical steam sterilization indicators is recommended. PMID:6493101

  1. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  2. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-15

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  3. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  4. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  5. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  6. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  7. 21 CFR 880.6880 - Steam sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steam sterilizer. 880.6880 Section 880.6880 Food... § 880.6880 Steam sterilizer. (a) Identification. A steam sterilizer (autoclave) is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of pressurized steam....

  8. Steam distillation effect and oil quality change during steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, K.T.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Steam distillation is an important mechanism which reduces residual oil saturation during steam injection. It may be the main recovery mechanism in steamflooding of light oil reservoirs. As light components are distilled the residual (initial) oil, the residuum becomes heavier. Mixing the distilled components with the initial oil results in a lighter produced oil. A general method has been developed to compute steam distillation yield and to quantify oil quality changes during steam injection. The quantitative results are specific because the California crude data bank was used. But general principles were followed and calculations were based on information extracted from the DOE crude oil assay data bank. It was found that steam distillation data from the literature can be correlated with the steam distillation yield obtained from the DOE crude oil assays. The common basis for comparison was the equivalent normal boiling point. Blending of distilled components with the initial oil results in API gravity changes similar to those observed in several laboratory and field operations.

  9. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  10. Dark compact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We investigate compact objects formed by dark matter admixed with ordinary matter made of neutron-star matter and white-dwarf material. We consider non-self annihilating dark matter with an equation of state given by an interacting Fermi gas. We find new stable solutions, dark compact planets, with Earth-like masses and radii from a few Km to few hundred Km for weakly interacting dark matter which are stabilized by the mutual presence of dark matter and compact star matter. For the strongly interacting dark matter case, we obtain dark compact planets with Jupiter-like masses and radii of few hundred Km. These objects could be detected by observing exoplanets with unusually small radii. Moreover, we find that the recently observed 2 M⊙ pulsars set limits on the amount of dark matter inside neutron stars which is, at most, 1 0-6 M⊙ .

  11. Focus on Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Cheryl G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes principal-initiated reform efforts at Alton Elementary School in downtown Memphis, Tennessee, that improved teacher performance and student reading scores. Alton is a K-4 school with a 100 percent African-American student population. (PKP)

  12. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  13. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-27

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  14. Compact baby Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, C.; Klimas, P.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2009-11-15

    For the baby Skyrme model with a specific potential, compacton solutions, i.e., configurations with a compact support and parabolic approach to the vacuum, are derived. Specifically, in the nontopological sector, we find spinning Q-balls and Q-shells, as well as peakons. Moreover, we obtain compact baby skyrmions with nontrivial topological charge. All these solutions may form stable multisoliton configurations provided they are sufficiently separated.

  15. On the road to reform: a sociocultural interpretation of reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2011-09-01

    In this paper I discuss how reform in science education is interpreted by Barma as she recounts the story of Catherine, a grade 9 biology teacher, who reforms her teaching practices in response to a national curriculum reform in Quebec, Canada. Unlike some cases in response to reform, this case is hopeful and positive. Also in this paper, I address some familiar areas that must be considered when teachers undertake curriculum reform and how science educators may fulfill the role of facilitator and advocate in the support of teachers on the road to reform. The commentary focuses on how Barma retells the story through the lens of activity theory.

  16. Experimental and predicted approaches for biomass gasification with enriched air-steam in a fluidised bed.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qirang; Huang, Yaji; Niu, Miaomiao; Yang, Gaoqiang; Shao, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    Thermo-chemical gasification of sawdust refuse-derived fuel was performed on a bench-scale fluidised bed gasifier with enriched air and steam as fluidising and oxidising agents. Dolomite as a natural mineral catalyst was used as bed material to reform tars and hydrocarbons. A series of experiments were carried out under typical operating conditions for gasification, as reported in the article. A modified equilibrium model, based on equilibrium constants, was developed to predict the gasification process. The sensitivity analysis of operating parameters, such as the fluidisation velocity, oxygen percentage of the enriched air and steam to biomass ratios on the produced gas composition, lower heating value, carbon conversion and cold gas efficiency was investigated. The results showed that the predicted syngas composition was in better agreement with the experimental data compared with the original equilibrium model. The higher fluidisation velocity enhanced gas-solid mixing, heat and mass transfers, and carbon fines elutriation, simultaneously. With the increase of oxygen percentage from 21% to 45%, the lower heating value of syngas increased from 5.52 MJ m(-3) to 7.75 MJ m(-3) and cold gas efficiency from 49.09% to 61.39%. The introduction of steam improved gas quality, but a higher steam to biomass ratio could decrease carbon conversion and gasification efficiency owing to a low steam temperature. The optimal value of steam to biomass ratio in this work was 1.0. PMID:25265865

  17. A compact MCFC power plant for industrial cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, P.

    1998-12-31

    Of all existing or emerging fuel cell technologies the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is specifically suited for stationary cogeneration applications in small to medium power range (several hundred kilowatts up to several megawatts). At a temperature level of 650 C the MCFC incorporates all the advantages of high temperature fuel cells: internal reforming of hydrocarbons for simplest system design and highest efficiency and useful high temperature heat for industrial steam generation, without having to cope with the problems of ceramic fuel cell manufacturing. The paper describes the fuel cell, the European MCFC development consortium, optimization by simplification and integration, scope of applications, and qualification and future development.

  18. Comparative analysis of steam delivery cost for surface and downhole steam drive technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, C.M.

    1981-10-01

    A basis is established for evaluating the economic performances of the technologies for enhanced recovery of heavy crude being investigated through the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM. Conventional surface steam drive is compared with: (1) thermally efficient delivery (through insulated strings) of surface generated steam; (2) low pressure combustion downhole steam generation; (3) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation; (4) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation using air as the oxygen source; and (5) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation substituting pure oxygen for air. A parametric analysis is performed for varying depths, injection rates, and steam qualities.

  19. Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jan; Griffin, Mr. Bob; Wright, Anthony L

    2006-01-01

    Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

  20. Design study status of compact containment BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Kuroki, M.; Kojima, Y.; Arai, K.; Tahara, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a relatively mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Japan Atomic Power Company has been taking initiative in developing the concept of the Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR). The CCR., which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's relatively mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The upper entry CRDs enable a simplified safety system followed by in-vessel retention (IVR) capability with the compact primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration of RPV below the top of the core height, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC). The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. Further core design study has been carried out taking into account compact reactor size and reduction of fuel

  1. Ecuador's silent health reform.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Pierre; Echeverría Tapia, Ramiro; Aguilar Santacruz, Edison; Unger, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Health sector reform was implemented in many Latin American countries in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to reduced public expenditure on health, limitations on public provision for disease control, and a minimum package of services, with concomitant growth of the private sector. At first sight, Ecuador appeared to follow a different pattern: no formal reform was implemented, despite many plans to reform the Ministry of Health and social health insurance. The authors conducted an in-depth review and analysis of published and gray literature on the Ecuadorian health sector from 1990 onward. They found that although neoliberal reform of the health sector was not openly implemented, many of its typical elements are present: severe reduction of public budgets, "universal" health insurance with limited coverage for targeted groups, and contracting out to private providers. The health sector remains segmented and fragmented, explaining the population's poor health status. The leftist Correa government has prepared an excellent long-term plan to unite services of the Ministry of Health and social security, but implementation is extremely slow. In conclusion, the health sector in Ecuador suffered a "silent" neoliberal reform. President Correa's progressive government intends to reverse this, increasing public budgets for health, but hesitates to introduce needed radical changes. PMID:22611652

  2. Development and application of steam turbines with advanced HLP single-cylinder rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, A.; Tsuda, Y.; Suzuki, M.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, the Gas Turbine capacity has been increased step by step to improve initial cost of the Gas turbine and plant efficiency as well as to improve cycle conditions that is, temperature, pressure and cycle. In accordance with this improvement, the steam turbine capacity has been increased gradually in combined-cycle plants. In this application, the steam turbine became larger and the steam turbine is generally equipped with multiple rotors. When the rotor forging with a good combination of creep rupture strength in the HP section and toughness in the LP section is available, the steam turbine can be designed as a single rotor, instead of multiple rotors, which makes the steam turbine to be compact and to be simple. The authors have already developed an HLP rotor forging (first generation), which has been applied to turbine rotors of units having capacities up to around 100 MW with a last stage blade (LSB) of a maximum 26 inch (660 mm) class. Recently, the advanced HLP rotor forging has been developed, which can be applied to longer LSBs of 42 inch (1070 mm) for 50 Hz machines, and 40 inch (1016 mm) for 60 Hz machines. As a result of the development, the steam turbines of 100 to 250 MW capacity in thermal power plants and advanced combined-cycle plants can be made more compact through this single-cylinder design. This paper describes development and application of the steam turbine with the advanced HLP rotor for advanced combined-cycle plants as well as for conventional thermal plants.

  3. Steam generator hand hole shielding.

    PubMed

    Cox, W E

    2000-05-01

    Seabrook Station is an 1198 MWE Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that began commercial operation in 1990. Expensive and dose intensive Steam Generator Replacement Projects among PWR operators have led to an increase in steam generator preventative maintenance. Most of this preventative maintenance is performed through access ports in the shell of the steam generator just above the tube sheet known as secondary side hand holes. Secondary side work activities performed through the hand holes are typically performed without the shielding benefit of water in the secondary side of the steam generator. An increase in cleaning and inspection work scope has led to an increase in dose attributed to steam generator secondary side maintenance. This increased work scope and the station goal of maintaining personnel radiation dose ALARA led to the development of the shielding concept described in this article. This shield design saved an estimated 2.5 person-rem (25 person-Smv) the first time it was deployed and is expected to save an additional 50 person-rem (500 person-mSv) over the remaining life of the plant. PMID:10770158

  4. Tri-reforming and combined reforming of methane for producing syngas with desired hydrogen/carbon monoxide ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wei

    This dissertation is an exploratory study of a new process concept for direct production of synthesis gas (CO + H2) with desired H 2/CO ratios (1.5--2.0) for methanol synthesis and F-T synthesis, using CO2 together with steam and unconverted O2 in flue gas from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants to react with methane or natural gas. This new process is called tri-reforming, referring to simultaneous CO2-steam-O2 reforming of methane or natural gas. This study included (1) The investigation of carbon formation in the tri-reforming process. For comparison, carbon formation in the combined reforming and CO2 reforming reaction was studied as well. (2) The effect of reaction conditions and feed compositions on equilibrium composition (e.g. H2/CO ratio) and equilibrium conversions in the tri-reforming process. (3) The role of catalysts in the tri-reforming process, especially the effect of catalysts on CO2 conversion in the presence of H 2O and O2. It was clearly evidenced from this study that CO in the product stream is probably the major source of carbon over Ni/Al2O3 in the equimolar CO2-CH4 reforming at 650°C and 1 atm. Addition of either O2 or H2O into the CO 2 reforming reaction system can suppress carbon formation. It was demonstrated that carbon-free operation can be achieved in the tri-reforming process. A thermodynamic comparison of tri-reforming with feed compositions of (H2O+CO2+0.5O2)/CH4 (mol ratio) = 1 showed that O2 improves equilibrium CH4 conversion, yet greatly decreases equilibrium CO2 conversion. H2O in tri-reforming has a significant effect on the H2/CO ratio in the products, while O2 has a minor effect. A kinetic study and catalytic performance tests indicated that the support in a supported catalyst has a significant role in enhancing CO2 conversion to CO in the presence of H2O and O2 in tri-reforming. The Ni/MgO catalyst showed superior performance with close to equilibrium CH4 and CO2 conversions at 850°C, 1 atm, and 32,000 ml

  5. Comprehensive Solutions for Urban Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Sally

    2005-01-01

    The comprehensive school reform (CSR) models build consistency throughout a district while addressing the needs of individual schools. The high-quality CSR programs offer a most effective option for urban education reform.

  6. A MEMS-based reformed methanol fuel cell for portable power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J. D.; Upadhye, R. S.; Graff, R. T.; Spadaccini, C.; Park, H. G.; Hart, E. K.

    2007-09-01

    A reformed methanol fuel cell system is described. The use of a microfluidic fuel processor enables component scaling and integration sufficient to achieve power sources in the 2 10 W regime that are competitive in size and energy density in comparison to alternative power sources. While carbon monoxide tolerance of proton conducting membranes has typically limited the performance of reformed methanol fuel cells, phosphoric-acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes have been tested that exhibit no degradation for carbon monoxide >2% mole fraction. Further benefits of the PBI membrane include operating temperature of 150 200 °C, and no need for water to assist protonic conduction. As a result, a chemically and thermally robust fuel cell power source is realized. Results of methanol steam reforming and catalytic combustor heating elements formed in a silicon MEMS platform, and PBI membrane performance with reformate fuel feed will be discussed.

  7. Fast fluidized bed steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Bryers, Richard W.; Taylor, Thomas E.

    1980-01-01

    A steam generator in which a high-velocity, combustion-supporting gas is passed through a bed of particulate material to provide a fluidized bed having a dense-phase portion and an entrained-phase portion for the combustion of fuel material. A first set of heat transfer elements connected to a steam drum is vertically disposed above the dense-phase fluidized bed to form a first flow circuit for heat transfer fluid which is heated primarily by the entrained-phase fluidized bed. A second set of heat transfer elements connected to the steam drum and forming the wall structure of the furnace provides a second flow circuit for the heat transfer fluid, the lower portion of which is heated by the dense-phase fluidized bed and the upper portion by the entrained-phase fluidized bed.

  8. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  9. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  10. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  11. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  12. The Effects of Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez-Martinez, Claudio-Rafael; Giron, Graciela; De-La-Luz-Arellano, Ivan; Ayon-Bañuelos, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Educational reform implies questions of social production and of state regulation that are the key words in educational reform, education and educational policies. These reforms are always on the political agenda of countries and involve international organisms, since education is a vehicle of development for social progress. A point of departure…

  13. Teacher Education Reforms in Albania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Joan

    2000-01-01

    Drawing on insights from Albanian teacher educators and government representatives, this paper examines processes of change and types of reform (modernization, structural, and systemic reform) in Albania. It also discusses the initial implementation of one of the reforms, which was directed at the balance and role of school experiences, analyzing…

  14. Kudzu, Rabbits, and School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodlad, John I.

    2002-01-01

    Essay on school reform argues that quality teachers are key to successful reform, not reform rhetoric by state governors and U.S. Presidents. Asserts that primary mission of schooling is to provide students an educational apprenticeship in democracy. Qualified, caring, competent teachers are essential to accomplish this mission. (PKP)

  15. Globalization, Citizenship and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qi, Jie

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the notions of globalization as embodied in Japanese educational reforms during the 1980s and 1990s. Modern institutional discourses of educational reform in Japan have shifted over time and all of these reform movements have been constructed by particular social and historical trajectories. Generally speaking, it has been…

  16. Prospects for Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

  17. Salisbury hospital's steam trap success.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    With the Carbon Reduction Commitment now fully in force, and the NHS tasked with achieving tough carbon emission reduction targets in line with both UK and EU mandates, healthcare estates teams across the country are seeking cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption. Against this backdrop, Salisbury District Hospital has implemented a concerted energy-saving programme, key elements of which include replacing existing bucket steam traps with higher performing, lower maintenance, and more effective GEM venturi steam traps from Thermal Energy International (TEI), installing a new gas CHP engine, and looking into fitting a TEI condensate economiser system. PMID:21485315

  18. Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanenko, Olga

    The objectives of this work are to test the application of steam pretreatment to direct coal liquefaction, to investigate the reaction of model compounds with water, and to explore the use of zeolites in these processes. Previous work demonstrated the effectiveness of steam pretreatment in a subsequent flash pyrolysis. Apparently, subcritical steam ruptures nearly all of the ether cross links, leaving a partially depolymerized structure. It was postulated that very rapid heating of the pretreated coal to liquefaction conditions would be required to preserve the effects of such treatment. Accordingly, a method was adopted in which coal slurry is injected into a hot autoclave containing solvent. Since oxygen is capable of destroying the pretreatment effect, precautions were taken for its rigorous exclusion. Tests were conducted with Illinois No. 6 coal steam treated at 340sp°C, 750 psia for 15 minutes. Both raw and pretreated samples were liquified in deoxygenated tetralin at high severity (400sp°C, 30 min.) and low severity (a: 350sp°C, 30 min., and b: 385sp°C, 15 min.) conditions under 1500 psia hydrogen. Substantial improvement in liquid product quality was obtained and the need for rapid heating and oxygen exclusion demonstrated. Under low severity conditions, the oil yield was more than doubled, going from 12.5 to 29 wt%. Also chemistry of the pretreatment process was studied using aromatic ethers as model compounds. alpha-Benzylnaphthyl ether (alpha-BNE), alpha-naphthylmethyl phenyl (alpha-NMPE), and 9-phenoxyphenanthrene were exposed to steam and inert gas at pretreatment conditions and in some cases to liquid water at 315sp°C. alpha-BNE and alpha-NMPE showed little difference in conversion in inert gas and in steam. Hence, these compounds are poor models for coal in steam pretreatment. Thermally stable 9-phenoxyphenanthrene, however, was completely converted in one hour by liquid water at 315sp°C. At pretreatment conditions mostly rearranged starting

  19. Organic Evaporator steam valve failure

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R. A.

    1992-09-29

    DWPF Technical has requested an analysis of the capacity of the organic Evaporator (OE) condenser (OEC) be performed to determine its capability in the case where the OE steam flow control valve fails open. Calculations of the OE boilup and the OEC heat transfer coefficient indicate the OEC will have more than enough capacity to remove the heat at maximum OE boilup. In fact, the Salt Cell Vent Condenser (SCVC) should also have sufficient capacity to handle the maximum OE boilup. Therefore it would require simultaneous loss of OEC and/or SCVC condensing capacity for the steam valve failure to cause high benzene in the Process Vessel Vent System (PVVS).

  20. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.