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Sample records for compact tension specimens

  1. A Back Face Strain Compliance Expression for the Compact Tension Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    A numerically generated expression to determine crack length in a compact tension specimen from back face strain compliance is presented. The numerically generated back face strain expression is bounded by two experimentally determined expressions previously published in the literature. Additionally, stress intensity factor and crack mouth opening expressions are determined. These expressions agree well with previously published results.

  2. The compact tension, C(T), specimen in laminated composite testing

    SciTech Connect

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    Use of the compact tension, C(T), specimens in laminated composites testing is investigated by considering two examples. A new computational methodology that scales up constituent material properties, stress, and strain limits to the structure level is used to evaluate damage propagation stages as well as the structural fracture load. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progressive fracture, and ultimate fracture modes are identified. Specific dependences of C(T) specimen test characteristics on laminate configuration and composite constituent properties are quantified.

  3. Reduction in Stress Intensity Factor of a Compact Tension Specimen by Bonding Symmetrical GFRP Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, P. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Singh, K. K.; Sarkar, P. K.; Kumar, P.

    2013-10-01

    Reduction in stress intensity factor (SIF) of an acrylic compact tension (CT) specimen is studied by symmetrical bonding of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) patches on both sides of the specimen. The CT specimen was designed and developed to satisfy all dimensional constraints for plane strain condition. A suitable load fixture using dead weight for higher accuracy was designed for the purpose. The numerical and experimental analysis of CT specimen with varying geometry of the GFRP patches was carried out to analyze their effect on SIF of the specimen. The strain near the crack tip was measured by bonding a small strain gauge to estimate the equivalent SIF of the CT specimen. The test data was compared with the results of numerical analysis carried out using ANSYS software. The variation in strain value determined through theoretical analysis, numerical evaluation and experimental measurement is within 7 %. The equivalent SIF was found to be drastically reduced after bonding the CT specimen with GFRP patches.

  4. Effect of Reinforcement Architecture on Fracture of Selectively Reinforced Metallic Compact Tension Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abada, Christopher H.; Farley, Gary L.; Hyer, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    A computer-based parametric study of the effect of reinforcement architectures on fracture response of aluminum compact-tension (CT) specimens is performed. Eleven different reinforcement architectures consisting of rectangular and triangular cross-section reinforcements were evaluated. Reinforced specimens produced between 13 and 28 percent higher fracture load than achieved with the non-reinforced case. Reinforcements with blunt leading edges (rectangular reinforcements) exhibited superior performance relative to the triangular reinforcements with sharp leading edges. Relative to the rectangular reinforcements, the most important architectural feature was reinforcement thickness. At failure, the reinforcements carried between 58 and 85 percent of the load applied to the specimen, suggesting that there is considerable load transfer between the base material and the reinforcement.

  5. Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, B.J. Jr.; Lloyd, W.R.; Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.

    1997-02-04

    A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: (a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; (b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; (c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and (d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen. 6 figs.

  6. Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, Jr., Brent J.; Lloyd, W. Randolph; Ward, Michael B.; Epstein, Jonathan S.

    1997-01-01

    A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen.

  7. Problems Associated with Statistical Pattern Recognition of Acoustic Emission Signals in a Compact Tension Fatigue Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were acquired during fatigue testing of an aluminum 2024-T4 compact tension specimen using a commercially available AE system. AE signals from crack extension were identified and separated from noise spikes, signals that reflected from the specimen edges, and signals that saturated the instrumentation. A commercially available software package was used to train a statistical pattern recognition system to classify the signals. The software trained a network to recognize signals with a 91-percent accuracy when compared with the researcher's interpretation of the data. Reasons for the discrepancies are examined and it is postulated that additional preprocessing of the AE data to focus on the extensional wave mode and eliminate other effects before training the pattern recognition system will result in increased accuracy.

  8. Effect of crack curvature on stress intensity factors for ASTM standard compact tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, J.; Mendelson, A.

    1983-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (SIF) are calculated using the method of lines for the compact tension specimen in tensile and shear loading for curved crack fronts. For the purely elastic case, it was found that as the crack front curvature increases, the SIF value at the center of the specimen decreases while increasing at the surface. For the higher values of crack front curvatures, the maximum value of the SIF occurs at an interior point located adjacent to the surface. A thickness average SIF was computed for parabolically applied shear loading. These results were used to assess the requirements of ASTM standards E399-71 and E399-81 on the shape of crack fronts. The SIF is assumed to reflect the average stress environment near the crack edge.

  9. Compliance calibration of specimens used in the R-curve practice. [for compact, crack-line-wedge-loaded, and center-crack tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, D. E.; Sha, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    The compliance calibrations for the compact (CS) and crack-line-wedge-loaded (CLWL) specimens have been determined by experimental measurements and by boundary-collocation analysis. The CS and CLWL specimen configurations were modeled more accurately than those used in previous analytical investigations. Polynomial expressions for the compliance at various stations along the crack line for CS and CLWL specimens are presented. The compliance calibrations for the center-crack tension (CCT) specimen have been determined theoretically by boundary-collocation and finite-element analysis. The calculated compliance values for the CCT specimen are compared with values obtained from the Irwin-Westergaard expression and from a modification to the Irwin-Westergaard expression proposed by Eftis and Liebowitz. The Eftis-Liebowitz expression was found to be in good agreement (plus or minus 2 percent) with both analyses for crack aspect ratios up to 0.8 and for gage half-span to specimen width ratios up to 0.5.

  10. Crack growth behavior under creep-fatigue conditions using compact and double edge notch tension-compression specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Chary, Santosh Balaji

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has recently developed a new standard for creep-fatigue crack growth testing, E 2760-10, that supports testing compact specimens, C(T), under load controlled conditions. C(T) specimens are commonly used for fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth testing under constant-load-amplitude conditions. The use of these specimens is limited to positive load ratios. They are also limited in the amount of crack growth data that can be developed at high stress intensity values due to accumulation of plastic and/or creep strains leading to ratcheting in the specimen. Testing under displacement control can potentially address these shortcomings of the load-controlled tests for which the C(T) geometry is unsuitable. A double edge notch tension-compression, DEN(T-C), specimen to perform displacement controlled creep-fatigue crack growth testing is developed and optimized with the help of finite element and boundary element analyses. Accurate expressions for estimating the fracture mechanics crack tip parameters such as the stress intensity parameter, K, the crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD), and the load-line displacement (LLD) are developed over a wide range of crack sizes for the DEN(T-C) specimen. A new compliance relationship for use in experimental testing has been developed by using the compliance form available in ASTM E-647 standard. Experimentally determined compliance value compared well with the new relation for C15 steel (AISI 1015) and P91 steel tested at room and elevated temperature conditions respectively. Fatigue crack growth rate data generated using the DEN(T-C) specimens on the two metallic materials are in good agreement with the data generated using standard compact specimens; thus validating the stress-intensity factor and the compliance equation for the double edge notch tension-compression specimen. The testing has shown that the DEN(T-C) specimen is prone to crack asymmetry issues. Through

  11. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  12. Apparatus for elevated temperature compression or tension testing of specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1992-05-01

    In order to support materials selection for the next generation supersonic civilian passenger transport aircraft, a testing apparatus was developed to evaluate certain materials under conditions of high load and elevated temperature. In order to elevate the temperature of the material during standard tension and compression testing the test specimen is surrounded by a pair of supports which include internal heating means. These supports also prevent buckling of the specimen during compression testing.

  13. Stress distribution in composite flatwise tension test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Curtis A.; Pereira, J. Michael

    1993-01-01

    A finite element analysis was conducted to determine the stress distribution in typical graphite/epoxy composite flat wise tension (FWT) specimens under normal loading conditions. The purpose of the analysis was to determine the relationship between the applied load and the stress in the sample to evaluate the validity of the test as a means of measuring the out-of-plane strength of a composite laminate. Three different test geometries and three different material lay ups were modeled. In all cases, the out-of-plane component of stress in the test section was found to be uniform, with no stress concentrations, and very close to the nominal applied stress. The stress in the sample was found to be three-dimensional, and the magnitude of in-plane normal and shear stresses varied with the anisotropy of the test specimen. However, in the cases considered here, these components of stress were much smaller than the out-of-plane normal stress. The geometry of the test specimen had little influence on the results. It was concluded that the flat wise tension test provides a good measure of the out-of-plane strength for the representative materials that were studied.

  14. Mode 1 stress intensity factors for round compact specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1976-01-01

    The mode 1 stress intensity factors were computed for round compact specimens by the boundary collocation method. Results are presented for ratios A sub T/R sub 0 in the range 0.3 to 0.8, where A sub t is the distance from the specimen center to the crack tip for a specimen of diameter 2R sub 0.

  15. Nitinol Fatigue Investigation on Stent-Finish Specimens Using Tension-Tension Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Pike, K.; Zipse, A.; Schlun, M.

    2011-07-01

    Nitinol fatigue strain limit versus both strain amplitude (range 0.25-1.25%) and mean strain (1.0, 2.0, and 4.0%) was investigated using a tension-tension method. In order to apply the fatigue testing results to a nitinol stent and evaluate stent fatigue performance, the dog-bone style specimens were processed from the same raw material common to implantable stent manufacturing, i.e., similar nitinol tubing, surface quality, and electropolished surface. To simulate a physiological environment, the tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted in water at 37 °C. This strain-controlled fatigue test was conducted with a run-out set at 106 cycles. The fatigue strain limit at 106 cycles as well as the mean strain effect and the effects of inclusions are discussed. Fatigue results appeared in a bi-modal pattern when the strain amplitude was at a level between too high, which made all specimens to fail, and too low, which allowed all specimens to survive.

  16. Treatment of singularities in a middle-crack tension specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element analysis of a middle-crack tension specimen subjected to mode I loading was performed to study the stress singularity along the crack front. The specimen was modeled using 20-node isoparametric elements with collapsed nonsingular elements at the crack front. The displacements and stresses from the analysis were used to estimate the power of singularities, by a log-log regression analysis, along the crack front. Analyses showed that finite-sized cracked bodies have two singular stress fields. Because of two singular stress fields near the free surface and the classical square root singularity elsewhere, the strain energy release rate appears to be an appropriate parameter all along the crack front.

  17. Device for tensioning test specimens within an hermetically sealed chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, P. K.; Shady, D. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The device is characterized by a support column adapted to be received within an insulated, hermetically sealable chamber. A plurality of anchor pins are mounted on the column for releasibly connecting thereto a plurality of test specimens. A plurality of axially displaceable pull rods are received by the column in coaxial alignment with the anchor pins. One end of each pull rod is provided with a coupling for connecting the pull rod to a test specimen. The opposite end of the pull rod is entended through a cover plate and adapted to be connected with a remotely related linear actuator through a connecting link including a load cell for measuring stress as the pull rod is placed in tension by the actuator.

  18. Numerical fracture simulation of compact and bend specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    An elastic-plastic finite-element analysis with a critical crack-tip-opening displacement criterion was used to simulate fracture of various size compact and bend specimens made of HY-130 steel. From the calculated load-crack-extension and load-displacement curves, J-resistance (J-R) curves were determined by several methods. The simulated 3-R curves were insensitive to specimen size up to maximum load but were sensitive to specimen configuration for crack extensions greater than 10 percent of the initial uncracked ligament length.

  19. Numerical fracture simulation of compact and bend specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite-element analysis with a critical crack-tip-opening displacement criterion was used to simulate fracture of various size compact and bend specimens made of HY-130 steel. From the calculated load-crack-extension and load-displacement curves, J-resistance (J-R) curves were determined by several methods. The simulated 3-R curves were insensitive to specimen size up to maximum load but were sensitive to specimen configuration for crack extensions greater than 10 percent of the initial uncracked ligament length.

  20. Investigations on specimen design and mounting for Split Hopkinson Tension Bar (SHTB) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledford, Noah; Paul, Hanna; Ganzenmüller, Georg; May, Michael; Höfemann, Matthias; Otto, Manuel; Petrinic, Nikica

    2015-09-01

    Split Hopkinson Tension Bar (SHTB) experiments can be used to test the material behavior with high strain rates in tension loading. The influence of the specimen mounting and the specimen design on the test results was investigated. Three mounting methods were tested. The best signal is achieve using a mounting based on form fit. The three tested specimen designs all lead to a valid fracture behavior, but result in a different local strain rate.

  1. Direct Tension Test Using a Plate Specimen in Cohesive Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin-Ichi

    Hydraulic fracturing is probably one of the causes of leakage and collapse in a dam body or foundation. Water pressure develops cracks and this is one of the causes for hydraulic fracturing. It is important to evaluate characteristics of tensile strength in the foundation and embankment material of fill-dam to examine development conditions of the cracks. It is possible to evaluate tensile strength of hard rocks and metals by fixing both ends of the specimen with chucks and making it work directly. However, it is not possible to use the same method for soft material like cohesive soil. Hence direct tensile test was performed in this research by the plate type specimen used for the calculation of energy release rate (J integral). Then the stress distribution in the specimen and the energy release rate were calculated by FEM to examine a form of the specimen useful for the direct tensile test of cohesive soil. Consequently it is considered that tensile strength of cohesive soil can be measured by adjusting height of the specimen and length of the initial crack to a suitable value respectively.

  2. Ductile-to-brittle transition characterization using surface crack specimens loaded in combined tension and bending

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    Surface cracked tension specimens of ASTM A515, Grade B steel plate were tested to failure in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. Two different specimen configurations were used: one configuration was loaded in tension except for the natural bending resulting from the presence of the surface crack, the second configuration had an offset test section and was pin-loaded to provide a strong bending component in addition to the tension load. For each configuration, at least seven repeat tests were conducted at each of two temperatures. All specimens failed by cleavage and the critical J-integral, J{sub c}, was obtained using three-dimensional finite element analysis of the specimen. The FEM analysis was validated by comparison with experimental strain gage and displacement measurements taken during the tests. The results were compared with previous fracture toughness measurements on the same plate using 2T SE(B) specimens and surface cracked bend SC(B) specimens. The present results exhibited the expected elevation in fracture toughness and downward shift in the transition temperature compared to the highly constrained, deeply cracked SE(B) specimens. The master curve approach was used to characterize the transition curves for each specimen geometry and the shift in the transition temperature was characterized by the associated reference temperature.

  3. Influence of test specimen fabrication method and cross-section configuration on tension-tension fatigue life of PMMA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Sheafi, E M; Tanner, K E

    2015-11-01

    Different cyclic loading modes have been used in in vitro fatigue studies of PMMA bone cement. It is unclear which loading mode is most appropriate from the perspective of the in vivo loading experienced by the cement in a cemented arthroplasty. Also, in different in vitro fatigue studies, different test specimen configurations have been used. The present work considers the influence of test specimen fabrication method (direct moulding vs moulding followed by machining) and cross-section shape (rectangular vs circular) on the tension-tension fatigue performance of two bone cement brands (SmartSet GHV and CMW1), under force control conditions. Two trends were consistent: 1) for each of the cements, for moulded specimens, a longer fatigue life was obtained with circular cross-sectioned specimens and, 2) for either rectangular or circular CMW1 specimens, a longer fatigue life was obtained using machined specimens. A comparison of the present results to those reported in our previous work on fully-reversed tension-compression loading under force control showed that, regardless of the test specimen fabrication method or cross-section configuration used, the fatigue life was considerably shorter under tension-compression than tension-tension loading. This finding highlights the fact that the presence of the compression portion in the loading cycle accelerates fatigue failure. PMID:26295451

  4. Effects of torsional buckling on the cleavage failure of low-alloy steel tension pipe specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Koundy, V.; Renevey, S.; Marini, B.; Combescure, A.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the design of the reactor pressure vessel of a PWR nuclear power station, due consideration is given to the possibility of fast fracture under normal and accident conditions. Here, the local approach criterion of fracture mechanics, initially developed by Beremin for brittle cleavage fracture, is applied to A508 class 3 low-alloy ferritic steel. This criterion, based on the maximum principal stress and Weibull statistics, has previously been verified in the case of uniaxial tests. In this study, it is extended to multiaxial loading tests, that can lead to more significant levels of plastic strain, and thus permit a study of the effect of plastic strain on cleavage fracture. Uniaxial tests on axisymmetric notched tensile bars (AE2-6) were used to determine Beremin`s model parameters m and {sigma}{sub u}. The cleavage fracture behavior, described by these parameters, was then verified by multiaxial tension-torsion tests carried out on thin tubular specimens. Numerical simulations of the tension-torsion tests, by the finite element method, were also performed, taking into account the nonlinear geometrical effects and the specimen plastic buckling. The buckling critical loads were calculated and used to ascertain whether fracture was associated with the instability phenomenon. Beremin`s model is shown to correctly describe experimental data which are not affected by buckling.

  5. Experimental compliance calibration of the compact fracture toughness specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. M.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Compliances and stress intensity coefficients were determined over crack length to width ratios from 0.1 to 0.8. Displacements were measured at the load points, load line, and crack mouth. Special fixturing was devised to permit accurate measurement of load point displacement. The results are in agreement with the currently used results of boundary collocation analyses. The errors which occur in stress intensity coefficients or specimen energy input determinations made from load line displacement measurements rather than from load point measurements are emphasized.

  6. Cyclic tension compression testing of AHSS flat specimens with digital image correlation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoerr, Lay; Sever, Nimet; McKune, Paul; Faath, Timo

    2013-12-01

    A cyclic tension-compression testing program was conducted on flat specimens of TPN-W®780 (Three Phase Nano) and DP980 (Dual Phase) Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). This experimental method was enabled utilizing an anti-buckling clamping device performed in a test machine, and the surface strains along the thickness edge are measured with a three-dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system. The in-plane pre-strain and reversed strain values, at specified strain rates, are investigated to observe the potential plastic flow and the nonlinear strain hardening behavior of the materials. The validity of the test results is established with the monotonic tension tests, to substantiate the true stress-strain curves corrected for the frictional and biaxial stresses induced by the clamping device. A process method for analyzing the correction using a macro script is shown to simplify the output of the true stress-strain results for material model calibration. An in progress study to validate the forming and spring-back predictive capabilities of a calibrated TPN-W®780 complex material model to an actual stamping of an automotive component will demonstrate the usefulness of the experimental cyclic test method. Suggestions to improve the testing, strain analysis and calibration of the model parameters are proposed for augmented use of this test method.

  7. Mode I crack surface displacements for a round compact specimen subject to a couple and force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1979-01-01

    Mode I displacement coefficients along the crack surface are presented for a radially cracked round compact specimen, treated as a plane elastostatic problem, subjected to two types of loading; a uniform tensile stress and a nominal bending stress distribution across the net section. By superposition the resultant displacement coefficient or the corresponding influence coefficient can be obtained for any practical load location. Load line displacements are presented for A/D ratios ranging from 0.40 to 0.95, where A is the crack length measured from the crack mouth to the crack tip and D is the specimen diameter. Through a linear extrapolation procedure crack mouth displacements are also obtained. Experimental evidence shows that the results of this study are valid over the range of A/D ratios analyzed for a practical pin loaded round compact specimen.

  8. Mode 1 crack surface displacements for a round compact specimen subject to a couple and force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1979-01-01

    Mode I displacement coefficients along the crack surface are presented for a radially cracked round compact specimen, treated as a plane elastostatic problem, subjected to two types of loading; a uniform tensile stress and a nominal bending stress distribution across the net section. By superposition the resultant displacement coefficient or the corresponding influence coefficient can be obtained for any practical load location. Load line displacements are presented for A/D ratios ranging from 0.40 to 0.95, where A is the crack length measured from the crack mouth to the crack tip and D is the specimen diameter. Through a linear extrapolation procedure crack mouth displacements are also obtained. Experimental evidence shows that the results are valid over the range of A/D ratios analyzed for a practical pin loaded round compact specimen.

  9. Comparison of compliance results for the wedge-loaded compact specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the ratio of stress intensity factor to crack-mouth displacement as a function of crack length are presented for the wedge-loaded compact specimen. Comparisons are made between experimental compliance results, numerical results from collocation methods, and deep-crack limit-solution results. Applications are for crack-arrest and stress-corrosion-cracking tests for metals and other materials under predominantly linear elastic conditions.

  10. Monitoring of Grouting Compactness in a Post-Tensioning Tendon Duct Using Piezoceramic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianyong; Kong, Qingzhao; Wang, Wenxi; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2016-01-01

    A post-tensioning tendon duct filled with grout can effectively prevent corrosion of the reinforcement, maintain bonding behavior between the reinforcement and concrete, and enhance the load bearing capacity of concrete structures. In practice, grouting of the post-tensioning tendon ducts always causes quality problems, which may reduce structural integrity and service life, and even cause accidents. However, monitoring of the grouting compactness is still a challenge due to the invisibility of the grout in the duct during the grouting process. This paper presents a stress wave-based active sensing approach using piezoceramic transducers to monitor the grouting compactness in real time. A segment of a commercial tendon duct was used as research object in this study. One lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoceramic transducer with marble protection, called a smart aggregate (SA), was bonded on the tendon and installed in the tendon duct. Two PZT patch sensors were mounted on the top outside surface of the duct, and one PZT patch sensor was bonded on the bottom outside surface of the tendon duct. In the active sensing approach, the SA was used as an actuator to generate a stress wave and the PZT sensors were utilized to detect the wave response. Cement or grout in the duct functions as a wave conduit, which can propagate the stress wave. If the cement or grout is not fully filled in the tendon duct, the top PZT sensors cannot receive much stress wave energy. The experimental procedures simulated four stages during the grout pouring process, which includes empty status, half grouting, 90% grouting, and full grouting of the duct. Experimental results show that the bottom PZT sensor can detect the signal when the grout level increases towards 50%, when a conduit between the SA and PZT sensor is formed. The top PZT sensors cannot receive any signal until the grout process is completely finished. The wavelet packet-based energy analysis was adopted in this research to

  11. Study of the Effect of Specimen Shape in Direct Tension Tests on Cohesive Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin-Ichi

    It is important to evaluate characteristics of tensile strength of foundation and embankment material of fill-dam for the examination of the development conditions of crack which is one of the causes for hydraulic fracturing. Though it is possible to evaluate the tensile strength of hard rock by fixing both ends of the specimen with chucks and making it work directly, it is not possible to use the same method for soft material like cohesive soil. Hence direct tensile test was performed in this research to measure the tensile strength by changing the column type specimen for the compression test into an I-shaped specimen and using the devices that were experimentally-made for the test. Moreover, the stress generated in the specimen was calculated by the FEM analysis and the form of the specimen for the direct tensile test was suggested. It gave useful result for the direct tensile test, with the specimen being further thinned only in the center part of the I-shaped specimen.

  12. Three-dimensional elastic-plastic analysis of shallow cracks in single-edge-crack-tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal N.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional, elastic-plastic, finite element results are presented for single-edge crack-tension specimens with several shallow crack-length-to-width ratios (0.05 less than or equal to a/W less than or equal to 0.5). Results showed the need to model the initial yield plateau in the stress-strain behavior to accurately model deformation of the A36 steel specimens. The crack-tip-opening-displacement was found to be linearly proportional to the crack-mouth-opening displacement. A new deformation dependent plastic-eta factor equation is presented for calculating the J-integral from test load-displacement records. This equation was shown to be accurate for all crack lengths considered.

  13. Spider Silk Peptide Is a Compact, Linear Nanospring Ideal for Intracellular Tension Sensing.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Michael D; Zhou, Ruobo; Conway, Daniel E; Lanzano, Luca; Gratton, Enrico; Schwartz, Martin A; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-03-01

    Recent development and applications of calibrated, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tension sensors have led to a new understanding of single molecule mechanotransduction in a number of biological systems. To expand the range of accessible forces, we systematically measured FRET versus force trajectories for 25, 40, and 50 amino acid peptide repeats derived from spider silk. Single molecule fluorescence-force spectroscopy showed that the peptides behaved as linear springs instead of the nonlinear behavior expected for a disordered polymer. Our data are consistent with a compact, rodlike structure that measures 0.26 nm per 5 amino acid repeat that can stretch by 500% while maintaining linearity, suggesting that the remarkable elasticity of spider silk proteins may in part derive from the properties of individual chains. We found the shortest peptide to have the widest range of force sensitivity: between 2 pN and 11 pN. Live cell imaging of the three tension sensor constructs inserted into vinculin showed similar force values around 2.4 pN. We also provide a lookup table for force versus intracellular FRET for all three constructs. PMID:26824190

  14. Effect of numerical parameters on characterizing the hardening behavior of ductile uniaxial tension specimens.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova, Theresa Elena; Dion, Kristin; Laing, John Robert; Corona, Edmundo; Breivik, Nicole L.; Wellman, Gerald William; Shelton, Timothy R.

    2010-11-01

    Many problems of practical importance involve ductile materials that undergo very large strains, in many cases to the point of failure. Examples include structures subjected to impact or blast loads, energy absorbing devices subjected to significant crushing, cold-forming manufacturing processes and others. One of the most fundamental pieces of data that is required in the analysis of this kind of problems is the fit of the uniaxial stress-strain curve of the material. A series of experiments where mild steel plates were punctured with a conical indenter provided a motivation to characterize the true stress-strain curve until the point of failure of this material, which displayed significant ductility. The hardening curve was obtained using a finite element model of the tensile specimens that included a geometric imperfection in the form of a small reduction in the specimen width to initiate necking. An automated procedure iteratively adjusted the true stress-strain curve fit used as input until the predicted engineering stress-strain curve matched experimental measurements. Whereas the fitting is relatively trivial prior to reaching the ultimate engineering stress, the fit of the softening part of the engineering stress-stain curve is highly dependent on the finite element parameters such as element formulation and initial geometry. Results by two hexahedral elements are compared. The first is a standard, under-integrated, uniform-strain element with hourglass control. The second is a modified selectively-reduced-integration element. In addition, the effects of element size, aspect ratio and hourglass control characteristics are investigated. The effect of adaptively refining the mesh based on the aspect ratio of the deformed elements is also considered. The results of the study indicate that for the plate puncture problem, characterizing the material with the same element formulation and size as used in the plate models is beneficial. On the other hand, using

  15. A compact and versatile microfluidic probe for local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cors, J. F.; Lovchik, R. D.; Delamarche, E.; Kaigala, G. V.

    2014-03-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) is a non-contact, scanning microfluidic technology for local (bio)chemical processing of surfaces based on hydrodynamically confining nanoliter volumes of liquids over tens of micrometers. We present here a compact MFP (cMFP) that can be used on a standard inverted microscope and assist in the local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens. The cMFP has a footprint of 175 × 100 × 140 mm3 and can scan an area of 45 × 45 mm2 on a surface with an accuracy of ±15 μm. The cMFP is compatible with standard surfaces used in life science laboratories such as microscope slides and Petri dishes. For ease of use, we developed self-aligned mounted MFP heads with standardized "chip-to-world" and "chip-to-platform" interfaces. Switching the processing liquid in the flow confinement is performed within 90 s using a selector valve with a dead-volume of approximately 5 μl. We further implemented height-compensation that allows a cMFP head to follow non-planar surfaces common in tissue and cellular ensembles. This was shown by patterning different macroscopic copper-coated topographies with height differences up to 750 μm. To illustrate the applicability to tissue processing, 5 μm thick M000921 BRAF V600E+ melanoma cell blocks were stained with hematoxylin to create contours, lines, spots, gradients of the chemicals, and multiple spots over larger areas. The local staining was performed in an interactive manner using a joystick and a scripting module. The compactness, user-friendliness, and functionality of the cMFP will enable it to be adapted as a standard tool in research, development and diagnostic laboratories, particularly for the interaction with tissues and cells.

  16. Comparison tests and experimental compliance calibration of the proposed standard round compact plane strain fracture toughness specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. M.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Standard round specimen fracture test results compared satisfactorily with results from standard rectangular compact specimens machined from the same material. The location of the loading pin holes was found to provide adequate strength in the load bearing region for plane strain fracture toughness testing. Excellent agreement was found between the stress intensity coefficient values obtained from compliance measurements and the analytic solution proposed for inclusion in the standard test method. Load displacement measurements were made using long armed displacement gages and hollow loading cylinders. Gage points registered on the loading hole surfaces through small holes in the walls of the loading cylinders.

  17. Stress-intensity factors and crack-opening displacements for round compact specimens. [fracture toughness of metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A two dimensional, boundary collocation stress analysis was used to analyze various round compact specimens. The influence of the round external boundary and of pin-loaded holes on stress intensity factors and crack opening displacements was determined as a function of crack-length-to-specimen-width ratios. A wide-range equation for the stress intensity factors was developed. Equations for crack-surface displacements and load-point displacements were also developed. In addition, stress intensity factors were calculated from compliance methods to demonstrate that load-displacement records must be made at the loading points and not along the crack line for crack-length-to-specimen-width ratios less than about 0.4.

  18. Apparatus for pre-stress-straining rod-type specimens in tension for in-situ passive fracture testing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Jy-an; Liu, Ken C.; Feng, Zhili

    2013-07-31

    A stress-strain testing apparatus imposes a stress-strain on a specimen while disposed in a controlled environment. Each end of the specimen is fastened to an end cap and a strain gage is attached to the specimen. An adjusting mechanism and a compression element are disposed between the end caps forming a frame for applying forces to the end caps and thereby stress-straining the specimen. The adjusting mechanism may be extended or retracted to increase or decrease the imposed stress-strain on the specimen, and the stress-strain is measured by the strain gage on the specimen while the apparatus is exposed to an environment such as high pressure hydrogen. Strain gages may be placed on the frame to measure stress-strains in the frame that may be caused by the environment.

  19. Effects of Holding Time on Thermomechanical Fatigue Properties of Compacted Graphite Iron Through Tests with Notched Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodrat, Sepideh; Riemslag, Ton A. C.; Kestens, Leo A. I.; Petrov, Roumen H.; Janssen, Michael; Sietsma, Jilt

    2013-05-01

    In cylinder heads of compacted graphite iron (CGI), the heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermomechanical fatigue (TMF). Traditionally, TMF behavior is studied by thermal cycling of smooth specimens. The resulting number of cycles to failure ( N f) constitutes a single parameter that can be used to predict actual service failures. Nevertheless, there are also some drawbacks of the conventional testing procedures, most noticeably the prolonged testing times and a considerable scatter in test results. To address these drawbacks, TMF tests were performed using notched specimens, resulting in shorter testing times with less scatter. In the case of cast iron, artificial notches do not necessarily change the TMF behavior since the inherent graphite particles behave as internal notches. Using a notch depth of 0.2 mm, the effect of prolonged holding times (HT) on TMF lifetime was studied and a clear effect was found. Extended holding times were also found to be accompanied by relaxation of compressive stresses, causing higher tensile stresses to develop in the subsequent low temperature stages of the TMF cycles. The lifetimes in notched CGI specimens can be predicted by the Paris' fatigue crack growth model. This model was used to differentiate between the individual effects of stress level and holding times on TMF lifetime. Microstructural changes were evaluated by analyzing quantitative data sets obtained by orientation contrast microscopy based on electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD).

  20. Stress intensity factors for large aspect ratio surface and corner cracks at a semi-circular notch in a tension specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stress intensity factor solutions for semielliptic surface and quarter-elliptic corner cracks emanating from a semicircular notch in a tension specimen are presented. A three-dimensional finite-element analysis in conjunction with the equivalent domain integral was used to calculate stress intensity factors (SIF). SIF solutions for surface or corner crack (crack length to depth ratio of 2) at a notch are presented for a wide range of crack sizes and notch radii. Results showed that the SIF are larger for larger crack lengths and for larger notch radii. The SIF are nearly constant all along the crack front for deep surface cracks and for all corner cracks analysed.

  1. Microtopographic Analysis of Part-Through Crack Growth in Alloy 304L Plate-type Tension Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Lloyd; E. D. Steffler; J. H. Jackson

    2003-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) used their microtopography analysis method to examine the fracture process in two Type 304 stainless steel, part-through crack, plate-type specimens. The two specimens had different initial defect geometries – one being nearly semicircular and moderately deep, the other being longer and shallower. The microtopographic analysis allowed determination of parameters such as: the crack tip opening displacement at initiation; the crack tip opening angle during ductile tearing; the crack mouth opening at through-thickness penetration; and, the incremental crack front profiles throughout the crack growth process. In essence, these data provide a nearly complete description of the entire ductile fracture process for the two cases examined. We describe the microtopographic analysis procedure as it was applied to these two specimens. Crack growth profiles predicted by the microtopography analysis are compared with those shown by heat tinting of the actual fracture subsurface, showing excellent agreement. Several areas of ductile crack growth theory relevant to the microtopographic method of analysis are discussed, including possible effects on the accuracy of the analyses. The accuracy of the resultant data is reviewed, and found acceptable or better. Areas for additional development of the microtopography method to improve accuracy in three-dimensional ductile fracture analysis are identified.

  2. Specimen Machining for the Study of the Effect of Swelling on CGR in PWR Environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the preparation of ten specimens to be used for the study of the effect of swelling on the propagation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking cracks. Four compact tension specimens, four microscopy plates and two tensile specimens were machined from a AISI 304 material that was irradiated up to 33 dpa. The specimens had been machined such as to represent the behavior of materials with 3.7%swelling and <2% swelling.

  3. Compacted Sewage Sludge as a Barrier for Tailings: The Heavy Metal Speciation and Total Organic Carbon Content in the Compacted Sludge Specimen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huyuan; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Bo; Wang, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) was the main environmental problem facing the mining industry. For AMD had high heavy metals content and low pH, the compacted sewage sludge might be a barrier for tailings whose oxidation and weathering produced AMD, with its own carbon source, microorganism reduction ability and impermeability. To study the heavy metals environmental risk, under the simulate AMD, the deionized water (DW), and the pH 2.1 sulfuric acid water (SA) seepage conditions, respectively, the changes of the chemical speciation of heavy metals Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC) content in the compacted sewage sludge were assessed in the different periods. The results indicated according to the distribution of heavy metals, the potential mobility was for Cd: 6.08 under AMD, 7.48 under SA, ∞ under DW; for Cu: 0.08 under AMD, 0.17 under SA, 0.59 under DW; for Fe: 0.15 under AMD, 0.22 under SA, 0.22 under DW; for Ni: 2.60 under AMD, 1.69 under SA, 1.67 under DW; and for Zn: 0.15 under AMD, 0.23 under SA and 0.21 under DW at the second checking time. TOC content firstly decreased from 67.62±0% to 66.29±0.35%, then increased to 67.74±0.65% under the AMD seepage while TOC decreased to 63.30±0.53%, then to 61.33±0.37% under the DW seepage, decreased to 63.86±0.41%, then to 63.28±0.49% under SA seepage. That indicated under the AMD seepage, the suitable microorganisms communities in the compacted sewage sludge were activated. And the heavy metals environmental risk of compacted sewage sludge was lower with AMD condition than with other two. So the compacted sewage sludge as a barrier for tailings was feasible as the aspect of environmental risk assessment. PMID:24979755

  4. Compacted sewage sludge as a barrier for tailings: the heavy metal speciation and total organic carbon content in the compacted sludge specimen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huyuan; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Bo; Wang, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) was the main environmental problem facing the mining industry. For AMD had high heavy metals content and low pH, the compacted sewage sludge might be a barrier for tailings whose oxidation and weathering produced AMD, with its own carbon source, microorganism reduction ability and impermeability. To study the heavy metals environmental risk, under the simulate AMD, the deionized water (DW), and the pH 2.1 sulfuric acid water (SA) seepage conditions, respectively, the changes of the chemical speciation of heavy metals Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn and total organic carbon (TOC) content in the compacted sewage sludge were assessed in the different periods. The results indicated according to the distribution of heavy metals, the potential mobility was for Cd: 6.08 under AMD, 7.48 under SA, ∞ under DW; for Cu: 0.08 under AMD, 0.17 under SA, 0.59 under DW; for Fe: 0.15 under AMD, 0.22 under SA, 0.22 under DW; for Ni: 2.60 under AMD, 1.69 under SA, 1.67 under DW; and for Zn: 0.15 under AMD, 0.23 under SA and 0.21 under DW at the second checking time. TOC content firstly decreased from 67.62±0% to 66.29±0.35%, then increased to 67.74±0.65% under the AMD seepage while TOC decreased to 63.30±0.53%, then to 61.33±0.37% under the DW seepage, decreased to 63.86±0.41%, then to 63.28±0.49% under SA seepage. That indicated under the AMD seepage, the suitable microorganisms communities in the compacted sewage sludge were activated. And the heavy metals environmental risk of compacted sewage sludge was lower with AMD condition than with other two. So the compacted sewage sludge as a barrier for tailings was feasible as the aspect of environmental risk assessment. PMID:24979755

  5. Stress intensity factor in a tapered specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue-Hui, L.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The general problem of a tapered specimen containing an edge crack is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations. The equations are solved and the stress intensity factor is calculated for a compact and for a slender tapered specimen, the latter simulating the double cantilever beam. The results are obtained primarily for a pair of concentrated forces and for crack surface wedge forces. The stress intensity factors are also obtained for a long strip under uniform tension which contains inclined edge cracks.

  6. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-31

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a 'thick' biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  7. Bolt-Tension Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldie, James H.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Gerver, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    In technique for measuring tensile force of bolt, specially fabricated magnetostrictive washer used as force transducer. Compact, portable inductive electronic sensor placed against washer to measure tension force. New system provides accurate, economical, and convenient way to measure bolt tension in field. Measurements on test assembly shows that tension can be measured to accuracy of about plus or minus 1 percent of load capacity of typical bolt.

  8. Fracture Tests on Thin Sheet 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloy for Specimens with and Without Anti-Buckling Guides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William M.; Newman, James C., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A series of fracture test were conducted to determine the effects of specimen type specimen width and buckling on the fracture behavior of cracked thin sheet (0.063 inch thick) 2024-T3 aluminum alloy. A summary of the experimental measurements is presented for fracture tests conducted on two specimen types and various widths. Middle-crack tension M(T) and compact tension C(T) specimens were tested in the L-T and T-L orientation with duplicate tests for each condition. Four widths (W= 3, 12, 24, and 40 inch) were tested for the middle-crack tension specimens, and three widths (W=2, 4, and 6 inch) were tested for the compact tension specimens. The M(T) specimens were tested in either a constrained (out-of-plane displacements restrained with antibuckling guides) or unconstrained conditions were the specimen was free to buckle out of plane Measurements were made of load against crack extension for all specimens.

  9. J-R Curve Determination for Disk-shaped Compact Specimens Based on the Normalization Method and Direct Current Potential Drop Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2014-01-01

    Material ductile fracture toughness can be described by J-integral versus crack extension relationship (J-R curve). As a conventional J-R curve measurement method, unloading compliance (UC) becomes impractical in elevated temperature testing due to relaxation of the material and a friction induced back-up shape of the J-R curve. In addition, the UC method may underpredict the crack extension for standard disk-shaped compact (DC(T)) specimens. In order to address these issues, the normalization method and direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique were applied for determining J-R curves at 24 C and 500 C for 0.18T DC(T) specimens made from type 316L stainless steel. For comparison purchase, the UC method was also applied in 24 C tests. The normalization method was able to yield valid J-R curves in all tests. The J-R curves from the DCPD technique need adjustment to account for the potential drop induced by plastic deformation, crack blunting, etc. and after applying a newly-developed DCPD adjustment procedure, the post-adjusted DCPD J-R curves essentially matched J-R curves from the normalization method. In contrast, the UC method underpredicted the crack extension in all tests resulting in substantial deviation in the derived J-R curves manifested by high Jq values than the normalization or DCPD method. Only for tests where the UC method underpredicted the crack extension by a very small value, J-R curves determined by the UC method were similar to those determined by the normalization or DCPD method.

  10. Numerical calibration of the stable poisson loaded specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, Dave N.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-Curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMOD's) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMOD's, and crack displacement profiles are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length, thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  11. Analytical stress intensity solution for the Stable Poisson Loaded specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1993-04-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMODs) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMODs, and crack displacement profiles, are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  12. Numerical calibration of the stable poisson loaded specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, Dave N.

    1992-10-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-Curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMOD's) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMOD's, and crack displacement profiles are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length, thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  13. Analytical stress intensity solution for the stable Poisson loaded specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1993-04-01

    An analytical calibration of the Stable Poisson Loaded (SPL) specimen is presented. The specimen configuration is similar to the ASTM E-561 compact-tension specimen with displacement controlled wedge loading used for R-curve determination. The crack mouth opening displacements (CMOD's) are produced by the diametral expansion of an axially compressed cylindrical pin located in the wake of a machined notch. Due to the unusual loading configuration, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed with gap elements simulating the contact between the pin and specimen. In this report, stress intensity factors, CMOD's, and crack displacement profiles, are reported for different crack lengths and different contacting conditions. It was concluded that the computed stress intensity factor decreases sharply with increasing crack length thus making the SPL specimen configuration attractive for fracture testing of brittle, high modulus materials.

  14. Wide-range displacement expressions for standard fracture mechanics specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. A.; Gross, B.; Leger, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Wide-range algebraic expressions for the displacement of cracked fracture mechanics specimens are developed. For each specimen two equations are given: one for the displacement as a function of crack length, the other for crack length as a function of displacement. All the specimens that appear in ASTM Test for Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials (E 399) are represented in addition to the crack mouth displacement for a pure bending specimen. For the compact tension sample and the disk-shaped compact tension sample, the displacement at the crack mouth and at the load line are both considered. Only the crack mouth displacements for the arc-shaped tension samples are presented. The agreement between the displacements or crack lengths predicted by the various equations and the corresponding numerical data from which they were developed are nominally about 3 percent or better. These expressions should be useful in all types of fracture testing including fracture toughness, K-resistance, and fatigue crack growth.

  15. An elastic strip with multiple cracks and applications to tapered specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.-H.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper an infinite elastic strip containing arbitrarily oriented cracks and subjected to uniform tension and a pair of concentrated forces is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations. Even though the technique is sufficiently general to solve new multiple crack problem, with the objective of applying the results to tapered specimens, only a certain symmetric crack geometry and loading conditions are considered. The stress intensity factors are calculated for edge cracks in the strip under uniform tension and for a 'compact' and a 'slender' tapered specimen (the latter simulating the double cantilever beam) under concentrated forces or crack surface wedge forces.

  16. Manufacture of composite test specimens for delamination studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumich, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the process for manufacturing high-quality test specimens for uses in evaluations of interlaminar tensile strength of laminated composites. The chosen specimen configuration is a curved beam which experiences interlaminar tension in the region of greatest curvature when the beam is subjected to 'opening' forces. The manufacturing process uses a lock-mold tooling approach, the principle of which relies upon the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion between the internal rubber mandrel and the surrounding steel female mold. With this method, compaction pressures above those provided by a typical autoclave can be achieved.

  17. Influence of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions on Debonding Prediction for Composite Skin-stiffener Specimens Subjected to Tension and Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed deflections, skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with lamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  18. Photoelastic study of the influence of non-singular stresses in fracture test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, R.J.; Fourney, W.L.; Chona, R.; Irwin, G.R.

    1981-08-01

    Improved computational methods have been developed to determine, from photoelastic fracture patterns, those stress field parameters additional to the stress intensity factor, that are associated with different fracture test specimen geometries. The variations with crack tip position of these non-singular terms in Modified-Compact-Tension and Rectangular-Double-Cantilever-Beam specimens have been studied. Results have been utilized to formulate criteria that can be used to quantify the concept of the singularity-dominated zone around a crack tip in specimens of finite dimensions.

  19. The effects of specimen geometry and size on the fracture toughness of nuclear graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Romanoski, G.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    In a joint Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) study, various fracture toughness techniques were applied to Toyo Tanso grade IG-110 graphite to establish if specimen geometry influences on fracture toughness. The test geometries investigated were: compact tension (CT), disc compact tension (DCT), short rod (SR), chevron-notched short-red (CNSR), cylindrical bend specimen (BS), and centrally slotted disc (CSD). Specimen geometries which allow slow crack propagation, such as the CNSR and CT, yielded higher fracture toughness values than those where fracture is very rapid, e.g., the CSD. In a further ORNL study, the CNSR specimen geometry was selected to investigate the effect of specimen size on fracture toughness. Three specimen sizes and three grades of graphite were examined: Great Lakes Carbon grade H-451, Stackpole grade 2020, and Toyo Tanso grade IG-110. Grade H-451 was the toughest graphite, while Stackpole 2020 was the least tough. Fracture toughness increased with increasing specimen size for all graphites tested. This result was attributed to rising R-curve behavior. 13 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Specimen shipment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian

    1987-01-01

    Procedures for shipping specimens vary with different disease diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, it is important to contact the receiving laboratory and obtain specific instructions. This will facilitate processing of specimens when they reach the laboratory and assure that the quality of the specimens is not compromised. Time spent on field investigation, specimen collection, and obtaining an adequate history will be of little clue is specimens become contaminated, decomposed, or otherwise spoiled enroute to the diagnostic laboratory. There are five bases of proper specimen shipment: (1) prevent cross-contamination from specimen to specimen, (2) prevent decomposition of the specimen, (3) prevent leakage of fluids, (4) preserve individual specimen identity, and (5) properly label the package. Basic supplies needed for specimen shipment are shown in Fig. 3.1.

  1. Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  2. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  3. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  4. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kneip, S.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J.

    2011-08-29

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  5. An inset CT specimen for evaluating fracture in small samples of material.

    PubMed

    Yahyazadehfar, M; Nazari, A; Kruzic, J J; Quinn, G D; Arola, D

    2014-02-01

    In evaluations on the fracture behavior of hard tissues and many biomaterials, the volume of material available to study is not always sufficient to apply a standard method of practice. In the present study an inset Compact Tension (inset CT) specimen is described, which uses a small cube of material (approximately 2×2×2mm(3)) that is molded within a secondary material to form the compact tension geometry. A generalized equation describing the Mode I stress intensity was developed for the specimen using the solutions from a finite element model that was defined over permissible crack lengths, variations in specimen geometry, and a range in elastic properties of the inset and mold materials. A validation of the generalized equation was performed using estimates for the fracture toughness of a commercial dental composite via the "inset CT" specimen and the standard geometry defined by ASTM E399 (2006). Results showed that the average fracture toughness obtained from the new specimen (1.23±0.02MPam(0.5)) was within 2% of that from the standard. Applications of the inset CT specimen are presented for experimental evaluations on the crack growth resistance of dental enamel and root dentin, including their fracture resistance curves. Potential errors in adopting this specimen are then discussed, including the effects of debonding between the inset and molding material on the estimated stress intensity distribution. Results of the investigation show that the inset CT specimen offers a viable approach for studying the fracture behavior of small volumes of structural materials. PMID:24268892

  6. An Inset CT Specimen for Evaluating Fracture in Small Samples of Material

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadehfar, M.; Nazari, A.; Kruzic, J.J.; Quinn, G.D.; Arola, D.

    2013-01-01

    In evaluations on the fracture behavior of hard tissues and many biomaterials, the volume of material available to study is not always sufficient to apply a standard method of practice. In the present study an inset Compact Tension (inset CT) specimen is described, which uses a small cube of material (approximately 2×2×2 mm3) that is molded within a secondary material to form the compact tension geometry. A generalized equation describing the Mode I stress intensity was developed for the specimen using the solutions from a finite element model that was defined over permissible crack lengths, variations in specimen geometry, and a range in elastic properties of the inset and mold materials. A validation of the generalized equation was performed using estimates for the fracture toughness of a commercial dental composite via the “inset CT” specimen and the standard geometry defined by ASTM E399. Results showed that the average fracture toughness obtained from the new specimen (1.23 ± 0.02 MPa•m0.5) was within 2% of that from the standard. Applications of the inset CT specimen are presented for experimental evaluations on the crack growth resistance of dental enamel and root dentin, including their fracture resistance curves. Potential errors in adopting this specimen are then discussed, including the effects of debonding between the inset and molding material on the estimated stress intensity distribution. Results of the investigation show that the inset CT specimen offers a viable approach for studying the fracture behavior of small volumes of structural materials. PMID:24268892

  7. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on the Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter of Glass Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, specimen configuration, and specimen size on the transverse tension strength of two glass epoxy materials loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, and/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was sensitive to span length due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, the utility of this scaling law for predicting transverse tension strength is unclear.

  8. Specimen for high-temperature tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Split nut with internal taper to hold specially formed specimen composed of filaments of refractory material provides means for holding at high temperature and under tension so that performance evaluations may be made.

  9. Sharply notch cylindrical tension specimen for screening plane-strain fracture toughness. I - Influence of fundamental testing variables on notch strength. II Applications in aluminum alloy quality assurance of fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.; Bucci, R. J.; Collis, S. F.; Kohm, R. F.; Kaufman, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of studies which have been conducted to establish an improved technology base for a use of the sharply notched cylindrical specimen in quality assurance tests of aluminum alloy products. The results are presented of an investigation of fundamental variables associated with specimen preparation and testing, taking into account the influence of the notch root radius, the eccentricity of loading, the specimen diameter, and the notch depth on the sharp notch strength. Attention is given to the statistical procedures which are necessary to establish correlations between the sharp notch strength and the plane-strain fracture toughness for high-strength aluminum alloys.

  10. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  11. Surface Tension

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension in the kitchen sink. At Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, scientists study surface tension to understand how molecules "self-assemble." The coin trick in the video uses the re-arrangement of water molecules to seemingly create order out of disorder. The same principle can be used to create order in otherwise hard-to-handle nano materials. Scientists can then transfer these ordered materials onto surfaces by dipping them through the air-water interface, or (as we've recently shown) squeeze them so that they collapse into the water as two-molecule-thick nano sheets. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/10/17/shaken-not-stirred/

  12. Multiaxial graphite test specimen

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    A multiaxial test program is to be conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the core component graphite. The objectives of the tests are to obtain failure data under uniaxial and biaxial states of stress in order to construct a failure surface in a two-dimensional stress space. These data will be used in verifying the accuracy of the maximum stress failure theory being proposed for use in designing the core graphite components. Tubular specimens are proposed to be used and are either loaded axially and/or subjected to internal pressure. This report includes a study on three specimen configurations. The conclusions of that study indicate that an elliptical transition geometry procedures the smallest discontinuity effects. Several loading combustions were studied using the elliptical transition specimen. The primary purpose is to establish the location of the highest stress state and its relation to the gage section for all of the loading conditions. The tension/internal pres sure loading condition (1:1) indicated that the high stress area is just outside the gage section but still should be acceptable. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  13. Tension Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The fabric structure pictured is the Campus Center of La Verne College, La Verne, California. Unlike the facilities shown on the preceding pages, it is not air-supported. It is a "tension structure," its multi-coned fabric membrane supported by a network of cables attached to steel columns which function like circus tent poles. The spider-web in the accompanying photo is a computer graph of the tension pattern. The designers, Geiger-Berger Associates PC, of New York City, conducted lengthy computer analysis to determine the the best placement of columns and cables. The firm also served as structural engineering consultant on the Pontiac Silverdome and a number of other large fabric structures. Built by Birdair Structures, Inc., Buffalo, New York, the La Verne Campus Center was the first permanent facility in the United States enclosed by the space-spinoff fabric made of Owens-Corning Beta fiber glass coated with Du Pont Teflon TFE. The flexible design permits rearrangement of the interior to accommodate athletic events, student activities, theatrical productions and other recreational programs. Use of fabric covering reduced building cost 30 percent below conventional construction.

  14. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  15. 46 CFR 57.06-4 - Production testing specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sides of the reduced-section tensile specimen in their respective test plates as shown in Figures 57.06...-weld tension test specimen shall have a tensile strength of not less than the minimum of the range of... WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-4 Production testing specimen requirements. (a) For...

  16. 46 CFR 57.06-4 - Production testing specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sides of the reduced-section tensile specimen in their respective test plates as shown in Figures 57.06...-weld tension test specimen shall have a tensile strength of not less than the minimum of the range of... WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-4 Production testing specimen requirements. (a) For...

  17. 46 CFR 57.06-4 - Production testing specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sides of the reduced-section tensile specimen in their respective test plates as shown in Figures 57.06...-weld tension test specimen shall have a tensile strength of not less than the minimum of the range of... WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-4 Production testing specimen requirements. (a) For...

  18. 46 CFR 57.06-4 - Production testing specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sides of the reduced-section tensile specimen in their respective test plates as shown in Figures 57.06...-weld tension test specimen shall have a tensile strength of not less than the minimum of the range of... WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-4 Production testing specimen requirements. (a) For...

  19. 46 CFR 57.06-4 - Production testing specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... sides of the reduced-section tensile specimen in their respective test plates as shown in Figures 57.06...-weld tension test specimen shall have a tensile strength of not less than the minimum of the range of... WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-4 Production testing specimen requirements. (a) For...

  20. Effect of the substrate-binder interactions on the mechanical properties of compacts.

    PubMed

    Remon, J P; Kiekens, F; Zelkó, R

    1998-11-01

    The effect of the substrate-binder interfacial interaction in granules, made of PVP and glass ballotini as model substrates, on the mechanical properties of rectangular compacts consisting of these granules was investigated by use of the four-point beam bending technique. The mechanical properties of the prepared compacts were correlated with the physico-chemical characteristics--contact angle, surface tension and binder concentration--of the granulation liquid. The mechanical strength and Young's modulus of the specimens both reached a maximum value when the binder concentration in the granulation liquid was increased to 20% (w/v) for all granulation liquid volumes used. Above a 20% PVP concentration, the increasing granulation liquid contact angle hindered the binder spreading, creating weak regions in the compact and decreasing its mechanical strength. PMID:9987196

  1. A tension stress loading unit designed for characterizing indentation response of single crystal silicon under tension stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei; Shi, Chengli; Hu, Xiaoli; Cui, Tao; Tian, Ye

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a tension stress loading unit is designed to provide tension stress for brittle materials by combining the piezo actuator and the flexible hinge. The structure of the tension stress loading unit is analyzed and discussed via the theoretical method and finite element simulations. Effects of holding time, the installed specimen and hysteresis of the piezo actuator on output performances of the tension stress loading unit are studied in detail. An experiment system is established by combing the indentation testing unit and the developed tension stress loading unit to characterize indentation response of single crystal silicon under tension stress. Experiment results indicate that tension stress leads to increasing of indentation displacement for the same inden-tation load of single crystal silicon. This paper provides a new tool for studying indentation response of brittle materials under tension stress.

  2. Orientation of histopathology specimens.

    PubMed

    Burns, A; Adams, J; Endersby, S

    2004-02-01

    We present a simple way of orientating large specimens being sent to the laboratory for histopathological examination by supplementing the pinning of the specimen on a cork board with Polaroid photographs of the specimen and numbered tags. PMID:14706306

  3. Cinemicrographic specimen housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Housing used to observe gravitation effects on specimens embedded in support media, such as agar, supports microbial specimens vertically for time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies. Procedure cannot be performed with conventional microscopes which see specimens in horizontal plane only.

  4. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  5. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  6. Skin tension related to tension reduction sutures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Han, Seung Ho; Hwang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the skin tension of several fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures. Six upper limbs and 8 lower limbs of 4 fresh cadavers were used. At the deltoid area (10 cm below the palpable acromion) and lateral thigh (midpoint from the palpable greater trochanter to the lateral border of the patella), and within a 3 × 6-cm fusiform area of skin, subcutaneous tissue defects were created. At the midpoint of the defect, a no. 5 silk suture was passed through the dermis at a 5-mm margin of the defect, and the defect was approximated. The initial tension to approximate the margins was measured using a tensiometer.The tension needed to approximate skin without any tension reduction suture (S) was 6.5 ± 4.6 N (Newton). The tensions needed to approximate superficial fascia (SF) and deep fascia (DF) were 7.8 ± 3.4 N and 10.3 ± 5.1 N, respectively. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the SF was 4.1 ± 3.4 N. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the DF was 4.9 ± 4.0 N. The tension reduction effect of approximating the SF was 38.8 ± 16.4% (2.4 ± 1.5 N, P = 0.000 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The tension reduction effect of approximating the DF was 25.2% ± 21.9% (1.5 ± 1.4 N, P = 0.001 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The reason for this is thought to be that the SF is located closely to the skin unlike the DF. The results of this study might be a basis for tension reduction sutures. PMID:25569413

  7. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  8. The Effect of Temperature, Specimen Size, and Geometry on the Fracture Toughness of a 3 Pct NiCrMoV Low Pressure Turbine Disc Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, N. B.; Spink, G. M.

    1983-03-01

    The variation of fracture toughness with temperature and specimen size of a 3 pct NiCrMoV LP disc steel has been investigated over the temperature range -100 to +100 °C using compact tension and single-edge-notched bend geometries. A number of large ‘half-disc’ three point bend specimens were also tested. Toughness increased up to a transition temperature coinciding with the onset of stable ductile tearing prior to instability. Below this temperature fracture could be described by established linear elastic or post yield fracture analyses. Above this temperature failure was by plastic collapse. The transition temperature decreased with decreasing specimen size, and at similar thicknesses was lower for the bend geometry than for the compact tension so that it was not possible to predict the fracture behavior of the full size service component from small scale tests in the transition region. A further complicating feature was the extreme scatter of some duplicate test results below the transition temperature. The implications for toughness testing in the transition region are discussed. The data obtained in this work have been combined with published data for similar steels to derive an equation which describes the variation of fracture toughness with temperature for steels of this type.

  9. TLP marine riser tensioner

    SciTech Connect

    Peppel, G.W.

    1988-03-08

    A riser tensioner for use in maintaining a tension on a marine riser from a tension leg platform, the tension leg platform moving relative to the marine riser and the marine riser having a center line is described comprising: (a) an elastomeric assembly, adjustably deformable in pad shear, for maintaining the riser in tension during vertical movement of the platform relative to the riser, the elastomeric assembly having upper and lower ends; (b) a gimbal assembly for pivotally connecting the upper end of the elastomeric assembly to the tension leg platform to accommodate misalignment between the riser and the tension leg platform; (c) a base ring to which the lower end of the elastomeric assembly is secured; and (d) a collar, securely mounted on the riser, for resting within the base ring to connect the lower end of the elastomeric assembly to the riser.

  10. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - tension - self- ...

  11. A Specimen Size Effect on the Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Threshold of IN 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garr, K. R.; Hresko, G. C., III

    1998-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) tests were conducted on IN 718 in the solution annealed and aged condition at room temperature in accordance with E647-87. As part of each test, the FCGR threshold was measured using the decreasing Delta K method. A new heat of material was being tested and some of this material was sent to a different laboratory which wanted to use a specimen with a 127 mm width. Threshold data previously had been established on specimens with a width of 50.8 mm. As a check of the laboratory, tests were conducted at room temperature and R equal to 0.1 for comparison with the earlier data. The results were a threshold significantly higher than previously observed. Interchanging of specimen sizes and laboratories showed that the results were not due to a heat-to-heat or lab-to-lab variation. The results to be presented here are those obtained at the original laboratory. Growth rates were measured using the electric potential drop technique at R values of 0.1, 0.7, and 0.9. Compact tension specimen sizes with planer dimensions of 25.4 mm, 50.8 mm, and 127 mm were used. Crack growth rates at threshold were generally below 2.5 X 10(exp -8) mm / cycle. Closure measurements were made on some of the specimens by a manual procedure using a clip gage. When the crack growth rate data for the specimens tested at R equal to 0.1 were plotted as a function of applied Delta K, the thresholds varied with specimen width. The larger the width, the higher the threshold. The thresholds varied from 6.5 MPa-m(exp 1/2) for the 25.4 mm specimen to 15.4 MPa-m(exp 1/2) for the 127 mm specimen. At R equal to 0.7, the 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm specimens had essentially the same threshold, about 2.9 MPa-m(exp 1/2)while the 127 mm specimen had a threshold of 4.5 MPa-m(exp 1/2). When plotted as a function of effective Delta K, the R equal to 0.1 data are essentially normalized. Various aspects of the test procedure will be discussed as well as the results of analysis of the data using

  12. Shear and tension hydraulic fractures in low permeability rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory hydrofracture experiments were performed on triaxially stressed specimens of oil shale and low-permeability granite. The results show that either shear or tension fractures could develop depending on the level of differentials stress, even in specimens containing preexisting fractures. With 1 kb of confining pressure and differential stress greater than 2kb, hydraulic fluid diffusion into the specimens reduced the effective confining pressure until failure occurred by shear fracture. Below 2kb of differential stress, tension fractures occurred. These results suggest that hydraulic fracturing in regions of significant tectonic stress may produce shear rather than tension fractures. In this case in situ stress determinations based on presumed tension fractures would lead to erroneous results. ?? 1977 Birkha??user Verlag.

  13. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap of a vessel and a piston that is moveable within the vessel. Pressurized fluid is provided to compression and tension chambers defined between the piston and the vessel. When the pressure in the compression chamber is greater than the pressure in the tension chamber, the specimen is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. While the specimen is subjected to either force, it is also surrounded by the pressurized fluid in the tension chamber. In some examples, the specimen is surrounded by hydrogen.

  14. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  15. Photoinduced tension of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Maerov, S.B.; Avakian, P.; Matheson, R.R. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Photoirradiation of polymer films at constant length induced a fast tension reduction (time scale; seconds) followed by slow tension buildup (time scale: minutes). Immediately after irradiation, fast tension buildup was followed by slow tension decay. Cycles were repeatable without significant hysteresis loss. The amplitude of both phenomena are intensity-dependent in the ultraviolet-visible spectral regions; both phenomena are thermal rather than photochemical effects. Light-absorbing chromophores in the polymer structure, or in additives such as dyes, lead to absorption of light and internal conversion into heat. The classical, rapid thermal expansion (or contraction) on heating (or cooling) leads to the fast relaxation (or buildup) of tension. The elastic, entropic response of the sample with its longer relaxation time leads to slow buildup (or decay) of tension. Fast and slow responses are observed sequentially with film of extensively crosslinked Riston photopolymer resist or with Kapton polyimide film, whereas, in experiments with latex rubber, the rubbery behavior dominates.

  16. Specimen collection and preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian

    1987-01-01

    Specimens, as discussed in this handbook, have but a single purpose--to provide information leading to the diagnosis of a cause of disease or death. A specimen may be an intact carcass, various tissues removed from carcasses, or parasites. In any event, the specimen should be as fresh and undamaged as possible.

  17. MACHINING TEST SPECIMENS FROM HARVESTED ZION RPV SEGMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Rosseel, Thomas M; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    The decommissioning of the Zion Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) in Zion, Illinois, presents a special and timely opportunity for developing a better understanding of materials degradation and other issues associated with extending the lifetime of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years of service. In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor fleet, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating and contracting with Zion Solutions, LLC, a subsidiary of Energy Solutions, an international nuclear services company, the selective procurement of materials, structures, components, and other items of interest from the decommissioned reactors. In this paper, we will discuss the acquisition of segments of the Zion Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), cutting these segments into blocks from the beltline and upper vertical welds and plate material and machining those blocks into mechanical (Charpy, compact tension, and tensile) test specimens and coupons for microstructural (TEM, SEM, APT, SANS and nano indention) characterization. Access to service-irradiated RPV welds and plate sections will allow through wall attenuation studies to be performed, which will be used to assess current radiation damage models [1].

  18. Influence of Specimen Size on the SCC Growth Rate of Ni-Alloys Exposed to High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; D Morton; W Moshier

    2005-10-19

    Tests were conducted on a single heat of Alloy 600 using compact tension specimens ranging from 50.80 mm (2 inches) in gross thickness (2T) to 10.16 mm (0.4 inches, 0.4T) in gross thickness. Results indicated that at stress intensity factor (K) levels above 55 MPa{radical}m, the growth rate is affected by specimen size in deaerated primary water. The growth rate can be significantly faster in 0.4T and 0.6T (15.24 mm = 0.6 inches in gross thickness) specimens at these elevated K levels compared to 2T specimens. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates > 6 x 10{sup -7} mm/s were observed at 338 C and 40 cc/kg H{sub 2} in 0.6T and 0.4T specimens at these elevated K levels, although the fracture mode was not significantly affected by the specimen size. The SCC growth rate of 2T specimens under comparable test conditions was {approx}6 x 10{sup -8} mm/s. All of the specimens examined that were tested at K > 55 MPa{radical}m exhibited intergranular failure, although ductile dimples and cracked grains were observed in the 0.4T specimens loaded to the elevated K levels. The effect of specimen size on the crack growth behavior indicated by electric potential drop (EPD) monitoring at K > 55 MPa{radical}m was also reviewed. EPD indicated steady state crack growth during the tests conducted on 1T (25.4 mm = 1.0 inches in gross thickness) and 2T specimens. Steady state crack growth was not indicated by EPD for the 0.4T and 0.6T specimens loaded at K > 55 MPa{radical}m. EPD indicated large jumps in the crack length at discrete points. Initially, it was believed that these large, rapid increases in the crack length corresponded to ductile tearing of uncracked ligaments in the crack wake as the SCC crack advanced. However, examination of the fracture surfaces did not reveal any evidence of isolated regions of ductile tearing in the crack wake. The large increases in the EPD signal were due to strain bursts. These results highlight the need to base SCC growth rates on destructive

  19. Leadership Tensions and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Bill; Mulford, Bill; Kendall, Diana; Kendall, Lawrie

    2008-01-01

    Results from the Tasmanian Successful School Principal Project (SSPP) survey concur with the four major leadership tensions and dilemmas identified in a background literature review. These tensions and dilemmas relate to internal/external control, ethic of care/responsibility, and an emphasis on professional/personal as well as…

  20. Interlaminar tension strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal N.; Allen, Harold G.; Avva, Vishnu S.

    1994-01-01

    An L-shaped curved beam specimen and a tension loading fixture were proposed to measure the interlaminar tension strength of laminated and textile composites. The specimen size was 2 X 2 in. (51 X 51 mm). The use of a standard tension test machine and the introduction of load nearly at the specimen midthickness were the advantages of the proposed specimen. Modified Lekhnitskii and beam theory equations for calculating interlaminar stresses of an L-beam were verified by finite element analysis. The beam theory equation is simple and accurate for mean radius to thickness ratios greater than 1.5. The modified Lekhnitskii equations can be used for detailed stress field calculation. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy unidirectional specimens with thicknesses of 16, 24, and 32 piles were fabricated and tested. The delamination initiation site agreed with the calculated maximum interlaminar tension stress location for all three thicknesses. Average interlaminar tension strengths of 16-, 24-, and 32-ply laminates were 47.6, 40.9, and 23.4 MPa, respectively.

  1. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  2. OR Specimen Labeling.

    PubMed

    Zervakis Brent, Mary Ann

    2016-02-01

    Mislabeled surgical specimens jeopardize patient safety and quality care. The purpose of this project was to determine whether labeling surgical specimens with two patient identifiers would result in an 80% reduction in specimen labeling errors within six months and a 100% reduction in errors within 12 months. Our failure mode effects analysis found that the lack of two patient identifiers per label was the most unsafe step in our specimen handling process. We piloted and implemented a new process in the OR using the Plan-Do-Check-Act conceptual framework. The audit process included collecting data and making direct observations to determine the sustainability of the process change; however, the leadership team halted the direct observation audit after four months. The total number of surgical specimen labeling errors was reduced by only 60% within six months and 62% within 12 months; therefore, the goal of the project was not met. However, OR specimen labeling errors were reduced. PMID:26849982

  3. Hydraulic stud tensioning aids pump performance

    SciTech Connect

    Marchand, G.J.

    1986-03-31

    This article considers the use of hydraulic stud tensioners on mud pump fluid ends. It contains tensioner testing and application. A typical problem involving a fluid end stud is presented to illustrate the use of hydraulic tensioning. Hydraulic stud tensioners give optimum preload reliability over traditional torque tensioning methods. Accurately controlling preload increases stud fatigue life and minimizes maintenance. At one time it was acceptable just to get fluid end connections tight by means of slogging wrenches, impact wrenches, or two of your biggest men on a 10-ft cheater pipe. If the connection did not leak during hydrotest, it was accepted and put into operation. Users of mud pumps are faced with fluid ends that may ''breathe'' excessively due to improper stud preload. Today's equipment is smaller in size and larger in horsepower than ever before, using large retaining studs requiring torques of 3,000 ft-lb and up. In present compact designs, many bolted connections have become virtually inaccessible using traditional tightening procedures. No longer will large wrenches, cheater pipes, and sledge hammers clear surrounding equipment.

  4. A subsized fatigue specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeelani, S.; Natarajan, R.; Reddy, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A subsized fatigue specimen has been designed to overcome the difficulty of machining a full-sized specimen from cast superalloy components. A finite element analysis confirmed that the stress was maximum at the gauge section for any given set of clamping and tensile loads, and that the stresses developed due to clamping forces were negligible compared with those due to tensile or compressive loads. Fatigue data generated using subsized specimens of AISI 4130 steel, 2024-T4 aluminum alloy and 6Al-4V titanium alloy compared well with those available in the literature for full-sized specimens.

  5. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - ...

  6. Echinococcal tension pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, Farhan; Al-Omeri, Muayyad M.

    1969-01-01

    Hydatid cyst is rarely mentioned among the causes of pneumothorax in text-books or monographs, especially those written in English. Five examples of tension pneumothorax secondary to ruptured hydatid cyst of the lung are reported: the mechanism of this tension effect and helpful diagnostic points are discussed. We think that surgical correction is the only satisfactory treatment of tension pneumothorax due to ruptured hydatid cyst: surgery is advocated in any suspected cyst as soon as it is discovered so as to avoid any such serious complication. Images PMID:5348321

  7. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  8. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s). (a... specimen(s), the applicant must: (1) For an amendment to allege use under § 2.76, verify by affidavit...

  9. Impact testing of ductile cast iron: Tension and compression

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.; Takata, T.; Sogabe, Y.

    1995-11-01

    Impact tension and compression tests on ferritic ductile cast iron (JIS FCD370) are conducted by means of the split Hopkinson bar technique. Reliable stress-strain relations in tension and compression for ductile cast iron are determined at strain rates of over 10{sup 3}/s. The test results indicate that ductile cast iron shows different strength characteristics in tension and compression under impact loading as well as under quasi-static loading. Microscopic examinations of the post-test specimens reveal that this mechanical behavior is attributed to the presence of spheroidal graphites in a ferritic matrix of ductile cast iron.

  10. Managing the right tension.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Dominic; Favaro, Ken

    2006-12-01

    Of all the competing objectives every company faces, three pairs stand out: profitability versus growth, the short term versus the long term, and the whole organization versus the units. In each case, progress on one front usually comes at the expense of progress on the other. The authors researched the performance of more than 1000 companies worldwide over the past two decades and found that most struggle to succeed across the three tensions. From 1983 to 2003, for example, only 32% of these companies more often than not achieved positive profitability and revenue growth at the same time. The problem, the authors discovered, is not so much that managers don't recognize the tensions--those are all too familiar to anyone who has ever run a business. Rather, it is that managers frequently don't focus on the tension that matters most to their company. Even when they do identify the right tension, they usually make the mistake of prioritizing a "lead" objective within it-for example, profitability over growth. As a result, companies often end up moving first in this direction, then in that, and then back again, never quite resolving the tension. The companies that performed best adopted a very different approach. Instead of setting a lead objective, they looked at how best to strengthen what the two sides of each tension have in common: For profitability and growth,the common bond is customer benefit; for the short term and the long, it is sustainable earnings; and for the whole and its parts, it is particular organizational resources and capabilities. The authors describe how companies can select the right tension, what traps they may fall into when they focus on one side over the other, and how to escape these traps by managing to the bonds between objectives. PMID:17183794

  11. DNA loops generate intracentromere tension in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Lawrimore, Josh; Vasquez, Paula A.; Falvo, Michael R.; Taylor, Russell M.; Vicci, Leandra; Yeh, Elaine; Forest, M. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The centromere is the DNA locus that dictates kinetochore formation and is visibly apparent as heterochromatin that bridges sister kinetochores in metaphase. Sister centromeres are compacted and held together by cohesin, condensin, and topoisomerase-mediated entanglements until all sister chromosomes bi-orient along the spindle apparatus. The establishment of tension between sister chromatids is essential for quenching a checkpoint kinase signal generated from kinetochores lacking microtubule attachment or tension. How the centromere chromatin spring is organized and functions as a tensiometer is largely unexplored. We have discovered that centromere chromatin loops generate an extensional/poleward force sufficient to release nucleosomes proximal to the spindle axis. This study describes how the physical consequences of DNA looping directly underlie the biological mechanism for sister centromere separation and the spring-like properties of the centromere in mitosis. PMID:26283798

  12. Nonequilibrium surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.

    2015-12-01

    A weakly nonlocal phase-field model is used to define surface tension in liquid binary mixtures in terms of the composition gradient in the interfacial region so that, at equilibrium, it depends linearly on the characteristic length that defines the interfacial width. In nonequilibrium conditions, surface tension changes with time: during mixing, it decreases as the inverse square root of time, while during phase separation, when nuclei coagulate, it increases exponentially to its equilibrium value. In addition, since temperature gradients modify the steepness of the concentration profile in the interfacial region, they induce gradients in the nonequilibrium surface tension, leading to the Marangoni thermocapillary migration of an isolated drop. Similarly, Marangoni stresses are induced in a composition gradient, leading to diffusiophoresis.

  13. Tension Pneumopericardium after Pericardiocentesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pneumopericardium is defined as the presence of air inside the pericardial space. Usually, it is reported as a complication of blunt or penetrating chest trauma, but rare iatrogenic and spontaneous cases have been reported. Pneumopericardium is relatively stable if it does not generate a tension effect on the heart. However, it may progress to tension pneumopericardium, which requires immediate pericardial aspiration. We report a case of iatrogenic pneumopericardium occurred in a 70-year-old man who presented dyspnea at emergency department. The patient underwent pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade due to large pericardial effusion, and iatrogenic tension pneumopericardium occurred due to misuse of the drainage device. After evacuating the pericardial air through the previously implanted catheter, the patient became stable. We report this case to increase the awareness of this fatal condition and to help increase the use of precautions against the development of this condition during emergency procedures. PMID:26952636

  14. [Treatment of tension headache].

    PubMed

    Schoenen, J

    2000-01-01

    The scientific basis of tension- type headache suffers from the lack of precise pathophysiological knowledge and the heterogenecity of this disorder. Treatment of acute tension-type headache episodes is more effective with an NSAIDs (ibuprofen 400-800mg, naproxen 550-825mg, ketoprofen 50-75mg) than with aspirin or paracetamol. Caffein containing preparations of NSAIDs are slightly superior, but should not be taken frequently to avoid headache chronification. For chronic tension-type headache, relaxation therapies with EMG biofeedback and tricyclics have about the same efficacy rate of 40-50p.100. Physical therapy and acupuncture are in general less effective. There is thus clearly a need for better strategies, e.g. combination of available therapies and novel approaches. PMID:11139755

  15. Tension in active shapes.

    PubMed

    Papari, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The concept of tension is introduced in the framework of active contours with prior shape information, and it is used to improve image segmentation. In particular, two properties of this new quantity are shown: 1) high values of the tension correspond to undesired equilibrium points of the cost function under minimization and 2) tension decreases if a curve is split into two or more parts. Based on these ideas, a tree is generated whose nodes are different local minima of the cost function. Deeper nodes in the tree are expected to correspond to lower values of the cost function. In this way, the search for the global optimum is reduced to visiting and pruning a binary tree. The proposed method has been applied to the problem of fish segmentation from low quality underwater images. Qualitative and quantitative comparison with existing algorithms based on the Euler–Lagrange diffusion equations shows the superiority of the proposed approach in avoiding undesired local minima. PMID:24235305

  16. Controlled environment specimen transfer.

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Christian D; Zandbergen, Henny; W Hansen, Thomas; Chorkendorff, Ib; B Wagner, Jakob

    2014-08-01

    Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking an environmental transmission electron microscope to an in situ X-ray diffractometer through a dedicated transmission electron microscope specimen transfer holder, capable of sealing the specimen in a gaseous environment at elevated temperatures. Two catalyst material systems have been investigated; Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for methanol synthesis and a Co/Al2O3 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Both systems are sensitive to ambient atmosphere as they will oxidize after relatively short air exposure. The Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, was reduced in the in situ X-ray diffractometer set-up, and subsequently, successfully transferred in a reactive environment to the environmental transmission electron microscope where further analysis on the local scale were conducted. The Co/Al2O3 catalyst was reduced in the environmental microscope and successfully kept reduced outside the microscope in a reactive environment. The in situ transfer holder facilitates complimentary in situ experiments of the same specimen without changing the specimen state during transfer. PMID:24824787

  17. Transport of viral specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, F B

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of viral infections by culture relies on the collection of proper specimens, proper care to protect the virus in the specimens from environmental damage, and use of an adequate transport system to maintain virus activity. Collection of specimens with swabs that are toxic to either virus or cell culture should be avoided. A variety of transport media have been formulated, beginning with early bacteriological transport media. Certain swab-tube combinations have proven to be both effective and convenient. Of the liquid transport media, sucrose-based and broth-based media appear to be the most widely accepted and used. Studies on virus stability show that most viruses tested are sufficiently stable in transport media to withstand a transport time of 1 to 3 days. Some viruses may withstand longer transport times. In many cases, it is not necessary to store virus specimens in a refrigerator or send them to the laboratory on wet ice or frozen on dry ice. However, the specimen should not be exposed to environmental extremes. Modern viral transport media allow for more effective use of viral culture and culture enhancement techniques for the diagnosis of human viral infections. PMID:2187591

  18. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  19. Sensing the Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Spanning over 4 decades, NASA's bolt tension monitoring technology has benefited automakers, airplane builders, and other major manufacturers that rely on the devices to evaluate the performance of computerized torque wrenches and other assembly line mechanisms. In recent years, the advancement of ultrasonic sensors has drastically eased this process for users, ensuring that proper tension and torque are being applied to bolts and fasteners, with less time needed for data analysis. Langley Research Center s Nondestructive Evaluation Branch is one of the latest NASA programs to incorporate ultrasonic sensors within a bolt tension measurement instrument. As a multi-disciplined research group focused on spacecraft and aerospace transportation safety, one of the branch s many commitments includes transferring problem solutions to industry. In 1998, the branch carried out this obligation in a licensing agreement with Micro Control, Inc., of West Bloomfield, Michigan. Micro Control, an automotive inspection company, obtained the licenses to two Langley patents to provide an improved-but-inexpensive means of ultrasonic tension measurement.

  20. The Tension Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    This is a bibliography of literature on the subject of tension. Books, films, and periodicals with a bearing on stress, relaxation, anxiety, and/or methods of controlling stress are listed from the fields of physiology, psychology, and philosophy. New methods such as transcendental meditation and biofeedback are analyzed briefly and criteria are…

  1. Compact, Lightweight Servo-Controllable Brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher S.; Townsend, William; Guertin, Jeffrey; Matsuoka, Yoky

    2010-01-01

    Compact, lightweight servo-controllable brakes capable of high torques are being developed for incorporation into robot joints. A brake of this type is based partly on the capstan effect of tension elements. In a brake of the type under development, a controllable intermediate state of torque is reached through on/off switching at a high frequency.

  2. Multiscale surface roughening of commercial purity titanium during uniaxial tension

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, Alexey; Kazachenok, Marina Kozelskaya, Anna Sinyakova, Elena; Lider, Andrey Sklyarova, Elena

    2015-10-27

    The mechanisms of the surface roughening of the titanium specimens during uniaxial tension were demonstrated. By means of optical profilometry and electron backscattered diffraction it was shown that the formation of surface roughening is a multilevel process. The correlation between the density of slip in some grains, and grain rotation, and their displacement towards the free surface was investigated.

  3. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Stoltz, G.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-01

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  4. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    SciTech Connect

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  5. Genomics and museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Michael W

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Allan Wilson and colleagues isolated DNA sequences from museum specimens of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys panamintinus) and compared these sequences with those from freshly collected animals (Thomas et al. 1990). The museum specimens had been collected up to 78 years earlier, so the two samples provided a direct temporal comparison of patterns of genetic variation. This was not the first time DNA sequences had been isolated from preserved material, but it was the first time it had been carried out with a population sample. Population geneticists often try to make inferences about the influence of historical processes such as selection, drift, mutation and migration on patterns of genetic variation in the present. The work of Wilson and colleagues was important in part because it suggested a way in which population geneticists could actually study genetic change in natural populations through time, much the same way that experimentalists can do with artificial populations in the laboratory. Indeed, the work of Thomas et al. (1990) spawned dozens of studies in which museum specimens were used to compare historical and present-day genetic diversity (reviewed in Wandeler et al. 2007). All of these studies, however, were limited by the same fundamental problem: old DNA is degraded into short fragments. As a consequence, these studies mostly involved PCR amplification of short templates, usually short stretches of mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites. In this issue, Bi et al. (2013) report a breakthrough that should open the door to studies of genomic variation in museum specimens. They used target enrichment (exon capture) and next-generation (Illumina) sequencing to compare patterns of genetic variation in historic and present-day population samples of alpine chipmunks (Tamias alpinus) (Fig. 1). The historic samples came from specimens collected in 1915, so the temporal span of this comparison is nearly 100 years. PMID:24138088

  6. Spectrum fatigue testing of T-shaped tension clips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmberg, Bjoern; Wallstenius, Bengt

    1992-12-01

    An investigation of strain distributions during static loading and crack propagation and fatigue lives under spectrum loading of T-shaped tension clips was carried out. Three slightly different, with respect to geometry, T shaped tension clips made of aluminum alloy 7010-T73651 were studied. The type 1 and 4 test specimens were different only with respect to the web thickness of the clamping end. The type 1 and 2 test specimens were different with repect to milled flat circular countersink around the holes in the type 2 specimens and with respect to the radius between the web and foot. The spectrum fatigue loading consisted of a load sequence representative for the wing root, lower side, of a fighter aircraft. Tests were made at two different load levels for each specimen type. The strain measurements show that the countersink in the type 2 specimens increases the stresses in the fatigue critical region. This is also manifested in the spectrum fatigue life results, where type 2 specimens show the shortest fatigue lives. The strain measurements show that the torque used for the bolts in joining two test specimens or one test specimen and a dummy has a rather large impact on the strain in the fatigue region. The strains decrease with increasing torque. The spectrum fatigue loading resulted in approximately an equal number of flights to obtain a 10.0 mm crack for specimens of type 1 and 4. This suggests that the type 1 configuration is superior since the web thickness is smaller for this type as compared to the type 4 specimens. In other words, the type 4 specimens have an unnecessary oversize of the clamping end web thickness.

  7. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  8. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s). 2.59 Section 2.59 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s)....

  9. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s). 2.59 Section 2.59 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s)....

  10. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s). 2.59 Section 2.59 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s)....

  11. Dynamic high-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified for dynamic high-temperature tensile characterization of thin-sheet alloys. An induction coil heater was used to heat the specimen while a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. As an example, the high-temperature Kolsky tension bar was used to characterize a DOP-26 iridium alloy in high-strain-rate tension at 860 s-1/1030 ∘C.

  12. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, S; Toloczko, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3 145 dpa at 380 503 C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm 3mm 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa ffiffiffiffiffi m p at 350 450 C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperatureP430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  13. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  14. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Start A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3-145 dpa at 380-503 °C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 °C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180-200 MPa √{m} at 350-450 °C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature ⩾430 °C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 °C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  15. Surface tension driven convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, S.

    1979-01-01

    In a normal gravitational environment, the free surface of a liquid in a container plays a passive role in the transport processes. However, at microgravity, the free surface can become the dominant factor. A simple but meaningful spaceflight experiment is proposed to investigate the nature and extent of flows induced by surface-tension gradients along the free surface. The influences of container geometry, wetability, contamination, and imposed heating modes will be investigated.

  16. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  17. Anaerobic specimen transport device.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, T D; Jimenez-Ulate, F

    1975-01-01

    A device is described and evaluated for the anaerobic transport of clinical specimens. The device limits the amount of oxygen entering with the sample to a maximum of 2%, which is rapidly removed by reacting with hydrogen in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The viability on swabs of 12 species of anaerobes, four strains of facultative anaerobes and a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was maintained during the length of the tests (24 or 48 h). The results demonstrated that this device protected even the more oxygen-sensitive clinical anaerobes from death due to oxygen exposure. This device can be used for swabs as well as for anaerobic collection and liquid and solid specimens. Images PMID:1104656

  18. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  19. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  20. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  1. Development of indirect ring tension test for fracture characterization of asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Siavashani, Alireza

    Low temperature cracking is a major distress in asphalt pavements. Several test configurations have been introduced to characterize the fracture properties of hot mix (HMA); however, most are considered to be research tools due to the complexity of the test methods or equipment. This dissertation describes the development of the indirect ring tension (IRT) fracture test for HMA, which was designed to be an effective and user-friendly test that could be deployed at the Department of Transportation level. The primary advantages of this innovative and yet practical test include: relatively large fracture surface test zone, simplicity of the specimen geometry, widespread availability of the required test equipment, and ability to test laboratory compacted specimens as well as field cores. Numerical modeling was utilized to calibrate the stress intensity factor formula of the IRT fracture test for various specimen dimensions. The results of this extensive analysis were encapsulated in a single equation. To develop the test procedure, a laboratory study was conducted to determine the optimal test parameters for HMA material. An experimental plan was then developed to evaluate the capability of the test in capturing the variations in the mix properties, asphalt pavement density, asphalt material aging, and test temperature. Five plant-produced HMA mixtures were used in this extensive study, and the results revealed that the IRT fracture test is highly repeatable, and capable of capturing the variations in the fracture properties of HMA. Furthermore, an analytical model was developed based on the viscoelastic properties of HMA to estimate the maximum allowable crack size for the pavements in the experimental study. This analysis indicated that the low-temperature cracking potential of the asphalt mixtures is highly sensitive to the fracture toughness and brittleness of the HMA material. Additionally, the IRT fracture test data seemed to correlate well with the data from

  2. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  3. A newly developed Kolsky tension bar.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Korellis, John S.

    2010-03-01

    Investigation of damage and failure of materials under impact loading relies on reliable dynamic tensile experiments. A precise Kolsky tension bar is highly desirable. Based on the template of the Kolsky compression bar that we recently developed and presented at 2009 SEM conference, a new Kolsky tension bar apparatus was completed at Sandia National Laboratories, California. It is secured to the same optical table. Linear bearings with interior Frelon coating were employed to support the whole tension bar system including the bars and gun barrel. The same laser based alignment system was used to efficiently facilitate highly precise alignment of the bar system. However, the gun part was completely re-designed. One end of the gun barrel, as a part of loading device, was directly jointed to the bar system. A solid cylindrical striker is launched inside the gun barrel and then impacts on a flange attached to the other end of the gun barrel to facilitate a sudden tensile loading on the whole system. This design improves the quality of impact to easily produce a perfect stress wave and is convenient to utilize pulse shaping technique. A calibration and dynamic characterization of an aluminum specimen are presented.

  4. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members, which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  5. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-09

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  6. Specimen flatness of thin crystalline arrays: influence of the substrate.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, R M

    1992-10-01

    The extreme degree of specimen flatness (i.e. planarity) required for high-resolution electron diffraction and electron microscopy at high tilt angles cannot be realized with thin, sheet-like crystals of biological macromolecules, just on the basis of the intrinsic stiffness of the specimen itself. In an effort to improve the rate of success at which suitably flat specimens are prepared, this paper analyzes several different factors that can either limit or enhance the specimen flatness. If specimens are adsorbed (by attractive forces) to a support film, such as evaporated carbon, which itself is not flat to atomic dimensions, quantitative calculations show that it is quite likely that the specimen will be too wrinkled to be used for high-resolution studies. Adsorption to an air-water interface is more likely to result in the necessary degree of flatness. Repulsive interactions, which might be used to "sandwich" a specimen between two interfaces, are estimated to be too "soft", i.e. too long-range in character, to be effective. Finally, if only one edge of a specimen sticks firmly to a substrate, then surface tension forces can pull the specimen taut over the surface of the substrate, so that the specimen itself can be more flat than the surface of the substrate upon which it is deposited. A second, important consideration in many studies is the fact that cooling the specimen to low temperature can result in specimen wrinkling, because of the fact that the biological crystal has a much larger coefficient of thermal expansion than that of the evaporated carbon film. In this case one expects that cooling-induced wrinkling might be reduced by using a metal support grid which has a smaller thermal coefficient than that of the carbon film. The validity of this qualitative idea is supported by experiments which show that cooling-induced wrinkling of glucose-embedded purple membrane can be prevented if molybdenum grids are used rather than copper. PMID:1481276

  7. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  8. Rainbow surface tension analysis.

    PubMed

    Adler, Charles L; Smith, Valen A; Haddad, Natalie M

    2008-03-31

    In this paper we outline a new all-optical non-contact technique for measurement of the surface tension of a Newtonian fluid. It is based on the accurate measurement of the spacing of the supernumerary fringes produced by the diffraction pattern of a laser beam transmitted through or reflected by a thin vertically-draining film of the liquid. We discuss the basic theory and application of this technique, and several issues which must be addressed before it can be used commercially. PMID:18542611

  9. Tension leg platform system

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.B.

    1983-12-20

    A tension leg platform system for use in drilling wellbores into the floor of an offshore body of water. Includes in the system is a buoyancy control vessel having a plurality of pull down cables attached thereto which extend to the ocean floor. A plurality of spaced apart anchors disposed at the ocean floor are positioned to receive the lower ends of the respective pull down cables. A submergible hull slidably engages the respective hold down cables such that the hull can be controllably lowered to the ocean floor whereby a canopy carried on the hull will cover an uncontrollably flowing well to conduct the effluent to the water's surface.

  10. Method for thinning specimen

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, David M.; Moran, Michael P.

    2005-03-15

    A method for thinning (such as in grinding and polishing) a material surface using an instrument means for moving an article with a discontinuous surface with an abrasive material dispersed between the material surface and the discontinuous surface where the discontinuous surface of the moving article provides an efficient means for maintaining contact of the abrasive with the material surface. When used to dimple specimens for microscopy analysis, a wheel with a surface that has been modified to produce a uniform or random discontinuous surface significantly improves the speed of the dimpling process without loss of quality of finish.

  11. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  12. Specimen housing unit for cinemicrographic studies in the vertical plane.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, J R; Tynan, C I; Boykin, E H

    1976-01-01

    A compact housing unit for low-power (X6 to X50) cinemicrographic studies of microbial specimens in the vertical plane is described. This unit was used successfully to record the development of a "halo" of cells around subsurface colonies of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:788640

  13. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  14. A dynamic technique for measuring surface tension at high temperatures in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miiller, A. P.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of a dynamic technique for measuring surface tension of liquid metals at high temperatures in a microgravity environment was demonstrated. The basic method involves heating a tubular specimen resistively from ambient temperature through its melting point in about 1 sec by passing an electrical current pulse through it, while simultaneously recording the pertinent experimental quantities. Static equilibrium for the molten specimen is achieved in a microgravity environment by splitting the current after it passes through the specimen tube and returning a fraction along the tube axis, and the remaining fraction outside the specimen. Adjustments to the current split enable a balance between the magnetic and surface tension forces acting on the specimen. Values for surface tension are determined from measurements of the equilibrium dimensions of the molten specimen tube, and the magnitudes of the currents. Rapid melting experiments, performed during microgravity simulations with the NASA KC-135 aircraft, yield a value for the surface tension of copper at its melting point which is in agreement with literature data. Measurements of surface tension of a refractory metal (tantalum) are underway.

  15. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, Robert; McMonigal, K. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) has been established to collect, process, annotate, store, and distribute specimens under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The NBSR is a secure controlled storage facility that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time, under well-controlled conditions, for future use in approved human spaceflight-related research protocols. The repository supports the Human Research Program, which is charged with identifying and investigating physiological changes that occur during human spaceflight, and developing and implementing effective countermeasures when necessary. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can validate clinical hypotheses, study space-flight related changes, and investigate physiological markers All samples collected require written informed consent from each long duration crewmember. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating long duration ISS crewmembers. These biological samples are collected pre-flight at approximately 45 days prior to launch, during flight on flight days 15, 30, 60 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days following landing. The number of inflight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Operations began in 2007 and as of October 2009, 23 USOS crewmembers have completed or agreed to participate in this project. As currently planned, these human biological samples will be collected from crewmembers covering multiple ISS missions until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS or 2017. The NBSR will establish guidelines for sample distribution that are consistent with ethical principles

  16. High Strain Rate Characterization of Laminate Composites Using Direct-Tension Split Hopkinson Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkala, S.; Hommeida, A.; Brar, N. S.

    1999-06-01

    Data on high strain rate response of laminate composites is required to numerically simulate penetration/perforation events. Tension specimens of laminate composites can only be fabricated in dog-bone shape and, therefore, a direct tension Hopkinson bar configuration is more appropriate for acquiring high strain data. Launching a 6.35-mm wall thickness aluminum tube around 25.4 diameter aluminum incident bar produces the tension pulse in the incident bar. Ends of the composite specimens in the dog-bone configuration are placed in specially designed grips, which are screwed in the incident and transmitter bars. The configuration allows testing of specimens with threaded ends. Stress-strain data on 6061-T6 aluminum and titanium 6-4 at a strain rate of 10^3/s agree with the published data. High strain rate data on laminate composite specimens reinforced with graphite and glass fibers will be presented.

  17. Tension in Highly Branched Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We propose a systematic method of designing branched macromolecules capable of building up high tension in their covalent bonds, which can be controlled by changing solvent quality. This tension is achieved exclusively due to intramolecular interactions by focusing lower tensions from its numerous branches to a particular section of the designed molecule. The simplest molecular architecture, which allows this tension amplification, is a so-called pom-pom macromolecule consisting of a relatively short linear spacer and two z-arm stars at its ends. Tension developed in the stars due to crowding of their branches is amplified by a factor of z and focused to the spacer. There are other highly branched macromolecules, such as molecular brushes - comb polymers with high density of side branches, that have similar focusing and amplification properties. In addition molecular brushes transmit tension along their backbone. Adsorption or grafting of these branched molecules on a substrate results in further increase in tension as compared to molecules in solution. Molecular architectures similar to pom-pom and molecular brushes with a high tension amplification parts can be used in numerous sensor applications. Unique conformations of molecular brushes in a pre-wetting layer allow direct visualization by atomic force microscope. Detailed images of individual molecules spreading along the surface enable critical evaluation of theories of chain dynamics in polymer monolayer. Strong spreading of densely branched macromolecules on a planar substrate can lead to high tension in the molecular backbone sufficient to break covalent bonds.

  18. Holding the Tension.

    PubMed

    Feudtner, Chris

    2016-05-01

    My colleagues and I had been asked by a member of a clinical team to help sort through the ethics of stopping a life-sustaining intervention for a very ill child. We had already talked with the parents, the physicians, and the folks from nursing, social work, and chaplaincy. Terms like "suffering," "cruel," "compassion," and "moral distress" had been uttered, as had terms like "inappropriate," "unethical," "neglectful," and "risk-management." The group had now stuffed all of these polarizing thoughts and feelings into this cramped room with only one door. And everyone was looking at me. What skill, competency, or inner capacity must one possess to hold and manage such tension? PMID:27150423

  19. Standard Methods for Unnotched Tension Testing of Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted by researchers at the Boeing Defense & Space Group to investigate the effects of specimen sizing on several braided textile materials. Test results from this and other test programs were compared in an effort to determine what effect, if any, specimen size has on elastic property measurements of unnotched tension test. In general, the unnotched tensile strength of 2-D braids was found to be insensitive to specimen width, length, or thickness effects. The results from this study suggest that standard testing methods used for tape materials may be sufficient for tension testing of textile composite materials. Specifically, the straight sided specimen geometry described in ASTM 3034, and used by Boeing, should provide acceptable results. Further experiments performed at Boeing and by other investigators on other textile architectures suggest similar results. Although specimen size studies were not conducted, failing stresses varied on the same order as those obtained with the 2-D materials. This suggests that the accuracy of the results were consistent with those obtained with the 2-D materials.

  20. Confronting Racial and Religious Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessler, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When a community's demographics change quickly in terms of racial, religious, or ethnic makeup, Wessler notes, tension surfaces. Schools are the likeliest place for these kinds of tensions to openly come to a head. Schools can't always avoid conflicts among students who feel mutual prejudice and suspicion. But schools can address simmering…

  1. Machining Test Specimens from Harvested Zion RPV Segments for Through Wall Attenuation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Nanstad, Randy K

    2015-01-01

    The decommissioning of the Zion Units 1 and 2 Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) in Zion, Illinois presents a special opportunity for developing a better understanding of materials degradation and other issues associated with extending the lifetime of existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years of service. In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor fleet, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating and contracting with Zion Solutions, LLC, a subsidiary of Energy Solutions, the selective procurement of materials, structures, and components from the decommissioned reactors. In this paper, we will discuss the acquisition of segments of the Zion Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), the cutting of these segments into sections and blocks from the beltline and upper vertical welds and plate material, the current status of machining those blocks into mechanical (Charpy, compact tension, and tensile) test specimens and coupons for chemical and microstructural (TEM, APT, SANS, and nano indention) characterization, as well as the current test plans and possible collaborative projects. Access to service-irradiated RPV welds and plate sections will allow through wall attenuation studies to be performed, which will be used to assess current radiation damage models (Rosseel et al. (2012) and Rosseel et al. (2015)).

  2. A biomechanical assessment of the coupling of torsion and tension in the human scapholunate ligament.

    PubMed

    Zdero, R; Olsen, M; Elfatori, S; Skrinskas, T; Schemitsch, E; Whyne, C; von Schroeder, H

    2008-08-01

    The mechanical behaviour of human scapholunate ligaments is not well described in the literature with regard to torsion. In this study, intact scapholunate specimens were mechanically tested in torsion to determine whether a simultaneous tensile load was generated. Human intact scapholunate specimens (n = 19) were harvested. The scaphoid and lunate bones were potted in square chambers using epoxy cement, while the interposing ligament remained exposed. Each specimen was mounted rigidly in a specially designed test jig and remained at a fixed axial length during all tests. Specimens were subjected to a torsional load regime that included cyclic preconditioning, ramp-up, stress relaxation, ramp-down, rest, and torsion to failure. Torque and axial tension were monitored simultaneously. The relationship between torsion and tension was determined. Graphs of torque versus tension were generated, from which outcome measures were extracted. Tests demonstrated a clear relationship between applied torsion and the resulting generation of tension for the ligament during ramp-up (torsion-to-tension ratio, 38.86 +/- 29.00 mm; linearity coefficient R2 = 0.89 +/- 0.15; n = 19), stress relaxation (torsion-to-tension ratio, 23.43 +/- 15.84 mm; R2 = 0.90 +/- 0.09; n = 16), and failure tests (torsion-to-tension ratio, 38.81 +/- 26.39mm; R2 = 0.77 +/- 0.20; n = 16). No statistically significant differences were detected between the torsion-to-tension ratios (p = 0.13) or between the linearity (R2) of the best-fit lines (p > 0.085). A strongly coupled linear relationship between torsion and tension for the scapholunate ligament was exhibited in all test phases. This may suggest interplay between these two parameters in the stabilization of the ligament during normal motion and for injury cascades. PMID:18935807

  3. Fabrication of molecular tension probes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    A unique bioluminescent imaging probe is introduced for illuminating molecular tension appended by protein–protein interactions (PPIs) of interest. A full-length luciferase is sandwiched between two proteins of interest via minimal flexible linkers. The ligand-activated PPIs append intramolecular tension to the sandwiched luciferase, boosting or dropping the enzymatic activity in a quantitative manner. This method guides construction of a new lineage of bioassays for determining molecular tension appended by ligand-activated PPIs. The summary of the method is: • Molecular tension appended by protein–protein interactions (PPI) is visualized with a luciferase. • Estrogen activities are quantitatively illuminated with the molecular tension probes. • Full-length Renilla luciferase enhances the optical intensities after bending by PPI. PMID:27222821

  4. Fabrication of molecular tension probes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    A unique bioluminescent imaging probe is introduced for illuminating molecular tension appended by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of interest. A full-length luciferase is sandwiched between two proteins of interest via minimal flexible linkers. The ligand-activated PPIs append intramolecular tension to the sandwiched luciferase, boosting or dropping the enzymatic activity in a quantitative manner. This method guides construction of a new lineage of bioassays for determining molecular tension appended by ligand-activated PPIs. The summary of the method is: •Molecular tension appended by protein-protein interactions (PPI) is visualized with a luciferase.•Estrogen activities are quantitatively illuminated with the molecular tension probes.•Full-length Renilla luciferase enhances the optical intensities after bending by PPI. PMID:27222821

  5. Compaction behavior of roller compacted ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-06-01

    The effect of roller compaction pressure on the bulk compaction of roller compacted ibuprofen was investigated using instrumented rotary tablet press. Three different roller pressures were utilized to prepare granules and Heckel analysis, Walker analysis, compressibility, and tabletability were performed to derive densification, deformation, course of volume reduction and bonding phenomenon of different pressure roller compacted granules. Nominal single granule fracture strength was obtained by micro tensile testing. Heckel analysis indicated that granules prepared using lower pressure during roller compaction showed lower yield strength. The reduction in tabletability was observed for higher pressure roller compacted granules. The reduction in tabletability supports the results of granule size enlargement theory. Apart from the granule size enlargement theory, the available fines and relative fragmentation during compaction is responsible for higher bonding strength and provide larger areas for true particle contact at constant porosity for lower pressure roller compacted granules. Overall bulk compaction parameters indicated that granules prepared by lower roller compaction pressure were advantageous in terms of tabletability and densification. Overall results suggested that densification during roller compaction affects the particle level properties of specific surface area, nominal fracture strength, and compaction behavior. PMID:18280716

  6. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  7. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  8. Magnetic fields of spherical compact stars in a braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Fattoyev, F. J.

    2008-08-15

    We study the stellar magnetic field configuration in dependence on brane tension and present solutions of Maxwell equations in the external background space-time of a magnetized spherical star in a Randall-Sundrum II type braneworld. The star is modeled as a sphere consisting of perfect highly magnetized fluid with infinite conductivity and a frozen-in magnetic field. With respect to solutions for magnetic fields found in the Schwarzschild space-time, brane tension introduces enhancing corrections to the exterior magnetic field which could be relevant for the magnetic fields of magnetized compact objects as pulsars and magnetars and may provide observational evidence for the brane tension.

  9. Tensional Homeostasis in Single Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Kevin D.; Ng, Win Pin; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Adherent cells generate forces through acto-myosin contraction to move, change shape, and sense the mechanical properties of their environment. They are thought to maintain defined levels of tension with their surroundings despite mechanical perturbations that could change tension, a concept known as tensional homeostasis. Misregulation of tensional homeostasis has been proposed to drive disorganization of tissues and promote progression of diseases such as cancer. However, whether tensional homeostasis operates at the single cell level is unclear. Here, we directly test the ability of single fibroblast cells to regulate tension when subjected to mechanical displacements in the absence of changes to spread area or substrate elasticity. We use a feedback-controlled atomic force microscope to measure and modulate forces and displacements of individual contracting cells as they spread on a fibronectin-patterned atomic-force microscope cantilever and coverslip. We find that the cells reach a steady-state contraction force and height that is insensitive to stiffness changes as they fill the micropatterned areas. Rather than maintaining a constant tension, the fibroblasts altered their contraction force in response to mechanical displacement in a strain-rate-dependent manner, leading to a new and stable steady-state force and height. This response is influenced by overexpression of the actin crosslinker α-actinin, and rheology measurements reveal that changes in cell elasticity are also strain- rate-dependent. Our finding of tensional buffering, rather than homeostasis, allows cells to transition between different tensional states depending on how they are displaced, permitting distinct responses to slow deformations during tissue growth and rapid deformations associated with injury. PMID:24988349

  10. Controlled shear/tension fixture

    DOEpatents

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Liu, Chain-tsuan; George, Easo P.

    2012-07-24

    A test fixture for simultaneously testing two material test samples is provided. The fixture provides substantially equal shear and tensile stresses in each test specimens. By gradually applying a load force to the fixture only one of the two specimens fractures. Upon fracture of the one specimen, the fixture and the load train lose contact and the second specimen is preserved in a state of upset just prior to fracture. Particular advantages of the fixture are (1) to control the tensile to shear load on the specimen for understanding the effect of these stresses on the deformation behavior of advanced materials, (2) to control the location of fracture for accessing localized material properties including the variation of the mechanical properties and residual stresses across the thickness of advanced materials, (3) to yield a fractured specimen for strength measurement and an unfractured specimen for examining the microstructure just prior to fracture.

  11. More About Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Del Signore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional discussion of technique for measuring interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Technique described in "Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids" (LEW-15855).

  12. Fracture toughness testing of Linde 1092 reactor vessel welds in the transition range using Charpy-sized specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Pavinich, W.A.; Yoon, K.K.; Hour, K.Y.; Hoffman, C.L.

    1999-10-01

    The present reference toughness method for predicting the change in fracture toughness can provide over estimates of these values because of uncertainties in initial RT{sub NDT} and shift correlations. It would be preferable to directly measure fracture toughness. However, until recently, no standard method was available to characterize fracture toughness in the transition range. ASTM E08 has developed a draft standard that shows promise for providing lower bound transition range fracture toughness using the master curve approach. This method has been successfully implemented using 1T compact fracture specimens. Combustion Engineering reactor vessel surveillance programs do not have compact fracture specimens. Therefore, the CE Owners Group developed a program to validate the master curve method for Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens for future application on irradiated specimens. This method was validated for Linde 1092 welds using unirradiated Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens by comparison of results with those from compact fracture specimens.

  13. Pilot environmental specimen bank program

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, S.A.; Zeisler, R.

    1984-10-01

    The concept of an environmental specimen bank for archiving of biological and environmental samples for retrospective analysis has been recognized recently as an important component of systematic environmental monitoring. A pilot program was designed to evaluate the feasibility of a national program by providing actual working experience in all aspects of specimen banking, that is, in specimen collection, processing, storage, and analysis. Four types of environmental specimens, which represent environmental accumulators, were selected for inclusion in the National Bureau of Standards pilot program: human soft tissue (liver), a marine accumulator (marine mussels, Mytilus edulis), a food accumulator and the air pollutant accumulator have not been selected. Attention is focused on the experience gained in the pilot program with the human liver specimens. 32 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  14. Wide range stress intensity factor expressions for ASTM E 399 standard fracture toughness specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srawley, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    For each of the two types of specimens, bend and compact, described previously for plane strain fracture toughness of materials, E 399, a polynominal expression is given for calculation of the stress intensity factor, K, from the applied force, P, and the specimen dimensions. It is explicitly stated, however, that these expressions should not be used outside the range of relative crack length, a/W, from 0.45 to 0.55. While this range is sufficient for the purpose of E 399, the same specimen types are often used for other purposes over a much wider range of a/W; for example, in the study of fatigue crack growth. Expressions are presented which are at least as accurate as those in E 399-74, and which cover much wider ranges of a/W: for the three-point bend specimen from 0 to 1; and for the compact specimen from 0.2 to 1. The range has to be restricted for the compact specimen because of the proximity of the loading pin holes to the crackline, which causes the stress intensity factor to be sensitive to small variations in dimensions when a/W is small. This is a penalty inherently associated with the compactness of the specimen.

  15. Improving corrosion resistance of post-tensioned substructures emphasizing high performance grouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schokker, Andrea Jeanne

    The use of post-tensioning in bridges can provide durability and structural benefits to the system while expediting the construction process. When post-tensioning is combined with precast elements, traffic interference can be greatly reduced through rapid construction. Post-tensioned concrete substructure elements such as bridge piers, hammerhead bents, and straddle bents have become more prevalent in recent years. Chloride induced corrosion of steel in concrete is one of the most costly forms of corrosion each year. Coastal substructure elements are exposed to seawater by immersion or spray, and inland bridges may also be at risk due to the application of deicing salts. Corrosion protection of the post-tensioning system is vital to the integrity of the structure because loss of post-tensioning can result in catastrophic failure. Documentation for durability design of the grout, ducts, and anchorage systems is very limited. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of corrosion protection measures for post-tensioned concrete substructures by designing and testing specimens representative of typical substructure elements using state-of-the-art practices in aggressive chloride exposure environments. This was accomplished through exposure testing of twenty-seven large-scale beam specimens and ten large-scale column specimens. High performance grout for post-tensioning tendon injection was also developed through a series of fresh property tests, accelerated exposure tests, and a large-scale pumping test to simulate field conditions. A high performance fly ash grout was developed for applications with small vertical rises, and a high performance anti-bleed grout was developed for applications involving large vertical rises such as tall bridge piers. Long-term exposure testing of the beam and column specimens is ongoing, but preliminary findings indicate increased corrosion protection with increasing levels of post-tensioning, although traditional

  16. An Experimental Study of a Stitched Composite with a Notch Subjected to Combined Bending and Tension Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Susan O.; Nettles, Alan T.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted to measure the strength of stitched carbon/epoxy composites containing through-thickness damage in the form of a crack-like notch. The specimens were subjected to three types of loading: pure bending, pure tension, and combined bending and tension loads. Measurements of applied loads, strains near crack tips, and crack opening displacements (COD) were monitored in all tests. The transverse displacement at the center of the specimen was measured using a Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT). The experimental data showed that the outer surface of the pure tension specimen failed at approximately 6,000 microstrain, while in combined bending and tension loads the measured tensile strains reached 10,000 microstrain.

  17. Investigation of smooth specimen scc test procedures; variations in environment, specimen size, stressing frame, and stress state. [for high strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifka, B. W.; Sprowls, D. O.; Kelsey, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The variables studied in the stress-corrosion cracking performance of high strength aluminum alloys were: (1) corrosiveness of the environment, (2) specimen size and stiffness of the stressing system, (3) interpretation of transgranular cracking, and (4) interaction of the state of stress and specimen orientation in a product with an anisotropic grain structure. It was shown that the probability of failure and time to fracture for a specimen loaded in direct tension are influenced by corrosion pattern, the stressing assembly stiffness, and the notch tensile strength of the alloy. Results demonstrate that the combination of a normal tension stress and a shear stress acting on the plane of maximum susceptibility in a product with a highly directional grain cause the greatest tendency for stress-corrosion cracking.

  18. Transverse Tension Fatigue Life Characterization Through Flexure Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The transverse tension fatigue life of S2/8552 glass-epoxy and IM7/8552 carbon-epoxy was characterized using flexure tests of 90-degree laminates loaded in 3-point and 4-point bending. The influence of specimen polishing and specimen configuration on transverse tension fatigue life was examined using the glass-epoxy laminates. Results showed that 90-degree bend specimens with polished machined edges and polished tension-side surfaces, where bending failures where observed, had lower fatigue lives than unpolished specimens when cyclically loaded at equal stress levels. The influence of specimen thickness and the utility of a Weibull scaling law was examined using the carbon-epoxy laminates. The influence of test frequency on fatigue results was also documented for the 4-point bending configuration. A Weibull scaling law was used to predict the 4-point bending fatigue lives from the 3-point bending curve fit and vice-versa. Scaling was performed based on maximum cyclic stress level as well as fatigue life. The scaling laws based on stress level shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the desired direction, however, the magnitude of the shift was not adequate to accurately predict the fatigue lives. Furthermore, the scaling law based on fatigue life shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the opposite direction from measured values. Therefore, these scaling laws were not adequate for obtaining accurate predictions of the transverse tension fatigue lives.

  19. The history of tissue tension.

    PubMed

    Peters, W S; Tomos, A D

    1996-06-01

    In recent years the phenomenon of tissue tension and its functional connection to elongation growth has regained much interest. In the present study we reconstruct older models of mechanical inhomogenities in growing plant organs, in order to establish an accurate historical background for the current discussion. We focus on the iatromechanic model developed in Stephen Hales' Vegetable Staticks, Wilhelm Hofmeister's mechanical model of negative geotropism, Julius Sachs' explanation of the development of tissue tension, and the differential-auxin-response-hypothesis by Kenneth Thimann and Charles Schneider. Each of these models is considered in the context of its respective historic and theoretical environment. In particular, the dependency of the biomechanical hypotheses on the cell theory and the hormone concept is discussed. We arrive at the conclusion that the historical development until the middle of our century is adequately described as a development towards more detailed explanations of how differential tensions are established during elongation growth in plant organs. Then we compare with the older models the structure of more recent criticism of hormonal theories of tropic curvature, and particularly the epidermal-growth-control hypothesis of Ulrich Kutschera. In contrast to the more elaborate of the older hypotheses, the recent models do not attempt an explanation of differential tensions, but instead focus on mechanical processes in organs, in which tissue tension already exists. Some conceptual implications of this discrepancy, which apparently were overlooked in the recent discussion, are briefly evaluated. PMID:11541099

  20. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  1. T*{sub {epsilon}} integral analysis of fracture specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Omori, Y.; Ma, L.; Kobayashi, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    T*{sub {epsilon}} integral values associated with stable crack growth in thin 2024-T3 aluminum compact (CT) specimens and A606 HSLA steel single edge notched (SEN) specimens were determined directly from the crack tip displacement field obtained by moire interferometry. Stable crack growth in the SEN specimen was also simulated by an elastic-plastic finite element (FE) model which was driven by the experimentally determined boundary conditions. T*{sub {epsilon}} obtained experimentally and by FE were in reasonable agreements with each other. Unlike the vanishing J integrals with crack extension, T*{sub {epsilon}} reached steady state values with stable crack growth. Thus, for a given integration contour, {Gamma}{sub {epsilon}}, near the crack tip, T*{sub {epsilon}} can be used as a stable crack growth as well as a ductile fracture criteria.

  2. The effect of test system misalignment in the dynamic tension test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Wang, T. P.; Yip, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of test system misalignment are analyzed for dynamic tension tests using sheet type rectangular 1100-0 aluminum specimens. The strain rate is assumed constant only on the natural axis of the specimen even though the specimen is subjected to a constant strain rate test. The results include: (1) the lower the strain rate, the more significant the misalignment errors become; (2) misalignment errors of 50% are found at the extreme fibers of the specimen; (3) the strain rate variation in the cross section decreases with increasing plastic strain and vanishes at plastic strain equal to 0.8% at the midspan of the specimen; and (4) the neutral axis shifts toward the centerline of the specimen as the plastic strain increases, but it reaches a limit and does not completely move back to the centerline.

  3. Standard methods for filled hole tension testing of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, M. A.; Masters, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of two test specimen geometry parameters, the specimen width and W/D ratio, on filled-hole tensile strength were determined for textile composite materials. Test data generated by Boeing and Lockheed on 2-D and 3-D braids, and 3-D weaves were used to make these evaluations. The investigation indicated that filled-hole tensile-strength showed little sensitivity to either parameter. Test specimen configurations used in open-hole tension tests, such as those suggested by ASTM D5766 - Standard Test Method for Open Hole Tensile Strength of Polymer Matrix Composite Laminates or those proposed by MIL-HDBK-17-lD should provide adequate results for material comparisons studies. Comparisons of the materials' open-hole and filled-hole tensile strengths indicated that the latter were generally lower than the former. The 3-D braids were the exception; their filled-hole strengths were unexpected larger than their open-hole strengths. However, these increases were small compared to the scatter in the data. Thus, filled hole tension may be a critical design consideration for textile composite materials.

  4. Tension-tension fatigue behavior of the Space Shuttle strain-isolation-pad material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. P.

    1981-01-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of 0.41-cm (0.16-in) thick strain-isolation-pad (SIP) material was explored in a series of constant- and random-amplitude loading tests. The SIP material is used on the Space Shuttle to isolate the ceramic insulating tiles from the strains and deflections of the aluminum alloy airframe. In all tests, 12.7 by 12.7 cm (5.0 by 5.0 in) SIP specimens were subjected to tension-tension loading in the through-the-thickness direction at a frequency of 10 Hz. When subjected to cyclic loading, the SIP material exhibited a monotonic increase in thickness and a monotonic increase in tensile tangent moduli. The rate of thickness growth increased with increasing test stress level and decreased with increasing number cycles endured. Power law equations were found to provide a good representation of the thickness growth rate data. Tensile tangent moduli increased by as much as 80 percent during fatigue tests. Simple cumulative damage fatigue models predicted the mean thickness growth under random-amplitude loading with reasonable accuracy (factor of 2 on life).

  5. Estimating the tensile strength of super hard brittle materials using truncated spheroidal specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serati, Mehdi; Alehossein, Habib; Williams, David J.

    2015-05-01

    New approaches need to be introduced to measure the tensile capacity of super hard materials since the standard methods are not effective. To pursue this objective, a series of laboratory tests were constructed to replicate the fracture mechanism of diamond-based materials. Experiments indicate that under a certain compressive test condition, stresses normal to the axisymmetric line in truncated spheroidal specimens (bullet-shaped specimens) are in tension contributing to the tensile fracture of the material. From experimental and numerical studies, it is concluded that semi-prolate spheroidal specimens can be used to determine precisely the tensile strength of brittle stiff diamond-like composites.

  6. Behavior of post-tensioned girder anchorage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, W. C.; Paes-Filho, W.; Breen, J. E.

    1981-04-01

    Several large, thin-webbed box girder bridges, with post-tensioned anchorage zones have experienced large cracks along the tendon path in the anchorage zones at the design stressing load. A simplified test specimen was developed to accurately simulate the behavior of the post-tensioned box girder web. The primary variables affecting the formation of the tendon path crack were. investigated: tendon inclination and eccentricity, section height and width, tensile splitting strength of the concrete, anchor width and geometry, and the effect of supplementary anchorage zone reinforcement, both active and passive. Behavioral trends are presented as determined from three sources. These include physical tests of 40 quarter-scale microconcrete models and physical tests of 9 full-scale prototype box girder web sections.

  7. Researching with Children: Ethical Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Einarsdottir, Johanna; Perry, Bob

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to reflect on both the processes and outcomes of the range of approaches aimed at promoting children's engagement in research, with the specific intent of listening to children's voices. This article considers some of the ethical tensions we have experienced when engaging children in research about their prior-to-school and school…

  8. Apparatus for determining surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razouk, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    System for studying capillary action uses pressure transducer and chart recorder instead of manometer. Apparatus enables measurements to be made under controlled atmospheres. It also may be remotely operated. These features are particularly useful when dealing with noxious liquids and for study of surface tension under high-pressure conditions that require use of all-metal apparatus.

  9. Snapping mechanical metamaterials under tension.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Akbarzadeh, Abdolhamid; Pasini, Damiano

    2015-10-21

    A snapping mechanical metamaterial is designed, which exhibits a sequential snap-through behavior under tension. The tensile response of this mechanical metamaterial can be altered by tuning the architecture of the snapping segments to achieve a range of nonlinear mechanical responses, including monotonic, S-shaped, plateau, and non-monotonic snap-through behavior. PMID:26314680

  10. Green strength of zirconium sponge and uranium dioxide powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishna, Palanki Murty, B. Narasimha; Sahoo, P.K.; Gopalakrishna, T.

    2008-07-15

    Zirconium metal sponge is compacted into rectangular or cylindrical shapes using hydraulic presses. These shapes are stacked and electron beam welded to form a long electrode suitable for vacuum arc melting and casting into solid ingots. The compact electrodes should be sufficiently strong to prevent breakage in handling as well as during vacuum arc melting. Usually, the welds are strong and the electrode strength is limited by the green strength of the compacts, which constitute the electrode. Green strength is also required in uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder compacts, to withstand stresses during de-tensioning after compaction as well as during ejection from the die and for subsequent handling by man and machine. The strengths of zirconium sponge and UO{sub 2} powder compacts have been determined by bending and crushing respectively, and Weibul moduli evaluated. The green density of coarse sponge compact was found to be larger than that from finer sponge. The green density of compacts from lightly attrited UO{sub 2} powder was higher than that from unattrited category, accompanied by an improvement in UO{sub 2} green crushing strength. The factors governing green strength have been examined in the light of published literature and experimental evidence. The methodology and results provide a basis for quality control in metal sponge and ceramic powder compaction in the manufacture of nuclear fuel.

  11. Measurement of surface tension and viscosity by open capillary techniques

    DOEpatents

    Rye,Robert R. , Yost,Frederick G.

    1998-01-01

    An open-channel capillary is provided, having preferably a v-shaped groove in a flat wettable surface. The groove has timing marks and a source marker in which the specimen to be tested is deposited. The time of passage between the timing marks is recorded, and the ratio of surface tension .gamma. to viscosity .mu. is determined from the equation given below: ##EQU1## where h.sub.0 is the groove depth, .alpha. is the groove angle, .theta. is the liquid/solid contact angle, and t is the flow time. It has been shown by the

  12. Design and fabrication of graphite-epoxy bolted wing skin splice specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy bolted joint specimens were designed and fabricated. These specimens were to be representative of a side-of-body wing skin splice with a 20-year life expectancy in a commercial transport environment. Preliminary tests were performed to determine design values of bearing and net tension stresses. Based upon the information developed, a three-fastener-wide representative wing skin splice was designed for a load of 2627 KN/m (15,000 lbf/in.). One joint specimen was fabricated and tested at NASA. The wing skin splice failed at 106 percent of design ultimate load. This joint design achieved all static load objectives. Fabrication of six specimens, together with their loading fixtures, was completed, and the specimens were delivered to NASA-LRC.

  13. Electrothermal fracturing of tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinn, H. O.; Hanks, J. G.; Perkins, H. P.

    1970-01-01

    Pulling device consisting of structural tube, connecting rod, spring-loaded nuts, loading rod, heating element, and three bulkheads fractures tensile specimens. Alternate heating and cooling increases tensile loading by increments until fracturing occurs. Load cell or strain gage, applied to pulling rod, determines forces applied.

  14. Light Scattering by Surface Tension Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbuch, G.; Garbay, F.

    1979-01-01

    This simple and inexpensive experiment is an illustration of the physical concepts of interaction between light and surface tension waves, and provides a new method of measuring surface tension. (Author/GA)

  15. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  16. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  17. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  18. Professional Identity Tensions of Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillen, Marieke; Beijaard, Douwe; den Brok, Perry

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on interviews with 24 beginning teachers about tensions they experienced regarding their professional identity. The interviewees reported a total of 59 tensions of tension that fell into three themes: (1) the change in role from student to teacher; (2) conflicts between desired and actual support given to students; and (3)…

  19. 10 CFR 26.165 - Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... single specimens. (a) Testing split specimens. (1) If a specimen has been split into Bottle A and Bottle... required, of the specimen in Bottle A. (2) If a specimen was initially tested at a licensee testing... laboratory shall perform initial and confirmatory testing, if required, of the specimen in Bottle A. (3)...

  20. 10 CFR 26.165 - Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... single specimens. (a) Testing split specimens. (1) If a specimen has been split into Bottle A and Bottle... required, of the specimen in Bottle A. (2) If a specimen was initially tested at a licensee testing... laboratory shall perform initial and confirmatory testing, if required, of the specimen in Bottle A. (3)...

  1. Baseline Test Specimen Machining Report

    SciTech Connect

    mark Carroll

    2009-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project is tasked with selecting a high temperature gas reactor technology that will be capable of generating electricity and supplying large amounts of process heat. The NGNP is presently being designed as a helium-cooled high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. The graphite baseline characterization project is conducting the research and development (R&D) activities deemed necessary to fully qualify nuclear-grade graphite for use in the NGNP reactor. Establishing nonirradiated thermomechanical and thermophysical properties by characterizing lot-to-lot and billet-to-billet variations (for probabilistic baseline data needs) through extensive data collection and statistical analysis is one of the major fundamental objectives of the project. The reactor core will be made up of stacks of graphite moderator blocks. In order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the varying characteristics in a wide range of suitable graphites, any of which can be classified as “nuclear grade,” an experimental program has been initiated to develop an extensive database of the baseline characteristics of numerous candidate graphites. Various factors known to affect the properties of graphite will be investigated, including specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation within a billet (either parallel to [P] or transverse to [T] the long axis of the as-produced billet), and billet-to-billet variations within a lot or across different production lots. Because each data point is based on a certain position within a given billet of graphite, particular attention must be paid to the traceability of each specimen and its spatial location and orientation within each billet. The evaluation of these properties is discussed in the Graphite Technology Development Plan (Windes et. al, 2007). One of the key components in the evaluation of these graphite types will be mechanical testing on

  2. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  3. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    PubMed

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  4. Appendix A: Specimen 72275 documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1974-01-01

    The friability of the matrix of specimen 72275 caused numerous fragments and an abundance of fines to break away from the main mass during transport from the moon and handling in the lunar receiving laboratory. Samples 72275,1 to 72275,14 were labeled during PET examination. Samples 72275,1, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were placed in storage, and the remainder were distributed.

  5. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  6. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  7. Behavior of compacted lunar simulants using new vacuum triaxial device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Saadatmanesh, Hamid; Allen, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to create a lunar simulant locally from a basaltic rock and to design and develop a vacuum triaxial test device that can permit testing of compacted lunar simulant under cyclic loading with different levels of initial vacuum. Triaxial testing is performed in the device itself without removing the compacted specimen. Preliminary constrained compression and triaxial shear tests are performed to identify effects of initial confinements and vacuums. The results are used to define deformation and strength parameters. At this time, vacuum levels up to 0.0001 are possible. The research can aid in the development of compacted materials for various construction applications.

  8. Eccentric loading of microtensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trapp, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic materials have a lower density than most metals and are capable of performing at extremely high temperatures. The utility of these materials is obvious; however, the fracture strength of brittle materials is not easily predicted and often varies greatly. Characteristically, brittle materials lack ductility and do not yield as other materials. Ceramics materials are naturally populated with microscopic cracks due to fabrication techniques. Upon application of a load, stress concentration occurs at the root of these cracks and fracture will eventually occur at some not easily predicted strength. In order to use ceramics in any application some design methodology must exist from which a component can be placed into service. This design methodology is CARES/LIFE (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) which has been developed and refined at NASA over the last several decades. The CARES/LIFE computer program predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component over its service life. CARES combines finite element results from a commercial FE (finite element) package such as ANSYS and experimental results to compute the abovementioned probability of failure. Over the course of several tests CARES has had great success in predicting the life of various ceramic components and has been used throughout industry. The latest challenge is to verify that CARES is valid for MEMS (Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems). To investigate a series of microtensile specimens were fractured in the laboratory. From this data, material parameters were determined and used to predict a distribution of strength for other specimens that exhibit a known stress concentration. If the prediction matches the experimental results then these parameters can be applied to a desired component outside of the laboratory. During testing nearly half of the tensile Specimens fractured at a location that was not expected and hence not captured in the FE model. It has been my duty

  9. Compound Charpy specimens by adhesive joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, M. M.; Hammad, F. H.; Pachur, D.; Britz, L.

    1992-03-01

    Compound (reconstituted) Charpy specimens were manufactured by an adhesive joining method in which each half of a previously tested specimen formed the central section of a new testpiece. 29 adhesives were screened to select the most suitable. Compound specimens were precracked and used as minature fracture mechanics specimens and tested in both 3-point static bending and impact. The results are in good agreement with those of conventional specimens. Recommendations for the most appropriate commercial adhesive for hot cell operations are given.

  10. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

  11. Small membranes under negative surface tension.

    PubMed

    Avital, Yotam Y; Farago, Oded

    2015-03-28

    We use computer simulations and a simple free energy model to study the response of a bilayer membrane to the application of a negative (compressive) mechanical tension. Such a tension destabilizes the long wavelength undulation modes of giant vesicles, but it can be sustained when small membranes and vesicles are considered. Our negative tension simulation results reveal two regimes-(i) a weak negative tension regime characterized by stretching-dominated elasticity and (ii) a strong negative tension regime featuring bending-dominated elastic behavior. This resembles the findings of the classic Evans and Rawicz micropipette aspiration experiment in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) [E. Evans and W. Rawicz, Phys, Rev. Lett. 64, 2094 (1990)]. However, in GUVs the crossover between the two elasticity regimes occurs at a small positive surface tension, while in smaller membranes it takes place at a moderate negative tension. Another interesting observation concerning the response of a small membrane to negative surface tension is related to the relationship between the mechanical and fluctuation tensions, which are equal to each other for non-negative values. When the tension decreases to negative values, the fluctuation tension γ drops somewhat faster than the mechanical tension τ in the small negative tension regime, before it saturates (and becomes larger than τ) for large negative tensions. The bending modulus exhibits an "opposite" trend. It remains almost unchanged in the stretching-dominated elastic regime, and decreases in the bending-dominated regime. Both the amplitudes of the thermal height undulations and the projected area variations diverge at the onset of mechanical instability. PMID:25833604

  12. Small membranes under negative surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Yotam Y.; Farago, Oded

    2015-03-01

    We use computer simulations and a simple free energy model to study the response of a bilayer membrane to the application of a negative (compressive) mechanical tension. Such a tension destabilizes the long wavelength undulation modes of giant vesicles, but it can be sustained when small membranes and vesicles are considered. Our negative tension simulation results reveal two regimes—(i) a weak negative tension regime characterized by stretching-dominated elasticity and (ii) a strong negative tension regime featuring bending-dominated elastic behavior. This resembles the findings of the classic Evans and Rawicz micropipette aspiration experiment in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) [E. Evans and W. Rawicz, Phys, Rev. Lett. 64, 2094 (1990)]. However, in GUVs the crossover between the two elasticity regimes occurs at a small positive surface tension, while in smaller membranes it takes place at a moderate negative tension. Another interesting observation concerning the response of a small membrane to negative surface tension is related to the relationship between the mechanical and fluctuation tensions, which are equal to each other for non-negative values. When the tension decreases to negative values, the fluctuation tension γ drops somewhat faster than the mechanical tension τ in the small negative tension regime, before it saturates (and becomes larger than τ) for large negative tensions. The bending modulus exhibits an "opposite" trend. It remains almost unchanged in the stretching-dominated elastic regime, and decreases in the bending-dominated regime. Both the amplitudes of the thermal height undulations and the projected area variations diverge at the onset of mechanical instability.

  13. ACOUSTIC COMPACTION LAYER DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The depth and strength of compacted layers in fields have been determined traditionally using the ASAE standardized cone penetrometer method. However, an on-the-go method would be much faster and much less labor intensive. The soil measurement system described here attempts to locate the compacted...

  14. Surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1988-01-01

    Thermocapillary flow is driven by a thermally induced surface tension variation along a liquid free surface. In the Earth-gravity environment such flows are usually overshadowed by buoyancy driven flows, but at reduced gravity conditions their influence could be significant. A comprehensive theoretical and experimental research program was stated 12 years ago and is still being continued. Past work done at Case Western Reserve University as well as work done by others is reviewed. The justification for low-gravity experiments is presented.

  15. Axelrod's model with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Bruno; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2014-06-01

    In this work we propose a subtle change in Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture. The mechanism consists of excluding from the set of potentially interacting neighbors those that would never possibly exchange. Although the alteration proposed does not alter the state space topologically, it yields significant qualitative changes, specifically the emergence of surface tension, driving the system in some cases to metastable states. The transient behavior is considerably richer, and cultural regions become stable leading to the formation of different spatiotemporal patterns. A metastable "glassy" phase emerges between the globalized phase and the disordered, multicultural phase.

  16. Dynamical compactness and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Khilko, Danylo; Kolyada, Sergiĭ; Zhang, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    To link the Auslander point dynamics property with topological transitivity, in this paper we introduce dynamically compact systems as a new concept of a chaotic dynamical system (X , T) given by a compact metric space X and a continuous surjective self-map T : X → X. Observe that each weakly mixing system is transitive compact, and we show that any transitive compact M-system is weakly mixing. Then we discuss the relationships between it and other several stronger forms of sensitivity. We prove that any transitive compact system is Li-Yorke sensitive and furthermore multi-sensitive if it is not proximal, and that any multi-sensitive system has positive topological sequence entropy. Moreover, we show that multi-sensitivity is equivalent to both thick sensitivity and thickly syndetic sensitivity for M-systems. We also give a quantitative analysis for multi-sensitivity of a dynamical system.

  17. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  19. Multiphoton microspectroscopy of biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Ping C.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Chen, RangWu; Wang, YiMin; Chen, JianCheng; Wang, Yung-Shun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Huang, Mao-Kuo

    2000-07-01

    The non-linear nature of multi-photon fluorescence excitation restricts the fluorescing volume to the vicinity of the focal point. As a result, the technology has the capacity for micro- spectroscopy of biological specimen at high spatial resolution. Chloroplasts in mesophyll protoplast of Arabidopsis thaliana and maize stem sections were used to demonstrate the feasibility of multi-photon fluorescence micro-spectroscopy at subcellular compartments. Time-lapse spectral recording provides a means for studying the response of cell organelles to high intensity illumination.

  20. Comparison of Obturation Quality in Modified Continuous Wave Compaction, Continuous Wave Compaction, Lateral Compaction and Warm Vertical Compaction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Namjou, Sara; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce modified continuous wave compaction (MCWC) technique and compare its obturation quality with that of lateral compaction (LC), warm vertical compaction (WVC) and continuous wave compaction techniques (CWC). The obturation time was also compared among the four techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four single-rooted teeth with 0–5° root canal curve and 64 artificially created root canals with 15° curves in acrylic blocks were evaluated. The teeth and acrylic specimens were each divided into four subgroups of 16 for testing the obturation quality of four techniques namely LC, WVC, CWC and MCWC. Canals were prepared using the Mtwo rotary system and filled with respect to their group allocation. Obturation time was recorded. On digital radiographs, the ratio of area of voids to the total area of filled canals was calculated using the Image J software. Adaptation of the filling materials to the canal walls was assessed at three cross-sections under a stereomicroscope (X30). Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc HSD test, the Kruskal Wallis test and t-test. Results: No significant difference existed in adaptation of filling materials to canal walls among the four subgroups in teeth samples (P ≥ 0.139); but, in artificially created canals in acrylic blocks, the frequency of areas not adapted to the canal walls was significantly higher in LC technique compared to MCWC (P ≤ 0.02). The void areas were significantly more in the LC technique than in other techniques in teeth (P < 0.001). The longest obturation time belonged to WVC technique followed by LC, CW and MCWC techniques (P<0.05). The difference between the artificially created canals in blocks and teeth regarding the obturation time was not significant (P = 0.41). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, MCWC technique resulted in better adaptation of gutta-percha to canal walls than LC at all cross-sections with

  1. [Tension headache--a review].

    PubMed

    Pfaffenrath, V; Wermuth, A; Pöllmann, W

    1988-12-01

    Tension headache (TH) is an ill-defined headache syndrome, characterized by bilateral, daily headaches with fronto-occipital localisation. TH is often accompanied by a migraine and an abuse of analgesics and/or ergotamine. In the etiology of TH vascular, muscular and psychogenic factors are assumed. Floating transitions to common migraine are discussed. The increased muscle tension is not specific for TH, but more probably a consequence of TH. In addition a decrease of the pain threshold with a deficiency of the antinociceptive system is supposed. The efficacy of tricyclic antidepressives in TH is based on potentiation of serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms and - besides their analgetic potencies - upon an increase of the pain threshold. TH prophylaxis is indicated if patients suffer from TH more than ten times per month. Medication are tricyclic antidepressives of the amitriptyline-type. Prophylaxis of TH can only be successful if a simultaneous abuse of analgesics and/or ergotamine is discontinued. In addition, EMG-biofeedback, as well as relaxation - and vasoconstriction training might be helpful in specific cases. PMID:3069680

  2. Update on Normal Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Jyotiranjan; Devi, Lily; Malik, Pradeep K.; Mallick, Jogamaya

    2016-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is labelled when typical glaucomatous disc changes, visual field defects and open anterior chamber angles are associated with intraocular pressure (IOP) constantly below 21 mmHg. Chronic low vascular perfusion, Raynaud's phenomenon, migraine, nocturnal systemic hypotension and over-treated systemic hypertension are the main causes of normal tension glaucoma. Goldmann applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography and visual field analysis are the main tools of investigation for the diagnosis of NTG. Management follows the same principles of treatment for other chronic glaucomas: To reduce IOP by a substantial amount, sufficient to prevent disabling visual loss. Treatment is generally aimed to lower IOP by 30% from pre-existing levels to 12-14 mmHg. Betaxolol, brimonidine, prostaglandin analogues, trabeculectomy (in refractory cases), systemic calcium channel blockers (such as nifedipine) and 24-hour monitoring of blood pressure are considered in the management of NTG. The present review summarises risk factors, causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of NTG. PMID:27413503

  3. Influence of precracked specimen configuration and starting stress intensity on the stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from a study of the effects of precracked specimen configuration and initial starting stress intensity on crack growth rate and threshold stress intensity, for both onset of cracking and crack arrest. Attention is given to AISI 4340 steel in a 3.5-percent NaCl solution, for configurations of a single edge-cracked specimen tested in cantilever bending under constant load, and a modified compact specimen bolt loaded to a constant deflection. The threshold stress intensity value determined was independent of specimen configuration, if the stress intensity value associated with the compact specimen is taken where the discontinuous break occurs in the velocity-stress intensity curve.

  4. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  5. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens.

    PubMed

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  6. Hydraulically Driven Grips For Hot Tensile Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Johnson, George W.

    1994-01-01

    Pair of grips for tensile and compressive test specimens operate at temperatures up to 1,500 degrees F. Grips include wedges holding specimen inside furnace, where heated to uniform temperature. Hydraulic pistons drive wedges, causing them to exert clamping force. Hydraulic pistons and hydraulic fluid remain outside furnace, at room temperature. Cooling water flows through parts of grips to reduce heat transferred to external components. Advantages over older devices for gripping specimens in high-temperature tests; no need to drill holes in specimens, maintains constant gripping force on specimens, and heated to same temperature as that of specimen without risk of heating hydraulic fluid and acuator components.

  7. Differential compaction mechanism for earth fissures near Casa Grande, Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Holzer, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Precise gravity measurements indicate that earth fissures or tension cracks caused by ground-water withdrawal within a 10km2 area SE of Casa Grande are associated with relief on the buried interface between the alluvial aquifer and underlying bedrock. These relations suggest that the fissures are forming in response to localized differential compaction caused by localized variations of aquifer-system thickness. -from Authors

  8. Initial tension loss in cerclage cables.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Jérémie; Émard, Maxime; Canet, Fanny; Brailovski, Vladimir; Petit, Yvan; Laflamme, George Y

    2013-10-01

    Cerclage cables, frequently used in the management of fractures and osteotomies, are associated with a high failure rate and significant loosening during surgery. This study compared the capacity to maintain tension of different types of orthopaedic cable systems. Multifilament Cobalt-Chrome (CoCr) cables with four different crimp/clamp devices (DePuy, Stryker, Zimmer and Smith&Nephew) and one non-metallic Nylon (Ny) cable from Kinamed were instrumented with a load cell to measure tension during insertion. Significant tension loss was observed with crimping for all cables (P<0.05). Removing the tensioner led to an additional unexpected tension loss (CoCr-DePuy: 18%, CoCr-Stryker: 29%, CoCr-Smith&Nephew: 33%, Ny: 46%, and CoCr-Zimmer: 52%). The simple CoCr (DePuy) cable system outperformed the more sophisticated locking devices due to its significantly better ability to prevent tension loss. PMID:23618753

  9. An experimental and numerical investigation of specimen size requirements for cleavage fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. L.; Dodds, R. H., Jr.

    1994-09-01

    Cleavage fracture toughness can be influenced by specimen dimensions. Crack tip constraint can relax in small specimens, resulting in higher apparent toughness. Moreover, there is a statistical sampling effect, where thicker specimens tend to have lower toughness than thin specimens due to an increased sample volume. In deeply notched bend and compact specimens, theoretical modeling, finite element analysis, and experimental data indicate that the results will not be significantly influenced by crack tip constraint as long as the following specimen size requirements are met: a/W greater than 0.5, B greater than or equal to MJ(c)/sigma(y), B/b greater than or equal to 1 where a is the crack length, W is the specimen width, B is the specimen thickness, b is the uncracked ligament, J(c) is the critical 3 value, sigma(y) is the effective yield strength and M is a dimensionless constant. These size requirements are conservative if M is set equal to 100; M- 50 appears to be adequate for many materials, but the authors recommend the stricter requirement until fracture validation is performed. When specimens meet the above requirements, fracture toughness should not be influenced by size, provided statistical thickness effects are taken into account.

  10. Soft x-ray holographic tomography for biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongyi; Chen, Jianwen; Xie, Honglan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Jiang, Shiping; Zhang, Yuxuan

    2003-10-01

    frequencies to improve the depth resolution. In NSRL, we performed soft X-ray holographic tomography experiments. The specimen was the spider filaments and PM M A as recording medium. By 3D CT reconstruction of the projection data, three dimensional density distribution of the specimen was obtained. Also, we developed a new X-ray holographic tomography m ethod called pre-amplified holographic tomography. The method permits a digital real-time 3D reconstruction with high-resolution and a simple and compact experimental setup as well.

  11. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  12. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.56 Specimens. (a) An application under section 1(a) of..., is acceptable. However, a photocopy of the drawing required by § 2.51 is not a proper specimen....

  13. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.56 Specimens. (a) An application under section 1(a) of..., is acceptable. However, a photocopy of the drawing required by § 2.51 is not a proper specimen....

  14. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Download Printable Version [ ... on the topics below to get started. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer How is cancer ...

  15. Shrinkage processes in standard-size Norway spruce wood specimens with different vulnerability to cavitation

    PubMed Central

    ROSNER, SABINE; KARLSSON, BO; KONNERTH, JOHANNES; HANSMANN, CHRISTIAN

    2011-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to observe the radial shrinkage of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.)] trunkwood specimens with different hydraulic vulnerability to cavitation from the fully saturated state until the overall shrinkage reaches a stable value, and to relate wood shrinkage and recovery from shrinkage to cavitations of the water column inside the tracheids. Radial shrinkage processes in standard-size sapwood specimens (6 mm × 6 mm × 100 mm; radial, tangential and longitudinal) obtained at different positions within the trunk, representing different ages of the cambium, were compared. Cavitation events were assessed by acoustic emission (AE) testing, hydraulic vulnerability by the AE feature analysis and shrinkage was calculated from the changes in contact pressure between the 150 kHz AE transducer and the wood specimen. Two shrinkage processes were observed in both juvenile (annual rings 1 and 2) and mature wood (annual rings 17–19), the first one termed tension shrinkage and the second one cell wall shrinkage process, which started when most of the tracheids reached relative water contents below fiber saturation. Maximum tension shrinkage coincided with high-energy AEs, and the periods of shrinkage recovery could be traced to tension release due to cavitation. Juvenile wood, which was less sensitive to cavitation, had lower earlywood tracheid diameters and was less prone to deformation due to tensile strain than mature wood, showed a lower cell wall shrinkage, and thus total shrinkage. Earlywood lumen diameters and maximum tension shrinkage were strongly positively related to each other, meaning that bigger tracheids are more prone to deformation at the same water tension than the smaller tracheids. PMID:19797244

  16. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  17. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  18. Dark compact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We investigate compact objects formed by dark matter admixed with ordinary matter made of neutron-star matter and white-dwarf material. We consider non-self annihilating dark matter with an equation of state given by an interacting Fermi gas. We find new stable solutions, dark compact planets, with Earth-like masses and radii from a few Km to few hundred Km for weakly interacting dark matter which are stabilized by the mutual presence of dark matter and compact star matter. For the strongly interacting dark matter case, we obtain dark compact planets with Jupiter-like masses and radii of few hundred Km. These objects could be detected by observing exoplanets with unusually small radii. Moreover, we find that the recently observed 2 M⊙ pulsars set limits on the amount of dark matter inside neutron stars which is, at most, 1 0-6 M⊙ .

  19. Studying Cryogenic Fracturing Process and Fracture Morphology using Transparent Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, M.; Yin, X.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Wu, Y. S.; Alqahtani, N.; Patterson, T.; Yao, B.; Miskimins, J.

    2014-12-01

    Cryogenic fracturing exploits thermal gradient and resulting local tensile stress to initiate fractures / cracks on a surface exposed to cryogenic fluids. This study investigates the development and morphology of cracks generated from cryogenic thermal shock in a borehole geometry. The study evaluates cryogenic thermal shock under no external confining stress to specimens. To better understand this process in a geometry relevant to applications, a borehole was drilled through transparent acrylic specimens representing a wellbore. This borehole was partially cased with stainless steel tubing set by a high yield epoxy. Liquid nitrogen was injected into the wellbore through a stainless steel tube. The pressure was low (< 10 psia) and the fractures were initiated by the thermal shock; these initiated fractures allowed further penetration of the cryogen, which helped to propagate fractures throughout the specimen. A major advantage of performing this experiment in a transparent cryogenic specimen is the ability to observe fracture proliferation through time. It is observed that fracture growth was characterized by abrupt starts and stops, which suggest that the tensile stress generated inside the borehole must reach a certain threshold for fracture initiation and growth. Two distinctive patterns in crack development were observed: one is horizontal-planar-radial pattern created by longitudinal thermal contraction, and another is vertical cracks by circumferential contraction. The horizontal cracks appeared to be spaced by a certain length, known as the exclusion distance, which exists because a set of cracks cannot be created closer than a certain length due to limited amount of thermal contraction. The vertical tension cracks tend to initiate between the horizontal radial cracks and bridge them, as it may be energy-efficient to start from and propagate to existing defects.

  20. Apparatus for automated testing of biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for performing automated testing of infections biological specimens is disclosed. The apparatus comprise a process controller for translating user commands into test instrument suite commands, and a test instrument suite comprising a means to treat the specimen to manifest an observable result, and a detector for measuring the observable result to generate specimen test results.

  1. Specimen mass measurement. [during space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Ord, J.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab specimen mass measurement device was operated throughout the altitude test in close simulation of the 56-day Skylab mission. It performed operational specimen measurements well until it was passed out of the chamber for replacement of the specimen hold-down and was autoclaved prior to return. Fecal measurements were typically made with less than one percent error.

  2. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scientific specimens. 14.24 Section 14.24....24 Scientific specimens. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to parts 16, 17, 18, 21, 22 or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts...

  3. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scientific specimens. 14.24 Section 14.24....24 Scientific specimens. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to parts 16, 17, 18, 21, 22 or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts...

  4. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scientific specimens. 14.24 Section 14.24....24 Scientific specimens. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to parts 16, 17, 18, 21, 22 or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts...

  5. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scientific specimens. 14.24 Section 14.24....24 Scientific specimens. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to parts 16, 17, 18, 21, 22 or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts...

  6. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific specimens. 14.24 Section 14.24....24 Scientific specimens. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to parts 16, 17, 18, 21, 22 or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts...

  7. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  8. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  9. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  10. [Tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax following tracheal perforation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, C T; Tsokos, M; Kurz, S D; Kleber, C

    2015-07-01

    Tension pneumothorax can occur at any time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with external cardiac massage and invasive ventilation either from primary or iatrogenic rib fractures with concomitant pleural or parenchymal injury. Airway injury can also cause tension pneumothorax during CPR. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old woman who suffered cardiopulmonary arrest after undergoing elective mandibular surgery. During CPR the upper airway could not be secured by orotracheal intubation due to massive craniofacial soft tissue swelling. A surgical airway was established with obviously unrecognized iatrogenic tracheal perforation and subsequent development of tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax during ventilation. Neither the tension pneumomediastinum nor the tension pneumothorax were decompressed and accordingly resuscitation efforts remained unsuccessful. This case illustrates the need for a structured approach to resuscitate patients with ventilation problems regarding decompression of tension pneumomediastinum and/or tension pneumothorax during CPR. PMID:26036317