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Sample records for compact tokamak reactors

  1. Compact tokamak reactors. Part 1 (analytic results)

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1996-09-13

    We discuss the possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First we review and summarize the existing literature. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamak power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field, and considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. The analytic results will be augmented by a numerical calculation which permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency; the results of which will be presented in Part II. Third, a scaling from any given reference reactor design to a copper toroidal field coil device is discussed. Throughout the paper the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculating electric power. We conclude that the latest published reactor studies, which show little advantage in using low aspect ratio unless remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, can be reproduced with the analytic model.

  2. The ignition physics study group supports the compact ignition tokamak and engineering test reactor programs

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a collection of Vugraphs dealing with the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) and the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). The role of the Ignition Physics Study Group is defined. Several design goals are presented. (JDH)

  3. First wall and blanket design for a high wall loading compact tokamak power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Corradini, M.L.; El-Afify, M.; Huh, K.Y.; Kuleinski, G.L.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1985-07-01

    Among the specific limitations which tend to complicate a compact high wall loading (HWL) tokamak reactor design are high surface and nuclear heating, compactness leading to crowded components, unlikely breeding on the inboard side and frequent first wall/blanket replacement. This paper describes the mechanical, thermal hydraulic and tritium aspects of an improved blanket design for a high ..beta.. (20%), high wall loading (R 10 MW/m/sup 2/) compact fusion power reactor of 1000 MW /sub th/ power output.

  4. The conceptual design of a robust, compact, modular tokamak reactor based on high-field superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, D. G.; Bonoli, P.; Barnard, H.; Haakonsen, C.; Hartwig, Z.; Kasten, C.; Palmer, T.; Sung, C.; Sutherland, D.; Bromberg, L.; Mangiarotti, F.; Goh, J.; Sorbom, B.; Sierchio, J.; Ball, J.; Greenwald, M.; Olynyk, G.; Minervini, J.

    2012-10-01

    Two of the greatest challenges to tokamak reactors are 1) large single-unit cost of each reactor's construction and 2) their susceptibility to disruptions from operation at or above operational limits. We present an attractive tokamak reactor design that substantially lessens these issues by exploiting recent advancements in superconductor (SC) tapes allowing peak field on SC coil > 20 Tesla. A R˜3.3 m, B˜9.2 T, ˜ 500 MW fusion power tokamak provides high fusion gain while avoiding all disruptive operating boundaries (no-wall beta, kink, and density limits). Robust steady-state core scenarios are obtained by exploiting the synergy of high field, compact size and ideal efficiency current drive using high-field side launch of Lower Hybrid waves. The design features a completely modular replacement of internal solid components enabled by the demountability of the coils/tapes and the use of an immersion liquid blanket. This modularity opens up the possibility of using the device as a nuclear component test facility.

  5. Activation analysis of the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    The US fusion program has completed the conceptual design of a compact tokamak device that achieves ignition. The high neutron wall loadings associated with this compact deuterium-tritium-burning device indicate that radiation-related issues may be significant considerations in the overall system design. Sufficient shielding will be requied for the radiation protection of both reactor components and occupational personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure to permit personnel access into the test cell after shutdown and limit the total activation of the test cell components. This paper describes the conceptual design of the igloo shield system and discusses the major neutronic concerns related to the design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak.

  6. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  7. Reactor applications of the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle for a D-T tokamak fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, H. A.; Logan, B. G.; Campbell, R. B.

    1988-03-01

    A preliminary design of a D-T fusion reactor blanket and MHD power conversion system is made based on the CFAR concept, and it was found that performance and costs for the reference cycle are very attractive. While much remains to be done, the potential advantage of liquid metal Rankine cycles for fusion applications are much clearer now. These include low pressures and mass flow rates, a nearly isothermal module shell which minimizes problems of thermal distortion and stresses, and an insensitivity to pressure losses in the blanket so that the two-phase MHD pressure drops in the boiling part of the blanket and the ordinary vapor pressure drops in the pebble-bed superheating zones are acceptable (the direct result of pumping a liquid rather than having to compress a gas). There are no moving parts in the high-temperature MHD power generators, no steam bottoming plant is required, only small vapor precoolers and condensers are needed because of the high heat rejection temperatures, and only a relatively small natural-draft heat exchanger is required to reject the heat to the atmosphere. The net result is a very compact fusion reactor and power conversion system which fit entirely inside an 18 meter radius reactor vault. Although a cost analysis has not yet been performed, preliminary cost estimates indicate low capital costs and a very attractive cost of electricity.

  8. On the survivability of diagnostic windows in the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.

    1988-11-01

    The problem of radiation induced stresses in CIT diagnostic windows is discussed. Existing data indicate windows of existing design will probably survive if placed on the periphery of the reactor. There is a lack of adequate engineering data upon which the design and survivability of windows can be based. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Physics of compact ignition tokamak designs

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Ku, L.P.; Bateman, G.; Seidl, F.; Sugihara, M.

    1986-03-01

    Models for predicting plasma performance in compact ignition experiments are constructed on the basis of theoretical and empirical constraints and data from tokamak experiments. Emphasis is placed on finding transport and confinement models which reproduce results of both ohmically and auxiliary heated tokamak data. Illustrations of the application of the models to compact ignition designs are given.

  10. System studies of compact ignition tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Blackfield, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    A new version of the FEDC Tokamak System Code (TSC) has been developed to analyze the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). These proposed experiments have small (major radius F 1.5m) and high magnetic fields (B J 10T), and are characterized by reduced cost. Key design constraints of CIT include limits to the high stress levels in the magnetic coils, limits to the large temperature rises in the coils and on the first wall or divertor plate, minimizing power supply requirements, and assuring adequate plasma performance in fusion ignition and burn time consistent with the latest physics understanding. We present systems code level studies of CIT parameter space here for a range of design options with various design constraints. The present version of the TSC incorporates new models for key components of CIT. For example, new algorithms have been incorporated for calculating stress levels in the TFC and ohmic solenoid, temperature rise in the magnetic coils, peak power requirements, plasma MHD equilibrium and volt-second capability. The code also incorporates a numerical optimizer to find combinations of engineering quantities (device size, coil sizes, coil current densities etc.) and physics quantities (plasma density temperature, and beta, etc.) which satisfy all the constraints and can minimize or maximize a figure of merit (e.g., the major radius). This method was recently used in a mirror reactor system code (3) for the Minimara concept development.

  11. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

  12. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

  13. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  14. Burning plasma simulation and environmental assessment of tokamak, spherical tokamak and helical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Uemura, S.; Oishi, T.; Garcia, J.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.

    2009-05-01

    Reference 1-GWe DT reactors (tokamak TR-1, spherical tokamak ST-1 and helical HR-1 reactors) are designed using physics, engineering and cost (PEC) code, and their plasma behaviours with internal transport barrier operations are analysed using toroidal transport analysis linkage (TOTAL) code, which clarifies the requirement of deep penetration of pellet fuelling to realize steady-state advanced burning operation. In addition, economical and environmental assessments were performed using extended PEC code, which shows the advantage of high beta tokamak reactors in the cost of electricity (COE) and the advantage of compact spherical tokamak in life-cycle CO2 emission reduction. Comparing with other electric power generation systems, the COE of the fusion reactor is higher than that of the fission reactor, but on the same level as the oil thermal power system. CO2 reduction can be achieved in fusion reactors the same as in the fission reactor. The energy payback ratio of the high-beta tokamak reactor TR-1 could be higher than that of other systems including the fission reactor.

  15. System studies of Compact Ignition Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Blackfield, D.T.

    1986-11-01

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code is used to perform trade studies in accordance with the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) physics and engineering guidelines. The authors examine various toroidal field coil (TFC) configurations, preload levels, and coil materials. Use of Inconel-copper composite material results in the smallest sized devices for both bucked and wedged TFCs and wedged-only TFCs. Preload levels of 23 Mkg are needed for the minimum sized devices, and for the lower strength materials, the minimum size is sensitive to the preload level. Results from these trade studies help lead to the choice of the baseline CIT point at R = 1.25 m and B = 10.4 T.

  16. Plasma transport in a compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Ku, L.P; Bateman, G.

    1987-02-01

    Nominal predicted plasma conditions in a compact ignition tokamak are illustrated by transport simulations using experimentally calibrated plasma transport models. The range of uncertainty in these predictions is explored by using various models which have given almost equally good fits to experimental data. Using a transport model which best fits the data, thermonuclear ignition occurs in a Compact Ignition Tokamak design with major radius 1.32 m, plasma half-width 0.43 m, elongation 2.0, and toroidal field and plasma current ramped in six seconds from 1.7 to 10.4 T and 0.7 to 10 MA, respectively. Ignition is facilitated by 20 MW of heating deposited off the magnetic axis near the /sup 3/He minority cyclotron resonance layer. Under these conditions, sawtooth oscillations are small and have little impact on ignition. Tritium inventory is minimized by preconditioning most discharges with deuterium. Tritium is injected, in large frozen pellets, only after minority resonance preheating. Variations of the transport model, impurity influx, heating profile, and pellet ablation rates, have a large effect on ignition and on the maximum beta that can be achieved.

  17. Physics evaluation of compact tokamak ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    At present, several approaches for compact, high-field tokamak ignition experiments are being considered. A comprehensive method for analyzing the potential physics operating regimes and plasma performance characteristics of such ignition experiments with O-D (analytic) and 1-1/2-D (WHIST) transport models is presented. The results from both calculations are in agreement and show that there are regimes in parameter space in which a class of small (R/sub o/ approx. 1-2 m), high-field (B/sub o/ approx. 8-13 T) tokamaks with aB/sub o/S/q/sub */ approx. 25 +- 5 and kappa = b/a approx. 1.6-2.0 appears ignitable for a reasonable range of transport assumptions. Considering both the density and beta limits, an evaluation of the performance is presented for various forms of chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/, including degradation at high power and sawtooth activity. The prospects of ohmic ignition are also examined. 16 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, D.C.

    1987-08-01

    Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) with the baseline liquid nitrogen cooling system was analyzed. On the basis of this analysis and present knowledge of the two-phase heat transfer, the current baseline CIT can be cooled down in about 1.5 h. An extensive heat transfer test program is recommended to reduce uncertainty in the heat transfer performance and to explore methods for minimizing the cooldown time. An alternate CIT cooldown system is described which uses a pressurized gaseous helium coolant in a closed-loop system. It is shown analytically that this system will cool down the CIT well within 1 h. Confidence in this analysis is sufficiently high that a heat transfer test program would not be necessary. The added cost of this alternate system is estimated to be about $5.3 million. This helium cooling system represents a reasonable backup approach to liquid nitrogen cooling of the CIT. 3 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Overview of the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A national team has developed a baseline concept for a Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). The CIT mission is to achieve ignition and provide experimental capability to study the behavior of burning plasma. The design uses large magnetic fields on axis (about 10 T) and large plasma currents (about 9-10 MA). The magnet structure derives high strength from the use of a copper-Inconel composite plate design in the nose of region of the toroidal field (TF) coil and in the ohmic heating solenoid. Inertial cooling is used;liquid nitrogen temperatures are established at the beginning of each pulse. Capability is provided to operate either with a divertor or limiter based plasma. The design is very compact (1.32-m major radius, 0.43-m plasma radius), has 16 TF coils, and has 16 major horizontal access ports, about 30 cm by 80 cm, located between TF coils. The schedule is for a construction project to be authorized for the period FY 1988-93.

  20. Recent progress on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes work done on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), both at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and at other fusion laboratories in the United States. The goal of CIT is to reach ignition in a tokamak fusion device in the mid-1990's. Scientific and engineering features of the design are described, as well as projected cost and schedule.

  1. Plasma diagnostics for the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.

    1988-06-01

    The primary mission of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is to study the physics of alpha-particle heating in an ignited D-T plasma. A burn time of about 10 /tau//sub E/ is projected in a divertor configuration with baseline machine design parameters of R=2.10 m, 1=0.65 m, b=1.30 m, I/sub p/=11 MA, B/sub T/=10 T and 10-20 MW of auxiliary rf heating. Plasma temperatures and density are expected to reach T/sub e/(O) /approximately/20 keV, T/sub i/(O) /approximately/30 keV, and n/sub e/(O) /approximately/ 1 /times/ 10/sup 21/m/sup /minus/3/. The combined effects of restricted port access to the plasma, the presence of severe neutron and gamma radiation backgrounds, and the necessity for remote of in-cell components create challenging design problems for all of the conventional diagnostic associated with tokamak operations. In addition, new techniques must be developed to diagnose the evolution in space, time, and energy of the confined alpha distribution as well as potential plasma instabilities driven by collective alpha-particle effects. The design effort for CIT diagnostics is presently in the conceptual phase with activity being focused on the selection of a viable diagnostic set and the identification of essential research and development projects to support this process. A review of these design issues and other aspects impacting the selection of diagnostic techniques for the CIT experiment will be presented. 28 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Physics aspects of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.; Bateman, G.; Houlberg, W.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.; Colestock, P.; Hughes, M.; Ignat, D.; Izzo, R.; Jardin, S.

    1986-11-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a proposed modest-size ignition experiment designed to study the physics of alpha-particle heating. The basic concept is to achieve ignition in a modest-size minimum cost experiment by using a high plasma density to achieve the condition of ntau/sub E/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 20/ sec m/sup -3/ required for ignition. The high density requires a high toroidal field (10 T). The high toroidal field allows a large plasma current (10 MA) which improves the energy confinement, and provides a high level of ohmic heating. The present CIT design also has a gigh degree of elongation (k approx. 1.8) to aid in producing the large plasma current. A double null poloidal divertor and a pellet injector are part of the design to provide impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for impurity and particle control, improve the confinement, and provide flexibility for improving the plasma profiles. Since auxiliary heating is expected to be necessary to achieve ignition, 10 to 20 MW of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) is to be provided.

  3. Decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will complete its experimental lifetime with a series of deuterium-tritium pulses in 1994. As a result, the machine structures will become radioactive, and vacuum components will also be contaminated with tritium. Dose rate levels will range from less than 1 mr/h for external structures to hundreds of mr/h for the vacuum vessel. Hence, decommissioning operations will range from hands on activities to the use of remotely operated equipment. After 21 months of cool down, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations will commence and continue for approximately 15 months. The primary objective is to render the test cell complex re-usable for the next machine, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). This paper presents an overview of decommissioning TFTR and discusses the D and D objectives.

  4. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D-{sup 3}He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs.

  5. Maintenance concept development for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, will be the next major experimental machine in the US Fusion Program. Its use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations on the machine. These operations consist of removing and repairing such components as diagnostic equipment modules by using remotely operated maintenance equipment. The major equipment being developed for maintenance external to the vacuum vessel includes both bridge-mounted and floor-mounted manipulator systems. Additionally, decontamination (decon) equipment, hot cell repair facilities, and equipment for handling and packaging solid radioactive waste (rad-waste) are being developed. Recent design activities have focused on establishing maintenance system interfaces with the facility design, developing manipulator system requirements, and using mock-ups to support the tokamak configuration design. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Development of tokamak reactor system analysis code NEW-TORSAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Masao; Ida, Toshio; Nishikawa, Masana; Kameari, Akihisa; Nishio, Satoshi; Tone, Tatsuzo

    1987-07-01

    A systems analysis code named NEW-TORSAC (TOkamak Reactor Systems Analysis Code) has been developed by modifying the TORSAC which had been already developed by us. The NEW-TORSAC is available for tokamak reactor designs and evaluations from experimental machines to commercial reactor plants. It has functions to design tokamaks automatically from plasma parameter setting to determining configurations of reactor equipments and calculating main characteristics parameters of auxiliary systems and the capital costs. In the case of analyzing tokamak reactor plants, the code can calculate busbar energy costs. In addition to numerical output, some output of this code such as a reactor configuration, plasma equilibrium, electro-magnetic forces, etc., are graphically displayed. The code has been successfully applied to the scoping studies of the next generation machines and commercial reactor plants.

  7. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  8. Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: R and D needs

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    This report on the Compact Ignition Tokamak Program supplies information concerning: segmented vacuum vessel joint development; first wall tile attachments; first wall/tile development - composite materials; vacuum leak detection; high frequency rf sources; Faraday shield development; design and testing of rf launchers for high power, ling pulse operation; radiation hardened, low loss, dielectric windows for rf, IR, visible, UV and X-rays, mirrors for changing direction and focusing IR, visible and UV radiation; radiation resistant optical dielectric wave guides; radiation resistant HV insulation for diagnostic magnetic pickup coils; compact radiation and/or magnetic shielding for in-vault diagnostics that need some attenuation to reduce S/N ratio; radiation hardened line-of-sight sensors such as bolometers, UV and soft X-ray detectors, neutral particle analyzers, torus pressure gauges; special maintenance fixtures and tools; material properties - design data base - all materials; and insulation - electrical/thermal and mechanical properties.

  9. Time-dependent simulations of a Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.; Bateman, G.

    1988-05-01

    Detailed simulations of the Compact Ignition Tokamak are carried out using a 1-1/2-D transport code. The calculations include time-varying densities, fields, and plasma shape. It is shown that ignition can be achieved in this device if somewhat better than L-mode energy confinement time scaling is possible. We also conclude that the performance of such a compact, short-pulse device can depend greatly on how the plasma is evolved to its flat-top parameters. Furthermore, in cases such as the ones discussed here, where there is not a great deal of ignition margin and the electron density is held constant, ignition ends if the helium ash is not removed. In general, control of the deuterium--tritium density is equivalent to burn control. 48 refs., 15 figs.

  10. Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

  11. In-vessel remote maintenance of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, M.A.; Hager, E.R.; Creedon, R.L.; Fisher, M.V.; Atkin, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is the first deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion device that will study the physics of an ignited plasma. The ability of the tokamak vacuum vessel to be maintained remotely while under vacuum has not been fully demonstrated on previous machines, and this ability will be critical to the efficient and safe operation of ignition devices. Although manned entry into the CIT vacuum vessel will be possible during the nonactivated stages of operation, remotely automated equipment will be used to assist in initial assembly of the vessel as well as to maintain all in-vessel components once the D-T burn is achieved. Remote maintenance and operation will be routinely required for replacement of thermal protection tiles, inspection of components, leak detection, and repair welding activities. Conceptual design to support these remote maintenance activities has been integrated with the conceptual design of the in-vessel components to provide a complete and practical remote maintenance system for CIT. The primary remote assembly and maintenance operations on CIT will be accomplished through two dedicated 37- x 100-cm ports on the main toroidal vessel. Each port contains a single articulated boom manipulator (ABM), which is capable of accessing half of the torus. The proposed ABM consists of a movable carriage assembly, telescoping two-part mast, and articulated link sections. 1 ref.

  12. Magnet design approach for pulsed tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    A choice of various operating modes of a tokamak reactor will have considerable impact on the fatigue lives and cost of ohmic heating (OH), equilibrium field (EF), and toroidal field (TF) coils. OH AND EF coil requirements and their costs, as well as the effects of the fringing fields of the EF coils on the TF coils, have been studied under cyclic operation in the range of N = 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 6/ cycles, spanning the range from a noninductively driven reactor (STARFIRE) to a conventional ohmically driven reactor. For a reference design of TF coils the design of the central OH solenoid has been studied as a function of its maximum field, B/sup OH/. Increasing requirements for structural support lead to only negligible increases in volt-seconds for B/sup OH/ greater than or equal to 10.0 T. Fatigue failure of the OH coil is not a concern for N less than or equal to 10/sup 5/; for N approx. 10/sup 6/ fatigue limits the strain to small values, resulting in small increases in structural requirements and modest decreases in volt-seconds. Should noninductive current drive be achievable we note that this not only eliminates the OH coil, but it also permits EF coil placement in the inboard region, which facilitates the creation of highly shaped plasma cross sections (large triangularity, or bean-shaped equilibria). We have computed the stored energy, coil configuration and fringing fields for a number of EF coil design options.

  13. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments.

  14. Preliminary design of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Goins, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    For the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) to achieve the performance goals set forth, the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) coil systems must operate in a cryogenic temperature regime. The cryostat has been designed to provide and maintain this environment. The preliminary design activity is addressing the design issues and interfaces necessary to provide a cryogenic vessel that will maintain a maximum temperature differential of 8{degree}C between the outer vessel wall and the ambient test cell conditions; operate in a pressure range of +5 psig to {minus}2 psig; accommodate numerous penetrations, including cooling, diagnostic, and gravity support items; and maintain a maximum leak rate of gaseous nitrogen at 1 l/s at 1 atm. Conceptually, the cryostat consists of thermal insulation sandwiched between an inner primary stainless steel pressure vessel and a thin outer stainless steel wall. Design activities have concentrated on determining the size and shape of the primary vessel wall and selecting the best candidate thermal insulation materials for future irradiation testing. The following shapes of the upper and lower cryostat structure were analyzed: a standard ASME torispherical domed top and bottom; a nonstandard domed top and bottom; and a 2{degree} sloped conical top and bottom contour. Screening of candidate insulation materials was based on lowest thermal conductivity over the range of temperatures anticipated in the CIT environment; low material cost and apparent ease of assembly; and survivability of material in the CIT irradiation environment. This paper presents the configuration development of the cryostat used to maintain the cryogenic temperature environment for CIT. 3 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Compact reactor/ORC power source

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for component development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500/sup 0/C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370/sup 0/C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analyses have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high. 10 refs.

  16. Beta optimization in the context of reactor relevant tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1990-08-01

    In a reactor relevant tokamak the appropriate definition of {beta}, the ratio of the particle and magnetic field pressures, is {beta}* {equivalent to} (2 < p{sup 2} >{sup {1/2}} /B{sup 2}), which exceeds the conventional definition by a factor dependent on the pressure peaking factor, PPF. A simple scaling is obtained which relates the two definitions, {beta}*/{beta}{approx equal}0.9 {plus} 0.15 PPF. Stability properties are determined in terms of {beta}* in a circular and dee-shaped tokamak. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  17. The impact of improved physics on commercial tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.; Mandrekas, J.

    1994-01-01

    Improvements in the confinement and beta capability of tokamak devices have long been a goal of the fusion program. We examine the impact of improvements in present day confinement and beta capabilities on commercial tokamak reactors. We characterize confinement with the achievable enhancement factor (H) over the ITER89 Power scaling confinement time, and beta by the Troyon coefficient g. A surprisingly narrow range of plasma confinement and beta are found to be useful in minimizing the cost of electricity for a tokamak reactor. Improvements in only one of these quantities is not useful beyond some point, without accompanying improvements in the other. For the plasma beta limited by a Troyon coefficient (g) near 4.3 (%mT/MA), confinement levels characterized by H factor enhancements of only 2 are useful for our nominal steady-state driven tokamak. These confinement levels are similar to those observed in present day experiments. If the permissible Troyon beta coefficient is near 6, the useful H factor confinement range increases to 2.5, still close to present day confinement levels. Inductively driven, pulsed reactors have somewhat increased useful ranges of confinement, relative to the steady-state cases. For a Troyon beta limit coefficient g near 4.3, H factors up to 2.5 are useful, and for g near 6, H factors up to 3 are useful.

  18. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m/sup 3/ versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m/sup 3/), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.).

  19. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Brooks, J.N.; Hogan, J.

    1998-07-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors.

  20. A Compact Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarator Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Ku; the ARIES-CS Team

    2003-10-20

    We report the progress made in assessing the potential of compact, quasi-axisymmetric stellarators as power-producing reactors. Using an aspect ratio A=4.5 configuration derived from NCSX and optimized with respect to the quasi-axisymmetry and MHD stability in the linear regime as an example, we show that a reactor of 1 GW(e) maybe realizable with a major radius *8 m. This is significantly smaller than the designs of stellarator reactors attempted before. We further show the design of modular coils and discuss the optimization of coil aspect ratios in order to accommodate the blanket for tritium breeding and radiation shielding for coil protection. In addition, we discuss the effects of coil aspect ratio on the peak magnetic field in the coils.

  1. Dust divertor for a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X Z; Delzanno, G L

    2009-01-01

    Micron-size tungsten particulates find equilibrium position in the magnetized plasma sheath in the normal direction of the divertor surface, but are convected poloidally and toroidally by the sonic-ion-flow drag parallel to the divertor surface. The natural circulation of dust particles in the magnetized plasma sheath can be used to set up a flowing dust shield that absorbs and exhausts most of the tokamak heat flux to the divertor. The size of the particulates and the choice of materials offer substantial room for optimization.

  2. WILDCAT: a catalyzed D-D tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    WILDCAT is a conceptual design of a catalyzed D-D, tokamak, commercial, fusion reactor. WILDCAT utilizes the beneficial features of no tritium breeding, while not extrapolating unnecessarily from existing D-T designs. The reactor is larger and has higher magnetic fields and plasma pressures than typical D-T devices. It is more costly, but eliminates problems associated with tritium breeding and has tritium inventories and throughputs approximately two orders of magnitude less than typical D-T reactors. There are both a steady-state version with Alfven-wave current drive and a pulsed version. Extensive comparison with D-T devices has been made, and cost and safety analyses have been included. All of the major reactor systems have been worked out to a level of detail appropriate to a complete, conceptual design.

  3. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is near completion. This short-pulse ignition experiment is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The high neutron wall loadings, /approximately/4-5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components and personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility with a radius of /approximately/12 m. The most critical radiation concern in the CIT design process relates to the numerous penetrations in the device. This paper discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operations of the CIT pellet injection system. The pellet injector is a major component, which has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require personnel access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to determine the feasibility of hands-on access. Results indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Plasma Physics Regimes in Tokamaks with Li Walls

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharo; N.N. Gorelenkov; R.B. White; S.I. Krasheninnikov; G.V. Pereverzev

    2003-08-21

    Low recycling regimes with a plasma limited by a lithium wall surface suggest enhanced stability and energy confinement, both necessary for tokamak reactors. These regimes could make ignition feasible in compact tokamaks. Ignited Spherical Tokamaks (IST), self-sufficient in the bootstrap current, are introduced as a necessary step for development of the physics and technology of power reactors.

  5. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak Hybrid Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Teofilo, V.L.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Aase, D.T.

    1980-09-01

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant has been performed. The tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb/sub 3/Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs have been made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis has been made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered.

  6. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak hybrid reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teofilo, V. L.; Leonard, B. R., Jr.; Aase, D. T.; Bickford, W. E.; McCormick, N. J.; McGrath, R. T.; Morrison, J. E.; Perry, R. T.; Schulte, S. C.; Willingham, C. E.

    1980-09-01

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant was performed. The Tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb3Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited Tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs were made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis was made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered.

  7. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; K. Rule; M. Viola; M. Williams; R. Strykowsky

    1999-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling.

  8. Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

    2003-01-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity.

  9. DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TOKAMAK FUSION TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, Keith; Perry, Erik; Parsells, Robert

    2003-02-27

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the techno logy was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. 10 complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of D&D activity.

  10. Tangential and Vertical Compact Torus Injection Experiments on the STOR-M Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chijin; D, Liu; S, Livingstone; A, K. Singh; E, Zhang; A, Hirose

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes the setup and results of compact torus (CT) injection experiments on the STOR-M tokamak. Tangential CT injection into STOR-M induced H-mode-like phenomena including doubling the electron density, reduction in the Hα radiation level, suppression of the floating potential fluctuations, suppression of the m = 2 Mirnov oscillations, and increase in the global energy confinement time. Experimental setup, bench-test results, and some preliminary injection data for vertical CT injection experiments on STOR-M will be shown. In addition, numerical simulations of the CT trajectories in tokamak discharges for both tangential and vertical injection geometries will be discussed.

  11. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  12. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  13. Neutron Dosimetry Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Lithium Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, F.Y.; Harker, Y.D.; Anderl, R.A.; Nigg, D.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) program is a first-of-kind neutronics experiment involving a toroidal fusion neutron source. Qualification experiments have been conducted to develop primary measurement techniques and verify dosimetry materials that will be used to characterize the neutron environment inside and on the surfaces of the LBM. The deuterium-tritium simulation experiments utilizing a 14-MeV neutron generator and a fusion blanket mockup facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Results and discussions are presented that identify the quality and limitations of the measured integral reaction data, including the minimum fluence requirement for the TFTR experiment.

  14. Operation of a tokamak reactor in the radiative improved mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, D. Kh.; Mavrin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a nuclear fusion reactor has been simulated within a model based on experimental results obtained at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak and other facilities in which quasistationary regimes were achieved with long confinement times, high densities, and absence of the edge-localized mode. The radiative improved mode of confinement studied in detail at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak is the most interesting such regime. One of the most important problems of modern tokamaks is the problem of a very high thermal load on a divertor (or a limiter). This problem is quite easily solved in the radiative improved mode. Since a significant fraction of the thermal energy is reemitted by an impurity, the thermal loading is significantly reduced. As the energy confinement time τ E at high densities in the indicated mode is significantly larger than the time predicted by the scaling of ITERH-98P(y, 2), ignition can be achieved in a facility much smaller than the ITER facility at plasma temperatures below 20 keV. The revealed decrease in the degradation of the confinement time τ E with an increase in the introduced power has been analyzed.

  15. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy.

  16. Neutron wall loading of Tokamak reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. P. C.

    2000-12-01

    Neutron wall loading (Γn) is a key parameter for the selection of fusion power core component materials. It also impacts the economic, performance, design, safety and environmental aspect of the fusion power plant. This paper reports the determination of the range of Γn for economically competitive fusion power plants based on the analysis that couples the MHD stability physics results to a system design code. Cost of electricity (COE) was selected as the parameter to be minimized. For both normal conducting and superconducting coil options, at thermal efficiency of 46% and at the power output range of 1-2 GW(e) the average neutron wall loading is 4-7 MW/m2. For a given power output, higher thermal efficiency will allow lower Γn. At the above range of Γn, in order to have economical fusion power reactors, for the solid first wall design option, high thermal efficiency of 46% to 57.5% requires the use of alloys like V and W-alloy, respectively. The corresponding COE can be projected to be in the economically competitive range of 62-54.6 mill/kWh.

  17. Demountable Toroidal Field Magnets for Use in a Compact Modular Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, F. J.; Goh, J.; Takayasu, M.; Bromberg, L.; Minervini, J. V.; Whyte, D.

    2014-05-01

    A concept of demountable toroidal field magnets for a compact fusion reactor is discussed. The magnets generate a magnetic field of 9.2 T on axis, in a 3.3 m major radius tokamak. Subcooled YBCO conductors have a critical current density adequate to provide this large magnetic field, while operating at 20 K reduces thermodynamic cooling cost of the resistive electrical joints. Demountable magnets allow for vertical replacement and maintenance of internal components, potentially reducing cost and time of maintenance when compared to traditional sector maintenance. Preliminary measurements of contact resistance of a demountable YBCO electrical joint between are presented.

  18. Comparing Linear Microinstability of the National Compact Stellarator Expriment and a Shaped Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Baumgaertel, G.W. Hammett and D.R. Mikkelsen

    2012-11-20

    One metric for comparing con nement properties of di erent magnetic fusion energy con gurations is the linear critical gradient of drift wave modes. The critical gradient scale length determines the ratio of the core to pedestal temperature when a plasma is limited to marginal stability in the plasma core. The gyrokinetic turbulence code GS2 was used to calculate critical temperature gradients for the linear, collisionless ion tem- perature gradient (ITG) mode in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and a prototypical shaped tokamak, based on the pro les of a JET H-mode shot and the stronger shaping of ARIES-AT. While a concern was that the narrow cross section of NCSX at some toroidal locations would result in steep gradients that drive instabilities more easily, it is found that other stabilizing e ects of the stellarator con guration o set this so that the normalized critical gradients for NCSX are competitive with or even better than for the tokamak. For the adiabatic ITG mode, NCSX and the tokamak had similar critical gradients, though beyond marginal stability, NCSX had larger growth rates. However, for the kinetic ITG mode, NCSX had a higher critical gradient and lower growth rates until a/LT ≈ 1:5 a/LT;crit, when it surpassed the tokamak's. A discussion of the results presented with respect to a/LT vs R/LT is included.

  19. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    The conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is nearing completion. The CIT is a short-pulse ignition experiment, which is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The high neutron wall loadings, 4--5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components as well as personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility that has a radius of 12 m. The most critical radiation concerns in the CIT design process relate to the numerous penetrations in the device. This report discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operation of the pellet injection system in the CIT. The pellet injector is a major component, and it has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require hands-on-access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to establish the feasibility of hands-on-access. A coupled Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates methodology was used to perform the analysis. This problem is characterized by deep penetration and streaming with very large length-to-diameter ratios. Results from this study indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve.

  1. Tritium pellet injector design for tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Baylor, L.R.; Bryan, W.E.; Combs, S.K.; Easterly, C.E.; Lunsford, R.V.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.; White, J.A.; Williamson, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    A tritium pellet injector (TPI) system has been designed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Q approx. 1 phase of operation. The injector gun utilizes a radial design with eight independent barrels and a common extruder to minimize tritium inventory. The injection line contains guide tubes with intermediate vacuum pumping stations and fast valves to minimize propellant leakage to the torus. The vacuum system is designed for tritium compatibility. The entire injector system is contained in a glove box for secondary containment protection against tritium release. Failure modes and effects have been analyzed, and structural analysis has been performed for most intense predicted earthquake conditions. Details of the design and operation of this system are presented in this paper.

  2. Winding insulation in electromagnetic systems for Tokamak reactor plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. V.; Trubachev, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic containment of the plasma in nuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak type requires electromagnets with insulation which must withstand high temperatures and thermal shocks as well as ionizing radiation in various forms and electric fields, and mechanical loads. Insulation materials to ensure adequate thermophysical and mechanical properties are evaluated, followed by design of insulation systems with satisfactory performance characteristics. Data on neutron fluence energy characteristics and radiation absorption doses during neutron interactions are essential for such an evaluation. Materials considered for insulation in electromagnets with superconductor and cryoresistance windings are glass mica tape with epoxy compound impregnation, glass cloth with epoxy compound impregnation (STE), polyimide glass cloth with adhesive coating (LSNL), glass Textolite with epoxy phenolic binder (STEN), epoxy resin paste with mineral fillers (PE), and polyurethane compound modified by epoxy resin with mineral filler (KPU).

  3. Ignition in a tokamak reactor with INTOR-like parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Seidl, F.G.P.; Post, D.E.; Rutherford, P.H.

    1980-08-01

    The requirements for ignition in a tokamak reactor with INTOR-like parameters were studied using a one-dimensional transport code. With empirical electron energy diffusivity Chi/sub e/, ignition was obtained with 60 to 75 MW of neutral beam injection at a volume average pressure ratio <..beta..> = 4 to 5% under a variety of conditions. Charging Chi/sub e/ gave ignition at the same <..beta..> if the plasma minor radius varied as a proportional to Chi/sub e/sup 1/2/. The maximum impurity concentration which allows ignition was found to be comparable to that for the much simpler case of a homogeneous plasma with radiative losses only. In long pulse simulations with efficient helium pumping, the maximum toroidal field ripple which allowed ignition was 2.0% (peak to peak) at the plasma edge. Ignition was maintained with over 99% recycling of helium ash using 5% less than maximum ripple.

  4. Conceptual design study of a superconducting spherical tokamak reactor with a self-consistent system analysis code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, Y. S.; Kang, J. S.; Lee, D. W.; Joo, H. G.; Ono, M.

    2011-11-01

    In a spherical tokamak (ST) reactor, the radial build of toroidal field coil and the shield play a key role in determining the size of the reactor. For self-consistent determination of the reactor components and physics parameters, a system analysis code is coupled with a one-dimensional radiation transport code. A conceptual design study of a compact superconducting ST reactor with an aspect ratio of up to 2.0 is conducted and the optimum radial build is identified. It is shown that the use of an improved shielding material and high-temperature superconducting magnets with high critical current density opens up the possibility of a fusion power plant with compact size and small re-circulating power simultaneously at a low aspect ratio, and that by using an inboard neutron reflector instead of a breeding blanket, tritium self-sufficiency is possible with an outboard blanket only and thus a compact-sized all superconducting coil ST reactor is viable.

  5. Compact formulas for bounce/transit averaging in axisymmetric tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Duthoit, F.-X.; Brizard, A. J.; Hahm, T. S.

    2014-12-15

    Compact formulas for bounce and transit orbit averaging of the fluctuation-amplitude eikonal factor in axisymmetric tokamak geometry, which is frequently encountered in bounce-gyrokinetic description of microturbulence, are given in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions and elliptic integrals. These formulas are readily applicable to the calculation of the neoclassical susceptibility in the framework of modern bounce-gyrokinetic theory. In the long-wavelength limit for axisymmetric electrostatic perturbations, we recover the expression for the Rosenbluth-Hinton residual zonal flow [M. N. Rosenbluth and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] accurately.

  6. Steady-state tokamak reactor with non-divertor impurity control: STARFIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.C.

    1980-01-01

    STARFIRE is a conceptual design study of a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant. Particular emphasis has been placed on simplifying the reactor concept by developing design concepts to produce a steady-state tokamak with non-divertor impurity control and helium ash removal. The concepts of plasma current drive using lower hybrid rf waves and a limiter/vacuum system for reactor applications are described.

  7. Hollow current profile scenarios for advanced tokamak reactor operations

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Leboeuf, J.-N.

    2009-11-15

    Advanced tokamak scenarios are a possible approach to boosting reactor performances. Such schemes usually trigger current holes, a particular magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium where no current or pressure gradients exist in the core of the plasma. While such equilibria have large bootstrap fractions, flat pressure profiles in the plasma core may not be optimal for a reactor. However, moderate modifications of the equilibrium current profile can lead to diamagnetism where most of the pressure gradient is now balanced by poloidal currents and the toroidal magnetic field. In this paper, we consider the properties of diamagnetic current holes, also called ''dual equilibria,'' and demonstrate that fusion throughput can be significantly increased in such scenarios. Their stability is investigated using the DCON code. Plasmas with a beta peak of 30% and an average beta of 6% are found stable to both fixed and free-boundary modes with toroidal mode numbers n=1-4, as well as Mercier and high-n ballooning modes. This is not surprising as these scenarios have a normal beta close to 3.

  8. Current generation by helicons and lower hybrid waves in modern tokamaks and reactors ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovin, V. L.

    2013-02-15

    The innovative concept and 3D full-wave code modeling the off-axis current drive by radio-frequency (RF) waves in large-scale tokamaks, ITER and DEMO, for steady-state operation with high efficiency is proposed. The scheme uses the helicon radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) ion cyclotron frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-700 MHz propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by helicons, in conjunction with the bootstrap current, ensure the maintenance of a given value of the total current in the stability margin q(0) {>=} 2 and q(a) {>=} 4, and will help to have regimes with a negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure {beta}{sub N} > 3 (the so-called advanced scenarios) of interest for the commercial reactor. Modeling with full-wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER and DEMO, using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal wave slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in the DIII-D, T-15MD, and JT-60AS tokamaks. Commercially available continuous-wave klystrons of the MW/tube range are promising for commercial stationary fusion reactors. The compact antennae of the waveguide type are proposed, and an example of a possible RF system for today's tokamaks is given. The advantages of the scheme (partially tested at lower frequencies in tokamaks) are a significant decline in the role of parametric instabilities in the plasma periphery, the use of electrically strong resonator-waveguide type antennae, and substantially greater antenna-plasma coupling.

  9. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

  10. Ion cyclotron transmission spectroscopy in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    The propagation of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies has been investigated experimentally in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. A small, broadband, radiofrequency (rf) magnetic probe located outside the plasma limiter, at a major radius near that of the plasma center, was excited with a low power, frequency swept source (1--200 MHz). Waves propagating to a distant location were detected with a second, identical probe. The rf transmission spectrum revealed a region of attenuation over a band of frequencies for which the minority fundamental resonance was located between the outer plasma edge and the major radius of the probe location. Distinct, non-overlapping attenuation bands were observed from hydrogen and helium-3 minority species; a distinct tritium band should be observed in future DT experiments. Rapid spectrum acquisition during a helium-3 gas puff experiment showed that the wave attenuation involved the plasma core and was not a surface effect. A model in which the received power varied exponentially with the minority density, averaged over the resonance region, fit the time evolution of the probe signal relatively well. Estimation of a 1-d tunneling parameter from the experimental observations is discussed. Minority concentrations of less than 0.5 % can be resolved with this measurement.

  11. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. An overview of the concept and its diamagnetic, high beta magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement scheme will be given. The analytical model of the major loss mechanisms and predicted performance will be discussed, along with the major physics challenges. Key features of an operational CFR reactor will be highlighted. The proposed developmental path following the current experimental efforts will be presented. ©2015 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Design of a tritium-compatible vacuum pumping system for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) vacuum pumping system features high-speed, magnetic-bearing turbomolecular pumps (TMPs), metal-sealed scroll pumps for roughing and backing, and all-metal valves and flange seals. Because the plasma chamber exhaust is handled in a throughput instead of hold-up fashion with no organic seal or lubricating materials exposed to the vacuum stream, inventories of tritium, which are vulnerable to release during an accident and which inhibit maintenance of the vacuum pumping equipment, are minimized. To achieve an initial base pressure of 1.3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ Pa in the plasma chamber, the design includes a large vacuum pumping duct and multiple high-speed TMPs arranged in two stages. The design studies discussed in this paper examine the feasibility and cost impact of providing a low-tritium-inventory, easily maintained vacuum pumping system for a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning tokamak. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Compact retarding field energy analyzer for the tokamak ISTTOK boundary plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Figueiredo, H.; Fernandes, H.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2006-10-15

    The retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) remains the more reliable diagnostic to measure the ion temperature in the boundary plasmas of magnetic fusion devices. A compact, simple design and inexpensive RFEA has been developed for investigations on the tokamak ISTTOK. It consists of a stainless steel pinhole (with a diameter of 0.6 mm), three fine nickel grids with a separation of 1 mm, and a collector, all insulated by mica. All the components are placed inside a boron nitride housing with dimensions of 14x14x23 mm{sup 3}. The RFEA has been tested in both ion and electron modes. The conditions of the RFEA operation are discussed, and preliminary measurements of the ion and electron temperature profiles presented.

  14. Plans for the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) instrumentation and control system

    SciTech Connect

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1987-10-07

    Extensive experience with previous fusion experiments (TFTR, MFTF-B and others) is driving the design of the Instrumentation and Control System (I and C) for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) to be built at Princeton. The new design will reuse much equipment from TFTR and will be subdivided into six major parts: machine control, machine data acquisition, plasma diagnostic instrument control and instrument data acquisition, the database, shot sequencing and safety interlocks. In a major departure from previous fusion experiment control systems, the CIT machine control system will be a commercial process control system. Since the machine control system will be purchased as a completely functional product, we will be able to concentrate development manpower in plasma diagnostic instrument control, data acquisition, data processing and analysis, and database systems. We will discuss the issues driving the design, give a design overview and state the requirements upon any prospective commercial process control system.

  15. Damping of electron cyclotron waves in dense plasmas of a compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Fidone, I.; Granata, G.

    1987-06-01

    Absorption of electromagnetic waves by hot and dense plasmas is investigated in the electron cyclotron range of frequency. It is shown that the strong reduction of the damping of the extraordinary mode, caused by finite Larmor radius effects on waves propagating perpendicularly to the magnetic field, becomes insignificant at large values of the parallel component of the refractive index. With an appropriate form of the relativistic dispersion relation which includes high order Larmor radius terms, heating of dense plasmas in a Compact Ignition Tokamak is investigated. It is shown that by using the extraordinary mode with oblique propagation and frequency of 190 GHz it is possible to bring to thermonuclear ignition a dense ohmic plasma with a toroidal magnetic field of 105 kG and a central density of 1 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/. 11 refs., 11 figs.

  16. Fuel systems for compact fast space reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, C.M.; Dutt, D.S.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1983-12-01

    About 200 refractory metal clad ceramic fuel pins have been irradiated in thermal reactors under the 1200 K to 1550 K cladding temperature conditions of primary relevance to space reactors. This paper reviews performance with respect to fissile atom density, operating temperatures, fuel swelling, fission gas release, fuel-cladding compatibility, and consequences of failure. It was concluded that UO/sub 2/ and UN fuels show approximately equal performance potential and that UC fuel has lesser potential. W/Re alloys have performed quite well as cladding materials, and Ta, Nb, and Mo/Re alloys, in conjunction with W diffusion barriers, show good promise. Significant issues to be addressed in the future include high burnup swelling of UN, effects of UO/sub 2/-Li coolant reaction in the event of fuel pin failure, and development of an irradiation performance data base with prototypically configured fuel pins irradiated in a fast neutron flux.

  17. High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

    1983-04-01

    The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams.

  18. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Batha, S.

    1996-01-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

  19. Analysis on damage to TF coils of a compact reversed shear tokamak CREST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Q.; Zheng, S.; Lu, L.; Zeng, Q.; Hiwatari, R.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.; Ogawa, Y.

    2007-08-01

    CREST is a conceptual tokamak reactor design with high β plasma, high thermal efficiency, competitive cost and water-cooled ferritic steel components. Some of its parameters are similar to those of the ITER advanced mode plasma. In this manuscript, the specific issues and analysis on damage to TF coils of CREST were carried out based on the three-dimensional model of the CREST with the widely used code MCNP/4C and the IAEA latest released FENDL/2.1 data library. Damage to some specific regions of the TF coils near large openings and at the inboard mid-plane are calculated and analyzed. Parameters such as the distributions of nuclear heat density, fast neutron flux, dose rate to the epoxy insulator, and peak displacement dose to Cu conductor for the TF coil near these regions were calculated and analyzed. The shield thicknesses at these regions are optimized.

  20. Limitations of power conversion systems under transient loads and impact on the pulsed tokamak power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, G. T.; Wong, C. P. C.; Kapich, D. D.; McDonald, C. F.; Schleicher, R. W.

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cyclic loading of the power conversion system of a helium-cooled, pulsed tokamak power plant is assessed. Design limits of key components of heat transport systems employing Rankine and Brayton thermodynamic cycles are quantified based on experience in gas-cooled fission reactor design and operation. Cyclic loads due to pulsed tokamak operation are estimated. Expected performance of the steam generator is shown to be incompatible with pulsed tokamak operation without load leveling thermal energy storage. The close cycle gas turbine is evaluated qualitatively based on performance of existing industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines. Advances in key technologies which significantly improve prospects for operation with tokamak fusion plants are reviewed.

  1. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-01

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  2. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    SciTech Connect

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-06

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  3. The development of a universal diagnostic probe system for Tokamak fusion test reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastronardi, R.; Cabral, R.; Manos, D.

    1982-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), the largest such facility in the U.S., is discussed with respect to instrumentation in general and mechanisms in particular. The design philosophy and detailed implementation of a universal probe mechanism for TFTR is discussed.

  4. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study. Progress report, December 1, 1990--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ``modest`` extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D-{sup 3}He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs.

  5. Spectroscopic diagnostics of superthermal electrons with high-number harmonic EC radiation in tokamak reactor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minashin, P. V.; Kukushkin, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    A method of spectroscopic diagnostics of the average perpendicular-to-magnetic-field momentum of the superthermal component of the electron velocity distribution (EVD), based on the high-number-harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) radiation, is suggested for nuclear fusion-reactor plasmas under condition of a strong auxiliary heating (e.g. in tokamak DEMO, a next step after tokamak ITER). The method is based on solving an inverse problem for reconstruction of the EVD in parallel and perpendicular-to-magnetic-field components of electron momentum at high and moderate energies responsible for the emission of the high-number-harmonic EC radiation.

  6. Initial testing of the tritium systems at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.; Sissingh, R.A.P.; Gentile, C.A.; Rossmassler, R.L.; Walters, R.T.; Voorhees, D.R.

    1993-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton will start its D-T experiments in late 1993, introducing and operating the tokamak with tritium in order to begin the study of burning plasma physics in D-T. Trace tritium injection experiments, using small amounts of tritium will begin in the fall of 1993. In preparation for these experiments, a series of tests with low concentrations of tritium inn deuterium have been performed as an initial qualification of the tritium systems. These tests began in April 1993. This paper describes the initial testing of the equipment in the TFTR tritium facility.

  7. Compact, battery powered, wireless digitizers for in situ data acquisitions in the sino-united spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangqing; Tan, Yi; Ke, Rui; Yang, Hao; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2015-07-01

    Potential isolation and long cable drive are very important in acquiring certain signals from tokamak diagnostics. Compact, battery powered, wireless digitizers for in situ data acquisition have been developed and routinely used in the sino-united spherical tokamak to solve the problems of isolation and long cables. The wireless digitizers utilize the integrated analog to digital converters and the static random access memory of microcontrollers but transfer data wirelessly. They consist of simple and concise circuits but have considerable performances of 12-16 bit in resolution and 500-1000 kS/s in sample rate. Wireless triggering and energy saving are two major challenges of the wireless digitizers. Wireless transceivers in the data link layer are used as trigger and can reduce the trigger jitters to be smaller than 1 μs. In order to reduce the energy consumption, the wireless digitizers are waken only when the tokamak is about to discharge. After discharges, they turn to a periodic checking mode with current consumption smaller than 200 μA. Because of low duty cycle, the wireless digitizers have a battery life of up to four weeks. In general, the wireless digitizers have better performance than normal isolation amplifiers and can greatly simplify the cable connections. They are very suitable for the data acquisition of dangerous and/or susceptible analog signals in tokamaks.

  8. Compact, battery powered, wireless digitizers for in situ data acquisitions in the sino-united spherical tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangqing; Tan, Yi; Ke, Rui; Yang, Hao; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2015-07-01

    Potential isolation and long cable drive are very important in acquiring certain signals from tokamak diagnostics. Compact, battery powered, wireless digitizers for in situ data acquisition have been developed and routinely used in the sino-united spherical tokamak to solve the problems of isolation and long cables. The wireless digitizers utilize the integrated analog to digital converters and the static random access memory of microcontrollers but transfer data wirelessly. They consist of simple and concise circuits but have considerable performances of 12-16 bit in resolution and 500-1000 kS/s in sample rate. Wireless triggering and energy saving are two major challenges of the wireless digitizers. Wireless transceivers in the data link layer are used as trigger and can reduce the trigger jitters to be smaller than 1 μs. In order to reduce the energy consumption, the wireless digitizers are waken only when the tokamak is about to discharge. After discharges, they turn to a periodic checking mode with current consumption smaller than 200 μA. Because of low duty cycle, the wireless digitizers have a battery life of up to four weeks. In general, the wireless digitizers have better performance than normal isolation amplifiers and can greatly simplify the cable connections. They are very suitable for the data acquisition of dangerous and/or susceptible analog signals in tokamaks. PMID:26233380

  9. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost.

  10. Radioactive waste disposal characteristics of candidate tokamak demonstration reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.A.; Stacey, W.M.; Hertel, N.E.

    1998-08-01

    Results from the current physics, materials and blanket R and D programs are combined with physics and engineering design constraints to characterize candidate tokamak demonstration plant (DEMO) designs. Blanket designs based on the principal structural materials, breeding materials and coolants being developed for the DEMO were adapted from the literature. Neutron flux and activation calculations were performed, and several radioactive waste disposal indices were evaluated, for each design. Of the primary low-activation structural materials under development in the US, it appears that vanadium and ferritic steel alloys, and possibly silicon carbide, could lead to DEMO designs which could satisfy realistic low-level waste (LLW) criteria, provided that impurities can be controlled within plausible limits. Allowable LLW concentrations are established for the limiting alloying and impurity elements. All breeding materials and neutron multipliers considered meet the LLW criterion.

  11. TRAIL: a Tokamak Rail Gun Limiter for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J R; Yu, W S; Fillo, J A; Usher, J L

    1980-01-01

    An attractive new limiter concept is investigated. The Tokamak Rail Gun Limiter (TRAIL) system impacts a stream of moderate velocity pellets (100 to 200 m/sec through the plasma edge region to absorb energy and define the plasma boundary. The pellets are recycled, after cooling, to the injector in an E-M mass accelerator. Heat fluxes of approx. 30,000 W/cm/sup 2/ can be readily accommodated by the pellets, with very low recirculating power requirements (approx. 0.1%) for the accelerator. The mass accelerator velocity requirements are well within the present state-of-the-art (several km/sec). Accelerators injecting pellets at approx. 1 km/sec can be used to control local plasma temperature and current profiles and to act as energy absorbers to shut down the plasma without damage to the first wall if a plasma disruption occurs.

  12. TOKOPS: Tokamak Reactor Operations Study: The influence of reactor operations on the design and performance of tokamaks with solid-breeder blankets: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Firestone, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    Reactor system operation and procedures have a profound impact on the conception and design of power plants. These issues are studied here using a model tokamak system employing a solid-breeder blanket. The model blanket is one which has evolved from the STARFIRE and BCSS studies. The reactor parameters are similar to those characterizing near-term fusion engineering reactors such as INTOR or NET (Next European Tokamak). Plasma startup, burn analysis, and methods for operation at various levels of output power are studied. A critical, and complicating, element is found to be the self-consistent electromagnetic response of the system, including the presence of the blanket and the resulting forces and loadings. Fractional power operation, and the strategy for burn control, is found to vary depending on the scaling law for energy confinement, and an extensive study is reported. Full-power reactor operation is at a neutron wall loading pf 5 MW/m/sup 2/ and a surface heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. The blanket is a pressurized steel module with bare beryllium rods and low-activation HT-9-(9-C-) clad LiAlO/sub 2/ rods. The helium coolant pressure is 5 MPa, entering the module at 297/sup 0/C and exiting at 550/sup 0/C. The system power output is rated at 1000 MW(e). In this report, we present our findings on various operational scenarios and their impact on system design. We first start with the salient aspects of operational physics. Time-dependent analyses of the blanket and balance of plant are then presented. Separate abstracts are included for each chapter.

  13. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1984-05-01

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles.

  14. Alpha-particle losses in compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, S.L.; Lyon, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Loss of alpha particles in compact torsatron reactors is studied. For 6, 9, and 12 field period reactors, the direct loss is a relatively weak function of radius and energy and varies from approx. =33% for M = 6 to approx. =18% for M = 12. Loss of alpha particles through scattering into the loss region is calculated using the Fokker-Plank equation for fast ions and found to contribute an additional alpha-particle energy loss of approx. =15%. The consequences of these relatively large losses for torsatron reactor design are discussed. The relationship between the direct particle losses and the magnetic field structure is also studied. Orbit losses from a variety of stellarator configurations are calculated and a figure-of-merit that characterizes the orbit confinement of a magnetic configuration is deduced from these calculations. This figure-of-merit is used to show how the direct losses might be reduced at low aspect-ratio. Effects of finite beta on the direct particle losses are also addressed, and are shown to significantly increase the direct losses in some configurations. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Analysis of measurement errors for Thomson diagnostics of non-Maxwellian plasmas in tokamak reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Mukhin, E. E.; Bassan, M.

    2016-01-01

    The study is stimulated by the expected noticeable deviation of the electron velocity distribution function (eVDF) from a Maxwellian under condition of a strong auxiliary heating of electron plasmas in tokamak-reactors. The key principles of accuracy estimation of the Thomson scattering diagnostic of non-Maxwellian plasmas in tokamak-reactors are presented. The algorithm extends the conventional approach to the assessment of non-Maxwellian plasmas measurements errors for a broad class of deviations of the eVDF from a Maxwellian. The algorithm is based on solving the inverse problem many times to determine main parameters of the eVDF with allowance for all possible sources of error and statistical variation of the input parameters of the problem. The method is applied to a preliminary analysis of the advantages of the formerly suggested use of various wavelengths of probing laser radiation in the Thomson diagnostics of non-Maxwellian plasma on the example of the core plasma Thomson scattering diagnostic system which is under design for ITER tokamak. The results obtained confirm the relevance of the diversification of the probing laser radiation wavelength.

  16. Feedback stabilization of the resistive shell mode in a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1997-07-01

    Stabilization of the {open_quotes}resistive shell mode{close_quotes} is vital to the success of the {open_quotes}advanced tokamak{close_quotes} concept. The most promising reactor relevant approach is to apply external feedback using, for instance, the previously proposed {open_quotes}fake rotating shell{close_quotes} scheme [R. Fitzpatrick and T. H. Jensen, Phys. Plasmas {bold 3}, 2641 (1996)]. This scheme, like other simple feedback schemes, only works if the feedback controlled conductors are located inside the {open_quotes}critical radius{close_quotes} at which a perfectly conducting shell is just able to stabilize the ideal external kink mode. In general, this is not possible in a reactor, since engineering constraints demand that any feedback controlled conductors be placed {ital outside} the neutron shielding blanket (i.e., relatively far from the edge of the plasma). It is demonstrated that the fake rotating shell feedback scheme can be modified so that it works even when the feedback controlled conductors are located well beyond the critical radius. The gain, bandwidth, current, and total power requirements of such a feedback system for a reactor sized plasma are estimated to be less than 100, a few Hz, a fews tens of kA, and a few MW, respectively. These requirements could easily be met using existing technology. It is concluded that feedback stabilization of the resistive shell mode is possible in a tokamak fusion reactor. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Model for collisional fast ion diffusion into Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor loss cone

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. |; Zweben, S.J.; Schivell, J.; Budny, R.; Scott, S.

    1994-08-01

    An analytic model is developed to estimate the classical pitch angle scattering loss of energetic fusion product ions into prompt loss orbits in a tokamak geometry. The result is applied to alpha particles produced by deutrium-tritium fusion reactions in a plasma condition relevant to Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A poloidal angular distribution of collisional fast ion loss at the first wall is obtained and the numerical result from the TRANSP code is discussed. The present model includes the effect that the prompt loss boundary moves away from the slowing-down path due to reduction in banana thickness, which enables us to understand, for the first time. the dependence of the collisional loss rate on Z{sub eff}.

  18. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C.

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  19. Compact and Lightweight Sabatier Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, via the Sabatier reaction is an important aspect of NASA s cabin Atmosphere Revitalization System and In-Situ Resource Utilization architectures for both low-earth orbit and long-term manned space missions. In the current International Space Station (ISS) and other low orbit missions, metabolically-generated CO2 is removed from the cabin air and vented into space, resulting in a net loss of O2. This requires a continuous resupply of O2 via water electrolysis, and thus highlights the need for large water storage capacity. For long-duration space missions, the amount of life support consumables is limited and resupply options are practically nonexistent, thus atmosphere resource management and recycle becomes crucial to significantly reduce necessary O2 and H2O storage. Additionally, the potential use of the Martian CO2-rich atmosphere and Lunar regolith to generate life support consumables and propellant fuels is of interest to NASA. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) has developed a compact, lightweight Microlith(Registered TradeMark)-based Sabatier (CO2 methanation) reactor which demonstrates the capability of achieving high CO2 conversion and near 100% CH4 selectivity at space velocities of 30,000-60,000 hr-1. The combination of the Microlith(Registered TradeMark) substrates and durable, novel catalyst coating permitted efficient Sabatier reactor operation that favors high reactant conversion, high selectivity, and long-term durability. This paper presents the reactor development and performance results at various operating conditions. Additionally, results from 100-hr durability tests and mechanical vibration tests are discussed.

  20. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Doll, David W.

    1985-01-01

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  1. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Doll, D.W.

    1982-10-21

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  2. Conceptual design of a Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant for the production of fissile fuel to support a significant number of client light water reactor (LWR) plants. The study was carried out in sufficient depth of indicate no insurmountable technical problems exist, assuming the physics of the fusion driver is verified, and has provided a basis for deriving cost estimates of the hybrid plant as well as estimates of the hybrid/LWR symbiotic system busbar electricity costs. This energy system has the potential to be optimized such that the net cost of electricity becomes competitive with conventional LWR plants as the price of U308 exceeds $100 per pound.

  3. Tokamak reactor for treating fertile material or waste nuclear by-products

    DOEpatents

    Kotschenreuther, Michael T.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Valanju, Prashant M.

    2012-10-02

    Disclosed is a tokamak reactor. The reactor includes a first toroidal chamber, current carrying conductors, at least one divertor plate within the first toroidal chamber and a second chamber adjacent to the first toroidal chamber surrounded by a section that insulates the reactor from neutrons. The current carrying conductors are configured to confine a core plasma within enclosed walls of the first toroidal chamber such that the core plasma has an elongation of 1.5 to 4 and produce within the first toroidal chamber at least one stagnation point at a perpendicular distance from an equatorial plane through the core plasma that is greater than the plasma minor radius. The at least one divertor plate and current carrying conductors are configured relative to one another such that the current carrying conductors expand the open magnetic field lines at the divertor plate.

  4. On the fusion triple product and fusion power gain of tokamak pilot plants and reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costley, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The energy confinement time of tokamak plasmas scales positively with plasma size and so it is generally expected that the fusion triple product, nTτ E, will also increase with size, and this has been part of the motivation for building devices of increasing size including ITER. Here n, T, and τ E are the ion density, ion temperature and energy confinement time respectively. However, tokamak plasmas are subject to operational limits and two important limits are a density limit and a beta limit. We show that when these limits are taken into account, nTτ E becomes almost independent of size; rather it depends mainly on the fusion power, P fus. In consequence, the fusion power gain, Q fus, a parameter closely linked to nTτ E is also independent of size. Hence, P fus and Q fus, two parameters of critical importance in reactor design, are actually tightly coupled. Further, we find that nTτ E is inversely dependent on the normalised beta, β N; an unexpected result that tends to favour lower power reactors. Our findings imply that the minimum power to achieve fusion reactor conditions is driven mainly by physics considerations, especially energy confinement, while the minimum device size is driven by technology and engineering considerations. Through dedicated R&D and parallel developments in other fields, the technology and engineering aspects are evolving in a direction to make smaller devices feasible.

  5. Experimental study of thermal crisis in connection with Tokamak reactor high heat flux components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, D.; Giardina, M.; Castiglia, F.; Celata, G. P.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G.; Cumo, M.

    2000-04-01

    The results of an experimental research on high heat flux thermal crisis in forced convective subcooled water flow, under operative conditions of interest to the thermal-hydraulic design of TOKAMAK fusion reactors, are here reported. These experiments, carried out in the framework of a collaboration between the Nuclear Engineering Department of Palermo University and the National Institute of Thermal - Fluid Dynamics of the ENEA - Casaccia (Rome), were performed on the STAF (Scambio Termico Alti Flussi) water loop and consisted, essentially, in a high speed photographic study which enabled focusing several information on bubble characteristics and flow patterns taking place during the burnout phenomenology.

  6. Pressure drop considerations of a lithium cooled fusion breeder tokamak reactor blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.P.C.

    1983-12-06

    Liquid lithium was selected as one of the coolants for the 1983 fusion breeder blanket used on the magnetically confined tokamak fusion reactor, and as a result, the thermal-hydraulic calculations were dominated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) considerations. The applicable sets of MHD equations for the engineering thermal-hydraulic design were reviewed and compared. Special attention was given to the MHD calculations for the fertile material zone, a packed bed of composite beryllium and thorium balls, since this region can dominate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of this blanket module. To keep the pressure drops acceptable, fertile fuel balls were omitted in the inboard blanket.

  7. Images of plasma disruption effects in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Maqueda, R.J.; Wurden, G.A.

    1999-02-01

    Fast-framing imaging of visible radiation from magnetically confined plasmas has lately become a useful tool for both machine operation and physics studies. Using an intensified, commercial Kodak Ektapro imaging system, the effects of a plasma disruption were observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The high-energy runaway electrons created soon after the disruption collide with the plasma facing components damaging this surface and producing a shower of debris that traverses the toroidal vessel and falls over the inner bumper limiter.

  8. Liquid metal MHD heat transfer investigations apllied to fusion Tokamak reactor cooling ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridov, V. G.; Ivochkin, Yu. P.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Zhilin, V. G.; Genin, L. G.; Ivanova, O. N.; Averianov, K. V.

    2003-12-01

    The liquid metal heat transfer experimental investigations were carried out at the joint MPEI-IIHI magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) complex. The united scientific group examines the liquid metal flow in a horizontal heated tube without and under a longitudinal or a transverse magnetic field. Various configurations of the applied heat flux were taken into consideration. All these cases correspond to the flow in the Tokamak fusion reactor blanket or divertor. Temperature fields, temperature fluctuations field, heat transfer intensities were measured. Strong influence of thermogravitational convection was observed in a horizontal heated tube. Depending on the MHD-configuration, magnetic fields (MF) can enhance or weaken this effect. Tables 2, Figs 5, Refs 8.

  9. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    M.E. Lumia; C.A. Gentile

    2002-01-18

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  10. Implications of the DD fuel cycle on tokamak reactor technology considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Evans, K. Jr.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.; Misra, B.; Smith, D.L.; Stevens, H.C.; Turner, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    The initial results of a study to develop a conceptual design of a DD tokamak reactor are reported in this paper. A comprehensive steady-state power and particle balance code has been used to survey a variety of design points. A reference set of parameters (R/sub 0/ = 8.6 m, B/sub max/ = 14 T, ..beta.. = 11%, P/sub th/ = 2500 to 2700 MW) has been selected for further study. The concepts of rf driven currents and a limiter-vacuum system have been examined and appear to offer promise. However, the penalty of rf current drive, in terms of recirculating power, is relatively larger for DD than for DT reactors. Blanket engineering studies have emphasized the optimization of energy multiplication and inboard blanket thickness.

  11. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER-II)) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-D transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability. 23 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Deuterium-Tritium Simulations of the Enhanced Reversed Shear Mode in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Manickam, J.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff

    1997-04-01

    The potential performance, in deuterium-tritium plasmas, of a new enhanced con nement regime with reversed magnetic shear (ERS mode) is assessed. The equilibrium conditions for an ERS mode plasma are estimated by solving the plasma transport equations using the thermal and particle dif- fusivities measured in a short duration ERS mode discharge in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [F. M. Levinton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 75, 4417, (1995)]. The plasma performance depends strongly on Zeff and neutral beam penetration to the core. The steady state projections typically have a central electron density of {approx}2:5x10 20 m{sup -3} and nearly equal central electron and ion temperatures of {approx}10 keV. In time dependent simulations the peak fusion power, {approx} 25 MW, is twice the steady state level. Peak performance occurs during the density rise when the central ion temperature is close to the optimal value of {approx} 15 keV. The simulated pressure profiles can be stable to ideal MHD instabilities with toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3, 4 and {infinity} for {beta}{sub norm} up to 2.5; the simulations have {beta}{sub norm} {le} 2.1. The enhanced reversed shear mode may thus provide an opportunity to conduct alpha physics experiments in conditions imilar to those proposed for advanced tokamak reactors.

  13. Evaluating and planning the radioactive waste options for dismantling the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, K.; Scott, J.; Larson, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a kind tritium fusion research reactor, and is planned to be decommissioned within the next several years. This is the largest fusion reactor in the world and as a result of deuterium-tritum reactions is tritium contaminated and activated from 14 Mev neutrons. This presents many unusual challenges when dismantling, packaging and disposing its components and ancillary systems. Special containers are being designed to accommodate the vacuum vessel, neutral beams, and tritium delivery and processing systems. A team of experienced professionals performed a detailed field study to evaluate the requirements and appropriate methods for packaging the radioactive materials. This team focused on several current and innovative methods for waste minimization that provides the oppurtunmost cost effective manner to package and dispose of the waste. This study also produces a functional time-phased schedule which conjoins the waste volume, weight, costs and container requirements with the detailed project activity schedule for the entire project scope. This study and project will be the first demonstration of the decommissioning of a tritium fusion test reactor. The radioactive waste disposal aspects of this project are instrumental in demonstrating the viability of a fusion power reactor with regard to its environmental impact and ultimate success.

  14. Safety in the ARIES-III D- sup 3 He tokamak reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Dolan, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES-3 reactor study is an extensive examination of the viability of a D-{sup 3}He-fueled commercial tokamak power reactor. Because neutrons are produced only through side reactions, the reactor has the significant advantages of reduced activation of the first wall and shield, low afterheat and Class A or C low level waste disposal. Since no tritium is required for operation, no lithium-containing breeding blanket is necessary. A ferritic steel shield behind the first wall protects the magnets from gamma and neutron heating and from radiation damage. The ARIES-3 reactor uses an organic coolant to cool the first wall, shield and divertor. The organic coolant has a low vapor pressure at the operating temperature required for good thermal efficiency. Radiation damage requires processing the coolant to remove and crack radiolytic products that would otherwise foul cooling surfaces. The cracking process produces waste, which must be disposed of through incineration or burial. We estimated the offsite doses due to incineration at five candidate locations. The plasma confinement requirements for a D-{sup 3}He reactor are much more challenging than those for a D-T reactor. Thus, the demands on the divertor are more severe, particularly during a disruption. We explored the potential for isotopically tailoring the 4 mm tungsten layer on the divertor in order to reduce the offsite doses should a tungsten aerosol be released from the reactor after an accident. We also modeled a loss-of-cooling accident in which the organic coolant was burning in order to estimate the amount of radionuclides released from the first wall. We analyzed the disposition of the 20 g/day of tritium that is produced by D-D reactions and removed by the vacuum pumps. For our reference design, the tritium will be burned in the plasma. These results re-emphasize the need for low activation materials and advanced divertor designs, even in reactors using advanced fuels.

  15. Safety in the ARIES-3 D-He-3 tokamak reactor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, J. S.; Dolan, T. J.

    1991-11-01

    The ARIES-3 reactor study is an extensive examination of the viability of a D-He-3 He-fueled commercial tokamak power reactor. Because neutrons are produced only through side reactions, the reactor has the significant advantages of reduced activation of the first wall and shield, low afterheat and Class A or C low level waste disposal. Since no tritium is required for operation, no lithium-containing breeding blanket is necessary. A ferritic steel shield behind the first wall protects the magnets from gamma and neutron heating and from radiation damage. The ARIES-3 reactor uses an organic coolant to cool the first wall, shield and divertor. The organic coolant has a low vapor pressure at the operating temperature required for good thermal efficiency. Radiation damage requires processing the coolant to remove and crack radiolytic products that would otherwise foul cooling surfaces. The cracking process produces waste, which must be disposed of through incineration or burial. We estimated the offsite doses due to incineration at five candidate locations. The plasma confinement requirements for a D-He-3 reactor are much more challenging than those for a D-T reactor. Thus, the demands on the divertor are more severe, particularly during a disruption. We explored the potential for isotopically tailoring the 4 mm tungsten layer on the divertor in order to reduce the offsite doses should a tungsten aerosol be released from the reactor after an accident. We also modeled a loss-of-cooling accident in which the organic coolant was burning in order to estimate the amount of radionuclides released from the first wall. We analyzed the disposition of the 20 g/day of tritium that is produced by D-D reactions and removed by the vacuum pumps. For our reference design, the tritium will be burned in the plasma. These results re-emphasize the need for low activation materials and advanced divertor designs, even in reactors using advanced fuels.

  16. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  17. Movable-molybdenum-reflector reactivity experiments for control studies of compact space power reactor concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental reflector reactivity study was made with a compact cylindrical reactor using a uranyl fluoride - water fuel solution. The reactor was axially unreflected and radially reflected with segments of molybdenum. The reflector segments were displaced incrementally in both the axial and radial dimensions, and the shutdown of each configuration was measured by using the pulsed-neutron source technique. The reactivity effects for axial and radial displacement of reflector segments are tabulated separately and compared. The experiments provide data for control-system studies of compact-space-power-reactor concepts.

  18. Mirror test for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor at the JET tokamak: An overview of the program

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, M. J.; De Temmerman, G.; Coad, J. P.; Vince, J.; Drake, J. R.; Le Guern, F.; Murari, A.; Pitts, R. A.; Walker, C.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2006-06-15

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical spectroscopy and imaging systems for plasma diagnosis that will be used at the next-step magnetic fusion experiment, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Any change of the mirror performance, in particular, reflectivity, will influence the quality and reliability of detected signals. At the instigation of the ITER Design Team, a dedicated technical and experimental activity aiming at the assessment of mirror surface degradation as a result of exposure to the plasma has been initiated on the JET tokamak. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the mirror test program, including design details of the mirror samples and their supports, their locations within JET, and the issue of optical characterization of the mirrors both before and after exposure. The postexposure characterization is particularly challenging in JET as a consequence of an environment in which both tritium and beryllium are present.

  19. Summary of Apollo; A D- sup 3 He tokamak reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Blanchard, T.P.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Emert, G.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Maynard, C.W.; Mogahed, E.A.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J. . Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, the key features of Apollo, a conceptual D-{sup 3}He tokamak reactor for commercial electricity production, are summarized. The 1000-MW (electric) design utilizes direct conversion of transport, neutron, and bremsstrahlung radiation power. The direct conversion method uses reactants, and the thermal conversion cycle uses an organic coolant. Apollo operates in the first-stability regime, with a major radius of 7.89 m, a peak magnetic field on the toroidal field coils of 19.3 T, a 53-MA plasma current, and a 6.7% beta value. The low neutron production of the D-{sup 3}He fuel cycle greatly reduces the radiation damage rate and allows a full-lifetime first wall and structure made of standard steels with only slight modifications to reduce activation levels.

  20. Modeling of neutral hydrogen velocities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Skinner, C. H.; Budny, R. V.; Ramsey, A. T.; Ruzic, D. N.; Turkot, R. B., Jr.

    1996-11-01

    Monte Carlo neutral transport simulations of hydrogen velocities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [K. M. McGuire et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)] are compared with experiment using the Doppler-broadened Balmer-α spectral line profile. Good agreement is obtained under a range of conditions, validating the treatment of charge exchange, molecular dissociation, surface reflection, and sputtering in the neutral gas code DEGAS [D. Heifetz et al., J. Comput. Phys. 46, 309 (1982)]. A residual deficiency of 10-100 eV neutrals in most of the simulations indicates that further study of the energetics of H+2 dissociation for electron energies in excess of 100 eV is needed.

  1. Neutron dosimetry qualification experiments for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Lithium Blanket Module program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, F.Y.; Harker, Y.D.; Anderi, R.A.; Nigg, D.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Lithium Blanket module (LBM) program is a first-of-kind neutronics experiment involving a toroidal fusion neutron source. Qualification experiments have been conducted to develop primary measurement techniques and verify dosimetry materials that will be used to characterize the neutron environment inside and on the surfaces of the LBM. The deuterium-tritium simulation experiments utilizing a 14-MeV neutron generator and a fusion blanket mockup facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Results and discussions are presented that identify the quality and limitations of the measured integral reaction data, including the minimum fluence requirement for the TFTR experiment and the use of such data in neutron spectrum adjustment and in predicting integral performance parameters, e.g., tritium production.

  2. Dielectronic satellite spectra of hydrogenlike iron from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Decaux, V. ); Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Taylor, G.; Park, H. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Bhalla, C.P. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-08-01

    Spectra of hydrogenlike iron, Fe26, have been observed from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. The experimental arrangement permits simultaneous observation of the Fe26 Ly-{alpha}{sub 1}and Ly-{alpha}{sub 2} lines and the associated dielectronic satellites, which are due to transitions 1snl-2pnl{prime} with n {ge} 2, as well as the heliumlike 1s{sup 2}({sup 1}S{sub 0}){minus}1s4p({sup 1}P{sub 1})and both hydrogenlike Ly-{beta}{sub 1} and Ly-{beta}{sub 2} lines from chromium. Relative wavelengths and line intensities can be determined very accurately. The spectral data are in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. The observed spectra have also been used to estimate the total dielectronic recombination rate coefficient of Fe26. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Development of integrated insulation joint for cooling pipe in tokamak reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Abe, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Masashi; Yamazaki, Seiichiro

    1994-08-01

    In a tokamak fusion reactor, an electrically insulated part is needed for an in-vessel piping system in order to break an electric circuit loop. When a closed loop is formed in the piping system, large induced electromagnetic forces during a plasma disruption (rapid plasma current quench) could give damages on the piping system. Ceramic brazing joint is a conventional method for the electric circuit break, but an application to the fusion reactor is not feasible due to its brittleness. Here, a stainless steel / ceramics / stainless steel functionally gradient material (FGM) has been proposed and developed as an integrated insulation joint of the piping system. Both sides of the joint can be welded to the main pipes, and expected to be reliable even in the fusion reactor environment. When the FGM joint is manufactured by way of a sintering process, a residual thermal stress is the key issue. Through detailed computations of the residual thermal stress and several trial productions, tubular elements of FGM joints have been successfully manufactured.

  4. Anomalous Loss of DT Alpha Particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W.

    1997-06-01

    Princeton's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is the first experimental fusion device to routinely use tritium to study the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction,allowing the first systematic study of DT alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. A crucial aspect of alpha-particle physics is the fraction of alphas that escape from the plasma, particularly since these energetic particles can do severe damage to the first wall of a reactor. An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of alpha-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous "delayed" loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on alpha-particle loss has led to a better understanding of alpha-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing alpha-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e. compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90 degree lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an alpha-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized alpha-particles near the

  5. Proceedings of a Symposium on Advanced Compact Reactor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Reactor system technologies suitable for a variety of aerospace and terrestrial applications are considered. Technologies, safety and regulatory considerations, potential applications, and research and development opportunities are covered.

  6. Review of deuterium-tritium results from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K. M.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Chang, C. S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dendy, R.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Mauel, M.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; von Goeler, S.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-06-01

    After many years of fusion research, the conditions needed for a D-T fusion reactor have been approached on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. For the first time the unique phenomena present in a D-T plasma are now being studied in a laboratory plasma. The first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. At present the maximum fusion power of 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-βp discharge following a current rampdown. The fusion power density in a core of the plasma is ≊2.8 MW m-3, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 239] at 1500 MW total fusion power. The energy confinement time, τE, is observed to increase in D-T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the ni(0) Ti(0) τE product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-βp discharges. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating of a D-T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP [Nucl. Fusion 34, 1247 (1994)] simulations. Initial measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from He gas puffing experiments. The loss of alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed

  7. A Compact Nuclear Fusion Reactor for Space Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastoyashchiy, Anatoly F.

    2006-05-01

    A small-scale nuclear fusion reactor is suggested based on the concepts of plasma confinement (with a high pressure gas) which have been patented by the author. The reactor considered can be used as a power setup in space flights. Among the advantages of this reactor is the use of a D3He fuel mixture which at burning gives main reactor products — charged particles. The energy balance considerably improves, as synchrotron radiation turn out "captured" in the plasma volume, and dangerous, in the case of classical magnetic confinement, instabilities in the direct current magnetic field configuration proposed do not exist. As a result, the reactor sizes are quite suitable (of the order of several meters). A possibility of making reactive thrust due to employment of ejection of multiply charged ions formed at injection of pellets from some adequate substance into the hot plasma center is considered.

  8. Spent fuel utilization in a compact traveling wave reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee

    2012-06-06

    In recent years, several innovative designs of nuclear reactors are proposed. One of them is Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR). The unique characteristic of a TWR is the capability of breeding its own fuel in the reactor. The reactor is fueled by mostly depleted, natural uranium or spent nuclear fuel and a small amount of enriched uranium to initiate the fission process. Later on in the core, the reactor gradually converts the non-fissile material into the fissile in a process like a traveling wave. In this work, a TWR with spent nuclear fuel blanket was studied. Several parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, and fission power, were analyzed. The discharge burnup composition was also analyzed. The calculation is performed by a continuous energy Monte Carlo code McCARD.

  9. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo Parra, R.; Moreno Quicios, R.; Ploeckl, B.; Birkenmeier, G.; Herrmann, A.; Kocsis, G.; Laggner, F. M.; Lang, P. T.; Lunt, T.; Macian-Juan, R.; Rohde, V.; Sellmair, G.; Szepesi, T.; Wolfrum, E.; Zeidner, W.; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 1019 atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 1020 atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet.

  10. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Arredondo Parra, R; Moreno Quicios, R; Ploeckl, B; Birkenmeier, G; Herrmann, A; Kocsis, G; Laggner, F M; Lang, P T; Lunt, T; Macian-Juan, R; Rohde, V; Sellmair, G; Szepesi, T; Wolfrum, E; Zeidner, W; Neu, R

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 10(19) atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 10(20) atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet. PMID:26931850

  11. Calculations of alpha particle loss for reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; White, R.B.; Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.

    1997-03-01

    Hamiltonian coordinate, guiding center code calculations of the toroidal field ripple loss of alpha particles from a reversed shear plasma predict both total alpha losses and ripple diffusion losses to be greater than those from a comparable non-reversed magnetic shear plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. High central q is found to increase alpha ripple losses as well as first orbit losses of alphas in the reversed shear simulations. A simple ripple loss model, benchmarked against the guiding center code, is found to work satisfactorily in transport analysis modelling of reversed and monotonic shear scenarios. Alpha ripple transport on TFTR affects ions within r/a=0.5, not at the plasma edge. The entire plasma is above threshold for stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles at birth energy in the reversed shear case simulated, so that all trapped 3.5 MeV alphas are lost stochastically or through prompt losses. The 40% alpha particle loss predictions for TFTR suggest that reduction of toroidal field ripple will be a critical issue in the design of a reversed shear fusion reactor.

  12. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  13. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.; Batha, S.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  14. Advanced Fuels Reactor using Aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak Hydrogenic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2015-11-01

    The use of advanced fuels for fusion reactor is conventionally envisaged for field reversed configuration (FRC) devices. It is proposed here a preliminary study about the use of these fuels but on an aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio (RULART) hydrogenic plasmas. The idea is to inject micro-size boron pellets vertically at the inboard side (HFS, where TF is very high and the tokamak electron temperature is relatively low because of profile), synchronised with a proton NBI pointed to this region. Therefore, p-B reactions should occur and alpha particles produced. These pellets will act as an edge-like disturbance only (cp. killer pellet, although the vertical HFS should make this less critical, since the unablated part should appear in the bottom of the device). The boron cloud will appear at midplance, possibly as a MARFE-look like. Scaling of the p-B reactions by varying the NBI energy should be compared with the predictions of nuclear physics. This could be an alternative to the FRC approach, without the difficulties of the optimization of the FRC low confinement time. Instead, a robust good tokamak confinement with high local HFS TF (enhanced due to the ultra low aspect ratio and low pitch angle) is used. The plasma central post makes the RULART concept attractive because of the proximity of NBI path and also because a fraction of born alphas will cross the plasma post and dragged into it in the direction of the central plasma post current, escaping vertically into a hole in the bias plate and reaching the direct electricity converter, such as in the FRC concept.

  15. MIRI: A multichannel far-infrared laser interferometer for electron density measurements on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Anderson, H.M.; Chouinard, R.; Foote, V.S.; Ma, C.H.; Clifton, B.J.

    1987-07-01

    A ten-channel far-infrared laser interferometer which is routinely used to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the electron density profile on the TFTR tokamak is described and representative results are presented. This system has been designed for remote operation in the very hostile environment of a fusion reactor. The possible expansion of the system to include polarimetric measurements is briefly outlined. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  16. A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit

    2012-06-19

    This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more

  17. A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit

    2012-06-01

    This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more

  18. Development of Compact Quasi-Axisymmetric Stellarator Reactor Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Ku; M. Zarnstorff; R.B. White; W.A. Cooper; R. Sanchez; H. Neilson; J.A. Schmidt

    2003-09-19

    We have started to examine the reactor potential of quasi-axisymmetric (QA) stellarators with an integrated approach that includes systems evaluation, engineering considerations, and plasma and coil optimizations. In this paper, we summarize the progress made so far in developing QA configurations with reduced alpha losses while retaining good MHD stability properties. The minimization of alpha losses is achieved by directly targeting the collisionless orbits to prolong the average resident times. Configurations with an overall energy loss rate of {approx}10% or less, including collisional contributions, have been found. To allow remotely maintaining coils and machine components in a reactor environment, there is a desire to simplify to the extent possible the coil design. To this end, finding a configuration that is optimized not only for the alpha confinement and MHD stability but also for the good coil and reactor performance, remains to be a challenging task.

  19. Tokamak burn cycle study: a data base for comparing long pulse and steady-state power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K. Jr.; Hassanein, A.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1983-11-01

    Several distinct operating modes (conventional ohmic, noninductive steady state, internal transformer, etc.) have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics (current drive efficiency) and engineering (superior materials) which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles.

  20. Evaluation of weldments in type 21-6-9 stainless steel for compact ignition tokamak structural applications, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D. J.; Goodwin, G. M.; Bloom, E. E.

    1991-06-01

    Primary design considerations for the Compact Ignition Tokamak toroidal field-coil cases are yield strength and toughness in the temperature range from 77 to 300 K. Type 21-6-9 stainless steel, also still known by its original Armco Steel Company trade name Nitronic 40, is the proposed alloy for this application. It has high yield strength and usually adequate base metal toughness, but weldments in thick sections have not been adequately characterized in terms of mechanical properties or hot-cracking propensity. In this study, weldability of the alloy in heavy sections and the mechanical properties of the resultant welds were investigated including tensile yield strength and Charpy V-notch toughness at 77 K and room temperature. Weldments were made in four different base metals using seven different filler metals. None of the weldments showed any indication of hot-cracking problems. All base metals, including weldment heat-affected zones, were found to have adequate strength and impact toughness at both test temperatures. Weld metals, on the other hand, except ERNiCr-3 and ENiCrFe-3, had impact toughnesses of less than 67 J at 77 K. Inconel 82 had an average weld metal impact toughness of over 135 J at 77 K, and although its strength at 77 K is less than that of type 21-6-9 base metal, at this point it is considered to be the first-choice filler metal. Phase 2 of this program will concentrate on composition refinement and process/procedure optimization for the generic ERNiCr-3 composition and will generate a design data base for base and weld metal, including tensile, fracture toughness, and crack growth rate data.

  1. A compact breed and burn fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, D.; Kim, Y.

    2012-07-01

    A long-life breed-and-burn (B and B) type fast reactor has been investigated from the neutronics points of view. The B and B reactor has the capability to breed the fissile fuels and use the bred fuel in situ in the same reactor. In this work, feasibility of a compact sodium-cooled B and B fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel as blanket material has been studied. In order to derive a compact B and B fast reactor, a tight fuel lattice and relatively large fuel pin are used to achieve high fuel volume fraction. The core is initially loaded with an LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel and a metallic fuel is used in the core. The Monte Carlo depletion has been performed for the core to see the long-term behavior of the B and B reactor. Several important parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, fission power, and fast neutron fluence, are analyzed through Monte Carlo reactor analysis. Evolution of the core fuel composition is also analyzed as a function of burnup. Although the long-life small B and B fast reactor is found to be feasible from the neutronics point of view, it is characterized to have several challenging technical issues including a very high fast neutron fluence of the structural materials. (authors)

  2. Preparations for deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D. B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L. A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Biglow, T. S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R. C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M. J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D. J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R. A.; Hsuan, H.; Jaeger, E. F.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Kwon, S.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Laughlin, M. J.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D. E.; Marchlik, M.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mastrocola, V.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Majeski, R.; Mauel, M.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Milora, S. L.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Pavlov, Yu. I.; Pearson, G.; Perkins, F.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pitcher, S.; Popovichev, S.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Scharer, J.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Senko, T.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C.; Snipes, J.; Snook, P.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Timberlake, J. R.; Towner, H. H.; Ulrickson, M.; von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, K.; Wong, D.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yeun, A.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zakharov, L.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.

    1994-05-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a FluorinertTM system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of ≊10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  3. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G.

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet{sup {trademark}} system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of {approximately} 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of {alpha}-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined {alpha}-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  4. On the power and size of tokamak fusion pilot plants and reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costley, A. E.; Hugill, J.; Buxton, P. F.

    2015-03-01

    It is generally accepted that the route to fusion power involves large devices of ITER scale or larger. However, we show, contrary to expectations, that for steady state tokamaks operating at fixed fractions of the density and beta limits, the fusion gain, Qfus, depends mainly on the absolute level of the fusion power and the energy confinement, and only weakly on the device size. Our investigations are carried out using a system code and also by analytical means. Further, we show that for the two qualitatively different global scalings that have been developed to fit the data contained in the ITER ELMy H-mode database, i.e. the normally used beta-dependent IPB98y2 scaling and the alternative beta-independent scalings, the power needed for high fusion performance differs substantially, typically by factors of three to four. Taken together, these two findings imply that lower power, smaller, and hence potentially lower cost, pilot plants and reactors than currently envisaged may be possible. The main parameters of a candidate low power (˜180 MW), high Qfus (˜5), relatively small (˜1.35 m major radius) device are given.

  5. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, M. G.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; White, R.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes experiments carried out on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [R. J. Hawryluk et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 33, 1509 (1991)] to investigate the dependence of β-limiting disruption characteristics on toroidal field strength. The hard disruptions found at the β-limit in high field plasmas were not found at low field, even for β's 50% higher than the empirical β-limit of β{sub n} ≈ 2 at high field. Comparisons of experimentally measured β's to TRANSP simulations suggest anomalous loss of up to half of the beam fast ions in the highest β, low field shots. The anomalous transport responsible for the fast ion losses may at the same time broaden the pressure profile. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes, fishbone instabilities, and Geodesic Acoustic Modes are investigated as possible causes of the enhanced losses. Here, we present the first observations of high frequency fishbones [F. Zonca et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 085009 (2009)] on TFTR. The interpretation of Axi-symmetric Beam-driven Modes as Geodesic Acoustic Modes and their possible correlation with transport barrier formation are also presented.

  6. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  7. Thin blanket design for MINIMARS - A compact tandem mirror fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Sawan, M.E.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Corradini, M.L.; Vogelsang, W.F.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1986-11-01

    Recent fusion power reactor designs have shown a trend toward lower power, lower cost, higher mass utilization compact configurations with inherent safety, in order to improve the economic aspects of fusion and make them more competitive with other energy sources. Since the blanket thickness directly impacts the size and mass of the remaining reactor components, it is prudent to minimize its thickness while ensuring adequate neutronic and thermal performance. This paper describes the blanket for the MINI-MARS compact tandem mirror fusion power reactor. The blanket which utilizes HT-9 ferritic steel structure, LiPb breeder, Be multiplier/moderator and He gas cooling is only 17 cm thick and is backed up by a steel reflector. Helium gas cools the blanket and reflector in series and the outlet temperature of 575/sup 0/C gives a gross thermal power cycle efficiency of 42.7%.

  8. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Lee L., Jr.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor, currently in its developmental stage, has a layered tungsten-lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other concepts were a boron carbide-beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride-beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboatory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced enery dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shields' ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydribe-tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. Volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  9. Surface analysis of 1984/1985 Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor limiter tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Pontau, A.E.; Wampler, W.R.; Mills, B.E.; Doyle, B.L.; Wright, A.F.; Ulrickson, M.A.; LaMarche, P.H.; Dylla, H.F.; Fukuda, S.

    1986-05-01

    Bare POCO AXF-5Q graphite tiles were installed as the plasma-facing surface of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) movable limiter for a series of approx. 2700 high power discharges (600 with up to 6 MW neutral beams). During this operating phase, erosion and deposition processes modified the surface of the limiter. In the regions of the most intense plasma contact, which reached temperatures over 2400/sup 0/C, only small amounts of metallic impurities (<5 x 10/sup 16/ atoms/cm/sup 2/) are observed during subsequent beta backscattering and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Also observed in these regions are several small areas of surface crazing, and scattered droplets of metals (approx. 1 mm diam) presumed to originate from melted internal hardware. In regions more removed from direct plasma contact, thicker metallic deposits are observed (approx. 2 x 10/sup 18/ atoms/cm/sup 2/). There are more of these deposits on the side facing the electron drift direction than on the ion drift side. The metallic deposits are composed of approx. 55% Ni, 25% Cr, and 20% Fe and several trace elements. Near-surface retained deuterium levels vary from 10/sup 16/ to 10/sup 18//cm/sup 2/ along one ion-side/electron-side pair of tiles. Deuterium from TFTR operations in the bulk of a tile may have been as much as 5 ppm. Hydrogen in the tile was approx.1 at. %. Surface roughness measured outside the intense plasma contact region is much more than the original POCO AXF-5Q graphite, whereas within the plasma contact region, tile surfaces are somewhat smoother than they were initially. Two of the tiles in high heat flux regions broke during operation. The resulting geometry change led to areas of enhanced erosion and nearby redeposition of carbon.

  10. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Alper, B.; Borba, D.; Cordey, J.G.; Ernst, D.R.; Gowers, C.

    2001-02-02

    First results of gyrokinetic analysis of JET [Joint European Torus] ELMy [Edge Localized Modes] H-mode [high-confinement modes] plasmas are presented. ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokamak reactors of the size of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. Relatively high performance for long duration has been achieved and the scaling appears to be favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Z(subscript eff) and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one with an intense gas puff and the other with a spontaneous transition between Type I to III ELMs at the heating power threshold. Linear gyrokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, gamma(subscript lin) of the fastest growing modes. The flow-shearing rate omega(subscript ExB) and gamma(subscript lin) are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high |gamma(subscript ExB)|/gamma(subscript lin) near the top of the pedestal for high confinement.

  11. Alpha Particle-Driven Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas: Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Nazikian, R.

    1998-07-09

    The toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [K. Young, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 26, 11 (1984)]deuterium-tritium plasmas are analyzed using the NOVA-K code [C.Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports 211, 1 (1992)]. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements in detail. In most cases, the theory agrees with the observations in terms of mode frequency, mode structure, and mode stability. However, one mode with toroidal mode number n = 2 is observed to be poloidally localized on the high field side of the magnetic axis with a mode frequency substantially below the TAE frequency.

  12. A New Interpretation of Alpha-particle-driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; G.J. Kramer; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; S.E. Sharapov

    2003-03-26

    The original description of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in terms of Toroidal Alfvin Eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the anti-ballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time.

  13. Neoclassical Simulations of Fusion Alpha Particles in Pellet Charge Exchange Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Levinton, F.M.; Redi, M.H.; et al

    1999-02-01

    Neoclassical simulations of alpha particle density profiles in high fusion power plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 1577] are found to be in good agreement with measurements of the alpha distribution function made with a sensitive active neutral particle diagnostic. The calculations are carried out in Hamiltonian magnetic coordinates with a fast, particle-following Monte Carlo code which includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first-principles model for stochastic ripple loss and collisional effects. New global loss and confinement domain calculations allow an estimate of the actual alpha particle densities measured with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic.

  14. New interpretation of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor.

    PubMed

    Nazikian, R; Kramer, G J; Cheng, C Z; Gorelenkov, N N; Berk, H L; Sharapov, S E

    2003-09-19

    The original description of alpha particle driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor in terms of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the antiballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time. PMID:14525368

  15. The ARIES-III D- sup 3 He tokamak reactor: Design-point determination and parametric studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bathke, C.G.; Werley, K.A.; Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A. ); Santarius, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The multi-institutional ARIES study has generated a conceptual design of another tokamak fusion reactor in a series that varies the assumed advances in technology and physics. The ARIES-3 design uses a D-{sup 3}He fuel cycle and requires advances in technology and physics for economical attractiveness. The optimal design was characterized through systems analyses for eventual conceptual engineering design. Results from the systems analysis are summarized, and a comparison with the high-field, D-T fueled ARIES-1 is included. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  16. ECH tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, M.A.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    A small steady-state tokamak capable of producing power in the 100 to 300 MWe range and relying on electron cyclotron RF heating (ECH) for both heating and current drive is described. Working in the first MHD stability regime for tokamaks, the approach adheres to the recently discovered maximum beta limit. An appropriate figure of merit is the ratio of the fusion power to absorbed RF power. Efficient devices are feasible at both small and large values of fusion power, thereby pointing to a development path for an attractive commercial fusion reactor.

  17. Collaboration on Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Text Reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T.

    2000-06-01

    This proposal was peer reviewed and funded as a Collaboration on ''Low Phase Speed Radio Frequency Current Drive Experiments at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''. The original plans we had were to carry out the collaboration proposal by including a post doctoral scientist stationed at PPPL. In response to a 60+% funding cut, all expenses were radically pruned. The post doctoral position was eliminated, and the Principal Investigator (T. Intrator) carried out the brunt of the collaboration. Visits to TFTR enabled T. Intrator to set up access to the TFTR computing network, database, and get familiar with the new antennas that were being installed in TFTR during an up to air. One unfortunate result of the budget squeeze that TFTR felt for its last year of operation was that the experiments that we specifically got funded to perform were not granted run time on TFTR., On the other hand we carried out some modeling of the electric field structure around the four strap direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) antenna that was operated on TFTR. This turned out to be a useful exercise and shed some light on the operational characteristics of the IBW antenna and its coupling to the plasma. Because of this turn of events, the project was renamed ''Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''.

  18. Nuclear aspects of tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) diagnostics and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    There are five principal aspects of the nuclear radiation from the high temperature plasmas of TFTR on its plasma diagnostic equipment. i) Important information about the plasma properties to be obtained from measurement of the neutrons, or other fusion reaction products. ii) Experimental studies to give design data for future tokamak devices and their instrumentation. iii) Transient noise or damage effects on the array of detectors for the collection of physics data about the plasma. iv) The effect of tritium on detectors that necessarily are in vacuum, directly connected to the tokamak vacuum vessel. v) Damage of diagnostic components mounted close to the vacuum vessel. Each of these topics will be addressed after a brief description of the TFTR tokamak and its radiation environment.

  19. A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated Strings of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C W; Reisman, D B; McLean, H S; Thomas, J

    2007-05-30

    A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall.

  20. Development and analysis of a compact low-conversion ratio fast burner reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-05-12

    This report explores design options for compact fast burner reactors that can achieve low conversion ratios. Operational characteristics and whole-core reactivity coefficients are generated and contrasted with low conversion ratio designs of previous studies. A compact core point design is then selected and detailed reactivity coefficients are displayed and discussed. The effectiveness of fast spectrum systems for actinide transmutation has been well documented. The key advantage of the fast spectrum resides in the severely reduced capture/fission ratios. this inhibits the production of the higher actinides that dominate the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste. In conventional fast burner studies, the transmutation rate was limited by constraints placed on the fuel composition. In an earlier phase of this study the entire range of fuel compositions (including non-uranium fuel) was explored to assess the performance and safety limits of fast burner reactor systems. In this report, similar fuel compositions are utilized for application in compact configurations to achieve conversion ratios below 0.5.

  1. Spherical tokamaks with plasma centre-post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2013-10-01

    The metal centre-post (MCP) in tokamaks is a structure which carries the total toroidal field current and also houses the Ohmic heating solenoid in conventional or low aspect ratio (Spherical)(ST) tokamaks. The MCP and solenoid are critical components for producing the toroidal field and for the limited Ohmic flux in STs. Constraints for a ST reactor related to these limitations lead to a minimum plasma aspect ratio of 1.4 which reduces the benefit of operation at higher betas in a more compact ST reactor. Replacing the MCP is of great interest for reactor-based ST studies since the device is simplified, compactness increased, and maintenance reduced. An experiment to show the feasibility of using a plasma centre-post (PCP) is being currently under construction and involves a high level of complexity. A preliminary study of a very simple PCP, which is ECR(Electron Cyclotron Resonance)-assisted and which includes an innovative fuelling system based on pellet injection, has recently been reported. This is highly suitable for an ultra-low aspect ratio tokamak (ULART) device. Advances on this PCP ECR-assisted concept within a ULART and the associated fuelling system are presented here, and will include the field topology for the PCP ECR-assisted scheme, pellet ablation modeling, and a possible global equilibrium simulation. VIE-ITCR, IAEA-CRP contr.17592, National Instruments-Costa Rica.

  2. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-12

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20–40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500–1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure β{sub N} > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D – Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  3. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-01

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure βN > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D - Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  4. SUSEE: A Compact, Lightweight Space Nuclear Power System Using Present Water Reactor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Maise, George; Powell, James; Paniagua, John

    2006-01-20

    The SUSEE space reactor system uses existing nuclear fuels and the standard steam cycle to generate electrical and thermal power for a wide range of in-space and surface applications, including manned bases, sub-surface mobile probes to explore thick ice deposits on Mars and the Jovian moons, and mobile rovers. SUSEE cycle efficiency, thermal to electric, ranges from {approx}20 to 24%, depending on operating parameters. Rejection of waste heat is by a lightweight condensing radiator that can be launched as a compact rolled-up package and deployed into flat panels when appropriate. The 50 centimeter diameter SUSEE reactor can provide power over the range of 10 kW(e) to 1 MW(e) for a period of 10 years. Higher power outputs are possible using slightly larger reactors. System specific weight (reactor, turbine, generator, piping, and radiator) is {approx}3 kg/kW(e). Two SUSEE reactor options are described, based on the existing Zr/O2 cermet and the UH3/ZrH2 TRIGA nuclear fuels.

  5. SUSEE: A Compact, Lightweight Space Nuclear Power System Using Present Water Reactor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maise, George; Powell, James; Paniagua, John

    2006-01-01

    The SUSEE space reactor system uses existing nuclear fuels and the standard steam cycle to generate electrical and thermal power for a wide range of in-space and surface applications, including manned bases, sub-surface mobile probes to explore thick ice deposits on Mars and the Jovian moons, and mobile rovers. SUSEE cycle efficiency, thermal to electric, ranges from ~20 to 24%, depending on operating parameters. Rejection of waste heat is by a lightweight condensing radiator that can be launched as a compact rolled-up package and deployed into flat panels when appropriate. The 50 centimeter diameter SUSEE reactor can provide power over the range of 10 kW(e) to 1 MW(e) for a period of 10 years. Higher power outputs are possible using slightly larger reactors. System specific weight (reactor, turbine, generator, piping, and radiator is ~3 kg/kW(e). Two SUSEE reactor options are described, based on the existing Zr/O2 cermet and the UH3/ZrH2 TRIGA nuclear fuels.

  6. Concept for Dismantling the Reactor Vessel and the Biological Shield of the Compact Sodium-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Facility (KNK)

    SciTech Connect

    Hillebrand, I.; Benkert, J.

    2002-02-27

    The Compact Sodium-cooled Nuclear Reactor Facility (KNK) was an experimental nuclear power plant of 20 MW electric power erected on the premises of the Karlsruhe Research Center. The plant was initially run as KNK I with a thermal core between 1971 and 1974 and then, between 1977 and 1991, with a fast core as the KNK II fast breeder plant. Under the decommissioning concept, the plant is to be decommissioned completely to green field conditions at the end of 2005 in ten steps, i.e. under the corresponding ten decommissioning permits. To this day, nine decommissioning permits have been issued, the first one in 1993 and the most recent one, number nine, in 2001. The decommissioning and demolition activities covered by decommissioning permits 1 to 7 have been completed. Under the 8th Decommissioning Permit, the components of the primary system and the rotating reactor top shield are to be removed by late 2001. Under the 9th Decommissioning Permit, the reactor vessel with its internals, the primary shield, and the biological shield are to be dismantled. The residual sodium volume in the reactor vessel was estimated to amount to approx. 30 l. The maximum Co-60 activation is on the order of 107-108 Bq/g; the maximum dose rate in the middle of the vessel was measured in April 1997 to be 55 Sv/h. The difficulty involved especially in dismantling KNK, on the one hand, is posed by the residual sodium in the plant, which determines the choice of neither wet nor thermical techniques to be used in disassembly. Another difficulty is caused by the depth of activation by fast neutrons, as a result of which not only the reactor vessel proper, but also the entire primary shield (60 cm of grey cast iron) and large parts of the biological shield must be disassembled and disposed of under remote control.

  7. Thermionic plasma injection for the Lockheed Martin T4 Compact Fusion Reactor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2015-11-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept relies on diamagnetic confinement in a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp geometry. Plasma injection into cusp field configurations requires careful deliberation. Previous work has shown that axial injection via a plasma gun is capable of achieving high-beta conditions in cusp configurations. We present a pulsed, high power thermionic plasma source and the associated magnetic field topology for plasma injection into the caulked-cusp magnetic field. The resulting plasma fueling and cross-field diffusion is discussed.

  8. Final Report for Monitoring of Reactor Antineutrinos with Compact Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John L.; Collar, J. I.

    2009-07-01

    This 2008 NCMR project has pursued measurement of the antineutrino-nucleus coherent scattering interaction using a low-energy threshold germanium gamma-ray spectrometer of roughly one-half kilogram total mass. These efforts support development of a compact system for monitoring the antineutrino emission from nuclear reactor cores. Such a monitoring system is relevant to nuclear safeguards and nuclear non-proliferation in general by adding a strong method for assuring quantitative material balance of special nuclear material in the nuclear fuel cycle used in electricity generation.

  9. Thermal-hydraulics and safety analysis of sectored compact reactor for lunar surface power

    SciTech Connect

    Schriener, T. M.; El-Genk, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    The liquid NaK-cooled, fast-neutron spectrum, Sectored Compact Reactor (SCoRe-N 5) concept has been developed at the Univ. of New Mexico for lunar surface power applications. It is loaded with highly enriched UN fuel pins in a triangular lattice, and nominally operates at exit and inlet coolant temperatures of 850 K and 900 K. This long-life reactor generates up to 1 MWth continuously for {>=} 20 years. To avoid a single point failure in reactor cooling, the core is divided into 6 sectors that are neutronically and thermally coupled, but hydraulically independent. This paper performs a 3-D the thermal-hydraulic analysis of SCoRe--N 5 at nominal operation temperatures and a power level of 1 MWth. In addition, the paper investigates the potential of continuing reactor operation at a lower power in the unlikely event that one sector in the core experiences a loss of coolant (LOC). Redesigning the core with a contiguous steel matrix enhances the cooling of the sector experiencing a LOC. Results show that with a core sector experiencing a LOC, SCORE-N 5 could continue operating safely at a reduced power of 166.6 kWth. (authors)

  10. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Batha, S.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Petrov, M.P.; von Goeler, S.; White, R.B.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.; TFTR Team

    1999-07-01

    Neoclassical simulations of alpha particle density profiles in high fusion power plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [Phys. Plasmas {bold 5}, 1577 (1998)] are found to be in good agreement with measurements of the alpha distribution function made with a sensitive active neutral particle diagnostic. The calculations are carried out in Hamiltonian magnetic coordinates with a fast, particle-following Monte Carlo code which includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first-principles model for stochastic ripple loss and collisional effects. New calculations show that monotonic shear alpha particles are virtually unaffected by toroidal field ripple. The calculations show that in reversed shear the confinement domain is not empty for trapped alphas at birth and allow an estimate of the actual alpha particle densities measured with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  12. Combination of helical ferritic-steel inserts and flux-tube-expansion divertor for the heat control in tokamak DEMO reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, T.; Tokunaga, S.; Hoshino, K.; Shimizu, K.; Asakura, N.

    2015-08-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) in the H-mode operation of tokamak reactors may be suppressed/mitigated by the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), but RMP coils are considered incompatible with DEMO reactors under the strong neutron flux. We propose an innovative concept of the RMP without installing coils but inserting ferritic steels of the helical configuration. Helically perturbed field is naturally formed in the axisymmetric toroidal field through the helical ferritic steel inserts (FSIs). When ELMs are avoided, large stationary heat load on divertor plates can be reduced by adopting a flux-tube-expansion (FTE) divertor like an X divertor. Separatrix shape and divertor-plate inclination are similar to those of a simple long-leg divertor configuration. Combination of the helical FSIs and the FTE divertor is a suitable method for the heat control to avoid transient ELM heat pulse and to reduce stationary divertor heat load in a tokamak DEMO reactor.

  13. What we should do for transition from current tokamaks to fusion-fission reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Russian fission community places several heavy demands to quality of fusion neutron source for the first step of investigation of minority transmutations ("burning") and breading of nuclear fuel. They are: the steady state regime of neutron production (not rare 80% of main operation time), the total power on neutron flux should be not lower than 20MW with surface neutron load not lower than 0.2MW/m2. Between the current fusion devices: mirror traps, reverse field pinches, stellarators, spherical torus and tokamaks only lasts have today the some probability to fulfill in the near future these hard demands. Two well known DT-tokamaks with neutron power production higher 10MW - TFTR and JET-had maximal neutron load approximately 0.1MW/m2 only in transient (with time scale lower 1s) regimes. The quasi steady state neutron emission regime (˜5MW, 5sec) was performed in JET with mean surface neutron load lower than 0.025MW/m2 only. In this communication it will be discussed the main needs of JET scale tokamak improvement for increase on neutron load up to 0.2MW/m2. They are: decrease of Zeff by ECRH and lithium use as plasma facing components, the increase of energy of steady state neutral injectors up to 150-170keV (tritium), the He removal and creation of closed loop of DT fuel circulation.

  14. TIBER II: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor: 1986 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1986-10-23

    Several chapters are presented that cover the following areas: (1) physics basis; (2) current drive; (3) compact divertors; (4) neutron shielding; (5) high-current density, radiation-tolerant magnets; and (6) costs. (MOW)

  15. CFD Modeling of Sodium-Oxide Deposition in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Compact Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Tatli, Emre; Ferroni, Paolo; Mazzoccoli, Jason

    2015-09-02

    The possible use of compact heat exchangers (HXs) in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) employing a Brayton cycle is promising due to their high power density and resulting small volume in comparison with conventional shell-and-tube HXs. However, the small diameter of their channels makes them more susceptible to plugging due to Na2O deposition during accident conditions. Although cold traps are designed to reduce oxygen impurity levels in the sodium coolant, their failure, in conjunction with accidental air ingress into the sodium boundary, could result in coolant oxygen levels that are above the saturation limit in the cooler parts of the HX channels. This can result in Na2O crystallization and the formation of solid deposits on cooled channel surfaces, limiting or even blocking coolant flow. The development of analysis tools capable of modeling the formation of these deposits in the presence of sodium flow will allow designers of SFRs to properly size the HX channels so that, in the scenario mentioned above, the reactor operator has sufficient time to detect and react to the affected HX. Until now, analytical methodologies to predict the formation of these deposits have been developed, but never implemented in a high-fidelity computational tool suited to modern reactor design techniques. This paper summarizes the challenges and the current status in the development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology to predict deposit formation, with particular emphasis on sensitivity studies on some parameters affecting deposition.

  16. Electron cyclotron heating of a tokamak reactor at down-shifted frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Mazzucato, E.

    1985-01-01

    The absorption of electron cyclotron waves in a hot and dense tokamak plasma is investigated for the case of the extraordinary mode for outside launching. It is shown that, for electron temperatures T/sub e/ greater than or equal to 5 keV, strong absorption occurs for oblique propagation at frequencies significantly below the electron gyrofrequency at the plasma center. A new density dependence of the wave absorption is found which is more favorable for plasma heating than the familiar n/sub e//sup -1/ scaling.

  17. Overview of the STARFIRE reference commercial tokamak fusion power reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.C.; Abdou, M.A.; DeFreece, D.A.; Trachsel, C.A.; Graumann, D.; Barry, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the STARFIRE study is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The major features for STARFIRE include a steady-state operating mode based on a continuous rf lower-hybrid current drive and auxiliary heating, solid tritium breeder material, pressurized water cooling, limiter/vacuum system for impurity control and exhaust, high tritium burnup, superconducting EF coils outside the TF superconducting coils, fully remote maintenance, and a low-activation shield.

  18. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2000-11-15

    ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokalmak reactors of the size of ITER. Relatively high performace for long durations has been achieved and the scaling is favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Zeff and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one in which the degradation occurs with an intense gas puff, and the other with a spontaneous transition at the heating power threshold from Type I to III ELMs. Linear gryokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, glin of the fastest growing mode. Our results indicate that the flow-shearing rate wExB and glin are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high *wExB*/glin near the top of the pedestal for high confinement.

  19. Particle confinement property in the cusp-mirror field of a compact fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Limin; Liu, Haifeng; Wang, Xianqu

    2016-09-01

    The cusp-mirror magnetic structure in a compact fusion reactor (CFR) is investigated to understand the properties of the particle confinement for the first time. Compared with a cascade magnetic mirror device, its advanced performance is shown by means of test particle simulations. Some interesting results are obtained as follows: the adiabatic region and non-adiabatic region are found in the CFR’s magnetic configuration. In the non-adiabatic region, due to the magnetic field-free space existing, the ions are scattered stochastically and are not directly guided into the loss cone, unlike the particles around the fixed magnetic lines in the adiabatic region, which decrease the ion loss fraction. The CFR’s configuration, combining advantages of cusp-magnetic configuration and mirror-magnetic configuration, leads to confine particles longer than cascade magnetic mirror’s. This phenomenon may be relevant to the construction of advanced magnetic-confinement devices.

  20. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  1. Ignition in near term D-/sup 3/He tokamak reactors: Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, G.A.; Deng, B.Q.

    1987-01-01

    The prospects for achieving breakeven and ignition in near term ETR type tokamaks under D/He-3 relevant conditions are considered. Using present scaling laws for beta in the first stability regime, it is found that CIT may be close to breakeven with the presently planned toroidal magnetic field system, if the ASDEX H-mode scaling law is used. With Kaye-Goldston scaling, Q = .22 can be attained, but this requires an excessive amount of rf heating power. Larger devices, such as NET/INTOR, can ignite with ASDEX H-mode scaling with an increase of the toroidal field by 20% and removal of the blanket and reduction of the inboard shield to that required for D/He-3. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Atomic data and level populations of highly ionized Ti for tokamak plasmas. [reactor chamber alloy constituent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents calculations of electron impact collision strengths and spontaneous radiative decay rates for titanium ions of the LiI through FI isoelectronic sequences for transitions between levels of the 2S(2)2p(k), 2s2p(k+1), and 2p(k+2) configurations. From these atomic data, excitation-rate coefficients are calculated along with level populations for these three configurations. The calculations of level populations include the effects of proton excitation, and are carried out at electron temperatures and densities typical of tokamak plasmas. Wavelengths of forbidden and intersystem lines are given, and a synthetic spectrum is presented for a typical temperature and density.

  3. Critical Design Issues of Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER's Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seokho H; Berry, Jan

    2011-01-01

    U.S. ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). The TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak to cooling water during nominal pulsed operation 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. This water contains radionuclides because impurities (e.g., tritium) diffuse from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200 240 C at up to 4.4MPa, and corrosion products become activated by neutron bombardment. The system is designated as safety important class (SIC) and will be fabricated to comply with the French Order concerning nuclear pressure equipment (December 2005) and the EU Pressure Equipment Directive using ASME Section VIII, Div 2 design codes. The complexity of the TCWS design and fabrication presents unique challenges. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed with several issues that need to be resolved to move to next stage of the design. Those issues include flow balancing between over hundreds of branch pipelines in parallel to supply cooling water to blankets, determination of optimum flow velocity while minimizing the potential for cavitation damage, design for freezing protection for cooling water flowing through cryostat (freezing) environment, requirements for high-energy piping design, and electromagnetic impact to piping and components. Although the TCWS consists of standard commercial components such as piping with valves and fittings, heat exchangers, and pumps, complex requirements present interesting design challenges. This paper presents a brief description of TCWS conceptual design and critical design issues that need to be resolved.

  4. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore » combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  5. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimum combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.

  6. Real-time loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification in compact disc micro-reactors.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Felipe, Sara; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Carrascosa, Javier; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-05-15

    An integrated device composed of micro-reactors embedded onto compact discs is proposed for real-time targeted DNA determination. The method principle is based on in-disc loop-mediated isothermal amplification (iD-LAMP) and quantitative optical read-out by a disc drive. In the presence of a target, the turbidimetric or colorimetric properties of reaction solution change, and the transmitted intensity of the disc drive laser modifies according to reaction yield. Monitoring real-time curves allowed the quantitative determination of DNA template amounts. The best amplification/detection results were obtained with micro-reactors (2mm diameter and 1.1mm in depth) drilled on a digital video disc (DVD) and detection based on the colorimetric mode. As proof-of-concept, the assay was applied to detect pathogenic bacteria Salmonella spp. and to identify bovine meat in food samples. Ninety-six samples were simultaneously analysed in 15 min, with high selectivity and sensitivity (5 CFU/mL and 10 µg/g for bacteria and meat, respectively). The in-disc results were comparable to those obtained by conventional LAMP or qPCR approaches. The developed device allows low sample and reagent consumption (3 µL of reaction), portability, ease-of-use, and rapid low-cost high-throughput analyses. PMID:26716424

  7. Liquid immersion blanket design for use in a compact modular fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Hartwig, Zachary; Olynyk, Geoffrey; Sierchio, Jennifer; Whyte, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    Traditional tritium breeding blankets in fusion reactor designs include a large amount of structural material. This results in complex engineering requirements, complicated sector maintenance, and marginal tritium breeding ratios (TBR). We present a conceptual design of a fully liquid blanket. To maximize tritium breeding volume, the vacuum vessel is completely immersed in a continuously recycled FLiBe blanket, with the exception of small support posts. FLiBe has a wide liquid temperature window (459 C to 1430 C), low electrical conductivity to minimize MHD effects, similar thermal/fluid characteristics to water, and is chemically inert. While tritium breeding with FLiBe in traditional blankets is poor, we use MCNP neutronics analysis to show that the immersion blanket design coupled with a beryllium neutron multiplier results in TBR > 1. FLiBe is shown to be a sufficient radiation shield for the toroidal field magnets and can be used as a coolant for the vacuum vessel and divertor, allowing for a simplified single-phase, low-pressure, single-fluid cooling scheme. When coupled with a high-field compact reactor design, the immersion blanket eliminates the need for complex sector maintenance, allows the vacuum vessel to be a replaceable component, and reduces financial cost.

  8. Non-Nuclear Testing of Compact Reactor Technologies at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Pearson, J. Boise; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Safe, reliable, compact, autonomous, long-life fission systems have numerous potential applications, both terrestrially and in space. Technologies and facilities developed in support of these systems could be useful to a variety of concepts. At moderate power levels, fission systems can be designed to operate for decades without the need for refueling. In addition, fast neutron damage to cladding and structural materials can be maintained at an acceptable level. Nuclear design codes have advanced to the stage where high confidence in the behavior and performance of a system can be achieved prior to initial testing. To help ensure reactor affordability, an optimal strategy must be devised for development and qualification. That strategy typically involves a combination of non-nuclear and nuclear testing. Non-nuclear testing is particularly useful for concepts in which nuclear operating characteristics are well understood and nuclear effects such as burnup and radiation damage are not likely to be significant. To be mass efficient, a SFPS must operate at higher coolant temperatures and use different types of power conversion than typical terrestrial reactors. The primary reason is the difficulty in rejecting excess heat to space. Although many options exist, NASA s current reference SFPS uses a fast spectrum, pumped-NaK cooled reactor coupled to a Stirling power conversion subsystem. The reference system uses technology with significant terrestrial heritage while still providing excellent performance. In addition, technologies from the SFPS system could be applicable to compact terrestrial systems. Recent non-nuclear testing at NASA s Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) has helped assess the viability of the reference SFPS and evaluate methods for system integration. In July, 2011 an Annular Linear Induction Pump (ALIP) provided by Idaho National Laboratory was tested at the EFF-TF to assess performance and verify suitability for use in a10 kWe technology

  9. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  10. RAMI Analysis for Designing and Optimizing Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) for the ITER's Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, Juan J; Reiersen, Wayne T

    2011-01-01

    U.S.-ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). TCWS is designed to provide cooling and baking for client systems that include the first wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, divertor, and neutral beam injector. Additional operations that support these primary functions include chemical control of water provided to client systems, draining and drying for maintenance, and leak detection/localization. TCWS interfaces with 27 systems including the secondary cooling system, which rejects this heat to the environment. TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak during nominal pulsed operation - 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. Impurities are diffused from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200-240 C at up to 4.4 MPa. TCWS is complex because it serves vital functions for four primary clients whose performance is critical to ITER's success and interfaces with more than 20 additional ITER systems. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed; however, several issues remain that must be resolved before moving to the next stage of the design process. The 2004 baseline design indicated cooling loops that have no fault tolerance for component failures. During plasma operation, each cooling loop relies on a single pump, a single pressurizer, and one heat exchanger. Consequently, failure of any of these would render TCWS inoperable, resulting in plasma shutdown. The application of reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability (RAMI) tools during the different stages of TCWS design is crucial for optimization purposes and for maintaining compliance with project requirements. RAMI analysis will indicate appropriate equipment redundancy that provides graceful degradation in the event of an equipment failure. This analysis helps demonstrate that using proven, commercially available equipment is better than using custom-designed equipment

  11. Distributions of alpha particles escaping to the wall during sawtooth oscillations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, Y.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; White, R.B.; Yakovenko, Y.V.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-04-01

    It has been observed experimentally in deuterium{endash}tritium shots of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion {bold 25}, 1167 (1985)] that crashes of sawtooth oscillations may result in very inhomogeneous flux of alpha particles to the wall. To explain this phenomenon, both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation have been carried out. It is concluded that the {open_quotes}crash-induced prompt loss,{close_quotes} i.e., the orbital loss of marginally trapped particles arising because of the crash-induced orbit transformation of circulating particles, is responsible for the flux near the bottom of the vessel, whereas the crash-induced stochastic diffusion of moderately trapped particles explains the large signal near the equatorial plane of the torus. The calculated poloidal distributions of the integral alpha flux are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The energy spectrum of the escaping particles has also been calculated, which can be used for diagnostics of the crash type. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.} thinsp

  12. Soft-computing approach to plasma evolution tracking in tokamak reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, Francesco C.

    1997-10-01

    Qualitative information about the structure of a mapping can surely be of help in learning a mapping by a collection of input-output pairs. However, there are conditions in which time and some other constraints make guessing the only plausible means for interpreting data. In this paper, the problem of the plasma boundary reconstruction in 'Tokamak' nuclear fusion rectors is assessed. The problem is formulated as an inverse 'identification' problem and the mapping is derived by a properly generated database of simulated experiments. Real data coming from experiments are also available to validate both numerically generated data and extracted model. The identification problem is solved for two different databases by using neural networks and more conventional models. The introduction of techniques derived from soft computing is shown to improve the performance in various respects. Dynamic identification systems appear to be rather demanding also for such systems, for the need of rapidly interpreting real time data for discharge control. Soft computing approaches may yet yield some low cost ways to take decisions during plasma evolution. The approximate analysis of experimental data could also improve the knowledge on the particular problem allowing an evolution of the knowledge base. Experimental data related to ASDEX-Upgrade machine are presented in this work and preliminary processed. Soft computing techniques also allow to simply get ideas about two other interesting problems in plasma engineering, namely, the fault tolerance and the minimization of the number of sensors.

  13. Designing a tokamak fusion reactor—How does plasma physics fit in?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, J. P.; Mangiarotti, F. J.; Minervini, J.

    2015-07-01

    This paper attempts to bridge the gap between tokamak reactor design and plasma physics. The analysis demonstrates that the overall design of a tokamak fusion reactor is determined almost entirely by the constraints imposed by nuclear physics and fusion engineering. Virtually, no plasma physics is required to determine the main design parameters of a reactor: a , R 0 , B 0 , T i , T e , p , n , τ E , I . The one exception is the value of the toroidal current I , which depends upon a combination of engineering and plasma physics. This exception, however, ultimately has a major impact on the feasibility of an attractive tokamak reactor. The analysis shows that the engineering/nuclear physics design makes demands on the plasma physics that must be satisfied in order to generate power. These demands are substituted into the well-known operational constraints arising in tokamak physics: the Troyon limit, Greenwald limit, kink stability limit, and bootstrap fraction limit. Unfortunately, a tokamak reactor designed on the basis of standard engineering and nuclear physics constraints does not scale to a reactor. Too much current is required to achieve the necessary confinement time for ignition. The combination of achievable bootstrap current plus current drive is not sufficient to generate the current demanded by the engineering design. Several possible solutions are discussed in detail involving advances in plasma physics or engineering. The main contribution of the present work is to demonstrate that the basic reactor design and its plasma physics consequences can be determined simply and analytically. The analysis thus provides a crisp, compact, logical framework that will hopefully lead to improved physical intuition for connecting plasma physic to tokamak reactor design.

  14. QUANTITATIVE HOMOGENEITY AND IN-CONTACT PARTICLES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTORS (HTR) COMPACTS DETERMINATION VIA X-RAY TOMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, G.; Letang, J. M.; Tisseur, D.; Banchet, J.; Vitali, M. P.

    2008-02-28

    In AREVA Nuclear Power's High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design called ANTARES, fuel consists of compacts composed of few thousands millimetric quasi-spherical particles dispersed in a graphite matrix. Compact homogeneity, defined as the homogeneous particles spatial distribution in the matrix, as well as the possibility of obtaining particles in contact, need to be assessed since they condition the thermo-mechanical behavior of the nuclear fuel under irradiation. In this paper, image and data processing algorithms are developed to do so, based on X-Ray tomographic images.

  15. Quantitative Homogeneity and In-Contact Particles of High Temperature Reactors (htr) Compacts Determination via X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, G.; Tisseur, D.; Létang, J. M.; Banchet, J.; Vitali, M. P.

    2008-02-01

    In AREVA Nuclear Power's High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design called ANTARES, fuel consists of compacts composed of few thousands millimetric quasi-spherical particles dispersed in a graphite matrix. Compact homogeneity, defined as the homogeneous particles spatial distribution in the matrix, as well as the possibility of obtaining particles in contact, need to be assessed since they condition the thermo-mechanical behavior of the nuclear fuel under irradiation. In this paper, image and data processing algorithms are developed to do so, based on X-Ray tomographic images.

  16. Feasibility study on ultralong-cycle operation and material performance for compact liquid metal-cooled fast reactors: a review work

    SciTech Connect

    Tak, Taewoo; Choe, Jiwon; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung; Kim, T. K.; Hong, Ser Gi

    2015-11-01

    This paper reviews the feasibility of ultralong-cycle operation on a compact liquid metal-cooled fast reactor (LMR) firstly by assessing the operation of a long-life fast reactor core and secondly by evaluating material performance in respect to both long-cycle operation and compact-size fast reactor. Many kinds of reactor concepts have been proposed, and LMR and small modular reactor (SMR) are the issued leading technologies for generation four (Gen-IV) reactor system development. The breed-and-burn strategy was proposed as a core burning strategy to operate a long cycle, and it has been evaluated in this paper with two reactor concepts: constant axial shape of neutron flux, nuclide densities, and power shape during life of energy and ultralong cycle fast reactor. In addition, Super-Safe, Small, and Simple and small modular fast reactor, compact LMR concepts, have been simulated to evaluate their long-life operation strategies. For the other practical issues, the materials for fuel, coolant, and structure have been identified and some of them are selected to have their performance optimized specifically for compact LMR with a long-cycle operation. It is believed that this comprehensive review will propose a proper direction for future reactor development and will be followed by the next step research for a complete reactor model with the other reactor components.

  17. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of {alpha}-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on {alpha}-particle loss has led to a better understanding of {alpha}-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing {alpha}-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90{degree} lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an {alpha}-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized {alpha}-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  18. An interim report on the materials and selection criteria analysis for the Compact Ignition Tokamak Toroidal Field Coil Turn-to-Turn Insulation System

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, V.W.; Dooley, J.B.; Hubrig, J.G.; Janke, C.J.; McManamy, T.J.; Welch, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Design criteria for the Compact Ignition Tokamak, Toroidal-Field (TF) Coil, Turn-to-Turn Insulation System require an insulation sheet and bonding system that will survive cryogenic cycling in a radiation environment and maintain structural integrity during exposure to the significant compressive and shear loads associated with each operating cycle. For thermosetting resin systems, a complex interactive dependency exists between optimum peak value, in-service property performance capabilities of candidate generic materials; key handling and processing parameters required to achieve their optimum in-service property performance as an insulation system; and suitability of their handling and processing parameters as a function of design configuration and assembly methodology. This dependency is assessed in a weighted study matrix in which two principal programmatic approaches for the development of the TF Coil Subassembly Insulation System have been identified. From this matrix study, two viable approaches to the fabrication of the insulation sheet were identified: use of a press-formed sheet bonded in place with epoxy for mechanical bonding and tolerance take-up and formation of the insulation sheet by placement of dry cloth and subsequent vacuum pressure impregnation. Laboratory testing was conducted to screen a number of combinations of resins and hardeners on a generic basis. These combinations were chosen for their performance in similar applications. Specimens were tested to screen viscosity, thermal-shock tolerance, and cryogenic tolerance. Cryogenic shock and cryogenic temperature proved to be extremely lethal to many combinations of resin, hardener, and cure. Two combinations survived: a heavily flexibilized bisphenol A resin with a flexibilized amine hardener and a bisphenol A resin with cycloaliphatic amine hardener. 7 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. High performance inboard shield design for the compact TIBER-II test reactor: Appendix A-2

    SciTech Connect

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The compactness of the TIBER-II reactor has placed a premium on the design of a high performance inboard shield to protect the inner legs of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The available space for shield is constrained to 48 cm and the use of tungsten is mandatory to protect the magnet against the 1.53 MW/m/sup 2/ neutron wall loading. The primary requirement for the shield is to limit the fast neutron fluence to 10/sup 19/ n/cm/sup 2/. In an optimization study, the performance of various candidate materials for protecting the magnet was examined. The optimum shield consists of a 40 cm thick W layer, followed by an 8 cm thick H/sub 2/O/LiNO/sub 3/ layer. The mechanical design of the shield calls for tungsten blocks within SS stiffened panels. All the coolant channels are vertical with more of them in the front where there is a high heat load. The coolant pressure is 0.2 MPa and the maximum structural surface temperature is <95/sup 0/C. The effects of the detailed mechanical design of the shield and the assembly gaps between the shield sectors on the damage in the magnet were analyzed and peaking factors of approx.2 were found at the hot spots. 2 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Nuclear design methodology for analyzing ultra high temperature highly compact ternary carbide reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouw, Reza Raymond

    Recent studies at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating solid solutions of ternary carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, (U,Zr,Ta)C, (U,Zr,Hf)C and (U,Zr,W)C. The necessity for accurate nuclear design analysis of these ternary carbides in highly compact nuclear space systems prompted the development of nuclear design methodology for analyzing these systems. This study will present the improvement made in the high temperature nuclear cross-sections. It will show the relation between Monte Carlo and Deterministic calculations. It will prove the significant role of the energy spectrum in the multigroup nuclear cross-sections generation in the highly-thermalized-nuclear system. The nuclear design methodology will address several issues in the homogenization of a nuclear system, such as energy spectrum comparison between a heterogeneous system and homogeneous system. It will also address several key points in the continuous and multigroup nuclear cross-sections generation. The study will present the methodology of selecting broad energy group structures. Finally, a comparison between the Monte Carlo and Deterministic methods will be performed for the Square-Lattice Honeycomb Nuclear Space Reactor. In the comparison calculations, it will include the system characterization calculations, such as energy spectrum comparison, 2-D power distributions, temperature coefficient analysis, and water submersion accident analysis.

  1. Thin blanket design for MINIMARS - a compact tandem mirror fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Sawan, M.E.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Corradini, M.L.; Vogelsang, W.F.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    A primary goal in the MINIMARS fusion power reactor design is to achieve the lowest possible cost of electricity and highest mass utilization while maintaining credibility and passive safety. Because the blanket impacts many components, reducing its thickness-while achieving adequate breeding and a high energy multiplication-was of prime importance. The MINIMARS blanket is a helium-gas-cooled design using 17Li-83Pb (LiPb) breeder, HT-9 structure, and beryllium moderator/multiplier. The helium gas is contained in small tubes that are immersed in a close-packed matrix of beryllium balls and LiPb. The result is a compact blanket only 18 cm thick in which only the tubes are operated in a stressed condition, but the blanket structure is designed to withstand a helium gas leak in one of the tubes. By circulating the helium gas from the blanket into the reflector, the reflector energy is recovered at a high temperature giving a gross power cycle efficiency of 42.7% while maintaining a low interface temperature between the breeding material and structure.

  2. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  3. Analysis of alpha particle-driven toroidal Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium{endash}tritium experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Wong, K.L.; Zweben, S.

    1996-11-01

    The toroidal Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes (TAE) are calculated to be stable in the presently obtained deuterium{endash}tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Plasma Phys. Controlled Nucl. Fusion Res. {bold 26}, 11 (1984)]. However, the core localized TAE mode can exist and is less stable than the global TAE modes. The beam ion Landau damping and the radiative damping are the two main stabilizing mechanisms in the present calculation. In future deuterium{endash}tritium experiments, the alpha-driven TAE modes are predicted to occur with a weakly reversed shear profile. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Systems code assessment of innovations, major design drivers, and minimum sizes of INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) and ETR-like designs

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Reid, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    System studies of next-generation superconducting tokamaks are presented here. These studies include examining design changes suggested for the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) as a means of reducing the size and simplifying the device and assessing the impact of a series of more aggressive design assumptions suggested in recent Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) studies. Also, a set of candidate design points offering small machines (major radius = 4 m) with a relatively conservative mix of design assumptions is proposed. Some of the design assumptions found to have a major effect on the minimum size are TF coil current density, noninductive current drive, plasma elongation and edge q, plasma temperature for current drive, maximum allowable plasma beta, the minimum required wall load, and assumptions on fixed radial dimensions such as shield thickness, gaps, and plasma scrapeoff. Some design assumptions with less impact on the device size are the OH coil current density, PF configuration (limiter/divertor), and plasma current level. 22 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  6. A physics study for negative void reactivity in compact supercritical CO{sub 2}-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Hartanto, D.; Lee, J. I.

    2013-07-01

    A compact S-CO{sub 2}-cooled fast reactor which has negative Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR) has been investigated. A negative CVR is important for the gas cooled fast reactor as an inherent safety mechanism to prevent the sudden positive reactivity insertion when the loss of coolant accident happens. An alternative solution to reduce the CVR is investigated in this study by using O-17 instead of O-16 in UO{sub 2} fuel. By using O-17 in the fuel, it is found that the CVR can even be negative. Impacts of the radial reflector on the CVR are also evaluated for the small SCO{sub 2} cooled fast reactor in this study. We have considered a pure lead (Pb) reflector and a lead magnesium eutectic (LME) reflector as alternative radial reflectors of the S-CO 2-cooled fast reactor. It has been shown that, with the LME radial reflector, the CVR can be negative, while the pure lead reflector provides a slightly positive CVR. (authors)

  7. Bootstrapped tokamak with oscillating field current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-07-01

    A magnetic helicity conserving mean-field Ohm's law is used to study bootstrapped tokamaks with oscillating field current drive. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the tokamak bootstrap effect can convert the largely alternating current of oscillating field current drive into a direct toroidal plasma current. This plasma current rectification is due to the intrinsically nonlinear nature of the tokamak bootstrap effect, and suggests that it may be possible to maintain the toroidal current of a tokamak reactor by supplementing the bootstrap current with oscillating field current drive. Steady-state tokamak fusion reactors operating with oscillating field current drive could provide an alternative to tokamak reactors operating with external current drive.

  8. Three-dimensional analysis of tokamaks and stellarators

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    The NSTAB equilibrium and stability code and the TRAN Monte Carlo transport code furnish a simple but effective numerical simulation of essential features of present tokamak and stellarator experiments. When the mesh size is comparable to the island width, an accurate radial difference scheme in conservation form captures magnetic islands successfully despite a nested surface hypothesis imposed by the mathematics. Three-dimensional asymmetries in bifurcated numerical solutions of the axially symmetric tokamak problem are relevant to the observation of unstable neoclassical tearing modes and edge localized modes in experiments. Islands in compact stellarators with quasiaxial symmetry are easier to control, so these configurations will become good candidates for magnetic fusion if difficulties with safety and stability are encountered in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. PMID:18768807

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of tokamaks and stellarators.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Paul R

    2008-09-16

    The NSTAB equilibrium and stability code and the TRAN Monte Carlo transport code furnish a simple but effective numerical simulation of essential features of present tokamak and stellarator experiments. When the mesh size is comparable to the island width, an accurate radial difference scheme in conservation form captures magnetic islands successfully despite a nested surface hypothesis imposed by the mathematics. Three-dimensional asymmetries in bifurcated numerical solutions of the axially symmetric tokamak problem are relevant to the observation of unstable neoclassical tearing modes and edge localized modes in experiments. Islands in compact stellarators with quasiaxial symmetry are easier to control, so these configurations will become good candidates for magnetic fusion if difficulties with safety and stability are encountered in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. PMID:18768807

  10. Preliminary Design For Conventional and Compact Secondary Heat Exchanger in a Molten Salt Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Ali Siahpush; Eung Soo Kim

    2012-07-01

    The strategic goal of the Advance Reactors such as AHTR is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy in the United States by producing power to meet growing energy demands and demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not being served by light water reactors

  11. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.; Jung, J.; Gilligan, J.

    1984-04-01

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the /sup 3/He from the D(D,n)/sup 3/He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general).

  12. A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated String of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Charles W.; Reisman, David B.; McLean, Harry S.; Thomas, John

    2008-06-01

    A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall. 60 /proj/ads/abstracts/absload/springerxml.pl* /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9121: total 28 28 10894_2007_Article_9121.xml.meta /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9122: total 16 16 10894_2007_Article_9122.xml.meta /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9123: total 12 12 10894_2007_Article_9123.xml.meta /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9124: total 36 36 10894_2007_Article_9124.xml.meta /proj/ads/abstracts/sources/SPRINGER/files/JOU=10894/VOL=2008.27/ISU=3/ART=9125: total 32 32 10894_2007_Article_9125.xml.meta /proj

  13. Prospects for pilot plants based on the tokamak, spherical tokamak and stellarator.

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, J. E.; Bromberg, L.; Brown, T.; Burgess, Thomas W; Dix, D.; El-GuebalyUniv. Wisco, L.; Gerrity, T.; Goldston, R. J.; Hawryluk, R.; Kastner, R.; Kessel, C.; Malang, S.; Minervini, J.; Neilson, G. H.; Neumeyer, C. L.; Prager, S.; Sawan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Sternlieb, A.; Waganer, L.; Whyte, D. G.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    A potentially attractive next-step towards fusion commercialization is a pilot plant, i.e. a device ultimately capable of small net electricity production in as compact a facility as possible and in a configuration scalable to a full-size power plant. A key capability for a pilot-plant programme is the production of high neutron fluence enabling fusion nuclear science and technology (FNST) research. It is found that for physics and technology assumptions between those assumed for ITER and nth-of-a-kind fusion power plant, it is possible to provide FNST-relevant neutron wall loading in pilot devices. Thus, it may be possible to utilize a single facility to perform FNST research utilizing reactor-relevant plasma, blanket, coil and auxiliary systems and maintenance schemes while also targeting net electricity production. In this paper three configurations for a pilot plant are considered: the advanced tokamak, spherical tokamak and compact stellarator. A range of configuration issues is considered including: radial build and blanket design, magnet systems, maintenance schemes, tritium consumption and self-sufficiency, physics scenarios and a brief assessment of research needs for the configurations.

  14. Prospects for pilot plants based on the tokamak, spherical tokamak and stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, J. E.; Bromberg, L.; Brown, T.; Burgess, T.; Dix, D.; El-Guebaly, L.; Gerrity, T.; Goldston, R. J.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Kastner, R.; Kessel, C.; Malang, S.; Minervini, J.; Neilson, G. H.; Neumeyer, C. L.; Prager, S.; Sawan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Sternlieb, A.; Waganer, L.; Whyte, D.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2011-10-01

    A potentially attractive next-step towards fusion commercialization is a pilot plant, i.e. a device ultimately capable of small net electricity production in as compact a facility as possible and in a configuration scalable to a full-size power plant. A key capability for a pilot-plant programme is the production of high neutron fluence enabling fusion nuclear science and technology (FNST) research. It is found that for physics and technology assumptions between those assumed for ITER and nth-of-a-kind fusion power plant, it is possible to provide FNST-relevant neutron wall loading in pilot devices. Thus, it may be possible to utilize a single facility to perform FNST research utilizing reactor-relevant plasma, blanket, coil and auxiliary systems and maintenance schemes while also targeting net electricity production. In this paper three configurations for a pilot plant are considered: the advanced tokamak, spherical tokamak and compact stellarator. A range of configuration issues is considered including: radial build and blanket design, magnet systems, maintenance schemes, tritium consumption and self-sufficiency, physics scenarios and a brief assessment of research needs for the configurations.

  15. Toroidal rotation and radial electric field driven by the lower-hybrid-wave in a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaojie

    2011-10-15

    A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the counter-current rotation driven by the lower-hybrid-wave observed in the tokamak lower-hybrid-wave parallel current drive experiments. It is found that ions absorb the toroidal momentum indirectly from the wave through collisional friction with the resonant electrons that directly take the momentum from the wave through Landau resonance. This momentum coupling pumps out the ions to produce a negative radial electric field and makes the plasma rotate in the counter-current direction.

  16. Calculation of the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Hendel, H.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    Neutron transport simulations have been carried out to calculate the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector which is used on the TFTR as a part of the primary fission detector diagnostic system for measuring fusion power yields. Transport simulations provide a means by which the effects of variations in various shielding and geometrical parameters can be explored. These effects are difficult to study in calibration experiments. The calculational model, benchmarked against measurements, can be used to complement future detector calibrations, when the high level of radioactivity resulting from machine operation may severely restrict access to the tokamak. We present a coupled forward-adjoint algorithm, employing both the deterministic and Monte Carlo sampling methods, to model the neutron transport in the complex tokamak and detector geometries. Sensitivities of the detector response to the major and minor radii, and angular anisotropy of the neutron emission are discussed. A semi-empirical model based on matching the calculational results with a small set of experiments produces good agreement (+-15%) for a wide range of source energies and geometries. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Evaluating quantitative 3-D image analysis as a design tool for low enriched uranium fuel compacts for the transient reactor test facility: A preliminary study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kane, J. J.; van Rooyen, I. J.; Craft, A. E.; Roney, T. J.; Morrell, S. R.

    2016-02-05

    In this study, 3-D image analysis when combined with a non-destructive examination technique such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) provides a highly quantitative tool for the investigation of a material’s structure. In this investigation 3-D image analysis and X-ray CT were combined to analyze the microstructure of a preliminary subsized fuel compact for the Transient Reactor Test Facility’s low enriched uranium conversion program to assess the feasibility of the combined techniques for use in the optimization of the fuel compact fabrication process. The quantitative image analysis focused on determining the size and spatial distribution of the surrogate fuel particles andmore » the size, shape, and orientation of voids within the compact. Additionally, the maximum effect of microstructural features on heat transfer through the carbonaceous matrix of the preliminary compact was estimated. The surrogate fuel particles occupied 0.8% of the compact by volume with a log-normal distribution of particle sizes with a mean diameter of 39 μm and a standard deviation of 16 μm. Roughly 39% of the particles had a diameter greater than the specified maximum particle size of 44 μm suggesting that the particles agglomerate during fabrication. The local volume fraction of particles also varies significantly within the compact although uniformities appear to be evenly dispersed throughout the analysed volume. The voids produced during fabrication were on average plate-like in nature with their major axis oriented perpendicular to the compaction direction of the compact. Finally, the microstructure, mainly the large preferentially oriented voids, may cause a small degree of anisotropy in the thermal diffusivity within the compact. α∥/α⊥, the ratio of thermal diffusivities parallel to and perpendicular to the compaction direction are expected to be no less than 0.95 with an upper bound of 1.« less

  18. Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T

    2007-04-03

    The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

  19. Design and optimization of Artificial Neural Networks for the modelling of superconducting magnets operation in tokamak fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froio, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Carli, S.; Quartararo, A.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2016-09-01

    In superconducting tokamaks, the cryoplant provides the helium needed to cool different clients, among which by far the most important one is the superconducting magnet system. The evaluation of the transient heat load from the magnets to the cryoplant is fundamental for the design of the latter and the assessment of suitable strategies to smooth the heat load pulses, induced by the intrinsically pulsed plasma scenarios characteristic of today's tokamaks, is crucial for both suitable sizing and stable operation of the cryoplant. For that evaluation, accurate but expensive system-level models, as implemented in e.g. the validated state-of-the-art 4C code, were developed in the past, including both the magnets and the respective external cryogenic cooling circuits. Here we show how these models can be successfully substituted with cheaper ones, where the magnets are described by suitably trained Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for the evaluation of the heat load to the cryoplant. First, two simplified thermal-hydraulic models for an ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet and for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) are developed, based on ANNs, and a detailed analysis of the chosen networks' topology and parameters is presented and discussed. The ANNs are then inserted into the 4C model of the ITER TF and CS cooling circuits, which also includes active controls to achieve a smoothing of the variation of the heat load to the cryoplant. The training of the ANNs is achieved using the results of full 4C simulations (including detailed models of the magnets) for conventional sigmoid-like waveforms of the drivers and the predictive capabilities of the ANN-based models in the case of actual ITER operating scenarios are demonstrated by comparison with the results of full 4C runs, both with and without active smoothing, in terms of both accuracy and computational time. Exploiting the low computational effort requested by the ANN-based models, a demonstrative optimization study has been

  20. The effect of plasma density on the behavior of the plasma boundary in helium discharges in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Pitcher, C.S.; Bell, M.G.; Manos, D.M.; Mansfield, D.K.; Nyberg, I.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.

    1990-03-01

    Langmuir probe measurements have been made across the plasma boundary in helium discharges of varying central electron densities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Radial profiles of ion saturation current density, I{sub s}, electron density, n{sub e}, and electron temperature, T{sub e}, were achieved by small displacements of the plasma relative to a stationary probe. Scrape-off lengths outside the plasma boundary decreased somewhat with increasing plasma density. Inside the plasma, I{sub s}, n{sub e}, and T{sub e} rose more steeply for the higher densities than the scrape-off lengths would predict. The floating potential, V{sub f}, decreased sharply inside the boundary as expected, with some density dependence. I{sub s} and n{sub e} increased with plasma density, while T{sub e} decreased a few eV. Measurements of C II emission at the inner wall combined with probe data support a relatively constant edge T{sub e} with increasing plasma density and a constant ratio between the fluxes of helium and carbon ions. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Measurements of the radial structure and poloidal spectra of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, R. D.; Fonck, R. J.; Wong, K. L.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Paul, S. F.

    1992-11-01

    Toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) have been excited by tangential neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1990, Washington, D.C. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1990), Vol. I, p. 9]. Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) has been used to study the radial structure and the poloidal power spectra of these modes. Radial profiles show a global, standing wave structure with a node near r/a=0.6 and a maximum displacement of about 5-10 mm. The cross-phase profiles and the power spectra both imply that the mode is composed of a mixture of components with various poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, as expected for the TAE. Measurements of the poloidal mode spectrum via BES show good agreement with theoretical simulations performed by a nonvariational, kinetic magnetohydrodynamics stability code (nova-k [Cheng, Phys. Rep. 211, 1 (1992)]). In particular, the dominant harmonics in the poloidal spectrum obey the expected relation m+1/2≊q(r)n.

  2. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, L.L.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor concept, currently in its developmental stage, has layered tungsten - lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other three concepts were a boron carbide - beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride - beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced energy-dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shield's ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydride - tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. However, a boron carbide - tungsten shield was calculably volume constrained. Therefore volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  3. The design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. A.; Thomassen, K. I.; Goldston, R. J.; Neilson, G. H.; Nevins, W. M.; Sinnis, J. C.; Andersen, P.; Bair, W.; Barr, W. L.; Batchelor, D. B.; Baxi, C.; Berg, G.; Bernabei, S.; Bialek, J. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Boozer, A.; Bowers, D.; Bronner, G.; Brooks, J. N.; Brown, T. G.; Bulmer, R.; Butner, D.; Campbell, R.; Casper, T.; Chaniotakis, E.; Chaplin, M.; Chen, S. J.; Chin, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Citrolo, J.; Cole, M. J.; Dahlgren, F.; Davis, F. C.; Davis, J.; Davis, S.; Diatchenko, N.; Dinkevich, S.; Feldshteyn, Y.; Felker, B.; Feng, T.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Fleming, R.; Fogarty, P. J.; Fragetta, W.; Fredd, E.; Gabler, M.; Galambos, J.; Gohar, Y.; Goranson, P. L.; Greenough, N.; Grisham, L. R.; Haines, J.; Haney, S.; Hassenzahl, W.; Heim, J.; Heitzenroeder, P. J.; Hill, D. N.; Hodapp, T.; Houlberg, W. A.; Hubbard, A.; Hyatt, A.; Jackson, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Jardin, S. C.; Johnson, J.; Jones, G. H.; Juliano, D. R.; Junge, R.; Kalish, M.; Kessel, C. E.; Knutson, D.; LaHaye, R. J.; Lang, D. D.; Langley, R. A.; Liew, S.-L.; Lu, E.; Mantz, H.; Manickam, J.; Mau, T. K.; Medley, S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Miller, R.; Monticello, D.; Morgan, D.; Moroz, P.; Motloch, C.; Mueller, J.; Myatt, L.; Nelson, B. E.; Neumeyer, C. L.; Nilson, D.; O'Conner, T.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Peebles, W. A.; Pelovitz, M.; Perkins, F. W.; Perkins, L. J.; Petersen, D.; Pillsbury, R.; Politzer, P. A.; Pomphrey, N.; Porkolab, M.; Posey, A.; Radovinsky, A.; Raftopoulis, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramos, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravenscroft, D.; Redler, K.; Reiersen, W. T.; Reiman, A.; Reis, E.; Rewoldt, G.; Richards, D. J.; Rocco, R.; Rognlien, T. D.; Ruzic, D.; Sabbagh, S.; Sapp, J.; Sayer, R. O.; Scharer, J. E.; Schmitz, L.; Schnitz, J.; Sevier, L.; Shipley, S. E.; Simmons, R. T.; Slack, D.; Smith, G. R.; Stambaugh, R.; Steill, G.; Stevenson, T.; Stoenescu, S.; Onge, K. T. St.; Stotler, D. P.; Strait, T.; Strickler, D. J.; Swain, D. W.; Tang, W.; Tuszewski, M.; Ulrickson, M. A.; VonHalle, A.; Walker, M. S.; Wang, C.; Wang, P.; Warren, J.; Werley, K. A.; West, W. P.; Williams, F.; Wong, R.; Wright, K.; Wurden, G. A.; Yugo, J. J.; Zakharov, L.; Zbasnik, J.

    1993-09-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment is designed to develop the scientific basis for a compact and continuously operating tokamak fusion reactor. It is based on an emerging class of tokamak operating modes, characterized by beta limits well in excess of the Troyon limit, confinement scaling well in excess of H-mode, and bootstrap current fractions approaching unity. Such modes are attainable through the use of advanced, steady state plasma controls including strong shaping, current profile control, and active particle recycling control. Key design features of the TPX are superconducting toroidal and poloidal field coils; actively-cooled plasma-facing components; a flexible heating and current drive system; and a spacious divertor for flexibility. Substantial deuterium plasma operation is made possible with an in-vessel remote maintenance system, a lowactivation titanium vacuum vessel, and shielding of ex-vessel components. The facility will be constructed as a national project with substantial participation by U.S. industry. Operation will begin with first plasma in the year 2000.

  4. An Assessment of the Penetrations in the First Wall Required for Plasma Measurments for Control of an Advanced Tokamak Plasma Demo

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2010-02-22

    A Demonstration tokamak (Demo) is an essential next step toward a magnetic-fusion based reactor. One based on advanced-tokamak (AT) plasmas is especially appealing because of its relative compactness. However, it will require many plasma measurements to provide the necessary signals to feed to ancillary systems to protect the device and control the plasma. This note addresses the question of how much intrusion into the blanket system will be required to allow the measurements needed to provide the information required for plasma control. All diagnostics will require, at least, the same shielding designs as planned for ITER, while having the capability to maintain their calibration through very long pulses. Much work is required to define better the measurement needs and the quantity and quality of the measurements that will have to be made, and how they can be integrated into the other tokamak structures.

  5. Construction and operation of parallel electric and magnetic field spectrometers for mass/energy resolved multi-ion charge exchange diagnostics on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Roquemore, A.L.

    1998-07-01

    A novel charge exchange spectrometer using a dee-shaped region of parallel electric and magnetic fields was developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for neutral particle diagnostics on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The E{parallel}B spectrometer has an energy range of 0.5{le}Athinsp(amu)Ethinsp(keV){le}600 and provides mass-resolved energy spectra of H{sup +}, D{sup +}, and T{sup +} (or {sup 3}He{sup +}) ion species simultaneously during a single discharge. The detector plane exhibits parallel rows of analyzed ions, each row containing the energy dispersed ions of a given mass-to-charge ratio. The detector consists of a large area microchannel plate (MCP) which is provided with three rectangular, semicontinuous active area strips, one coinciding with each of the mass rows for detection of H{sup +}, D{sup +}, and T{sup +} (or {sup 3}He{sup +}) and each mass row has 75 energy channels. To suppress spurious signals attending operation of the plate in the magnetic fringe field of the spectrometer, the MCP was housed in a double-walled iron shield with a wire mesh ion entrance window. Using an accelerator neutron generator, the MCP neutron detection efficiency was measured to be 1.7{times}10{sup {minus}3} and 6.4{times}10{sup {minus}3}thinspcounts/neutron/cm{sup 2} for 2.5 MeV-DD and 14 MeV-DT neutrons, respectively. The design and calibration of the spectrometer are described in detail, including the effect of MCP exposure to tritium, and results obtained during high performance D{endash}D operation on TFTR are presented to illustrate the performance of the E{parallel}B spectrometer. The spectrometers were not used during D{endash}T plasma operation due to the cost of providing the required radiation shielding. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor.

    PubMed

    Singh, M J; De Esch, H P L

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H(-) accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated. PMID:20113091

  7. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. J.; De Esch, H. P. L.

    2010-01-15

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H{sup -} accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  8. R&D around a photoneutralizer-based NBI system (Siphore) in view of a DEMO Tokamak steady state fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, A.; Achard, Jocelyn; Achkasov, K.; Bechu, S.; Baudouin, C.; Baulaigue, O.; Blondel, C.; Boeuf, J. P.; Bresteau, D.; Cartry, G.; Chaibi, W.; Drag, C.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Fiorucci, D.; Fubiani, G.; Furno, I.; Futtersack, R.; Garibaldi, P.; Gicquel, A.; Grand, C.; Guittienne, Ph.; Hagelaar, G.; Howling, A.; Jacquier, R.; Kirkpatrick, M. J.; Lemoine, D.; Lepetit, B.; Minea, T.; Odic, E.; Revel, A.; Soliman, B. A.; Teste, P.

    2015-11-01

    Since the signature of the ITER treaty in 2006, a new research programme targeting the emergence of a new generation of neutral beam (NB) system for the future fusion reactor (DEMO Tokamak) has been underway between several laboratories in Europe. The specifications required to operate a NB system on DEMO are very demanding: the system has to provide plasma heating, current drive and plasma control at a very high level of power (up to 150 MW) and energy (1 or 2 MeV), including high performances in term of wall-plug efficiency (η  >  60%), high availability and reliability. To this aim, a novel NB concept based on the photodetachment of the energetic negative ion beam is under study. The keystone of this new concept is the achievement of a photoneutralizer where a high power photon flux (~3 MW) generated within a Fabry-Perot cavity will overlap, cross and partially photodetach the intense negative ion beam accelerated at high energy (1 or 2 MeV). The aspect ratio of the beam-line (source, accelerator, etc) is specifically designed to maximize the overlap of the photon beam with the ion beam. It is shown that such a photoneutralized based NB system would have the capability to provide several tens of MW of D0 per beam line with a wall-plug efficiency higher than 60%. A feasibility study of the concept has been launched between different laboratories to address the different physics aspects, i.e. negative ion source, plasma modelling, ion accelerator simulation, photoneutralization and high voltage holding under vacuum. The paper describes the present status of the project and the main achievements of the developments in laboratories.

  9. Burn Control Mechanisms in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Maxwell; Stacey, Weston

    2013-10-01

    Burn control and passive safety in accident scenarios will be an important design consideration in future tokamaks, especially those used as a neutron source for fusion-fission hybrid reactors, such as the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor (SABR) concept. At Georgia Tech, we are developing a new burning plasma dynamics code to investigate passive safety mechanisms that could prevent power excursions in tokamak reactors. This code solves the coupled set of balance equations governing burning plasmas in conjunction with a two-point SOL-divertor model. Predictions have been benchmarked against data from DIII-D. We are examining several potential negative feedback mechanisms to limit power excursions: i) ion-orbit loss, ii) thermal instabilities, iii) the degradation of alpha-particle confinement resulting from ripples in the toroidal field, iv) modifications to the radial current profile, v) ``divertor choking'' and vi) Type 1 ELMs.

  10. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Tokamak power systems studies, FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1985-12-01

    The Tokamak Power System Studies (TPSS) at ANL in FY-1985 were devoted to exploring innovative design concepts which have the potential for making substantial improvements in the tokamak as a commercial power reactor. Major objectives of this work included improved reactor economics, improved environmental and safety features, and the exploration of a wide range of reactor plant outputs with emphasis on reduced plant sizes compared to STARFIRE. The activities concentrated on three areas: plasma engineering, impurity control, and blanket/first wall/shield technology. 205 refs., 125 figs., 107 tabs.

  12. Superconducting magnet system for the TPX Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Chaplin, M.R.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-09-15

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will be the first Tokamak using superconducting magnets for both the poloidal and toroidal field. It is designed for advanced Tokamak physics experiments in steady-state and long-pulse operation. The TPX superconducting magnets use an advanced cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to that developed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The toroidal field magnets provide 4.0 T at 2.25 m with a stored energy of 1.05 GJ. The poloidal field magnets provide 18.0 V-s to ohmically start and control long burns of a 2.0 MA plasma.

  13. ITER tokamak device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-07-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER, a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fueling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (1) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (2) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (3) first wall, (4) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (5) blanket/shield system, (6) maintenance equipment, (7) current drive and heating, (8) fuel cycle system, and (9) diagnostics.

  14. Tokamak and RFP ignition requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    A plasma model is applied to calculate numerically transport- confinement (n{tau}{sub E}) requirements and steady-state operation tokamak. The CIT tokamak and RFP ignition conditions are examined. Physics differences between RFP and tokamaks, and their consequences for a DT ignition machine, are discussed. The ignition RFP, compared to a tokamak, has many physics advantages, including ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, low ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits), and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f{sub RAD} {approximately} 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic fields, larger aspect ratios, and smaller plasma cross sections translate into significant cost reductions for both ignition and power reactor. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present confinement scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. The 4-MA ZTH was expected to extend the n{tau}{sub E} transport scaling data three order of magnitude above ZT-40M results, and if the present scaling held, to achieve a DT-equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q=1. A basecase RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Advanced fusion MHD power conversion using the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Logan, B.G.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1988-10-01

    The CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a tokamak reactor involves the use of a high-temperature Rankine cycle in combination with microwave superheaters and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators to obtain a compact, low-capital-cost power conversion system which fits almost entirely within the reactor vault. The significant savings in the balance-of-plant costs are expected to result in much lower costs of electricity than previous concepts. This paper describes the unique features of the CFAR cycle and a high- temperature blanket designed to take advantage of it as well as the predicted performance of the MHD disk generators using mercury seeded with cesium. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  17. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low beta compact toroid injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui

    2009-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low {beta} compact toroid (CT) injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into CT fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). A regime is identified in terms of CT injection speed and CT-to-background magnetic field ratio that appears promising for precise core fueling. Shock-dominated regimes, which are probably unfavorable for tokamak fueling, are also identified. The CT penetration depth is proportional to the CT injection speed and density. The entire CT evolution can be divided into three stages: (1) initial penetration, (2) compression in the direction of propagation and reconnection, and (3) coming to rest and spreading in the direction perpendicular to injection. Tilting of the CT is not observed due to the fast transit time of the CT across the background plasma.

  18. OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    LIN-LIU,YR; STAMBAUGH,RD

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS. The dependence of the ideal ballooning {beta} limit on aspect ratio, A, and elongation {kappa} is systematically explored for nearly 100% bootstrap current driven tokamak equilibria in a wide range of the shape parameters (A = 1.2-7.0, {kappa} = 1.5-6.0 with triangularity {delta} = 0.5). The critical {beta}{sub N} is shown to be optimal at {kappa} = 3.0-4.0 for all A studied and increases as A decreases with a dependence close to A{sup -0.5}. The results obtained can be used as a theoretical basis for the choice of optimum aspect ratio and elongation of next step burning plasma tokamaks or tokamak reactors.

  19. Control of Dust Inventory in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Andrew, P.; Ciattaglia, S.; Pitcher, C. S.; Taylor, N.; Furlan, J.

    2008-09-07

    Particles with sizes ranging from 100 nm to 100 {mu}m are produced in tokamaks by the interaction of the plasma with the first wall materials and divertor. Dust has not yet been of a major concern in existing tokamaks mainly because their quantities are small and these devices are not nuclear facilities. However, in ITER and in future reactors, they could represent operational and potential safety issues. The aim of this paper is thus to describe the dust creation processes in the tokamak environment. The diagnostics and removal techniques that are needed to be implemented to measure and minimise the dust inventory are also presented. The integration of these techniques into a tokamak environment is also discussed.

  20. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  1. Ripple induced trapped particle loss in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    The threshold for stochastic transport of high energy trapped particles in a tokamak due to toroidal field ripple is calculated by explicit construction of primary resonances, and a numerical examination of the route to chaos. Critical field ripple amplitude is determined for loss. The expression is given in magnetic coordinates and makes no assumptions regarding shape or up-down symmetry. An algorithm is developed including the effects of prompt axisymmetric orbit loss, ripple trapping, convective banana flow, and stochastic ripple loss, which gives accurate ripple loss predictions for representative Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor equilibria. The algorithm is extended to include the effects of collisions and drag, allowing rapid estimation of alpha particle loss in tokamaks.

  2. MHD stability of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, M.S. Sun, Y.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Okabayashi, M.

    1992-08-01

    This paper will give an overview of the some of the methods which are used to simulate the ideal MHD properties of tokamak plasmas. A great deal of the research in this field is necessarily numerical and the substantial progress made during the past several years has roughly paralleled the continuing availability of more advanced supercomputers. These have become essential to accurately model the complex configurations necessary for achieving MHD stable reactor grade conditions. Appropriate tokamak MHD equilibria will be described. Then the stability properties is discussed in some detail, emphasizing the difficulties of obtaining stable high {beta} discharges in plasmas in which the current is mainly ohmically driven and thus demonstrating the need for tailoring the current and pressure profiles of the plasma away from the ohmic state. The outline of this paper will roughly follow the physics development to attain the second region of stability in the PBX-M device at The Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory.

  3. NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Nov. 15, 2001 - Feb. 15,2002) ''Design and Layout Concepts for Compact, Factory-Produced, Transportable, Generation IV Reactor Systems''

    SciTech Connect

    Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Mohammed Khan; Joe McConn; Lawrence Townsend; Wesley Williams; Martin Williamson

    2002-03-15

    The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. Three nuclear power plant concepts are being studied representing water, helium and lead-bismuth coolants. This is the sixth quarterly progress report.

  4. NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Aug 15, 2002 to Nov. 15, 2002) - DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Lawrence Townsend; Martin Williamson; Rupy Sawhney; Jacob Fife

    2002-12-15

    The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. This report covers the ninth quarter of the project. The three reactor concept teams have completed initial plant concept development, evaluation and layout. A significant design effort has proceeded with substantial change and evolution from original ideas. The concepts have been reviewed by the industry participants and improvements have been implemented. The third phase, industrial engineering simulation of reactor fabrication has begun.

  5. Comparison of tokamak burn cycle options

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K. Jr.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental confirmation of noninductive current drive has spawned a number of suggestions as to how this technique can be used to extend the fusion burn period and improve the reactor prospects of tokamaks. Several distinct burn cycles, which employ various combinations of Ohmic and noninductive current generation, are possible, and we will study their relative costs and benefits for both a commerical reactor as well as an INTOR-class device. We begin with a review of the burn cycle options.

  6. Development of a repetitive compact torus injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, Takumi; McColl, David; Dreval, Mykola; Rohollahi, Akbar; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira; Zushi, Hideki

    2013-10-01

    A system for Repetitive Compact Torus Injection (RCTI) has been developed at the University of Saskatchewan. CTI is a promising fuelling technology to directly fuel the core region of tokamak reactors. In addition to fuelling, CTI has also the potential for (a) optimization of density profile and thus bootstrap current and (b) momentum injection. For steady-state reactor operation, RCTI is necessary. The approach to RCTI is to charge a storage capacitor bank with a large capacitance and quickly charge the CT capacitor bank through a stack of integrated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). When the CT bank is fully charged, the IGBT stack will be turned off to isolate banks, and CT formation/acceleration sequence will start. After formation of each CT, the fast bank will be replenished and a new CT will be formed and accelerated. Circuits for the formation and the acceleration in University of Saskatchewan CT Injector (USCTI) have been modified. Three CT shots at 10 Hz or eight shots at 1.7 Hz have been achieved. This work has been sponsored by the CRC and NSERC, Canada.

  7. Burn Control Mechanisms in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. A.; Stacey, W. M.

    2015-11-01

    Burn control and passive safety in accident scenarios will be an important design consideration in future tokamak reactors, in particular fusion-fission hybrid reactors, e.g. the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor. We are developing a burning plasma dynamics code to explore various aspects of burn control, with the intent to identify feedback mechanisms that would prevent power excursions. This code solves the coupled set of global density and temperature equations, using scaling relations from experimental fits. Predictions of densities and temperatures have been benchmarked against DIII-D data. We are examining several potential feedback mechanisms to limit power excursions: i) ion-orbit loss, ii) thermal instability density limits, iii) MHD instability limits, iv) the degradation of alpha-particle confinement, v) modifications to the radial current profile, vi) ``divertor choking'' and vii) Type 1 ELMs. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-00ER54538, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. Tokamak Systems Code

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  9. Compact, Lightweight Adsorber and Sabatier Reactor for CO2 Capture and Reduction for Consumable and Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Busby, Stacy A.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce (or recycle) life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, and to generate propellant fuels is an important aspect of NASA's concept for future, long duration planetary exploration. One potential approach is to capture and use CO2 from the Martian atmosphere to generate the consumables and propellant fuels. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI), with support from NASA, continues to develop its regenerable adsorber technology for capturing CO2 from gaseous atmospheres (for cabin atmosphere revitalization and in-situ resource utilization applications) and its Sabatier reactor for converting CO2 to methane and water. Both technologies are based on PCI's Microlith(R) substrates and have been demonstrated to reduce size, weight, and power consumption during CO2 capture and methanation process. For adsorber applications, the Microlith substrates offer a unique resistive heating capability that shows potential for short regeneration time and reduced power requirements compared to conventional systems. For the Sabatier applications, the combination of the Microlith substrates and durable catalyst coating permits efficient CO2 methanation that favors high reactant conversion, high selectivity, and durability. Results from performance testing at various operating conditions will be presented. An effort to optimize the Sabatier reactor and to develop a bench-top Sabatier Development Unit (SDU) will be discussed.

  10. Microbial and Physicochemical Characteristics of Compact Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Granules in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Hu, Bao-Lan; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Kartal, Boran; Liu, Xian-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Jetten, Mike; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a promising new process to treat high-strength nitrogenous wastewater. Due to the low growth rate of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, efficient biomass retention is essential for reactor operation. Therefore, we studied the settling ability and community composition of the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing granules, which were cultivated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor seeded with aerobic granules. With this seed, the start-up period was less than 160 days at a NH4+-N removal efficiency of 94% and a loading rate of 0.064 kg N per kg volatile suspended solids per day. The formed granules were bright red and had a high settling velocity (41 to 79 m h−1). Cells and extracellular polymeric substances were evenly distributed over the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing granules. The high percentage of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the granules could be visualized by fluorescent in situ hybridization and electron microscopy. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA genes of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the granules were determined to be 4.6 × 108 copies ml−1. The results of this study could be used for a better design, shorter start-up time, and more stable operation of anammox systems for the treatment of nitrogen-rich wastewaters. PMID:20190088