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Sample records for comparative genetic mapping

  1. A genetic linkage map and comparative mapping of the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) is an emerging rodent model for investigating the genetics, evolution and molecular mechanisms of social behavior. Though a karyotype for the prairie vole has been reported and low-resolution comparative cytogenetic analyses have been done in this species, other basic genetic resources for this species, such as a genetic linkage map, are lacking. Results Here we report the construction of a genome-wide linkage map of the prairie vole. The linkage map consists of 406 markers that are spaced on average every 7 Mb and span an estimated ~90% of the genome. The sex average length of the linkage map is 1707 cM, which, like other Muroid rodent linkage maps, is on the lower end of the length distribution of linkage maps reported to date for placental mammals. Linkage groups were assigned to 19 out of the 26 prairie vole autosomes as well as the X chromosome. Comparative analyses of the prairie vole linkage map based on the location of 387 Type I markers identified 61 large blocks of synteny with the mouse genome. In addition, the results of the comparative analyses revealed a potential elevated rate of inversions in the prairie vole lineage compared to the laboratory mouse and rat. Conclusions A genetic linkage map of the prairie vole has been constructed and represents the fourth genome-wide high-resolution linkage map reported for Muroid rodents and the first for a member of the Arvicolinae sub-family. This resource will advance studies designed to dissect the genetic basis of a variety of social behaviors and other traits in the prairie vole as well as our understanding of genome evolution in the genus Microtus. PMID:21736755

  2. YouGenMap: a web platform for dynamic multi-comparative mapping and visualization of genetic maps.

    PubMed

    Batesole, Keith; Wimalanathan, Kokulapalan; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Fan; Echt, Craig S; Liang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genetic maps are used in examination of genome organization, detection of conserved gene order, and exploration of marker order variations. YouGenMap is an open-source web tool that offers dynamic comparative mapping capability of users' own genetic mapping between 2 or more map sets. Users' genetic map data and optional gene annotations are uploaded, either publically or privately, as long as they follow our template which is available in several standard file formats. Data is parsed and loaded into MySQL relational database to be displayed and compared against users' genetic maps or other public data available on YouGenMap. With the highly interactive GUIs, all public data on YouGenMap are maps available for visualization, comparison, search, filtration and download. YouGenMap web tool is available on the website (http://conifergdb.miamioh.edu/yougenmap) with the source-code repository at (http://sourceforge.net/projects/yougenmap/?source=directory). PMID:25009553

  3. Genetic, physical, and comparative map of the subtelomeric region of mouse Chromosome 4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Li, Shanru; Chen, Zhenyu; Tordoff, Michael G.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Wu, Chenyan; Chen, Lianchun; West, David B.; Ross, David A.; Ohmen, Jeffery D.; Reed, Danielle R.

    2007-01-01

    The subtelomeric region of mouse chromosome (Chr) 4 harbors loci with effects on behavior, development, and disease susceptibility. Regions near the telomeres are more difficult to map and characterize than other areas because of the unique features of subtelomeric DNA. As a result of these problems, the available mapping information for this part of mouse Chr 4 was insufficient to pursue candidate gene evaluation. Therefore, we sought to characterize the area in greater detail by creating a comprehensive genetic, physical, and comparative map. We constructed a genetic map that contained 30 markers and covered 13.3 cM; then we created a 1.2-Mb sequence-ready BAC contig, representing a 5.1-cM area, and sequenced a 246-kb mouse BAC from this contig. The resulting sequence, as well as approximately 40 kb of previously deposited genomic sequence, yielded a total of 284 kb of sequence, which contained over 20 putative genes. These putative genes were confirmed by matching ESTs or cDNA in the public databases to the genomic sequence and/or by direct sequencing of cDNA. Comparative genome sequence analysis demonstrated conserved synteny between the mouse and the human genomes (1p36.3). DNA from two strains of mice (C57BL/6ByJ and 129P3/J) was sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The frequency of SNPs in this region was more than threefold higher than the genome-wide average for comparable mouse strains (129/Sv and C57BL/6J). The resulting SNP map, in conjunction with the sequence annotation and with physical and genetic maps, provides a detailed description of this gene-rich region. These data will facilitate genetic and comparative mapping studies and identification of a large number of novel candidate genes for the trait loci mapped to this region. PMID:11773963

  4. Comparative genetic mapping between clementine, pummelo and sweet orange and the interspecicic structure of the Clementine genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genetic mapping between clementine, pummelo and sweet orange and the interspecicic structure of the Clementine genome The availability of a saturated genetic map of Clementine was identified by the International Citrus Genome Consortium as an essential prerequisite to assist the assembly...

  5. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources ... prevalent. Using various laboratory techniques, the scientists isolate DNA from these samples and examine it for unique ...

  6. Construction of Genetic Linkage Maps and Comparative Genome Analysis of Catfish Using Gene-Associated Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kucuktas, Huseyin; Wang, Shaolin; Li, Ping; He, Chongbo; Xu, Peng; Sha, Zhenxia; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Yanliang; Baoprasertkul, Puttharat; Somridhivej, Benjaporn; Wang, Yaping; Abernathy, Jason; Guo, Ximing; Liu, Lei; Muir, William; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2009-01-01

    A genetic linkage map of the channel catfish genome (N = 29) was constructed using EST-based microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in an interspecific reference family. A total of 413 microsatellites and 125 SNP markers were polymorphic in the reference family. Linkage analysis using JoinMap 4.0 allowed mapping of 331 markers (259 microsatellites and 72 SNPs) to 29 linkage groups. Each linkage group contained 3–18 markers. The largest linkage group contained 18 markers and spanned 131.2 cM, while the smallest linkage group contained 14 markers and spanned only 7.9 cM. The linkage map covered a genetic distance of 1811 cM with an average marker interval of 6.0 cM. Sex-specific maps were also constructed; the recombination rate for females was 1.6 times higher than that for males. Putative conserved syntenies between catfish and zebrafish, medaka, and Tetraodon were established, but the overall levels of genome rearrangements were high among the teleost genomes. This study represents a first-generation linkage map constructed by using EST-derived microsatellites and SNPs, laying a framework for large-scale comparative genome analysis in catfish. The conserved syntenies identified here between the catfish and the three model fish species should facilitate structural genome analysis and evolutionary studies, but more importantly should facilitate functional inference of catfish genes. Given that determination of gene functions is difficult in nonmodel species such as catfish, functional genome analysis will have to rely heavily on the establishment of orthologies from model species. PMID:19171943

  7. Theobroma cacao: A genetically integrated physical map and genome-scale comparative synteny analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive integrated genomic framework is considered a centerpiece of genomic research. In collaboration with the USDA-ARS (SHRS) and Mars Inc., the Clemson University Genomics Institute (CUGI) has developed a genetically anchored physical map of the T. cacao genome. Three BAC libraries contai...

  8. On genetic map functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hongyu; Speed, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various genetic map functions have been proposed to infer the unobservable genetic distance between two loci from the observable recombination fraction between them. Some map functions were found to fit data better than others. When there are more than three markers, multilocus recombination probabilities cannot be uniquely determined by the defining property of map functions, and different methods have been proposed to permit the use of map functions to analyze multilocus data. If for a given map function, there is a probability model for recombination that can give rise to it, then joint recombination probabilities can be deduced from this model. This provides another way to use map functions in multilocus analysis. In this paper we show that stationary renewal processes give rise to most of the map functions in the literature. Furthermore, we show that the interevent distributions of these renewal processes can all be approximated quite well by gamma distributions. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Development and implementation of a highly-multiplexed SNP array for genetic mapping in maritime pine and comparative mapping with loblolly pine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant source of genetic variation among individuals of a species. New genotyping technologies allow examining hundreds to thousands of SNPs in a single reaction for a wide range of applications such as genetic diversity analysis, linkage mapping, fine QTL mapping, association studies, marker-assisted or genome-wide selection. In this paper, we evaluated the potential of highly-multiplexed SNP genotyping for genetic mapping in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), the main conifer used for commercial plantation in southwestern Europe. Results We designed a custom GoldenGate assay for 1,536 SNPs detected through the resequencing of gene fragments (707 in vitro SNPs/Indels) and from Sanger-derived Expressed Sequenced Tags assembled into a unigene set (829 in silico SNPs/Indels). Offspring from three-generation outbred (G2) and inbred (F2) pedigrees were genotyped. The success rate of the assay was 63.6% and 74.8% for in silico and in vitro SNPs, respectively. A genotyping error rate of 0.4% was further estimated from segregating data of SNPs belonging to the same gene. Overall, 394 SNPs were available for mapping. A total of 287 SNPs were integrated with previously mapped markers in the G2 parental maps, while 179 SNPs were localized on the map generated from the analysis of the F2 progeny. Based on 98 markers segregating in both pedigrees, we were able to generate a consensus map comprising 357 SNPs from 292 different loci. Finally, the analysis of sequence homology between mapped markers and their orthologs in a Pinus taeda linkage map, made it possible to align the 12 linkage groups of both species. Conclusions Our results show that the GoldenGate assay can be used successfully for high-throughput SNP genotyping in maritime pine, a conifer species that has a genome seven times the size of the human genome. This SNP-array will be extended thanks to recent sequencing effort using new generation

  10. Comparative genomics of Lupinus angustifolius gene-rich regions: BAC library exploration, genetic mapping and cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The narrow-leafed lupin, Lupinus angustifolius L., is a grain legume species with a relatively compact genome. The species has 2n = 40 chromosomes and its genome size is 960 Mbp/1C. During the last decade, L. angustifolius genomic studies have achieved several milestones, such as molecular-marker development, linkage maps, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Here, these resources were integratively used to identify and sequence two gene-rich regions (GRRs) of the genome. Results The genome was screened with a probe representing the sequence of a microsatellite fragment length polymorphism (MFLP) marker linked to Phomopsis stem blight resistance. BAC clones selected by hybridization were subjected to restriction fingerprinting and contig assembly, and 232 BAC-ends were sequenced and annotated. BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH) identified eight single-locus clones. Based on physical mapping, cytogenetic localization, and BAC-end annotation, five clones were chosen for sequencing. Within the sequences of clones that hybridized in FISH to a single-locus, two large GRRs were identified. The GRRs showed strong and conserved synteny to Glycine max duplicated genome regions, illustrated by both identical gene order and parallel orientation. In contrast, in the clones with dispersed FISH signals, more than one-third of sequences were transposable elements. Sequenced, single-locus clones were used to develop 12 genetic markers, increasing the number of L. angustifolius chromosomes linked to appropriate linkage groups by five pairs. Conclusions In general, probes originating from MFLP sequences can assist genome screening and gene discovery. However, such probes are not useful for positional cloning, because they tend to hybridize to numerous loci. GRRs identified in L. angustifolius contained a low number of interspersed repeats and had a high level of synteny to the genome of the model legume G. max. Our results showed that

  11. Comparative mapping of canine and human proximal Xq and genetic analysis of canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Deschenes, S.M.; Puck, J.M.; Dutra, A.S.

    1994-09-01

    Parallel genetic analysis of animal and human genetic diseases can facilitate the identification and characterization of the causative gene defects. For example, canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by clinical, pathological, and immunological manifestations similar to the most common form of human SCID. To derive a canine syntenic map including genes that in humans are located in proximal Xq, near human X-linked SCID, poly (TG) polymorphisms were identified at the canine phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and choroideremia (CHM) loci. These plus a polymorphic poly (CAG) sequence in exon 1 of the canine androgen receptor gene (AR) were used to genotype members of the colony informative for X-linked SCID. No recombinations among SCIDX1, AR, PGK, or CHM were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized PGK and CHM to proximal Xq in the dog, in the same chromosomal location occupied by the human genes. Somatic cell hybrid analysis and methylation differences at AR demonstrated that female dogs carrying X-linked SCID have the same lymphocyte-limited skewed X-chromosome inactivation patterns as human carriers. These genetic and phenotypic findings provide evidence that mutations in the same gene, now identified as the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor, cause canine and human X-linked SCID. This approach is an efficient method for comparative gene mapping and disease identification. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A comparative genetic linkage map of eggplant (Solanum melongena) and its implications for genome evolution in the solanaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Doganlar, Sami; Frary, Anne; Daunay, Marie-Christine; Lester, Richard N; Tanksley, Steven D

    2002-01-01

    A molecular genetic linkage map based on tomato cDNA, genomic DNA, and EST markers was constructed for eggplant, Solanum melongena. The map consists of 12 linkage groups, spans 1480 cM, and contains 233 markers. Comparison of the eggplant and tomato maps revealed conservation of large tracts of colinear markers, a common feature of genome evolution in the Solanaceae and other plant families. Overall, eggplant and tomato were differentiated by 28 rearrangements, which could be explained by 23 paracentric inversions and five translocations during evolution from the species' last common ancestor. No pericentric inversions were detected. Thus, it appears that paracentric inversion has been the primary mechanism for chromosome evolution in the Solanaceae. Comparison of relative distributions of the types of rearrangements that distinguish pairs of solanaceous species also indicates that the frequency of different chromosomal structural changes was not constant over evolutionary time. On the basis of the number of chromosomal disruptions and an approximate divergence time for Solanum, approximately 0.19 rearrangements per chromosome per million years occurred during the evolution of eggplant and tomato from their last ancestor. This result suggests that genomes in Solanaceae, or at least in Solanum, are evolving at a moderate pace compared to other plant species. PMID:12196412

  13. Genetic and physical map correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and physical maps illustrate the arrangement of genes and DNA markers on a chromosome. The relative distances between positions on a genetic map are calculated using recombination frequencies while a physical map is based on the actual number of nucleotide pairs between loci. These maps ar...

  14. An Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)-enriched genetic map of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): a useful framework for comparative genomics across model and farmed teleosts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a relevant species in European aquaculture. The small turbot genome provides a source for genomics strategies to use in order to understand the genetic basis of productive traits, particularly those related to sex, growth and pathogen resistance. Genetic maps represent essential genomic screening tools allowing to localize quantitative trait loci (QTL) and to identify candidate genes through comparative mapping. This information is the backbone to develop marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs in aquaculture. Expressed sequenced tag (EST) resources have largely increased in turbot, thus supplying numerous type I markers suitable for extending the previous linkage map, which was mostly based on anonymous loci. The aim of this study was to construct a higher-resolution turbot genetic map using EST-linked markers, which will turn out to be useful for comparative mapping studies. Results A consensus gene-enriched genetic map of the turbot was constructed using 463 SNP and microsatellite markers in nine reference families. This map contains 438 markers, 180 EST-linked, clustered at 24 linkage groups. Linkage and comparative genomics evidences suggested additional linkage group fusions toward the consolidation of turbot map according to karyotype information. The linkage map showed a total length of 1402.7 cM with low average intermarker distance (3.7 cM; ~2 Mb). A global 1.6:1 female-to-male recombination frequency (RF) ratio was observed, although largely variable among linkage groups and chromosome regions. Comparative sequence analysis revealed large macrosyntenic patterns against model teleost genomes, significant hits decreasing from stickleback (54%) to zebrafish (20%). Comparative mapping supported particular chromosome rearrangements within Acanthopterygii and aided to assign unallocated markers to specific turbot linkage groups. Conclusions The new gene-enriched high-resolution turbot map represents a

  15. Large-scale development of cost-effective single-nucleotide polymorphism marker assays for genetic mapping in pigeonpea and comparative mapping in legumes.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rachit K; Penmetsa, R Varma; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Kumar, Ashish; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Schlueter, Jessica A; Farmer, Andrew; Whaley, Adam M; Sarma, Birinchi K; May, Gregory D; Cook, Douglas R; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2012-12-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, >2000) were discovered by using RNA-seq and allele-specific sequencing approaches in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan). For making the SNP genotyping cost-effective, successful competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (KASPar) assays were developed for 1616 SNPs and referred to as PKAMs (pigeonpea KASPar assay markers). Screening of PKAMs on 24 genotypes [23 from cultivated species and 1 wild species (Cajanus scarabaeoides)] defined a set of 1154 polymorphic markers (77.4%) with a polymorphism information content (PIC) value from 0.04 to 0.38. One thousand and ninety-four PKAMs showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the reference mapping population (C. cajan ICP 28 × C. scarabaeoides ICPW 94). By using high-quality marker genotyping data on 167 F(2) lines from the population, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 875 PKAMs with an average inter-marker distance of 1.11 cM was developed. Previously mapped 35 simple sequence repeat markers were integrated into the PKAM map and an integrated genetic map of 996.21 cM was constructed. Mapped PKAMs showed a higher degree of synteny with the genome of Glycine max followed by Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus and least with Vigna unguiculata. These PKAMs will be useful for genetics research and breeding applications in pigeonpea and for utilizing genome information from other legume species. PMID:23103470

  16. Large-scale development of cost-effective SNP marker assays for diversity assessment and genetic mapping in chickpea and comparative mapping in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Pavana J; Kumar, Ashish; Penmetsa, Ramachandra Varma; Farmer, Andrew; Schlueter, Jessica A; Chamarthi, Siva K; Whaley, Adam M; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Gaur, Pooran M; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B; Shah, Trushar M; Cook, Douglas R; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2012-01-01

    A set of 2486 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were compiled in chickpea using four approaches, namely (i) Solexa/Illumina sequencing (1409), (ii) amplicon sequencing of tentative orthologous genes (TOGs) (604), (iii) mining of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (286) and (iv) sequencing of candidate genes (187). Conversion of these SNPs to the cost-effective and flexible throughput Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar) assays generated successful assays for 2005 SNPs. These marker assays have been designated as Chickpea KASPar Assay Markers (CKAMs). Screening of 70 genotypes including 58 diverse chickpea accessions and 12 BC3F2 lines showed 1341 CKAMs as being polymorphic. Genetic analysis of these data clustered chickpea accessions based on geographical origin. Genotyping data generated for 671 CKAMs on the reference mapping population (Cicer arietinum ICC 4958 × Cicer reticulatum PI 489777) were compiled with 317 unpublished TOG-SNPs and 396 published markers for developing the genetic map. As a result, a second-generation genetic map comprising 1328 marker loci including novel 625 CKAMs, 314 TOG-SNPs and 389 published marker loci with an average inter-marker distance of 0.59 cM was constructed. Detailed analyses of 1064 mapped loci of this second-generation chickpea genetic map showed a higher degree of synteny with genome of Medicago truncatula, followed by Glycine max, Lotus japonicus and least with Vigna unguiculata. Development of these cost-effective CKAMs for SNP genotyping will be useful not only for genetics research and breeding applications in chickpea, but also for utilizing genome information from other sequenced or model legumes. PMID:22703242

  17. Comparative genetic mapping between duplicated segments on maize chromosomes 3 and 8 and homoeologous regions in sorghum and sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Dufour, P; Grivet, L; D'Hont, A; Deu, M; Trouche, G; Glaszmann, J C; Hamon, P

    1996-06-01

    Comparative mapping within maize, sorghum and sugarcane has previously revealed the existence of syntenic regions between the crops. In the present study, mapping on the sorghum genome of a set of probes previously located on the maize and sugarcane maps allow a detailed analysis of the relationship between maize chromosomes 3 and 8 and sorghum and sugarcane homoeologous regions. Of 49 loci revealed by 46 (4 sugarcane and 42 maize) polymorphic probes in sorghum, 42 were linked and were assigned to linkage groups G (28), E (10) and I (4). On the basis of common probes, a complete co-linearity is observed between sorghum linkage group G and the two sugarcane linkage groups II and III. The comparison between the consensus sorghum/sugarcane map (G/II/III) and the maps of maize chromosomes 3 and 8 reveals a series of linkage blocks within which gene orders are conserved. These blocks are interspersed with non-homoeologous regions corresponding to the central part of the two maize chromosomes and have been reshuffled, resulting in several inversions in maize compared to sorghum and sugarcane. The results emphasize the fact that duplication will considerably complicate precise comparative mapping at the whole genome scale between maize and other Poaceae. PMID:24166631

  18. Genetic Mapping in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, David; Daly, Mark J.; Lander, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mapping provides a powerful approach to identify genes and biological processes underlying any trait influenced by inheritance, including human diseases. We discuss the intellectual foundations of genetic mapping of Mendelian and complex traits in humans, examine lessons emerging from linkage analysis of Mendelian diseases and genome-wide association studies of common diseases, and discuss questions and challenges that lie ahead. PMID:18988837

  19. Genetic mapping and QTL analysis for body weight in Jian carp ( Cyprinus carpio var. Jian) compared with mirror carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ying; Lu, Cuiyun; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Li, Chao; Yu, Juhua; Sun, Xiaowen

    2015-05-01

    We report the genetic linkage map of Jian carp ( Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). An F1 population comprising 94 Jian carp individuals was mapped using 254 microsatellite markers. The genetic map spanned 1 381.592 cM and comprised 44 linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 6.58 cM. We identified eight quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for body weight (BW) in seven linkage groups, explaining 12.6% to 17.3% of the phenotypic variance. Comparative mapping was performed between Jian carp and mirror carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.), which both have 50 chromosomes. One hundred and ninety-eight Jian carp marker loci were found in common with the mirror carp map, with 186 (93.94%) showing synteny. All 44 Jian carp linkage groups could be one-to-one aligned to the 44 mirror carp linkage groups, mostly sharing two or more common loci. Three QTLs for BW in Jian carp were conserved in mirror carp. QTL comparison suggested that the QTL confidence interval in mirror carp was more precise than the homologous interval in Jian carp, which was contained within the QTL interval in Jian carp. The syntenic relationship and consensus QTLs between the two varieties provide a foundation for genomic research and genetic breeding in common carp.

  20. A genetic linkage map of sole (Solea solea): a tool for evolutionary and comparative analyses of exploited (flat)fishes.

    PubMed

    Diopere, Eveline; Maes, Gregory E; Komen, Hans; Volckaert, Filip A M; Groenen, Martien A M

    2014-01-01

    Linkage maps based on markers derived from genes are essential evolutionary tools for commercial marine fish to help identify genomic regions associated with complex traits and subject to selective forces at play during exploitation or selective breeding. Additionally, they allow the use of genomic information from other related species for which more detailed information is available. Sole (solea solea L.) is a commercially important flatfish species in the North Sea, subject to overexploitation and showing evidence of fisheries-induced evolutionary changes in growth- and maturation-related traits. Sole would definitely benefit from a linkage map to better understand how evolution has shaped its genome structure. This study presents a linkage map of sole based on 423 single nucleotide polymorphisms derived from expressed sequence tags and 8 neutral microsatellite markers. The total map length is 1233.8 cM and consists of 38 linkage groups with a size varying between 0 to 92.1 cM. Being derived from expressed sequence tags allowed us to align the map with the genome of four model fish species, namely medaka (Oryzias latipes), Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and green spotted pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis). This comparison revealed multiple conserved syntenic regions with all four species, and suggested that the linkage groups represent 21 putative sole chromosomes. The map was also compared to the linkage map of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), another commercially important flatfish species and closely related to sole. For all putative sole chromosomes (except one) a turbot homolog was detected, confirming the even higher degree of synteny between these two flatfish species. PMID:25541971

  1. Genome-wide SNP identification for the construction of a high-resolution genetic map of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus): applications to QTL mapping of Vibrio anguillarum disease resistance and comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Changwei; Niu, Yongchao; Rastas, Pasi; Liu, Yang; Xie, Zhiyuan; Li, Hengde; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yong; Tai, Shuaishuai; Tian, Yongsheng; Sakamoto, Takashi; Chen, Songlin

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution genetic maps are essential for fine mapping of complex traits, genome assembly, and comparative genomic analysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the primary molecular markers used for genetic map construction. In this study, we identified 13,362 SNPs evenly distributed across the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) genome. Of these SNPs, 12,712 high-confidence SNPs were subjected to high-throughput genotyping and assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the genetic linkage map was 3,497.29 cM with an average distance of 0.47 cM between loci, thereby representing the densest genetic map currently reported for Japanese flounder. Nine positive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) forming two main clusters for Vibrio anguillarum disease resistance were detected. All QTLs could explain 5.1-8.38% of the total phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis of the QTL regions on the genome assembly revealed 12 immune-related genes, among them 4 genes strongly associated with V. anguillarum disease resistance. In addition, 246 genome assembly scaffolds with an average size of 21.79 Mb were anchored onto the LGs; these scaffolds, comprising 522.99 Mb, represented 95.78% of assembled genomic sequences. The mapped assembly scaffolds in Japanese flounder were used for genome synteny analyses against zebrafish (Danio rerio) and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Flounder and medaka were found to possess almost one-to-one synteny, whereas flounder and zebrafish exhibited a multi-syntenic correspondence. The newly developed high-resolution genetic map, which will facilitate QTL mapping, scaffold assembly, and genome synteny analysis of Japanese flounder, marks a milestone in the ongoing genome project for this species. PMID:25762582

  2. Genetic map construction with constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Rawlings, C.J.; Soursenot, S.

    1994-12-31

    A pilot program, CME, is described for generating a physical genetic map from hybridization fingerprinting data. CME is implemented in the parallel constraint logic programming language ElipSys. The features of constraint logic programming are used to enable the integration of preexisting mapping information (partial probe orders from cytogenetic maps and local physical maps) into the global map generation process, while parallelism enables the search space to be traversed more efficiently. CME was tested using data from chromosome 2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and was found able to generate maps as well as (and sometimes better than) a more traditional method. This paper illustrates the practical benefits of using a symbolic logic programming language and shows that the features of constraint handling and parallel execution bring the development of practical systems based on Al programming technologies nearer to being a reality.

  3. Genetic mapping and DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, T.; Waterman, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Human Genome Initiative has as its primary objective the characterization of the human genome. High-resolution linkage maps of genetic markers will play an important role in completing the human genome project. This is one of two volumes based on the proceedings of the 1994 IMA Summer Program on Molecular Biology and comprises Weeks 1 and 2 of the four-week program. This volume focuses on genetic mapping and DNA sequencing. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. A high-density genetic recombination map of sequence-tagged sites for sorghum, as a framework for comparative structural and evolutionary genomics of tropical grains and grasses.

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John E; Abbey, Colette; Anderson, Sharon; Chang, Charlene; Draye, Xavier; Hoppe, Alison H; Jessup, Russell; Lemke, Cornelia; Lennington, Jennifer; Li, Zhikang; Lin, Yann-Rong; Liu, Sin-Chieh; Luo, Lijun; Marler, Barry S; Ming, Reiguang; Mitchell, Sharon E; Qiang, Dou; Reischmann, Kim; Schulze, Stefan R; Skinner, D Neil; Wang, Yue-Wen; Kresovich, Stephen; Schertz, Keith F; Paterson, Andrew H

    2003-01-01

    We report a genetic recombination map for Sorghum of 2512 loci spaced at average 0.4 cM ( approximately 300 kb) intervals based on 2050 RFLP probes, including 865 heterologous probes that foster comparative genomics of Saccharum (sugarcane), Zea (maize), Oryza (rice), Pennisetum (millet, buffelgrass), the Triticeae (wheat, barley, oat, rye), and Arabidopsis. Mapped loci identify 61.5% of the recombination events in this progeny set and reveal strong positive crossover interference acting across intervals of comparative genomics, we support and extend prior findings regarding maize-sorghum synteny-in particular, 45% of comparative loci fall outside the inferred colinear/syntenic regions, suggesting that many small rearrangements have occurred since maize-sorghum divergence. These genetically anchored sequence-tagged sites will foster many structural, functional and evolutionary genomic studies in major food, feed, and biomass crops. PMID:14504243

  5. Structure, evolution, and comparative genomics of tetraploid cotton based on a high-density genetic linkage map

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ximei; Jin, Xin; Wang, Hantao; Zhang, Xianlong; Lin, Zhongxu

    2016-01-01

    A high-density linkage map was constructed using 1,885 newly obtained loci and 3,747 previously published loci, which included 5,152 loci with 4696.03 cM in total length and 0.91 cM in mean distance. Homology analysis in the cotton genome further confirmed the 13 expected homologous chromosome pairs and revealed an obvious inversion on Chr10 or Chr20 and repeated inversions on Chr07 or Chr16. In addition, two reciprocal translocations between Chr02 and Chr03 and between Chr04 and Chr05 were confirmed. Comparative genomics between the tetraploid cotton and the diploid cottons showed that no major structural changes exist between DT and D chromosomes but rather between AT and A chromosomes. Blast analysis between the tetraploid cotton genome and the mixed genome of two diploid cottons showed that most AD chromosomes, regardless of whether it is from the AT or DT genome, preferentially matched with the corresponding homologous chromosome in the diploid A genome, and then the corresponding homologous chromosome in the diploid D genome, indicating that the diploid D genome underwent converted evolution by the diploid A genome to form the DT genome during polyploidization. In addition, the results reflected that a series of chromosomal translocations occurred among Chr01/Chr15, Chr02/Chr14, Chr03/Chr17, Chr04/Chr22, and Chr05/Chr19. PMID:27084896

  6. Genetic mapping with octoploid strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2004, the USDA-CSREES call for proposals for the National Research Initiative (NRI) Program 52.1, Plant Genetics, focused on crops within the plant family Rosaceae. Two of the funded projects focus on molecular marker mapping of flowering traits of strawberry: sex determination and remontancy. Bo...

  7. Genetic epidemiology, genetic maps and positional cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Newton E

    2003-01-01

    Genetic epidemiology developed in the middle of the last century, focused on inherited causes of disease but with methods and results applicable to other traits and even forensics. Early success with linkage led to the localization of genes contributing to disease, and ultimately to the Human Genome Project. The discovery of millions of DNA markers has encouraged more efficient positional cloning by linkage disequilibrium (LD), using LD maps and haplotypes in ways that are rapidly evolving. This has led to large international programmes, some promising and others alarming, with laws about DNA patenting and ethical guidelines for responsible research still struggling to be born. PMID:14561327

  8. Genetic map of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, R.K.; Schild, D.

    1980-12-01

    Researchers present a compilation of most of the published yeast mapping data, as well as a large amount of unpublished data, according to chromosomes and intervals; the numbers of independent sets of data for the different intervals ranged from 1 to 12. These data have been analyzed and a new genetic map has been constructed. Although all of the data presented in this article are from tetrad analyses, many other techniques have been used to assign genes to chromosomes or to specific chromosome arms. These techniques include aneuploid analysis, mitotic recombination analysis, mitotic chromosome loss or nondisjunction, and random spore analysis.

  9. The molecular genetic linkage map of the model legume Medicago truncatula: an essential tool for comparative legume genomics and the isolation of agronomically important genes

    PubMed Central

    Thoquet, Philippe; Ghérardi, Michele; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Kereszt, Attila; Ané, Jean-Michel; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Huguet, Thierry

    2002-01-01

    Background The legume Medicago truncatula has emerged as a model plant for the molecular and genetic dissection of various plant processes involved in rhizobial, mycorrhizal and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. Aiming to develop essential tools for such genetic approaches, we have established the first genetic map of this species. Two parental homozygous lines were selected from the cultivar Jemalong and from the Algerian natural population (DZA315) on the basis of their molecular and phenotypic polymorphism. Results An F2 segregating population of 124 individuals between these two lines was obtained using an efficient manual crossing technique established for M. truncatula and was used to construct a genetic map. This map spans 1225 cM (average 470 kb/cM) and comprises 289 markers including RAPD, AFLP, known genes and isoenzymes arranged in 8 linkage groups (2n = 16). Markers are uniformly distributed throughout the map and segregation distortion is limited to only 3 linkage groups. By mapping a number of common markers, the eight linkage groups are shown to be homologous to those of diploid alfalfa (M. sativa), implying a good level of macrosynteny between the two genomes. Using this M. truncatula map and the derived F3 populations, we were able to map the Mtsym6 symbiotic gene on linkage group 8 and the SPC gene, responsible for the direction of pod coiling, on linkage group 7. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Medicago truncatula is amenable to diploid genetic analysis and they open the way to map-based cloning of symbiotic or other agronomically-important genes using this model plant. PMID:11825338

  10. A large maize (Zea Mays L.) SNP genotyping array: development and germplasm genotyping, and genetic mapping to compare with the B73 reference genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SNP genotyping arrays have been useful for many applications that require a large number of molecular markers such as high-density genetic mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection for accelerated breeding. We report the establishment of a large SNP array for maize and i...

  11. A Microsatellite Genetic Linkage Map for Xiphophorus

    PubMed Central

    Walter, R. B.; Rains, J. D.; Russell, J. E.; Guerra, T. M.; Daniels, C.; Johnston, Dennis A.; Kumar, Jay; Wheeler, A.; Kelnar, K.; Khanolkar, V. A.; Williams, E. L.; Hornecker, J. L.; Hollek, L.; Mamerow, M. M.; Pedroza, A.; Kazianis, S.

    2004-01-01

    Interspecies hybrids between distinct species of the genus Xiphophorus are often used in varied research investigations to identify genomic regions associated with the inheritance of complex traits. There are 24 described Xiphophorus species and a greater number of pedigreed strains; thus, the number of potential interspecies hybrid cross combinations is quite large. Previously, select Xiphophorus experimental crosses have been shown to exhibit differing characteristics between parental species and among the hybrid fishes derived from crossing them, such as widely differing susceptibilities to chemical or physical agents. For instance, genomic regions harboring tumor suppressor and oncogenes have been identified via linkage association of these loci with a small set of established genetic markers. The power of this experimental strategy is related to the number of genetic markers available in the Xiphophorus interspecies cross of interest. Thus, we have undertaken the task of expanding the suite of easily scored markers by characterization of Xiphophorus microsatellite sequences. Using a cross between Xiphophorus maculatus and X. andersi, we report a linkage map predominantly composed of microsatellite markers. All 24 acrocentric chromosome sets of Xiphophorus are represented in the assembled linkage map with an average intergenomic distance of 7.5 cM. Since both male and female F1 hybrids were used to produce backcross progeny, these recombination rates were compared between “male” and “female” maps. Although several genomic regions exhibit differences in map length, male- and female-derived maps are similar. Thus Xiphophorus, in contrast to zebrafish, Danio rerio, and several other vertebrate species, does not show sex-specific differences in recombination. The microsatellite markers we report can be easily adapted to any Xiphophorus interspecies and some intraspecies crosses, and thus provide a means to directly compare results derived from independent

  12. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of eating behavior in pigs and its implications for humans obesity by comparative mapping.

    PubMed

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage; Jensen, Just; Mark, Thomas; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions controlling feeding behavior in Danish Duroc boars and its potential implications for eating behavior in humans. Data regarding individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of daily visits to feeder (NVD), average duration of each visit (TPV), mean feed intake per visit (FPV) and mean feed intake rate (FR) were available for 1130 boars. All boars were genotyped using the Illumina Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The association analyses were performed using the GenABEL package in the R program. Sixteen SNPs were found to have moderate genome-wide significance (p<5E-05) and 76 SNPs had suggestive (p<5E-04) association with feeding behavior traits. MSI2 gene on chromosome (SSC) 14 was very strongly associated with NVD. Thirty-six SNPs were located in genome regions where QTLs have previously been reported for behavior and/or feed intake traits in pigs. The regions: 64-65 Mb on SSC 1, 124-130 Mb on SSC 8, 63-68 Mb on SSC 11, 32-39 Mb and 59-60 Mb on SSC 12 harbored several signifcant SNPs. Synapse genes (GABRR2, PPP1R9B, SYT1, GABRR1, CADPS2, DLGAP2 and GOPC), dephosphorylation genes (PPM1E, DAPP1, PTPN18, PTPRZ1, PTPN4, MTMR4 and RNGTT) and positive regulation of peptide secretion genes (GHRH, NNAT and TCF7L2) were highly significantly associated with feeding behavior traits. This is the first GWAS to identify genetic variants and biological mechanisms for eating behavior in pigs and these results are important for genetic improvement of pig feed efficiency. We have also conducted pig-human comparative gene mapping to reveal key genomic regions and/or genes on the human genome that may influence eating behavior in human beings and consequently affect the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. This is the first translational genomics study of its kind to report potential candidate genes for eating behavior in humans. PMID:23977060

  13. Mapping genetic influences on human brain structure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul; Cannon, Tyrone D; Toga, Arthur W

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in brain imaging and genetics have empowered the mapping of genetic and environmental influences on the human brain. These techniques shed light on the 'nature/nurture' debate, revealing how genes determine individual differences in intelligence quotient (IQ) or risk for disease. They visualize which aspects of brain structure and function are heritable, and to what degree, linking these features with behavioral or cognitive traits or disease phenotypes. In genetically transmitted disorders such as schizophrenia, patterns of brain structure can be associated with increased disease liability, and sites can be mapped where non-genetic triggers may initiate disease. We recently developed a large-scale computational brain atlas, including data components from the Finnish Twin registry, to store information on individual variations in brain structure and their heritability. Algorithms from random field theory, anatomical modeling, and population genetics were combined to detect a genetic continuum in which brain structure is heavily genetically determined in some areas but not others. These algorithmic advances motivate studies of disease in which the normative atlas acts as a quantitative reference for the heritability of structural differences and deficits in patient populations. The resulting genetic brain maps isolate biological markers for inherited traits and disease susceptibility, which may serve as targets for genetic linkage and association studies. Computational methods from brain imaging and genetics can be fruitfully merged, to shed light on the inheritance of personality differences and behavioral traits, and the genetic transmission of diseases that affect the human brain. PMID:12553492

  14. Genetic Linkage Maps: Strategies, Resources and Achievements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter is for the sunflower volume in the Crop GGB (Genetics, Genomics and Breeding) Book Series. The book includes chapters covering basic information about the sunflower plant, germplasm diversity, classical genetics and traditional breeding, genome mapping, regulation of seed oil conte...

  15. Genetic Mapping with Octoploid Strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2004, the USDA-CSREES call for proposals for the National Research Initiative (NRI) Program 52.1, Plant Genetics, focused on crops within the plant family Rosaceae. The USDA-ARS strawberry (Fragaria L.) and bramble (Rubus L.) breeding and genetics program at Beltsville, Maryland, was involved wit...

  16. MICROSATELLITE BASED GENETIC MAP OF SWEET POTATO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic map would be an aid to identification of new traits and in understanding fundamental processes in the sweetpotato related to essential functions in the crop and economic qualities like food quality. This map could also be useful in the understanding of the genes involved in multiple pest ...

  17. The Genetic Map Enters Its Second Century

    PubMed Central

    Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The Genetics Society of America (GSA) Medal is awarded to an individual for outstanding contributions to the field of genetics in the past 15 years. Recipients of the GSA Medal are recognized for elegant and highly meaningful contributions to modern genetics and exemplify the ingenuity of GSA members. The 2015 recipient is Steven Henikoff, whose achievements include major contributions to Drosophila genetics and epigenetics, Arabidopsis genetics and epigenetics, population and evolutionary genetics, genomic technologies, computational biology, and transcription and chromatin biology. Among these achievements, Henikoff elucidated the mechanism for position-effect variegation, revealed a central role for variant histones in nucleosome assembly at active genes, and provided new insights into genome evolution. He has also developed widely used computational tools for genome and protein analysis and new strategies for mapping chromatin-binding sites. PMID:26170439

  18. A genetic linkage map for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    placed on this genetic map have been evaluated in up to 18 other extant species of crocodilian, this map will be of intrinsic value to comparative mapping efforts aimed at understanding genome content and organization among crocodilians, as well as the molecular evolution of reptilian and other amniote genomes. As researchers continue to work towards elucidation of the crocodilian genome, this first generation map lays the groundwork for more detailed mapping investigations, as well as providing a valuable scaffold for future genome sequence assembly. PMID:19640266

  19. A Genetic Linkage Map for Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, M. D.; Kappes, S. M.; Keele, J. W.; Stone, R. T.; Sunden, SLF.; Hawkins, G. A.; Toldo, S. S.; Fries, R.; Grosz, M. D.; Yoo, J.; Beattie, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    We report the most extensive physically anchored linkage map for cattle produced to date. Three-hundred thirteen genetic markers ordered in 30 linkage groups, anchored to 24 autosomal chromosomes (n = 29), the X and Y chromosomes, four unanchored syntenic groups and two unassigned linkage groups spanning 2464 cM of the bovine genome are summarized. The map also assigns 19 type I loci to specific chromosomes and/or syntenic groups and four cosmid clones containing informative microsatellites to chromosomes 13, 25 and 29 anchoring syntenic groups U11, U7 and U8, respectively. This map provides the skeletal framework prerequisite to development of a comprehensive genetic map for cattle and analysis of economic trait loci (ETL). PMID:7908653

  20. A physical map of the papaya genome with integrated genetic map and genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Papaya is a major fruit crop in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide and has primitive sex chromosomes controlling sex determination in this trioecious species. The papaya genome was recently sequenced because of its agricultural importance, unique biological features, and successful application of transgenic papaya for resistance to papaya ringspot virus. As a part of the genome sequencing project, we constructed a BAC-based physical map using a high information-content fingerprinting approach to assist whole genome shotgun sequence assembly. Results The physical map consists of 963 contigs, representing 9.4× genome equivalents, and was integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence using BAC end sequences and a sequence-tagged high-density genetic map. The estimated genome coverage of the physical map is about 95.8%, while 72.4% of the genome was aligned to the genetic map. A total of 1,181 high quality overgo (overlapping oligonucleotide) probes representing conserved sequences in Arabidopsis and genetically mapped loci in Brassica were anchored on the physical map, which provides a foundation for comparative genomics in the Brassicales. The integrated genetic and physical map aligned with the genome sequence revealed recombination hotspots as well as regions suppressed for recombination across the genome, particularly on the recently evolved sex chromosomes. Suppression of recombination spread to the adjacent region of the male specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY), and recombination rates were recovered gradually and then exceeded the genome average. Recombination hotspots were observed at about 10 Mb away on both sides of the MSY, showing 7-fold increase compared with the genome wide average, demonstrating the dynamics of recombination of the sex chromosomes. Conclusion A BAC-based physical map of papaya was constructed and integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence. The integrated map facilitated the draft genome assembly

  1. Comparative mapping among subsection Australes (genus Pinus, family Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Mervyn; Williams, Claire G

    2008-05-01

    Comparative mapping in conifers has not yet been used to test for small-scale genomic disruptions such as inversions, duplications, and deletions occurring between closely related taxa. Using comparative mapping to probe this smaller scale of inquiry may provide clues about speciation in a phylogenetically problematic taxon, the diploxylon pine subsection Australes (genus Pinus, family Pinaceae). Genetic maps were constructed for two allopatric species of Australes, P. elliottii var. elliottii and P. caribaea var. hondurensis, using microsatellites and an F1 hybrid. A third map was generated directly from the meiotic products of an adult F1 hybrid, eliminating the need for an F2 generation. Numerous small-scale disruptions were detected in addition to synteny and collinearity, and these included (1) map shrinkage, (2) a paracentric inversion, (3) transmission ratio distortion, and (4) mild selection against a parental haplotype. Such cryptic signatures of genomic divergence between closely related interfertile species are useful in elucidating this problematic evolutionary history. PMID:18438435

  2. Comparative mapping of expressed sequence tags containing microsatellites in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Rexroad, Caird E; Rodriguez, Maria F; Coulibaly, Issa; Gharbi, Karim; Danzmann, Roy G; DeKoning, Jenefer; Phillips, Ruth; Palti, Yniv

    2005-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics, through the integration of genetic maps from species of interest with whole genome sequences of other species, will facilitate the identification of genes affecting phenotypes of interest. The development of microsatellite markers from expressed sequence tags will serve to increase marker densities on current salmonid genetic maps and initiate in silico comparative maps with species whose genomes have been fully sequenced. Results Eighty-nine polymorphic microsatellite markers were generated for rainbow trout of which at least 74 amplify in other salmonids. Fifty-five have been associated with functional annotation and 30 were mapped on existing genetic maps. Homologous sequences were identified for 20 of the EST containing microsatellites to identify comparative assignments within the tetraodon, mouse, and/or human genomes. Conclusion The addition of microsatellite markers constructed from expressed sequence tag data will facilitate the development of high-density genetic maps for rainbow trout and comparative maps with other salmonids and better studied species. PMID:15836796

  3. A high-density genetic map and growth related QTL mapping in bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis)

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Beide; Liu, Haiyang; Yu, Xiaomu; Tong, Jingou

    2016-01-01

    Growth related traits in fish are controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTL), but no QTL for growth have been detected in bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) due to the lack of high-density genetic map. In this study, an ultra-high density genetic map was constructed with 3,121 SNP markers by sequencing 117 individuals in a F1 family using 2b-RAD technology. The total length of the map was 2341.27 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.75 cM. A high level of genomic synteny between our map and zebrafish was detected. Based on this genetic map, one genome-wide significant and 37 suggestive QTL for five growth-related traits were identified in 6 linkage groups (i.e. LG3, LG11, LG15, LG18, LG19, LG22). The phenotypic variance explained (PVE) by these QTL varied from 15.4% to 38.2%. Marker within the significant QTL region was surrounded by CRP1 and CRP2, which played an important role in muscle cell division. These high-density map and QTL information provided a solid base for QTL fine mapping and comparative genomics in bighead carp. PMID:27345016

  4. What is a genetic map function?

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, T.P.

    1996-12-31

    We review the reasons that genetic map functions are studied and the way they are used. The connections between chiasma point processes on four-stranded bivalents, crossover point processes on the single strand products of meiosis, multilocus recombination probabilities and map functions are discussed in detail, mainly, but not exclusively under the assumption of no chromatid interference. As a result of this discussion we obtain a number of inequalities constraining map functions which lead to both bound and smoothness constraints. We show that most of the functions proposed as map functions in the literature do in fact arise in association with a stationary renewal chiasma process, and we clarify the relation between their doing so, while failing to be multilocus feasible in the sense of Liberman & Karlin. We emphasize the fact that map functions can in general neither define chiasma nor crossover processes nor multilocus recombination probabilities, nor can they fully reflect the nature of the interference present in a chiasma or crossover process. Our attempt to answer the question in the title of this paper is not wholly successful, but we present some simple necessary conditions which become sufficient when supplemented by two further simple conditions. The paper closes with the statement of several open problems. 64 refs.

  5. A Genetic Linkage Map of the Mimetic Butterfly Heliconius melpomene

    PubMed Central

    Jiggins, Chris D.; Mavarez, Jesus; Beltrán, Margarita; McMillan, W. Owen; Johnston, J. Spencer; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2005-01-01

    Heliconius melpomene is a mimetic butterfly that exhibits great geographic variation in color pattern. We present here a genetic linkage map based on analysis of genetic markers in 73 individuals from a single F2 family, offspring of a cross between H. m. cythera from western Ecuador and H. m. melpomene from French Guiana. A novel “three-step method” is described for the analysis of dominant markers in an F2 cross, using outbred parental strains and taking advantage of the lack of crossing over in female Lepidoptera. This method is likely to prove useful for future mapping studies in outbred species with crossing over restricted to one sex, such as the Lepidoptera and Drosophila. The resulting linkage map has 21 linkage groups corresponding to the 21 chromosomes of H. melpomene and includes 219 AFLP markers, 23 microsatellites, 19 single-copy nuclear genes, and the color pattern switch genes Yb and Sb. The marker density is high, averaging >1/7 cM. The total map length is 1616 cM and the average chromosome length is 77 cM. The genome size of H. melpomene was estimated to be 292 Mb, giving a relationship of physical-to-map distance of 180 kb/cM. This map forms the basis for future comparative linkage analysis of color pattern evolution in Heliconius. PMID:15489522

  6. A Genetic Map for the Only Self-Fertilizing Vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Akira; Sugita, Yosuke; Yuasa, Yasufumi; Suzuki, Takamasa; Kawamura, Kouichi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Kamimura, Katsuyasu; Matsuda, Yoichi; Wilson, Catherine A.; Amores, Angel; Postlethwait, John H.; Suga, Koushirou; Sakakura, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    The mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus, and its close relative Kryptolebias hermaphroditus, are the only vertebrate species known to reproduce by self-fertilization due to functional ovotestis development. To improve our understanding of their genomes, we constructed a genetic map. First, a single F1 fish was made by artificial fertilization between K. marmoratus and K. hermaphroditus strains. F2 progeny were then obtained by self-fertilization of the F1 fish. We used RAD-seq to query genomic DNAs from the two parental strains, the F1 individual and 49 F2 progeny. Results identified 9904 polymorphic RAD-tags (DNA markers) that mapped to 24 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of these species. The total length of the map was 1248 cM, indicating that about one recombination occurred for each of the 24 homologous chromosome pairs in each meiosis. Markers were not evenly distributed along the chromosomes: in all chromosomes, many markers (> 8% of the total markers for each chromosome) mapped to chromosome tips. Centromeres suppress recombination, and this uneven distribution is probably due to the species’ acrocentric chromosomes. Mapped marker sequences were compared to genomic sequences of medaka and platyfish, the next most closely related species with sequenced genomes that are anchored to genetic maps. Results showed that each mangrove killifish chromosome corresponds to a single chromosome of both platyfish and medaka, suggesting strong conservation of chromosomes over 100 million years of evolution. Our genetic map provides a framework for the K. marmoratus/K. hermaphroditus genome sequence and an important resource for understanding the biology of hermaphroditism. PMID:26865699

  7. A Genetic Map for the Only Self-Fertilizing Vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Akira; Sugita, Yosuke; Yuasa, Yasufumi; Suzuki, Takamasa; Kawamura, Kouichi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Kamimura, Katsuyasu; Matsuda, Yoichi; Wilson, Catherine A; Amores, Angel; Postlethwait, John H; Suga, Koushirou; Sakakura, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    The mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus, and its close relative Kryptolebias hermaphroditus, are the only vertebrate species known to reproduce by self-fertilization due to functional ovotestis development. To improve our understanding of their genomes, we constructed a genetic map. First, a single F1 fish was made by artificial fertilization between K. marmoratus and K. hermaphroditus strains. F2 progeny were then obtained by self-fertilization of the F1 fish. We used RAD-seq to query genomic DNAs from the two parental strains, the F1 individual and 49 F2 progeny. Results identified 9904 polymorphic RAD-tags (DNA markers) that mapped to 24 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of these species. The total length of the map was 1248 cM, indicating that about one recombination occurred for each of the 24 homologous chromosome pairs in each meiosis. Markers were not evenly distributed along the chromosomes: in all chromosomes, many markers (> 8% of the total markers for each chromosome) mapped to chromosome tips. Centromeres suppress recombination, and this uneven distribution is probably due to the species' acrocentric chromosomes. Mapped marker sequences were compared to genomic sequences of medaka and platyfish, the next most closely related species with sequenced genomes that are anchored to genetic maps. Results showed that each mangrove killifish chromosome corresponds to a single chromosome of both platyfish and medaka, suggesting strong conservation of chromosomes over 100 million years of evolution. Our genetic map provides a framework for the K. marmoratus/K. hermaphroditus genome sequence and an important resource for understanding the biology of hermaphroditism. PMID:26865699

  8. A GENETIC LINKAGE MAP AND A CDNA LIBRARY FOR WATERMELON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic linkage map was constructed for watermelon based on a testcross population and an F2 population. The testcross map includes 312 markers (RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, SSR, and ASRP). This map covered a genetic distance of 1385 cM, and identified 11 large (50.7~155.2 cm), five intermediate (37.5-46.2...

  9. Genetic map of Salmonella typhimurium, edition VIII.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, K E; Hessel, A; Rudd, K E

    1995-01-01

    We present edition VIII of the genetic map of Salmonella typhimurium LT2. We list a total of 1,159 genes, 1,080 of which have been located on the circular chromosome and 29 of which are on pSLT, the 90-kb plasmid usually found in LT2 lines. The remaining 50 genes are not yet mapped. The coordinate system used in this edition is neither minutes of transfer time in conjugation crosses nor units representing "phage lengths" of DNA of the transducing phage P22, as used in earlier editions, but centisomes and kilobases based on physical analysis of the lengths of DNA segments between genes. Some of these lengths have been determined by digestion of DNA by rare-cutting endonucleases and separation of fragments by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Other lengths have been determined by analysis of DNA sequences in GenBank. We have constructed StySeq1, which incorporates all Salmonella DNA sequence data known to us. StySeq1 comprises over 548 kb of nonredundant chromosomal genomic sequences, representing 11.4% of the chromosome, which is estimated to be just over 4,800 kb in length. Most of these sequences were assigned locations on the chromosome, in some cases by analogy with mapped Escherichia coli sequences. PMID:7603411

  10. Genetic approaches in comparative and evolutionary physiology.

    PubMed

    Storz, Jay F; Bridgham, Jamie T; Kelly, Scott A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-08-01

    Whole animal physiological performance is highly polygenic and highly plastic, and the same is generally true for the many subordinate traits that underlie performance capacities. Quantitative genetics, therefore, provides an appropriate framework for the analysis of physiological phenotypes and can be used to infer the microevolutionary processes that have shaped patterns of trait variation within and among species. In cases where specific genes are known to contribute to variation in physiological traits, analyses of intraspecific polymorphism and interspecific divergence can reveal molecular mechanisms of functional evolution and can provide insights into the possible adaptive significance of observed sequence changes. In this review, we explain how the tools and theory of quantitative genetics, population genetics, and molecular evolution can inform our understanding of mechanism and process in physiological evolution. For example, lab-based studies of polygenic inheritance can be integrated with field-based studies of trait variation and survivorship to measure selection in the wild, thereby providing direct insights into the adaptive significance of physiological variation. Analyses of quantitative genetic variation in selection experiments can be used to probe interrelationships among traits and the genetic basis of physiological trade-offs and constraints. We review approaches for characterizing the genetic architecture of physiological traits, including linkage mapping and association mapping, and systems approaches for dissecting intermediary steps in the chain of causation between genotype and phenotype. We also discuss the promise and limitations of population genomic approaches for inferring adaptation at specific loci. We end by highlighting the role of organismal physiology in the functional synthesis of evolutionary biology. PMID:26041111

  11. Genetic approaches in comparative and evolutionary physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bridgham, Jamie T.; Kelly, Scott A.; Garland, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Whole animal physiological performance is highly polygenic and highly plastic, and the same is generally true for the many subordinate traits that underlie performance capacities. Quantitative genetics, therefore, provides an appropriate framework for the analysis of physiological phenotypes and can be used to infer the microevolutionary processes that have shaped patterns of trait variation within and among species. In cases where specific genes are known to contribute to variation in physiological traits, analyses of intraspecific polymorphism and interspecific divergence can reveal molecular mechanisms of functional evolution and can provide insights into the possible adaptive significance of observed sequence changes. In this review, we explain how the tools and theory of quantitative genetics, population genetics, and molecular evolution can inform our understanding of mechanism and process in physiological evolution. For example, lab-based studies of polygenic inheritance can be integrated with field-based studies of trait variation and survivorship to measure selection in the wild, thereby providing direct insights into the adaptive significance of physiological variation. Analyses of quantitative genetic variation in selection experiments can be used to probe interrelationships among traits and the genetic basis of physiological trade-offs and constraints. We review approaches for characterizing the genetic architecture of physiological traits, including linkage mapping and association mapping, and systems approaches for dissecting intermediary steps in the chain of causation between genotype and phenotype. We also discuss the promise and limitations of population genomic approaches for inferring adaptation at specific loci. We end by highlighting the role of organismal physiology in the functional synthesis of evolutionary biology. PMID:26041111

  12. Comparative genome map of human and cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas-Toldo, S.; Fries, R.; Lengauer, C.

    1995-06-10

    Chromosomal homologies between individual human chromosomes and the bovine karyotype have been established by using a new approach termed Zoo-FISH. Labeled DNA libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization on cattle chromosomes. All human DNA libraries, except the Y chromosome library, hybridized to one or more cattle chromosomes, identifying and delineating 50 segments of homology, most of them corresponding to the regions of homology as identified by the previous mapping of individual conserved loci. However, Zoo-FISH refines the comparative maps constructed by molecular gene mapping of individual loci by providing information on the boundaries of conserved regions in the absence of obvious cytogenetic homologies of human and bovine chromosomes. It allows study of karyotypic evolution and opens new avenues for genomic analysis by facilitating the extrapolation of results from the human genome initiative. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. [Comparative hierarchic structure of the genetic language].

    PubMed

    Ratner, V A

    1993-05-01

    The genetical texts and genetic language are built according to hierarchic principle and contain no less than 6 levels of coding sequences, separated by marks of punctuation, separation and indication: codons, cistrons, scriptons, replicons, linkage groups, genomes. Each level has all the attributes of the language. This hierarchic system expresses some general properties and regularities. The rules of genetic language being determined, the variability of genetical texts is generated by block-modular combinatorics on each level. Between levels there are some intermediate sublevels and module types capable of being combined. The genetic language is compared with two different independent linguistic systems: human natural languages and artificial programming languages. Genetic language is a natural one by its origin, but it is a typical technical language of the functioning genetic regulatory system--by its predestination. All three linguistic systems under comparison have evident similarity of the organization principles and hierarchical structures. This argues for similarity of their principles of appearance and evolution. PMID:8335232

  14. A second generation genetic map for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Genetic maps characterizing the inheritance patterns of traits and markers have been developed for a wide range of species and used to study questions in biomedicine, agriculture, ecology and evolutionary biology. The status of rainbow trout genetic maps has progressed significantly over...

  15. Alignment Between Genetic and Physical Maps of Gibberella zeae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously published a genetic map of Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum) based on a cross between Kansas strain Z-3639 (lineage 7) and Japanese strain R-5470 (lineage 6). In this study, that genetic map was aligned with the third assembly of the genomic sequence of G. zeae strain PH-1 (linea...

  16. Accretion stream mapping with `genetically modified fireflies'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, C. M.; Hakala, Pasi; Cropper, Mark; Ramsay, Gavin

    2004-07-01

    We apply an eclipse mapping technique using `genetically modified fireflies' to the eclipse light curves of HU Aqr and EP Dra. The technique makes as few assumptions as possible about the location of accretion stream material, allowing the emission to be located anywhere within the Roche lobe of the white dwarf. We model two consecutive eclipses in the UBVRC band for HU Aqr, and four consecutive `white'-light eclipses for EP Dra, to determine the changing brightness distribution of stream material. We find firefly distributions which are consistent with accretion through a curtain of material in both HU Aqr and EP Dra, and show that the previously assumed two-part ballistic and magnetic trajectory is a good approximation for polars. Model fits to the colour-band data of HU Aqr indicate that the material confined to the magnetic field lines is brightest, and most of the emission originates from close to the white dwarf. There is evidence for emission from close to a calculated ballistic stream in both HU Aqr and EP Dra. We propose that a change in the stream density causes a change in the location of the bright material in the accretion stream in EP Dra.

  17. [MapDraw: a microsoft excel macro for drawing genetic linkage maps based on given genetic linkage data].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-Hu; Meng, Jin-Ling

    2003-05-01

    MAPMAKER is one of the most widely used computer software package for constructing genetic linkage maps.However, the PC version, MAPMAKER 3.0 for PC, could not draw the genetic linkage maps that its Macintosh version, MAPMAKER 3.0 for Macintosh,was able to do. Especially in recent years, Macintosh computer is much less popular than PC. Most of the geneticists use PC to analyze their genetic linkage data. So a new computer software to draw the same genetic linkage maps on PC as the MAPMAKER for Macintosh to do on Macintosh has been crying for. Microsoft Excel,one component of Microsoft Office package, is one of the most popular software in laboratory data processing. Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is one of the most powerful functions of Microsoft Excel. Using this program language, we can take creative control of Excel, including genetic linkage map construction, automatic data processing and more. In this paper, a Microsoft Excel macro called MapDraw is constructed to draw genetic linkage maps on PC computer based on given genetic linkage data. Use this software,you can freely construct beautiful genetic linkage map in Excel and freely edit and copy it to Word or other application. This software is just an Excel format file. You can freely copy it from ftp://211.69.140.177 or ftp://brassica.hzau.edu.cn and the source code can be found in Excel's Visual Basic Editor. PMID:15639879

  18. Construction of the High-Density Genetic Linkage Map and Chromosome Map of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea)

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Jingqun; Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Mu, Yinnan; Ding, Yang; Mao, Kaiqiong; Bian, Chao; Mu, Pengfei; Shi, Qiong; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic maps are essential for genome assembly, comparative genomic analysis and fine mapping of complex traits. In this study, 31,191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) evenly distributed across the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) genome were identified using restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq). Among them, 10,150 high-confidence SNPs were assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the genetic linkage map was 5451.3 cM with an average distance of 0.54 cM between loci. This represents the densest genetic map currently reported for large yellow croaker. Using 2889 SNPs to target specific scaffolds, we assigned 533 scaffolds, comprising 421.44 Mb (62.04%) of the large yellow croaker assembled sequence, to the 24 linkage groups. The mapped assembly scaffolds in large yellow croaker were used for genome synteny analyses against the stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Greater synteny was observed between large yellow croaker and stickleback. This supports the hypothesis that large yellow croaker is more closely related to stickleback than to medaka. Moreover, 1274 immunity-related genes and 195 hypoxia-related genes were mapped to the 24 chromosomes of large yellow croaker. The integration of the high-resolution genetic map and the assembled sequence provides a valuable resource for fine mapping and positional cloning of quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in large yellow croaker. PMID:26540048

  19. An updated USMARC genetic map for the pig integrated with the pig physical map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten years ago, we published our last comprehensive genetic map for the pig. This map contained 1,042 markers (mostly microsatellites) and spanned 2,286 cM of the autosomal genome, ~98% estimated coverage based on information available at the time. Since that time, USMARC has continued to add genetic...

  20. Quantitative Genetic Interaction Mapping Using the E-MAP Approach

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sean R.; Roguev, Assen; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic interactions represent the degree to which the presence of one mutation modulates the phenotype of a second mutation. In recent years, approaches for measuring genetic interactions systematically and quantitatively have proven to be effective tools for unbiased characterization of gene function and have provided valuable data for analyses of evolution. Here, we present protocols for systematic measurement of genetic interactions with respect to organismal growth rate for two yeast species. PMID:20946812

  1. A genetic linkage map for tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ju-Kyung; Kantety, Ramesh V; Graznak, Elizabeth; Benscher, David; Tefera, Hailu; Sorrells, Mark E

    2006-10-01

    Tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter] is the major cereal crop in Ethiopia. Tef is an allotetraploid with a base chromosome number of 10 (2n = 4x = 40) and a genome size of 730 Mbp. Ninety-four F(9) recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from the interspecific cross, Eragrostis tef cv. Kaye Murri x Eragrostis pilosa (accession 30-5), were mapped using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), simple sequence repeats derived from expressed sequence tags (EST-SSR), single nucleotide polymorphism/insertion and deletion (SNP/INDEL), intron fragment length polymorphism (IFLP) and inter-simple sequence repeat amplification (ISSR). A total of 156 loci from 121 markers was grouped into 21 linkage groups at LOD 4, and the map covered 2,081.5 cM with a mean density of 12.3 cM per locus. Three putative homoeologous groups were identified based on multi-locus markers. Sixteen percent of the loci deviated from normal segregation with a predominance of E. tef alleles, and a majority of the distorted loci were clustered on three linkage groups. This map will be useful for further genetic studies in tef including mapping of loci controlling quantitative traits (QTL), and comparative analysis with other cereal crops. PMID:16900349

  2. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Guannan; Jiang, Liming; He, Yan; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Jiang, Haibin; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-12-01

    Ovoviviparous black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) is an important marine fish species for aquaculture and fisheries in China. Genetic information of this species is scarce because of the lack of microsatellite markers. In this study, a large number of microsatellite markers of black rockfish were isolated by constructing microsatellite-enriched libraries. Female- and male-specific genetic linkage maps were constructed using 435 microsatellite markers genotyped in a full-sib family of the fish species. The female linkage map contained 140 microsatellite markers, in which 23 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1334.1 cM and average inter-marker space of 13.3 cM. The male linkage map contained 156 microsatellite markers, in which 25 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1359.6 cM and average inter-marker distance of 12.4 cM. The genome coverage of the female and male linkage maps was 68.6% and 69.3%, respectively. The female-to-male ratio of the recombination rate was approximately 1.07:1 in adjacent microsatellite markers. This paper presents the first genetic linkage map of microsatellites in black rockfish. The collection of polymorphic markers and sex-specific linkage maps of black rockfish could be useful for further investigations on parental assignment, population genetics, quantitative trait loci mapping, and marker-assisted selection in related breeding programs.

  3. An Integrative Method for Accurate Comparative Genome Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Swidan, Firas; Rocha, Eduardo P. C; Shmoish, Michael; Pinter, Ron Y

    2006-01-01

    We present MAGIC, an integrative and accurate method for comparative genome mapping. Our method consists of two phases: preprocessing for identifying “maximal similar segments,” and mapping for clustering and classifying these segments. MAGIC's main novelty lies in its biologically intuitive clustering approach, which aims towards both calculating reorder-free segments and identifying orthologous segments. In the process, MAGIC efficiently handles ambiguities resulting from duplications that occurred before the speciation of the considered organisms from their most recent common ancestor. We demonstrate both MAGIC's robustness and scalability: the former is asserted with respect to its initial input and with respect to its parameters' values. The latter is asserted by applying MAGIC to distantly related organisms and to large genomes. We compare MAGIC to other comparative mapping methods and provide detailed analysis of the differences between them. Our improvements allow a comprehensive study of the diversity of genetic repertoires resulting from large-scale mutations, such as indels and duplications, including explicitly transposable and phagic elements. The strength of our method is demonstrated by detailed statistics computed for each type of these large-scale mutations. MAGIC enabled us to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the different forces shaping prokaryotic genomes from different clades, and to quantify the importance of novel gene content introduced by horizontal gene transfer relative to gene duplication in bacterial genome evolution. We use these results to investigate the breakpoint distribution in several prokaryotic genomes. PMID:16933978

  4. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saar, Kathrin; Beck, Alfred; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Birney, Ewan; Brocklebank, Denise; Chen, Yuan; Cuppen, Edwin; Demonchy, Stephanie; Dopazo, Joaquin; Flicek, Paul; Foglio, Mario; Fujiyama, Asao; Gut, Ivo G; Gauguier, Dominique; Guigo, Roderic; Guryev, Victor; Heinig, Matthias; Hummel, Oliver; Jahn, Niels; Klages, Sven; Kren, Vladimir; Kube, Michael; Kuhl, Heiner; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuroki, Yoko; Lechner, Doris; Lee, Young-Ae; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Lathrop, G Mark; Mashimo, Tomoji; Medina, Ignacio; Mott, Richard; Patone, Giannino; Perrier-Cornet, Jeanne-Antide; Platzer, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Reinhardt, Richard; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schilhabel, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Serikawa, Tadao; Shikhagaie, Medya; Tatsumoto, Shouji; Taudien, Stefan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Voigt, Birger; Zelenika, Diana; Zimdahl, Heike; Hubner, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a survey of genetic variation based on almost 3 million newly identified SNPs. We obtained accurate and complete genotypes for a subset of 20,238 SNPs across 167 distinct inbred rat strains, two rat recombinant inbred panels and an F2 intercross. Using 81% of these SNPs, we constructed high-density genetic maps, creating a large dataset of fully characterized SNPs for disease gene mapping. Our data characterize the population structure and illustrate the degree of linkage disequilibrium. We provide a detailed SNP map and demonstrate its utility for mapping of quantitative trait loci. This community resource is openly available and augments the genetic tools for this workhorse of physiological studies. PMID:18443594

  5. INTEGRATION OF GENETIC AND RADIATION HYBRID MAPS OF THE PIG: THE SECOND GENERATION IMPRH MAPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 4500 markers, ESTs and genes have been mapped on IMpRH radiation hybrid panel and submitted to IMpRH Server before 30 March 2002, whereas 757 markers only were mapped on the first generation map (Hawken et al, 1999). To take advantage of the different resolutions observed on the genetic an...

  6. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  7. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  8. Genetic mapping of abiotic stress responses in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to rich genetic diversity for tolerance to various abiotic stress conditions, sorghum is an ideal system for genetic mapping and elucidation of genome regions that confer such response among cereal crops. Coupled with the development of DNA marker technologies and most recently the sequencing o...

  9. Genetic landscapes GIS Toolbox: tools to map patterns of genetic divergence and diversity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, Amy G.; Perry, William M.; Lugo, Roberto V.; Hathaway, Stacie A.

    2011-01-01

    The Landscape Genetics GIS Toolbox contains tools that run in the Geographic Information System software, ArcGIS, to map genetic landscapes and to summarize multiple genetic landscapes as average and variance surfaces. These tools can be used to visualize the distribution of genetic diversity across geographic space and to study associations between patterns of genetic diversity and geographic features or other geo-referenced environmental data sets. Together, these tools create genetic landscape surfaces directly from tables containing genetic distance or diversity data and sample location coordinates, greatly reducing the complexity of building and analyzing these raster surfaces in a Geographic Information System.

  10. Maize centromere mapping: A comparison of physical and genetic strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The location of chromosome centromeres in various maize genetic maps relative to physical maps has not been consistently and clearly identified due to the paucity of markers and low recombination in the highly heterochromatic centromeric and flanking regions. Centromere positions on seven maize chro...

  11. On the accurate construction of consensus genetic maps.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghui; Close, Timothy J; Lonardi, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    We study the problem of merging genetic maps, when the individual genetic maps are given as directed acyclic graphs. The problem is to build a consensus map, which includes and is consistent with all (or, the vast majority of) the markers in the individual maps. When markers in the input maps have ordering conflicts, the resulting consensus map will contain cycles. We formulate the problem of resolving cycles in a combinatorial optimization framework, which in turn is expressed as an integer linear program. A faster approximation algorithm is proposed, and an additional speed-up heuristic is developed. According to an extensive set of experimental results, our tool is consistently better than JOINMAP, both in terms of accuracy and running time. PMID:19642288

  12. Second-Generation Genetic Linkage Map of Catfish and Its Integration with the BAC-Based Physical Map

    PubMed Central

    Ninwichian, Parichart; Peatman, Eric; Liu, Hong; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Somridhivej, Benjaporn; Liu, Shikai; Li, Ping; Jiang, Yanliang; Sha, Zhenxia; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Abernathy, Jason W.; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Fei; Lee, Yoona; Wong, Lilian; Wang, Shaolin; Lu, Jianguo; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2012-01-01

    Construction of high-density genetic linkage maps is crucially important for quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies, and they are more useful when integrated with physical maps. Such integrated maps are valuable genome resources for fine mapping of QTL, comparative genomics, and accurate and efficient whole-genome assembly. Previously, we established both linkage maps and a physical map for channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, the dominant aquaculture species in the United States. Here we added 2030 BAC end sequence (BES)-derived microsatellites from 1481 physical map contigs, as well as markers from singleton BES, ESTs, anonymous microsatellites, and SNPs, to construct a second-generation linkage map. Average marker density across the 29 linkage groups reached 1.4 cM/marker. The increased marker density highlighted variations in recombination rates within and among catfish chromosomes. This work effectively anchored 44.8% of the catfish BAC physical map contigs, covering ∼52.8% of the genome. The genome size was estimated to be 2546 cM on the linkage map, and the calculated physical distance per centimorgan was 393 Kb. This integrated map should enable comparative studies with teleost model species as well as provide a framework for ordering and assembling whole-genome scaffolds. PMID:23050234

  13. AFRICAN GENETIC DIVERSITY: Implications for Human Demographic History, Modern Human Origins, and Complex Disease Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Michael C.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Comparative studies of ethnically diverse human populations, particularly in Africa, are important for reconstructing human evolutionary history and for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic adaptation and complex disease. African populations are characterized by greater levels of genetic diversity, extensive population substructure, and less linkage disequilibrium (LD) among loci compared to non-African populations. Africans also possess a number of genetic adaptations that have evolved in response to diverse climates and diets, as well as exposure to infectious disease. This review summarizes patterns and the evolutionary origins of genetic diversity present in African populations, as well as their implications for the mapping of complex traits, including disease susceptibility. PMID:18593304

  14. SNP-based high density genetic map and mapping of btwd1 dwarfing gene in barley

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xifeng; Wang, Jibin; Liu, Lipan; Sun, Genlou; Li, Chengdao; Luo, Hong; Sun, Dongfa

    2016-01-01

    A high-density linkage map is a valuable tool for functional genomics and breeding. A newly developed sequence-based marker technology, restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, has been proven to be powerful for the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and for the high-density genetic map construction. The objective of this research was to construct a high-density genetic map of barley using RAD sequencing. 1894 high-quality SNP markers were developed and mapped onto all seven chromosomes together with 68 SSR markers. These 1962 markers constituted a total genetic length of 1375.8 cM and an average of 0.7 cM between adjacent loci. The number of markers within each linkage group ranged from 209 to 396. The new recessive dwarfing gene btwd1 in Huaai 11 was mapped onto the high density linkage maps. The result showed that the btwd1 is positioned between SNP marks 7HL_6335336 and 7_249275418 with a genetic distance of 0.9 cM and 0.7 cM on chromosome 7H, respectively. The SNP-based high-density genetic map developed and the dwarfing gene btwd1 mapped in this study provide critical information for position cloning of the btwd1 gene and molecular breeding of barley. PMID:27530597

  15. SNP-based high density genetic map and mapping of btwd1 dwarfing gene in barley.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xifeng; Wang, Jibin; Liu, Lipan; Sun, Genlou; Li, Chengdao; Luo, Hong; Sun, Dongfa

    2016-01-01

    A high-density linkage map is a valuable tool for functional genomics and breeding. A newly developed sequence-based marker technology, restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, has been proven to be powerful for the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and for the high-density genetic map construction. The objective of this research was to construct a high-density genetic map of barley using RAD sequencing. 1894 high-quality SNP markers were developed and mapped onto all seven chromosomes together with 68 SSR markers. These 1962 markers constituted a total genetic length of 1375.8 cM and an average of 0.7 cM between adjacent loci. The number of markers within each linkage group ranged from 209 to 396. The new recessive dwarfing gene btwd1 in Huaai 11 was mapped onto the high density linkage maps. The result showed that the btwd1 is positioned between SNP marks 7HL_6335336 and 7_249275418 with a genetic distance of 0.9 cM and 0.7 cM on chromosome 7H, respectively. The SNP-based high-density genetic map developed and the dwarfing gene btwd1 mapped in this study provide critical information for position cloning of the btwd1 gene and molecular breeding of barley. PMID:27530597

  16. A high-density integrated genetic linkage and radiation hybrid map of the laboratory rat.

    PubMed

    Steen, R G; Kwitek-Black, A E; Glenn, C; Gullings-Handley, J; Van Etten, W; Atkinson, O S; Appel, D; Twigger, S; Muir, M; Mull, T; Granados, M; Kissebah, M; Russo, K; Crane, R; Popp, M; Peden, M; Matise, T; Brown, D M; Lu, J; Kingsmore, S; Tonellato, P J; Rozen, S; Slonim, D; Young, P; Jacob, H J

    1999-06-01

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a key animal model for biomedical research. However, the genetic infrastructure required for connecting phenotype and genotype in the rat is currently incomplete. Here, we report the construction and integration of two genomic maps: a dense genetic linkage map of the rat and the first radiation hybrid (RH) map of the rat. The genetic map was constructed in two F2 intercrosses (SHRSP x BN and FHH x ACI), containing a total of 4736 simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) markers. Allele sizes for 4328 of the genetic markers were characterized in 48 of the most commonly used inbred strains. The RH map is a lod >/= 3 framework map, including 983 SSLPs, thereby allowing integration with markers on various genetic maps and with markers mapped on the RH panel. Together, the maps provide an integrated reference to >3000 genes and ESTs and >8500 genetic markers (5211 of our SSLPs and >3500 SSLPs developed by other groups). [Bihoreau et al. (1997); James and Tanigami, RHdb (http:www.ebi.ac.uk/RHdb/index.html); Wilder (http://www.nih.gov/niams/scientific/ratgbase); Serikawa et al. (1992); RATMAP server (http://ratmap.gen.gu.se)] RH maps (v. 2.0) have been posted on our web sites at http://goliath.ifrc.mcw.edu/LGR/index.html or http://curatools.curagen.com/ratmap. Both web sites provide an RH mapping server where investigators can localize their own RH vectors relative to this map. The raw data have been deposited in the RHdb database. Taken together, these maps provide the basic tools for rat genomics. The RH map provides the means to rapidly localize genetic markers, genes, and ESTs within the rat genome. These maps provide the basic tools for rat genomics. They will facilitate studies of multifactorial disease and functional genomics, allow construction of physical maps, and provide a scaffold for both directed and large-scale sequencing efforts and comparative genomics in this important experimental organism. PMID:10400928

  17. Comparative mapping in the Fagaceae and beyond with EST-SSRs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic markers and linkage mapping are basic prerequisites for comparative genetic analyses, QTL detection and map-based cloning. A large number of mapping populations have been developed for oak, but few gene-based markers are available for constructing integrated genetic linkage maps and comparing gene order and QTL location across related species. Results We developed a set of 573 expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) and located 397 markers (EST-SSRs and genomic SSRs) on the 12 oak chromosomes (2n = 2x = 24) on the basis of Mendelian segregation patterns in 5 full-sib mapping pedigrees of two species: Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (sessile oak). Consensus maps for the two species were constructed and aligned. They showed a high degree of macrosynteny between these two sympatric European oaks. We assessed the transferability of EST-SSRs to other Fagaceae genera and a subset of these markers was mapped in Castanea sativa, the European chestnut. Reasonably high levels of macrosynteny were observed between oak and chestnut. We also obtained diversity statistics for a subset of EST-SSRs, to support further population genetic analyses with gene-based markers. Finally, based on the orthologous relationships between the oak, Arabidopsis, grape, poplar, Medicago, and soybean genomes and the paralogous relationships between the 12 oak chromosomes, we propose an evolutionary scenario of the 12 oak chromosomes from the eudicot ancestral karyotype. Conclusions This study provides map locations for a large set of EST-SSRs in two oak species of recognized biological importance in natural ecosystems. This first step toward the construction of a gene-based linkage map will facilitate the assignment of future genome scaffolds to pseudo-chromosomes. This study also provides an indication of the potential utility of new gene-based markers for population genetics and comparative mapping within and beyond the

  18. Genetic Mapping of Persistence in Tetraploid Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Persistence is a critical trait for alfalfa, yet the genetics of this trait is poorly understood. Herein, we characterize an F1 alfalfa population derived from the cross between the two cultivated alfalfa subpecies for persistence in three production seasons at Ames and Nashua, Iowa locations and o...

  19. Association Mapping for Enhancing Maize Genetic Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping through linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis is a powerful tool for the dissection of complex agronomic traits and for the identification of alleles that can contribute to the enhancement of a target trait. With the developments of high throughput genotyping techniques and advanc...

  20. Integrating the USMARC genetic map for the pig with the pig physical map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map containing 3418 markers and spanning 2,326 cM of the autosomal genome was generated and integrated with the available physical maps for the pig. Marker types consisted of 1531 microsatellites and 1887 markers based on single feature polymorphisms, insertion/delet...

  1. Excess heterozygosity contributes to genetic map expansion in pea recombinant inbred populations.

    PubMed

    Knox, M R; Ellis, T H N

    2002-10-01

    Several plant genetic maps presented in the literature are longer than expected from cytogenetic data. Here we compare F(2) and RI maps derived from a cross between the same two parental lines and show that excess heterozygosity contributes to map inflation. These maps have been constructed using a common set of dominant markers. Although not generally regarded as informative for F(2) mapping, these allowed rapid map construction, and the resulting data analysis has provided information not otherwise obvious when examining a population from only one generation. Segregation distortion, a common feature of most populations and marker systems, found in the F(2) but not the RI, has identified excess heterozygosity. A few markers with a deficiency of heterozygotes were found to map to linkage group V (chromosome 3), which is known to form rod bivalents in this cross. Although the final map length was longer for the F(2) population, the mapped order of markers was generally the same in the F(2) and RI maps. The data presented in this analysis reconcile much of the inconsistency between map length estimates from chiasma counts and genetic data. PMID:12399396

  2. Excess heterozygosity contributes to genetic map expansion in pea recombinant inbred populations.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, M R; Ellis, T H N

    2002-01-01

    Several plant genetic maps presented in the literature are longer than expected from cytogenetic data. Here we compare F(2) and RI maps derived from a cross between the same two parental lines and show that excess heterozygosity contributes to map inflation. These maps have been constructed using a common set of dominant markers. Although not generally regarded as informative for F(2) mapping, these allowed rapid map construction, and the resulting data analysis has provided information not otherwise obvious when examining a population from only one generation. Segregation distortion, a common feature of most populations and marker systems, found in the F(2) but not the RI, has identified excess heterozygosity. A few markers with a deficiency of heterozygotes were found to map to linkage group V (chromosome 3), which is known to form rod bivalents in this cross. Although the final map length was longer for the F(2) population, the mapped order of markers was generally the same in the F(2) and RI maps. The data presented in this analysis reconcile much of the inconsistency between map length estimates from chiasma counts and genetic data. PMID:12399396

  3. SSR-based genetic linkage map of Cucurbita moschata and its synteny with Cucurbita pepo.

    PubMed

    Gong, L; Pachner, M; Kalai, K; Lelley, T

    2008-11-01

    The first SSR-based genetic linkage map of Cucurbita moschata was created by integrating the maps of two F2 populations with one common parent developed from the crosses Waltham Butternut (WB) x Nigerian Local (NL) and ZHOU (a hull-less type) x WB. The integrated C. moschata map comprises 205 SSR markers and two morphological traits (Gr and n). The map is composed of 27 linkage groups with a marker density of 7 cM. Comparing the C. moschata map with the published Cucurbita pepo map, we found a high level of macrosynteny. Seventy-two of 76 common SSR markers between C. moschata and C. pepo were located in homologous linkage groups. These markers in general have conserved orders and similar genetic distances; they represent orthologous loci. A reference map based on these SSRs was obtained. No major chromosomal rearrangement between the two species could be detected at present, although four SSR markers were mapped in nonhomologous linkage groups. The comparative alignment of SSR markers did not provide any indication of a possible ancient polyploid origin of the species. The comparative mapping of C. moschata and C. pepo reported here will be useful for further studies on Cucurbit evolution, gene isolation, and breeding work. PMID:18956020

  4. Genetic analysis of arsenic accumulation in maize using QTL mapping

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Xing, Xiaolong; Xu, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Haochuan; Xue, Yadong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in crops and poses a threat to human health. The genetic mechanism of As accumulation is unclear. Herein, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to unravel the genetic basis of As accumulation in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from the Chinese crossbred variety Yuyu22. The kernels had the lowest As content among the different maize tissues, followed by the axes, stems, bracts and leaves. Fourteen QTLs were identified at each location. Some of these QTLs were identified in different environments and were also detected by joint analysis. Compared with the B73 RefGen v2 reference genome, the distributions and effects of some QTLs were closely linked to those of QTLs detected in a previous study; the QTLs were likely in strong linkage disequilibrium. Our findings could be used to help maintain maize production to satisfy the demand for edible corn and to decrease the As content in As-contaminated soil through the selection and breeding of As pollution-safe cultivars. PMID:26880701

  5. Genetic analysis of arsenic accumulation in maize using QTL mapping.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Xing, Xiaolong; Xu, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Haochuan; Xue, Yadong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in crops and poses a threat to human health. The genetic mechanism of As accumulation is unclear. Herein, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to unravel the genetic basis of As accumulation in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from the Chinese crossbred variety Yuyu22. The kernels had the lowest As content among the different maize tissues, followed by the axes, stems, bracts and leaves. Fourteen QTLs were identified at each location. Some of these QTLs were identified in different environments and were also detected by joint analysis. Compared with the B73 RefGen v2 reference genome, the distributions and effects of some QTLs were closely linked to those of QTLs detected in a previous study; the QTLs were likely in strong linkage disequilibrium. Our findings could be used to help maintain maize production to satisfy the demand for edible corn and to decrease the As content in As-contaminated soil through the selection and breeding of As pollution-safe cultivars. PMID:26880701

  6. A genetic map of Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum).

    PubMed Central

    Jurgenson, J E; Bowden, R L; Zeller, K A; Leslie, J F; Alexander, N J; Plattner, R D

    2002-01-01

    We constructed a genetic linkage map of Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum) by crossing complementary nitrate-nonutilizing (nit) mutants of G. zeae strains R-5470 (from Japan) and Z-3639 (from Kansas). We selected 99 nitrate-utilizing (recombinant) progeny and analyzed them for amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). We used 34 pairs of two-base selective AFLP primers and identified 1048 polymorphic markers that mapped to 468 unique loci on nine linkage groups. The total map length is approximately 1300 cM with an average interval of 2.8 map units between loci. Three of the nine linkage groups contain regions in which there are high levels of segregation distortion. Selection for the nitrate-utilizing recombinant progeny can explain two of the three skewed regions. Two linkage groups have recombination patterns that are consistent with the presence of intercalary inversions. Loci governing trichothecene toxin amount and type (deoxynivalenol or nivalenol) map on linkage groups IV and I, respectively. The locus governing the type of trichothecene produced (nivalenol or deoxynivalenol) cosegregated with the TRI5 gene (which encodes trichodiene synthase) and probably maps in the trichothecene gene cluster. This linkage map will be useful in population genetic studies, in map-based cloning, for QTL (quantitative trait loci) analysis, for ordering genomic libraries, and for genomic comparisons of related species. PMID:11973300

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers for genetic mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-04-16

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that have recently revolutionized human, mouse and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila using an STS-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that the genome. The majority of these markers are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sequences for these variants are provided in an accessible format. The average density of the new markers is 1 marker per 225 kb on the autosomes and 1 marker per 1 Mb on the X chromosome. We include in this survey a set of P-element strains that provide additional utility for high-resolution mapping. We demonstrate one application of the new markers in a simple set of crosses to map a mutation in the hedgehog gene to an interval of <1 Mb. This new map resource significantly increases the efficiency and resolution of recombination mapping and will be of immediate value to the Drosophila research community.

  8. Comparing landslide inventories: The map depends on the method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wills, C.J.; McCrink, T.P.

    2002-01-01

    Landslide inventory maps are generally prepared by interpreting the geomorphic expression of landsliding on aerial photos, topographic maps, or on the ground. Distinctive landslide geomorphology allows the recognition and mapping of landslides, although there are always landslides that have very subtle expression and are not identified. The difficulties of mapping landslides based on their geomorphic expression are amplified in heavily forested terrain. The ground surface is obscured by tree cover on aerial photographs, and landslide-related features are often hidden. This limitation affects not only aerial photo interpretation, but also interpretation of topographic maps, which are based on aerial photographs. We compared five maps showing landslides in the Laurel Quadrangle in the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. These include a geologic map, a map prepared for the county based on interpretation of aerial photographs, a map prepared by us based on aerial photographs and compilation of previous work, a map of features interpreted from the U.S. Geological Survey 7.5-minute topographic map, and a detailed field-based landslide map. Comparison of these maps shows that the geologic map identifies few landslides, but most landslides on the geologic map are also shown on the other maps. The two maps based mainly on aerial photo interpretation tend to show the larger slides, but there is only about 60 percent correspondence of landslide areas between the two. Comparing the reconnaissance techniques with the much more detailed field mapping shows that the reconnaisance maps emphasize the large slides of bedrock and identify a lower percentage of shallow debris slides and debris flows.

  9. Accurate construction of consensus genetic maps via integer linear programming.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghui; Close, Timothy J; Lonardi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    We study the problem of merging genetic maps, when the individual genetic maps are given as directed acyclic graphs. The computational problem is to build a consensus map, which is a directed graph that includes and is consistent with all (or, the vast majority of) the markers in the input maps. However, when markers in the individual maps have ordering conflicts, the resulting consensus map will contain cycles. Here, we formulate the problem of resolving cycles in the context of a parsimonious paradigm that takes into account two types of errors that may be present in the input maps, namely, local reshuffles and global displacements. The resulting combinatorial optimization problem is, in turn, expressed as an integer linear program. A fast approximation algorithm is proposed, and an additional speedup heuristic is developed. Our algorithms were implemented in a software tool named MERGEMAP which is freely available for academic use. An extensive set of experiments shows that MERGEMAP consistently outperforms JOINMAP, which is the most popular tool currently available for this task, both in terms of accuracy and running time. MERGEMAP is available for download at http://www.cs.ucr.edu/~yonghui/mgmap.html. PMID:20479505

  10. An autosomal genetic linkage map of the sheep genome

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, A.M.; Ede, A.J.; Pierson, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    We report the first extensive ovine genetic linkage map covering 2070 cM of the sheep genome. The map was generated from the linkage analysis of 246 polymorphic markers, in nine three-generation full-sib pedigrees, which make up the AgResearch International Mapping Flock. We have exploited many markers from cattle so that valuable comparisons between these two ruminant linkage maps can be made. The markers, used in the segregation analyses, comprised 86 anonymous microsatellite markers derived from the sheep genome, 126 anonymous microsatellites from cattle, one from deer, and 33 polymorphic markers of various types associated with known genes. The maximum number of informative meioses within the mapping flock was 22. The average number of informative meioses per marker was 140 (range 18-209). Linkage groups have been assigned to all 26 sheep autosomes. 102 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  12. CRISPR-directed mitotic recombination enables genetic mapping without crosses.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Meru J; Bloom, Joshua S; Day, Laura; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2016-05-27

    Linkage and association studies have mapped thousands of genomic regions that contribute to phenotypic variation, but narrowing these regions to the underlying causal genes and variants has proven much more challenging. Resolution of genetic mapping is limited by the recombination rate. We developed a method that uses CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats) to build mapping panels with targeted recombination events. We tested the method by generating a panel with recombination events spaced along a yeast chromosome arm, mapping trait variation, and then targeting a high density of recombination events to the region of interest. Using this approach, we fine-mapped manganese sensitivity to a single polymorphism in the transporter Pmr1. Targeting recombination events to regions of interest allows us to rapidly and systematically identify causal variants underlying trait differences. PMID:27230379

  13. An Inquiry Activity for Genetics Using Chromosome Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; Snodgrass, George

    1982-01-01

    Concepts to be developed, objectives, and student instructions are provided for an activity useful as an introduction to or review of Mendelian genetics and sex determination. Universal codes (read by optical scanners at supermarket checkout stands) from soup can labels are used as chromosome maps during the activity. (JN)

  14. Linguini Models of Molecular Genetic Mapping and Fingerprinting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James N., Jr.; Gray, Stanton B.; Hellack, Jenna J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an exercise using linguini noodles to demonstrate an aspect of DNA fingerprinting. DNA maps that show genetic differences can be produced by digesting a certain piece of DNA with two or more restriction enzymes both individually and in combination. By rearranging and matching linguini fragments, students can recreate the original pattern…

  15. Coupled mutagenesis screens and genetic mapping in zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, John F; Frieda, Matthew R; McAdow, Anthony R; Gross, Jason P; Clayton, Chad M; Heyen, Candy K; Johnson, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    Forward genetic analysis is one of the principal advantages of the zebrafish model system. However, managing zebrafish mutant lines derived from mutagenesis screens and mapping the corresponding mutations and integrating them into the larger collection of mutations remain arduous tasks. To simplify and focus these endeavors, we developed an approach that facilitates the rapid mapping of new zebrafish mutations as they are generated through mutagenesis screens. We selected a minimal panel of 149 simple sequence length polymorphism markers for a first-pass genome scan in crosses involving C32 and SJD inbred lines. We also conducted a small chemical mutagenesis screen that identified several new mutations affecting zebrafish embryonic melanocyte development. Using our first-pass marker panel in bulked-segregant analysis, we were able to identify the genetic map positions of these mutations as they were isolated in our screen. Rapid mapping of the mutations facilitated stock management, helped direct allelism tests, and should accelerate identification of the affected genes. These results demonstrate the efficacy of coupling mutagenesis screens with genetic mapping. PMID:12663538

  16. PeanutMap: an online genome database for comparative molecular maps of peanut

    PubMed Central

    Jesubatham, Arun M; Burow, Mark D

    2006-01-01

    Background Molecular maps have been developed for many species, and are of particular importance for varietal development and comparative genomics. However, despite the existence of multiple sets of linkage maps, databases of these data are lacking for many species, including peanut. Description PeanutMap provides a web-based interface for viewing specific linkage groups of a map set. PeanutMap can display and compare multiple maps of a set based upon marker or trait correspondences, which is particularly important as cultivated peanut is a disomic tetraploid. The database can also compare linkage groups among multiple map sets, allowing identification of corresponding linkage groups from results of different research projects. Data from the two published peanut genome map sets, and also from three maps sets of phenotypic traits are present in the database. Data from PeanutMap have been incorporated into the Legume Information System website to allow peanut map data to be used for cross-species comparisons. Conclusion The utility of the database is expected to increase as several SSR-based maps are being developed currently, and expanded efforts for comparative mapping of legumes are underway. Optimal use of these data will benefit from the development of tools to facilitate comparative analysis. PMID:16904007

  17. Integration of Lupinus angustifolius L. (narrow-leafed lupin) genome maps and comparative mapping within legumes.

    PubMed

    Wyrwa, Katarzyna; Książkiewicz, Michał; Szczepaniak, Anna; Susek, Karolina; Podkowiński, Jan; Naganowska, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) has recently been considered a reference genome for the Lupinus genus. In the present work, genetic and cytogenetic maps of L. angustifolius were supplemented with 30 new molecular markers representing lupin genome regions, harboring genes involved in nitrogen fixation during the symbiotic interaction of legumes and soil bacteria (Rhizobiaceae). Our studies resulted in the precise localization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) carrying sequence variants for early nodulin 40, nodulin 26, nodulin 45, aspartate aminotransferase P2, asparagine synthetase, cytosolic glutamine synthetase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. Together with previously mapped chromosomes, the integrated L. angustifolius map encompasses 73 chromosome markers, including 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and 45S rDNA, and anchors 20 L. angustifolius linkage groups to corresponding chromosomes. Chromosomal identification using BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization identified two BAC clones as narrow-leafed lupin centromere-specific markers, which served as templates for preliminary studies of centromere composition within the genus. Bioinformatic analysis of these two BACs revealed that centromeric/pericentromeric regions of narrow-leafed lupin chromosomes consisted of simple sequence repeats ordered into tandem repeats containing the trinucleotide and pentanucleotide simple sequence repeats AGG and GATAC, structured into long arrays. Moreover, cross-genus microsynteny analysis revealed syntenic patterns of 31 single-locus BAC clones among several legume species. The gene and chromosome level findings provide evidence of ancient duplication events that must have occurred very early in the divergence of papilionoid lineages. This work provides a strong foundation for future comparative mapping among legumes and may facilitate understanding of mechanisms involved in shaping legume chromosomes. PMID:27168155

  18. Comparative Genome Mapping of Sorghum and Maize

    PubMed Central

    Whitkus, R.; Doebley, J.; Lee, M.

    1992-01-01

    Linkage relationships were determined among 85 maize low copy number nuclear DNA probes and seven isozyme loci in an F(2) population derived from a cross of Sorghum bicolor ssp. bicolor X S. bicolor ssp. arundinaceum. Thirteen linkage groups were defined, three more than the 10 chromosomes of sorghum. Use of maize DNA probes to produce the sorghum linkage map allowed us to make several inferences concerning processes involved in the evolutionary divergence of the maize and sorghum genomes. The results show that many linkage groups are conserved between these two genomes and that the amount of recombination in these conserved linkage groups is roughly equivalent in maize and sorghum. Estimates of the proportions of duplicated loci suggest that a larger proportion of the loci are duplicated in the maize genome than in the sorghum genome. This result concurs with a prior estimate that the nuclear DNA content of maize is three to four times greater than that of sorghum. The pattern of conserved linkages between maize and sorghum is such that most sorghum linkage groups are composed of loci that map to two maize chromosomes. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesized ancient polyploid origin of maize and sorghum. There are nine cases in which locus order within shared linkage groups is inverted in sorghum relative to maize. These may have arisen from either inversions or intrachromosomal translocations. We found no evidence for large interchromosomal translocations. Overall, the data suggest that the primary processes involved in divergence of the maize and sorghum genomes were duplications (either by polyploidy or segmental duplication) and inversions or intrachromosomal translocations. PMID:1360933

  19. Annotated genetic linkage maps of Pinus pinaster Ait. from a Central Spain population using microsatellite and gene based markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pinus pinaster Ait. is a major resin producing species in Spain. Genetic linkage mapping can facilitate marker-assisted selection (MAS) through the identification of Quantitative Trait Loci and selection of allelic variants of interest in breeding populations. In this study, we report annotated genetic linkage maps for two individuals (C14 and C15) belonging to a breeding program aiming to increase resin production. We use different types of DNA markers, including last-generation molecular markers. Results We obtained 13 and 14 linkage groups for C14 and C15 maps, respectively. A total of 211 and 215 markers were positioned on each map and estimated genome length was between 1,870 and 2,166 cM respectively, which represents near 65% of genome coverage. Comparative mapping with previously developed genetic linkage maps for P. pinaster based on about 60 common markers enabled aligning linkage groups to this reference map. The comparison of our annotated linkage maps and linkage maps reporting QTL information revealed 11 annotated SNPs in candidate genes that co-localized with previously reported QTLs for wood properties and water use efficiency. Conclusions This study provides genetic linkage maps from a Spanish population that shows high levels of genetic divergence with French populations from which segregating progenies have been previously mapped. These genetic maps will be of interest to construct a reliable consensus linkage map for the species. The importance of developing functional genetic linkage maps is highlighted, especially when working with breeding populations for its future application in MAS for traits of interest. PMID:23036012

  20. A second-generation genetic linkage map of the domestic dog, Canis familiaris.

    PubMed Central

    Neff, M W; Broman, K W; Mellersh, C S; Ray, K; Acland, G M; Aguirre, G D; Ziegle, J S; Ostrander, E A; Rine, J

    1999-01-01

    Purebred strains, pronounced phenotypic variation, and a high incidence of heritable disease make the domestic dog uniquely suited to complement genetic analyses in humans and mice. A comprehensive genetic linkage map would afford many opportunities in dogs, ranging from the positional cloning of disease genes to the dissection of quantitative differences in size, shape, and behavior. Here we report a canine linkage map with the number of mapped loci expanded to 276 and 10-cM coverage extended to 75-90% of the genome. Most of the 38 canine autosomes are likely represented in the collection of 39 autosomal linkage groups. Eight markers were sufficiently informative to detect linkage at distances of 10-13 cM, yet remained unlinked to any other marker. Taken together, the results suggested a genome size of about 27 M. As in other species, the genetic length varied between sexes, with the female autosomal distance being approximately 1.4-fold greater than that of male meioses. Fifteen markers anchored well-described genes on the map, thereby serving as landmarks for comparative mapping in dogs. We discuss the utility of the current map and outline steps necessary for future map improvement. PMID:9927471

  1. Dinucleotide repeat loci contribute highly informative genetic markers to the human chromosome 2 linkage map

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S. ); Sherman, S.L. ); Naylor, S.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Microsatellite repeat loci can provide informative markers for genetic linkage. Currently, the human chromosome 2 genetic linkage map has very few highly polymorphic markers. Being such a large chromosome, it will require a large number of informative markers for the dense coverage desired to allow disease genes to be mapped quickly and accurately. Dinucleotide repeat loci from two anonymous chromosome 2 genomic DNA clones were sequenced so that oligonucleotide primers could be designed for amplifying each locus using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Five sets of PCR primers were also generated from nucleotide sequences in the GenBank Database of chromosome 2 genes containing dinucleotide repeats. In addition, one PCR primer pair was made that amplifies a restriction fragment length polymorphism on the TNP1 gene. These markers were placed on the CEPH genetic linkage map by screening the CEPH reference DNA panel with each primer set, combining these data with those of other markers previously placed on the map, and analyzing the combined data set using CRI-MAP and LINKAGE. The microsatellite loci are highly informative markers and the TNP1 locus, as expected, is only moderately informative. A map was constructed with 38 ordered loci (odds [ge] 1000:1) spanning 296 cM (male) and 476 cM (female) of chromosome 2 compared with 306 cM (male) and 529 cM (female) for a previous map of 20 markers. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. NIH Scientists Map Genetic Changes That Drive Tumors in a Common Pediatric Soft-Tissue Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Releases NCI Press Release NIH scientists map genetic changes that drive tumors in a common pediatric ... Office 301-496-6641 Scientists have mapped the genetic changes that drive tumors in rhabdomyosarcoma, a pediatric ...

  3. Construction of an integrated genetic map for Capsicum baccatum L.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ramos, H C C; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Gonçalves, L S A; Viana, A P

    2015-01-01

    Capsicum baccatum L. is one of the five Capsicum domesticated species and has multiple uses in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. This species is also a valuable source of genes for chili pepper breeding, especially genes for disease resistance and fruit quality. However, knowledge of the genetic structure of C. baccatum is limited. A reference map for C. baccatum (2n = 2x = 24) based on 42 microsatellite, 85 inter-simple sequence repeat, and 56 random amplified polymorphic DNA markers was constructed using an F2 population consisting of 203 individuals. The map was generated using the JoinMap software (version 4.0) and the linkage groups were formed and ordered using a LOD score of 3.0 and maximum of 40% recombination. The genetic map consisted of 12 major and four minor linkage groups covering a total genome distance of 2547.5 cM with an average distance of 14.25 cM between markers. Of the 152 pairs of microsatellite markers available for Capsicum annuum, 62 were successfully transferred to C. baccatum, generating polymorphism. Forty-two of these markers were mapped, allowing the introduction of C. baccatum in synteny studies with other species of the genus Capsicum. PMID:26125877

  4. Mapping genetic influences on ventricular structure in twins

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Yi-Yu; Leporé, Natasha; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Avedissian, Christina; Barysheva, Marina; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Meredith, Matthew; Wright, Margaret J.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in measuring the anatomical and functional variability of the human brain, little is known about the genetic and environmental causes of these variations. Here we developed an automated system to visualize genetic and environmental effects on brain structure in large brain MRI databases. We applied our multi-template segmentation approach termed “Multi-Atlas Fluid Image Alignment” to fluidly propagate hand-labeled parameterized surface meshes, labeling the lateral ventricles, in 3D volumetric MRI scans of 76 identical (monozygotic, MZ) twins (38 pairs; mean age=24.6 (SD=1.7)); and 56 same-sex fraternal (dizygotic, DZ) twins (28 pairs; mean age=23.0 (SD=1.8)), scanned as part of a 5-year research study that will eventually study over 1000 subjects. Mesh surfaces were averaged within subjects to minimize segmentation error. We fitted quantitative genetic models at each of 30,000 surface points to measure the proportion of shape variance attributable to (1) genetic differences among subjects, (2) environmental influences unique to each individual, and (3) shared environmental effects. Surface-based statistical maps, derived from path analysis, revealed patterns of heritability, and their significance, in 3D. Path coefficients for the ‘ACE’ model that best fitted the data indicated significant contributions from genetic factors (A=7.3%), common environment (C=38.9%) and unique environment (E=53.8%) to lateral ventricular volume. Earlier-maturing occipital horn regions may also be more genetically influenced than later-maturing frontal regions. Maps visualized spatially-varying profiles of environmental versus genetic influences. The approach shows promise for automatically measuring gene-environment effects in large image databases. PMID:19041405

  5. Comparative Aspects of Map Collections in the State of Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, G. Robert

    The paper presents data on map collections in governmental, academic, public, institutional, and corporate libraries in Ohio. Only those collections containing over 100 maps are included in the study. The overall objective is to increase awareness of cartography as a source of information. A more specific objective is to provide comparative,…

  6. Comparing Hand Drawn and Computer Generated Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royer, Regina; Royer, Jeffery

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the use of paper/pencil and computer tools for creating concept maps. Participants were 52 students in two combined 9th/10th grade biology classes. An independent measures research design was used. There were two treatment groups: computer and paper/pencil. The computer group created concept maps using Inspiration software…

  7. Genetic Map of Triticale Integrating Microsatellite, DArT and SNP Markers.

    PubMed

    Tyrka, Mirosław; Tyrka, Dorota; Wędzony, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm) is an economically important crop for fodder and biomass production. To facilitate the identification of markers for agronomically important traits and for genetic and genomic characteristics of this species, a new high-density genetic linkage map of triticale was constructed using doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between cultivars 'Hewo' and 'Magnat'. The map consists of 1615 bin markers, that represent 50 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 842 diversity array technology (DArT), and 16888 DArTseq markers mapped onto 20 linkage groups assigned to the A, B, and R genomes of triticale. No markers specific to chromosome 7R were found, instead mosaic linkage group composed of 1880 highly distorted markers (116 bins) from 10 wheat chromosomes was identified. The genetic map covers 4907 cM with a mean distance between two bins of 3.0 cM. Comparative analysis in respect to published maps of wheat, rye and triticale revealed possible deletions in chromosomes 4B, 5A, and 6A, as well as inversion in chromosome 7B. The number of bin markers in each chromosome varied from 24 in chromosome 3R to 147 in chromosome 6R. The length of individual chromosomes ranged between 50.7 cM for chromosome 2R and 386.2 cM for chromosome 7B. A total of 512 (31.7%) bin markers showed significant (P < 0.05) segregation distortion across all chromosomes. The number of 8 the segregation distorted regions (SDRs) were identified on 1A, 7A, 1B, 2B, 7B (2 SDRs), 5R and 6R chromosomes. The high-density genetic map of triticale will facilitate fine mapping of quantitative trait loci, the identification of candidate genes and map-based cloning. PMID:26717308

  8. Genetic Map of Triticale Integrating Microsatellite, DArT and SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Mirosław; Tyrka, Dorota; Wędzony, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm) is an economically important crop for fodder and biomass production. To facilitate the identification of markers for agronomically important traits and for genetic and genomic characteristics of this species, a new high-density genetic linkage map of triticale was constructed using doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between cultivars ‘Hewo’ and ‘Magnat’. The map consists of 1615 bin markers, that represent 50 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 842 diversity array technology (DArT), and 16888 DArTseq markers mapped onto 20 linkage groups assigned to the A, B, and R genomes of triticale. No markers specific to chromosome 7R were found, instead mosaic linkage group composed of 1880 highly distorted markers (116 bins) from 10 wheat chromosomes was identified. The genetic map covers 4907 cM with a mean distance between two bins of 3.0 cM. Comparative analysis in respect to published maps of wheat, rye and triticale revealed possible deletions in chromosomes 4B, 5A, and 6A, as well as inversion in chromosome 7B. The number of bin markers in each chromosome varied from 24 in chromosome 3R to 147 in chromosome 6R. The length of individual chromosomes ranged between 50.7 cM for chromosome 2R and 386.2 cM for chromosome 7B. A total of 512 (31.7%) bin markers showed significant (P < 0.05) segregation distortion across all chromosomes. The number of 8 the segregation distorted regions (SDRs) were identified on 1A, 7A, 1B, 2B, 7B (2 SDRs), 5R and 6R chromosomes. The high-density genetic map of triticale will facilitate fine mapping of quantitative trait loci, the identification of candidate genes and map-based cloning. PMID:26717308

  9. Integrating the markers Pan I and haemoglobin with the genetic linkage map of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Haemoglobin (Hb) and pantophysin (Pan I) markers have been used intensively in population studies of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and in the analysis of traits such as temperature tolerance, growth characteristics and sexual maturation. We used an Illumina GoldenGate panel and the KASPar SNP genotyping system to analyse SNPs in three Atlantic cod families, one of which was polymorphic at the Hb β1 locus, and to generate a genetic linkage map integrating Pan I and multiple Hb loci. Findings Data generated allowed the mapping of nine Hb loci, the Pan I locus, and other 122 SNPs onto an existing linkage genetic map for Atlantic cod. Four Hb genes (i.e. α1, α4, β1 and β5) have been mapped on linkage group (LG) 2 while the other five (i.e. α2, α3, β2, β3 and β4) were placed on LG18. Pan I was mapped on LG 1 using a newly developed KASPar assay for a SNP variable only in Pan IA allelic variants. The new linkage genetic map presented here comprises 1046 SNPs distributed between 23 linkage groups, with a length of 1145.6 cM. A map produced by forcing additional loci, resulting in a reduced goodness-of-fit for mapped markers, allowed the mapping of a total of 1300 SNPs. Finally, we compared our genetic linkage map data with the genetic linkage map data produced by a different group and identified 29 shared SNPs distributed on 10 different linkage groups. Conclusions The genetic linkage map presented here incorporates the marker Pan I, together with multiple Hb loci, and integrates genetic linkage data produced by two different research groups. This represents a useful resource to further explore if Pan I and Hbs or other genes underlie quantitative trait loci (QTL) for temperature sensitivity/tolerance or other phenotypes. PMID:20946683

  10. Deletion mapping of genetic regions associated with apomixis in Hieracium.

    PubMed

    Catanach, Andrew S; Erasmuson, Sylvia K; Podivinsky, Ellen; Jordan, Brian R; Bicknell, Ross

    2006-12-01

    Although apomixis has been quoted as a technology with the potential to deliver benefits similar in scale to those achieved with the Green Revolution, very little is currently known of the genetic mechanisms that control this trait in plants. To address this issue, we developed Hieracium, a genus of daisies native to Eurasia and North America, as a genetic model to study apomixis. In a molecular mapping study, we defined the number of genetic loci involved in apomixis, and we explored dominance and linkage relationships between these loci. To avoid difficulties often encountered with inheritance studies of apomicts, we based our mapping effort on the use of deletion mutagenesis, coupled with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) as a genomic fingerprinting tool. The results indicate that apomixis in Hieracium caespitosum is controlled at two principal loci, one of which regulates events associated with the avoidance of meiosis (apomeiosis) and the other, an unlinked locus that controls events associated with the avoidance of fertilization (parthenogenesis). AFLP bands identified as central to both loci were isolated, sequenced, and used to develop sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. The validity of the AFLP markers was verified by using a segregating population generated by hybridization. The validity of the SCAR markers was verified by their pattern of presence/absence in specific mutants. The mutants, markers, and genetic data derived from this work are now being used to isolate genes controlling apomixis in this system. PMID:17047034

  11. Human genetic mapping studies using single sperm typing

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Sperm typing is a powerful technique that uses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze DNA sequences within single sperm cells in order to construct genetic maps. This methodology was used to estimate the recombination fraction between D3S2 and D3S2 which was found to be 0.28 (95% CI = 0.20-0.36). Pedigree analysis was unable to determine genetic distance between these two markers due to their low informativeness. We also showed that dinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeat polymorphisms can be analyzed in single cells without using radioactivity or denaturing gels. This provides a rich new source of DANA polymorphisms for genetic mapping by sperm typing. In addition, an approach that uses the sperm typing methodology is described that can define the physical boundaries of meiotic recombination hotspots. The hotspot at 4p16.3 near the Huntington disease gene was localized to an interval between D4S10 and D4S126. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of sperm typing as a tool for the study of human genetic.

  12. Integrated genetic map of Anopheles gambiae: use of RAPD polymorphisms for genetic, cytogenetic and STS landmarks.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Zheng, L; Kumar, V; della Torre, A; Kafatos, F C; Louis, C

    1996-06-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers have been integrated in the genetic and cytogenetic maps of the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Fifteen of these markers were mapped by recombination, relative to microsatellite markers that had been mapped previously. Thirty-four gel-purified RAPD bands were cloned and sequenced, generating sequence tagged sites (STSs) that can be used as entry points to the A. gambiae genome. Thirty one of these STSs were localized on nurse cell polytene chromosomes through their unique hybridization signal in in situ hybridization experiments. Five STSs map close to the breakpoints of polymorphic inversions, which are notable features of the Anopheles genome. The usefulness and limitations of this integrated mosquito map are discussed. PMID:8725241

  13. [Genetic analysis of Streptomyces erythreus heteroclones. II. Determination of the distances between genetic loci on the map].

    PubMed

    Pencheva, R; Todorov, T

    1989-01-01

    As a result of recombination experiments between auxotrophic mutants of S. erythreus BTCC2 haploid recombinants and heteroclones were isolated. A genetic map of S. erythreus, including 15 auxotrophic loci was constructed by genetic analysis of the segregants of the heteroclones obtained. The genetic distances between 7 key loci on the map were determined and the entire length of the map of about 105 standard recombination units was calculated. PMID:2624163

  14. AFLP-based genetic mapping of the “bud-flowering” trait in heather (Calluna vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calluna vulgaris is one of the most important landscaping plants produced in Germany. Its enormous economic success is due to the prolonged flower attractiveness of mutants in flower morphology, the so-called bud-bloomers. In this study, we present the first genetic linkage map of C. vulgaris in which we mapped a locus of the economically highly desired trait “flower type”. Results The map was constructed in JoinMap 4.1. using 535 AFLP markers from a single mapping population. A large fraction (40%) of markers showed distorted segregation. To test the effect of segregation distortion on linkage estimation, these markers were sorted regarding their segregation ratio and added in groups to the data set. The plausibility of group formation was evaluated by comparison of the “two-way pseudo-testcross” and the “integrated” mapping approach. Furthermore, regression mapping was compared to the multipoint-likelihood algorithm. The majority of maps constructed by different combinations of these methods consisted of eight linkage groups corresponding to the chromosome number of C. vulgaris. Conclusions All maps confirmed the independent inheritance of the most important horticultural traits “flower type”, “flower colour”, and “leaf colour”. An AFLP marker for the most important breeding target “flower type” was identified. The presented genetic map of C. vulgaris can now serve as a basis for further molecular marker selection and map-based cloning of the candidate gene encoding the unique flower architecture of C. vulgaris bud-bloomers. PMID:23915059

  15. Molecular and comparative genetics of mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Inlow, Jennifer K; Restifo, Linda L

    2004-01-01

    Affecting 1-3% of the population, mental retardation (MR) poses significant challenges for clinicians and scientists. Understanding the biology of MR is complicated by the extraordinary heterogeneity of genetic MR disorders. Detailed analyses of >1000 Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database entries and literature searches through September 2003 revealed 282 molecularly identified MR genes. We estimate that hundreds more MR genes remain to be identified. A novel test, in which we distributed unmapped MR disorders proportionately across the autosomes, failed to eliminate the well-known X-chromosome overrepresentation of MR genes and candidate genes. This evidence argues against ascertainment bias as the main cause of the skewed distribution. On the basis of a synthesis of clinical and laboratory data, we developed a biological functions classification scheme for MR genes. Metabolic pathways, signaling pathways, and transcription are the most common functions, but numerous other aspects of neuronal and glial biology are controlled by MR genes as well. Using protein sequence and domain-organization comparisons, we found a striking conservation of MR genes and genetic pathways across the approximately 700 million years that separate Homo sapiens and Drosophila melanogaster. Eighty-seven percent have one or more fruit fly homologs and 76% have at least one candidate functional ortholog. We propose that D. melanogaster can be used in a systematic manner to study MR and possibly to develop bioassays for therapeutic drug discovery. We selected 42 Drosophila orthologs as most likely to reveal molecular and cellular mechanisms of nervous system development or plasticity relevant to MR. PMID:15020472

  16. Genetic and physical mapping of the bovine X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Yeh, C C; Taylor, J F; Gallagher, D S; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Davis, S K

    1996-03-01

    Three hundred eighty reciprocal backcross and F(2) full sib progeny from 33 families produced by embryo transfer from 77 Angus (Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), and F1 parents and grandparents were used to construct genetic maps of the bovine X and Y chromosomes. Ml individuals were scored for 15 microsatellite loci, with an average of 608 informative meioses per locus. The length of the bovine X chromosome genetic map was 118.7 cM (female only) and of the pseudoautosomal region was 13.0 cM (male only). The 15-marker framework map in Kosambi centimorgans is [BM6017-6.1 -TGLA89-35.8-TEXAN13-3.4-TGLA128-1.3 -BM2713 -21.1 -BM4604-2.4-BR215 - 12.9-TGLA68-10.0-BM4321 - 1.0-HEL14-4.9-TGLA15-2.3-INRA12O- 12.5-TGLA325- 1.6-MAF45-3.2-INRA3O], with an average interval of 7.91 cM. Clones containing pseudoautosomal or sex-linked microsatellites were isolated from a bovine bacterial artificial chromosome library and were physically mapped to bovine metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization to orient the X and Y chromosome maps. BAC57, containing the pseudoautosomal microsatellite INRA3O, mapped to the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome at q42-ter and to the short arm of the Y chromosome at p13-ter. This confirms the published assignment of this region to Ypl2-ter, but challenges the published assignment of Xpl4-ter and thus reorients the X chromosome physical map. BAC2O4, containing the X-linked microsatellite BM4604, mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped markers indicates either a lack of microsatellite markers for a large (30 to 50 cM) region of the short arm of the X chromosome or heterogeneity of recombination along the X chromosome. PMID:8833151

  17. Chromatin structure and physical mapping of chromosome 6 of potato and comparative analyses with tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) has the densest genetic linkage map and one of the earliest established cytogenetic maps among all plant species. However, there has been limited effort to integrate these maps. Here, we report fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of 25 genetic marker-anchor...

  18. A SSR-based composite genetic linkage map for the cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    distorted loci tended to cluster on LG1, LG3, LG4 and LG5. There were only 15 EST-SSR markers mapped due to low polymorphism. By comparison, there were potential synteny, collinear order of some markers and conservation of collinear linkage groups among the maps and with the AA genome but not fully conservative. Conclusion A composite linkage map was constructed from three individual mapping populations with 175 SSR markers in 22 composite linkage groups. This composite genetic linkage map is among the first "true" tetraploid peanut maps produced. This map also consists of 47 SSRs that have been used in the published AA genome maps, and could be used in comparative mapping studies. The primers described in this study are PCR-based markers, which are easy to share for genetic mapping in peanuts. All 1044 primer pairs are provided as additional files and the three RIL populations will be made available to public upon request for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and linkage map improvement. PMID:20105299

  19. A novel genetic map of wheat: utility for mapping QTL for yield under different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important food crops worldwide. Wheat varieties that maintain yield (YD) under moderate or even intense nitrogen (N) deficiency can adapt to low input management systems. A detailed genetic map is necessary for both wheat molecular breeding and genomics research. In this study, an F6:7 recombinant inbred line population comprising 188 lines was used to construct a novel genetic map and subsequently to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for YD and response to N stress. Results A genetic map consisting of 591 loci distributed across 21 wheat chromosomes was constructed. The map spanned 3930.7 cM, with one marker per 6.7 cM on average. Genomic simple sequence repeat (g-SSR), expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellite (e-SSR), diversity arrays technology (DArT), sequence-tagged sites (STS), sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers were included in the map. The linear relationships between loci found in the present map and in previously compiled physical maps were presented, which were generally in accordance. Information on the genetic and physical positions and allele sizes (when possible) of 17 DArT, 50 e-SSR, 44 SRAP, five ISSR, and two morphological markers is reported here for the first time. Seven segregation distortion regions (SDR) were identified on chromosomes 1B, 3BL, 4AL, 6AS, 6AL, 6BL, and 7B. A total of 22 and 12 QTLs for YD and yield difference between the value (YDDV) under HN and the value under LN were identified, respectively. Of these, QYd-4B-2 and QYddv-4B, two major stable QTL, shared support interval with alleles from KN9204 increasing YD in LN and decreasing YDDV. We probe into the use of these QTLs in wheat breeding programs. Moreover, factors affecting the SDR and total map length are discussed in depth. Conclusions This novel map may facilitate the use of novel markers in wheat molecular breeding programs

  20. Functional mapping - how to map and study the genetic architecture of dynamic complex traits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongling; Lin, Min

    2006-03-01

    The development of any organism is a complex dynamic process that is controlled by a network of genes as well as by environmental factors. Traditional mapping approaches for analysing phenotypic data measured at a single time point are too simple to reveal the genetic control of developmental processes. A general statistical mapping framework, called functional mapping, has been proposed to characterize, in a single step, the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) or nucleotides (QTNs) that underlie a complex dynamic trait. Functional mapping estimates mathematical parameters that describe the developmental mechanisms of trait formation and expression for each QTL or QTN. The approach provides a useful quantitative and testable framework for assessing the interplay between gene actions or interactions and developmental changes. PMID:16485021

  1. Construction of genetic linkage map and mapping of QTL for seed color in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Berisso; Cheema, Kuljit; Greenshields, David L; Li, Changxi; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Rahman, Habibur

    2012-12-01

    A genetic linkage map of Brassica rapa L. was constructed using recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between yellow-seeded cultivar Sampad and a yellowish brown seeded inbred line 3-0026.027. The RILs were evaluated for seed color under three conditions: field plot, greenhouse, and controlled growth chambers. Variation for seed color in the RILs ranged from yellow, like yellow sarson, to dark brown/black even though neither parent had shown brown/black colored seeds. One major QTL (SCA9-2) and one minor QTL (SCA9-1) on linkage group (LG) A9 and two minor QTL (SCA3-1, SCA5-1) on LG A3 and LG A5, respectively, were detected. These collectively explained about 67% of the total phenotypic variance. SCA9-2 mapped in the middle of LG A9, explained about 55% phenotypic variance, and consistently expressed in all environments. The second QTL on LG A9 was ~70 cM away from SCA9-2, suggesting that independent assortment of these QTLs is possible. A digenic epistatic interaction was found between the two main effect QTL on LG A9; and the epistasis × environment interaction was nonsignificant, suggesting stability of the interaction across the environments. The QTL effect on LG A9 was validated using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from the two QTL regions of this LG on a B(1)S(1) population (F(1) backcrossed to Sampad followed by self-pollination) segregating for brown and yellow seed color, and on their self-pollinated progenies (B(1)S(2)). The SSR markers from the QTL region SCA9-2 showed a stronger linkage association with seed color as compared with the marker from SCA9-1. This suggests that the QTL SCA9-2 is the major determinant of seed color in the A genome of B. rapa. PMID:23231600

  2. Integrated consensus genetic and physical maps of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Sylvie; Ragupathy, Raja; Miranda, Evelyn; Radovanovic, Natasa; Reimer, Elsa; Walichnowski, Andrzej; Ward, Kerry; Rowland, Gordon; Duguid, Scott; Banik, Mitali

    2012-12-01

    Three linkage maps of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) were constructed from populations CDC Bethune/Macbeth, E1747/Viking and SP2047/UGG5-5 containing between 385 and 469 mapped markers each. The first consensus map of flax was constructed incorporating 770 markers based on 371 shared markers including 114 that were shared by all three populations and 257 shared between any two populations. The 15 linkage group map corresponds to the haploid number of chromosomes of this species. The marker order of the consensus map was largely collinear in all three individual maps but a few local inversions and marker rearrangements spanning short intervals were observed. Segregation distortion was present in all linkage groups which contained 1-52 markers displaying non-Mendelian segregation. The total length of the consensus genetic map is 1,551 cM with a mean marker density of 2.0 cM. A total of 670 markers were anchored to 204 of the 416 fingerprinted contigs of the physical map corresponding to ~274 Mb or 74 % of the estimated flax genome size of 370 Mb. This high resolution consensus map will be a resource for comparative genomics, genome organization, evolution studies and anchoring of the whole genome shotgun sequence. PMID:22890805

  3. A PCR-based genetic linkage map of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.; Kozman, H.M.; Thompson, A.

    1994-07-01

    A high-resolution cytogenetic-based physical map and a genetic linkage map of human chromosome 16 have been developed based on 79 PCR-typable genetic markers and 2 Southern-based RFLP markers. The PCR-based markers were previously-characterized polymorphic (AC){sub n} repeats. Two approaches have led to the characterization of 47 highly informative genetic markers spread along chromosome 16, some of which are closely linked to disease loci. In addition, 22 markers (D16S401-423) previously genetically mapped were also physically mapped. Ten markers characterized by other laboratories were physically mapped and genotyped on the CEPH families. These 32 markers were incorporated into the PCR-based map. Seventy-two markers have heterozygosities >0.50 and 51 of these markers >0.70. By multipoint linkage analysis a framework genetic map and a comprehensive genetic map were constructed. The length of the sex-averaged framework genetic map if 152.1 cM. The average distance and the median distance between markers on this map are 3.2 and 2.7 cM, respectively, and the largest gap is 15.9 cM. These maps were anchored to the high-resolution cytogenetic map (on average 1.5 Mb per interval). Together these integrated genetic and physical maps of human chromosome 16 provide the basis for the localization and ultimately the isolation of disease genes that map to this chromosome. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Evaluation of algorithms used to order markers on genetic maps.

    PubMed

    Mollinari, M; Margarido, G R A; Vencovsky, R; Garcia, A A F

    2009-12-01

    When building genetic maps, it is necessary to choose from several marker ordering algorithms and criteria, and the choice is not always simple. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of algorithms try (TRY), seriation (SER), rapid chain delineation (RCD), recombination counting and ordering (RECORD) and unidirectional growth (UG), as well as the criteria PARF (product of adjacent recombination fractions), SARF (sum of adjacent recombination fractions), SALOD (sum of adjacent LOD scores) and LHMC (likelihood through hidden Markov chains), used with the RIPPLE algorithm for error verification, in the construction of genetic linkage maps. A linkage map of a hypothetical diploid and monoecious plant species was simulated containing one linkage group and 21 markers with fixed distance of 3 cM between them. In all, 700 F(2) populations were randomly simulated with 100 and 400 individuals with different combinations of dominant and co-dominant markers, as well as 10 and 20% of missing data. The simulations showed that, in the presence of co-dominant markers only, any combination of algorithm and criteria may be used, even for a reduced population size. In the case of a smaller proportion of dominant markers, any of the algorithms and criteria (except SALOD) investigated may be used. In the presence of high proportions of dominant markers and smaller samples (around 100), the probability of repulsion linkage increases between them and, in this case, use of the algorithms TRY and SER associated to RIPPLE with criterion LHMC would provide better results. PMID:19639011

  5. Comparing and combining the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yongzhong; Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angelica; Devlin, Mark J.; Herbig, Thomas; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Page, Lyman

    2001-05-15

    We present a method for comparing and combining maps with different resolutions and beam shapes, and apply it to the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE-DMR data sets. Although the Saskatoon and QMAP maps detect signals at the 21{sigma} and 40{sigma} levels, respectively, their difference is consistent with pure noise, placing strong limits on possible systematic errors. In particular, we obtain quantitative upper limits on relative calibration and pointing errors. Splitting the combined data by frequency shows similar consistency between the Ka and Q bands, placing limits on foreground contamination. The visual agreement between the maps is equally striking. Our combined QMAP+Saskatoon map, nicknamed QMASK, is publicly available on the web together with its 6495x6495 noise covariance matrix. This thoroughly tested data set covers a large enough area (648 square degrees -- currently the largest degree-scale map available) to allow a statistical comparison with COBE-DMR, showing good agreement.

  6. Consolidation of the genetic and cytogenetic maps of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) using FISH with BAC clones.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Xoana; Pansonato-Alves, Jose C; Foresti, Fausto; Martínez, Paulino; Viñas, Ana; Pardo, Belén G; Bouza, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) have been widely used for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of chromosome landmarks in different organisms, including a few in teleosts. In this study, we used BAC-FISH to consolidate the previous genetic and cytogenetic maps of the turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), a commercially important pleuronectiform. The maps consisted of 24 linkage groups (LGs) but only 22 chromosomes. All turbot LGs were assigned to specific chromosomes using BAC probes obtained from a turbot 5× genomic BAC library. It consisted of 46,080 clones with inserts of at least 100 kb and <5 % empty vectors. These BAC probes contained gene-derived or anonymous markers, most of them linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL) related to productive traits. BAC clones were mapped by FISH to unique marker-specific chromosomal positions, which showed a notable concordance with previous genetic mapping data. The two metacentric pairs were cytogenetically assigned to LG2 and LG16, and the nucleolar organizer region (NOR)-bearing pair was assigned to LG15. Double-color FISH assays enabled the consolidation of the turbot genetic map into 22 linkage groups by merging LG8 with LG18 and LG21 with LG24. In this work, a first-generation probe panel of BAC clones anchored to the turbot linkage and cytogenetical map was developed. It is a useful tool for chromosome traceability in turbot, but also relevant in the context of pleuronectiform karyotypes, which often show small hardly identifiable chromosomes. This panel will also be valuable for further integrative genomics of turbot within Pleuronectiformes and teleosts, especially for fine QTL mapping for aquaculture traits, comparative genomics, and whole-genome assembly. PMID:24473579

  7. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zunchun; Liu, Shikai; Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies. PMID:26398139

  8. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies. PMID:26398139

  9. From E-MAPs to module maps: dissecting quantitative genetic interactions using physical interactions.

    PubMed

    Ulitsky, Igor; Shlomi, Tomer; Kupiec, Martin; Shamir, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological breakthroughs allow the quantification of hundreds of thousands of genetic interactions (GIs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The interpretation of these data is often difficult, but it can be improved by the joint analysis of GIs along with complementary data types. Here, we describe a novel methodology that integrates genetic and physical interaction data. We use our method to identify a collection of functional modules related to chromosomal biology and to investigate the relations among them. We show how the resulting map of modules provides clues for the elucidation of function both at the level of individual genes and at the level of functional modules. PMID:18628749

  10. Genetic mapping in the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Krejci, R. ); Homolka, L. )

    1991-01-01

    The basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium is commonly used as a model organism in studies concerned with lignin biodegradation. In further investigations of the enzymology and regulation of ligninolytic activity as well as the construction of industrially applicable strains for biotechnological processing of lignin and lignocellulose, the genetics of this fungus is of great interest. A method of meiotic segregation analysis based on recombinant selection in the homothallic basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium was developed. Using this method, we were able to reveal linkage relationships and to estimate recombination frequencies between seven mutations to auxotrophy. We detected two linkage groups, the first containing four and the second three of the seven mapped mutations.

  11. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rashmi; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Jain, Mukesh; Parida, Swarup K.; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777) of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%), experimental validation success rate (81%) and polymorphic potential (55%) of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48%) detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%). An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777) having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7–23 cM) longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped highest

  12. Integration of the Aedes aegypti mosquito genetic linkage and physical maps.

    PubMed

    Brown, S E; Severson, D W; Smith, L A; Knudson, D L

    2001-03-01

    Two approaches were used to correlate the Aedes aegypti genetic linkage map to the physical map. STS markers were developed for previously mapped RFLP-based genetic markers so that large genomic clones from cosmid libraries could be found and placed to the metaphase chromosome physical maps using standard FISH methods. Eight cosmids were identified that contained eight RFLP marker sequences, and these cosmids were located on the metaphase chromosomes. Twenty-one cDNAs were mapped directly to metaphase chromosomes using a FISH amplification procedure. The chromosome numbering schemes of the genetic linkage and physical maps corresponded directly and the orientations of the genetic linkage maps for chromosomes 2 and 3 were inverted relative to the physical maps. While the chromosome 2 linkage map represented essentially 100% of chromosome 2, approximately 65% of the chromosome 1 linkage map mapped to only 36% of the short p-arm and 83% of the chromosome 3 physical map contained the complete genetic linkage map. Since the genetic linkage map is a RFLP cDNA-based map, these data also provide a minimal estimate for the size of the euchromatic regions. The implications of these findings on positional cloning in A. aegypti are discussed. PMID:11238414

  13. A LCP 85-384 genetic linkage map enriched with polymorphic SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) cultivars, such as Q165, R570 and LCP 85-384, have been used to construct genetic segregation populations for the development of genetic linkage maps. Based on the genetic linkage map for a selfed-progeny population of R570, the French research group at CIRAD tagge...

  14. Lessons from 25 years of genetic mapping in onion: where next?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic maps are useful tools for both basic research and plant improvement. Close association of genetic markers with genes controlling economically important traits allows for indirect selection, avoiding often time-consuming and expensive phenotypic evaluations. As a result, detailed genetic maps...

  15. An integrated BAC/BIBAC-based physical and genetic map of the cotton genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrated genome-wide genetic and physical maps are crucial to many aspects of cotton genome research. We report a genome-wide BAC/BIBAC-based physical and genetic map of the upland cotton genome using a high-resolution and high-throughput capillary-based fingerprinting method. The map was constr...

  16. How detailed should earthquake hazard maps be: comparing the performance of Japan's maps to uniform, randomized, and smoothed maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Edward; Stein, Seth; Spencer, Bruce; Liu, Mian

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake hazard maps forecast future shaking via assumptions about where, when, and how large future earthquakes will be. These assumptions involve the known earthquake history, models of fault geometry and motion, and geodetic data. Maps are made more detailed as additional data and more complicated models become available. However, the extent to which this process produces better forecasts of shaking is unknown. We explore this issue by comparing how well a 510-year-long record of earthquake shaking in Japan is described by the Japanese national hazard (JNH) maps, uniform maps, and randomized maps. Surprisingly, as measured by the metric implicit in the JNH maps, i.e. that during the chosen time interval the predicted shaking should be exceeded only at a specific fraction of the sites, both uniform and randomized maps do better than the actual maps. However, using as a metric the squared misfit between maximum observed shaking and that predicted, the JNH maps do better than uniform or randomized maps. Similarly, by the squared misfit metric, map performance improves up to a ~75-150 km smoothing window, and then decreases with further smoothing. Because the maps were made by using other data and models to try to predict future earthquake shaking, rather than by fitting past shaking data, these results are probably not an artifact of hindcasting rather than forecasting. They suggest that hazard models and the resulting maps can be over-parameterized, in that including too high a level of detail to describe past earthquakes may lower the maps' ability to forecast what will occur in the future. For example in Nepal, where GPS data show no significant variation in coupling between areas that have had recent large earthquakes and those that have not, past earthquakes likely do not show which parts are more at risk, and the entire area can be regarded as equally hazardous.

  17. Mining, genetic mapping and expression analysis of EST-derived resistance gene homologs (RGHs) in cotton

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cotton is the dominant textile crop and also serves as an important oil crop. An estimated 15% economic loss associated with cotton production in China has been caused by diseases, and no resistance genes have been cloned in this crop. Molecular markers developed from resistance gene homologues (RGHs) might be tightly linked with target genes and could be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) or gene cloning. Results To genetically map expressed RGHs, 100 potential pathogenesis-related proteins (PRPs) and 215 resistance gene analogs (RGAs) were identified in the cotton expressed sequence tag database, and 347 specific primers were developed. Meanwhile, 61 cotton genome-derived RGA markers and 24 resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) markers from published papers were included to view their genomic distribution. As a result, 38 EST-derived and 17 genome-derived RGH markers were added to our interspecific genetic map. These 55 markers were distributed on 18 of the 26 cotton chromosomes, with 34 markers on 6 chromosomes (Chr03, Chr04, Chr11, Chr17, Chr19 and Chr26). Homologous RGHs tended to be clustered; RGH clusters appeared on 9 chromosomes, with larger clusters on Chr03, Chr04 and Chr19, which suggests that RGH clusters are widely distributed in the cotton genome. Expression analysis showed that 19 RGHs were significantly altered after inoculation with the V991 stain of Verticillium dahliae. Comparative mapping showed that four RGH markers were linked with mapped loci for Verticillium wilt resistance. Conclusions The genetic mapping of RGHs confirmed their clustering in cotton genome. Expression analysis and comparative mapping suggest that EST-derived RGHs participate in cotton resistance. RGH markers are seemed to be useful tools to detected resistance loci and identify candidate resistance genes in cotton. PMID:25064562

  18. Dissection of DNA Damage Responses Using Multiconditional Genetic Interaction Maps

    PubMed Central

    Guénolé, Aude; Srivas, Rohith; Vreeken, Kees; Wang, Ze Zhong; Wang, Shuyi; Krogan, Nevan J.; Ideker, Trey; van Attikum, Haico

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY To protect the genome, cells have evolved a diverse set of pathways designed to sense, signal, and repair multiple types of DNA damage. To assess the degree of coordination and crosstalk among these pathways, we systematically mapped changes in the cell's genetic network across a panel of different DNA-damaging agents, resulting in ~1,800,000 differential measurements. Each agent was associated with a distinct interaction pattern, which, unlike single-mutant phenotypes or gene expression data, has high statistical power to pinpoint the specific repair mechanisms at work. The agent-specific networks revealed roles for the histone acetyltranferase Rtt109 in the mutagenic bypass of DNA lesions and the neddylation machinery in cell-cycle regulation and genome stability, while the network induced by multiple agents implicates Irc21, an uncharacterized protein, in checkpoint control and DNA repair. Our multiconditional genetic interaction map provides a unique resource that identifies agent-specific and general DNA damage response pathways. PMID:23273983

  19. Genetic map of the Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Vallier, H.; Welker, N.E. )

    1990-02-01

    A circular genetic map of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 was constructed by transduction with bacteriophage TP-42C and protoplast fusion. Sixty-four genes were tentatively assigned a cognate Bacillus subtilis gene based on growth response to intermediates or end products of metabolism, cross-feeding, accumulation of intermediates, or their relative order in a linkage group. Although the relative position of many genes on the Bacillus subtilis genetic map appears to be similar, some differences were detected. The tentative order of the genes in the Bacillus stearothermophilus aro region is aspB-aroBAFEC-tyra-hisH-(trp), whereas it is aspB-aroE-tyrA-hisH-(trp)-aroHBF in Bacillus subtilis. The aroA, aroC, and aroG genes in Bacillus subtilis are located in another region. The tentative order of genes in the trp operon of Bacillus stearothermophilus is trpFCDABE, whereas it is trpABFCDE in Bacillus subtilis.

  20. Systematic Mapping of Chemical-Genetic Interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Sundari; Schlecht, Ulrich; Xu, Weihong; Bray, Walter; Miranda, Molly; Davis, Ronald W; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Lokey, R Scott; St Onge, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Chemical-genetic interactions (CGIs) describe a phenomenon where the effects of a chemical compound (i.e., a small molecule) on cell growth are dependent on a particular gene. CGIs can reveal important functional information about genes and can also be powerful indicators of a compound's mechanism of action. Mapping CGIs can lead to the discovery of new chemical probes, which, in contrast to genetic perturbations, operate at the level of the gene product (or pathway) and can be fast-acting, tunable, and reversible. The simple culture conditions required for yeast and its rapid growth, as well as the availability of a complete set of barcoded gene deletion strains, facilitate systematic mapping of CGIs in this organism. This process involves two basic steps: first, screening chemical libraries to identify bioactive compounds affecting growth and, second, measuring the effects of these compounds on genome-wide collections of mutant strains. Here, we introduce protocols for both steps that have great potential for the discovery and development of new small-molecule tools and medicines. PMID:27587783

  1. Comparative mapping in the Poaceae family reveals translocations in the complex polyploid genome of sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The understanding of sugarcane genetics has lagged behind that of other members of the Poaceae family such as wheat, rice, barley and sorghum mainly due to the complexity, size and polyploidization of the genome. We have used the genetic map of a sugarcane cultivar to generate a consensus genetic map to increase genome coverage for comparison to the sorghum genome. We have utilized the recently developed sugarcane DArT array to increase the marker density within the genetic map. The sequence of these DArT markers plus SNP and EST-SSR markers was then used to form a bridge to the sorghum genomic sequence by BLAST alignment to start to unravel the complex genomic architecture of sugarcane. Results Comparative mapping revealed that certain sugarcane chromosomes show greater levels of synteny to sorghum than others. On a macrosyntenic level a good collinearity was observed between sugarcane and sorghum for 4 of the 8 homology groups (HGs). These 4 HGs were syntenic to four sorghum chromosomes with from 98% to 100% of these chromosomes covered by these linked markers. Four major chromosome rearrangements were identified between the other four sugarcane HGs and sorghum, two of which were condensations of chromosomes reducing the basic chromosome number of sugarcane from x = 10 to x = 8. This macro level of synteny was transferred to other members within the Poaceae family such as maize to uncover the important evolutionary relationships that exist between sugarcane and these species. Conclusions Comparative mapping of sugarcane to the sorghum genome has revealed new information on the genome structure of sugarcane which will help guide identification of important genes for use in sugarcane breeding. Furthermore of the four major chromosome rearrangements identified in this study, three were common to maize providing some evidence that chromosome reduction from a common paleo-ancestor of both maize and sugarcane was driven by the same translocation

  2. Construction of an Interspecific Genetic Map Based on InDel and SSR for Mapping the QTLs Affecting the Initiation of Flower Primordia in Pepper (Capsicum spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Nong, Ding-Guo; Li, Wei-Peng; Tang, Xin; Wu, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Kai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Re-sequencing permits the mining of genome-wide variations on a large scale and provides excellent resources for the research community. To accelerate the development and application of molecular markers and identify the QTLs affecting the flowering time-related trait in pepper, a total of 1,038 pairs of InDel and 674 SSR primers from different sources were used for genetic mapping using the F2 population (n = 154) derived from a cross between BA3 (C. annuum) and YNXML (C. frutescens). Of these, a total of 224 simple PCR-based markers, including 129 InDels and 95 SSRs, were validated and integrated into a map, which was designated as the BY map. The BY map consisted of 13 linkage groups (LGs) and spanned a total genetic distance of 1,249.77 cM with an average marker distance of 5.60 cM. Comparative analysis of the genetic and physical map based on the anchored markers showed that the BY map covered nearly the whole pepper genome. Based on the BY map, one major and five minor QTLs affecting the number of leaves on the primary axis (Nle) were detected on chromosomes P2, P7, P10 and P11 in 2012. The major QTL on P2 was confirmed based on another subset of the same F2 population (n = 147) in 2014 with selective genotyping of markers from the BY map. With the accomplishment of pepper whole genome sequencing and annotations (release 2.0), 153 candidate genes were predicted to embed in the Nle2.2 region, of which 12 important flowering related genes were obtained. The InDel/SSR-based interspecific genetic map, QTLs and candidate genes obtained by the present study will be useful for the downstream isolation of flowering time-related gene and other genetic applications for pepper. PMID:25781878

  3. Reconstruction of the ancestral marsupial karyotype from comparative gene maps

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing number of assembled mammalian genomes makes it possible to compare genome organisation across mammalian lineages and reconstruct chromosomes of the ancestral marsupial and therian (marsupial and eutherian) mammals. However, the reconstruction of ancestral genomes requires genome assemblies to be anchored to chromosomes. The recently sequenced tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) genome was assembled into over 300,000 contigs. We previously devised an efficient strategy for mapping large evolutionarily conserved blocks in non-model mammals, and applied this to determine the arrangement of conserved blocks on all wallaby chromosomes, thereby permitting comparative maps to be constructed and resolve the long debated issue between a 2n = 14 and 2n = 22 ancestral marsupial karyotype. Results We identified large blocks of genes conserved between human and opossum, and mapped genes corresponding to the ends of these blocks by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A total of 242 genes was assigned to wallaby chromosomes in the present study, bringing the total number of genes mapped to 554 and making it the most densely cytogenetically mapped marsupial genome. We used these gene assignments to construct comparative maps between wallaby and opossum, which uncovered many intrachromosomal rearrangements, particularly for genes found on wallaby chromosomes X and 3. Expanding comparisons to include chicken and human permitted the putative ancestral marsupial (2n = 14) and therian mammal (2n = 19) karyotypes to be reconstructed. Conclusions Our physical mapping data for the tammar wallaby has uncovered the events shaping marsupial genomes and enabled us to predict the ancestral marsupial karyotype, supporting a 2n = 14 ancestor. Futhermore, our predicted therian ancestral karyotype has helped to understand the evolution of the ancestral eutherian genome. PMID:24261750

  4. A genetic interaction map of cell cycle regulators.

    PubMed

    Billmann, Maximilian; Horn, Thomas; Fischer, Bernd; Sandmann, Thomas; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2016-04-15

    Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach to screen for modulators of many cellular processes. However, resulting candidate gene lists from cell-based assays comprise diverse effectors, both direct and indirect, and further dissecting their functions can be challenging. Here we screened a genome-wide RNAi library for modulators of mitosis and cytokinesis inDrosophilaS2 cells. The screen identified many previously known genes as well as modulators that have previously not been connected to cell cycle control. We then characterized ∼300 candidate modifiers further by genetic interaction analysis using double RNAi and a multiparametric, imaging-based assay. We found that analyzing cell cycle-relevant phenotypes increased the sensitivity for associating novel gene function. Genetic interaction maps based on mitotic index and nuclear size grouped candidates into known regulatory complexes of mitosis or cytokinesis, respectively, and predicted previously uncharacterized components of known processes. For example, we confirmed a role for theDrosophilaCCR4 mRNA processing complex componentl(2)NC136during the mitotic exit. Our results show that the combination of genome-scale RNAi screening and genetic interaction analysis using process-directed phenotypes provides a powerful two-step approach to assigning components to specific pathways and complexes. PMID:26912791

  5. A genetic interaction map of cell cycle regulators

    PubMed Central

    Billmann, Maximilian; Horn, Thomas; Fischer, Bernd; Sandmann, Thomas; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach to screen for modulators of many cellular processes. However, resulting candidate gene lists from cell-based assays comprise diverse effectors, both direct and indirect, and further dissecting their functions can be challenging. Here we screened a genome-wide RNAi library for modulators of mitosis and cytokinesis in Drosophila S2 cells. The screen identified many previously known genes as well as modulators that have previously not been connected to cell cycle control. We then characterized ∼300 candidate modifiers further by genetic interaction analysis using double RNAi and a multiparametric, imaging-based assay. We found that analyzing cell cycle–relevant phenotypes increased the sensitivity for associating novel gene function. Genetic interaction maps based on mitotic index and nuclear size grouped candidates into known regulatory complexes of mitosis or cytokinesis, respectively, and predicted previously uncharacterized components of known processes. For example, we confirmed a role for the Drosophila CCR4 mRNA processing complex component l(2)NC136 during the mitotic exit. Our results show that the combination of genome-scale RNAi screening and genetic interaction analysis using process-directed phenotypes provides a powerful two-step approach to assigning components to specific pathways and complexes. PMID:26912791

  6. Genome survey and high-density genetic map construction provide genomic and genetic resources for the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Li, Fuhua; Chen, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yongzhen; Huang, Long; Zheng, Hongkun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is the dominant crustacean species in global seafood mariculture. Understanding the genome and genetic architecture is useful for deciphering complex traits and accelerating the breeding program in shrimp. In this study, a genome survey was conducted and a high-density linkage map was constructed using a next-generation sequencing approach. The genome survey was used to identify preliminary genome characteristics and to generate a rough reference for linkage map construction. De novo SNP discovery resulted in 25,140 polymorphic markers. A total of 6,359 high-quality markers were selected for linkage map construction based on marker coverage among individuals and read depths. For the linkage map, a total of 6,146 markers spanning 4,271.43 cM were mapped to 44 sex-averaged linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 0.7 cM. An integration analysis linked 5,885 genome scaffolds and 1,504 BAC clones to the linkage map. Based on the high-density linkage map, several QTLs for body weight and body length were detected. This high-density genetic linkage map reveals basic genomic architecture and will be useful for comparative genomics research, genome assembly and genetic improvement of L. vannamei and other penaeid shrimp species. PMID:26503227

  7. Genome survey and high-density genetic map construction provide genomic and genetic resources for the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Li, Fuhua; Chen, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yongzhen; Huang, Long; Zheng, Hongkun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is the dominant crustacean species in global seafood mariculture. Understanding the genome and genetic architecture is useful for deciphering complex traits and accelerating the breeding program in shrimp. In this study, a genome survey was conducted and a high-density linkage map was constructed using a next-generation sequencing approach. The genome survey was used to identify preliminary genome characteristics and to generate a rough reference for linkage map construction. De novo SNP discovery resulted in 25,140 polymorphic markers. A total of 6,359 high-quality markers were selected for linkage map construction based on marker coverage among individuals and read depths. For the linkage map, a total of 6,146 markers spanning 4,271.43 cM were mapped to 44 sex-averaged linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 0.7 cM. An integration analysis linked 5,885 genome scaffolds and 1,504 BAC clones to the linkage map. Based on the high-density linkage map, several QTLs for body weight and body length were detected. This high-density genetic linkage map reveals basic genomic architecture and will be useful for comparative genomics research, genome assembly and genetic improvement of L. vannamei and other penaeid shrimp species. PMID:26503227

  8. A Genetic Linkage Map of the Hermaphrodite Teleost Fish Sparus aurata L.

    PubMed Central

    Franch, Rafaella; Louro, Bruno; Tsalavouta, Matina; Chatziplis, Dimitris; Tsigenopoulos, Costas S.; Sarropoulou, Elena; Antonello, Jenny; Magoulas, Andonis; Mylonas, Constantinos C.; Babbucci, Massimiliano; Patarnello, Tomaso; Power, Deborah M.; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Bargelloni, Luca

    2006-01-01

    The gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) is a marine fish of great importance for fisheries and aquaculture. It has also a peculiar sex-determination system, being a protandrous hermaphrodite. Here we report the construction of a first-generation genetic linkage map for S. aurata, based on 204 microsatellite markers. Twenty-six linkage groups (LG) were found. The total map length was 1241.9 cM. The ratio between sex-specific map lengths was 1:1.2 (male:female). Comparison with a preliminary radiation hybrid (RH) map reveals a good concordance, as all markers located in a single LG are located in a single RH group, except for Ad-25 and CId-31. Comparison with the Tetraodon nigroviridis genome revealed a considerable number of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) between the two species. The mean size of ECRs was 182 bp (sequence identity 60–90%). Forty-one ECRs have a known chromosomal location in the pufferfish genome. Despite the limited number of anchoring points, significant syntenic relationships were found. The linkage map presented here provides a robust comparative framework for QTL analysis in S. aurata and is a step toward the identification of genetic loci involved both in the determination of economically important traits and in the individual timing of sex reversal. PMID:16951080

  9. Physical and genetic map of the Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Cornillot, E; Croux, C; Soucaille, P

    1997-01-01

    A physical and genetic map of the Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 chromosome was constructed. The macrorestriction map for CeuI, EagI, and SstII was created by ordering the 38 restriction sites by one- and two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and by using an original strategy based on the CeuI enzyme and indirect end labelling by hybridization on both sides of the CeuI sites with rrs (16S RNA) and 3' rrl (23S RNA) probes. The circular chromosome was estimated to be 4.15 Mb in size, and the average resolution of the physical map is 110 kb. The chromosome contains 11 rrn loci, which are localized on 44% of the chromosome in a divergent transcriptional orientation regarding the presumed location of the replication origin. In addition to these 11 rrn operons, a total of 40 identified genes were mapped by hybridization experiments with genes from C. acetobutylicum and from various other clostridia as probes. The genetic map of C. acetobutylicum was compared to that of the three other endospore-forming bacteria characterized so far: Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Clostridium perfringens. Parodoxically, the chromosomal backbone of C. acetobutylicum showed more similarity to that of B. subtilis than to those of the clostridia. PMID:9393708

  10. Genetic map of Triticum turgidum based on a hexaploid wheat population without genetic recombination for D genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A synthetic doubled-haploid hexaploid wheat population, SynDH1, derived from the spontaneous chromosome doubling of triploid F1 hybrid plants obtained from the cross of hybrids Triticum turgidum ssp. durum line Langdon (LDN) and ssp. turgidum line AS313, with Aegilops tauschii ssp. tauschii accession AS60, was previously constructed. SynDH1 is a tetraploidization-hexaploid doubled haploid (DH) population because it contains recombinant A and B chromosomes from two different T. turgidum genotypes, while all the D chromosomes from Ae. tauschii are homogenous across the whole population. This paper reports the construction of a genetic map using this population. Results Of the 606 markers used to assemble the genetic map, 588 (97%) were assigned to linkage groups. These included 513 Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers, 72 simple sequence repeat (SSR), one insertion site-based polymorphism (ISBP), and two high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) markers. These markers were assigned to the 14 chromosomes, covering 2048.79 cM, with a mean distance of 3.48 cM between adjacent markers. This map showed good coverage of the A and B genome chromosomes, apart from 3A, 5A, 6A, and 4B. Compared with previously reported maps, most shared markers showed highly consistent orders. This map was successfully used to identify five quantitative trait loci (QTL), including two for spikelet number on chromosomes 7A and 5B, two for spike length on 7A and 3B, and one for 1000-grain weight on 4B. However, differences in crossability QTL between the two T. turgidum parents may explain the segregation distortion regions on chromosomes 1A, 3B, and 6B. Conclusions A genetic map of T. turgidum including 588 markers was constructed using a synthetic doubled haploid (SynDH) hexaploid wheat population. Five QTLs for three agronomic traits were identified from this population. However, more markers are needed to increase the density and resolution of this map in the

  11. The first comprehensive genetic linkage map of a marsupial: the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed Central

    Zenger, Kyall R; McKenzie, Louise M; Cooper, Desmond W

    2002-01-01

    The production of a marsupial genetic linkage map is perhaps one of the most important objectives in marsupial research. This study used a total of 353 informative meioses and 64 genetic markers to construct a framework genetic linkage map for the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). Nearly all markers (93.8%) formed a significant linkage (LOD > 3.0) with at least one other marker, indicating that the majority of the genome had been mapped. In fact, when compared with chiasmata data, >70% (828 cM) of the genome has been covered. Nine linkage groups were identified, with all but one (LG7; X-linked) allocated to the autosomes. These groups ranged in size from 15.7 to 176.5 cM and have an average distance of 16.2 cM between adjacent markers. Of the autosomal linkage groups (LGs), LG2 and LG3 were assigned to chromosome 1 and LG4 localized to chromosome 3 on the basis of physical localization of genes. Significant sex-specific distortions toward reduced female recombination rates were revealed in 22% of comparisons. When comparing the X chromosome data to closely related species it is apparent that they are conserved in both synteny and gene order. PMID:12242243

  12. Genetic linkage map construction and QTL mapping of cadmium accumulation in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Liangju; Gong, Yiqin; Dai, Wenhao; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Xianwen; Wen, Tiancai; Liu, Liwang

    2012-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread soil pollutant and poses a significant threat to human health via the food chain. Large phenotypic variations in Cd concentration of radish roots and shoots have been observed. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms of Cd accumulation in radish remain to be elucidated. In this study, a genetic linkage map was constructed using an F(2) mapping population derived from a cross between a high Cd-accumulating cultivar NAU-Dysx and a low Cd-accumulating cultivar NAU-Yh. The linkage map consisted of 523 SRAP, RAPD, SSR, ISSR, RAMP, and RGA markers and had a total length of 1,678.2 cM with a mean distance of 3.4 cM between two markers. All mapped markers distributed on nine linkage groups (LGs) having sizes between 134.7 and 236.8 cM. Four quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for root Cd accumulation were mapped on LGs 1, 4, 6, and 9, which accounted for 9.86 to 48.64 % of all phenotypic variance. Two QTLs associated with shoot Cd accumulation were detected on LG1 and 3, which accounted for 17.08 and 29.53 % of phenotypic variance, respectively. A major-effect QTL, qRCd9 (QTL for root Cd accumulation on LG9), was identified on LG 9 flanked by NAUrp011_754 and EM5me6_286 markers with a high LOD value of 23.6, which accounted for 48.64 % of the total phenotypic variance in Cd accumulation of F(2) lines. The results indicated that qRCd9 is a novel QTL responsible for controlling root Cd accumulation in radish, and the identification of specific molecular markers tightly linked to the major QTL could be further applied for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in low-Cd content radish breeding program. PMID:22491896

  13. Comparative riverscape genetics reveals reservoirs of genetic diversity for conservation and restoration of Great Plains fishes

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Megan J; Perkin, Joshuah S.; Gido, Keith B.; Turner, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    We used comparative landscape genetics to examine the relative roles of historical events, intrinsic traits, and landscape factors in determining the distribution of genetic diversity of river fishes across the North American Great Plains. Spatial patterns of diversity were overlaid on a patch-based graphical model, and then compared within and among three species that co-occurred across five Great Plains watersheds. Species differing in reproductive strategy (benthic vs. pelagic spawning) were hypothesized to have different patterns of genetic diversity, but the overriding factor shaping contemporary patterns of diversity was the signature of past climates and geological history. Allelic diversity was significantly higher at southern latitudes for Cyprinella lutrensis and Hybognathus placitus, consistent with northward expansion from southern Pleistocene refugia. Within the historical context, all species exhibited lowered occupancy and abundance in heavily fragmented and drier upstream reaches, particularly H. placitus; a pelagic-spawning species, suggesting rates of extirpation have outpaced losses of genetic diversity in this species. Within most basins, genetically diverse populations of each species persisted. Hence, reconnecting genetically diverse populations with those characterized by reduced diversity (regardless of their position within the riverine network) would provide populations with greater genetic and demographic resilience. We discuss cases where cross-basin transfer may be appropriate to enhance genetic diversity and mitigate negative effects of climate change. Overall, striking similarities in genetic patterns and response to fragmentation and dewatering suggest a common strategy for genetic resource management in this unique riverine fish assemblage. PMID:25327780

  14. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of human chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, R.E.; Speer, M.C.; Luo, Ying; Ott, J.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J. )

    1993-01-01

    We isolated nine new microsatellite markers from chromosome 18 and further characterized and mapped eight microsatellites developed in other laboratories. We have constructed a framework linkage map of chromosome 18 that includes 14 microsatellite markers (12 dinucleotide and 2 tetranucleotide) and 2 RFLP markers. Cytogenetic localization for the microsatellites was performed by PCR amplification of IS somatic cell hybrids containing different deletions of chromosome 18. Twelve of the microsatellites and one of the RFLPs have heterozygosities greater than 70%. The average heterozygosity of the markers included in the map is 72%. In addition, we have made provisional placements of 3 more microsatellite markers and 2 more RFLP markers. The map lengths (in Kosambi centimorgans) are as follows: sex-averaged, 109.3 cM; male, 72.4 cM; female, 161.2 cM. The average distance between markers in the sex-averaged map is 7.3 cM, and the largest gap between markers is 16.7 cM. Analysis of the data for differences in the female:male map distance ratio revealed significant evidence for a constant difference in the ratio (X[sup 2]=32.25; df = 1; P < 0.001; ratio = 2.5:1). Furthermore, there was significant evidence in favor of a variable female:male map distance ratio across the chromosome compared to a constant distance ratio (X[sup 2] = 27.78; df = 14; P = 0.015). To facilitate their use in genomic screening for disease genes, all of the microsatellite markers used here can be amplified under standard PCR conditions, and most can be used in duplex PCR reactions. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Genetic Mapping of Novel Loci Affecting Canine Blood Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    White, Michelle E.; Hayward, Jessica J.; Stokol, Tracy; Boyko, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of the dog genome and the construction of high-quality genome-wide SNP arrays, thousands of dogs have been genotyped for disease studies. For many of these dogs, additional clinical phenotypes are available, such as hematological and clinical chemistry results collected during routine veterinary care. Little is known about the genetic basis of variation in blood phenotypes, but this variation may play an important role in the etiology and progression of many diseases. From a cohort of dogs that had been previously genotyped on a semi-custom Illumina CanineHD array for various genome-wide association studies (GWAS) at Cornell University Hospital for Animals, we chose 353 clinically healthy, adult dogs for our analysis of clinical pathologic test results (14 hematological tests and 25 clinical chemistry tests). After correcting for age, body weight and sex, genetic associations were identified for amylase, segmented neutrophils, urea nitrogen, glucose, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. Additionally, a strong genetic association (P = 8.1×10−13) was evident between a region of canine chromosome 13 (CFA13) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), explaining 23% of the variation in ALT levels. This region of CFA13 encompasses the GPT gene that encodes the transferase. Dogs homozygous for the derived allele exhibit lower ALT activity, making increased ALT activity a less useful marker of hepatic injury in these individuals. Overall, these associations provide a roadmap for identifying causal variants that could improve interpretation of clinical blood tests and understanding of genetic risk factors associated with diseases such as canine diabetes and anemia, and demonstrate the utility of holistic phenotyping of dogs genotyped for disease mapping studies. PMID:26683458

  16. A sequence-based genetic map of Medicago truncatula and comparison of marker colinearity with M. sativa.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Dongjin; Uhm, Taesik; Limpens, Eric; Lim, Hyunju; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Kalo, Peter; Penmetsa, R Varma; Seres, Andrea; Kulikova, Olga; Roe, Bruce A; Bisseling, Ton; Kiss, Gyorgy B; Cook, Douglas R

    2004-01-01

    A core genetic map of the legume Medicago truncatula has been established by analyzing the segregation of 288 sequence-characterized genetic markers in an F(2) population composed of 93 individuals. These molecular markers correspond to 141 ESTs, 80 BAC end sequence tags, and 67 resistance gene analogs, covering 513 cM. In the case of EST-based markers we used an intron-targeted marker strategy with primers designed to anneal in conserved exon regions and to amplify across intron regions. Polymorphisms were significantly more frequent in intron vs. exon regions, thus providing an efficient mechanism to map transcribed genes. Genetic and cytogenetic analysis produced eight well-resolved linkage groups, which have been previously correlated with eight chromosomes by means of FISH with mapped BAC clones. We anticipated that mapping of conserved coding regions would have utility for comparative mapping among legumes; thus 60 of the EST-based primer pairs were designed to amplify orthologous sequences across a range of legume species. As an initial test of this strategy, we used primers designed against M. truncatula exon sequences to rapidly map genes in M. sativa. The resulting comparative map, which includes 68 bridging markers, indicates that the two Medicago genomes are highly similar and establishes the basis for a Medicago composite map. PMID:15082563

  17. RRDistMaps: a UCSF Chimera tool for viewing and comparing protein distance maps

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jonathan E.; Huang, Conrad C.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Contact maps are a convenient method for the structural biologists to identify structural features through two-dimensional simplification. Binary (yes/no) contact maps with a single cutoff distance can be generalized to show continuous distance ranges. We have developed a UCSF Chimera tool, RRDistMaps, to compute such generalized maps in order to analyze pairwise variations in intramolecular contacts. An interactive utility, RRDistMaps, visualizes conformational changes, both local (e.g. binding-site residues) and global (e.g. hinge motion), between unbound and bound proteins through distance patterns. Users can target residue pairs in RRDistMaps for further navigation in Chimera. The interface contains the unique features of identifying long-range residue motion and aligning sequences to simultaneously compare distance maps. Availability and implementation: RRDistMaps was developed as part of UCSF Chimera release 1.10, which is freely available at http://rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/download.html, and operates on Linux, Windows, and Mac OS. Contact: conrad@cgl.ucsf.edu PMID:25540183

  18. The first genetic map of the American cranberry: exploration of synteny conservation and quantitative trait loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first genetic map of cranberry has been constructed, comprising 14 linkage groups totaling 879.9 cM with an estimated coverage of 82.2%. This map, based on four mapping populations segregating for field fruit rot resistance, contains 136 distinct loci. Mapped markers include blueberry simple se...

  19. Prototype development and comparative evaluation of wheelchair pressure mapping system.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Pell, M; Cardi, M D

    1993-01-01

    Wheelchair pressure mapping devices used in the prescription of seat cushions and postural supports have been limited in durability, data presentation, and/or clinical efficiency. This project sought to establish the ideal specifications for clinically useful pressure mapping systems, and to use these specifications to influence the design of an innovative wheelchair pressure mapping system (Tekscan "Seat"). Technology, previously developed for measurement of forces of dental occlusion and of the foot during gait, was applied to wheelchair seat mapping. Tests were designed to compare the performance of three pressure mapping systems: the Tekscan system, the FSA system, and the Talley TPM3. Bench tests were done to measure reproducibility, hysteresis, and creep of each of the pressure mapping systems. A contoured loader gauge was developed to test for the influence of hammocking. Tests were also performed using spinal cord-injured subjects to demonstrate the relative performance of the pressure mapping systems in a clinical setting. A focus group session was conducted with seating specialists to review the strengths and weakness of the systems for routine clinical use. The TPM3 was found to be the most accurate, stable, and reproducible but limited in ease of use, speed, and data presentation. FSA was rated well in clinical application and data management but demonstrated a pronounced hysteresis (+/-19%) and creep (4%). The Tekscan system also showed substantial hysteresis (+/-20%) and creep (19%) but was preferred by clinicians for its real-time display capabilities, resolution, and display options. Some trends in system performance on varied support surfaces were identified and can be a valuable guide to interpretation of measurements and prescription decision making in the clinic. Problems identified with the accuracy and stability of the Tekscan and FSA systems may be amenable to resolution with software correction and changes in fabrication. With these

  20. Genetic analysis of 12 unrelated CADASIL families: Demonstration of genetic homogeneity: Physical mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Nibbio, A.; Vahedi, K.

    1994-09-01

    CADASIL is the acronym (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Ischemic Strokes and Leukoencephalopathy) designating a recently identified mendelian cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of ischemic sensory and motor deficits leading to a progressive subcortical dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows extensive areas of increased signal in the hemispheric white matter. We recently mapped the CADASIL locus in 2 large families on chromosome 19 in a 14 cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215{sup *}. Forty additional families have been collected. Twelve of them including more than 200 members have already been genotyped with a set of 10 highly polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families are significantly linked to chromosome 19 demonstrating genetic homogeneity. Combined lod scores for several of these markers are above 30. The size of the mapping interval has been reduced to 2 cM. Genetic testing for presymptomatic individuals is now possible with respect to all ethical rules in this severe condition. Lastly, physical mapping of the affected gene has been started and data will be presented at the meeting.

  1. Comparing G: multivariate analysis of genetic variation in multiple populations.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J D; Hine, E; McGuigan, K; Blows, M W

    2014-01-01

    The additive genetic variance-covariance matrix (G) summarizes the multivariate genetic relationships among a set of traits. The geometry of G describes the distribution of multivariate genetic variance, and generates genetic constraints that bias the direction of evolution. Determining if and how the multivariate genetic variance evolves has been limited by a number of analytical challenges in comparing G-matrices. Current methods for the comparison of G typically share several drawbacks: metrics that lack a direct relationship to evolutionary theory, the inability to be applied in conjunction with complex experimental designs, difficulties with determining statistical confidence in inferred differences and an inherently pair-wise focus. Here, we present a cohesive and general analytical framework for the comparative analysis of G that addresses these issues, and that incorporates and extends current methods with a strong geometrical basis. We describe the application of random skewers, common subspace analysis, the 4th-order genetic covariance tensor and the decomposition of the multivariate breeders equation, all within a Bayesian framework. We illustrate these methods using data from an artificial selection experiment on eight traits in Drosophila serrata, where a multi-generational pedigree was available to estimate G in each of six populations. One method, the tensor, elegantly captures all of the variation in genetic variance among populations, and allows the identification of the trait combinations that differ most in genetic variance. The tensor approach is likely to be the most generally applicable method to the comparison of G-matrices from any sampling or experimental design. PMID:23486079

  2. Genetic mapping of variation in spatial learning in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Daniela; Reynolds, David S; Ferris, Pushpindar; Lincoln, Rachael; Datta, Susmita; Stanley, Joanna; Paterson, Andrea; Dawson, Gerard R; Flint, Jonathan

    2003-03-15

    Inbred strains of mice are known to differ in their performance in the Morris water maze task, a test of spatial discrimination and place navigation in rodents, but the genetic basis of individual variation in spatial learning is unknown. We have mapped genetic effects that contribute to the difference between two strains, DBA/2 and C57BL6/J, using an F2 intercross and methods to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found two QTL, one on chromosome 4 and one on chromosome 12, that influence behavior in the probe trial of the water maze (genome-wide significance p = 0.017 and 0.015, respectively). By including tests of avoidance conditioning and behavior in a novel environment, we show that the QTL on chromosomes 4 and 12 specifically influence variation in spatial learning. QTL that influence differences in fearful behavior (on chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 15, and 19) operate while mice are trained in the water maze apparatus. PMID:12657702

  3. Genetic Analysis and QTL Mapping of Seed Coat Color in Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Miao, Hongmei; Wei, Libin; Li, Chun; Zhao, Ruihong; Wang, Cuiying

    2013-01-01

    Seed coat color is an important agronomic trait in sesame, as it is associated with seed biochemical properties, antioxidant content and activity and even disease resistance of sesame. Here, using a high-density linkage map, we analyzed genetic segregation and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sesame seed coat color in six generations (P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2). Results showed that two major genes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects and polygenes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects were responsible for controlling the seed coat color trait. Average heritability of the major genes in the BC1, BC2 and F2 populations was 89.30%, 24.00%, and 91.11% respectively, while the heritability of polygenes was low in the BC1 (5.43%), in BC2 (0.00%) and in F2 (0.89%) populations. A high-density map was constructed using 724 polymorphic markers. 653 SSR, AFLP and RSAMPL loci were anchored in 14 linkage groups (LG) spanning a total of 1,216.00 cM. The average length of each LG was 86.86 cM and the marker density was 1.86 cM per marker interval. Four QTLs for seed coat color, QTL1-1, QTL11-1, QTL11-2 and QTL13-1, whose heritability ranged from 59.33%–69.89%, were detected in F3 populations using CIM and MCIM methods. Alleles at all QTLs from the black-seeded parent tended to increase the seed coat color. Results from QTLs mapping and classical genetic analysis among the P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2 populations were comparatively consistent. This first QTL analysis and high-density genetic linkage map for sesame provided a good foundation for further research on sesame genetics and molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:23704951

  4. Genetic analysis and QTL mapping of seed coat color in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Miao, Hongmei; Wei, Libin; Li, Chun; Zhao, Ruihong; Wang, Cuiying

    2013-01-01

    Seed coat color is an important agronomic trait in sesame, as it is associated with seed biochemical properties, antioxidant content and activity and even disease resistance of sesame. Here, using a high-density linkage map, we analyzed genetic segregation and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sesame seed coat color in six generations (P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2). Results showed that two major genes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects and polygenes with additive-dominant-epistatic effects were responsible for controlling the seed coat color trait. Average heritability of the major genes in the BC1, BC2 and F2 populations was 89.30%, 24.00%, and 91.11% respectively, while the heritability of polygenes was low in the BC1 (5.43%), in BC2 (0.00%) and in F2 (0.89%) populations. A high-density map was constructed using 724 polymorphic markers. 653 SSR, AFLP and RSAMPL loci were anchored in 14 linkage groups (LG) spanning a total of 1,216.00 cM. The average length of each LG was 86.86 cM and the marker density was 1.86 cM per marker interval. Four QTLs for seed coat color, QTL1-1, QTL11-1, QTL11-2 and QTL13-1, whose heritability ranged from 59.33%-69.89%, were detected in F3 populations using CIM and MCIM methods. Alleles at all QTLs from the black-seeded parent tended to increase the seed coat color. Results from QTLs mapping and classical genetic analysis among the P1, P2, F1, BC1, BC2 and F2 populations were comparatively consistent. This first QTL analysis and high-density genetic linkage map for sesame provided a good foundation for further research on sesame genetics and molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:23704951

  5. Joint assembly and genetic mapping of the Atlantic horseshoe crab genome reveals ancient whole genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horseshoe crabs are marine arthropods with a fossil record extending back approximately 450 million years. They exhibit remarkable morphological stability over their long evolutionary history, retaining a number of ancestral arthropod traits, and are often cited as examples of “living fossils.” As arthropods, they belong to the Ecdysozoa, an ancient super-phylum whose sequenced genomes (including insects and nematodes) have thus far shown more divergence from the ancestral pattern of eumetazoan genome organization than cnidarians, deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans. However, much of ecdysozoan diversity remains unrepresented in comparative genomic analyses. Results Here we apply a new strategy of combined de novo assembly and genetic mapping to examine the chromosome-scale genome organization of the Atlantic horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. We constructed a genetic linkage map of this 2.7 Gbp genome by sequencing the nuclear DNA of 34 wild-collected, full-sibling embryos and their parents at a mean redundancy of 1.1x per sample. The map includes 84,307 sequence markers grouped into 1,876 distinct genetic intervals and 5,775 candidate conserved protein coding genes. Conclusions Comparison with other metazoan genomes shows that the L. polyphemus genome preserves ancestral bilaterian linkage groups, and that a common ancestor of modern horseshoe crabs underwent one or more ancient whole genome duplications 300 million years ago, followed by extensive chromosome fusion. These results provide a counter-example to the often noted correlation between whole genome duplication and evolutionary radiations. The new, low-cost genetic mapping method for obtaining a chromosome-scale view of non-model organism genomes that we demonstrate here does not require laboratory culture, and is potentially applicable to a broad range of other species. PMID:24987520

  6. Wildfire susceptibility mapping: comparing deterministic and stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mário; Leuenberger, Michael; Parente, Joana; Tonini, Marj

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the probability of wildfire-occurrence in a certain area under particular environmental conditions represents a modern tool to support forest protection plans and to reduce fires consequences. This can be performed by the implementation of wildfire susceptibility mapping, normally achieved employing more or less sophisticated models which combine the predisposing variables (as raster datasets) into a geographic information systems (GIS). The selection of the appropriate variables includes the evaluation of success and the implementation of prediction curves, as well as independent probabilistic validations for different scenarios. These methods allow to define the spatial pattern of wildfire-occurrences, characterize the susceptibility of the territory, namely for specific fire causes/types, and can also account for other factors such as human behavior and social aspects. We selected Portugal as the study region which, due to its favorable climatic, topographic and vegetation conditions, is by far the European country most affected by wildfires. In addition, Verde and Zêzere (2010) performed a first assessment and validation of wildfire susceptibility and hazard in Portugal which can be used as benchmarking. The objectives of the present study comprise: (1) assessing the structural forest fire risk in Portugal using updated datasets, namely, with higher spatial resolution (80 m to 25 m), most recent vegetation cover (Corine Land Cover), longer fire history (1975-2013); and, (2) comparing linear vs non-linear approaches for wildfire susceptibility mapping. The data we used includes: (i) a DEM derived from the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission in a resolution of 1 arc-seconds (DEM-SRTM 25 m) to assess elevation and slope; (ii) the Corine Land Cover inventory provided by the European Environment Agency (http://www.eea.europa.eu/pt) to produce the land use land cover map; (iii) the National Mapping Burnt Areas (NMBA) provided by the Institute for the

  7. First haploid genetic map based on microsatellite markers in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup 1858).

    PubMed

    Molina-Luzón, Ma Jesús; Hermida, Miguel; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Robles, Francisca; Navas, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Rejón, Carmelo; Bouza, Carmen; Martínez, Paulino; de la Herrán, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    The Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup 1858) is a flatfish species of great value for aquaculture. In this study, we develop the first linkage map in this species based on microsatellite markers characterized from genomic DNA libraries and EST databases of Senegalese sole and from other flatfish species. Three reference gynogenetic families were obtained by chromosome-manipulation techniques: two haploid gynogenetics, used to assign and order microsatellites to linkage groups and another diploid gynogenetic family, used for estimating marker-centromere distances. The consensus map consists of 129 microsatellites distributed in 27 linkage groups (LG), with an average density of 4.7 markers per LG and comprising 1,004 centimorgans (cM). Additionally, 15 markers remained unlinked. Through half-tetrad analysis, we were able to estimate the centromere distance for 81 markers belonging to 24 LG, representing an average of 3 markers per LG. Comparative mapping was performed between flatfish species LG and model fish species chromosomes (stickleback, Tetraodon, medaka, fugu and zebrafish). The usefulness of microsatellite markers and the genetic map as tools for comparative mapping and evolution studies is discussed. PMID:25107689

  8. Genetic mapping and QTL analysis for disease resistance using F2 and F5 mapping population derived from the same cross in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Achieving a high dense genetic map in peanut is very challenging due to availability of limited genomic resources, low polymorphism and large genome. Realizing the importance of dense genetic maps in several genetic and breeding applications, a mapping population derived from Tifrunner × GT-C20 (T p...

  9. Genetic marker anchoring by six-dimensional pools for development of a soybean physical map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrated genetic and physical maps are extremely valuable for genomic studies and as important references for assembling of whole genome shotgun sequences. Screening of a BAC library using molecular markers is an indispensable procedure for integration of both physical and genetic maps of a genom...

  10. A Consensus Genetic Map for Pinus taeda and Pinus elliottii and Extent of Linkage Disequilibrium in Two Genotype-Phenotype Discovery Populations of Pinus taeda.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Jared W; Chhatre, Vikram E; Wu, Le-Shin; Chamala, Srikar; Neves, Leandro Gomide; Muñoz, Patricio; Martínez-García, Pedro J; Neale, David B; Kirst, Matias; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Nelson, C Dana; Peter, Gary F; Davis, John M; Echt, Craig S

    2015-08-01

    A consensus genetic map for Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) and Pinus elliottii (slash pine) was constructed by merging three previously published P. taeda maps with a map from a pseudo-backcross between P. elliottii and P. taeda. The consensus map positioned 3856 markers via genotyping of 1251 individuals from four pedigrees. It is the densest linkage map for a conifer to date. Average marker spacing was 0.6 cM and total map length was 2305 cM. Functional predictions of mapped genes were improved by aligning expressed sequence tags used for marker discovery to full-length P. taeda transcripts. Alignments to the P. taeda genome mapped 3305 scaffold sequences onto 12 linkage groups. The consensus genetic map was used to compare the genome-wide linkage disequilibrium in a population of distantly related P. taeda individuals (ADEPT2) used for association genetic studies and a multiple-family pedigree used for genomic selection (CCLONES). The prevalence and extent of LD was greater in CCLONES as compared to ADEPT2; however, extended LD with LGs or between LGs was rare in both populations. The average squared correlations, r(2), between SNP alleles less than 1 cM apart were less than 0.05 in both populations and r(2) did not decay substantially with genetic distance. The consensus map and analysis of linkage disequilibrium establish a foundation for comparative association mapping and genomic selection in P. taeda and P. elliottii. PMID:26068575

  11. A Consensus Genetic Map for Pinus taeda and Pinus elliottii and Extent of Linkage Disequilibrium in Two Genotype-Phenotype Discovery Populations of Pinus taeda

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Jared W.; Chhatre, Vikram E.; Wu, Le-Shin; Chamala, Srikar; Neves, Leandro Gomide; Muñoz, Patricio; Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Neale, David B.; Kirst, Matias; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Nelson, C. Dana; Peter, Gary F.; Echt, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A consensus genetic map for Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) and Pinus elliottii (slash pine) was constructed by merging three previously published P. taeda maps with a map from a pseudo-backcross between P. elliottii and P. taeda. The consensus map positioned 3856 markers via genotyping of 1251 individuals from four pedigrees. It is the densest linkage map for a conifer to date. Average marker spacing was 0.6 cM and total map length was 2305 cM. Functional predictions of mapped genes were improved by aligning expressed sequence tags used for marker discovery to full-length P. taeda transcripts. Alignments to the P. taeda genome mapped 3305 scaffold sequences onto 12 linkage groups. The consensus genetic map was used to compare the genome-wide linkage disequilibrium in a population of distantly related P. taeda individuals (ADEPT2) used for association genetic studies and a multiple-family pedigree used for genomic selection (CCLONES). The prevalence and extent of LD was greater in CCLONES as compared to ADEPT2; however, extended LD with LGs or between LGs was rare in both populations. The average squared correlations, r2, between SNP alleles less than 1 cM apart were less than 0.05 in both populations and r2 did not decay substantially with genetic distance. The consensus map and analysis of linkage disequilibrium establish a foundation for comparative association mapping and genomic selection in P. taeda and P. elliottii. PMID:26068575

  12. A high density consensus genetic map of tetraploid cotton that integrates multiple component maps through molecular marker redundancy check

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ultra-dense consensus (UDC) genetic map of tetraploid cotton was constructed using six high-density component maps and after the integration of a sequence-based marker redundancy check. Public cotton SSR libraries (17,343 markers) were curated for sequence redundancy using 90% as a similarity cut...

  13. Genetic Linkage Map Construction and QTL Mapping of Salt Tolerance Traits in Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hailin; Ding, Wanwen; Chen, Jingbo; Chen, Xuan; Zheng, Yiqi; Wang, Zhiyong; Liu, Jianxiu

    2014-01-01

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia Willd.) is an important warm season turfgrass that is grown in many parts of the world. Salt tolerance is an important trait in zoysiagrass breeding programs. In this study, a genetic linkage map was constructed using sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers and random amplified polymorphic DNA markers based on an F1 population comprising 120 progeny derived from a cross between Zoysia japonica Z105 (salt-tolerant accession) and Z061 (salt-sensitive accession). The linkage map covered 1211 cM with an average marker distance of 5.0 cM and contained 24 linkage groups with 242 marker loci (217 sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers and 25 random amplified polymorphic DNA markers). Quantitative trait loci affecting the salt tolerance of zoysiagrass were identified using the constructed genetic linkage map. Two significant quantitative trait loci (qLF-1 and qLF-2) for leaf firing percentage were detected; qLF-1 at 36.3 cM on linkage group LG4 with a logarithm of odds value of 3.27, which explained 13.1% of the total variation of leaf firing and qLF-2 at 42.3 cM on LG5 with a logarithm of odds value of 2.88, which explained 29.7% of the total variation of leaf firing. A significant quantitative trait locus (qSCW-1) for reduced percentage of dry shoot clipping weight was detected at 44.1 cM on LG5 with a logarithm of odds value of 4.0, which explained 65.6% of the total variation. This study provides important information for further functional analysis of salt-tolerance genes in zoysiagrass. Molecular markers linked with quantitative trait loci for salt tolerance will be useful in zoysiagrass breeding programs using marker-assisted selection. PMID:25203715

  14. Comparing the performance of various digital soil mapping approaches to map physical soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborczi, Annamária; Takács, Katalin; Pásztor, László

    2015-04-01

    Spatial information on physical soil properties is intensely expected, in order to support environmental related and land use management decisions. One of the most widely used properties to characterize soils physically is particle size distribution (PSD), which determines soil water management and cultivability. According to their size, different particles can be categorized as clay, silt, or sand. The size intervals are defined by national or international textural classification systems. The relative percentage of sand, silt, and clay in the soil constitutes textural classes, which are also specified miscellaneously in various national and/or specialty systems. The most commonly used is the classification system of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Soil texture information is essential input data in meteorological, hydrological and agricultural prediction modelling. Although Hungary has a great deal of legacy soil maps and other relevant soil information, it often occurs, that maps do not exist on a certain characteristic with the required thematic and/or spatial representation. The recent developments in digital soil mapping (DSM), however, provide wide opportunities for the elaboration of object specific soil maps (OSSM) with predefined parameters (resolution, accuracy, reliability etc.). Due to the simultaneous richness of available Hungarian legacy soil data, spatial inference methods and auxiliary environmental information, there is a high versatility of possible approaches for the compilation of a given soil map. This suggests the opportunity of optimization. For the creation of an OSSM one might intend to identify the optimum set of soil data, method and auxiliary co-variables optimized for the resources (data costs, computation requirements etc.). We started comprehensive analysis of the effects of the various DSM components on the accuracy of the output maps on pilot areas. The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate different

  15. Molecular-genetic mapping of zebrafish mutants with variable phenotypic penetrance.

    PubMed

    Jain, Roshan A; Wolman, Marc A; Schmidt, Lauren A; Burgess, Harold A; Granato, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in vertebrates are powerful tools to generate models relevant to human diseases, including neuropsychiatric disorders. Variability in phenotypic penetrance and expressivity is common in these disorders and behavioral mutant models, making their molecular-genetic mapping a formidable task. Using a 'phenotyping by segregation' strategy, we molecularly map the hypersensitive zebrafish houdini mutant despite its variable phenotypic penetrance, providing a generally applicable strategy to map zebrafish mutants with subtle phenotypes. PMID:22039502

  16. Molecular-Genetic Mapping of Zebrafish Mutants with Variable Phenotypic Penetrance

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Lauren A.; Burgess, Harold A.; Granato, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in vertebrates are powerful tools to generate models relevant to human diseases, including neuropsychiatric disorders. Variability in phenotypic penetrance and expressivity is common in these disorders and behavioral mutant models, making their molecular-genetic mapping a formidable task. Using a ‘phenotyping by segregation’ strategy, we molecularly map the hypersensitive zebrafish houdini mutant despite its variable phenotypic penetrance, providing a generally applicable strategy to map zebrafish mutants with subtle phenotypes. PMID:22039502

  17. Rapid genotyping by low-coverage resequencing to construct genetic linkage maps of fungi: a case study in Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are important tools in breeding programmes and quantitative trait analyses. Traditional molecular markers used for genotyping are limited in throughput and efficiency. The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has facilitated progeny genotyping and genetic linkage map construction in the major grains. However, the applicability of the approach remains untested in the fungal system. Findings Shiitake mushroom, Lentinula edodes, is a basidiomycetous fungus that represents one of the most popular cultivated edible mushrooms. Here, we developed a rapid genotyping method based on low-coverage (~0.5 to 1.5-fold) whole-genome resequencing. We used the approach to genotype 20 single-spore isolates derived from L. edodes strain L54 and constructed the first high-density sequence-based genetic linkage map of L. edodes. The accuracy of the proposed genotyping method was verified experimentally with results from mating compatibility tests and PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism on a few known genes. The linkage map spanned a total genetic distance of 637.1 cM and contained 13 linkage groups. Two hundred sequence-based markers were placed on the map, with an average marker spacing of 3.4 cM. The accuracy of the map was confirmed by comparing with previous maps the locations of known genes such as matA and matB. Conclusions We used the shiitake mushroom as an example to provide a proof-of-principle that low-coverage resequencing could allow rapid genotyping of basidiospore-derived progenies, which could in turn facilitate the construction of high-density genetic linkage maps of basidiomycetous fungi for quantitative trait analyses and improvement of genome assembly. PMID:23915543

  18. Detailed comparative mapping of cereal chromosome regions corresponding to the Ph1 locus in wheat

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, T.; Roberts, M.; Kurata, N.

    1997-10-01

    Detailed physical mapping of markers from rich chromosome 9, and from syntenous (at the genetic level) regions of other cereal genomes, has resulted in rice yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning parts of rice 9. This physical mapping, together with comparative genetic mapping, has demonstrated that synteny has been largely maintained between the genomes of several cereals at the level of contiged YACs. Markers located in one region of rice chromosome 9 encompassed by the YAC contigs have exhibited restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using deletion lines for the Ph1 locus. This has allowed demarcation of the region of rice chromosome 9 syntenous with the phlb and phlc deletions in wheat chromosome 5B. A group of probes located in wheat homoeologous group 5 and barley chromosome 5H, however, have synteny with rice chromosomes other than 9. This suggests that the usefulness of comparative trait analysis and of the rice genome as a tool to facilitate gene isolation will differ from one region to the next, and implies that the rice genome is more ancestral in structure than those of the Triticeae. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Detailed Comparative Mapping of Cereal Chromosome Regions Corresponding to the Ph1 Locus in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Foote, T.; Roberts, M.; Kurata, N.; Sasaki, T.; Moore, G.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed physical mapping of markers from rice chromosome 9, and from syntenous (at the genetic level) regions of other cereal genomes, has resulted in rice yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning parts of rice 9. This physical mapping, together with comparative genetic mapping, has demonstrated that synteny has been largely maintained between the genomes of several cereals at the level of contiged YACs. Markers located in one region of rice chromosome 9 encompassed by the YAC contigs have exhibited restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using deletion lines for the Ph1 locus. This has allowed demarcation of the region of rice chromosome 9 syntenous with the ph1b and ph1c deletions in wheat chromosome 5B. A group of probes located in wheat homoeologous group 5 and barley chromosome 5H, however, have synteny with rice chromosomes other than 9. This suggests that the usefulness of comparative trait analysis and of the rice genome as a tool to facilitate gene isolation will differ from one region to the next, and implies that the rice genome is more ancestral in structure than those of the Triticeae. PMID:9335614

  20. A microsatellite-based genetic linkage map and putative sex-determining genomic regions in Lake Victoria cichlids.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yu; Nikaido, Masato; Kondo, Azusa; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Yoshida, Kohta; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Okada, Norihiro

    2015-04-15

    Cichlid fishes in East Africa have undergone extensive adaptive radiation, which has led to spectacular diversity in their morphology and ecology. To date, genetic linkage maps have been constructed for several tilapias (riverine), Astatotilapia burtoni (Lake Tanganyika), and hybrid lines of Lake Malawi cichlids to facilitate genome-wide comparative analyses. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map of the hybrid line of Lake Victoria cichlids, so that maps of cichlids from all the major areas of East Africa will be available. The genetic linkage map shown here is derived from the F2 progeny of an interspecific cross between Haplochromis chilotes and Haplochromis sauvagei and is based on 184 microsatellite and two single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Most of the microsatellite markers used in the present study were originally designed for other genetic linkage maps, allowing us to directly compare each linkage group (LG) among different cichlid groups. We found 25 LGs, the total length of which was 1133.2cM with an average marker spacing of about 6.09cM. Our subsequent linkage mapping analysis identified two putative sex-determining loci in cichlids. Interestingly, one of these two loci is located on cichlid LG5, on which the female heterogametic ZW locus and several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to adaptive evolution have been reported in Lake Malawi cichlids. We also found that V1R1 and V1R2, candidate genes for the fish pheromone receptor, are located very close to the recently detected sex-determining locus on cichlid LG5. The genetic linkage map study presented here may provide a valuable foundation for studying the chromosomal evolution of East African cichlids and the possible role of sex chromosomes in generating their genomic diversity. PMID:25639358

  1. Construction of a reference genetic linkage map for carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are important tools for many genetic applications including mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs), identifying DNA markers for fingerprinting, and map-based gene cloning. Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) is an important ornamental flower worldwide. We previously reported a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-based genetic linkage map derived from Dianthus capitatus ssp. andrezejowskianus and a simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based genetic linkage map constructed using data from intraspecific F2 populations; however, the number of markers was insufficient, and so the number of linkage groups (LGs) did not coincide with the number of chromosomes (x = 15). Therefore, we aimed to produce a high-density genetic map to improve its usefulness for breeding purposes and genetic research. Results We improved the SSR-based genetic linkage map using SSR markers derived from a genomic library, expression sequence tags, and RNA-seq data. Linkage analysis revealed that 412 SSR loci (including 234 newly developed SSR loci) could be mapped to 17 linkage groups (LGs) covering 969.6 cM. Comparison of five minor LGs covering less than 50 cM with LGs in our previous RAPD-based genetic map suggested that four LGs could be integrated into two LGs by anchoring common SSR loci. Consequently, the number of LGs corresponded to the number of chromosomes (x = 15). We added 192 new SSRs, eight RAPD, and two sequence-tagged site loci to refine the RAPD-based genetic linkage map, which comprised 15 LGs consisting of 348 loci covering 978.3 cM. The two maps had 125 SSR loci in common, and most of the positions of markers were conserved between them. We identified 635 loci in carnation using the two linkage maps. We also mapped QTLs for two traits (bacterial wilt resistance and anthocyanin pigmentation in the flower) and a phenotypic locus for flower-type by analyzing previously reported genotype and phenotype data. Conclusions The improved genetic

  2. Genetic analysis of genome-wide transcriptional regulation through eQTL mapping in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) mapping is a powerful tool for identifying the genetic basis of gene expression variation. Coincident genetic locations of eQTL and phenotypic QTL provide the basis for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved. Genetic analysis of expr...

  3. A high resolution genetic map anchoring scaffolds of the sequenced watermelon genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence and map the watermelon (Citrullus spp.) genome, we have constructed a high-density genetic linkage map. The map positioned 234 watermelon genome sequence scaffolds (an average size of 1.41 Mb) that cover about 330 Mb and account for 93.5% of the 353 Mb of ...

  4. Preliminary Genetic Map of Hydrangea macrophylla Using SSR Markers and a Pseudo-Testcross Strategy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a “two-way pseudo-testcross” mapping strategy in combination with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to construct a genetic map of Hydrangea macrophylla. Mapping populations were developed from reciprocal crosses between two divergent cultivars, “Bailmer” and “Veitchii”. “Bailmer”, which i...

  5. Genetic Mapping of Millions of SNPs in Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) via Whole-Genome Resequencing.

    PubMed

    Bowers, John E; Pearl, Stephanie A; Burke, John M

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assembly of complete genomes is facilitated by very high density genetic maps. We performed low-coverage, whole-genome shotgun sequencing on 96 F6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of a cross between safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) and its wild progenitor (C. palaestinus Eig). We also produced a draft genome assembly of C. tinctorius covering 866 million bp (∼two-thirds) of the expected 1.35 Gbp genome after sequencing a single, short insert library to ∼21 × depth. Sequence reads from the RILs were mapped to this genome assembly to facilitate SNP identification, and the resulting polymorphisms were used to construct a genetic map. The resulting map included 2,008,196 genetically located SNPs in 1178 unique positions. A total of 57,270 scaffolds, each containing five or more mapped SNPs, were anchored to the map. This resulted in the assignment of sequence covering 14% of the expected genome length to a genetic position. Comparison of this safflower map to genetic maps of sunflower and lettuce revealed numerous chromosomal rearrangements, and the resulting patterns were consistent with a whole-genome duplication event in the lineage leading to sunflower. This sequence-based genetic map provides a powerful tool for the assembly of a low-cost draft genome of safflower, and the same general approach is expected to work for other species. PMID:27226165

  6. Genetic Mapping of Millions of SNPs in Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) via Whole-Genome Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John E.; Pearl, Stephanie A.; Burke, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assembly of complete genomes is facilitated by very high density genetic maps. We performed low-coverage, whole-genome shotgun sequencing on 96 F6 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of a cross between safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) and its wild progenitor (C. palaestinus Eig). We also produced a draft genome assembly of C. tinctorius covering 866 million bp (∼two-thirds) of the expected 1.35 Gbp genome after sequencing a single, short insert library to ∼21 × depth. Sequence reads from the RILs were mapped to this genome assembly to facilitate SNP identification, and the resulting polymorphisms were used to construct a genetic map. The resulting map included 2,008,196 genetically located SNPs in 1178 unique positions. A total of 57,270 scaffolds, each containing five or more mapped SNPs, were anchored to the map. This resulted in the assignment of sequence covering 14% of the expected genome length to a genetic position. Comparison of this safflower map to genetic maps of sunflower and lettuce revealed numerous chromosomal rearrangements, and the resulting patterns were consistent with a whole-genome duplication event in the lineage leading to sunflower. This sequence-based genetic map provides a powerful tool for the assembly of a low-cost draft genome of safflower, and the same general approach is expected to work for other species. PMID:27226165

  7. High-resolution genetic mapping of complex traits

    SciTech Connect

    Zruglyak, L.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-05-01

    Positional cloning requires high-resolution genetic mapping. To plan a positional cloning project, one needs to know how many informative meioses will be required to narrow the search for a disease gene to an acceptably small region. For a simple Mendelian trait studied with linkage analysis, the answer is straightforward. In this paper, we address the situation of a complex trait studied with affected-relative-pair methods. We derive mathematical formulas for the size of an appropriate confidence region, as a function of the relative risk attributable to the gene. Using these results, we provide graphs showing the number of relative pairs required to narrow the gene hunt to an interval of a given size. For example, we show that localizing a gene to a 1 cM requires a median of 200 sib pairs for a locus causing a fivefold increased risk to an offspring and 700 sib pairs for a locus causing a twofold increased risk. We discuss the implications of these results for the positional cloning of genes underlying complex traits. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. High-resolution genetic mapping of complex traits.

    PubMed Central

    Kruglyak, L; Lander, E S

    1995-01-01

    Positional cloning requires high-resolution genetic mapping. To plan a positional cloning project, one needs to know how many informative meioses will be required to narrow the search for a disease gene to an acceptably small region. For a simple Mendelian trait studied with linkage analysis, the answer is straightforward. In this paper, we address the situation of a complex trait studied with affected-relative-pair methods. We derive mathematical formulas for the size of an appropriate confidence region, as a function of the relative risk attributable to the gene. Using these results, we provide graphs showing the number of relative pairs required to narrow the gene hunt to an interval of a given size. For example, we show that localizing a gene to 1 cM requires a median of 200 sib pairs for a locus causing a fivefold increased risk to an offspring and 700 sib pairs for a locus causing a twofold increased risk. We discuss the implications of these results for the positional cloning of genes underlying complex traits. PMID:7726179

  9. A genetic linkage map of the model legume Lotus japonicus and strategies for fast mapping of new loci.

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Niels; Krusell, Lene; Radutoiu, Simona; Olbryt, Magdalena; Pedrosa, Andrea; Stracke, Silke; Sato, Shusei; Kato, Tomohiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Parniske, Martin; Bachmair, Andreas; Ketelsen, Tina; Stougaard, Jens

    2002-01-01

    A genetic map for the model legume Lotus japonicus has been developed. The F(2) mapping population was established from an interspecific cross between L. japonicus and L. filicaulis. A high level of DNA polymorphism between these parents was the source of markers for linkage analysis and the map is based on a framework of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Additional markers were generated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequence-specific PCR. A total of 524 AFLP markers, 3 RAPD markers, 39 gene-specific markers, 33 microsatellite markers, and six recessive symbiotic mutant loci were mapped. This genetic map consists of six linkage groups corresponding to the six chromosomes in L. japonicus. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with selected markers aligned the linkage groups to chromosomes as described in the accompanying article by Pedrosa et al. 2002(this issue). The length of the linkage map is 367 cM and the average marker distance is 0.6 cM. Distorted segregation of markers was found in certain sections of the map and linkage group I could be assembled only by combining colormapping and cytogenetics (FISH). A fast method to position genetic loci employing three AFLP primer combinations yielding 89 markers was developed and evaluated by mapping three symbiotic loci, Ljsym1, Ljsym5, and Ljhar1-3. PMID:12196410

  10. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5 cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future. PMID:26439740

  11. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5 cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future. PMID:26439740

  12. Comparative Landscape Genetics of Three Closely Related Sympatric Hesperid Butterflies with Diverging Ecological Traits

    PubMed Central

    Engler, Jan O.; Balkenhol, Niko; Filz, Katharina J.; Habel, Jan C.; Rödder, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    To understand how landscape characteristics affect gene flow in species with diverging ecological traits, it is important to analyze taxonomically related sympatric species in the same landscape using identical methods. Here, we present such a comparative landscape genetic study involving three closely related Hesperid butterflies of the genus Thymelicus that represent a gradient of diverging ecological traits. We analyzed landscape effects on their gene flow by deriving inter-population connectivity estimates based on different species distribution models (SDMs), which were calculated from multiple landscape parameters. We then used SDM output maps to calculate circuit-theoretic connectivity estimates and statistically compared these estimates to actual genetic differentiation in each species. We based our inferences on two different analytical methods and two metrics of genetic differentiation. Results indicate that land use patterns influence population connectivity in the least mobile specialist T. acteon. In contrast, populations of the highly mobile generalist T. lineola were panmictic, lacking any landscape related effect on genetic differentiation. In the species with ecological traits in between those of the congeners, T. sylvestris, climate has a strong impact on inter-population connectivity. However, the relative importance of different landscape factors for connectivity varies when using different metrics of genetic differentiation in this species. Our results show that closely related species representing a gradient of ecological traits also show genetic structures and landscape genetic relationships that gradually change from a geographical macro- to micro-scale. Thus, the type and magnitude of landscape effects on gene flow can differ strongly even among closely related species inhabiting the same landscape, and depend on their relative degree of specialization. In addition, the use of different genetic differentiation metrics makes it possible to

  13. Efficient high-resolution genetic mapping of mouse interspersed repetitive sequence PCR products, toward integrated genetic and physical mapping of the mouse genome.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, L; Hunter, K; Schalkwyk, L; Riba, L; Anson, S; Mott, R; Newell, W; Bruley, C; Bar, I; Ramu, E

    1995-01-01

    The ability to carry out high-resolution genetic mapping at high throughput in the mouse is a critical rate-limiting step in the generation of genetically anchored contigs in physical mapping projects and the mapping of genetic loci for complex traits. To address this need, we have developed an efficient, high-resolution, large-scale genome mapping system. This system is based on the identification of polymorphic DNA sites between mouse strains by using interspersed repetitive sequence (IRS) PCR. Individual cloned IRS PCR products are hybridized to a DNA array of IRS PCR products derived from the DNA of individual mice segregating DNA sequences from the two parent strains. Since gel electrophoresis is not required, large numbers of samples can be genotyped in parallel. By using this approach, we have mapped > 450 polymorphic probes with filters containing the DNA of up to 517 backcross mice, potentially allowing resolution of 0.14 centimorgan. This approach also carries the potential for a high degree of efficiency in the integration of physical and genetic maps, since pooled DNAs representing libraries of yeast artificial chromosomes or other physical representations of the mouse genome can be addressed by hybridization of filter representations of the IRS PCR products of such libraries. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777502

  14. Gene-Based Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Genetic and Association Mapping in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In common bean, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are an underestimated source of gene-based markers such as insertion-deletions (Indels) or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, due to the nature of these conserved sequences, detection of markers is difficult and portrays low levels of polymorphism. Therefore, development of intron-spanning EST-SNP markers can be a valuable resource for genetic experiments such as genetic mapping and association studies. Results In this study, a total of 313 new gene-based markers were developed at target genes. Intronic variation was deeply explored in order to capture more polymorphism. Introns were putatively identified after comparing the common bean ESTs with the soybean genome, and the primers were designed over intron-flanking regions. The intronic regions were evaluated for parental polymorphisms using the single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique and Sequenom MassARRAY system. A total of 53 new marker loci were placed on an integrated molecular map in the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. The new linkage map was used to build a consensus map, merging the linkage maps of the BAT93 × JALO EEP558 and DOR364 × BAT477 populations. A total of 1,060 markers were mapped, with a total map length of 2,041 cM across 11 linkage groups. As a second application of the generated resource, a diversity panel with 93 genotypes was evaluated with 173 SNP markers using the MassARRAY-platform and KASPar technology. These results were coupled with previous SSR evaluations and drought tolerance assays carried out on the same individuals. This agglomerative dataset was examined, in order to discover marker-trait associations, using general linear model (GLM) and mixed linear model (MLM). Some significant associations with yield components were identified, and were consistent with previous findings. Conclusions In short, this study illustrates the power of intron

  15. Mapping genes of complex psychiatric diseases in Daghestan genetic isolates.

    PubMed

    Bulayeva, Kazima B; Leal, Suzanne M; Pavlova, Tatiana A; Kurbanov, Ruslan M; Glatt, Stephen J; Bulayev, Oleg A; Tsuang, Ming T

    2005-01-01

    Genetic isolates, which provide outstanding opportunities for identification of susceptibility genes for complex diseases, can be classified as primary (having an ancient demographic history in a stable environment) or secondary (having a younger demographic history) Neel [1992: Minority populations: Genetics, demography, and health, pp. 1-13]. Daghestan contains 26 out of 50 indigenous Caucasus ethnicities that have been in existence for hundreds of generations in the same highland region. The ethnic groups are subdivided into numerous primary isolates. The founder effect and gene drift in these primary isolates may have caused aggregation of specific haplotypes with limited numbers of pathogenic alleles and loci in some isolates relative to others. These are expressed as inter-population differences in lifetime prevalence and features of certain complex clinical phenotypes and in patterns of genetic linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD). Stable highland and ethnic-cultural environments have led to increased penetrance and a reduced number of phenocopies, which typically hamper the identification of any susceptibility genes for complex diseases. Owing to these characteristics of the primary isolates, a comparative linkage study in the primary isolates allows us to define the number of susceptibility genes for any complex disease and to identify the source of variability and non-replication of linkage analysis results. As part of an ongoing study, seven extended schizophrenia and one nonspecific mental retardation kindreds have been ascertained from Daghestan isolates. Lifetime morbid risk for schizophrenia in the isolates varied from 0 to 5%. A genome scan with markers spaced 10 cM apart was carried out on these pedigrees and linkage analysis was performed using descent graph methods, as implemented in Simwalk2. To identify regions containing susceptibility genes within these kindreds, we followed up those regions with non-parametric and parametric linkage

  16. Genetic analysis of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum (Panicoidae) and comparative genetics with rice (Oryzoidae)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Dong; Kong, Wenqian; Robertson, Jon; Goff, Valorie H; Epps, Ethan; Kerr, Alexandra; Mills, Gabriel; Cromwell, Jay; Lugin, Yelena; Phillips, Christine; et al

    2015-12-01

    Domestication has played an important role in shaping characteristics of the inflorescence and plant height in cultivated cereals. Taking advantage of meta-analysis of QTLs, phylogenetic analyses in 502 diverse sorghum accessions, GWAS in a sorghum association panel (n = 354) and comparative data, we provide insight into the genetic basis of the domestication traits in sorghum and rice. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 6 traits related to inflorescence morphology and 6 traits related to plant height in sorghum, comparing the genomic regions implicated in these traits by GWAS and QTL mapping, respectively. In a search for signatures ofmore » selection, we identify genomic regions that may contribute to sorghum domestication regarding plant height, flowering time and pericarp color. Comparative studies across taxa show functionally conserved ‘hotspots’ in sorghum and rice for awn presence and pericarp color that do not appear to reflect corresponding single genes but may indicate co-regulated clusters of genes. We also reveal homoeologous regions retaining similar functions for plant height and flowering time since genome duplication an estimated 70 million years ago or more in a common ancestor of cereals. In most such homoeologous QTL pairs, only one QTL interval exhibits strong selection signals in modern sorghum. Intersections among QTL, GWAS and comparative data advance knowledge of genetic determinants of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum, and add new dimensions to comparisons between sorghum and rice.« less

  17. Genetic analysis of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum (Panicoidae) and comparative genetics with rice (Oryzoidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dong; Kong, Wenqian; Robertson, Jon; Goff, Valorie H; Epps, Ethan; Kerr, Alexandra; Mills, Gabriel; Cromwell, Jay; Lugin, Yelena; Phillips, Christine; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-12-01

    Domestication has played an important role in shaping characteristics of the inflorescence and plant height in cultivated cereals. Taking advantage of meta-analysis of QTLs, phylogenetic analyses in 502 diverse sorghum accessions, GWAS in a sorghum association panel (n = 354) and comparative data, we provide insight into the genetic basis of the domestication traits in sorghum and rice. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 6 traits related to inflorescence morphology and 6 traits related to plant height in sorghum, comparing the genomic regions implicated in these traits by GWAS and QTL mapping, respectively. In a search for signatures of selection, we identify genomic regions that may contribute to sorghum domestication regarding plant height, flowering time and pericarp color. Comparative studies across taxa show functionally conserved ‘hotspots’ in sorghum and rice for awn presence and pericarp color that do not appear to reflect corresponding single genes but may indicate co-regulated clusters of genes. We also reveal homoeologous regions retaining similar functions for plant height and flowering time since genome duplication an estimated 70 million years ago or more in a common ancestor of cereals. In most such homoeologous QTL pairs, only one QTL interval exhibits strong selection signals in modern sorghum. Intersections among QTL, GWAS and comparative data advance knowledge of genetic determinants of inflorescence and plant height components in sorghum, and add new dimensions to comparisons between sorghum and rice.

  18. Genetic Linkage Map Construction and QTL Analysis of Two Interspecific Reproductive Isolation Traits in Sponge Gourd.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibin; He, Xiaoli; Gong, Hao; Luo, Shaobo; Li, Mingzhu; Chen, Junqiu; Zhang, Changyuan; Yu, Ting; Huang, Wangping; Luo, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    The hybrids between Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb. and L.cylindrica (L.) Roem. have strong heterosis effects. However, some reproductive isolation traits hindered their normal hybridization and fructification, which was mainly caused by the flowering time and hybrid pollen sterility. In order to study the genetic basis of two interspecific reproductive isolation traits, we constructed a genetic linkage map using an F2 population derived from a cross between S1174 [L. acutangula (L.) Roxb.] and 93075 [L. cylindrica (L.) Roem.]. The map spans 1436.12 CentiMorgans (cM), with an average of 8.11 cM among markers, and consists of 177 EST-SSR markers distributed in 14 linkage groups (LG) with an average of 102.58 cM per LG. Meanwhile, we conducted colinearity analysis between the sequences of EST-SSR markers and the genomic sequences of cucumber, melon and watermelon. On the basis of genetic linkage map, we conducted QTL mapping of two reproductive isolation traits in sponge gourd, which were the flowering time and hybrid male sterility. Two putative QTLs associated with flowering time (FT) were both detected on LG 1. The accumulated contribution of these two QTLs explained 38.07% of the total phenotypic variance (PV), and each QTL explained 15.36 and 22.71% of the PV respectively. Four QTLs for pollen fertility (PF) were identified on LG 1 (qPF1.1 and qPF1.2), LG 3 (qPF3) and LG 7 (qPF7), respectively. The percentage of PF explained by these QTLs varied from 2.91 to 16.79%, and all together the four QTLs accounted for 39.98% of the total PV. Our newly developed EST-SSR markers and linkage map are very useful for gene mapping, comparative genomics and molecular marker-assisted breeding. These QTLs for interspecific reproductive isolation will also contribute to the cloning of genes relating to interspecific reproductive isolation and the utilization of interspecific heterosis in sponge gourd in further studies. PMID:27458467

  19. Genetic Linkage Map Construction and QTL Analysis of Two Interspecific Reproductive Isolation Traits in Sponge Gourd

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haibin; He, Xiaoli; Gong, Hao; Luo, Shaobo; Li, Mingzhu; Chen, Junqiu; Zhang, Changyuan; Yu, Ting; Huang, Wangping; Luo, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    The hybrids between Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb. and L.cylindrica (L.) Roem. have strong heterosis effects. However, some reproductive isolation traits hindered their normal hybridization and fructification, which was mainly caused by the flowering time and hybrid pollen sterility. In order to study the genetic basis of two interspecific reproductive isolation traits, we constructed a genetic linkage map using an F2 population derived from a cross between S1174 [L. acutangula (L.) Roxb.] and 93075 [L. cylindrica (L.) Roem.]. The map spans 1436.12 CentiMorgans (cM), with an average of 8.11 cM among markers, and consists of 177 EST-SSR markers distributed in 14 linkage groups (LG) with an average of 102.58 cM per LG. Meanwhile, we conducted colinearity analysis between the sequences of EST-SSR markers and the genomic sequences of cucumber, melon and watermelon. On the basis of genetic linkage map, we conducted QTL mapping of two reproductive isolation traits in sponge gourd, which were the flowering time and hybrid male sterility. Two putative QTLs associated with flowering time (FT) were both detected on LG 1. The accumulated contribution of these two QTLs explained 38.07% of the total phenotypic variance (PV), and each QTL explained 15.36 and 22.71% of the PV respectively. Four QTLs for pollen fertility (PF) were identified on LG 1 (qPF1.1 and qPF1.2), LG 3 (qPF3) and LG 7 (qPF7), respectively. The percentage of PF explained by these QTLs varied from 2.91 to 16.79%, and all together the four QTLs accounted for 39.98% of the total PV. Our newly developed EST-SSR markers and linkage map are very useful for gene mapping, comparative genomics and molecular marker-assisted breeding. These QTLs for interspecific reproductive isolation will also contribute to the cloning of genes relating to interspecific reproductive isolation and the utilization of interspecific heterosis in sponge gourd in further studies. PMID:27458467

  20. Comparative RNA sequencing reveals substantial genetic variation in endangered primates

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Melsted, Páll; Marioni, John C.; Wang, Ying; Bainer, Russell; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Michelini, Katelyn; Zehr, Sarah; Yoder, Anne D.; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Gilad, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genomic studies in primates have yielded important insights into the evolutionary forces that shape genetic diversity and revealed the likely genetic basis for certain species-specific adaptations. To date, however, these studies have focused on only a small number of species. For the majority of nonhuman primates, including some of the most critically endangered, genome-level data are not yet available. In this study, we have taken the first steps toward addressing this gap by sequencing RNA from the livers of multiple individuals from each of 16 mammalian species, including humans and 11 nonhuman primates. Of the nonhuman primate species, five are lemurs and two are lorisoids, for which little or no genomic data were previously available. To analyze these data, we developed a method for de novo assembly and alignment of orthologous gene sequences across species. We assembled an average of 5721 gene sequences per species and characterized diversity and divergence of both gene sequences and gene expression levels. We identified patterns of variation that are consistent with the action of positive or directional selection, including an 18-fold enrichment of peroxisomal genes among genes whose regulation likely evolved under directional selection in the ancestral primate lineage. Importantly, we found no relationship between genetic diversity and endangered status, with the two most endangered species in our study, the black and white ruffed lemur and the Coquerel's sifaka, having the highest genetic diversity among all primates. Our observations imply that many endangered lemur populations still harbor considerable genetic variation. Timely efforts to conserve these species alongside their habitats have, therefore, strong potential to achieve long-term success. PMID:22207615

  1. Physical mapping of genetic markers on the short arm of chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, M.; Goodart, S.A.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-12-01

    The deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 is associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. In addition, loss of this portion of a chromosome is a common cytogenetic marker in a number of malignancies. However, to date, no genes associated with these disorders have been identified. Physical maps are the first step in isolating causative genes, and genes involved in autosomal recessive disorders are now routinely mapped through the identification of linked markers. Extensive genetic maps based upon polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) have provided researchers with a large number of markers to which such disorders can be genetically mapped. However, the physical locations of many of these STRs have not been determined. Toward the goal of integrating the human genetic maps with the physical maps, a 5p somatic cell hybrid deletion mapping panel that was derived from patients with 5p deletions or translocations was used to physically map 47 STRs that have been used to construct genetic maps of 5p. These data will be useful in the localization of disease genes that map to 5p and may be involved in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. 26 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Genetic, Physical, Maps, and Database Resources for Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resources for maize genetics and genomics exist in great depth and breadth. They can be brought to bear on its productivity, on selected properties, and on studies of genetic functions, mechanisms of inheritance, phylogeny, and processes of change during domestication. Genetic materials available ...

  3. An annotated genetic map of loblolly pine based on microsatellite and cDNA markers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genetic linkage maps have been based on a variety of DNA polymorphisms, such as AFLPs, RAPDs, RFLPs, and ESTPs, but only a few SSRs (simple sequence repeats), also known as simple tandem repeats or microsatellites, have been mapped in P. taeda. The objective of this study was to integrate a large set of SSR markers from a variety of sources and published cDNA markers into a composite P. taeda genetic map constructed from two reference mapping pedigrees. A dense genetic map that incorporates SSR loci will benefit complete pine genome sequencing, pine population genetics studies, and pine breeding programs. Careful marker annotation using a variety of references further enhances the utility of the integrated SSR map. Results The updated P. taeda genetic map, with an estimated genome coverage of 1,515 cM(Kosambi) across 12 linkage groups, incorporated 170 new SSR markers and 290 previously reported SSR, RFLP, and ESTP markers. The average marker interval was 3.1 cM. Of 233 mapped SSR loci, 84 were from cDNA-derived sequences (EST-SSRs) and 149 were from non-transcribed genomic sequences (genomic-SSRs). Of all 311 mapped cDNA-derived markers, 77% were associated with NCBI Pta UniGene clusters, 67% with RefSeq proteins, and 62% with functional Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Duplicate (i.e., redundant accessory) and paralogous markers were tentatively identified by evaluating marker sequences by their UniGene cluster IDs, clone IDs, and relative map positions. The average gene diversity, He, among polymorphic SSR loci, including those that were not mapped, was 0.43 for 94 EST-SSRs and 0.72 for 83 genomic-SSRs. The genetic map can be viewed and queried at http://www.conifergdb.org/pinemap. Conclusions Many polymorphic and genetically mapped SSR markers are now available for use in P. taeda population genetics, studies of adaptive traits, and various germplasm management applications. Annotating mapped genes with Uni

  4. A negative genetic interaction map in isogenic cancer cell lines reveals cancer cell vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Arnold, Roland; Vizeacoumar, Frederick S; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Buzina, Alla; Young, Jordan T F; Kwan, Julian H M; Sayad, Azin; Mero, Patricia; Lawo, Steffen; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Brown, Kevin R; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Mak, Anthony B; Fedyshyn, Yaroslav; Wang, Yadong; Brito, Glauber C; Kasimer, Dahlia; Makhnevych, Taras; Ketela, Troy; Datti, Alessandro; Babu, Mohan; Emili, Andrew; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeff; Wainberg, Zev; Kim, Philip M; Rottapel, Robert; O'Brien, Catherine A; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Moffat, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Improved efforts are necessary to define the functional product of cancer mutations currently being revealed through large-scale sequencing efforts. Using genome-scale pooled shRNA screening technology, we mapped negative genetic interactions across a set of isogenic cancer cell lines and confirmed hundreds of these interactions in orthogonal co-culture competition assays to generate a high-confidence genetic interaction network of differentially essential or differential essentiality (DiE) genes. The network uncovered examples of conserved genetic interactions, densely connected functional modules derived from comparative genomics with model systems data, functions for uncharacterized genes in the human genome and targetable vulnerabilities. Finally, we demonstrate a general applicability of DiE gene signatures in determining genetic dependencies of other non-isogenic cancer cell lines. For example, the PTEN−/− DiE genes reveal a signature that can preferentially classify PTEN-dependent genotypes across a series of non-isogenic cell lines derived from the breast, pancreas and ovarian cancers. Our reference network suggests that many cancer vulnerabilities remain to be discovered through systematic derivation of a network of differentially essential genes in an isogenic cancer cell model. PMID:24104479

  5. Construction of a genetic map based on high-throughput SNP genotyping and genetic mapping of a TuMV resistance locus in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee; Jeong, Young-Min; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Seong; Chung, Won-Hyong; Yu, Hee-Ju

    2014-04-01

    Brassica rapa is a member of the Brassicaceae family and includes vegetables and oil crops that are cultivated worldwide. The introduction of durable resistance against turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) into agronomically important cultivars has been a significant challenge for genetic and horticultural breeding studies of B. rapa. Based on our previous genome-wide analysis of DNA polymorphisms between the TuMV-resistant doubled haploid (DH) line VC40 and the TuMV-susceptible DH line SR5, we constructed a core genetic map of the VCS-13M DH population, which is composed of 83 individuals derived from microspore cultures of a F1 cross between VC40 and SR5, by analyzing the segregation of 314 sequence-characterized genetic markers. The genetic markers correspond to 221 SNPs and 31 InDels of genes as well as 62 SSRs, covering 1,115.9 cM with an average distance of 3.6 cM between the adjacent marker loci. The alignment and orientation of the constructed map showed good agreement with the draft genome sequence of Chiifu, thus providing an efficient strategy to map genic sequences. Using the genetic map, a novel dominant TuMV resistance locus (TuMV-R) in the VCS-13M DH population was identified as a 0.34 Mb region in the short arm of chromosome A6 in which four CC-NBS-LRR resistance genes and two pathogenesis-related-1 genes reside. The genetic map developed in this study can play an important role in the genetic study of TuMV resistance and the molecular breeding of B. rapa. PMID:24326528

  6. Efficient and Accurate Construction of Genetic Linkage Maps from the Minimum Spanning Tree of a Graph

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yonghui; Bhat, Prasanna R.; Close, Timothy J.; Lonardi, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are cornerstones of a wide spectrum of biotechnology applications, including map-assisted breeding, association genetics, and map-assisted gene cloning. During the past several years, the adoption of high-throughput genotyping technologies has been paralleled by a substantial increase in the density and diversity of genetic markers. New genetic mapping algorithms are needed in order to efficiently process these large datasets and accurately construct high-density genetic maps. In this paper, we introduce a novel algorithm to order markers on a genetic linkage map. Our method is based on a simple yet fundamental mathematical property that we prove under rather general assumptions. The validity of this property allows one to determine efficiently the correct order of markers by computing the minimum spanning tree of an associated graph. Our empirical studies obtained on genotyping data for three mapping populations of barley (Hordeum vulgare), as well as extensive simulations on synthetic data, show that our algorithm consistently outperforms the best available methods in the literature, particularly when the input data are noisy or incomplete. The software implementing our algorithm is available in the public domain as a web tool under the name MSTmap. PMID:18846212

  7. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Svetlana A.; Perelman, Polina L.; Trifonov, Vladimir A.; Serdyukova, Natalia A.; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O’Brien, Patricia C. M.; Ng, Bee L.; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S.; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents. PMID:26010445

  8. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Perelman, Polina L; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Serdyukova, Natalia A; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ng, Bee L; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents. PMID:26010445

  9. Construction of a high-density high-resolution genetic map and its integration with BAC-based physical map in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Construction of genetic linkage map is essential for genetic and genomic studies. Recent advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies made it possible to generate high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage maps, especially for the organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the pre...

  10. An intervarietal genetic linkage map of Indian bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and QTL maps for some metric traits.

    PubMed

    Nalini, E; Bhagwat, S G; Jawali, N

    2007-06-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) exhibits very narrow genetic diversity and hence there is high relatedness among cultivated varieties. However, a population generated from an intervarietal cross, with the parents differing in a large number of traits, could lead to the generation of QTL maps which will be useful in practice. In this report a genetic linkage map of wheat is constructed using a cross between two Indian bread wheat varieties: Sonalika and Kalyansona. The linkage map consisted of 236 markers and spanned a distance of 3639 cM, with 1211.2 cM for the A genome, 1669.2 cM for the B genome, 192.4 cM for the D genome and 566.2 cM for unassigned groups. Linkage analysis defined 37 linkage groups of which 24 were assigned to 17 chromosomes. The genetic map was used to identify QTLs by composite internal mapping (CIM) for three metric traits, viz. culm length (CL), flag leaf length (FLL) and flag leaf breadth (FLB). Of 25 QTLs identified in this study, 15 have not been reported previously. Multitrait CIM (MCIM) analysis was carried out for traits that were significantly correlated such as FLB-FLL and CL-FLB-FLL. Detection of a large number of QTLs for the three traits analysed suggests that in parent cultivars that are not too diverse, the differences at genetic level detected as polymorphisms may be mostly associated with QTLs for the observed differences. PMID:17894910

  11. AN OPEN-SOURCE FIRST-GENERATION MOLECULAR GENETIC MAP FROM A SUGAR X TABLE BEET CROSS AND ITS EXTENSION TO PHYSICAL MAPPING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sugar beet, many linkage maps have been constructed, but the availability of markers continues to limit utility of genetic maps in public domain programs. Here a framework genetic map is presented that is expandable and transferable to research programs interested in locating their markers on a c...

  12. Construction of an AFLP genetic map with nearly complete genome coverage in Pinus taeda.

    PubMed

    Remington, D L; Whetten, R W; Liu, B H; O'Malley, D M

    1999-06-01

    De novo construction of complete genetic linkage maps requires large mapping populations, large numbers of genetic markers, and efficient algorithms for ordering markers and evaluating order confidence. We constructed a complete genetic map of an individual loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers segregating in haploid megagametophytes and PGRI mapping software. We generated 521 polymorphic fragments from 21 AFLP primer pairs. A total of 508 fragments mapped to 12 linkage groups, which is equal to the Pinus haploid chromosome number. Bootstrap locus order matrices and recombination matrices generated by PGRI were used to select 184 framework markers that could be ordered confidently. Order support was also evaluated using log likelihood criteria in MAPMAKER. Optimal marker orders from PGRI and MAPMAKER were identical, but the implied reliability of orders differed greatly. The framework map provides nearly complete coverage of the genome, estimated at approximately 1700 cM in length using a modified estimator. This map should provide a useful framework for merging existing loblolly pine maps and adding multiallelic markers as they become available. Map coverage with dominant markers in both linkage phases will make the map useful for subsequent quantitative trait locus mapping in families derived by self-pollination. PMID:12238515

  13. A Genetic Map Between Gossypium hirsutum and the Brazilian Endemic G. mustelinum and Its Application to QTL Mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baohua; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Dong; Zhuang, Zhimin; Guo, Hui; Qiao, Xin; Wei, Lijuan; Rong, Junkang; May, O Lloyd; Paterson, Andrew H; Chee, Peng W

    2016-01-01

    Among the seven tetraploid cotton species, little is known about transmission genetics and genome organization in Gossypium mustelinum, the species most distant from the source of most cultivated cotton, G. hirsutum In this research, an F2 population was developed from an interspecific cross between G. hirsutum and G. mustelinum (HM). A genetic linkage map was constructed mainly using simple sequence repeat (SSRs) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) DNA markers. The arrangements of most genetic loci along the HM chromosomes were identical to those of other tetraploid cotton species. However, both major and minor structural rearrangements were also observed, for which we propose a parsimony-based model for structural divergence of tetraploid cottons from common ancestors. Sequences of mapped markers were used for alignment with the 26 scaffolds of the G. hirsutum draft genome, and showed high consistency. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of fiber elongation in advanced backcross populations derived from the same parents demonstrated the value of the HM map. The HM map will serve as a valuable resource for QTL mapping and introgression of G. mustelinum alleles into G. hirsutum, and help clarify evolutionary relationships between the tetraploid cotton genomes. PMID:27172208

  14. A Genetic Map Between Gossypium hirsutum and the Brazilian Endemic G. mustelinum and Its Application to QTL Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baohua; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Dong; Zhuang, Zhimin; Guo, Hui; Qiao, Xin; Wei, Lijuan; Rong, Junkang; May, O. Lloyd; Paterson, Andrew H.; Chee, Peng W.

    2016-01-01

    Among the seven tetraploid cotton species, little is known about transmission genetics and genome organization in Gossypium mustelinum, the species most distant from the source of most cultivated cotton, G. hirsutum. In this research, an F2 population was developed from an interspecific cross between G. hirsutum and G. mustelinum (HM). A genetic linkage map was constructed mainly using simple sequence repeat (SSRs) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) DNA markers. The arrangements of most genetic loci along the HM chromosomes were identical to those of other tetraploid cotton species. However, both major and minor structural rearrangements were also observed, for which we propose a parsimony-based model for structural divergence of tetraploid cottons from common ancestors. Sequences of mapped markers were used for alignment with the 26 scaffolds of the G. hirsutum draft genome, and showed high consistency. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of fiber elongation in advanced backcross populations derived from the same parents demonstrated the value of the HM map. The HM map will serve as a valuable resource for QTL mapping and introgression of G. mustelinum alleles into G. hirsutum, and help clarify evolutionary relationships between the tetraploid cotton genomes. PMID:27172208

  15. Strategy Maps in University Management: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Shuangmiao; Zhong, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the conceptual use of the strategy map approach and the strategy map which it produces have been adapted from the business sector and introduced as tools for achieving more effective strategic planning and management in higher education institutions (HEIs). This study discusses the development of strategy maps as transformational…

  16. Genome Wide SSR High Density Genetic Map Construction from an Interspecific Cross of Gossypium hirsutum × Gossypium tomentosum

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad K. R.; Chen, Haodong; Zhou, Zhongli; Ilyas, Muhammad K.; Wang, Xingxing; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunying; Liu, Fang; Wang, Kunbo

    2016-01-01

    A high density genetic map was constructed using F2 population derived from an interspecific cross of G. hirsutum × G. tomentosum. The map consisted of 3093 marker loci distributed across all the 26 chromosomes and covered 4365.3 cM of cotton genome with an average inter-marker distance of 1.48 cM. The maximum length of chromosome was 218.38 cM and the minimum was 122.09 cM with an average length of 167.90 cM. A sub-genome covers more genetic distance (2189.01 cM) with an average inter loci distance of 1.53 cM than D sub-genome which covers a length of 2176.29 cM with an average distance of 1.43 cM. There were 716 distorted loci in the map accounting for 23.14% and most distorted loci were distributed on D sub-genome (25.06%), which were more than on A sub-genome (21.23%). In our map 49 segregation hotspots (SDR) were distributed across the genome with more on D sub-genome as compared to A genome. Two post-polyploidization reciprocal translocations of “A2/A3 and A4/A5” were suggested by seven pairs of duplicate loci. The map constructed through these studies is one of the three densest genetic maps in cotton however; this is the first dense genome wide SSR interspecific genetic map between G. hirsutum and G. tomentosum. PMID:27148280

  17. Reliable In Silico Identification of Sequence Polymorphisms and Their Application for Extending the Genetic Map of Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Holtgräwe, Daniela; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Viehöver, Prisca; Schneider, Jessica; Schulz, Britta; Borchardt, Dietrich; Kraft, Thomas; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers are a highly valuable tool for creating genetic maps. Like in many other crops, sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) breeding is increasingly supported by the application of such genetic markers. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers have a high potential for automated analysis and high-throughput genotyping. We developed a bioinformatics workflow that uses Sanger and 2nd-generation sequence data for detection, evaluation and verification of new transcript-associated SNPs from sugar beet. RNAseq data from one parent of an established mapping population were produced by 454-FLX sequencing and compared to Sanger ESTs derived from the other parent. The workflow established for SNP detection considers the quality values of both types of reads, provides polymorphic alignments as well as selection criteria for reliable SNP detection and allows painless generation of new genetic markers within genes. We obtained a total of 14,323 genic SNPs and InDels. According to empirically optimised settings for the quality parameters, we classified these SNPs into four usability categories. Validation of a subset of the in silico detected SNPs by genotyping the mapping population indicated a high success rate of the SNP detection. Finally, a total of 307 new markers were integrated with existing data into a new genetic map of sugar beet which offers improved resolution and the integration of terminal markers. PMID:25302600

  18. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  19. Genetic Linkage Maps of Eucalyptus Grandis and Eucalyptus Urophylla Using a Pseudo-Testcross: Mapping Strategy and Rapd Markers

    PubMed Central

    Grattapaglia, D.; Sederoff, R.

    1994-01-01

    We have used a ``two-way pseudo-testcross'' mapping strategy in combination with the random amplified polymorhic DNA (RAPD) assay to construct two moderate density genetic linkage maps for species of Eucalyptus. In the cross between two heterozygous individuals many single-dose RAPD markers will be heterozygous in one parent, null in the other and therefore segregate 1:1 in their F(1) progeny following a testcross configuration. Meiosis and gametic segregation in each individual can be directly and efficiently analyzed using RAPD markers. We screened 305 primers of arbitrary sequence, and selected 151 to amplify a total of 558 markers. These markers were grouped at LOD 5.0, θ = 0.25, resulting in the maternal Eucalyptus grandis map having a total of 240 markers into 14 linkage groups (1552 cM) and the paternal Eucalyptus urophylla map with 251 markers in 11 linkage groups (1101 cM) (n = 11 in Eucalyptus). Framework maps ordered with a likelihood support >/=1000:1 were assembled covering 95% of the estimated genome size in both individuals. Characterization of genome complexity of a sample of 48 mapped random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers indicate that 53% amplify from low copy regions. These are the first reported high coverage linkage maps for any species of Eucalyptus and among the first for any hardwood tree species. We propose the combined use of RAPD markers and the pseudo-testcross configuration as a general strategy for the construction of single individual genetic linkage maps in outbred forest trees as well as in any highly heterozygous sexually reproducing living organism. A survey of the occurrence of RAPD markers in different individuals suggests that the pseudo-testcross/RAPD mapping strategy should also be efficient at the intraspecific level and increasingly so with crosses of genetically divergent individuals. The ability to quickly construct single-tree genetic linkage maps in any forest species opens the way for a shift from the

  20. A genetic linkage map of Brassica carinata constructed with a doubled haploid population.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaomin; Zou, Jun; Li, Ruiyan; Long, Yan; Chen, Sheng; Meng, Jinling

    2012-10-01

    Brassica carinata is an important oilseed crop with unique favourable traits that are desirable for other Brassica crops. However, given the limited research into genetic resources in B. carinata, knowledge of the genetic structure of this species is relatively poor. Nine homozygous, genetically distinct accessions of B. carinata were obtained via microspore culture, from which two divergent doubled haploid (DH) lines were used to develop a DH mapping population that consisted of 183 lines. The mapping population showed segregation of multiple traits of interest. A genetic map was constructed with PCR-based markers, and a total of 212 loci, which covered 1,703 cM, were assigned to eight linkage groups in the B genome and nine linkage groups in the C genome, which allowed comparison with genetic maps of other important Brassica species that contain the B/C genome(s). Loci for two Mendelian-inherited traits related to pigmentation (petal and anther tip colour) and one quantitative trait (seed coat colour) were identified using the linkage map. The significance of the mapping population in the context of genetic improvement of Brassica crops is discussed. PMID:22669300

  1. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cabannes, Delphine; Clément, Aurélien; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG), and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens. PMID:26921302

  2. Genetic map of the human pseudoautosomal region reveals a high rate of recombination in female meiosis at the Xp telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, A.; Fischer, C.; Rappold, G.A. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes the genetic map of the pseudoautosomal region bounded by the telomere of the short arms of the X and Y chromosomes. In males, meiotic exchange on Xp/Yp is confined to this region, leading to highly elevated recombination rates. The map was constructed using 11 pseudoautosomal probes (six of which are new) and typing individuals from 38 CEPH families. All markers have been physically mapped, thus providing the opportunity to compare genetic distance to physical distance through all intervals of the map. This comparison reveals an unexpected high rate of recombination in female meiosis between loci DXYS20 and DXYS78, within 20-80 kb from the telomere. Within this telemore-adjacent region no differences in male and female recombination rates are seen. Furthermore, data from this genetic map support the hypothesis of a linear gradient of recombination across most of the region in male meiosis and provide densely spaced anchor points for linkage studies especially in the telomeric portion of the pseudoautosomal region. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cabannes, Delphine; Clément, Aurélien; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG), and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus. The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens. PMID:26921302

  4. An SSR-based genetic map of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) serves as an anchor for the alignment of major pepper maps

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Yutaka; Inoue, Takahiro; Minamiyama, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Nakao

    2012-01-01

    Of the Capsicum peppers (Capsicum spp.), cultivated C. annuum is the most commercially important, but has lacked an intraspecific linkage map based on sequence-specific PCR markers in accord with haploid chromosome numbers. We constructed a linkage map of pepper using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between two C. annuum genotypes, a bell-type cultivar ‘California Wonder’ and a Malaysian small-fruited cultivar ‘LS2341 (JP187992)’, which is used as a source of resistance to bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum). A set of 253 markers (151 SSRs, 90 AFLPs, 10 CAPSs and 2 sequence-tagged sites) was on the map which we constructed, spanning 1,336 cM. This is the first SSR-based map to consist of 12 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number in an intraspecific cross of C. annuum. As this map has a lot of PCR-based anchor markers, it is easy to compare it to other pepper genetic maps. Therefore, this map and the newly developed markers will be useful for cultivated C. annuum breeding. PMID:23136519

  5. An SSR-based genetic map of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) serves as an anchor for the alignment of major pepper maps.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Yutaka; Inoue, Takahiro; Minamiyama, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Nakao

    2012-03-01

    Of the Capsicum peppers (Capsicum spp.), cultivated C. annuum is the most commercially important, but has lacked an intraspecific linkage map based on sequence-specific PCR markers in accord with haploid chromosome numbers. We constructed a linkage map of pepper using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between two C. annuum genotypes, a bell-type cultivar 'California Wonder' and a Malaysian small-fruited cultivar 'LS2341 (JP187992)', which is used as a source of resistance to bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum). A set of 253 markers (151 SSRs, 90 AFLPs, 10 CAPSs and 2 sequence-tagged sites) was on the map which we constructed, spanning 1,336 cM. This is the first SSR-based map to consist of 12 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number in an intraspecific cross of C. annuum. As this map has a lot of PCR-based anchor markers, it is easy to compare it to other pepper genetic maps. Therefore, this map and the newly developed markers will be useful for cultivated C. annuum breeding. PMID:23136519

  6. Genetic Analyses Reveal Functions for MAP2K3 and MAP2K6 in Mouse Testis Determination.

    PubMed

    Warr, Nick; Siggers, Pam; Carré, Gwenn-Aël; Wells, Sara; Greenfield, Andy

    2016-05-01

    Testis determination in mammals is initiated by expression of SRY in somatic cells of the embryonic gonad. Genetic analyses in the mouse have revealed a requirement for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in testis determination: targeted loss of the kinases MAP3K4 and p38 MAPK causes complete XY embryonic gonadal sex reversal. These kinases occupy positions at the top and bottom level, respectively, in the canonical three-tier MAPK-signaling cascade: MAP3K, MAP2K, MAPK. To date, no role in sex determination has been attributed to a MAP2K, although such a function is predicted to exist. Here, we report roles for the kinases MAP2K3 and MAP2K6 in testis determination. C57BL/6J (B6) embryos lacking MAP2K3 exhibited no significant abnormalities of testis development, whilst those lacking MAP2K6 exhibited a minor delay in testis determination. Compound mutants lacking three out of four functional alleles at the two loci also exhibited delayed testis determination and transient ovotestis formation as a consequence, suggestive of partially redundant roles for these kinases in testis determination. Early lethality of double-knockout embryos precludes analysis of sexual development. To reveal their roles in testis determination more clearly, we generated Map2k mutant B6 embryos using a weaker Sry allele (Sry(AKR)). Loss of Map2k3 on this highly sensitized background exacerbates ovotestis development, whilst loss of Map2k6 results in complete XY gonadal sex reversal associated with reduction of Sry expression at 11.25 days postcoitum. Our data suggest that MAP2K6 functions in mouse testis determination, via positive effects on Sry, and also indicate a minor role for MAP2K3. PMID:27009039

  7. An SSR-Based Genetic Linkage Map of the Model Grass Brachypodium distachyon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The grass species Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) has been adopted as a model system for grasses. While many genome resources are being developed, genetic resources will be essential to make full use of this model. Here, we describe the first molecular map of diploid Brachypodium. The genetic...

  8. Genetic Analysis of Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation through eQTL Mapping in Soy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variation in gene transcript accumulation levels can be measured to map underlying expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL). Coincident genetic locations of eQTL and phenotypic QTL provide the basis for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved. Genetic analysis of expression trait...

  9. An Integrated Genetic and Cytogenetic Map of the Cucumber Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cucurbitaceae includes important crops as cucumber, melon, watermelon, and squash and pumpkin. However, few genetic and genomic resources are available for plant improvement. Some cucurbit species such as cucumber have a narrow genetic base, which impedes construction of saturated molecular li...

  10. Mapping Malus sieversii: A valuable genetic resource for apple breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit has established a collection of Malus from around the world in order to preserve and develop genetic resources important to the apple industry. Among this collection is Malus sieversii, the main progenitor of the domestic apple, collected from Central Asia ...

  11. Creating a genetic framework map for Malus sieversii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to preserve and develop genetic resources important to the apple industry, the USDA-ARS Plant Genetic Resources Unit has established a globally representative collection of Malus. Malus sieversii, the main progenitor of the domestic apple collected from Central Asia (Khazakhstan), is among...

  12. An annotated genetic map of loblolly pine based on microsatellite and cDNA markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genetic linkage maps have been based on a variety of DNA polymorphisms, such as AFLPs, RAPDs, RFLPs, and ESTPs, but only a few SSRs (simple sequence repeats), also known as simple tandem repeats or microsatellites, have been mapped in P. taeda. The objective o...

  13. Fine-mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger, celiac disease risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine-mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQ alleles and observed five novel associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability. PMID:25894500

  14. Comparative mapping reveals quantitative trait loci that affect spawning time in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, Cristian; Díaz, Nelson F.; Gomez, Gilda; López, María Eugenia; Iturra, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Spawning time in salmonids is a sex-limited quantitative trait that can be modified by selection. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), various quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect the expression of this trait have been discovered. In this study, we describe four microsatellite loci associated with two possible spawning time QTL regions in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The four loci were identified in females from two populations (early and late spawners) produced by divergent selection from the same base population. Three of the loci (OmyFGT34TUF, One2ASC and One19ASC) that were strongly associated with spawning time in coho salmon (p < 0.0002) were previously associated with QTL for the same trait in rainbow trout; a fourth loci (Oki10) with a suggestive association (p = 0.00035) mapped 10 cM from locus OmyFGT34TUF in rainbow trout. The changes in allelic frequency observed after three generations of selection were greater than expected because of genetic drift. This work shows that comparing information from closely-related species is a valid strategy for identifying QTLs for marker-assisted selection in species whose genomes are poorly characterized or lack a saturated genetic map. PMID:22888302

  15. Genetic dissection of mammalian ERAD through comparative haploid and CRISPR forward genetic screens.

    PubMed

    Timms, Richard T; Menzies, Sam A; Tchasovnikarova, Iva A; Christensen, Lea C; Williamson, James C; Antrobus, Robin; Dougan, Gordon; Ellgaard, Lars; Lehner, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    The application of forward genetic screens to cultured human cells represents a powerful method to study gene function. The repurposing of the bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system provides an effective method to disrupt gene function in mammalian cells, and has been applied to genome-wide screens. Here, we compare the efficacy of genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-mediated forward genetic screens versus gene-trap mutagenesis screens in haploid human cells, which represent the existing 'gold standard' method. This head-to-head comparison aimed to identify genes required for the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) of MHC class I molecules. The two approaches show high concordance (>70%), successfully identifying the majority of the known components of the canonical glycoprotein ERAD pathway. Both screens also identify a role for the uncharacterized gene TXNDC11, which we show encodes an EDEM2/3-associated disulphide reductase. Genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-mediated screens together with haploid genetic screens provide a powerful addition to the forward genetic toolbox. PMID:27283361

  16. Genetic dissection of mammalian ERAD through comparative haploid and CRISPR forward genetic screens

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Richard T.; Menzies, Sam A.; Tchasovnikarova, Iva A.; Christensen, Lea C.; Williamson, James C.; Antrobus, Robin; Dougan, Gordon; Ellgaard, Lars; Lehner, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The application of forward genetic screens to cultured human cells represents a powerful method to study gene function. The repurposing of the bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system provides an effective method to disrupt gene function in mammalian cells, and has been applied to genome-wide screens. Here, we compare the efficacy of genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-mediated forward genetic screens versus gene-trap mutagenesis screens in haploid human cells, which represent the existing ‘gold standard' method. This head-to-head comparison aimed to identify genes required for the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) of MHC class I molecules. The two approaches show high concordance (>70%), successfully identifying the majority of the known components of the canonical glycoprotein ERAD pathway. Both screens also identify a role for the uncharacterized gene TXNDC11, which we show encodes an EDEM2/3-associated disulphide reductase. Genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-mediated screens together with haploid genetic screens provide a powerful addition to the forward genetic toolbox. PMID:27283361

  17. Integrative transcriptome, proteome, phosphoproteome and genetic mapping reveals new aspects in a fiberless mutant of cotton

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi-Feng; Wu, Chun-Hui; Wu, Man; Pei, Wen-Feng; Li, Xing-Li; Wang, Wen-Kui; Zhang, Jinfa; Yu, Ji-Wen; Yu, Shu-Xun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of fiber initiation in cotton (Gossypium spp.), an integrated approach combining transcriptome, iTRAQ-based proteome and genetic mapping was taken to compare the ovules of the Xuzhou 142 wild type (WT) with its fuzzless-lintless (fl) mutant at −3 and 0 day post-anthesis. A total of 1,953 mRNAs, 187 proteins, and 131 phosphoproteins were differentially expressed (DE) between WT and fl, and the levels of transcripts and their encoded proteins and phosphoproteins were highly congruent. A functional analysis suggested that the abundance of proteins were mainly involved in amino sugar, nucleotide sugar and fatty acid metabolism, one carbon pool for folate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis. qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and enzymatic assays were performed to confirm the regulation of these transcripts and proteins. A molecular mapping located the lintless gene li3 in the fl mutant on chromosome 26 for the first time. A further in-silico physical mapping of DE genes with sequence variations between fl and WT identified one and four candidate genes in the li3 and n2 regions, respectively. Taken together, the transcript abundance, phosphorylation status of proteins at the fiber initiation stage and candidate genes have provided insights into regulatory processes underlying cotton fiber initiation. PMID:27075604

  18. Integrative transcriptome, proteome, phosphoproteome and genetic mapping reveals new aspects in a fiberless mutant of cotton.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qi-Feng; Wu, Chun-Hui; Wu, Man; Pei, Wen-Feng; Li, Xing-Li; Wang, Wen-Kui; Zhang, Jinfa; Yu, Ji-Wen; Yu, Shu-Xun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of fiber initiation in cotton (Gossypium spp.), an integrated approach combining transcriptome, iTRAQ-based proteome and genetic mapping was taken to compare the ovules of the Xuzhou 142 wild type (WT) with its fuzzless-lintless (fl) mutant at -3 and 0 day post-anthesis. A total of 1,953 mRNAs, 187 proteins, and 131 phosphoproteins were differentially expressed (DE) between WT and fl, and the levels of transcripts and their encoded proteins and phosphoproteins were highly congruent. A functional analysis suggested that the abundance of proteins were mainly involved in amino sugar, nucleotide sugar and fatty acid metabolism, one carbon pool for folate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis. qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and enzymatic assays were performed to confirm the regulation of these transcripts and proteins. A molecular mapping located the lintless gene li3 in the fl mutant on chromosome 26 for the first time. A further in-silico physical mapping of DE genes with sequence variations between fl and WT identified one and four candidate genes in the li3 and n2 regions, respectively. Taken together, the transcript abundance, phosphorylation status of proteins at the fiber initiation stage and candidate genes have provided insights into regulatory processes underlying cotton fiber initiation. PMID:27075604

  19. Genetical and comparative genomics of Brassica under altered Ca supply identifies Arabidopsis Ca-transporter orthologs.

    PubMed

    Graham, Neil S; Hammond, John P; Lysenko, Artem; Mayes, Sean; O Lochlainn, Seosamh; Blasco, Bego; Bowen, Helen C; Rawlings, Chris J; Rios, Juan J; Welham, Susan; Carion, Pierre W C; Dupuy, Lionel X; King, Graham J; White, Philip J; Broadley, Martin R

    2014-07-01

    Although Ca transport in plants is highly complex, the overexpression of vacuolar Ca(2+) transporters in crops is a promising new technology to improve dietary Ca supplies through biofortification. Here, we sought to identify novel targets for increasing plant Ca accumulation using genetical and comparative genomics. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping to 1895 cis- and 8015 trans-loci were identified in shoots of an inbred mapping population of Brassica rapa (IMB211 × R500); 23 cis- and 948 trans-eQTLs responded specifically to altered Ca supply. eQTLs were screened for functional significance using a large database of shoot Ca concentration phenotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana. From 31 Arabidopsis gene identifiers tagged to robust shoot Ca concentration phenotypes, 21 mapped to 27 B. rapa eQTLs, including orthologs of the Ca(2+) transporters At-CAX1 and At-ACA8. Two of three independent missense mutants of BraA.cax1a, isolated previously by targeting induced local lesions in genomes, have allele-specific shoot Ca concentration phenotypes compared with their segregating wild types. BraA.CAX1a is a promising target for altering the Ca composition of Brassica, consistent with prior knowledge from Arabidopsis. We conclude that multiple-environment eQTL analysis of complex crop genomes combined with comparative genomics is a powerful technique for novel gene identification/prioritization. PMID:25082855

  20. Construction and comparative analyses of highly dense linkage maps of two sweet cherry intra-specific progenies of commercial cultivars.

    PubMed

    Klagges, Carolina; Campoy, José Antonio; Quero-García, José; Guzmán, Alejandra; Mansur, Levi; Gratacós, Eduardo; Silva, Herman; Rosyara, Umesh R; Iezzoni, Amy; Meisel, Lee A; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Despite the agronomical importance and high synteny with other Prunus species, breeding improvements for cherry have been slow compared to other temperate fruits, such as apple or peach. However, the recent release of the peach genome v1.0 by the International Peach Genome Initiative and the sequencing of cherry accessions to identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) provide an excellent basis for the advancement of cherry genetic and genomic studies. The availability of dense genetic linkage maps in phenotyped segregating progenies would be a valuable tool for breeders and geneticists. Using two sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) intra-specific progenies derived from crosses between 'Black Tartarian' × 'Kordia' (BT×K) and 'Regina' × 'Lapins'(R×L), high-density genetic maps of the four parental lines and the two segregating populations were constructed. For BT×K and R×L, 89 and 121 F(1) plants were used for linkage mapping, respectively. A total of 5,696 SNP markers were tested in each progeny. As a result of these analyses, 723 and 687 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups (LGs) in BT×K and R×L, respectively. The resulting maps spanned 752.9 and 639.9 cM with an average distance of 1.1 and 0.9 cM between adjacent markers in BT×K and R×L, respectively. The maps displayed high synteny and co-linearity between each other, with the Prunus bin map, and with the peach genome v1.0 for all eight LGs (LG1-LG8). These maps provide a useful tool for investigating traits of interest in sweet cherry and represent a qualitative advance in the understanding of the cherry genome and its synteny with other members of the Rosaceae family. PMID:23382953

  1. Construction and Comparative Analyses of Highly Dense Linkage Maps of Two Sweet Cherry Intra-Specific Progenies of Commercial Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Quero-García, José; Guzmán, Alejandra; Mansur, Levi; Gratacós, Eduardo; Silva, Herman; Rosyara, Umesh R.; Iezzoni, Amy; Meisel, Lee A.; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Despite the agronomical importance and high synteny with other Prunus species, breeding improvements for cherry have been slow compared to other temperate fruits, such as apple or peach. However, the recent release of the peach genome v1.0 by the International Peach Genome Initiative and the sequencing of cherry accessions to identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) provide an excellent basis for the advancement of cherry genetic and genomic studies. The availability of dense genetic linkage maps in phenotyped segregating progenies would be a valuable tool for breeders and geneticists. Using two sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) intra-specific progenies derived from crosses between ‘Black Tartarian’ × ‘Kordia’ (BT×K) and ‘Regina’ × ‘Lapins’(R×L), high-density genetic maps of the four parental lines and the two segregating populations were constructed. For BT×K and R×L, 89 and 121 F1 plants were used for linkage mapping, respectively. A total of 5,696 SNP markers were tested in each progeny. As a result of these analyses, 723 and 687 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups (LGs) in BT×K and R×L, respectively. The resulting maps spanned 752.9 and 639.9 cM with an average distance of 1.1 and 0.9 cM between adjacent markers in BT×K and R×L, respectively. The maps displayed high synteny and co-linearity between each other, with the Prunus bin map, and with the peach genome v1.0 for all eight LGs (LG1–LG8). These maps provide a useful tool for investigating traits of interest in sweet cherry and represent a qualitative advance in the understanding of the cherry genome and its synteny with other members of the Rosaceae family. PMID:23382953

  2. A circular genetic map of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaichik, E.A.; Pesnyakevich, A.G.

    1995-08-01

    A circular genetic map of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2 was constructed on the basis of the R471a plasmid and Tn5 and Tn9 using Hfr-like donors. Forty-six genes, including phytopathogenicity genes, were located on the basis of interrupted mating experiment results and analysis of coinheritance of markers on a map of 183 min in length. The similarity and differences of chromosomal genetic maps of Erwinia genus bacteria are discussed. 23 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Genetic mapping and quantitative trait loci analysis for disease resistance using F2 and F5 generation-based genetic maps derived from 'Tifrunner' x'GT-C20' in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One mapping population derived from Tifrunner × GT-C20 has shown great potential in developing a high dense genetic map and identification of QTLs for important disease resistance, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spot (LS). Both F2 and F5 generation-based genetic maps were constructed prev...

  4. Comparative hi-density intraspecific linkage mapping using three elite populations from common parents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-density linkage maps are fundamental to contemporary organismal research and scientific approaches to genetic improvement, especially in paleopolyploids with exceptionally complex genomes, e.g., Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., 2n=52). Using 3 full-sib intra-specific mapping populations fr...

  5. Genetic mapping and marker development for resistance of wheat against the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus neglectus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Rlnn1 locus, which resides on chromosome 7A of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) confers moderate resistance against the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus neglectus. Prior to this research, the exact linkage relationships of Rlnn1 with other loci on chromosome 7A were not clear and there were no simple codominant markers available for selection of Rlnn1 in wheat breeding. The objectives of the research reported here were to (1) develop an improved genetic map of the Rlnn1 region of chromosome 7A and (2) develop molecular markers that could be used in marker-assisted selection to improve resistance of wheat against P. neglectus. Results A large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance against P. neglectus was genetically mapped using a population of Excalibur/Kukri doubled haploid lines. This QTL coincides in position with the rust resistance gene(s) Lr20/Sr15, the phytoene synthase gene Psy-A1 and 10 molecular markers, including five new markers designed using wheat-rice comparative genomics and wheat expressed sequence tags. Two of the new markers are suitable for use as molecular diagnostic tools to distinguish plants that carry Rlnn1 and Lr20/Sr15 from those that do not carry these resistance genes. Conclusions The genomic location of Rlnn1 was confirmed to be in the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 7A. Molecular markers were developed that provide simple alternatives to costly phenotypic assessment of resistance against P. neglectus in wheat breeding. In Excalibur, genetic recombination seems to be completely suppressed in the Rlnn1 region. PMID:24377498

  6. Comparative analysis of patterns of localization of mobile genetic elements in selection-genetic experiments on Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil`eva, L.A.; Ratner, V.A. |; Zabanov, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    A comparative selection-genetic analysis of three heterogeneous lines of Drosophila melanogaster with an interrupted longitudinal wing vein was performed. In the control line, riC, and two selection lines, riSP and riSN, overall patterns of localization of six families mobile genetic elements (MGE) (MDG1, MDG2, MDG3, MDG4, copia, and 297) were compared. In all, the lines contained 220 sites (copies) in 153 segments of the Bridges` map. According to response to selection, six classes of sites were identified: strong positive (P), weak positive (p), neutral (0), weak negative (n), strong negative (N), and abnormal (A). More than 50% of the sites (P + N + p + n) were shown to respond to selection; the contrasting classes (P and N and p and n) counterbalanced each other. These sites are assumed to mark actual parts of the genome, where polygenes are located. In other words, more than 50% of the total number of the genome sites act as polygenes controlling this quantitative character and respond to selection. Pleiotropy of polygenes in such a system must be very high. 22.2% of sites are neutral (class 0); apparently, they do not mark polygenes. The remaining 21.8% of sites (class A) show an anomalous response to selection. They are assumed to mark the polygenes of another genetic system, which participated in the maintenance of homeostasis in the original line riC. On the basis of this evidence, the concept of oligogenes and polygenes is developed. Oligogenes and polygenes are genes that occupy respectively limiting and nonlimiting positions in systems of expression. Adaptive properties of oligogenes are evaluated first and evolve rapidly. Adaptive properties of polygenes are evaluated only with regard to their total set and are limited by oligogenes. Variation of polygenic systems is generated by polygenic combination and spontaneous transpositions and excisions of MGE. 26 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Admixture mapping of genetic variants for uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Wiener, Howard; Aissani, Brahim

    2015-09-01

    Uterine leiomyoma (UL) are benign neoplasms arising from the smooth muscle cells of the uterus. One of the established risk factors for UL is African American ethnicity. Studies have consistently shown that African Americans have two to three times higher risk compared with that of non-Hispanic Whites. However, there is still no adequate explanation for the higher risk among African Americans. To investigate the genetic contribution to the observed difference between the African American and European American populations, we conducted an admixture scan in 525 eligible African American women participants to the NIEHS uterine fibroid study (NIEHS-UFS). In models with no stratification, we found multiple genomic regions showing significant and suggestive evidence of association, with chromosomal band 2q32.2 at rs256552 showing the highest score (Z-score=7.86, Bonferroni adjusted P-value=5.5 × 10(-12)) consistent with the suggestive evidence reported for this genomic region in the Black Women's Health Study. However, in models stratified by the body mass index (BMI) covariate, chromosome 1q42.2 was the sole genomic region that consistently showed suggestive associations across the BMI categories tested (Z-scores ⩽-3.96, Bonferroni adjusted P-values ⩽0.107). In age-stratified models, a significant association was observed in the older category (age >40) reaching a Z-score of 6.44 (Bonferroni-adjusted P-value=1.64 × 10(-7)) at rs256552. The mean percentage of European ancestry among cases was lower than that among controls in the NIEHS-UFS study. However, our study did not show a significant association between mean percentage of European ancestry and UL. PMID:26040208

  8. Admixture mapping of genetic variants for uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kui; Wiener, Howard; Aissani, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyoma (UL) are benign neoplasms arising from the smooth muscle cells of the uterus. One of the established risk factors for UL is African American ethnicity. Studies have consistently shown that African Americans have 2-3 times higher risk compared with that of non-Hispanic Whites. However, there is still no adequate explanation for the higher risk among African Americans. To investigate the genetic contribution to the observed difference between the African American and European American populations, we conducted an admixture scan in 525 eligible African American women participants to the NIEHS uterine fibroid study (NIEHS-UFS). In models with no stratification, we found multiple genomic regions showing significant and suggestive evidence of association, with chromosomal band 2q32.2 at rs256552 showing the highest score (Z-score = 7.86, Bonferroni adjusted p-value = 5.5×10-12) consistent with the suggestive evidence reported for this genomic region in the Black Women's Health Study. However, in models stratified by the body mass index (BMI) covariate, chromosomal 1q42.2 was the sole genomic region that consistently showed suggestive associations across the BMI categories tested (Z-scores ≤ -3.96, Bonferroni adjusted p-values ≤ 0.107). In age-stratified models, a significant association was observed in the older category (age > 40) reaching a Z-score of 6.44 (Bonferroni-adjusted p-value = 1.64 × 10-7) at rs256552. The mean percentage of European ancestry among cases was lower than that among controls in the NIEHS-UFS study. However, our study did not show a significant association between mean percentage of European ancestry and UL. PMID:26040208

  9. Computer Software for Displaying Map Projections and Comparing Distortions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikle, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Discusses software that educators can use to teach about distortions associated with alternative map projections. Examines the Projection, MicroCAM, World, and Atlas-GIS software programs. Suggests using the software in either introductory or more advanced courses dealing with map design or thematic cartography. Explains how to obtain the…

  10. Integration of the cytogenetic and genetic linkage maps of Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Elaine C; Barker, Guy C; Jones, Gareth H; Kearsey, Michael J; King, Graham J; Kop, Erik P; Ryder, Carol D; Teakle, Graham R; Vicente, Joana G; Armstrong, Susan J

    2002-01-01

    We have assigned all nine linkage groups of a Brassica oleracea genetic map to each of the nine chromosomes of the karyotype derived from mitotic metaphase spreads of the B. oleracea var. alboglabra line A12DHd using FISH. The majority of probes were BACs, with A12DHd DNA inserts, which give clear, reliable FISH signals. We have added nine markers to the existing integrated linkage map, distributed over six linkage groups. BACs were definitively assigned to linkage map positions through development of locus-specific PCR assays. Integration of the cytogenetic and genetic linkage maps was achieved with 22 probes representing 19 loci. Four chromosomes (2, 4, 7, and 9) are in the same orientation as their respective linkage groups (O4, O7, O8, and O6) whereas four chromosomes (1, 3, 5, and 8) and linkage groups (O3, O9, O2, and O1) are in the opposite orientation. The remaining chromosome (6) is probably in the opposite orientation. The cytogenetic map is an important resource for locating probes with unknown genetic map positions and is also being used to analyze the relationships between genetic and cytogenetic maps. PMID:12136025

  11. Drosophila transposon insertions as unknowns for structured inquiry recombination mapping exercises in an undergraduate genetics course.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Jeffrey M; Hughes, Tia M

    2009-06-01

    Structured inquiry approaches, in which students receive a Drosophila strain of unknown genotype to analyze and map the constituent mutations, are a common feature of many genetics teaching laboratories. The required crosses frustrate many students because they are aware that they are participating in a fundamentally trivial exercise, as the map locations of the genes are already established and have been recalculated thousands of times by generations of students. We modified the traditional structured inquiry approach to include a novel research experience for the students in our undergraduate genetics laboratories. Students conducted crosses with Drosophila strains carrying P[lacW] transposon insertions in genes without documented recombination map positions, representing a large number of unique, but equivalent genetic unknowns. Using the eye color phenotypes associated with the inserts as visible markers, it is straightforward to calculate recombination map positions for the interrupted loci. Collectively, our students mapped 95 genetic loci on chromosomes 2 and 3. In most cases, the calculated 95% confidence interval for meiotic map location overlapped with the predicted map position based on cytology. The research experience evoked positive student responses and helped students better understand the nature of scientific research for little additional cost or instructor effort. PMID:19332881

  12. Comparing a Coevolutionary Genetic Algorithm for Multiobjective Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Kraus, William F.; Haith, Gary L.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a study comparing a recently developed coevolutionary genetic algorithm (CGA) against a set of evolutionary algorithms using a suite of multiobjective optimization benchmarks. The CGA embodies competitive coevolution and employs a simple, straightforward target population representation and fitness calculation based on developmental theory of learning. Because of these properties, setting up the additional population is trivial making implementation no more difficult than using a standard GA. Empirical results using a suite of two-objective test functions indicate that this CGA performs well at finding solutions on convex, nonconvex, discrete, and deceptive Pareto-optimal fronts, while giving respectable results on a nonuniform optimization. On a multimodal Pareto front, the CGA finds a solution that dominates solutions produced by eight other algorithms, yet the CGA has poor coverage across the Pareto front.

  13. Genetic aberrations detected by comparative genomic hybridisation in vulvar cancers.

    PubMed

    Allen, D G; Hutchins, A-M; Hammet, F; White, D J; Scurry, J P; Tabrizi, S N; Garland, S M; Armes, J E

    2002-03-18

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva is a disease of significant clinical importance, which arises in the presence or absence of human papillomavirus. We used comparative genomic hybridisation to document non-random chromosomal gains and losses within human papillomavirus positive and negative vulvar cancers. Gain of 3q was significantly more common in human papillomavirus-positive cancers compared to human papillomavirus-negative cancers. The smallest area of gain was 3q22-25, a chromosome region which is frequently gained in other human papillomavirus-related cancers. Chromosome 8q was more commonly gained in human papillomavirus-negative compared to human papillomavirus-positive cancers. 8q21 was the smallest region of gain, which has been identified in other, non-human papillomavirus-related cancers. Chromosome arms 3p and 11q were lost in both categories of vulvar cancer. This study has demonstrated chromosome locations important in the development of vulvar squamous cell carcinoma. Additionally, taken together with previous studies of human papillomavirus-positive cancers of other anogenital sites, the data indicate that one or more oncogenes important in the development and progression of human papillomavirus-induced carcinomas are located on 3q. The different genetic changes seen in human papillomavirus-positive and negative vulvar squamous cell carcinomas support the clinicopathological data indicating that these are different cancer types. PMID:11953825

  14. Fast and Accurate Construction of Ultra-Dense Consensus Genetic Maps Using Evolution Strategy Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Mester, David; Ronin, Yefim; Schnable, Patrick; Aluru, Srinivas; Korol, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to develop a fast and accurate algorithm for constructing consensus genetic maps for chip-based SNP genotyping data with a high proportion of shared markers between mapping populations. Chip-based genotyping of SNP markers allows producing high-density genetic maps with a relatively standardized set of marker loci for different mapping populations. The availability of a standard high-throughput mapping platform simplifies consensus analysis by ignoring unique markers at the stage of consensus mapping thereby reducing mathematical complicity of the problem and in turn analyzing bigger size mapping data using global optimization criteria instead of local ones. Our three-phase analytical scheme includes automatic selection of ~100-300 of the most informative (resolvable by recombination) markers per linkage group, building a stable skeletal marker order for each data set and its verification using jackknife re-sampling, and consensus mapping analysis based on global optimization criterion. A novel Evolution Strategy optimization algorithm with a global optimization criterion presented in this paper is able to generate high quality, ultra-dense consensus maps, with many thousands of markers per genome. This algorithm utilizes "potentially good orders" in the initial solution and in the new mutation procedures that generate trial solutions, enabling to obtain a consensus order in reasonable time. The developed algorithm, tested on a wide range of simulated data and real world data (Arabidopsis), outperformed two tested state-of-the-art algorithms by mapping accuracy and computation time. PMID:25867943

  15. Genetic association mapping based on discordant sib pairs: the discordant-alleles test.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, M; Langefeld, C D

    1998-04-01

    Family-based tests of association provide the opportunity to test for an association between a disease and a genetic marker. Such tests avoid false-positive results produced by population stratification, so that evidence for association may be interpreted as evidence for linkage or causation. Several methods that use family-based controls have been proposed, including the haplotype relative risk, the transmission-disequilibrium test, and affected family-based controls. However, because these methods require genotypes on affected individuals and their parents, they are not ideally suited to the study of late-onset diseases. In this paper, we develop several family-based tests of association that use discordant sib pairs (DSPs) in which one sib is affected with a disease and the other sib is not. These tests are based on statistics that compare counts of alleles or genotypes or that test for symmetry in tables of alleles or genotypes. We describe the use of a permutation framework to assess the significance of these statistics. These DSP-based tests provide the same general advantages as parent-offspring trio-based tests, while being applicable to essentially any disease; they may also be tailored to particular hypotheses regarding the genetic model. We compare the statistical properties of our DSP-based tests by computer simulation and illustrate their use with an application to Alzheimer disease and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Our results suggest that the discordant-alleles test, which compares the numbers of nonmatching alleles in DSPs, is the most powerful of the tests we considered, for a wide class of disease models and marker types. Finally, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of the DSP design for genetic association mapping. PMID:9529345

  16. A physical map of the highly heterozygous Populus genome: integration with the genome sequence and genetic map

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Colin; CHIU, Dr. R.; Shin, Dr. H.; Krywinski, Martin; Fjell, Chris; Wilkin, Jennifer; Yin, Tongming; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a larger project to sequence the Populus genome and generate genomic resources for this emerging model tree, we constructed a physical map of the Populus genome, representing one of the few such maps of an undomesticated, highly heterozygous plant species. The physical map, consisting of 2802 contigs, was constructed from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. The map represents approximately 9.4-fold coverage of the Populus genome, which has been estimated from the genome sequence assembly to be 485 {+-} 10 Mb in size. BAC ends were sequenced to assist long-range assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence scaffolds and to anchor the physical map to the genome sequence. Simple sequence repeat-based markers were derived from the end sequences and used to initiate integration of the BAC and genetic maps. A total of 2411 physical map contigs, representing 97% of all clones assigned to contigs, were aligned to the sequence assembly (JGI Populus trichocarpa, version 1.0). These alignments represent a total coverage of 384 Mb (79%) of the entire poplar sequence assembly and 295 Mb (96%) of linkage group sequence assemblies. A striking result of the physical map contig alignments to the sequence assembly was the co-localization of multiple contigs across numerous regions of the 19 linkage groups. Targeted sequencing of BAC clones and genetic analysis in a small number of representative regions showed that these co-aligning contigs represent distinct haplotypes in the heterozygous individual sequenced, and revealed the nature of these haplotype sequence differences.

  17. Evolution of Chromosome 6 of Solanum Species Revealed by Comparative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome mapping is an important tool in evolutionary research. Here we demonstrate a comparative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping strategy. A set of 13 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones derived from potato chromosome 6 was used for FISH mapping in seven differen...

  18. CMap 1.01: a comparative mapping application for the internet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CMap is a web-based tool for displaying and comparing maps of any type and from any species. A user can compare an unlimited number of maps, view pair-wise comparisons of known correspondences, and search for maps or for features by name, species, type and accession. CMap is freely available, can ...

  19. Mapping and Cracking Sensorimotor Circuits in Genetic Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Damon A.; Freifeld, Limor; Clandinin, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    One central goal of systems neuroscience is to understand how neural circuits implement the computations that link sensory inputs to behavior. Work combining electrophysiological and imaging-based approaches to measure neural activity with pharmacological and electrophysiological manipulations has provided fundamental insights. More recently, genetic approaches have been used to monitor and manipulate neural activity, opening up new experimental opportunities and challenges. Here, we discuss issues associated with applying genetic approaches to circuit dissection in sensorimotor transformations, outlining important considerations for experimental design and considering how modeling can complement experimental approaches. PMID:23719159

  20. A High-throughput AFLP-based Method for Constructing Integrated Genetic and Physical Maps: Progress Toward a Sorghum Genome Map

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Patricia E.; Klein, Robert R.; Cartinhour, Samuel W.; Ulanch, Paul E.; Dong, Jianmin; Obert, Jacque A.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Schlueter, Shannon D.; Childs, Kevin L.; Ale, Melissa; Mullet, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Sorghum is an important target for plant genomic mapping because of its adaptation to harsh environments, diverse germplasm collection, and value for comparing the genomes of grass species such as corn and rice. The construction of an integrated genetic and physical map of the sorghum genome (750 Mbp) is a primary goal of our sorghum genome project. To help accomplish this task, we have developed a new high-throughput PCR-based method for building BAC contigs and locating BAC clones on the sorghum genetic map. This task involved pooling 24,576 sorghum BAC clones (∼4× genome equivalents) in six different matrices to create 184 pools of BAC DNA. DNA fragments from each pool were amplified using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technology, resolved on a LI-COR dual-dye DNA sequencing system, and analyzed using Bionumerics software. On average, each set of AFLP primers amplified 28 single-copy DNA markers that were useful for identifying overlapping BAC clones. Data from 32 different AFLP primer combinations identified ∼2400 BACs and ordered ∼700 BAC contigs. Analysis of a sorghum RIL mapping population using the same primer pairs located ∼200 of the BAC contigs on the sorghum genetic map. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting of the entire collection of sorghum BAC clones was applied to test and extend the contigs constructed using this PCR-based methodology. Analysis of the fingerprint data allowed for the identification of 3366 contigs each containing an average of 5 BACs. BACs in ∼65% of the contigs aligned by AFLP analysis had sufficient overlap to be confirmed by DNA fingerprint analysis. In addition, 30% of the overlapping BACs aligned by AFLP analysis provided information for merging contigs and singletons that could not be joined using fingerprint data alone. Thus, the combination of fingerprinting and AFLP-based contig assembly and mapping provides a reliable, high-throughput method for building an integrated genetic and physical map

  1. Construction of a high-density genetic map and QTL mapping for pearl quality-related traits in Hyriopsis cumingii

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zhi-Yi; Han, Xue-Kai; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Qing-Qing; Li, Jia-Le

    2016-01-01

    A high-density genetic map is essential for quantitative trait locus (QTL) fine mapping. In this study, 4,508 effective single nucleotide polymorphism markers (detected using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing) and 475 microsatellites were mapped to 19 linkage groups (LGs) using a family with 157 individuals. The map spanned 2,713 cM, with an average of 259 markers and 79 loci per LG and an average inter-marker distance of 1.81 cM. To identify QTLs for pearl quality traits, 26 putatively significant QTLs were detected for 10 traits, including, three for shell width, seven for body weight, two for shell weight, two for margin mantle weight, five for inner mantle weight, and seven for shell nacre colour. Among them, five QTLs associated with shell nacre colour were mapped to LG17 and explained 19.7% to 22.8% of the trait variation; this suggests that some important genes or loci determine shell nacre colour in LG17. The linkage map and mapped QTLs for shell nacre colour would be useful for improving the quality of Hyriopsis cumingii via marker-assisted selection. PMID:27587236

  2. Construction of a high-density genetic map and QTL mapping for pearl quality-related traits in Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhi-Yi; Han, Xue-Kai; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Qing-Qing; Li, Jia-Le

    2016-01-01

    A high-density genetic map is essential for quantitative trait locus (QTL) fine mapping. In this study, 4,508 effective single nucleotide polymorphism markers (detected using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing) and 475 microsatellites were mapped to 19 linkage groups (LGs) using a family with 157 individuals. The map spanned 2,713 cM, with an average of 259 markers and 79 loci per LG and an average inter-marker distance of 1.81 cM. To identify QTLs for pearl quality traits, 26 putatively significant QTLs were detected for 10 traits, including, three for shell width, seven for body weight, two for shell weight, two for margin mantle weight, five for inner mantle weight, and seven for shell nacre colour. Among them, five QTLs associated with shell nacre colour were mapped to LG17 and explained 19.7% to 22.8% of the trait variation; this suggests that some important genes or loci determine shell nacre colour in LG17. The linkage map and mapped QTLs for shell nacre colour would be useful for improving the quality of Hyriopsis cumingii via marker-assisted selection. PMID:27587236

  3. Genetic mapping of the mouse neuromuscular mutation kyphoscoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Skynner, M.J.; Coulton, G.R.; Mason, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    The ky mouse mutant, kyphoscoliosis, exhibits a degenerative muscle disease resulting in chronic deformation of the spinal column. Using an interspecific backcross segregating the ky mutation, we have mapped the ky locus to a small region of mouse chromosome 9. ky is nonrecombinant with the microsatellites D9Mit24 and D9Mit169 and lies in a conserved linkage group that encompasses human chromosome 3. s-Laminin (LAMS) and the gene for dystrophin-associated glycoprotein 1 (DAG1), which map to human chromosome 3, are both recombinant with ky, ruling them out as candidates. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A High Resolution Genetic Map Anchoring Scaffolds of the Sequenced Watermelon Genome

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Qinghe; Jiang, Jiao; Guo, Shaogui; Zhang, Haiying; Hou, Wenju; Zou, Xiaohua; Sun, Honghe; Gong, Guoyi; Levi, Amnon; Xu, Yong

    2012-01-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence and map the watermelon (Citrullus spp.) genome, we have constructed a high density genetic linkage map. The map positioned 234 watermelon genome sequence scaffolds (an average size of 1.41 Mb) that cover about 330 Mb and account for 93.5% of the 353 Mb of the assembled genomic sequences of the elite Chinese watermelon line 97103 (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus). The genetic map was constructed using an F8 population of 103 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). The RILs are derived from a cross between the line 97103 and the United States Plant Introduction (PI) 296341-FR (C. lanatus var. citroides) that contains resistance to fusarium wilt (races 0, 1, and 2). The genetic map consists of eleven linkage groups that include 698 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 219 insertion-deletion (InDel) and 36 structure variation (SV) markers and spans ∼800 cM with a mean marker interval of 0.8 cM. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 11 BACs that produced chromosome-specifc signals, we have depicted watermelon chromosomes that correspond to the eleven linkage groups constructed in this study. The high resolution genetic map developed here should be a useful platform for the assembly of the watermelon genome, for the development of sequence-based markers used in breeding programs, and for the identification of genes associated with important agricultural traits. PMID:22247776

  5. High-resolution genetic maps of Eucalyptus improve Eucalyptus grandis genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Bartholomé, Jérôme; Mandrou, Eric; Mabiala, André; Jenkins, Jerry; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Klopp, Christophe; Schmutz, Jeremy; Plomion, Christophe; Gion, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    Genetic maps are key tools in genetic research as they constitute the framework for many applications, such as quantitative trait locus analysis, and support the assembly of genome sequences. The resequencing of the two parents of a cross between Eucalyptus urophylla and Eucalyptus grandis was used to design a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array of 6000 markers evenly distributed along the E. grandis genome. The genotyping of 1025 offspring enabled the construction of two high-resolution genetic maps containing 1832 and 1773 markers with an average marker interval of 0.45 and 0.5 cM for E. grandis and E. urophylla, respectively. The comparison between genetic maps and the reference genome highlighted 85% of collinear regions. A total of 43 noncollinear regions and 13 nonsynthetic regions were detected and corrected in the new genome assembly. This improved version contains 4943 scaffolds totalling 691.3 Mb of which 88.6% were captured by the 11 chromosomes. The mapping data were also used to investigate the effect of population size and number of markers on linkage mapping accuracy. This study provides the most reliable linkage maps for Eucalyptus and version 2.0 of the E. grandis genome. PMID:25385325

  6. QTL mapping reveals the genetic architecture of loci affecting pre- and post-zygotic isolating barriers in Louisiana Iris

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybridization among Louisiana Irises has been well established and the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation is known to affect the potential for and the directionality of introgression between taxa. Here we use co-dominant markers to identify regions where QTL are located both within and between backcross maps to compare the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation and fitness traits across treatments and years. Results QTL mapping was used to elucidate the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation between Iris fulva and Iris brevicaulis. Homologous co-dominant EST-SSR markers scored in two backcross populations between I. fulva and I. brevicaulis were used to generate genetic linkage maps. These were used as the framework for mapping QTL associated with variation in 11 phenotypic traits likely responsible for reproductive isolation and fitness. QTL were dispersed throughout the genome, with the exception of one region of a single linkage group (LG) where QTL for flowering time, sterility, and fruit production clustered. In most cases, homologous QTL were not identified in both backcross populations, however, homologous QTL for flowering time, number of growth points per rhizome, number of nodes per inflorescence, and number of flowers per node were identified on several linkage groups. Conclusions Two different traits affecting reproductive isolation, flowering time and sterility, exhibit different genetic architectures, with numerous QTL across the Iris genome controlling flowering time and fewer, less distributed QTL affecting sterility. QTL for traits affecting fitness are largely distributed across the genome with occasional overlap, especially on LG 4, where several QTL increasing fitness and decreasing sterility cluster. Given the distribution and effect direction of QTL affecting reproductive isolation and fitness, we have predicted genomic regions where introgression may be more likely to occur (those regions associated with

  7. Genetic mapping in grapevine using a SNP microarray: intensity values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping microarrays are widely used for genome wide association studies, but in high-diversity organisms, the quality of SNP calls can be diminished by genetic variation near the assayed nucleotide. To address this limitation in grapevine, we developed a simple heuristic that uses hybridization i...

  8. A genetically anchored physical map of the cacao genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mars Incorporated and the United States Department of Agriculture have undertaken the sequencing of the genome of Theobroma cacao, which produces cocoa beans, the key ingredient in chocolate. Genetic information, such as whole genome sequence is necessary to better understand and improve cacao. In m...

  9. Recent advances in molecular genetic linkage maps of cultivated peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The competitiveness of peanuts in domestic and global markets has been threatened by losses in productivity and quality that are attributed to diseases, pests, environmental stresses and allergy or food safety issues. Narrow genetic diversity and deficiency of polymorphic DNA markers had severely hi...

  10. Genetic Properties of the Maize Nested Association Mapping Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is one of the world’s most diverse species, and this variation can be used to understand the molecular basis of phenotypic variation and to improve agricultural efficiency and sustainability. To access this genetic variation, 25 diverse inbred maize lines were crossed to the B73 reference lin...

  11. Comparative Genetics: Synergizing Human and NOD Mouse Studies for Identifying Genetic Causation of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Driver, John P.; Chen, Yi-Guang; Mathews, Clayton E.

    2012-01-01

    Although once widely anticipated to unlock how human type 1 diabetes (T1D) develops, extensive study of the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse has failed to yield effective treatments for patients with the disease. This has led many to question the usefulness of this animal model. While criticism about the differences between NOD and human T1D is legitimate, in many cases disease in both species results from perturbations modulated by the same genes or different genes that function within the same biological pathways. Like in humans, unusual polymorphisms within an MHC class II molecule contributes the most T1D risk in NOD mice. This insight supports the validity of this model and suggests the NOD has been improperly utilized to study how to cure or prevent disease in patients. Indeed, clinical trials are far from administering T1D therapeutics to humans at the same concentration ranges and pathological states that inhibit disease in NOD mice. Until these obstacles are overcome it is premature to label the NOD mouse a poor surrogate to test agents that cure or prevent T1D. An additional criticism of the NOD mouse is the past difficulty in identifying genes underlying T1D using conventional mapping studies. However, most of the few diabetogenic alleles identified to date appear relevant to the human disorder. This suggests that rather than abandoning genetic studies in NOD mice, future efforts should focus on improving the efficiency with which diabetes susceptibility genes are detected. The current review highlights why the NOD mouse remains a relevant and valuable tool to understand the genes and their interactions that promote autoimmune diabetes and therapeutics that inhibit this disease. It also describes a new range of technologies that will likely transform how the NOD mouse is used to uncover the genetic causes of T1D for years to come. PMID:23804259

  12. Utilization of a whole genome SNP panel for efficient genetic mapping in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Jennifer L.; Bolton, Andrew D.; Tran, Pamela V.; Brown, Alison; Dwyer, Noelle D.; Manning, Danielle K.; Bjork, Bryan C.; Li, Cheng; Montgomery, Kate; Siepka, Sandra M.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Wiltshire, Tim; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Beier, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Phenotype-driven genetics can be used to create mouse models of human disease and birth defects. However, the utility of these mutant models is limited without identification of the causal gene. To facilitate genetic mapping, we developed a fixed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel of 394 SNPs as an alternative to analyses using simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) marker mapping. With the SNP panel, chromosomal locations for 22 monogenic mutants were identified. The average number of affected progeny genotyped for mapped monogenic mutations is nine. Map locations for several mutants have been obtained with as few as four affected progeny. The average size of genetic intervals obtained for these mutants is 43 Mb, with a range of 17–83 Mb. Thus, our SNP panel allows for identification of moderate resolution map position with small numbers of mice in a high-throughput manner. Importantly, the panel is suitable for mapping crosses from many inbred and wild-derived inbred strain combinations. The chromosomal localizations obtained with the SNP panel allow one to quickly distinguish between potentially novel loci or remutations in known genes, and facilitates fine mapping and positional cloning. By using this approach, we identified DNA sequence changes in two ethylnitrosourea-induced mutants. PMID:16461637

  13. Construction of a high-density, high-resolution genetic map and its integration with BAC-based physical map in channel catfish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Qin, Zhenkui; Waldbieser, Geoff; Wang, Ruijia; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Danzmann, Roy G.; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-01-01

    Construction of genetic linkage map is essential for genetic and genomic studies. Recent advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies made it possible to generate high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage maps, especially for the organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the present work, we constructed a high-density and high-resolution genetic map for channel catfish with three large resource families genotyped using the catfish 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 54,342 SNPs were placed on the linkage map, which to our knowledge had the highest marker density among aquaculture species. The estimated genetic size was 3,505.4 cM with a resolution of 0.22 cM for sex-averaged genetic map. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 4,495.1 cM in females and 2,593.7 cM in males, presenting a ratio of 1.7 : 1 between female and male in recombination fraction. After integration with the previously established physical map, over 87% of physical map contigs were anchored to the linkage groups that covered a physical length of 867 Mb, accounting for ∼90% of the catfish genome. The integrated map provides a valuable tool for validating and improving the catfish whole-genome assembly and facilitates fine-scale QTL mapping and positional cloning of genes responsible for economically important traits. PMID:25428894

  14. Construction of a high-density, high-resolution genetic map and its integration with BAC-based physical map in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Qin, Zhenkui; Waldbieser, Geoff; Wang, Ruijia; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Danzmann, Roy G; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-02-01

    Construction of genetic linkage map is essential for genetic and genomic studies. Recent advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies made it possible to generate high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage maps, especially for the organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the present work, we constructed a high-density and high-resolution genetic map for channel catfish with three large resource families genotyped using the catfish 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 54,342 SNPs were placed on the linkage map, which to our knowledge had the highest marker density among aquaculture species. The estimated genetic size was 3,505.4 cM with a resolution of 0.22 cM for sex-averaged genetic map. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 4,495.1 cM in females and 2,593.7 cM in males, presenting a ratio of 1.7 : 1 between female and male in recombination fraction. After integration with the previously established physical map, over 87% of physical map contigs were anchored to the linkage groups that covered a physical length of 867 Mb, accounting for ∼90% of the catfish genome. The integrated map provides a valuable tool for validating and improving the catfish whole-genome assembly and facilitates fine-scale QTL mapping and positional cloning of genes responsible for economically important traits. PMID:25428894

  15. A collection of strains containing genetically linked alternating antibiotic resistance elements for genetic mapping of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M; Baker, T A; Schnitzler, G; Deischel, S M; Goel, M; Dove, W; Jaacks, K J; Grossman, A D; Erickson, J W; Gross, C A

    1989-01-01

    We present a collection of 182 isogenic strains containing genetically linked antibiotic resistance elements located at approximately 1-min intervals around the Escherichia coli chromosome. At most positions both Tn10 (Tetr) and TN10kan (Kanr) elements are available, so that the collection contains a linked set of alternating antibiotic resistance markers. The map position of each insertion has been aligned to the E. coli genetic map as well as to the Kohara ordered clone bank. These strains are designed to be used in a rapid two-step mapping system in E. coli. In the first step, the mutation is localized to a 5- to 15-min region of the chromosome by Hfr mapping with a set of Hfr strains containing either Tn10 or Tn10kan elements located 20 min from their respective origins of transfer. In the second step, the mutation is localized to a 1-min region by P1 transduction, with a collection of isogenic insertion strains as donors. We discuss the uses of this collection of strains to map and eventually to clone a variety of mutations in E. coli. PMID:2540407

  16. Comparing Image-Based Methods for Assessing Visual Clutter in Generalized Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touya, G.; Decherf, B.; Lalanne, M.; Dumont, M.

    2015-08-01

    Map generalization abstracts and simplifies geographic information to derive maps at smaller scales. The automation of map generalization requires techniques to evaluate the global quality of a generalized map. The quality and legibility of a generalized map is related to the complexity of the map, or the amount of clutter in the map, i.e. the excessive amount of information and its disorganization. Computer vision research is highly interested in measuring clutter in images, and this paper proposes to compare some of the existing techniques from computer vision, applied to generalized maps evaluation. Four techniques from the literature are described and tested on a large set of maps, generalized at different scales: edge density, subband entropy, quad tree complexity, and segmentation clutter. The results are analyzed against several criteria related to generalized maps, the identification of cluttered areas, the preservation of the global amount of information, the handling of occlusions and overlaps, foreground vs background, and blank space reduction.

  17. Affected sib-pair interval mapping and exclusion for complex genetic traits: Inferring identity by descent status from relatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.R.; Boehnke, M.; Guo, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    Affected sib-pair (ASP) methods provide a useful approach for the initial genetic mapping of complex diseases for which mode of inheritance is uncertain. Risch described a method for interval mapping and exclusion based on the ratio lambda comparing disease risk in the first degree relatives of affected individuals to disease risk in the general population. He assumed marker identity by descent (IBD) status for the ASP could be deduced from parental genotypes. For late onset diseases such as type 2 diabetes, parents may be dead or otherwise unavailable, so that marker IBD status generally cannot be inferred with certainty. Guo has developed efficient methods for probabilistic determination of marker IBD sharing for two or more loci. We have combined and extended the methods of Risch and Guo to carry out interval mapping and exclusion when parents are missing but other relatives such as additional siblings are available. Our method is based on calculating the likelihood of marker data of the ASP and their relatives conditional on the disease status of the ASP, as a function of lambda and the position of the disease locus within the genetic map. We currently are using this method to compare the information to detect or exclude linkage provided by various types of ASP nuclear families -- zero, one, or two typed parents and zero, one, two, or more additional siblings -- as a function of sample size, marker density and informativity, and risk ratio lambda.

  18. A genetic linkage map of a cichlid fish, the tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, T D; Lee, W J; Sobolewska, H; Penman, D; McAndrew, B

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a genetic map for a tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, using DNA markers. The segregation of 62 microsatellite and 112 anonymous fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) was studied in 41 haploid embryos derived from a single female. We have identified linkages among 162 (93.1%) of these markers. 95% of the microsatellites and 92% of the AFLPs were linked in the final map. The map spans 704 Kosambi cM in 30 linkage groups covering the 22 chromosomes of this species. Twenty-four of these linkage groups contain at least one microsatellite polymorphism. From the number of markers 15 or fewer cM apart, we estimate a total map length of approximately 1000-1200 cM. High levels of interference are observed, consistent with measurements in other fish species. This map is a starting point for the mapping of single loci and quantitative traits in cichlid fishes. PMID:9539437

  19. A genetic linkage map of a cichlid fish, the tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Kocher, T D; Lee, W J; Sobolewska, H; Penman, D; McAndrew, B

    1998-03-01

    We have constructed a genetic map for a tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, using DNA markers. The segregation of 62 microsatellite and 112 anonymous fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) was studied in 41 haploid embryos derived from a single female. We have identified linkages among 162 (93.1%) of these markers. 95% of the microsatellites and 92% of the AFLPs were linked in the final map. The map spans 704 Kosambi cM in 30 linkage groups covering the 22 chromosomes of this species. Twenty-four of these linkage groups contain at least one microsatellite polymorphism. From the number of markers 15 or fewer cM apart, we estimate a total map length of approximately 1000-1200 cM. High levels of interference are observed, consistent with measurements in other fish species. This map is a starting point for the mapping of single loci and quantitative traits in cichlid fishes. PMID:9539437

  20. Genetic mapping of a locus predisposing to human colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peltomaeki, P.; Aaltonen, L.A.; Pylkkaenen, L.; Chappelle, A. de la ); Sistonen, P. Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki ); Mecklin, J.P. ); Haervinen, H. ); Green, J.S. ); Jass, J.R. ); Weber, J.L. ); Leach, F.S.; Petersen, G.M.; Hamilton, S.R.; Vogelstein, B. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD )

    1993-05-07

    Genetic linkage analysis was used to determine whether a specific chromosomal locus could be implicated in families with a history of early onset cancer but with no other unique features. Close linkage of disease to anonymous microsatellite markers on chromosome 2 was demonstrated in two large kindreds. The pairwise lod scores for linkage to marker D2S123 in these kindreds were 6.39 and 1.45 at zero recombination, and multipoint linkage with flanking markers resulted in lod scores of 6.47 and 6.01. These results prove the existence of a genetically determined predisposition to colorectal cancer that has important ramifications for understanding and preventing this disease. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Genetic dissection of fruiting body-related traits using quantitative trait loci mapping in Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wen-Bing; Li, Lei; Zhou, Yan; Bian, Yin-Bing; Kwan, Hoi-Shan; Cheung, Man-Kit; Xiao, Yang

    2016-06-01

    To provide a better understanding of the genetic architecture of fruiting body formation of Lentinula edodes, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping was employed to uncover the loci underlying seven fruiting body-related traits (FBRTs). An improved L. edodes genetic linkage map, comprising 572 markers on 12 linkage groups with a total map length of 983.7 cM, was constructed by integrating 82 genomic sequence-based insertion-deletion (InDel) markers into a previously published map. We then detected a total of 62 QTLs for seven target traits across two segregating testcross populations, with individual QTLs contributing 5.5 %-30.2 % of the phenotypic variation. Fifty-three out of the 62 QTLs were clustered in six QTL hotspots, suggesting the existence of main genomic regions regulating the morphological characteristics of fruiting bodies in L. edodes. A stable QTL hotspot on MLG2, containing QTLs for all investigated traits, was identified in both testcross populations. QTLs for related traits were frequently co-located on the linkage groups, demonstrating the genetic basis for phenotypic correlation of traits. Meta-QTL (mQTL) analysis was performed and identified 16 mQTLs with refined positions and narrow confidence intervals (CIs). Nine genes, including those encoding MAP kinase, blue-light photoreceptor, riboflavin-aldehyde-forming enzyme and cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase, and cytochrome P450s, were likely to be candidate genes controlling the shape of fruiting bodies. The study has improved our understanding of the genetic architecture of fruiting body formation in L. edodes. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide QTL detection of FBRTs in L. edodes. The improved genetic map, InDel markers and QTL hotspot regions revealed here will assist considerably in the conduct of future genetic and breeding studies of L. edodes. PMID:26875873

  2. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This project is now progressing strongly. Thirteen somatic cell hybrids containing rearranged {number sign}16 chromosomes have been constructed, bringing the total number of hybrids constructed by the group to 27 which divides chromosome 16 into 29 regions. 170 probes have been mapped into these regions. Although this is the second progress report for this contract it essentially contains all the work carried out since the first progress report covered a period of less than three months during which little had been done other than setting up. The project has been progressing very well and has led to numerous collaborations with other groups involved in mapping this chromosome or studying genes on it. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Genetic mapping of a new heart rate QTL on chromosome 8 of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gustavo JJ; Pereira, Alexandre C; Krieger, Eduardo M; Krieger, José E

    2007-01-01

    Background Tachycardia is commonly observed in hypertensive patients, predominantly mediated by regulatory mechanisms integrated within the autonomic nervous system. The genetic loci and genes associated with increased heart rate in hypertension, however, have not yet been identified. Methods An F2 intercross of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) × Brown Norway (BN) linkage analysis of quantitative trait loci mapping was utilized to identify candidate genes associated with an increased heart rate in arterial hypertension. Results Basal heart rate in SHR was higher compared to that of normotensive BN rats (365 ± 3 vs. 314 ± 6 bpm, p < 0.05 for SHR and BN, respectively). A total genome scan identified one quantitative trait locus in a 6.78 cM interval on rat chromosome 8 (8q22–q24) that was responsible for elevated heart rate. This interval contained 241 genes, of which 65 are known genes. Conclusion Our data suggest that an influential genetic region located on the rat chromosome 8 contributes to the regulation of heart rate. Candidate genes that have previously been associated with tachycardia and/or hypertension were found within this QTL, strengthening our hypothesis that these genes are, potentially, associated with the increase in heart rate in a hypertension rat model. PMID:17419875

  4. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery and High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Cauliflower Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenqing; Gu, Honghui; Sheng, Xiaoguang; Yu, Huifang; Wang, Jiansheng; Huang, Long; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps play an important role in plant genomics and breeding studies. Cauliflower is an important and distinctive vegetable; however, very few molecular resources have been reported for this species. In this study, a novel, specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing strategy was employed for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and high-density genetic map construction in a double-haploid, segregating population of cauliflower. A total of 12.47 Gb raw data containing 77.92 M pair-end reads were obtained after processing and 6815 polymorphic SLAFs between the two parents were detected. The average sequencing depths reached 52.66-fold for the female parent and 49.35-fold for the male parent. Subsequently, these polymorphic SLAFs were used to genotype the population and further filtered based on several criteria to construct a genetic linkage map of cauliflower. Finally, 1776 high-quality SLAF markers, including 2741 SNPs, constituted the linkage map with average data integrity of 95.68%. The final map spanned a total genetic length of 890.01 cM with an average marker interval of 0.50 cM, and covered 364.9 Mb of the reference genome. The markers and genetic map developed in this study could provide an important foundation not only for comparative genomics studies within Brassica oleracea species but also for quantitative trait loci identification and molecular breeding of cauliflower. PMID:27047515

  5. Comparative sequence and genetic analyses of asparagus BACs reveal no microsynteny with onion or rice.

    PubMed

    Jakse, Jernej; Telgmann, Alexa; Jung, Christian; Khar, Anil; Melgar, Sergio; Cheung, Foo; Town, Christopher D; Havey, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    The Poales (includes the grasses) and Asparagales [includes onion (Allium cepa L.) and asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.)] are the two most economically important monocot orders. The Poales are a member of the commelinoid monocots, a group of orders sister to the Asparagales. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed a high degree of synteny among the grasses; however, it is not known if this synteny extends to other major monocot groups such as the Asparagales. Although we previously reported no evidence for synteny at the recombinational level between onion and rice, microsynteny may exist across shorter genomic regions in the grasses and Asparagales. We sequenced nine asparagus BACs to reveal physically linked genic-like sequences and determined their most similar positions in the onion and rice genomes. Four of the asparagus BACs were selected using molecular markers tightly linked to the sex-determining M locus on chromosome 5 of asparagus. These BACs possessed only two putative coding regions and had long tracts of degenerated retroviral elements and transposons. Five asparagus BACs were selected after hybridization of three onion cDNAs that mapped to three different onion chromosomes. Genic-like sequences that were physically linked on the cDNA-selected BACs or genetically linked on the M-linked BACs showed significant similarities (e < -20) to expressed sequences on different rice chromosomes, revealing no evidence for microsynteny between asparagus and rice across these regions. Genic-like sequences that were linked in asparagus were used to identify highly similar (e < -20) expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of onion. These onion ESTs mapped to different onion chromosomes and no relationship was observed between physical or genetic linkages in asparagus and genetic linkages in onion. These results further indicate that synteny among grass genomes does not extend to a sister order in the monocots and that asparagus may not be an appropriate smaller genome

  6. Exploiting Single-Cell Quantitative Data to Map Genetic Variants Having Probabilistic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Chuffart, Florent; Jost, Daniel; Burny, Claire; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Yvert, Gaël

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in sequencing technologies, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) remain limited by a statistical-power issue: many polymorphisms contribute little to common trait variation and therefore escape detection. The small contribution sometimes corresponds to incomplete penetrance, which may result from probabilistic effects on molecular regulations. In such cases, genetic mapping may benefit from the wealth of data produced by single-cell technologies. We present here the development of a novel genetic mapping method that allows to scan genomes for single-cell Probabilistic Trait Loci that modify the statistical properties of cellular-level quantitative traits. Phenotypic values are acquired on thousands of individual cells, and genetic association is obtained from a multivariate analysis of a matrix of Kantorovich distances. No prior assumption is required on the mode of action of the genetic loci involved and, by exploiting all single-cell values, the method can reveal non-deterministic effects. Using both simulations and yeast experimental datasets, we show that it can detect linkages that are missed by classical genetic mapping. A probabilistic effect of a single SNP on cell shape was detected and validated. The method also detected a novel locus associated with elevated gene expression noise of the yeast galactose regulon. Our results illustrate how single-cell technologies can be exploited to improve the genetic dissection of certain common traits. The method is available as an open source R package called ptlmapper. PMID:27479122

  7. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  8. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Comparing Two Forms of Concept Map Critique Activities to Facilitate Knowledge Integration Processes in Evolution Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendimann, Beat A.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    Concept map activities often lack a subsequent revision step that facilitates knowledge integration. This study compares two collaborative critique activities using a Knowledge Integration Map (KIM), a form of concept map. Four classes of high school biology students (n?=?81) using an online inquiry-based learning unit on evolution were assigned…

  10. Fine genetic mapping localizes cucumber scab resistance gene Ccu into an R gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Kang, Houxiang; Weng, Yiqun; Yang, Yuhong; Zhang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Shengping; Mao, Zhenchuan; Cheng, Guohua; Gu, Xingfang; Huang, Sanwen; Xie, Bingyan

    2011-03-01

    Scab, caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F(9) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and 1,944 F(2) plants derived from the resistant cucumber inbred line 9110Gt and the susceptible line 9930, whose draft genome sequence is now available. A framework linkage map was first constructed with simple sequence repeat markers placing Ccu into the terminal 670 kb region of cucumber Chromosome 2. The 9110Gt genome was sequenced at 5× genome coverage with the Solexa next-generation sequencing technology. Sequence analysis of the assembled 9110Gt contigs and the Ccu region of the 9930 genome identified three insertion/deletion (Indel) markers, Indel01, Indel02, and Indel03 that were closely linked with the Ccu locus. On the high-resolution map developed with the F(2) population, the two closest flanking markers, Indel01 and Indel02, were 0.14 and 0.15 cM away from the target gene Ccu, respectively, and the physical distance between the two markers was approximately 140 kb. Detailed annotation of the 180 kb region harboring the Ccu locus identified a cluster of six resistance gene analogs (RGAs) that belong to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) type R genes. Four RGAs were in the region delimited by markers Indel01 and Indel02, and thus were possible candidates of Ccu. Comparative DNA analysis of this cucumber Ccu gene region with a melon (C. melo) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone revealed a high degree of micro-synteny and conservation of the RGA tandem repeats in this region. PMID:21104067

  11. Comparative physical mapping links conservation of microsynteny to chromosome structure and recombination in grasses

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John E.; Arias, Miguel A.; Asher, Rochelle; Avise, Jennifer A.; Ball, Robert T.; Brewer, Gene A.; Buss, Ryan W.; Chen, Amy H.; Edwards, Thomas M.; Estill, James C.; Exum, Heather E.; Goff, Valorie H.; Herrick, Kristen L.; Steele, Cassie L. James; Karunakaran, Santhosh; Lafayette, Gmerice K.; Lemke, Cornelia; Marler, Barry S.; Masters, Shelley L.; McMillan, Joana M.; Nelson, Lisa K.; Newsome, Graham A.; Nwakanma, Chike C.; Odeh, Rosana N.; Phelps, Cynthia A.; Rarick, Elizabeth A.; Rogers, Carl J.; Ryan, Sean P.; Slaughter, Keimun A.; Soderlund, Carol A.; Tang, Haibao; Wing, Rod A.; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2005-01-01

    Nearly finished sequences for model organisms provide a foundation from which to explore genomic diversity among other taxonomic groups. We explore genome-wide microsynteny patterns between the rice sequence and two sorghum physical maps that integrate genetic markers, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) fingerprints, and BAC hybridization data. The sorghum maps largely tile a genomic component containing 41% of BACs but 80% of single-copy genes that shows conserved microsynteny with rice and partially tile a nonsyntenic component containing 46% of BACs but only 13% of single-copy genes. The remaining BACs are centromeric (4%) or unassigned (8%). The two genomic components correspond to cytologically discernible “euchromatin” and “heterochromatin.” Gene and repetitive DNA distributions support this classification. Greater microcolinearity in recombinogenic (euchromatic) than nonrecombinogenic (heterochromatic) regions is consistent with the hypothesis that genomic rearrangements are usually deleterious, thus more likely to persist in nonrecombinogenic regions by virtue of Muller's ratchet. Interchromosomal centromeric rearrangements may have fostered diploidization of a polyploid cereal progenitor. Model plant sequences better guide studies of related genomes in recombinogenic than nonrecombinogenic regions. Bridging of 35 physical gaps in the rice sequence by sorghum BAC contigs illustrates reciprocal benefits of comparative approaches that extend at least across the cereals and perhaps beyond. PMID:16141333

  12. Construction of the first genetic linkage map of Japanese gentian (Gentianaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Japanese gentians (Gentiana triflora and Gentiana scabra) are amongst the most popular floricultural plants in Japan. However, genomic resources for Japanese gentians have not yet been developed, mainly because of the heterozygous genome structure conserved by outcrossing, the long juvenile period, and limited knowledge about the inheritance of important traits. In this study, we developed a genetic linkage map to improve breeding programs of Japanese gentians. Results Enriched simple sequence repeat (SSR) libraries from a G. triflora double haploid line yielded almost 20,000 clones using 454 pyrosequencing technology, 6.7% of which could be used to design SSR markers. To increase the number of molecular markers, we identified three putative long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences using the recently developed inter-primer binding site (iPBS) method. We also developed retrotransposon microsatellite amplified polymorphism (REMAP) markers combining retrotransposon and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. In addition to SSR and REMAP markers, modified amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and random amplification polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were developed. Using 93 BC1 progeny from G. scabra backcrossed with a G. triflora double haploid line, 19 linkage groups were constructed with a total of 263 markers (97 SSR, 97 AFLP, 39 RAPD, and 30 REMAP markers). One phenotypic trait (stem color) and 10 functional markers related to genes controlling flower color, flowering time and cold tolerance were assigned to the linkage map, confirming its utility. Conclusions This is the first reported genetic linkage map for Japanese gentians and for any species belonging to the family Gentianaceae. As demonstrated by mapping of functional markers and the stem color trait, our results will help to explain the genetic basis of agronomic important traits, and will be useful for marker-assisted selection in gentian breeding programs. Our map will also be an

  13. A 4103 marker integrated physical and comparative map of the horse genome

    PubMed Central

    Raudsepp, Terje; Gustafson-Seabury, Ashley; Durkin, Keith; Wagner, Michelle L.; Goh, Glenda; Seabury, Christopher M.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice; Lee, Eun-Joon; Agarwala, Richa; Rice, Edward Stallknecht; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Skow, Loren C.; Tozaki, Teruaki; Yasue, Hiroshi; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Lyons, Leslie A.; Khazanehdari, Kamal A.; Binns, Matthew M.; MacLeod, James N.; Distl, Ottmar; Guérin, Gérard; Leeb, Tosso; Mickelson, James R.; Chowdhary, Bhanu P.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive second-generation whole genome radiation hybrid (RH II), cytogenetic and comparative map of the horse genome (2n=64) has been developed using the 5000rad horse × hamster radiation hybrid panel and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The map contains 4,103 markers (3,816 RH, 1,144 FISH) assigned to all 31 pairs of autosomes and the X chromosome. The RH maps of individual chromosomes are anchored and oriented using 857 cytogenetic markers. The overall resolution of the map is one marker per 775 kilobase-pairs (kb), which represents a more than five-fold improvement over the first-generation map. The RH II incorporates 920 markers shared jointly with the two recently reported meiotic maps. Consequently the two maps were aligned with the RH II maps of individual autosomes and the X chromosome. Additionally, a comparative map of the horse genome was generated by connecting 1,904 loci on the horse map with genome sequences available for eight diverse vertebrates to highlight regions of evolutionarily conserved syntenies, linkages and chromosomal breakpoints. The integrated map thus obtained presents the most comprehensive information on the physical and comparative organization of the equine genome and will assist future assemblies of whole genome BAC fingerprint maps and the genome sequence. It will also serve as a tool to identify genes governing health, disease and performance traits in horses and assist us in understanding the evolution of the equine genome in relation to other species. PMID:18931483

  14. Fine Genetic Mapping Localizes Cucumber Scab Resistance Gene Ccu into an R Gene Cluster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scab caused by Cladosporium cucumerinum, is an important disease of cucumber, Cucumis sativus. In this study, we conducted fine genetic mapping of the single dominant scab resistance gene, Ccu, with 148 F9 recombination inbreeding lines (RILs) and 1,944 F2 plants derived from the resistant cucum...

  15. Genetic Mapping of Sulfur Assimilation Genes Reveals a QTL for Onion Bulb Pungency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onion exhibits wide genetic and environmental variation in bioactive organosulfur compounds that impart pungency and health benefits. A PCR-based molecular marker map that included candidate genes for sulfur assimilation was used to identify genomic regions affecting pungency in the cross 'W202A' x ...

  16. Genetic dissection of heterosis using epistatic QTL mapping in partial NCII mating design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterosis refers to the phenomenon in which hybrid F1 exhibits enhanced growth or agronomic performance. However, theoretical studies on the genetic basis of heterosis were based on bi-parental segregation populations instead of multiple-parental hybrid F1 populations. In simulation study, we mapped...

  17. Microdissection and microcloning of mid-chromosome 4: Genetic mapping of 41 microdissection clones

    SciTech Connect

    Bahary, N.; McGraw, D.E.; Shilling, R.; Friedman, J.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Available genetic information places the mouse db (diabetes) gene approximately 5 cM distal to Ifa on mid/distal mouse chromosome 4. These data have indicated that there is a relevant paucity of genetic markers that map to this region of chromosome 4. To increase the density of the genetic map on mid-chromosome 4, the authors have applied the techniques of microdissection and microcloning of the mid-portion of mouse chromosome 4. A total of 47 RFLPs from the microdissection library were used to type the progeny of three C57BL/6J Mus spretus backcrosses. The resulting composite genetic map positions seven known genes, 41 microclones, and three other anonymous markers to a region of approximately 21 cM on mid-chromosome 4 extending from b to Lck. The density of markers in this region of chromosome 4 should be sufficient to initiate the physical mapping of this subchromosomal segment, facilitating efforts to clone the db gene, as well as other uncloned mutant loci in this region of chromosome 4. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A Genetic Linkage Map of Mycosphaerella Fijiensis, using SSR and DArT Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the causal agent of black leaf streak or Black Sigatoka disease in bananas. This pathogen threatens global banana production as the main export Cavendish cultivars are highly susceptible. Previously a genetic linkage map was generated predominantly using anonymous AFLP ma...

  19. Genetic Mapping of a Triticum monococcum-derived Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene in Common Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powdery mildew of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a major fungal disease caused by Blumeria graminis DC f sp. tritici. A microsatellite linkage map was developed for the T. monococcum-derived powdery mildew resistant gene present in the North Carolina germplasm line NCBGT96A6 (NCA6). Genetic analys...

  20. Genetic mapping analysis of bread-making quality traits in spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we assess the genetic architecture of bread-making quality traits in spring wheat. A mapping population derived from BR34 and Grandin, a soft x hard cross, was used to measure 20 end-use quality traits including six kernel characteristics, seven milling and flour traits, four dough mi...

  1. Mapping Authors in Intellectual Space: Population Genetics in the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Katherine W.

    1989-01-01

    Uses multidimensional scaling and clustering analysis of the co-citation patterns of 58 authors to explore the intellectual organization of population genetics and related specialties. Concludes that co-cited author mapping, with the author as the unit of analysis, is likely to complement studies of informal communication networks. (SR)

  2. GENETIC LINKAGE MAP FOR WATERMELON: SEGREGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF DNA MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic linkage map is being constructed for watermelon based on a testcross population and an F2 population. About 51.0% and 31.8% of the markers in the testcross and F2 populations are skewed from the expected segregation ratios. AFLP markers appeared to be clustered on linkage regions, while IS...

  3. Evolution of the Oat Genetic Road Map: From Tetraploid to Hexaploid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of a genetic linkage map for hexaploid oat (Avena sativa L. 2n = 6 x = 42) that defines all 21 chromosomes has been hindered due to the lack of oat-based markers and the size and complexity of the oat genome. Recent efforts in oat DArT, SSR, and SNP marker development should improve...

  4. Transcriptome sequencing to produce a SNP-based genetic map of onion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequencing the onion genome is challenging because of its enormous size (16 giga base pairs DNA per haploid genome). Pilot sequencing of onion transcripts showed sufficient numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to develop a detailed genetic map. We sequenced 2.5 Roche-454 plates of norma...

  5. Comparative global albedo and color maps of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Mosher, Joel A.

    1991-01-01

    The surfaces of the Uranian satellites Ariel, Miranda, Oberon, Titania, and Umbriel are characterized on the basis of Voyager observations. Tables of spectrophotometric data and maps of normal reflectances, green/violet ratios, and possible geological formations are presented and discussed in detail. Variations in albedo are found to be associated with impact features, and it is inferred from color differences that the upper surface of Ariel contains a higher proportion of redder material (tentatively identified as accreted low-albedo meteoritic dust) than those of the other moons.

  6. Genetic mapping of wild introgressions into cultivated peanut: a way toward enlarging the genetic basis of a recent allotetraploid

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is widely used as a food and cash crop around the world. It is considered to be an allotetraploid (2n = 4x = 40) originated from a single hybridization event between two wild diploids. The most probable hypothesis gave A. duranensis as the wild donor of the A genome and A. ipaënsis as the wild donor of the B genome. A low level of molecular polymorphism is found in cultivated germplasm and up to date few genetic linkage maps have been published. The utilization of wild germplasm in breeding programs has received little attention due to the reproductive barriers between wild and cultivated species and to the technical difficulties encountered in making large number of crosses. We report here the development of a SSR based genetic map and the analysis of genome-wide segment introgressions into the background of a cultivated variety through the utilization of a synthetic amphidiploid between A. duranensis and A. ipaënsis. Results Two hundred ninety eight (298) loci were mapped in 21 linkage groups (LGs), spanning a total map distance of 1843.7 cM with an average distance of 6.1 cM between adjacent markers. The level of polymorphism observed between the parent of the amphidiploid and the cultivated variety is consistent with A. duranensis and A. ipaënsis being the most probable donor of the A and B genomes respectively. The synteny analysis between the A and B genomes revealed an overall good collinearity of the homeologous LGs. The comparison with the diploid and tetraploid maps shed new light on the evolutionary forces that contributed to the divergence of the A and B genome species and raised the question of the classification of the B genome species. Structural modifications such as chromosomal segment inversions and a major translocation event prior to the tetraploidisation of the cultivated species were revealed. Marker assisted selection of BC1F1 and then BC2F1 lines carrying the desirable donor segment with the best

  7. Genetic linkage map of Chinese native variety faba bean (Vicia faba L.) based on simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker is a powerful tool for construction of genetic linkage map which can be applied for locating quantitative trait loci (QTL) and marker-assisted selection (MAS). In this study, a genetic map of faba bean was constructed with SSR markers using a population of 129 F2 ...

  8. A combinatorial approach of comprehensive QTL-based comparative genome mapping and transcript profiling identified a seed weight-regulating candidate gene in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Khan, Yusuf; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Shree, Tanima; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C L L; Singh, Sube; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Chattopdhyay, Debasis; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-01-01

    High experimental validation/genotyping success rate (94-96%) and intra-specific polymorphic potential (82-96%) of 1536 SNP and 472 SSR markers showing in silico polymorphism between desi ICC 4958 and kabuli ICC 12968 chickpea was obtained in a 190 mapping population (ICC 4958 × ICC 12968) and 92 diverse desi and kabuli genotypes. A high-density 2001 marker-based intra-specific genetic linkage map comprising of eight LGs constructed is comparatively much saturated (mean map-density: 0.94 cM) in contrast to existing intra-specific genetic maps in chickpea. Fifteen robust QTLs (PVE: 8.8-25.8% with LOD: 7.0-13.8) associated with pod and seed number/plant (PN and SN) and 100 seed weight (SW) were identified and mapped on 10 major genomic regions of eight LGs. One of 126.8 kb major genomic region harbouring a strong SW-associated robust QTL (Caq'SW1.1: 169.1-171.3 cM) has been delineated by integrating high-resolution QTL mapping with comprehensive marker-based comparative genome mapping and differential expression profiling. This identified one potential regulatory SNP (G/A) in the cis-acting element of candidate ERF (ethylene responsive factor) TF (transcription factor) gene governing seed weight in chickpea. The functionally relevant molecular tags identified have potential to be utilized for marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea. PMID:25786576

  9. Genetic and Molecular Mapping of Chromosome Region 85a in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. K.; Rawls-Jr., J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome region 85A contains at least 12 genetic complementation groups, including the genes dhod, pink and hunchback. In order to better understand the organization of this chromosomal segment and to permit molecular studies of these genes, we have carried out a genetic analysis coupled with a chromosome walk to isolate the DNA containing these genes. Complementation tests with chromosomal deficiencies permitted unambiguous ordering of most of the complementation groups identified within the 85A region. Recombinant bacteriophage clones were isolated that collectively span over 120 kb of 85A DNA and these were used to produce a molecular map of the region. The breakpoint sites of a number of 85A chromosome rearrangements were localized on the molecular map, thereby delimiting regions of the DNA that contain the various genetic complementation groups. PMID:2852138

  10. Genetic mapping of hph2, a mutation affecting amino acid transport in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Symula, D J; Shedlovsky, A; Dove, W F

    1997-02-01

    We describe the genetic mapping of hyperphenylal-aninemia 2 (hph2), a recessive mutation in the mouse that causes deficient amino acid transport similar to Hartnup disorder, a human genetic amino acid transport disorder. The hph2 locus was mapped in three separate crosses to identify candidate genes for hph2 and a region of homology in the human genome where we propose the Hartnup Disorder gene might lie. The mutation maps to mouse Chromosome (Chr) 7 distal of the simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) marker D7Mit140 and does not recombine with D7Nds4, an SSLP marker in the fibroblast growth factor 3 (Fgf3) gene. Unexpectedly, the mutant chromosome affects recombination frequency in the D7Mit12 to D7Nds4 interval. PMID:9060407

  11. Construction of the first high-density genetic linkage map of Salvia miltiorrhiza using specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Guo, Linlin; Pan, Yuling; Zhao, Qi; Wang , Jianhua; Song, Zhenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal crop in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Knowledge of its genetic foundation is limited because sufficient molecular markers have not been developed, and therefore a high-density genetic linkage map is incomplete. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-throughput strategy for large-scale SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) discovery and genotyping based on next generation sequencing (NGS). In this study, genomic DNA extracted from two parents and their 96 F1 individuals was subjected to high-throughput sequencing and SLAF library construction. A total of 155.96 Mb of data containing 155,958,181 pair-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average coverage of each SLAF marker was 83.43-fold for the parents compared with 10.36-fold for the F1 offspring. The final linkage map consists of 5,164 SLAFs in 8 linkage groups (LGs) and spans 1,516.43 cM, with an average distance of 0.29 cM between adjacent markers. The results will not only provide a platform for mapping quantitative trait loci but also offer a critical new tool for S. miltiorrhiza biotechnology and comparative genomics as well as a valuable reference for TCM studies. PMID:27040179

  12. Construction of the first high-density genetic linkage map of Salvia miltiorrhiza using specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Guo, Linlin; Pan, Yuling; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Jianhua; Song, Zhenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal crop in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Knowledge of its genetic foundation is limited because sufficient molecular markers have not been developed, and therefore a high-density genetic linkage map is incomplete. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-throughput strategy for large-scale SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) discovery and genotyping based on next generation sequencing (NGS). In this study, genomic DNA extracted from two parents and their 96 F1 individuals was subjected to high-throughput sequencing and SLAF library construction. A total of 155.96 Mb of data containing 155,958,181 pair-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average coverage of each SLAF marker was 83.43-fold for the parents compared with 10.36-fold for the F1 offspring. The final linkage map consists of 5,164 SLAFs in 8 linkage groups (LGs) and spans 1,516.43 cM, with an average distance of 0.29 cM between adjacent markers. The results will not only provide a platform for mapping quantitative trait loci but also offer a critical new tool for S. miltiorrhiza biotechnology and comparative genomics as well as a valuable reference for TCM studies. PMID:27040179

  13. Genetic mapping of tumor susceptibility genes involved in mouse plasmacytomagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.A.; Krall, M.M.; Dosik, J.K. )

    1993-10-15

    Plasmacytomas (PCTs) were induced in 47% of BALB/cAnPt mice by the intraperitoneal injection of pristane, in 2% of (BALB/c [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1], and in 11% of 773 BALB/cAnPt [times] (BALB/cAnPt [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1]N[sub 2] backcross mice. This result indicates a multigenic mode of inheritance for PCT susceptibility. To locate genes controlling this complex genetic trait, tumor susceptibility in backcross progeny generated from BALB/c and DBA/2N (resistant) mice was correlated with alleles of 83 marker loci. The genotypes of the PCT-susceptible progeny displayed an excess homozygosity for BALB/c alleles with a 32-centimorgan stretch of mouse chromosome 4 (>95% probability of linkage) with minimal recombination (12%) near Gt10. Another susceptibility gene on mouse chromosome 1 may be linked to Fcgr2 (90% probability of linkage); there were excess heterozygotes for Fcgr2 among the susceptible progeny and excess homozygotes among the resistant progeny. Regions of mouse chromosomes 4 and 1 that are correlated with PCT susceptibility share extensive linkage homology with regions of human chromosome 1 that have been associated with cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma and lymphoid, breast, and endocrine tumors. 68 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Mapping genetic and phylogenetic diversity of a temperate forest using remote sensing based upscaling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escriba, C. G.; Yamasaki, E.; Leiterer, R.; Tedder, A.; Shimizu, K.; Morsdorf, F.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Functioning and resilience of forest ecosystems under environmental pressures increases when biodiversity at genetic, species, canopy and ecosystem level is higher. Therefore mapping and monitoring diversity becomes a necessity to assess changes in ecosystems and understanding their consequences. Diversity can be assessed by using different metrics, such as diversity of functional traits or genetic diversity amongst others. In-situ approaches have provided useful, but usually spatially constrained information, often dependent on expert knowledge. We propose using remote sensing in combination with in-situ sampling at different spatial scales. We map phylogenetic and genetic diversity using airborne imaging spectroscopy in combination with terrestrial and airborne laser scanning, as well as exhaustive in-situ sampling schemes. To this end, we propose to link leaf optical properties using a taxonomic approach (spectranomics) to genetic and phylogenetic diversity. The test site is a managed mixed temperate forest on the south-facing slope of Laegern Mountain, Switzerland (47°28'42.0" N, 8°21'51.8" E, 682 m.a.s.l.). The intensive sampling area is roughly 300m x 300m and dominant species are European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Ash (Fraxinus excelsior). We perform phylogenetic and intraspecific genetic variation analyses for the five most dominant tree species at the test site. For these species, information on functional biochemical and architectural plant traits diversity is retrieved from imaging spectroscopy and laser scanning data and validated with laboratory and in-situ measurements. To assess regional-scale genetic diversity, the phylogenetic and genetic signals are quantified using the remote sensing data, resulting in spatially distributed intra-specific genetic variation. We discuss the usefulness of combined remote sensing and in-situ sampling, to bridge diversity scales from genetic to canopy level.

  15. Genetic bases of renal agenesis in the ACI rat: mapping of Renag1 to chromosome 14.

    PubMed

    Shull, James D; Lachel, Cynthia M; Strecker, Tracy E; Spady, Thomas J; Tochacek, Martin; Pennington, Karen L; Murrin, Clare R; Meza, Jane L; Schaffer, Beverly S; Flood, Lisa A; Gould, Karen A

    2006-07-01

    Unilateral renal agenesis (URA) is a common developmental defect in humans, occurring at a frequency of approximately 1 in 500-1,000 births. Several genetic syndromes include bilateral or unilateral renal agenesis as an associated phenotype. However, URA frequently occurs in individuals not afflicted by these syndromes and is often asymptomatic. Although it is clear that genetic factors contribute to the etiology of URA, the genetic bases of URA are poorly defined at this time. ACI rats, both males and females, exhibit URA at an incidence of 5%-15%. In this article we characterize the incidence of URA in female and male F(1), F(2), and backcross (BC) progeny from reciprocal genetic crosses between the ACI strain and the unaffected Brown Norway (BN) strain. Through interval mapping analyses of 353 phenotypically defined female F(2) progeny, we mapped to rat Chromosome 14 (RNO14) a genetic locus, designated Renag1 (Renal agenesis 1), that serves as the major determinant of URA in these crosses. Further genotypic analyses of URA-affected female and male F(2) and BC progeny localized Renag1 to a 14.4-Mb interval on RNO14 bounded by markers D14Rat50 and D14Rat12. The data from these genetic studies suggest that the ACI allele of Renag1 acts in an incompletely dominant and incompletely penetrant manner to confer URA. PMID:16845468

  16. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange. PMID:26083847

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Global Cropping Systems Models and Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. B.; You, L.; Wood, S.; Wood-Sichra, U.; Wu, W.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural practices have dramatically altered the land cover of the Earth, but the spatial extent and intensity of these practices is often difficult to catalogue. Cropland accounts for nearly 15 million km2 of the Earth's land cover - amounting to 12% of the Earth's ice-free land surface - yet information on the distribution and performance of specific crops is often available only through national or sub-national statistics. While remote sensing products offer spatially disaggregated information, those currently available on a global scale are ill-suited for many applications due to the limited separation of crop types within the area classified as cropland. Recently, however, there have been multiple independent efforts to incorporate the detailed information available from statistical surveys with supplemental spatial information to produce a spatially explicit global dataset specific to individual cropss for the year 2000. While these datasets provide analysts and decision makers with improved information on global cropping systems, the final global cropping maps differ from one another substantially. This study aims to explore and quantify systematic similarities and differences between four major global cropping systems products: the monthly irrigated and rainfed crop areas around the year 2000 (MIRAC2000) dataset, the spatial production allocation model (SPAM), the global agro-ecological zone (GAEZ) dataset, and the dataset developed by Monfreda et al., 2008. The analysis explores not only the final cropping systems maps but also the interdependencies of each product, methodological differences and modeling assumptions, which will provide users with information vital for discerning between datasets in selecting a product appropriate for each intended application.

  18. An Ultra-High-Density, Transcript-Based, Genetic Map of Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Truco, Maria José; Ashrafi, Hamid; Kozik, Alexander; van Leeuwen, Hans; Bowers, John; Wo, Sebastian Reyes Chin; Stoffel, Kevin; Xu, Huaqin; Hill, Theresa; Van Deynze, Allen; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    We have generated an ultra-high-density genetic map for lettuce, an economically important member of the Compositae, consisting of 12,842 unigenes (13,943 markers) mapped in 3696 genetic bins distributed over nine chromosomal linkage groups. Genomic DNA was hybridized to a custom Affymetrix oligonucleotide array containing 6.4 million features representing 35,628 unigenes of Lactuca spp. Segregation of single-position polymorphisms was analyzed using 213 F7:8 recombinant inbred lines that had been generated by crossing cultivated Lactuca sativa cv. Salinas and L. serriola acc. US96UC23, the wild progenitor species of L. sativa. The high level of replication of each allele in the recombinant inbred lines was exploited to identify single-position polymorphisms that were assigned to parental haplotypes. Marker information has been made available using GBrowse to facilitate access to the map. This map has been anchored to the previously published integrated map of lettuce providing candidate genes for multiple phenotypes. The high density of markers achieved in this ultradense map allowed syntenic studies between lettuce and Vitis vinifera as well as other plant species. PMID:23550116

  19. Comparative mapping in intraspecific populations uncovers a high degree of macrosynteny between A- and B-genome diploid species of peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cultivated peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important oilseed crop with an allotetraploid genome (AABB, 2n = 4x = 40). Both the low level of genetic variation within the cultivated gene pool and its polyploid nature limit the utilization of molecular markers to explore genome structure and facilitate genetic improvement. Nevertheless, a wealth of genetic diversity exists in diploid Arachis species (2n = 2x = 20), which represent a valuable gene pool for cultivated peanut improvement. Interspecific populations have been used widely for genetic mapping in diploid species of Arachis. However, an intraspecific mapping strategy was essential to detect chromosomal rearrangements among species that could be obscured by mapping in interspecific populations. To develop intraspecific reference linkage maps and gain insights into karyotypic evolution within the genus, we comparatively mapped the A- and B-genome diploid species using intraspecific F2 populations. Exploring genome organization among diploid peanut species by comparative mapping will enhance our understanding of the cultivated tetraploid peanut genome. Moreover, new sources of molecular markers that are highly transferable between species and developed from expressed genes will be required to construct saturated genetic maps for peanut. Results A total of 2,138 EST-SSR (expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat) markers were developed by mining a tetraploid peanut EST assembly including 101,132 unigenes (37,916 contigs and 63,216 singletons) derived from 70,771 long-read (Sanger) and 270,957 short-read (454) sequences. A set of 97 SSR markers were also developed by mining 9,517 genomic survey sequences of Arachis. An SSR-based intraspecific linkage map was constructed using an F2 population derived from a cross between K 9484 (PI 298639) and GKBSPSc 30081 (PI 468327) in the B-genome species A. batizocoi. A high degree of macrosynteny was observed when comparing the

  20. Footprints in time: comparative quantitative trait loci mapping of the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, William E; Emerson, Kevin J; Catchen, Julian M; Cresko, William A; Holzapfel, Christina M

    2012-11-22

    Identifying regions of the genome contributing to phenotypic evolution often involves genetic mapping of quantitative traits. The focus then turns to identifying regions of 'major' effect, overlooking the observation that traits of ecological or evolutionary relevance usually involve many genes whose individual effects are small but whose cumulative effect is large. Herein, we use the power of fully interfertile natural populations of a single species of mosquito to develop three quantitative trait loci (QTL) maps: one between two post-glacially diverged populations and two between a more ancient and a post-glacial population. All demonstrate that photoperiodic response is genetically a highly complex trait. Furthermore, we show that marker regressions identify apparently 'non-significant' regions of the genome not identified by composite interval mapping, that the perception of the genetic basis of adaptive evolution is crucially dependent upon genetic background and that the genetic basis for adaptive evolution of photoperiodic response is highly variable within contemporary populations as well as between anciently diverged populations. PMID:23015622

  1. Footprints in time: comparative quantitative trait loci mapping of the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, William E.; Emerson, Kevin J.; Catchen, Julian M.; Cresko, William A.; Holzapfel, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying regions of the genome contributing to phenotypic evolution often involves genetic mapping of quantitative traits. The focus then turns to identifying regions of ‘major’ effect, overlooking the observation that traits of ecological or evolutionary relevance usually involve many genes whose individual effects are small but whose cumulative effect is large. Herein, we use the power of fully interfertile natural populations of a single species of mosquito to develop three quantitative trait loci (QTL) maps: one between two post-glacially diverged populations and two between a more ancient and a post-glacial population. All demonstrate that photoperiodic response is genetically a highly complex trait. Furthermore, we show that marker regressions identify apparently ‘non-significant’ regions of the genome not identified by composite interval mapping, that the perception of the genetic basis of adaptive evolution is crucially dependent upon genetic background and that the genetic basis for adaptive evolution of photoperiodic response is highly variable within contemporary populations as well as between anciently diverged populations. PMID:23015622

  2. Identifying Genetic Hotspots by Mapping Molecular Diversity of Widespread Trees: When Commonness Matters.

    PubMed

    Souto, Cintia P; Mathiasen, Paula; Acosta, María Cristina; Quiroga, María Paula; Vidal-Russell, Romina; Echeverría, Cristian; Premoli, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Conservation planning requires setting priorities at the same spatial scale at which decision-making processes are undertaken considering all levels of biodiversity, but current methods for identifying biodiversity hotspots ignore its genetic component. We developed a fine-scale approach based on the definition of genetic hotspots, which have high genetic diversity and unique variants that represent their evolutionary potential and evolutionary novelties. Our hypothesis is that wide-ranging taxa with similar ecological tolerances, yet of phylogenetically independent lineages, have been and currently are shaped by ecological and evolutionary forces that result in geographically concordant genetic patterns. We mapped previously published genetic diversity and unique variants of biparentally inherited markers and chloroplast sequences for 9 species from 188 and 275 populations, respectively, of the 4 woody dominant families of the austral temperate forest, an area considered a biodiversity hotspot. Spatial distribution patterns of genetic polymorphisms differed among taxa according to their ecological tolerances. Eight genetic hotspots were detected and we recommend conservation actions for some in the southern Coastal Range in Chile. Existing spatially explicit genetic data from multiple populations and species can help to identify biodiversity hotspots and guide conservation actions to establish science-based protected areas that will preserve the evolutionary potential of key habitats and species. PMID:26245788

  3. Genetic Characterization of Human Populations: From ABO to a Genetic Map of the British People

    PubMed Central

    Bodmer, Walter

    2015-01-01

    From 1900, when Landsteiner first described the ABO blood groups, to the present, the methods used to characterize the genetics of human populations have undergone a remarkable development. Concomitantly, our understanding of the history and spread of human populations across the earth has become much more detailed. As has often been said, a better understanding of the genetic relationships among the peoples of the world is one of the best antidotes to racial prejudices. Such an understanding provides us with a fascinating, improved insight into our origins as well as with valuable information about population differences that are of medical relevance. The study of genetic polymorphisms has been essential to the analysis of the relationships between human populations. The evolution of methods used to study human polymorphisms and the resulting contributions to our understanding of human health and history is the subject of this Perspectives. PMID:25657345

  4. Genetic mapping of fall armyworm resistance in Zoysiagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular tools have not identified markers for host plant resistance to fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)], one of the most damaging insect pests in the southeastern U.S., in turfgrasses. Available QTLs in corn have not been further assessed for utility as comparative markers for ...

  5. Toward an Integrated Linkage Map of Common Bean. III. Mapping Genetic Factors Controlling Host-Bacteria Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nodari, R. O.; Tsai, S. M.; Guzman, P.; Gilbertson, R. L.; Gepts, P.

    1993-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based genetic linkage maps allow us to dissect the genetic control of quantitative traits (QT) by locating individual quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on the linkage map and determining their type of gene action and the magnitude of their contribution to the phenotype of the QT. We have performed such an analysis for two traits in common bean, involving interactions between the plant host and bacteria, namely Rhizobium nodule number (NN) and resistance to common bacterial blight (CBB) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli. Analyses were conducted in the progeny of a cross between BAT93 (fewer nodules; moderately resistant to CBB) and Jalo EEP558 (more nodules; susceptible to CBB). An RFLP-based linkage map for common bean based on 152 markers had previously been derived in the F(2) of this cross. Seventy F(2)-derived F(3) families were inoculated in separate greenhouse experiments with Rhizobium tropici strain UMR1899 or X. c. pv. phaseoli isolate isolate W18. Regression and interval mapping analyses were used to identify genomic regions involved in the genetic control of these traits. These two methods identified the same genomic regions for each trait, with a few exceptions. For each trait, at least four putative QTLs were identified, which accounted for approximately 50% and 75% of the phenotypic variation in NN and CBB resistance, respectively. A chromosome region on linkage group D7 carried factor(s) influencing both traits. In all other cases, the putative QTLs affecting NN and CBB were located in different linkage groups or in the same linkage group, but far apart (more than 50 cM). Both BAT93 and Jalo EEP558 contributed alleles associated with higher NN, whereas CBB resistance was always associated with BAT93 alleles. Further investigations are needed to determine whether the QTLs for NN and CBB on linkage group D7 represent linked genes or the same gene with pleiotropic effects. Identification of the

  6. Microsatellite marker based genetic linkage maps of Oreochromis aureus and O. niloticus (Cichlidae): extensive linkage group segment homologies revealed.

    PubMed

    McConnell, S K; Beynon, C; Leamon, J; Skibinski, D O

    2000-06-01

    Partial genetic linkage maps, based on microsatellite markers, were constructed for two tilapia species, Oreochromis aureus and Oreochromis niloticus using an interspecific backcross population. The linkage map for O. aureus comprised 28 markers on 10 linkage groups and covered 212.8 CM. Nine markers were mapped to four linkage groups on an O. niloticus female linkage map covering 40.6 CM. Results revealed a high degree of conservation of synteny between the linkage groups defined in O. aureus and the previously published genetic linkage map of O. niloticus. PMID:10895314

  7. Development of a genetic linkage map for Louisiana sugarcane: New microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers identified for LCP 85-384

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of the recently developed genetic linkage map of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) cultivar LCP 85-384 has been limited due to the small number of DNA markers, in particular microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers, on the map. Adding DNA markers to the map improves its usefulness in identifying assoc...

  8. Molecular characterisation and genetic mapping of candidate genes for qualitative disease resistance in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Dracatos, Peter M; Cogan, Noel OI; Sawbridge, Timothy I; Gendall, Anthony R; Smith, Kevin F; Spangenberg, German C; Forster, John W

    2009-01-01

    Background Qualitative pathogen resistance in both dicotyledenous and monocotyledonous plants has been attributed to the action of resistance (R) genes, including those encoding nucleotide binding site – leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins and receptor-like kinase enzymes. This study describes the large-scale isolation and characterisation of candidate R genes from perennial ryegrass. The analysis was based on the availability of an expressed sequence tag (EST) resource and a functionally-integrated bioinformatics database. Results Amplification of R gene sequences was performed using template EST data and information from orthologous candidate using a degenerate consensus PCR approach. A total of 102 unique partial R genes were cloned, sequenced and functionally annotated. Analysis of motif structure and R gene phylogeny demonstrated that Lolium R genes cluster with putative ortholoci, and evolved from common ancestral origins. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predicted through resequencing of amplicons from the parental genotypes of a genetic mapping family were validated, and 26 distinct R gene loci were assigned to multiple genetic maps. Clusters of largely non-related NBS-LRR genes were located at multiple distinct genomic locations and were commonly found in close proximity to previously mapped defence response (DR) genes. A comparative genomics analysis revealed the co-location of several candidate R genes with disease resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Conclusion This study is the most comprehensive analysis to date of qualitative disease resistance candidate genes in perennial ryegrass. SNPs identified within candidate genes provide a valuable resource for mapping in various ryegrass pair cross-derived populations and further germplasm analysis using association genetics. In parallel with the use of specific pathogen virulence races, such resources provide the means to identify gene-for-gene mechanisms for multiple host pathogen

  9. A Genetic Linkage Map of the Mouse Using Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning (Rlgs)

    PubMed Central

    Hayashizaki, Y.; Hirotsune, S.; Okazaki, Y.; Shibata, H.; Akasako, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Kawai, J.; Hirasawa, T.; Watanabe, S.; Shiroishi, T.; Moriwaki, K.; Taylor, B. A.; Matsuda, Y.; Elliott, R. W.; Manly, K. F.; Chapman, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a multiplex method of genome analysis, restriction landmark genomic scanning (RLGS) that has been used to construct genetic maps in mice. Restriction landmarks are end-labeled restriction fragments of genomic DNA that are separated by using high resolution, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identifying as many as two thousand landmark loci in a single gel. Variation for several hundred of these loci has been identified between laboratory strains and between these strains and Mus spretus. The segregation of more than 1100 RLGS loci has been analyxed in recombinant inbred (RI) strains and in two separate interspecific genetic crosses. Genetic maps have been derived that link 1045 RLGS loci to reference loci on all of the autosomes and the X chromosome of the mouse genome. The RLGS method can be applied to genome analysis in many different organisms to identify genomic loci because it used end-labeling of restriction landmarks rather than probe hybridization. Different combinations of restriction enzymes yield different sets of RLGS loci providing expanded power for genetic mapping. PMID:7896102

  10. Genetic and Physical Mapping of Telomeres in the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe Grisea

    PubMed Central

    Farman, M. L.; Leong, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Telomeric restriction fragments were genetically mapped to a previously described linkage map of Magnaporthe grisea, using RFLPs identified by a synthetic probe, (TTAGGG)(3). Frequent rearrangement of telomeric sequences was observed in progeny isolates creating a potential for misinterpretation of data. Therefore a consensus segregation data set was used to minimize mapping errors. Twelve of the 14 telomeres were found to be genetically linked to existing RFLP markers. Second-dimensional electrophoresis of restricted chromosomes confirmed these linkage assignments and revealed the chromosomal location of the two unlinked telomeres. We were thus able to assign all 14 M. grisea telomeres to their respective chromosome ends. The Achilles' cleavage (AC) technique was employed to determine that chromosome 1 markers 11 and CH5-120H were ~1.8 Mb and 1.28 Mb, respectively, from their nearest telomeres. RecA-AC was also used to determine that unlinked telomere 6 was ~530 kb from marker CH5-176H in strain 2539 and 580 kb in Guy11. These experiments indicated that large portions of some chromosome ends are unrepresented by genetic markers and provided estimates of the relationship of genetic to physical distance in these regions of the genome. PMID:7498730

  11. Development of INDEL Markers for Genetic Mapping Based on Whole Genome Resequencing in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaofeng; Wei, Haichao; Cheng, Wen; Yang, Suxin; Zhao, Yanxiu; Li, Xuan; Luo, Da; Zhang, Hui; Feng, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is an important crop worldwide. In this study, a Chinese local soybean cultivar, Hedou 12, was resequenced by next generation sequencing technology to develop INsertion/DELetion (INDEL) markers for genetic mapping. 49,276 INDEL polymorphisms and 242,059 single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between Hedou 12 and the Williams 82 reference sequence. Of these, 243 candidate INDEL markers ranging from 5–50 bp in length were chosen for validation, and 165 (68%) of them revealed polymorphisms between Hedou 12 and Williams 82. The validated INDEL markers were also tested in 12 other soybean cultivars. The number of polymorphisms in the pairwise comparisons of 14 soybean cultivars varied from 27 to 165. To test the utility of these INDEL markers, they were used to perform genetic mapping of a crinkly leaf mutant, and the CRINKLY LEAF locus was successfully mapped to a 360 kb region on chromosome 7. This research shows that high-throughput sequencing technologies can facilitate the development of genome-wide molecular markers for genetic mapping in soybean. PMID:26483012

  12. Diversity Array Technology Markers: Genetic Diversity Analyses and Linkage Map Construction in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N.; Aslam, M.N.; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A.; Kilian, A.; Sharpe, Andrew G.; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines ‘Lynx-037DH’ and ‘Monty-028DH’. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed. PMID:22193366

  13. Diversity array technology markers: genetic diversity analyses and linkage map construction in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N; Aslam, M N; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A; Kilian, A; Sharpe, Andrew G; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines 'Lynx-037DH' and 'Monty-028DH'. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed. PMID:22193366

  14. [A comparative study on genetic polymorphism and genetic relationship of 13 SNPs in three Chinese populations].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Heng; Liu, Li-Min; Zhao, Jin-Ling

    2009-03-01

    Using the fluorescence labeled capillary electrophoresis of multi-PCR technique, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing system of fragment length discrepant allele specific fluorescence labeled multi-PCR technique is established based on the principle of allele-specific PCR. The typing of the 13 SNP loci can be completed simultaneously according to the length of PCR products and the number of product peaks. It appears a single product peak when the SNP is homozygous, and two product peaks with 4 bp differences will appear when it is heterozygous. By using this system, we conducted population census about allele frequencies for 13 autosomal SNP loci in Southern Liaoning Han samples, Mongolian samples in Inner Mongolia and Zhuang samples in Guangxi area, and got the allele frequencies of the 13 SNP loci in the three populations, then preliminarily discussed their genetic relationship by comparing their differences in allelic polymorphism. The results indicate that the allelic distributions of the 13 SNP loci in the three populations are polymorphic, and the difference is significant in some SNP loci (P< or =0.01). The sampling survey shows that the result is consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and Han population in southern Liaoning has relatively closer relationship with Mongolian in Inner Mongolia than with Zhuang population in Guangxi by origin. PMID:19273440

  15. Comparative mRNA analysis of behavioral and genetic mouse models of aggression.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Tosto, Maria G; Pain, Oliver; Sluyter, Frans; Mineur, Yann S; Crusio, Wim E; de Boer, Sietse; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; Kesserwani, Jad; Robinson, Edward; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of aggression have traditionally compared strains, most notably BALB/cJ and C57BL/6. However, these strains were not designed to study aggression despite differences in aggression-related traits and distinct reactivity to stress. This study evaluated expression of genes differentially regulated in a stress (behavioral) mouse model of aggression with those from a recent genetic mouse model aggression. The study used a discovery-replication design using two independent mRNA studies from mouse brain tissue. The discovery study identified strain (BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J) × stress (chronic mild stress or control) interactions. Probe sets differentially regulated in the discovery set were intersected with those uncovered in the replication study, which evaluated differences between high and low aggressive animals from three strains specifically bred to study aggression. Network analysis was conducted on overlapping genes uncovered across both studies. A significant overlap was found with the genetic mouse study sharing 1,916 probe sets with the stress model. Fifty-one probe sets were found to be strongly dysregulated across both studies mapping to 50 known genes. Network analysis revealed two plausible pathways including one centered on the UBC gene hub which encodes ubiquitin, a protein well-known for protein degradation, and another on P38 MAPK. Findings from this study support the stress model of aggression, which showed remarkable molecular overlap with a genetic model. The study uncovered a set of candidate genes including the Erg2 gene, which has previously been implicated in different psychopathologies. The gene networks uncovered points at a Redox pathway as potentially being implicated in aggressive related behaviors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888158

  16. Genetic Mapping of MAPK-Mediated Complex Traits Across S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Treusch, Sebastian; Albert, Frank W.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kotenko, Iulia E.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways enable cells to sense and respond to their environment. Many cellular signaling strategies are conserved from fungi to humans, yet their activity and phenotypic consequences can vary extensively among individuals within a species. A systematic assessment of the impact of naturally occurring genetic variation on signaling pathways remains to be conducted. In S. cerevisiae, both response and resistance to stressors that activate signaling pathways differ between diverse isolates. Here, we present a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approach that enables us to identify genetic variants underlying such phenotypic differences across the genetic and phenotypic diversity of S. cerevisiae. Using a Round-robin cross between twelve diverse strains, we identified QTL that influence phenotypes critically dependent on MAPK signaling cascades. Genetic variants under these QTL fall within MAPK signaling networks themselves as well as other interconnected signaling pathways. Finally, we demonstrate how the mapping results from multiple strain background can be leveraged to narrow the search space of causal genetic variants. PMID:25569670

  17. Mapping Determinants of Gene Expression Plasticity by Genetical Genomics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gutteling, Evert W; Tijsterman, Marcel; Fu, Jingyuan; Riksen, Joost A. G; Hazendonk, Esther; Prins, Pjotr; Plasterk, Ronald H. A; Jansen, Ritsert C; Breitling, Rainer; Kammenga, Jan E

    2006-01-01

    Recent genetical genomics studies have provided intimate views on gene regulatory networks. Gene expression variations between genetically different individuals have been mapped to the causal regulatory regions, termed expression quantitative trait loci. Whether the environment-induced plastic response of gene expression also shows heritable difference has not yet been studied. Here we show that differential expression induced by temperatures of 16 °C and 24 °C has a strong genetic component in Caenorhabditis elegans recombinant inbred strains derived from a cross between strains CB4856 (Hawaii) and N2 (Bristol). No less than 59% of 308 trans-acting genes showed a significant eQTL-by-environment interaction, here termed plasticity quantitative trait loci. In contrast, only 8% of an estimated 188 cis-acting genes showed such interaction. This indicates that heritable differences in plastic responses of gene expression are largely regulated in trans. This regulation is spread over many different regulators. However, for one group of trans-genes we found prominent evidence for a common master regulator: a transband of 66 coregulated genes appeared at 24 °C. Our results suggest widespread genetic variation of differential expression responses to environmental impacts and demonstrate the potential of genetical genomics for mapping the molecular determinants of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:17196041

  18. Construction of a high-coverage bacterial artificial chromosome library and comprehensive genetic linkage map of yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese amberjack/yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) is a commonly cultured marine fish in Japan. For cost effective fish production, a breeding program that increases commercially important traits is one of the major solutions. In selective breeding, information of genetic markers is useful and sufficient to identify individuals carrying advantageous traits but if the aim is to determine the genetic basis of the trait, large insert genomic DNA libraries are essential. In this study, toward prospective understanding of genetic basis of several economically important traits, we constructed a high-coverage bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, obtained sequences from the BAC-end, and constructed comprehensive female and male linkage maps of yellowtail using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers developed from the BAC-end sequences and a yellowtail genomic library. Results The total insert length of the BAC library we constructed here was estimated to be approximately 11 Gb and hence 16-times larger than the yellowtail genome. Sequencing of the BAC-ends showed a low fraction of repetitive sequences comparable to that in Tetraodon and fugu. A total of 837 SSR markers developed here were distributed among 24 linkage groups spanning 1,026.70 and 1,057.83 cM with an average interval of 4.96 and 4.32 cM in female and male map respectively without any segregation distortion. Oxford grids suggested conserved synteny between yellowtail and stickleback. Conclusions In addition to characteristics of yellowtail genome such as low repetitive sequences and conserved synteny with stickleback, our genomic and genetic resources constructed and revealed here will be powerful tools for the yellowtail breeding program and also for studies regarding the genetic basis of traits. PMID:24684753

  19. Physical and genetic mapping of the muscle phosphofructokinase gene (PFKM): Reassignment to human chromosome 12q

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, T.D.; Akots, G.; Bowden, D.W.

    1996-05-15

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a key rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis and represents a major control point in the metabolism of glucose. There are at least three known isoforms of PFK in humans, referred to as the muscle, platelet, and liver forms, each of which is differentially expressed in various tissues. The gene for muscle phosphofructokinase, PFKM, is mutated in Tarui disease and conceivably contributes to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Based on physical and genetic mapping, we have found that the gene for PFKM does not map to chromosome 1 as previously described, but instead maps to chromosome 12. PCR analysis with a somatic cell hybrid mapping panel using primers derived from intron 6 and exon 18 of the PFKM gene showed consistent amplification of cell lines containing chromosome 12 (concordance, 100%). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with CEPH YAC 762G4, isolated with exon 18 primers, indicated that this clone maps to 12q13, centromeric to the diacylglycerol kinase gene (DAGK) at 12q13.3. A highly informative genetic marker isolated from YAC 762G4 was used to map PFKM genetically between the CHLC framework markers D12S1090 and D12S390. This placement for 762G4 was significantly proximal to the recently reported locus for a third gene for maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The PFKM-associated microsatellite will be a valuable tool in the evaluation of PFKM in diabetic populations as well as in linkage analysis in families with Tarui disease. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Refinement of the spinal muscular atrophy locus by genetic and physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.H.; Kleyn, P.W.; Vitale, E.; Ross, B.M.; Xu, J.; Carter, T.A.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Obici, S.; Lien, L.; Selig, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report the mapping and characterization of 12 microsatellite markers including 11 novel markers. All markers were generated from overlapping YAC clones that span the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus. PCR amplification of 32 overlapping YAC clones show that 9 of the new markers (those set in italics) map to the interval between the two previous closest flanking markers (D5S629 and D5S557):cen - D5S6 - D5S125 - D5S435 - D5S1407 - D5S629 - D5S1410 - D5S1411/D5S1412 - D5S1413 - D5S1414 - D5Z8 - D5Z9 - CATT1 - D5Z10/D5Z6 - D5S557 - D5S1408 - D5S1409 - D5S637 - D5S351 - MAP1B - tel. Four of these new markers detect multiple loci in and out of the SMA gene region. Genetic analysis of recombinant SMA families indicates that D5S1413 is a new proximal flanking locus for the SMA gene. Interestingly, among the 40 physically mapped loci, the 14 multilocus markers map contiguously to a genomic region that overlaps, and perhaps helps define, the minimum genetic region encompassing the SMA gene(s). 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Fine-mapping the genetic basis of CRP regulation in African Americans: a Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Benjamin; Morris, David L.; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Aubin, Cristin; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Kelly, Jeremiah F.; Evans, Dennis A.; Whittaker, John C.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; De Jager, Philip L.; Vyse, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Basal levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with disease, particularly future cardiovascular events. Twin studies estimate 50% CRP heritability, so the identification of genetic variants influencing CRP expression is important. Existing studies in populations of European ancestry have identified numerous cis-acting variants but leave significant ambiguity over the identity of the key functional polymorphisms. We addressed this issue by typing a dense map of CRP single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and quantifying serum CRP in 594 unrelated African Americans. We used Bayesian model choice analysis to select the combination of SNPs best explaining basal CRP and found strong support for triallelic rs3091244 alone, with the T allele acting in an additive manner (Bayes factor >100 vs. null model), with additional support for a model incorporating both rs3091244 and rs12728740. Admixture analysis suggested SNP rs12728740 segregated with haplotypes predicted to be of recent European origin. Using a cladistic approach we confirmed the importance of rs3091244(T) by demonstrating a significant partition of haplotype effect based on the rs3091244(C/T) mutation (F=8.91, P=0.006). We argue that weaker linkage disequilibrium across the African American CRP locus compared with Europeans has allowed us to establish an unambiguous functional role for rs3091244(T), while also recognising the potential for additional functional mutations present in the European genome. PMID:18500540

  2. Fine-mapping the genetic basis of CRP regulation in African Americans: a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Benjamin; Morris, David L; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Aubin, Cristin; de Leon, Carlos F Mendes; Kelly, Jeremiah F; Evans, Dennis A; Whittaker, John C; Oksenberg, Jorge R; De Jager, Philip L; Vyse, Tim J

    2008-07-01

    Basal levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with disease, particularly future cardiovascular events. Twin studies estimate 50% CRP heritability, so the identification of genetic variants influencing CRP expression is important. Existing studies in populations of European ancestry have identified numerous cis-acting variants but leave significant ambiguity over the identity of the key functional polymorphisms. We addressed this issue by typing a dense map of CRP single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and quantifying serum CRP in 594 unrelated African Americans. We used Bayesian model choice analysis to select the combination of SNPs best explaining basal CRP and found strong support for triallelic rs3091244 alone, with the T allele acting in an additive manner (Bayes factor > 100 vs. null model), with additional support for a model incorporating both rs3091244 and rs12728740. Admixture analysis suggested SNP rs12728740 segregated with haplotypes predicted to be of recent European origin. Using a cladistic approach we confirmed the importance of rs3091244(T) by demonstrating a significant partition of haplotype effect based on the rs3091244(C/T) mutation (F = 8.91, P = 0.006). We argue that weaker linkage disequilibrium across the African American CRP locus compared with Europeans has allowed us to establish an unambiguous functional role for rs3091244(T), while also recognising the potential for additional functional mutations present in the European genome. PMID:18500540

  3. Genetic insights into Map3k-dependent proliferative expansion of T cells.

    PubMed

    Suddason, Tesha; Gallagher, Ewen

    2016-08-01

    Mapks are important regulators of T cell proliferative expansion and cell cycle progression. Detailed genetic analysis of unconventional iNKT cells in both Map3k1(ΔKD) and Lck(Cre/+)Map3k1(f/f) mice demonstrated that Mekk1 (encoded by Map3k1) signaling activates Mapks to regulate Cdkn1b (encoding p27(Kip1)) expression and p27(Kip1)-dependent proliferative expansion in response to antigen. Mekk1 signaling and activation of E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, by a phosphorylation-dependent conformational change, is also an important regulatory mechanism for the control of T helper cell cytokine production. Cdkn1b expression is regulated by Mekk1-dependent signaling in differentiated Th17 cells. Mekk1 is one of the 19 Ste11-like Map3ks, and Mekk1 signaling regulates iNKT cell proliferative expansion in response to glycolipid antigens and T cell homeostasis in the liver. Tak1 (encoded by Map3k7), a related Map3k to Mekk1, similarly regulates the proliferative expansion and homeostasis of T cells in the liver, and this illustrates the importance of multiple Map3ks for mammalian Mapk signaling. PMID:27246297

  4. Filling gaps with construction of a genetic linkage map in tetraploid roses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Luo, Le; Pan, Huitang; Guo, Xuelian; Wan, Huihua; Zhang, Qixiang

    2015-01-01

    Rose (Rosa sp.) is one of the most economically important ornamental crops worldwide. The present work contains a genetic linkage map for tetraploid roses that was constructed from an F1 segregation population using AFLPs and SSRs on 189 individuals. The preliminary ‘Yunzheng Xiawei’ and ‘Sun City’ maps consisted of 298 and 255 markers arranged into 26 and 32 linkage groups, respectively. The recombined parental maps covered 737 and 752 cM of the genome, respectively. The integrated linkage map was composed of 295 polymorphic markers that spanned 874 cM, and it had a mean intermarker distance of 2.9 cM. In addition, a set of newly developed EST-SSRs that are distributed evenly throughout the mapping population were released. The work identified 67 anchoring points that came from 43 common SSRs. The results that were produced from a large number of individuals (189) and polymorphic SSRs (242) will enhance the ability to construct higher density consensus maps with the available diploid level rose maps, and they will definitely serve as a tool for accurate QTL detection and marker assisted selection. PMID:25628638

  5. Centromere-Linkage Analysis and Consolidation of the Zebrafish Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S. L.; Gates, M. A.; Johnson, M.; Talbot, W. S.; Horne, S.; Baik, K.; Rude, S.; Wong, J. R.; Postlethwait, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    The ease of isolating mutations in zebrafish will contribute to an understanding of a variety of processes common to all vertebrates. To facilitate genetic analysis of such mutations, we have identified DNA polymorphisms closely linked to each of the 25 centromeres of zebrafish, placed centromeres on the linkage map, increased the number of mapped PCR-based markers to 652, and consolidated the number of linkage groups to the number of chromosomes. This work makes possible centromere-linkage analysis, a novel, rapid method to assign mutations to a specific linkage group using half-tetrads. PMID:8846904

  6. A high-density genetic map of cucumber derived from Specific Length Amplified Fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuewen; Xu, Ruixue; Zhu, Biyun; Yu, Ting; Qu, Wenqin; Lu, Lu; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaohua; Chen, Xuehao

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic map provides an essential framework for accurate and efficient genome assembly and QTL fine mapping. Construction of high-density genetic maps appears more feasible since the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), which eases SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping of large population. In this research, a high-density genetic map of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was successfully constructed across an F2 population by a recently developed Specific Length Amplified Fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) method. In total, 18.69 GB of data containing 93,460,000 paired-end reads were obtained after preprocessing. The average sequencing depth was 44.92 in the D8 (female parent), 42.16 in the Jin5-508 (male parent), and 5.01 in each progeny. 79,092 high-quality SLAFs were detected, of which 6784 SLAFs were polymorphic, and 1892 of the polymorphic markers met the requirements for constructing genetic map. The genetic map spanned 845.87 cm with an average genetic distance of 0.45 cm. It is a reliable linkage map for fine mapping and molecular breeding of cucumber for its high marker density and well-ordered markers. PMID:25610449

  7. Comparative mapping of Raphanus sativus genome using Brassica markers and quantitative trait loci analysis for the Fusarium wilt resistance trait.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaona; Choi, Su Ryun; Ramchiary, Nirala; Miao, Xinyang; Lee, Su Hee; Sun, Hae Jeong; Kim, Sunggil; Ahn, Chun Hee; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2013-10-01

    Fusarium wilt (FW), caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum is a serious disease in cruciferous plants, including the radish (Raphanus sativus). To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) or gene(s) conferring resistance to FW, we constructed a genetic map of R. sativus using an F2 mapping population derived by crossing the inbred lines '835' (susceptible) and 'B2' (resistant). A total of 220 markers distributed in 9 linkage groups (LGs) were mapped in the Raphanus genome, covering a distance of 1,041.5 cM with an average distance between adjacent markers of 4.7 cM. Comparative analysis of the R. sativus genome with that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa revealed 21 and 22 conserved syntenic regions, respectively. QTL mapping detected a total of 8 loci conferring FW resistance that were distributed on 4 LGs, namely, 2, 3, 6, and 7 of the Raphanus genome. Of the detected QTL, 3 QTLs (2 on LG 3 and 1 on LG 7) were constitutively detected throughout the 2-year experiment. QTL analysis of LG 3, flanked by ACMP0609 and cnu_mBRPGM0085, showed a comparatively higher logarithm of the odds (LOD) value and percentage of phenotypic variation. Synteny analysis using the linked markers to this QTL showed homology to A. thaliana chromosome 3, which contains disease-resistance gene clusters, suggesting conservation of resistance genes between them. PMID:23864230

  8. Comparative polytene chromosome maps of D. montana and D. virilis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Päällysaho, Seliina; Vieira, Cristina P; Hoikkala, Anneli; Vieira, Jorge

    2007-02-01

    Chromosomal inversion polymorphism was characterized in Finnish Drosophila montana populations. A total of 14 polymorphic inversions were observed in Finnish D. montana of which nine had not been described before. The number of polymorphic inversions in each chromosome was not significantly different from that expected, assuming equal chance of occurrence in the euchromatic genome. There was, however, no correlation between the number of polymorphic inversions and that of fixed inversions in each chromosome. Therefore, a simple neutral model does not explain the evolutionary dynamics of inversions. Furthermore, in contrast to results obtained by others, no significant correlation was found between the two transposable elements (TEs) Penelope and Ulysses and inversion breakpoints in D. montana. This result suggests that these TEs were not involved in the creation of the polymorphic inversions seen in D. montana. A comparative analysis of D. montana and Drosophila virilis polytene chromosomes 4 and 5 was performed with D. virilis bacteriophage P1 clones, thus completing the comparative studies of the two species. PMID:16906413

  9. Mapping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Genetic Diversity Profiles in Tanzania and Other African Countries.

    PubMed

    Mbugi, Erasto V; Katale, Bugwesa Z; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Keyyu, Julius D; Kendall, Sharon L; Dockrell, Hazel M; Michel, Anita L; Rweyemamu, Mark M; Warren, Robin M; Matee, Mecky I; van Helden, Paul D; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotypic diversity in Tanzania, as well as in neighbouring East and other several African countries. We used spoligotyping to identify a total of 293 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates (one isolate per patient) collected in the Bunda, Dar es Salaam, Ngorongoro and Serengeti areas in Tanzania. The results were compared with results in the SITVIT2 international database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Genotyping and phylogeographical analyses highlighted the predominance of the CAS, T, EAI, and LAM MTBC lineages in Tanzania. The three most frequent Spoligotype International Types (SITs) were: SIT21/CAS1-Kili (n = 76; 25.94%), SIT59/LAM11-ZWE (n = 22; 7.51%), and SIT126/EAI5 tentatively reclassified as EAI3-TZA (n = 18; 6.14%). Furthermore, three SITs were newly created in this study (SIT4056/EAI5 n = 2, SIT4057/T1 n = 1, and SIT4058/EAI5 n = 1). We noted that the East-African-Indian (EAI) lineage was more predominant in Bunda, the Manu lineage was more common among strains isolated in Ngorongoro, and the Central-Asian (CAS) lineage was more predominant in Dar es Salaam (p-value<0.0001). No statistically significant differences were noted when comparing HIV status of patients vs. major lineages (p-value = 0.103). However, when grouping lineages as Principal Genetic Groups (PGG), we noticed that PGG2/3 group (Haarlem, LAM, S, T, and X) was more associated with HIV-positive patients as compared to PGG1 group (Beijing, CAS, EAI, and Manu) (p-value = 0.03). This study provided mapping of MTBC genetic diversity in Tanzania (containing information on isolates from different cities) and neighbouring East African and other several African countries highlighting differences as regards to MTBC genotypic distribution between Tanzania and other African countries. This work also allowed underlining of spoligotyping patterns tentatively grouped within the newly designated EAI3-TZA

  10. Mapping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Genetic Diversity Profiles in Tanzania and Other African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mbugi, Erasto V.; Katale, Bugwesa Z.; Streicher, Elizabeth M.; Keyyu, Julius D.; Kendall, Sharon L.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Michel, Anita L.; Rweyemamu, Mark M.; Warren, Robin M.; Matee, Mecky I.; van Helden, Paul D.; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotypic diversity in Tanzania, as well as in neighbouring East and other several African countries. We used spoligotyping to identify a total of 293 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates (one isolate per patient) collected in the Bunda, Dar es Salaam, Ngorongoro and Serengeti areas in Tanzania. The results were compared with results in the SITVIT2 international database of the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Genotyping and phylogeographical analyses highlighted the predominance of the CAS, T, EAI, and LAM MTBC lineages in Tanzania. The three most frequent Spoligotype International Types (SITs) were: SIT21/CAS1-Kili (n = 76; 25.94%), SIT59/LAM11-ZWE (n = 22; 7.51%), and SIT126/EAI5 tentatively reclassified as EAI3-TZA (n = 18; 6.14%). Furthermore, three SITs were newly created in this study (SIT4056/EAI5 n = 2, SIT4057/T1 n = 1, and SIT4058/EAI5 n = 1). We noted that the East-African-Indian (EAI) lineage was more predominant in Bunda, the Manu lineage was more common among strains isolated in Ngorongoro, and the Central-Asian (CAS) lineage was more predominant in Dar es Salaam (p-value<0.0001). No statistically significant differences were noted when comparing HIV status of patients vs. major lineages (p-value = 0.103). However, when grouping lineages as Principal Genetic Groups (PGG), we noticed that PGG2/3 group (Haarlem, LAM, S, T, and X) was more associated with HIV-positive patients as compared to PGG1 group (Beijing, CAS, EAI, and Manu) (p-value = 0.03). This study provided mapping of MTBC genetic diversity in Tanzania (containing information on isolates from different cities) and neighbouring East African and other several African countries highlighting differences as regards to MTBC genotypic distribution between Tanzania and other African countries. This work also allowed underlining of spoligotyping patterns tentatively grouped within the newly designated EAI3-TZA

  11. SNP Discovery by GBS in Olive and the Construction of a High-Density Genetic Linkage Map.

    PubMed

    İpek, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Kübra; Sıkıcı, Pelin; Tangu, Nesrin Aktepe; Öz, Ayşe Tülin; Bayraktar, Murat; İpek, Meryem; Gülen, Hatice

    2016-06-01

    Genetic linkage maps are valuable tools for genetic, genomic, and crop breeding studies. Several genetic linkage maps were constructed for the olive (Olea europaea L.) genome, mainly using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. However, AFLPs and SSR markers were not enough to develop a high-density olive linkage map. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a recently developed single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification methodology based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, has been demonstrated to be useful for the identification of a high number of SNP markers and the construction of high-density genetic linkage maps. In the present study, we identified a total of 10,941 SNPs from a cross between the olive cultivars 'Gemlik' and 'Edincik Su' using GBS and de novo SNP discovery implemented in the computer program "Stacks." A high-density genetic linkage map for the olive genome was constructed using 121 cross-pollinated full-sib F1 progeny and 5643 markers (21 SSRs, 203 AFLPs, and 5736 SNPs). This linkage map was composed of 25 linkage groups, covering 3049 cM of the olive genome, and the mean distance between the flanking markers was 0.53 cM. To the best of our knowledge, this map is the most saturated genetic linkage map in olive to date. We demonstrated that GBS is a valuable tool for the identification of thousands of SNPs for the construction of a saturated genetic linkage map in olive. The high-density genetic map developed in this study is a useful tool for locating quantitative trait loci and other economically important traits in the olive genome. PMID:26902470

  12. A high-density genetic map of Arachis duranensis, a diploid ancestor of cultivated peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an allotetraploid species whose ancestral genomes are most likely derived from the A-genome species, A. duranensis, and the B-genome species, A. ipaensis. The very recent (several millennia) evolutionary origin of A. hypogaea has imposed a bottleneck for allelic and phenotypic diversity within the cultigen. However, wild diploid relatives are a rich source of alleles that could be used for crop improvement and their simpler genomes can be more easily analyzed while providing insight into the structure of the allotetraploid peanut genome. The objective of this research was to establish a high-density genetic map of the diploid species A. duranensis based on de novo generated EST databases. Arachis duranensis was chosen for mapping because it is the A-genome progenitor of cultivated peanut and also in order to circumvent the confounding effects of gene duplication associated with allopolyploidy in A. hypogaea. Results More than one million expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences generated from normalized cDNA libraries of A. duranensis were assembled into 81,116 unique transcripts. Mining this dataset, 1236 EST-SNP markers were developed between two A. duranensis accessions, PI 475887 and Grif 15036. An additional 300 SNP markers also were developed from genomic sequences representing conserved legume orthologs. Of the 1536 SNP markers, 1054 were placed on a genetic map. In addition, 598 EST-SSR markers identified in A. hypogaea assemblies were included in the map along with 37 disease resistance gene candidate (RGC) and 35 other previously published markers. In total, 1724 markers spanning 1081.3 cM over 10 linkage groups were mapped. Gene sequences that provided mapped markers were annotated using similarity searches in three different databases, and gene ontology descriptions were determined using the Medicago Gene Atlas and TAIR databases. Synteny analysis between A. duranensis, Medicago and Glycine revealed

  13. Mouse BMD Quantitative Trait Loci Show Improved Concordance With Human Genome-wide Association Loci When Recalculated on a New, Common Mouse Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Karasik, David; Li, Qian; Smith, Randy V; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly J; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern

    2010-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a heritable trait, and in mice, over 100 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been reported, but candidate genes have been identified for only a small percentage. Persistent errors in the mouse genetic map have negatively affected QTL localization, spurring the development of a new, corrected map. In this study, QTLs for BMD were remapped in 11 archival mouse data sets using this new genetic map. Since these QTLs all were mapped in a comparable way, direct comparisons of QTLs for concordance would be valid. We then compared human genome-wide association study (GWAS) BMD loci with the mouse QTLs. We found that 26 of the 28 human GWAS loci examined were located within the confidence interval of a mouse QTL. Furthermore, 14 of the GWAS loci mapped to within 3 cM of a mouse QTL peak. Lastly, we demonstrated that these newly remapped mouse QTLs can substantiate a candidate gene for a human GWAS locus, for which the peak single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) fell in an intergenic region. Specifically, we suggest that MEF2C (human chromosome 5, mouse chromosome 13) should be considered a candidate gene for the genetic regulation of BMD. In conclusion, use of the new mouse genetic map has improved the localization of mouse BMD QTLs, and these remapped QTLs show high concordance with human GWAS loci. We believe that this is an opportune time for a renewed effort by the genetics community to identify the causal variants regulating BMD using a synergistic mouse-human approach. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200990

  14. Comparative assessment of thematic accuracy of GLC maps for specific applications using existing reference data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsendbazar, N. E.; de Bruin, S.; Mora, B.; Schouten, L.; Herold, M.

    2016-02-01

    Inputs to various applications and models, current global land cover (GLC) maps are based on different data sources and methods. Therefore, comparing GLC maps is challenging. Statistical comparison of GLC maps is further complicated by the lack of a reference dataset that is suitable for validating multiple maps. This study utilizes the existing Globcover-2005 reference dataset to compare thematic accuracies of three GLC maps for the year 2005 (Globcover, LC-CCI and MODIS). We translated and reinterpreted the LCCS (land cover classification system) classifier information of the reference dataset into the different map legends. The three maps were evaluated for a variety of applications, i.e., general circulation models, dynamic global vegetation models, agriculture assessments, carbon estimation and biodiversity assessments, using weighted accuracy assessment. Based on the impact of land cover confusions on the overall weighted accuracy of the GLC maps, we identified map improvement priorities. Overall accuracies were 70.8 ± 1.4%, 71.4 ± 1.3%, and 61.3 ± 1.5% for LC-CCI, MODIS, and Globcover, respectively. Weighted accuracy assessments produced increased overall accuracies (80-93%) since not all class confusion errors are important for specific applications. As a common denominator for all applications, the classes mixed trees, shrubs, grasses, and cropland were identified as improvement priorities. The results demonstrate the necessity of accounting for dissimilarities in the importance of map classification errors for different user application. To determine the fitness of use of GLC maps, accuracy of GLC maps should be assessed per application; there is no single-figure accuracy estimate expressing map fitness for all purposes.

  15. Comparative genetics of disease resistance within the solanaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Grube, R C; Radwanski, E R; Jahn, M

    2000-01-01

    Genomic positions of phenotypically defined disease resistance genes (R genes) and R gene homologues were analyzed in three solanaceous crop genera, Lycopersicon (tomato), Solanum (potato), and Capsicum (pepper). R genes occurred at corresponding positions in two or more genomes more frequently than expected by chance; however, in only two cases, both involving Phytophthora spp., did genes at corresponding positions have specificity for closely related pathogen taxa. In contrast, resistances to Globodera spp., potato virus Y, tobacco mosaic virus, and tomato spotted wilt virus were mapped in two or more genera and did not occur in corresponding positions. Without exception, pepper homologues of the cloned R genes Sw-5, N, Pto, Prf, and I2 were found in syntenous positions in other solanaceous genomes and in some cases also mapped to additional positions near phenotypically defined solanaceous R genes. This detailed analysis and synthesis of all available data for solanaceous R genes suggests a working hypothesis regarding the evolution of R genes. Specifically, while the taxonomic specificity of host R genes may be evolving rapidly, general functions of R alleles (e.g., initiation of resistance response) may be conserved at homologous loci in related plant genera. PMID:10835406

  16. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  17. Toward allotetraploid cotton genome assembly: integration of a high-density molecular genetic linkage map with DNA sequence information

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cotton is the world’s most important natural textile fiber and a significant oilseed crop. Decoding cotton genomes will provide the ultimate reference and resource for research and utilization of the species. Integration of high-density genetic maps with genomic sequence information will largely accelerate the process of whole-genome assembly in cotton. Results In this paper, we update a high-density interspecific genetic linkage map of allotetraploid cultivated cotton. An additional 1,167 marker loci have been added to our previously published map of 2,247 loci. Three new marker types, InDel (insertion-deletion) and SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) developed from gene information, and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), were used to increase map density. The updated map consists of 3,414 loci in 26 linkage groups covering 3,667.62 cM with an average inter-locus distance of 1.08 cM. Furthermore, genome-wide sequence analysis was finished using 3,324 informative sequence-based markers and publicly-available Gossypium DNA sequence information. A total of 413,113 EST and 195 BAC sequences were physically anchored and clustered by 3,324 sequence-based markers. Of these, 14,243 ESTs and 188 BACs from different species of Gossypium were clustered and specifically anchored to the high-density genetic map. A total of 2,748 candidate unigenes from 2,111 ESTs clusters and 63 BACs were mined for functional annotation and classification. The 337 ESTs/genes related to fiber quality traits were integrated with 132 previously reported cotton fiber quality quantitative trait loci, which demonstrated the important roles in fiber quality of these genes. Higher-level sequence conservation between different cotton species and between the A- and D-subgenomes in tetraploid cotton was found, indicating a common evolutionary origin for orthologous and paralogous loci in Gossypium. Conclusion This study will serve as a valuable genomic resource

  18. High Resolution Genetic Mapping by Genome Sequencing Reveals Genome Duplication and Tetraploid Genetic Structure of the Diploid Miscanthus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Jensen, Elaine; Alexandrov, Nickolai; Troukhan, Maxim; Zhang, Liping; Thomas-Jones, Sian; Farrar, Kerrie; Clifton-Brown, John; Donnison, Iain; Swaller, Timothy; Flavell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have created a high-resolution linkage map of Miscanthus sinensis, using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), identifying all 19 linkage groups for the first time. The result is technically significant since Miscanthus has a very large and highly heterozygous genome, but has no or limited genomics information to date. The composite linkage map containing markers from both parental linkage maps is composed of 3,745 SNP markers spanning 2,396 cM on 19 linkage groups with a 0.64 cM average resolution. Comparative genomics analyses of the M. sinensis composite linkage map to the genomes of sorghum, maize, rice, and Brachypodium distachyon indicate that sorghum has the closest syntenic relationship to Miscanthus compared to other species. The comparative results revealed that each pair of the 19 M. sinensis linkages aligned to one sorghum chromosome, except for LG8, which mapped to two sorghum chromosomes (4 and 7), presumably due to a chromosome fusion event after genome duplication. The data also revealed several other chromosome rearrangements relative to sorghum, including two telomere-centromere inversions of the sorghum syntenic chromosome 7 in LG8 of M. sinensis and two paracentric inversions of sorghum syntenic chromosome 4 in LG7 and LG8 of M. sinensis. The results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that the diploid M. sinensis is tetraploid origin consisting of two sub-genomes. This complete and high resolution composite linkage map will not only serve as a useful resource for novel QTL discoveries, but also enable informed deployment of the wealth of existing genomics resources of other species to the improvement of Miscanthus as a high biomass energy crop. In addition, it has utility as a reference for genome sequence assembly for the forthcoming whole genome sequencing of the Miscanthus genus. PMID:22439001

  19. High resolution genetic mapping by genome sequencing reveals genome duplication and tetraploid genetic structure of the diploid Miscanthus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Jensen, Elaine; Alexandrov, Nickolai; Troukhan, Maxim; Zhang, Liping; Thomas-Jones, Sian; Farrar, Kerrie; Clifton-Brown, John; Donnison, Iain; Swaller, Timothy; Flavell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have created a high-resolution linkage map of Miscanthus sinensis, using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), identifying all 19 linkage groups for the first time. The result is technically significant since Miscanthus has a very large and highly heterozygous genome, but has no or limited genomics information to date. The composite linkage map containing markers from both parental linkage maps is composed of 3,745 SNP markers spanning 2,396 cM on 19 linkage groups with a 0.64 cM average resolution. Comparative genomics analyses of the M. sinensis composite linkage map to the genomes of sorghum, maize, rice, and Brachypodium distachyon indicate that sorghum has the closest syntenic relationship to Miscanthus compared to other species. The comparative results revealed that each pair of the 19 M. sinensis linkages aligned to one sorghum chromosome, except for LG8, which mapped to two sorghum chromosomes (4 and 7), presumably due to a chromosome fusion event after genome duplication. The data also revealed several other chromosome rearrangements relative to sorghum, including two telomere-centromere inversions of the sorghum syntenic chromosome 7 in LG8 of M. sinensis and two paracentric inversions of sorghum syntenic chromosome 4 in LG7 and LG8 of M. sinensis. The results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that the diploid M. sinensis is tetraploid origin consisting of two sub-genomes. This complete and high resolution composite linkage map will not only serve as a useful resource for novel QTL discoveries, but also enable informed deployment of the wealth of existing genomics resources of other species to the improvement of Miscanthus as a high biomass energy crop. In addition, it has utility as a reference for genome sequence assembly for the forthcoming whole genome sequencing of the Miscanthus genus. PMID:22439001

  20. [The construction of the genetic map and QTL locating analysis on chromosome 2 in swine].

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan-Chun; Deng, Chang-Yan; Xiong, Yuan-Zhu; Zheng, Rong; Yu, Li; Su, Yu-Hong; Liu, Gui-Lan

    2002-01-01

    The study constructed the genetic linkage map of porcine chromosome 2 and further analysis of quantitative trait loci was conducted. The results of the study demonstrated that all 7 microsatellite loci we chose were with relatively high polymorphism, and its polymorphic information content was from 0.40182 to 0.58477. The genetic map we constructed for resource family was 152.9 cM in length, with the order of all loci highly consistent with the USDA map. All marker intervals were longer than USDA map with the interval between marker Sw2516 and Sw1201 as an exception. Furthermore, we conducted QTLs locating analysis by combining the genetic map with the phenotypic data. QTLs affecting lively estimated traits such as lean meat percentage, were located at 60-65 cM on chromosome 2, while QTLs for the height and marbling of Longissmus dorsi muscle were located at 20 cM and 55 cM, respectively Among them, QTL for estimated lean meat percentage was significant at chromosome-wise level (P < 0.01) and was responsible for 21.55% of the phenotypic variance. QTLs for the height and marbling of Longissmus dorsi muscle were responsible for 10.12% and 10.97% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. The additive and dominance effect of lively estimated traits were in the inverse tendency, while the QTL for the height of Longissmus dorsi muscle had its additive and dominance effect in the same tendency and was with advantageous allele in Large White. The QTLs we detected had relatively large effect on phenotype and built a basis for molecular marker assisted selection and breeding. PMID:12645259

  1. Physical mapping in large genomes: accelerating anchoring of BAC contigs to genetic maps through in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Paux, Etienne; Legeai, Fabrice; Guilhot, Nicolas; Adam-Blondon, Anne-Françoise; Alaux, Michaël; Salse, Jérôme; Sourdille, Pierre; Leroy, Philippe; Feuillet, Catherine

    2008-02-01

    Anchored physical maps represent essential frameworks for map-based cloning, comparative genomics studies, and genome sequencing projects. High throughput anchoring can be achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library pools with molecular markers. However, for large genomes such as wheat, the development of high dimension pools and the number of reactions that need to be performed can be extremely large making the screening laborious and costly. To improve the cost efficiency of anchoring in such large genomes, we have developed a new software named Elephant (electronic physical map anchoring tool) that combines BAC contig information generated by FingerPrinted Contig with results of BAC library pools screening to identify BAC addresses with a minimal amount of PCR reactions. Elephant was evaluated during the construction of a physical map of chromosome 3B of hexaploid wheat. Results show that a one dimensional pool screening can be sufficient to anchor a BAC contig while reducing the number of PCR by 384-fold thereby demonstrating that Elephant is an efficient and cost-effective tool to support physical mapping in large genomes. PMID:18038165

  2. Functional genomics platform for pooled screening and mammalian genetic interaction maps

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Martin; Bassik, Michael C.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic genetic interaction maps in microorganisms are powerful tools for identifying functional relationships between genes and defining the function of uncharacterized genes. We have recently implemented this strategy in mammalian cells as a two-stage approach. First, genes of interest are robustly identified in a pooled genome-wide screen using complex shRNA libraries. Second, phenotypes for all pairwise combinations of hit genes are measured in a double-shRNA screen and used to construct a genetic interaction map. Our protocol allows for rapid pooled screening under various conditions without a requirement for robotics, in contrast to arrayed approaches. Each stage of the protocol can be implemented in ~2 weeks, with additional time for analysis and generation of reagents. We discuss considerations for screen design, and present complete experimental procedures as well as a full computational analysis suite for identification of hits in pooled screens and generation of genetic interaction maps. While the protocols outlined here were developed for our original shRNA-based approach, they can be applied more generally, including to CRISPR-based approaches. PMID:24992097

  3. Construction of a genetic linkage map and QTL analysis in bambara groundnut.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nariman Salih; Redjeki, Endah Sri; Ho, Wai Kuan; Aliyu, Siise; Mayes, Katie; Massawe, Festo; Kilian, Andrzej; Mayes, Sean

    2016-07-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an indigenous underutilized legume that has the potential to improve food security in semi-arid Africa. So far, there are a lack of reports of controlled breeding populations that could be used for variety development and genetic studies. We report here the construction of the first genetic linkage map of bambara groundnut using a F3 population derived from a "narrow" cross between two domesticated landraces (Tiga Nicuru and DipC) with marked divergence in phenotypic traits. The map consists of 238 DArT array and SSR based markers in 21 linkage groups with a total genetic distance of 608.3 cM. In addition, phenotypic traits were evaluated for a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis over two generations. A total of 36 significant QTLs were detected for 19 traits. The phenotypic effect explained by a single QTL ranged from 11.6% to 49.9%. Two stable QTLs were mapped for internode length and growth habit. The identified QTLs could be useful for marker-assisted selection in bambara groundnut breeding programmes. PMID:27253730

  4. Construction of the physical map for three loci in chromosome band 13q14: comparison to the genetic map.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, M J; Turmel, C; Noolandi, J; Neumann, P E; Lalande, M

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and deletion mapping are being used to construct a physical map of the long arm of human chromosome 13. The present study reports a 2700-kilobase (kb) Not I long-range restriction map encompassing the 13q14-specific loci D13S10, D13S21, and D13S22, which are detected by the cloned DNA markers p7D2, pG24E2.4, and pG14E1.9, respectively. Analysis of a panel of seven cell lines that showed differential methylation at a Not I site between D13S10 and D13S21 proved physical linkage of the two loci to the same 875-kb Not I fragment. D13S22 mapped to a different Not I fragment, precluding the possibility that D13S22 is located between D13S10 and D13S21. PFGE analysis of Not I partial digests placed the 1850-kb Not I fragment containing D13S22 immediately adjacent to the 875-kb fragment containing the other two loci. The proximal rearrangement breakpoint in a cell line carrying a del13(q14.1q21.2) was detected by D13S21 but not by D13S10, demonstrating that D13S21 lies proximal to D13S10. Quantitative analysis of hybridization signals of the three DNA probes to DNA from the same cell line indicated that only D13S10 was deleted, establishing the order of these loci to be cen-D13S22-D13S21-D13S10-tel. Surprisingly, this order was estimated to be 35,000 times less likely than that favored by genetic linkage analysis. Images PMID:1970636

  5. An AFLP genetic linkage map of pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Yanhong, Xu; Ruihai, Yu; Akihiro, Kijima

    2007-07-01

    A genetic linkage map of Pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai) was constructed using AFLP markers based on a two-way pseudo-testeross strategy in a full-sib family. With 33 primer combinations, a total of 455 markers (225 from the female parent and 230 from the male parent) segregated in a 1:1 ratio, corresponding to DNA polymorphism: heterozygous in one parent and null in the other. The female framework map consisted of 174 markers distributed in 18 linkage groups, equivalent to the H. discus hannai haploid chromosome number, and spanning a total length of 2031.4 cM, with an average interval of 13.0 cM between adjacent markers. The male framework map consisted of 195 markers mapped on 19 linkage groups, spanning a total length of 2273.4 cM, with an average spacing of 12.9 cM between adjacent markers. The estimated coverage for the framework linkage maps was 81.2% for the female and 82.1% for the male, on the basis of two estimates of genome length. Fifty-two markers (11.4%) remained unlinked. The level of segregation distortion observed in this cross was 20.4%. These linkage maps will serve as a starting point for linkage studies in the Pacific abalone with potential application for marker-assisted selection in breeding programs.

  6. Mapping the Pathways to Staphylococcal Pathogenesis by Comparative Secretomics

    PubMed Central

    Sibbald, M. J. J. B.; Ziebandt, A. K.; Engelmann, S.; Hecker, M.; de Jong, A.; Harmsen, H. J. M.; Raangs, G. C.; Stokroos, I.; Arends, J. P.; Dubois, J. Y. F.; van Dijl, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent component of the human microbial flora that can turn into a dangerous pathogen. As such, this organism is capable of infecting almost every tissue and organ system in the human body. It does so by actively exporting a variety of virulence factors to the cell surface and extracellular milieu. Upon reaching their respective destinations, these virulence factors have pivotal roles in the colonization and subversion of the human host. It is therefore of major importance to obtain a clear understanding of the protein transport pathways that are active in S. aureus. The present review aims to provide a state-of-the-art roadmap of staphylococcal secretomes, which include both protein transport pathways and the extracytoplasmic proteins of these organisms. Specifically, an overview is presented of the exported virulence factors, pathways for protein transport, signals for cellular protein retention or secretion, and the exoproteomes of different S. aureus isolates. The focus is on S. aureus, but comparisons with Staphylococcus epidermidis and other gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, are included where appropriate. Importantly, the results of genomic and proteomic studies on S. aureus secretomes are integrated through a comparative “secretomics” approach, resulting in the first definition of the core and variant secretomes of this bacterium. While the core secretome seems to be largely employed for general housekeeping functions which are necessary to thrive in particular niches provided by the human host, the variant secretome seems to contain the “gadgets” that S. aureus needs to conquer these well-protected niches. PMID:16959968

  7. Genetic Interaction Maps in Escherichia coli Reveal Functional Crosstalk among Cell Envelope Biogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vlasblom, James; Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Graham, Chris; Yousif, Fouad; Ding, Huiming; Xiong, Xuejian; Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Alamgir, Md; Ali, Mehrab; Pogoutse, Oxana; Pe'er, Asaf; Arnold, Roland; Michaut, Magali; Parkinson, John; Golshani, Ashkan; Whitfield, Chris; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among >235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target. PMID:22125496

  8. High-density interspecific genetic maps of kiwifruit and the identification of sex-specific markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Yifei; VanBuren, Robert; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhong, Caihong; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-10-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planchon) is an important specialty fruit crop that suffers from narrow genetic diversity stemming from recent global commercialization and limited cultivar improvement. Here, we present high-density RAD-seq-based genetic maps using an interspecific F1 cross between Actinidia rufa 'MT570001' and A. chinensis 'Guihai No4'. The A. rufa (maternal) map consists of 2,426 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers with a total length of 2,651 cM in 29 linkage groups (LGs) corresponding to the 29 chromosomes. The A. chinensis (paternal) map consists of 4,214 SNP markers over 3,142 cM in 29 LGs. Using these maps, we were able to anchor an additional 440 scaffolds from the kiwifruit draft genome assembly. Kiwifruit is functionally dioecious, which presents unique challenges for breeding and production. Three sex-specific simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers can be used to accurately sex type male and female kiwifruit in breeding programmes. The sex-determination region (SDR) in kiwifruit was narrowed to a 1-Mb subtelomeric region on chromosome 25. Localizing the SDR will expedite the discovery of genes controlling carpel abortion in males and pollen sterility in females. PMID:26370666

  9. M2SG: mapping human disease-related genetic variants to protein sequences and genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renkai; Cong, Qian; Li, Wenlin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a manually curated compendium of human genetic variants and the corresponding phenotypes, mostly human diseases. Instead of directly documenting the native sequences for gene entries, OMIM links its entries to protein and DNA sequences in other databases. However, because of the existence of gene isoforms and errors in OMIM records, mapping a specific OMIM mutation to its corresponding protein sequence is not trivial. Combining computer programs and extensive manual curation of OMIM full-text descriptions and original literature, we mapped 98% of OMIM amino acid substitutions (AASs) and all SwissProt Variant (SwissVar) disease-related AASs to reference sequences and confidently mapped 99.96% of all AASs to the genomic loci. Based on the results, we developed an online database and interactive web server (M2SG) to (i) retrieve the mapped OMIM and SwissVar variants for a given protein sequence; and (ii) obtain related proteins and mutations for an input disease phenotype. This database will be useful for analyzing sequences, understanding the effect of mutations, identifying important genetic variations and designing experiments on a protein of interest. Availability and implementation: The database and web server are freely available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/M2S/mut2seq.cgi. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24002112

  10. Use of the Caulobacter crescentus Genome Sequence To Develop a Method for Systematic Genetic Mapping

    PubMed Central

    West, Lisandra; Yang, Desiree; Stephens, Craig

    2002-01-01

    The functional analysis of sequenced genomes will be facilitated by the development of tools for the rapid mapping of mutations. We have developed a systematic approach to genetic mapping in Caulobacter crescentus that is based on bacteriophage-mediated transduction of strategically placed antibiotic resistance markers. The genomic DNA sequence was used to identify sites distributed evenly around the chromosome at which plasmids could be nondisruptively integrated. DNA fragments from these sites were amplified by PCR and cloned into a kanamycin-resistant (Kanr) suicide vector. Delivery of these plasmids into C. crescentus resulted in integration via homologous recombination. A set of 41 strains containing Kanr markers at 100-kb intervals was thereby generated. These strains serve as donors for generalized transduction using bacteriophage φCr30, which can transduce at least 120 kb of DNA. Transductants are selected with kanamycin and screened for loss of the mutant phenotype to assess linkage between the marker and the site of the mutation. The dependence of cotransduction frequency on sequence distance was evaluated using several markers and mutant strains. With these data as a standard, previously unmapped mutations were readily localized to DNA sequence intervals equivalent to less than 1% of the genome. Candidate genes within the interval were then examined further by subcloning and complementation analysis. Mutations resulting in sensitivity to ampicillin, in nutritional auxotrophies, or temperature-sensitive growth were mapped. This approach to genetic mapping should be applicable to other bacteria with sequenced genomes for which generalized transducing phage are available. PMID:11914347

  11. High-density interspecific genetic maps of kiwifruit and the identification of sex-specific markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Yifei; VanBuren, Robert; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhong, Caihong; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planchon) is an important specialty fruit crop that suffers from narrow genetic diversity stemming from recent global commercialization and limited cultivar improvement. Here, we present high-density RAD-seq-based genetic maps using an interspecific F1 cross between Actinidia rufa ‘MT570001’ and A. chinensis ‘Guihai No4’. The A. rufa (maternal) map consists of 2,426 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers with a total length of 2,651 cM in 29 linkage groups (LGs) corresponding to the 29 chromosomes. The A. chinensis (paternal) map consists of 4,214 SNP markers over 3,142 cM in 29 LGs. Using these maps, we were able to anchor an additional 440 scaffolds from the kiwifruit draft genome assembly. Kiwifruit is functionally dioecious, which presents unique challenges for breeding and production. Three sex-specific simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers can be used to accurately sex type male and female kiwifruit in breeding programmes. The sex-determination region (SDR) in kiwifruit was narrowed to a 1-Mb subtelomeric region on chromosome 25. Localizing the SDR will expedite the discovery of genes controlling carpel abortion in males and pollen sterility in females. PMID:26370666

  12. Physical and genetic map of the Serpulina hyodysenteriae B78T chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Zuerner, R L; Stanton, T B

    1994-01-01

    A combined physical and genetic map of the Serpulina hyodysenteriae B78T genome was constructed by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA blot hybridizations. The S. hyodysenteriae genome is a single circular chromosome about 3.2 Mb in size. The physical map of the chromosome was constructed with the restriction enzymes BssHII, EclXI, NotI, SalI, and SmaI. The physical map was used to constructed a linkage map for genes encoding rRNA, flagellum subunit proteins, DNA gyrase, NADH oxidase, and three distinct hemolysins. Several flaB2-related loci, encoding core flagellum subunit proteins, were detected and are dispersed around the chromosome. The rRNA gene organization in S. hyodysenteriae is unusual. S. hyodysenteriae has one gene each for 5S (rrf), 16S (rrs), and 23S (rrl) rRNAs. The rrf and rrl genes are closely linked (within 5 kb), while the rrs gene is about 860 kb from the other two rRNA genes. Using a probe for the S. hyodysenteriae gyrA gene, we identified a possible location for the chromosomal replication origin. The size and genetic organization of the S. hyodysenteriae chromosome are different from those of previously characterized spirochetes. Images PMID:8106320

  13. An Integrated Genetic Map of the African Human Malaria Vector Mosquito, Anopheles Gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L.; Benedict, M. Q.; Cornel, A. J.; Collins, F. H.; Kafatos, F. C.

    1996-01-01

    We present a genetic map based on microsatellite polymorphisms for the African human malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. Polymorphisms in laboratory strains were detected for 89% of the tested microsatellite markers. Genotyping was performed for individual mosquitoes from 13 backcross families that included 679 progeny. Three linkage groups were identified, corresponding to the three chromosomes. We added 22 new markers to the existing X chromosome map, for a total of 46 microsatellite markers spanning a distance of 48.9 cM. The second chromosome has 57 and the third 28 microsatellite markers spanning a distance of 72.4 and 93.7 cM, respectively. The overall average distance between markers is 1.6 cM (or 1.1, 1.2, and 3.2 cM for the X, second, and third chromosomes, respectively). In addition to the 131 microsatellite markers, the current map also includes a biochemical selectable marker, Dieldrin resistance (Dl), on the second chromosome and five visible markers, pink-eye (p) and white (w) on the X, collarless (c) and lunate (lu) on the second, and red-eye (r) on the third. The cytogenetic locations on the nurse cell polytene chromosomes have been determined for 47 markers, making this map an integrated tool for cytogenetic, genetic, and molecular analysis. PMID:8725240

  14. Efficient algorithms for multidimensional global optimization in genetic mapping of complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Kajsa; Mishchenko, Kateryna; Holmgren, Sverker

    2010-01-01

    We present a two-phase strategy for optimizing a multidimensional, nonconvex function arising during genetic mapping of quantitative traits. Such traits are believed to be affected by multiple so called quantitative trait loci (QTL), and searching for d QTL results in a d-dimensional optimization problem with a large number of local optima. We combine the global algorithm DIRECT with a number of local optimization methods that accelerate the final convergence, and adapt the algorithms to problem-specific features. We also improve the evaluation of the QTL mapping objective function to enable exploitation of the smoothness properties of the optimization landscape. Our best two-phase method is demonstrated to be accurate in at least six dimensions and up to ten times faster than currently used QTL mapping algorithms. PMID:21918629

  15. Quasi-conformal mapping with genetic algorithms applied to coordinate transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Matesanz, F. J.; Malpica, J. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, piecewise conformal mapping for the transformation of geodetic coordinates is studied. An algorithm, which is an improved version of a previous algorithm published by Lippus [2004a. On some properties of piecewise conformal mappings. Eesti NSV Teaduste Akademmia Toimetised Füüsika-Matemaakika 53, 92-98; 2004b. Transformation of coordinates using piecewise conformal mapping. Journal of Geodesy 78 (1-2), 40] is presented; the improvement comes from using a genetic algorithm to partition the complex plane into convex polygons, whereas the original one did so manually. As a case study, the method is applied to the transformation of the Spanish datum ED50 and ETRS89, and both its advantages and disadvantages are discussed herein.

  16. Genetic Linkage Map of a High Yielding FELDA Deli×Yangambi Oil Palm Cross

    PubMed Central

    Seng, Tzer-Ying; Mohamed Saad, Siti Hawa; Chin, Cheuk-Weng; Ting, Ngoot-Chin; Harminder Singh, Rajinder Singh; Qamaruz Zaman, Faridah; Tan, Soon-Guan; Syed Alwee, Sharifah Shahrul Rabiah

    2011-01-01

    Enroute to mapping QTLs for yield components in oil palm, we constructed the linkage map of a FELDA high yielding oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), hybrid cross. The parents of the mapping population are a Deli dura and a pisifera of Yangambi origin. The cross out-yielded the average by 8–21% in four trials all of which yielded comparably to the best current commercial planting materials. The higher yield derived from a higher fruit oil content. SSR markers in the public domain - from CIRAD and MPOB, as well as some developed in FELDA - were used for the mapping, augmented by locally-designed AFLP markers. The female parent linkage map comprised 317 marker loci and the male parent map 331 loci, both in 16 linkage groups each. The number of markers per group ranged from 8–47 in the former and 12–40 in the latter. The integrated map was 2,247.5 cM long and included 479 markers and 168 anchor points. The number of markers per linkage group was 15–57, the average being 29, and the average map density 4.7 cM. The linkage groups ranged in length from 77.5 cM to 223.7 cM, with an average of 137 cM. The map is currently being validated against a closely related population and also being expanded to include yield related QTLs. PMID:22069457

  17. Genetic linkage map of a high yielding FELDA deli×yangambi oil palm cross.

    PubMed

    Seng, Tzer-Ying; Mohamed Saad, Siti Hawa; Chin, Cheuk-Weng; Ting, Ngoot-Chin; Harminder Singh, Rajinder Singh; Qamaruz Zaman, Faridah; Tan, Soon-Guan; Syed Alwee, Sharifah Shahrul Rabiah

    2011-01-01

    Enroute to mapping QTLs for yield components in oil palm, we constructed the linkage map of a FELDA high yielding oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), hybrid cross. The parents of the mapping population are a Deli dura and a pisifera of Yangambi origin. The cross out-yielded the average by 8-21% in four trials all of which yielded comparably to the best current commercial planting materials. The higher yield derived from a higher fruit oil content. SSR markers in the public domain - from CIRAD and MPOB, as well as some developed in FELDA - were used for the mapping, augmented by locally-designed AFLP markers. The female parent linkage map comprised 317 marker loci and the male parent map 331 loci, both in 16 linkage groups each. The number of markers per group ranged from 8-47 in the former and 12-40 in the latter. The integrated map was 2,247.5 cM long and included 479 markers and 168 anchor points. The number of markers per linkage group was 15-57, the average being 29, and the average map density 4.7 cM. The linkage groups ranged in length from 77.5 cM to 223.7 cM, with an average of 137 cM. The map is currently being validated against a closely related population and also being expanded to include yield related QTLs. PMID:22069457

  18. Genetic Linkage Mapping of Economically Important Traits in Cultivated Tetraploid Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Massa, Alicia N; Manrique-Carpintero, Norma C; Coombs, Joseph J; Zarka, Daniel G; Boone, Anne E; Kirk, William W; Hackett, Christine A; Bryan, Glenn J; Douches, David S

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genetic map at the cultivated tetraploid level to locate quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to economically important traits in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). The 156 F1 progeny and parents of a cross (MSL603) between "Jacqueline Lee" and "MSG227-2" were genotyped using the Infinium 8303 Potato Array. Furthermore, the progeny and parents were evaluated for foliar late blight reaction to isolates of the US-8 genotype of Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary and vine maturity. Linkage analyses and QTL mapping were performed using a novel approach that incorporates allele dosage information. The resulting genetic maps contained 1972 SNP markers with an average density of 1.36 marker per cM. QTL mapping identified the major source of late blight resistance in "Jacqueline Lee." The best SNP marker mapped ~0.54 Mb from a resistance hotspot on the long arm of chromosome 9. For vine maturity, the major-effect QTL was located on chromosome 5 with allelic effects from both parents. A candidate SNP marker for this trait mapped ~0.25 Mb from the StCDF1 gene, which is a candidate gene for the maturity trait. The identification of markers for P. infestans resistance will enable the introgression of multiple sources of resistance through marker-assisted selection. Moreover, the discovery of a QTL for late blight resistance not linked to the QTL for vine maturity provides the opportunity to use marker-assisted selection for resistance independent of the selection for vine maturity classifications. PMID:26374597

  19. Genetic Linkage Mapping of Economically Important Traits in Cultivated Tetraploid Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Alicia N.; Manrique-Carpintero, Norma C.; Coombs, Joseph J.; Zarka, Daniel G.; Boone, Anne E.; Kirk, William W.; Hackett, Christine A.; Bryan, Glenn J.; Douches, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genetic map at the cultivated tetraploid level to locate quantitative trait loci (QTL) contributing to economically important traits in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). The 156 F1 progeny and parents of a cross (MSL603) between “Jacqueline Lee” and “MSG227-2” were genotyped using the Infinium 8303 Potato Array. Furthermore, the progeny and parents were evaluated for foliar late blight reaction to isolates of the US-8 genotype of Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary and vine maturity. Linkage analyses and QTL mapping were performed using a novel approach that incorporates allele dosage information. The resulting genetic maps contained 1972 SNP markers with an average density of 1.36 marker per cM. QTL mapping identified the major source of late blight resistance in “Jacqueline Lee.” The best SNP marker mapped ∼0.54 Mb from a resistance hotspot on the long arm of chromosome 9. For vine maturity, the major-effect QTL was located on chromosome 5 with allelic effects from both parents. A candidate SNP marker for this trait mapped ∼0.25 Mb from the StCDF1 gene, which is a candidate gene for the maturity trait. The identification of markers for P. infestans resistance will enable the introgression of multiple sources of resistance through marker-assisted selection. Moreover, the discovery of a QTL for late blight resistance not linked to the QTL for vine maturity provides the opportunity to use marker-assisted selection for resistance independent of the selection for vine maturity classifications. PMID:26374597

  20. Application of a dense genetic map for assessment of genomic responses to selection and inbreeding in Heliothis virescens.

    PubMed

    Fritz, M L; Paa, S; Baltzegar, J; Gould, F

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation of pest species to laboratory conditions and selection for resistance to toxins in the laboratory are expected to cause inbreeding and genetic bottlenecks that reduce genetic variation. Heliothis virescens, a major cotton pest, has been colonized in the laboratory many times, and a few laboratory colonies have been selected for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) resistance. We developed 350-bp double-digest restriction-site associated DNA-sequencing (ddRAD-seq) molecular markers to examine and compare changes in genetic variation associated with laboratory adaptation, artificial selection and inbreeding in this nonmodel insect species. We found that allelic and nucleotide diversity declined dramatically in laboratory-reared H. virescens as compared with field-collected populations. The declines were primarily a result of the loss of low frequency alleles present in field-collected H. virescens. A further, albeit modest decline in genetic diversity was observed in a Bt-selected population. The greatest decline was seen in H. virescens that were sib-mated for 10 generations, in which more than 80% of loci were fixed for a single allele. To determine which regions of the genome were resistant to fixation in our sib-mated line, we generated a dense intraspecific linkage map containing three PCR-based and 659 ddRAD-seq markers. Markers that retained polymorphism were observed in small clusters spread over multiple linkage groups, but this clustering was not statistically significant. Overall, we have confirmed and extended the general expectations for reduced genetic diversity in laboratory colonies, provided tools for further genomic analyses and produced highly homozygous genomic DNA for future whole genome sequencing of H. virescens. PMID:27097739

  1. Genetic mapping of a 7R Al tolerance QTL in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack).

    PubMed

    Niedziela, A; Bednarek, P T; Labudda, M; Mańkowski, D R; Anioł, A

    2014-02-01

    Triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) is a relatively new cereal crop. In Poland, triticale is grown on 12 % of arable land ( http://www.stat.gov.pl ). There is an increasing interest in its cultivation due to lowered production costs and increased adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. However, it has an insufficient tolerance to the presence of aluminum ions (Al(3+)) in the soil. The number of genes controlling aluminum tolerance in triticale and their chromosomal location is not known. Two F2 mapping biparental populations (MP1 and MP15) segregating for aluminum (Al) tolerance were tested with AFLP, SSR, DArT, and specific PCR markers. Genetic mapping enabled the construction of linkage groups representing chromosomes 7R, 5R and 2B. Obtained linkage groups were common for both mapping populations and mostly included the same markers. Composite interval mapping (CIM) allowed identification of a single QTL that mapped to the 7R chromosome and explained 25 % (MP1) and 36 % (MP15) of phenotypic variation. The B1, B26 and Xscm150 markers were 0.04 cM and 0.02 cM from the maximum of the LOD function in the MP1 and MP15, respectively and were highly associated with aluminum tolerance as indicated by Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. Moreover, the molecular markers B1, B26, Xrems1162 and Xscm92, previously associated with the Alt4 locus that encoded an aluminum-activated malate transporter (ScALMT1) that was involved in Al tolerance in rye (Secale cereale) also mapped within QTL. Biochemical analysis of plants represented MP1 and MP15 mapping populations confirmed that the QTL located on 7R chromosome in both mapping populations is responsible for Al tolerance. PMID:24222435

  2. Fine physical and genetic mapping of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 originating from wild emmer (Triticum dicoccoides).

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Shuhong; Zhang, Dong; Han, Jun; Zhao, Xiaojie; Cui, Yu; Song, Wei; Huo, Naxin; Liang, Yong; Xie, Jingzhong; Wang, Zhenzhong; Wu, Qiuhong; Chen, Yong-Xing; Lu, Ping; Zhang, De-Yun; Wang, Lili; Sun, Hua; Yang, Tsomin; Keeble-Gagnere, Gabriel; Appels, Rudi; Doležel, Jaroslav; Ling, Hong-Qing; Luo, Mingcheng; Gu, Yongqiang; Sun, Qixin; Liu, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important wheat diseases in the world. In this study, a single dominant powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 was identified in the IW172 wild emmer accession and mapped to the distal region of chromosome arm 7AL (bin7AL-16-0.86-0.90) via molecular marker analysis. MlIW172 was closely linked with the RFLP probe Xpsr680-derived STS marker Xmag2185 and the EST markers BE405531 and BE637476. This suggested that MlIW172 might be allelic to the Pm1 locus or a new locus closely linked to Pm1. By screening genomic BAC library of durum wheat cv. Langdon and 7AL-specific BAC library of hexaploid wheat cv. Chinese Spring, and after analyzing genome scaffolds of Triticum urartu containing the marker sequences, additional markers were developed to construct a fine genetic linkage map on the MlIW172 locus region and to delineate the resistance gene within a 0.48 cM interval. Comparative genetics analyses using ESTs and RFLP probe sequences flanking the MlIW172 region against other grass species revealed a general co-linearity in this region with the orthologous genomic regions of rice chromosome 6, Brachypodium chromosome 1, and sorghum chromosome 10. However, orthologous resistance gene-like RGA sequences were only present in wheat and Brachypodium. The BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds that we have developed provide a framework for the physical mapping and map-based cloning of MlIW172. PMID:24955773

  3. Fine Physical and Genetic Mapping of Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene MlIW172 Originating from Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Zhao, Xiaojie; Cui, Yu; Song, Wei; Huo, Naxin; Liang, Yong; Xie, Jingzhong; Wang, Zhenzhong; Wu, Qiuhong; Chen, Yong-Xing; Lu, Ping; Zhang, De-Yun; Wang, Lili; Sun, Hua; Yang, Tsomin; Keeble-Gagnere, Gabriel; Appels, Rudi; Doležel, Jaroslav; Ling, Hong-Qing; Luo, Mingcheng; Gu, Yongqiang; Sun, Qixin; Liu, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important wheat diseases in the world. In this study, a single dominant powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW172 was identified in the IW172 wild emmer accession and mapped to the distal region of chromosome arm 7AL (bin7AL-16-0.86-0.90) via molecular marker analysis. MlIW172 was closely linked with the RFLP probe Xpsr680-derived STS marker Xmag2185 and the EST markers BE405531 and BE637476. This suggested that MlIW172 might be allelic to the Pm1 locus or a new locus closely linked to Pm1. By screening genomic BAC library of durum wheat cv. Langdon and 7AL-specific BAC library of hexaploid wheat cv. Chinese Spring, and after analyzing genome scaffolds of Triticum urartu containing the marker sequences, additional markers were developed to construct a fine genetic linkage map on the MlIW172 locus region and to delineate the resistance gene within a 0.48 cM interval. Comparative genetics analyses using ESTs and RFLP probe sequences flanking the MlIW172 region against other grass species revealed a general co-linearity in this region with the orthologous genomic regions of rice chromosome 6, Brachypodium chromosome 1, and sorghum chromosome 10. However, orthologous resistance gene-like RGA sequences were only present in wheat and Brachypodium. The BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds that we have developed provide a framework for the physical mapping and map-based cloning of MlIW172. PMID:24955773

  4. A 1,681-locus consensus genetic map of cultivated cucumber including 67 NB-LRR resistance gene homolog and ten gene loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cucumber is an important vegetable crop that is susceptible to many pathogens, but no disease resistance (R) genes have been cloned. The availability of whole genome sequences provides an excellent opportunity for systematic identification and characterization of the nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) type R gene homolog (RGH) sequences in the genome. Cucumber has a very narrow genetic base making it difficult to construct high-density genetic maps. Development of a consensus map by synthesizing information from multiple segregating populations is a method of choice to increase marker density. As such, the objectives of the present study were to identify and characterize NB-LRR type RGHs, and to develop a high-density, integrated cucumber genetic-physical map anchored with RGH loci. Results From the Gy14 draft genome, 70 NB-containing RGHs were identified and characterized. Most RGHs were in clusters with uneven distribution across seven chromosomes. In silico analysis indicated that all 70 RGHs had EST support for gene expression. Phylogenetic analysis classified 58 RGHs into two clades: CNL and TNL. Comparative analysis revealed high-degree sequence homology and synteny in chromosomal locations of these RGH members between the cucumber and melon genomes. Fifty-four molecular markers were developed to delimit 67 of the 70 RGHs, which were integrated into a genetic map through linkage analysis. A 1,681-locus cucumber consensus map including 10 gene loci and spanning 730.0 cM in seven linkage groups was developed by integrating three component maps with a bin-mapping strategy. Physically, 308 scaffolds with 193.2 Mbp total DNA sequences were anchored onto this consensus map that covered 52.6% of the 367 Mbp cucumber genome. Conclusions Cucumber contains relatively few NB-LRR RGHs that are clustered and unevenly distributed in the genome. All RGHs seem to be transcribed and shared significant sequence homology and synteny with the melon

  5. Ligand based validated comparative chemometric modeling and pharmacophore mapping of aurone derivatives as antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Nilanjan; Halder, Amit Kumar; Mondal, Chanchal; Jha, Tarun

    2013-09-01

    Chloroquine resistance is nowadays a great problem. Aurone derivatives are effective against chloroquine resistant parasite. Ligand based validated comparative chemometric modeling through 2D-QSAR and kNN-MFA 3DQSAR studies as well as common feature 3D pharmacophore mapping were done on thirtyfive aurone derivatives having antimalarial activity. Statistically significant 2D-QSAR models were generated on unsplitted as well as splitted dataset by MLR and PLS technique. The MLR model of the unsplitted method was validated by two-deep cross validation and 10 fold cross validation for determining the predictive ability. The PLS technique of the unsplitted method was done to compare the significance of these methods. In the splitted method, model was developed on the training set by Y-based ranking method by using the same descriptors and was validated on fifty pairs of the test and the training sets by k-MCA technique. These models generated by using the same descriptors were well validated irrespective of MLR as well as PLS analysis of unsplitted as well as splitted methods and are showing similar results. Therefore, these descriptors and model generated were reliable and robust. The kNN-MFA 3D-QSAR models were generated by three variable selection methods: genetic algorithm, simulated annealing and stepwise regression. The kNN-MFA 3D-QSAR results support the 2D QSAR data and in turn validate the earlier observed SAR results. Common feature 3D-pharmacophore generation was performed on these compounds to validate both 2D and 3D-QSAR studies as well as the earlier observed SAR data. The work highlights the required structural features for the higher antimalarial activity. PMID:24010937

  6. Physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum (formerly Clostridium acetobutylicum) NCP 262 chromosome.

    PubMed

    Keis, S; Sullivan, J T; Jones, D T

    2001-07-01

    A physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP 262 chromosome was constructed. The order of macrorestriction fragments was determined by analysing fragments generated after single and double digestion with the restriction enzymes BssHII, I-CeuI, Sse8387I, RsrII and SfiI and separation by PFGE. The I-CeuI backbone of C. saccharobutylicum was constructed by indirect end-labelling with rrs- and 3' rrl-specific probes located on either side of the I-CeuI site in the rrn operon, and reciprocal separation of BssHII and I-CeuI digestion products by two-dimensional PFGE. The positions of BssHII fragments on the physical map were determined using a library of linking clones containing BssHII cleavage sites. The size of the circular genome was estimated to be 5.3 Mb with a mean resolution of approximately 140 kb. The chromosome of C. saccharobutylicum contains 12 rrn operons, located on 46% of the chromosome, which are transcribed divergently from the deduced origin of replication. The genetic map was constructed by determining the location of 28 genes involved in house-keeping, heat-shock response, sporulation, electron transfer and acid- and solvent-formation. Comparison of the C. saccharobutylicum genetic map with those of the spore-forming bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium beijerinckii indicated C. saccharobutylicum to be most similar to the latter two Clostridium species, with the order of the genes within the gyrAB and recA loci being conserved. PMID:11429467

  7. An Unbiased Systems Genetics Approach to Mapping Genetic Loci Modulating Susceptibility to Severe Streptococcal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Abdeltawab, Nourtan F.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Kansal, Rita; Rowe, Sarah L.; Su, Yin; Gardner, Lidia; Brannen, Charity; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Attia, Ramy R.; Abdelsamed, Hossam A.; Taylor, William L.; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.; Kotb, Malak

    2008-01-01

    Striking individual differences in severity of group A streptococcal (GAS) sepsis have been noted, even among patients infected with the same bacterial strain. We had provided evidence that HLA class II allelic variation contributes significantly to differences in systemic disease severity by modulating host responses to streptococcal superantigens. Inasmuch as the bacteria produce additional virulence factors that participate in the pathogenesis of this complex disease, we sought to identify additional gene networks modulating GAS sepsis. Accordingly, we applied a systems genetics approach using a panel of advanced recombinant inbred mice. By analyzing disease phenotypes in the context of mice genotypes we identified a highly significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) on Chromosome 2 between 22 and 34 Mb that strongly predicts disease severity, accounting for 25%–30% of variance. This QTL harbors several polymorphic genes known to regulate immune responses to bacterial infections. We evaluated candidate genes within this QTL using multiple parameters that included linkage, gene ontology, variation in gene expression, cocitation networks, and biological relevance, and identified interleukin1 alpha and prostaglandin E synthases pathways as key networks involved in modulating GAS sepsis severity. The association of GAS sepsis with multiple pathways underscores the complexity of traits modulating GAS sepsis and provides a powerful approach for analyzing interactive traits affecting outcomes of other infectious diseases. PMID:18421376

  8. Genetic mapping of variation in dauer larvae development in growing populations of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Green, J W M; Snoek, L B; Kammenga, J E; Harvey, S C

    2013-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the appropriate induction of dauer larvae development within growing populations is likely to be a primary determinant of genotypic fitness. The underlying genetic architecture of natural genetic variation in dauer formation has, however, not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we report extensive natural genetic variation in dauer larvae development within growing populations across multiple wild isolates. Moreover, bin mapping of introgression lines (ILs) derived from the genetically divergent isolates N2 and CB4856 reveals 10 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting dauer formation. Comparison of individual ILs to N2 identifies an additional eight QTLs, and sequential IL analysis reveals six more QTLs. Our results also show that a behavioural, laboratory-derived, mutation controlled by the neuropeptide Y receptor homolog npr-1 can affect dauer larvae development in growing populations. These findings illustrate the complex genetic architecture of variation in dauer larvae formation in C. elegans and may help to understand how the control of variation in dauer larvae development has evolved. PMID:23715016

  9. First genetic linkage map for the mud crab (Scylla paramamosain) constructed using microsatellite and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Ma, H Y; Li, S J; Feng, N N; Ma, C Y; Wang, W; Chen, W; Ma, L B

    2016-01-01

    The mud crab (Scylla paramamosain) is of economic importance for the fisheries and aquaculture industry in China. In this study, we constructed the first genetic linkage map for this species using microsatellite and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The map consisted of 65 linkage groups, including 34 triplets and 9 doublets. A total of 212 molecular markers were mapped, including 60 microsatellites and 152 AFLP markers. The linkage groups ranged from 7 to 102.5 cM and covered 2746.4 cM in length. The mean length was 42.3 cM per linkage group, and the mean spacing was 18.68 cM. The genome size was estimated to be 5539.62 cM, with 50% coverage by the present map. Moreover, we reported 5 transcriptome-derived polymorphic microsatellite markers and characterized their polymorphism in a first-generation family. This study will facilitate studies on high-density maps and molecular marker-assisted selection in S. paramamosain and related crustacean species. PMID:27323059

  10. Comparative mapping of chalkiness components in rice using five populations across two environments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chalkiness is a major constraint in rice production because it is one of the key factors determining grain quality (appearance, processing, milling, storing, eating, and cooking quality) and price. Its reduction is a major goal, and the primary purpose of this study was to dissect the genetic basis of grain chalkiness. Using five populations across two environments, we also sought to determine how many quantitative trait loci (QTL) can be consistently detected. We obtained an integrated genetic map using the data from five mapping populations and further confirmed the reliability of the identified QTL. Results A total of 79 QTL associated with six chalkiness traits (chalkiness rate, white core rate, white belly rate, chalkiness area, white core area, and white belly area) were mapped on 12 chromosomes using five populations (two doubled haploid lines and three recombinant inbred lines) across two environments (Hainan in 2004 and Wuhan in 2004). The final integrated map included 430 markers; 58.3% of the QTL clustered together (QTL clusters), 71.4% of the QTL clusters were identified in two or more populations, and 36.1% of the QTL were consistently detected in the two environments. The QTL could be detected again and showed dominance (qWBR1, qWBR8, qWBR12, and qCR5) or overdominance effects (qWCR7) for the rate of the white belly or white core, respectively, and all four QTL clusters derived from Zhenshan 97 controlling white belly rate were stably and reliably identified in an F2 population. Conclusions Our results identified 79 QTL associated with six chalkiness traits using five populations across two environments and yielded an integrated genetic map, indicating most of the QTL clustered together and could be detected in different backgrounds. The identified QTL were stable and reliable in the F2 population, and they may facilitate our understanding of the QTL related to chalkiness traits in different populations and various environments, the

  11. Mapping the Regional Influence of Genetics on Brain Structure Variability - A Tensor-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Caroline; Leporé, Natasha; Pennec, Xavier; Lee, Agatha D.; Barysheva, Marina; Madsen, Sarah K.; Avedissian, Christina; Chou, Yi-Yu; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie; Wright, Margaret; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence brain structure and function profoundly The search for heritable anatomical features and their influencing genes would be accelerated with detailed 3D maps showing the degree to which brain morphometry is genetically determined. As part of an MRI study that will scan 1150 twins, we applied Tensor-Based Morphometry to compute morphometric differences in 23 pairs of identical twins and 23 pairs of same-sex fraternal twins (mean age: 23.8 ± 1.8 SD years). All 92 twins’ 3D brain MRI scans were nonlinearly registered to a common space using a Riemannian fluid-based warping approach to compute volumetric differences across subjects. A multi-template method was used to improve volume quantification. Vector fields driving each subject’s anatomy onto the common template were analyzed to create maps of local volumetric excesses and deficits relative to the standard template. Using a new structural equation modeling method, we computed the voxelwise proportion of variance in volumes attributable to additive (A) or dominant (D) genetic factors versus shared environmental (C) or unique environmental factors (E). The method was also applied to various anatomical regions of interest (ROIs). As hypothesized, the overall volumes of the brain, basal ganglia, thalamus, and each lobe were under strong genetic control; local white matter volumes were mostly controlled by common environment. After adjusting for individual differences in overall brain scale, genetic influences were still relatively high in the corpus callosum and in early-maturing brain regions such as the occipital lobes, while environmental influences were greater in frontal brain regions which have a more protracted maturational time-course. PMID:19446645

  12. Integrated physical, genetic and genome map of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Varshney, Rajeev K; Mir, Reyazul Rouf; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Thudi, Mahendar; Hu, Yuqin; Azam, Sarwar; Zhang, Yong; Jaganathan, Deepa; You, Frank M; Gao, Jinliang; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar; Luo, Ming-Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Physical map of chickpea was developed for the reference chickpea genotype (ICC 4958) using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries targeting 71,094 clones (~12× coverage). High information content fingerprinting (HICF) of these clones gave high-quality fingerprinting data for 67,483 clones, and 1,174 contigs comprising 46,112 clones and 3,256 singletons were defined. In brief, 574 Mb genome size was assembled in 1,174 contigs with an average of 0.49 Mb per contig and 3,256 singletons represent 407 Mb genome. The physical map was linked with two genetic maps with the help of 245 BAC-end sequence (BES)-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. This allowed locating some of the BACs in the vicinity of some important quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for drought tolerance and reistance to Fusarium wilt and Ascochyta blight. In addition, fingerprinted contig (FPC) assembly was also integrated with the draft genome sequence of chickpea. As a result, ~965 BACs including 163 minimum tilling path (MTP) clones could be mapped on eight pseudo-molecules of chickpea forming 491 hypothetical contigs representing 54,013,992 bp (~54 Mb) of the draft genome. Comprehensive analysis of markers in abiotic and biotic stress tolerance QTL regions led to identification of 654, 306 and 23 genes in drought tolerance "QTL-hotspot" region, Ascochyta blight resistance QTL region and Fusarium wilt resistance QTL region, respectively. Integrated physical, genetic and genome map should provide a foundation for cloning and isolation of QTLs/genes for molecular dissection of traits as well as markers for molecular breeding for chickpea improvement. PMID:24610029

  13. Comparing the Usefulness of Video and Map Information In Navigation Tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis W. Nielsen; Michael A. Goodrich

    2006-03-01

    One of the fundamental aspects of robot teleoperation is the ability to successfully navigate a robot through an environment. We define successful navigation to mean that the robot minimizes collisions and arrives at the destination in a timely manner. Often video and map information is presented to a robot operator to aid in navigation tasks. This paper addresses the usefulness of map and video information in a navigation task by comparing a side-by-side (2D) representation and an integrated (3D) representation in both a simulated and a real world study. The results suggest that sometimes video is more helpful than a map and other times a map is more helpful than video. From a design perspective, an integrated representation seems to help navigation more than placing map and video side-by-side.

  14. Evidence of Allopolyploidy in Urochloa humidicola Based on Cytological Analysis and Genetic Linkage Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Vigna, Bianca B. Z.; Santos, Jean C. S.; Jungmann, Leticia; do Valle, Cacilda B.; Mollinari, Marcelo; Pastina, Maria M.; Garcia, Antonio A. F.

    2016-01-01

    The African species Urochloa humidicola (Rendle) Morrone & Zuloaga (syn. Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick.) is an important perennial forage grass found throughout the tropics. This species is polyploid, ranging from tetra to nonaploid, and apomictic, which makes genetic studies challenging; therefore, the number of currently available genetic resources is limited. The genomic architecture and evolution of U. humidicola and the molecular markers linked to apomixis were investigated in a full-sib F1 population obtained by crossing the sexual accession H031 and the apomictic cultivar U. humidicola cv. BRS Tupi, both of which are hexaploid. A simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based linkage map was constructed for the species from 102 polymorphic and specific SSR markers based on simplex and double-simplex markers. The map consisted of 49 linkage groups (LGs) and had a total length of 1702.82 cM, with 89 microsatellite loci and an average map density of 10.6 cM. Eight homology groups (HGs) were formed, comprising 22 LGs, and the other LGs remained ungrouped. The locus that controls apospory (apo-locus) was mapped in LG02 and was located 19.4 cM from the locus Bh027.c.D2. In the cytological analyses of some hybrids, bi- to hexavalents at diakinesis were observed, as well as two nucleoli in some meiocytes, smaller chromosomes with preferential allocation within the first metaphase plate and asynchronous chromosome migration to the poles during anaphase. The linkage map and the meiocyte analyses confirm previous reports of hybridization and suggest an allopolyploid origin of the hexaploid U. humidicola. This is the first linkage map of an Urochloa species, and it will be useful for future quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis after saturation of the map and for genome assembly and evolutionary studies in Urochloa spp. Moreover, the results of the apomixis mapping are consistent with previous reports and confirm the need for additional studies to search for a co

  15. Evidence of Allopolyploidy in Urochloa humidicola Based on Cytological Analysis and Genetic Linkage Mapping.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Bianca B Z; Santos, Jean C S; Jungmann, Leticia; do Valle, Cacilda B; Mollinari, Marcelo; Pastina, Maria M; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Garcia, Antonio A F; Souza, Anete P

    2016-01-01

    The African species Urochloa humidicola (Rendle) Morrone & Zuloaga (syn. Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick.) is an important perennial forage grass found throughout the tropics. This species is polyploid, ranging from tetra to nonaploid, and apomictic, which makes genetic studies challenging; therefore, the number of currently available genetic resources is limited. The genomic architecture and evolution of U. humidicola and the molecular markers linked to apomixis were investigated in a full-sib F1 population obtained by crossing the sexual accession H031 and the apomictic cultivar U. humidicola cv. BRS Tupi, both of which are hexaploid. A simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based linkage map was constructed for the species from 102 polymorphic and specific SSR markers based on simplex and double-simplex markers. The map consisted of 49 linkage groups (LGs) and had a total length of 1702.82 cM, with 89 microsatellite loci and an average map density of 10.6 cM. Eight homology groups (HGs) were formed, comprising 22 LGs, and the other LGs remained ungrouped. The locus that controls apospory (apo-locus) was mapped in LG02 and was located 19.4 cM from the locus Bh027.c.D2. In the cytological analyses of some hybrids, bi- to hexavalents at diakinesis were observed, as well as two nucleoli in some meiocytes, smaller chromosomes with preferential allocation within the first metaphase plate and asynchronous chromosome migration to the poles during anaphase. The linkage map and the meiocyte analyses confirm previous reports of hybridization and suggest an allopolyploid origin of the hexaploid U. humidicola. This is the first linkage map of an Urochloa species, and it will be useful for future quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis after saturation of the map and for genome assembly and evolutionary studies in Urochloa spp. Moreover, the results of the apomixis mapping are consistent with previous reports and confirm the need for additional studies to search for a co

  16. Comparative analysis of the domestic cat genome reveals genetic signatures underlying feline biology and domestication.

    PubMed

    Montague, Michael J; Li, Gang; Gandolfi, Barbara; Khan, Razib; Aken, Bronwen L; Searle, Steven M J; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W; Koboldt, Daniel C; Davis, Brian W; Driscoll, Carlos A; Barr, Christina S; Blackistone, Kevin; Quilez, Javier; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Thomas, Gregg W C; Hahn, Matthew W; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; O'Brien, Stephen J; Wilson, Richard K; Lyons, Leslie A; Murphy, William J; Warren, Wesley C

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the genetic changes that distinguish domestic cat populations from their wild progenitors. Here we describe a high-quality domestic cat reference genome assembly and comparative inferences made with other cat breeds, wildcats, and other mammals. Based upon these comparisons, we identified positively selected genes enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolism that underpin adaptations to a hypercarnivorous diet. We also found positive selection signals within genes underlying sensory processes, especially those affecting vision and hearing in the carnivore lineage. We observed an evolutionary tradeoff between functional olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene repertoires in the cat and dog genomes, with an expansion of the feline chemosensory system for detecting pheromones at the expense of odorant detection. Genomic regions harboring signatures of natural selection that distinguish domestic cats from their wild congeners are enriched in neural crest-related genes associated with behavior and reward in mouse models, as predicted by the domestication syndrome hypothesis. Our description of a previously unidentified allele for the gloving pigmentation pattern found in the Birman breed supports the hypothesis that cat breeds experienced strong selection on specific mutations drawn from random bred populations. Collectively, these findings provide insight into how the process of domestication altered the ancestral wildcat genome and build a resource for future disease mapping and phylogenomic studies across all members of the Felidae. PMID:25385592

  17. Comparative analysis of the domestic cat genome reveals genetic signatures underlying feline biology and domestication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Gandolfi, Barbara; Khan, Razib; Aken, Bronwen L.; Searle, Steven M. J.; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Davis, Brian W.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Barr, Christina S.; Blackistone, Kevin; Quilez, Javier; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Thomas, Gregg W. C.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Lyons, Leslie A.; Murphy, William J.; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic changes that distinguish domestic cat populations from their wild progenitors. Here we describe a high-quality domestic cat reference genome assembly and comparative inferences made with other cat breeds, wildcats, and other mammals. Based upon these comparisons, we identified positively selected genes enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolism that underpin adaptations to a hypercarnivorous diet. We also found positive selection signals within genes underlying sensory processes, especially those affecting vision and hearing in the carnivore lineage. We observed an evolutionary tradeoff between functional olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene repertoires in the cat and dog genomes, with an expansion of the feline chemosensory system for detecting pheromones at the expense of odorant detection. Genomic regions harboring signatures of natural selection that distinguish domestic cats from their wild congeners are enriched in neural crest-related genes associated with behavior and reward in mouse models, as predicted by the domestication syndrome hypothesis. Our description of a previously unidentified allele for the gloving pigmentation pattern found in the Birman breed supports the hypothesis that cat breeds experienced strong selection on specific mutations drawn from random bred populations. Collectively, these findings provide insight into how the process of domestication altered the ancestral wildcat genome and build a resource for future disease mapping and phylogenomic studies across all members of the Felidae. PMID:25385592

  18. Genetic linkage maps for Asian and American lotus constructed using novel SSR markers derived from the genome of sequenced cultivar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Nelumbo Adans. comprises two living species, N. nucifera Gaertan. (Asian lotus) and N. lutea Pers. (American lotus). A genetic linkage map is an essential resource for plant genetic studies and crop improvement but has not been generated for Nelumbo. We aimed to develop genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from the genome sequence and construct two genetic maps for Nelumbo to assist genome assembly and integration of a genetic map with the genome sequence. Results A total of 86,089 SSR motifs were identified from the genome sequences. Di- and tri-nucleotide repeat motifs were the most abundant, and accounted for 60.73% and 31.66% of all SSRs, respectively. AG/GA repeats constituted 51.17% of dinucleotide repeat motifs, followed by AT/TA (44.29%). Of 500 SSR primers tested, 386 (77.20%) produced scorable alleles with an average of 2.59 per primer, and 185 (37.00%) showed polymorphism among two parental genotypes, N. nucifera ‘Chinese Antique’ and N. lutea ‘AL1’, and six progenies of their F1 population. The normally segregating markers, which comprised 268 newly developed SSRs, 37 previously published SSRs and 53 sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers, were used for genetic map construction. The map for Asian lotus was 365.67 cM with 47 markers distributed in seven linkage groups. The map for American lotus was 524.51 cM, and contained 177 markers distributed in 11 genetic linkage groups. The number of markers per linkage group ranged from three to 34 with an average genetic distance of 3.97 cM between adjacent markers. Moreover, 171 SSR markers contained in linkage groups were anchored to 97 genomic DNA sequence contigs of ‘Chinese Antique’. The 97 contigs were merged into 60 scaffolds. Conclusion Genetic mapping of SSR markers derived from sequenced contigs in Nelumbo enabled the associated contigs to be anchored in the linkage map and facilitated assembly of the genome sequences of ‘Chinese Antique’. The

  19. Efficient search, mapping, and optimization of multi-protein genetic systems in diverse bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Farasat, Iman; Kushwaha, Manish; Collens, Jason; Easterbrook, Michael; Guido, Matthew; Salis, Howard M

    2014-01-01

    Developing predictive models of multi-protein genetic systems to understand and optimize their behavior remains a combinatorial challenge, particularly when measurement throughput is limited. We developed a computational approach to build predictive models and identify optimal sequences and expression levels, while circumventing combinatorial explosion. Maximally informative genetic system variants were first designed by the RBS Library Calculator, an algorithm to design sequences for efficiently searching a multi-protein expression space across a > 10,000-fold range with tailored search parameters and well-predicted translation rates. We validated the algorithm's predictions by characterizing 646 genetic system variants, encoded in plasmids and genomes, expressed in six gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial hosts. We then combined the search algorithm with system-level kinetic modeling, requiring the construction and characterization of 73 variants to build a sequence-expression-activity map (SEAMAP) for a biosynthesis pathway. Using model predictions, we designed and characterized 47 additional pathway variants to navigate its activity space, find optimal expression regions with desired activity response curves, and relieve rate-limiting steps in metabolism. Creating sequence-expression-activity maps accelerates the optimization of many protein systems and allows previous measurements to quantitatively inform future designs. PMID:24952589

  20. Genetic Mapping and Exome Sequencing Identify Variants Associated with Five Novel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Puffenberger, Erik G.; Jinks, Robert N.; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A.; Achilly, Nathan P.; Cassidy, Ryan P.; Fiorentini, Christopher J.; Heiken, Kory F.; Lawrence, Johnny J.; Mahoney, Molly H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nair, Devika T.; Politi, Kristin A.; Worcester, Kimberly N.; Setton, Roni A.; DiPiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A.; Eastman, James T.; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L.; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D. Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean = 4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean = 79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data. PMID:22279524

  1. Genetic divergence in morphology-performance mapping between Misty Lake and inlet stickleback.

    PubMed

    Hendry, A P; Hudson, K; Walker, J A; Räsänen, K; Chapman, L J

    2011-01-01

    Different environments should select for different aspects of organismal performance, which should lead to correlated divergence in morphological traits that influence performance. The result should be genetic divergence in aspects of performance, morphology and associations ('maps') between morphology and performance. Testing this hypothesis requires quantifying performance and morphology in multiple populations after controlling for environmental differences, but this is rarely attempted. We used a common-garden experiment to examine morphology and several aspects of swimming performance within and between the lake and inlet populations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from the Misty system, Vancouver Island, Canada. Controlling for body size, lake stickleback had shallower bodies, larger caudal fins and smaller pelvic girdles. With or without morphological covariates, lake stickleback showed greater performance in both sustained and burst swimming. In contrast, inlet stickleback showed greater manoeuverability than did lake stickleback in some analyses. Morphology-performance relationships were decoupled when considering variation within vs. between populations. Moreover, morphology-performance mapping differed between the two populations. Based on these observations, we advance a hypothesis for why populations adapting to different environments should show adaptive genetic divergence in morphology-performance mapping. PMID:21091565

  2. A reciprocal cross design to map the genetic architecture of complex traits in apomictic plants.

    PubMed

    Yin, Danni; Zhu, Xuli; Jiang, Libo; Zhang, Jian; Zeng, Yanru; Wu, Rongling

    2015-02-01

    Many higher plants of economic and biological importance undergo apomixis in which the maternal tissue of the ovule forms a seed, without experiencing meiosis and fertilization. This feature of apomixis has made it difficult to perform linkage mapping which relies on meiotic recombination. Here, we describe a computational model for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control complex traits in apomictic plants. The model is founded on the mixture model-based likelihood in which maternal genotypes are dissolved into two possible components generated by meiotic and apomictic processes, respectively. The EM algorithm was implemented to discern meiotic and apomictic genotypes and, therefore, allow the marker-QTL linkage relationship to be estimated. By capitalizing on reciprocal crosses, the model is renovated to estimate and test imprinting effects of QTLs, providing a better gateway to characterize the genetic architecture of complex traits. The model was validated through computer simulation and further demonstrated for its usefulness by analyzing a real data for an apomictic woody plant. The model has for the first time provided a unique tool for genetic mapping in apomictic plants. PMID:25354995

  3. High-resolution genetic mapping of maize pan-genome sequence anchors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fei; Romay, Maria C; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Bradbury, Peter J; Elshire, Robert J; Wang, Tianyu; Li, Yu; Li, Yongxiang; Semagn, Kassa; Zhang, Xuecai; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Mikel, Mark A; Soifer, Ilya; Barad, Omer; Buckler, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    In addition to single-nucleotide polymorphisms, structural variation is abundant in many plant genomes. The structural variation across a species can be represented by a 'pan-genome', which is essential to fully understand the genetic control of phenotypes. However, the pan-genome's complexity hinders its accurate assembly via sequence alignment. Here we demonstrate an approach to facilitate pan-genome construction in maize. By performing 18 trillion association tests we map 26 million tags generated by reduced representation sequencing of 14,129 maize inbred lines. Using machine-learning models we select 4.4 million accurately mapped tags as sequence anchors, 1.1 million of which are presence/absence variations. Structural variations exhibit enriched association with phenotypic traits, indicating that it is a significant source of adaptive variation in maize. The ability to efficiently map ultrahigh-density pan-genome sequence anchors enables fine characterization of structural variation and will advance both genetic research and breeding in many crops. PMID:25881062

  4. Chromosome rearrangements during domestication of cucumber as revealed from high-density genetic mapping and draft genome assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber is an economically important vegetable crop, but available genetic and genomics resources for cucumber are limited that hinders progress in cucumber breeding. In this study, we made significant contributions to the cucumber research community by developing a high-density genetic map for cul...

  5. Next Generation Genetic Mapping of the Ligon-lintless-2 (Li2) Locus in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing offers new ways to identify the genetic mechanisms that underlie mutant phenotypes. The release of a reference diploid Gossypium raimondii (D5) genome and bioinformatics tools to sort tetraploid reads into subgenomes has brought cotton genetic mapping into the genomics er...

  6. Development of a genetic linkage map for tetraploid highbush blueberry using SSR and EST-PCR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to better understand the genetic control of chilling requirement in tetraploid highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), a genetic linkage map is being constructed from the cross between ‘Draper’ and ‘Jewel’ blueberry cultivars (northern and southern adapted, respectively). The mapp...

  7. An integrated genetic and physical map of homoeologous chromosomes 12 and 26 in Upland cotton (G. hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland cotton (G. hirsutum L.) is the leading fiber crop worldwide. Genetic improvement of fiber quality and yield is facilitated by a variety of genomics tools. An integrated genetic and physical map is needed to better characterize quantitative trait loci and to allow for the positional cloning ...

  8. An ultra-high-density map as a community resource for discerning the genetic basis of quantitative traits in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we generated a linkage map containing 1,151,856 high quality SNPs between Mo17 and B73, which were verified in the maize intermated B73'×'Mo17 (IBM) Syn10 population. This resource is an excellent complement to existing maize genetic maps available in an online database (iPlant, http:...

  9. Genetical and Comparative Genomics of Brassica under Altered Ca Supply Identifies Arabidopsis Ca-Transporter Orthologs[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Neil S.; Hammond, John P.; Lysenko, Artem; Mayes, Sean; Ó Lochlainn, Seosamh; Blasco, Bego; Bowen, Helen C.; Rawlings, Chris J.; Rios, Juan J.; Welham, Susan; Carion, Pierre W.C.; Dupuy, Lionel X.; King, Graham J.; White, Philip J.; Broadley, Martin R.

    2014-01-01

    Although Ca transport in plants is highly complex, the overexpression of vacuolar Ca2+ transporters in crops is a promising new technology to improve dietary Ca supplies through biofortification. Here, we sought to identify novel targets for increasing plant Ca accumulation using genetical and comparative genomics. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping to 1895 cis- and 8015 trans-loci were identified in shoots of an inbred mapping population of Brassica rapa (IMB211 × R500); 23 cis- and 948 trans-eQTLs responded specifically to altered Ca supply. eQTLs were screened for functional significance using a large database of shoot Ca concentration phenotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana. From 31 Arabidopsis gene identifiers tagged to robust shoot Ca concentration phenotypes, 21 mapped to 27 B. rapa eQTLs, including orthologs of the Ca2+ transporters At-CAX1 and At-ACA8. Two of three independent missense mutants of BraA.cax1a, isolated previously by targeting induced local lesions in genomes, have allele-specific shoot Ca concentration phenotypes compared with their segregating wild types. BraA.CAX1a is a promising target for altering the Ca composition of Brassica, consistent with prior knowledge from Arabidopsis. We conclude that multiple-environment eQTL analysis of complex crop genomes combined with comparative genomics is a powerful technique for novel gene identification/prioritization. PMID:25082855

  10. Construction of a high-density genetic map for grape using next generation restriction-site associated DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic mapping and QTL detection are powerful methodologies in plant improvement and breeding. Construction of a high-density and high-quality genetic map would be of great benefit in the production of superior grapes to meet human demand. High throughput and low cost of the recently developed next generation sequencing (NGS) technology have resulted in its wide application in genome research. Sequencing restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) might be an efficient strategy to simplify genotyping. Combining NGS with RAD has proven to be powerful for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker development. Results An F1 population of 100 individual plants was developed. In-silico digestion-site prediction was used to select an appropriate restriction enzyme for construction of a RAD sequencing library. Next generation RAD sequencing was applied to genotype the F1 population and its parents. Applying a cluster strategy for SNP modulation, a total of 1,814 high-quality SNP markers were developed: 1,121 of these were mapped to the female genetic map, 759 to the male map, and 1,646 to the integrated map. A comparison of the genetic maps to the published Vitis vinifera genome revealed both conservation and variations. Conclusions The applicability of next generation RAD sequencing for genotyping a grape F1 population was demonstrated, leading to the successful development of a genetic map with high density and quality using our designed SNP markers. Detailed analysis revealed that this newly developed genetic map can be used for a variety of genome investigations, such as QTL detection, sequence assembly and genome comparison. PMID:22908993

  11. Comparative Genetics of Seed Size Traits in Divergent Cereal Lineages Represented by Sorghum (Panicoidae) and Rice (Oryzoidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong; Li, Jingping; Compton, Rosana O.; Robertson, Jon; Goff, Valorie H.; Epps, Ethan; Kong, Wenqian; Kim, Changsoo; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Seed size is closely related to fitness of wild plants, and its modification has been a key recurring element in domestication of seed/grain crops. In sorghum, a genomic and morphological model for panicoid cereals, a rich history of research into the genetics of seed size is reflected by a total of 13 likelihood intervals determined by conventional QTL (linkage) mapping in 11 nonoverlapping regions of the genome. To complement QTL data and investigate whether the discovery of seed size QTL is approaching “saturation,” we compared QTL data to GWAS for seed mass, seed length, and seed width studied in 354 accessions from a sorghum association panel (SAP) that have been genotyped at 265,487 SNPs. We identified nine independent GWAS-based “hotspots” for seed size associations. Targeted resequencing near four association peaks with the most notable linkage disequilibrium provides further support of the role(s) of these regions in the genetic control of sorghum seed size and identifies two candidate causal variants with nonsynonymous mutations. Of nine GWAS hotspots in sorghum, seven have significant correspondence with rice QTL intervals and known genes for components of seed size on orthologous chromosomes. Identifying intersections between positional and association genetic data are a potentially powerful means to mitigate constraints associated with each approach, and nonrandom correspondence of sorghum (panicoid) GWAS signals to rice (oryzoid) QTL adds a new dimension to the ability to leverage genetic data about this important trait across divergent plants. PMID:25834216

  12. Comparative Genetics of Seed Size Traits in Divergent Cereal Lineages Represented by Sorghum (Panicoidae) and Rice (Oryzoidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Li, Jingping; Compton, Rosana O; Robertson, Jon; Goff, Valorie H; Epps, Ethan; Kong, Wenqian; Kim, Changsoo; Paterson, Andrew H

    2015-06-01

    Seed size is closely related to fitness of wild plants, and its modification has been a key recurring element in domestication of seed/grain crops. In sorghum, a genomic and morphological model for panicoid cereals, a rich history of research into the genetics of seed size is reflected by a total of 13 likelihood intervals determined by conventional QTL (linkage) mapping in 11 nonoverlapping regions of the genome. To complement QTL data and investigate whether the discovery of seed size QTL is approaching "saturation," we compared QTL data to GWAS for seed mass, seed length, and seed width studied in 354 accessions from a sorghum association panel (SAP) that have been genotyped at 265,487 SNPs. We identified nine independent GWAS-based "hotspots" for seed size associations. Targeted resequencing near four association peaks with the most notable linkage disequilibrium provides further support of the role(s) of these regions in the genetic control of sorghum seed size and identifies two candidate causal variants with nonsynonymous mutations. Of nine GWAS hotspots in sorghum, seven have significant correspondence with rice QTL intervals and known genes for components of seed size on orthologous chromosomes. Identifying intersections between positional and association genetic data are a potentially powerful means to mitigate constraints associated with each approach, and nonrandom correspondence of sorghum (panicoid) GWAS signals to rice (oryzoid) QTL adds a new dimension to the ability to leverage genetic data about this important trait across divergent plants. PMID:25834216

  13. Brain eQTL Mapping Informs Genetic Studies of Psychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyu

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been used to identify genes that increase risk of psychiatric diseases. However, much of the variation in disease risk is still unexplained, suggesting that there are genes still to be discovered. Functional annotation of genetic variants may increase the power of GWASs to identify disease genes by providing prior information that can be used in Bayesian analysis or in reducing the number of tests. Genetic mapping of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) is helping us to reveal novel functional effects of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The published brain eQTL studies are reviewed here, and major methodological issues and their possible solutions are discussed. We emphasize the frequently-ignored problems of batch effects, covariates, and multiple testing, all of which can lead to false positives and false negatives. The future application of eQTL data to the GWAS analysis is also discussed. PMID:21441974

  14. Mapping quantitative trait loci for milk production and genetic polymorphisms of milk proteins in dairy sheep

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present recent advances in the molecular dissection of complex traits in dairy sheep and discuss their possible impact on breeding schemes. In the first step, we review the literature data on genetic polymorphisms and the effects of sheep αs1-casein and β-lactoglobulin loci. It is concluded that the results are rather inconsistent and cannot be used in dairy sheep selection. In a second step, we describe the strategy implemented in France, Italy and Spain taking advantage of the genetic maps for QTL detection. These studies were part of a European project, called "genesheepsafety", which investigated both milk production and functional traits. Preliminary QTL results are presented for production traits. PMID:15601591

  15. Genetic Mapping of the BRCA1 Region on Chromosome 17q21

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Hans; Plaetke, Rosemarie; Ballard, Linda; Fujimoto, Esther; Connolly, Judith; Lawrence, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Pilar; Robertson, Margaret; Bradley, Paige; Milner, Bruce; Fuhrman, David; Marks, Andy; Sargent, Robert; Cartwright, Peter; Matsunami, Nori; White, Ray

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome 17q21 harbors a gene (BRCA1) associated with a hereditary form of breast cancer. As a step toward identification of this gene itself we developed a number of simple-sequence-repeat (SSR) markers for chromosome 17 and constructed a high-resolution genetic map of a 40-cM region around 17q21. As part of this effort we captured genotypes from five of the markers by using an ABI sequencing instrument and stored them in a locally developed database, as a step toward automated genotyping. In addition, YACs that physically link some of the SSR markers were identified. The results provided by this study should facilitate physical mapping of the BRCA1 region and isolation of the BRCA1 gene. ImagesFigure 2Figure 1 PMID:8116621

  16. The GDB Human Genome Data Base: a source of integrated genetic mapping and disease data.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, K A

    1993-01-01

    The GDB Human Genome Data Base refers collectively to GDB and OMIM, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. GDB and OMIM are linked databases that provide an international repository for information generated by the Human Genome Initiative. GDB contains human gene mapping data, while OMIM offers the text of Dr. Victor A. McKusick's catalog of genetic disease and phenotype descriptions. These databases, updated and edited continuously, integrate bibliographic and full-text information with several types of mapping data. They are accessible through a flexible interface and are available through SprintNet and the Internet to the scientific community without cost. This paper provides an overview of the context, development, structure, content, and use of these databases. PMID:8374584

  17. Explorations in topology-delving underneath the surface of genetic interaction maps.

    PubMed

    Breker, Michal; Schuldiner, Maya

    2009-12-01

    High throughput assays, as well as advances in computational approaches, have recently allowed the acquisition of vast amounts of genetic interaction (GI) data in several organisms. Since GIs are a functional measure that reports on the effect of a mutation in one gene on the phenotype of a mutation in another, they can serve as a powerful tool to study both the function of individual genes and the wiring of biological networks. Therefore, these data hold much promise for advancing our understanding of cellular systems. In this review we focus on the methodologies currently available for using and interpreting large datasets of GIs for functional gene groups (GI maps), and elaborate on the challenges ahead. In addition, we discuss potential applications for the study of evolution and disease mechanisms, and highlight the need for comprehensive integrative analysis to extract the wealth of information found in these maps. PMID:19763324

  18. Genetic analysis of bacteriophage phi 29 of Bacillus subtilis: integration and mapping of reference mutants of two collections.

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, R P; Moreno, F; Viñuela, E; Salas, M; Reilly, B E; Anderson, D L

    1976-01-01

    Reference mutants of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 of the Madrid and Minneapolis collections were employed to construct a genetic map. Suppressor-sensitive and temperature-sensitive mutants were assigned to 17 cistrons by quantitative complementation. Three-factor crosses were used to assign an unambiguous order for the 17 cistrons. Recombination frequencies determined by two-factor crosses were used to construct a linear genetic map of 24.4 recombination units. The genes were numbered sequentially from left to right (1 to 17) according to their relative map position. PMID:822174

  19. A novel method to design S-box based on chaotic map and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Wong, Kwok-Wo; Li, Changbing; Li, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The substitution box (S-box) is an important component in block encryption algorithms. In this Letter, the problem of constructing S-box is transformed to a Traveling Salesman Problem and a method for designing S-box based on chaos and genetic algorithm is proposed. Since the proposed method makes full use of the traits of chaotic map and evolution process, stronger S-box is obtained. The results of performance test show that the presented S-box has good cryptographic properties, which justify that the proposed algorithm is effective in generating strong S-boxes.

  20. A molecular map of the apomixis-control locus in Paspalum procurrens and its comparative analysis with other species of Paspalum.

    PubMed

    Hojsgaard, D H; Martínez, E J; Acuña, C A; Quarin, C L; Pupilli, F

    2011-10-01

    Since apomixis was first mapped in Paspalum, the absence of recombination that characterizes the related locus appeared to be the most difficult bottleneck to overcome for the dissection of the genetic determinants that control this trait. An approach to break the block of recombination was developed in this genus through an among-species comparative mapping strategy. A new apomictic species, P. procurrens (Q4094) was crossed with a sexual plant of P. simplex and their progeny was classified for reproductive mode with the aid of morphological, embryological and genetic analyses. On this progeny, a set of heterologous rice RFLP markers strictly co-segregating in coupling phase with apomixis was identified. These markers were all located on the telomeric region of the long arm of the chromosome 12 of rice. In spite of the lack of recombination exhibited by the apomixis-linked markers in P. procurrens, a comparative mapping analysis among P. simplex, P. malacophyllum, P. notatum and P. procurrens, allowed us to identify a small group of markers co-segregating with apomixis in all these species. These markers bracketed a chromosome region that likely contains all the genetic determinants of apomictic reproduction in Paspalum. The implications of this new inter-specific approach for overcoming the block of recombination to isolate the genetic determinants of apomixis and gain a better comprehension of genome structure of apomictic chromosome region are discussed. PMID:21713535

  1. Mapping of Genetic Abnormalities of Primary Tumours from Metastatic CRC by High-Resolution SNP Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sayagués, José María; Fontanillo, Celia; Abad, María del Mar; González-González, María; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; del Carmen Chillon, Maria; Garcia, Eva; Bengoechea, Oscar; Fonseca, Emilio; Gonzalez-Diaz, Marcos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Background For years, the genetics of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) have been studied using a variety of techniques. However, most of the approaches employed so far have a relatively limited resolution which hampers detailed characterization of the common recurrent chromosomal breakpoints as well as the identification of small regions carrying genetic changes and the genes involved in them. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we applied 500K SNP arrays to map the most common chromosomal lesions present at diagnosis in a series of 23 primary tumours from sporadic CRC patients who had developed liver metastasis. Overall our results confirm that the genetic profile of metastatic CRC is defined by imbalanced gains of chromosomes 7, 8q, 11q, 13q, 20q and X together with losses of the 1p, 8p, 17p and 18q chromosome regions. In addition, SNP-array studies allowed the identification of small (<1.3 Mb) and extensive/large (>1.5 Mb) altered DNA sequences, many of which contain cancer genes known to be involved in CRC and the metastatic process. Detailed characterization of the breakpoint regions for the altered chromosomes showed four recurrent breakpoints at chromosomes 1p12, 8p12, 17p11.2 and 20p12.1; interestingly, the most frequently observed recurrent chromosomal breakpoint was localized at 17p11.2 and systematically targeted the FAM27L gene, whose role in CRC deserves further investigations. Conclusions/Significance In summary, in the present study we provide a detailed map of the genetic abnormalities of primary tumours from metastatic CRC patients, which confirm and extend on previous observations as regards the identification of genes potentially involved in development of CRC and the metastatic process. PMID:21060790

  2. [Unequal crossing over in Escherichia coli: genetic and physical mapping of duplications isolated in conjugational matings].

    PubMed

    Sukhodolets, V V; Dukhiĭ, D E

    1996-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that stable heterozygous duplications deoA deoB :: Tn5/deoC deoD can be isolated among Deo+ recombinants obtained in conjugational matings between Escherichia coli strains HfrH deoA deoB :: Tn5 and HfrH deoC deoD. In this work, 30 duplications were tested by transduction for the inclusion of a set of genetic markers adjoining the deo operon (99.5 min) at the genetic map of E. coli: cycA :: Tn10 (96 min), zji :: Tn10 (98.2 min), thr :: Tn9 (100/0 min), car :: Tn10 (1 min), leu :: Tn9 (2 min), and proAB :: Tn10 (6 min). The results obtained indicate that only three out of 30 duplications could have originated from unequal crossing over between the rrn operons. In eight strains, duplications were chosen for physical mapping by the use of Not I restriction, pulsed-field electrophoresis, and Southern blot hybridization with DNA of the deo operon. In all these strains, the presence of duplications (once a triplication) was confirmed by corresponding changes in the set of Not I digests, although some strains had additional genetic rearrangements. The order of operon copies in a tandem was determined, and the length of a duplicated chromosomal segment was calculated as equal to 25, 46, 80, 150.5, and 175 kb in duplication D49, D4, D5, D9, and D18, respectively. Thus, the use of the conjugational Hfr x Hfr system allows the generation of unique rearrangements of the E. coli genetic material. PMID:8647423

  3. Maize genetic diversity and association mapping using transposable element insertion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zerjal, Tatiana; Rousselet, Agnès; Mhiri, Corinne; Combes, Valérie; Madur, Delphine; Grandbastien, Marie-Angèle; Charcosset, Alain; Tenaillon, Maud I

    2012-05-01

    Transposable elements are the major component of the maize genome and presumably highly polymorphic yet they have not been used in population genetics and association analyses. Using the Transposon Display method, we isolated and converted into PCR-based markers 33 Miniature Inverted Repeat Transposable Elements (MITE) polymorphic insertions. These polymorphisms were genotyped on a population-based sample of 26 American landraces for a total of 322 plants. Genetic diversity was high and partitioned within and among landraces. The genetic groups identified using Bayesian clustering were in agreement with published data based on SNPs and SSRs, indicating that MITE polymorphisms reflect maize genetic history. To explore the contribution of MITEs to phenotypic variation, we undertook an association mapping approach in a panel of 367 maize lines phenotyped for 26 traits. We found a highly significant association between the marker ZmV1-9, on chromosome 1, and male flowering time. The variance explained by this association is consistent with a flowering delay of +123 degree-days. This MITE insertion is located at only 289 nucleotides from the 3' end of a Cytochrome P450-like gene, a region that was never identified in previous association mapping or QTL surveys. Interestingly, we found (i) a non-synonymous mutation located in the exon 2 of the gene in strong linkage disequilibrium with the MITE polymorphism, and (ii) a perfect sequence homology between the MITE sequence and a maize siRNA that could therefore potentially interfere with the expression of the Cytochrome P450-like gene. Those two observations among others offer exciting perspectives to validate functionally the role of this region on phenotypic variation. PMID:22350086

  4. Genetic fine mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Kyle J; Ferreira, Teresa; Lee, Yeji; Raimondo, Anne; Mägi, Reedik; Reschen, Michael E; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex S F; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen-Hong L; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peltonen, Leena; Perry, John R B; Platou, Carl G P; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wiltshire, Steven; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöcke, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin N A; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    We performed fine mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in or near KCNQ1. 'Credible sets' of the variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to noncoding sequence, implying that association with T2D is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that the T2D risk allele for this SNP increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease. PMID:26551672

  5. Genetic fine-mapping and genomic annotation defines causal mechanisms at type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil; Scott, Robert A; Prokopenko, Inga; Scott, Laura J; Green, Todd; Sparso, Thomas; Thuillier, Dorothee; Yengo, Loic; Grallert, Harald; Wahl, Simone; Frånberg, Mattias; Strawbridge, Rona J; Kestler, Hans; Chheda, Himanshu; Eisele, Lewin; Gustafsson, Stefan; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Qi, Lu; Karssen, Lennart C; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Willems, Sara M; Li, Man; Chen, Han; Fuchsberger, Christian; Kwan, Phoenix; Ma, Clement; Linderman, Michael; Lu, Yingchang; Thomsen, Soren K; Rundle, Jana K; Beer, Nicola L; van de Bunt, Martijn; Chalisey, Anil; Kang, Hyun Min; Voight, Benjamin F; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Almgren, Peter; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borringer, Erwin P; Burtt, Noël P; Carey, Jason; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David J; Crenshaw, Andrew T; van Dam, Rob M; Doney, Alex SF; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Edkins, Sarah; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tonu; Eury, Elodie; Fadista, João; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fox, Caroline; Franks, Paul W; Gertow, Karl; Gieger, Christian; Gigante, Bruna; Gottesman, Omri; Grant, George B; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Hassinen, Maija; Have, Christian T; Herder, Christian; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Humphries, Steve E; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Anne U; Jonsson, Anna; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kerrison, Nicola D; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Kravic, Jasmina; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Liang, Liming; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindholm, Eero; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian’an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; McLeod, Olga; Meyer, Julia; Mihailov, Evelin; Mirza, Ghazala; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Carmen; Nöthen, Markus M; Oskolkov, Nikolay N; Owen, Katharine R; Palli, Domenico; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perry, John RB; Platou, Carl GP; Roden, Michael; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rybin, Denis; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Sennblad, Bengt; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Stančáková, Alena; Steinbach, Gerald; Storm, Petter; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Thorand, Barbara; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tonjes, Anke; Trakalo, Joseph; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wennauer, Roman; Wood, Andrew R; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Dunham, Ian; Birney, Ewan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Ferrer, Jorge; Loos, Ruth JF; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia; Sijbrands, Eric; Meigs, James B; Hu, Frank B; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stumvoll, Michael; Pedersen, Nancy L; Lind, Lars; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva; Saaristo, Timo E; Saltevo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Metspalu, Andres; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ingelsson, Erik; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Koistinen, Heikki; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hveem, Kristian; Njølstad, Inger; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Donnelly, Peter J; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Illig, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Cauchi, Stephane; Sladek, Rob; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Collin NA; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Nilsson, Peter M; Groop, Leif C; Barroso, Inês; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; O’Callaghan, Christopher A; Gloyn, Anna L; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Teslovich, Tanya M; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    We performed fine-mapping of 39 established type 2 diabetes (T2D) loci in 27,206 cases and 57,574 controls of European ancestry. We identified 49 distinct association signals at these loci, including five mapping in/near KCNQ1. “Credible sets” of variants most likely to drive each distinct signal mapped predominantly to non-coding sequence, implying that T2D association is mediated through gene regulation. Credible set variants were enriched for overlap with FOXA2 chromatin immunoprecipitation binding sites in human islet and liver cells, including at MTNR1B, where fine-mapping implicated rs10830963 as driving T2D association. We confirmed that this T2D-risk allele increases FOXA2-bound enhancer activity in islet- and liver-derived cells. We observed allele-specific differences in NEUROD1 binding in islet-derived cells, consistent with evidence that the T2D-risk allele increases islet MTNR1B expression. Our study demonstrates how integration of genetic and genomic information can define molecular mechanisms through which variants underlying association signals exert their effects on disease. PMID:26551672

  6. Integration of High-Resolution Physical and Genetic Map Reveals Differential Recombination Frequency between Chromosomes and the Genome Assembling Quality in Cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chunyan; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Ji; Huang, Sanwen; Chen, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cucumber is an important model crop and the first species sequenced in Cucurbitaceae family. Compared to the fast increasing genetic and genomics resources, the molecular cytogenetic researches in cucumber are still very limited, which results in directly the shortage of relation between plenty of physical sequences or genetic data and chromosome structure. We mapped twenty-three fosmids anchored by SSR markers from LG-3, the longest linkage group, and LG-4, the shortest linkage group on pachytene chromosomes 3 and 4, using uorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Integrated molecular cytogenetic maps of chromosomes 3 and 4 were constructed. Except for three SSR markers located on heterochromatin region, the cytological order of markers was concordant with those on the linkage maps. Distinct structural differences between chromosomes 3 and 4 were revealed by the high resolution pachytene chromosomes. The extreme difference of genetic length between LG-3 and LG-4 was mainly attributed to the difference of overall recombination frequency. The significant differentiation of heterochromatin contents in chromosomes 3 and 4 might have a direct correlation with recombination frequency. Meanwhile, the uneven distribution of recombination frequency along chromosome 4 was observed, and recombination frequency of the long arm was nearly 3.5 times higher than that of the short arm. The severe suppression of recombination was exhibited in centromeric and heterochromatin domains of chromosome 4. Whereas a close correlation between the gene density and recombination frequency was observed in chromosome 4, no significant correlation was observed between them along chromosome 3. The comparison between cytogenetic and sequence maps revealed a large gap on the pericentromeric heterochromatin region of sequence map of chromosome 4. These results showed that integrated molecular cytogenetic maps can provide important information for the study of genetic and genomics in cucumber. PMID

  7. Patterns of Chromosomal Duplication in Maize and Their Implications for Comparative Maps of the Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Gaut, Brandon S.

    2001-01-01

    The maize genome contains extensive chromosomal duplications that probably were produced by an ancient tetraploid event. Comparative cereal maps have identified at least 10 duplicated, or homologous, chromosomal regions within maize. However, the methods used to document chromosomal homologies from comparative maps are not statistical, and their criteria are often unclear. This paper describes the development of a simulation method to test for the statistical significance of marker colinearity between chromosomes, and the application of the method to a molecular map of maize. The method documents colinearity among 24 pairs of maize chromosomes, suggesting homology in maize is more complex than represented by comparative cereal maps. The results also reveal that 60%–82% of the genome has been retained in colinear regions and that as much as a third of the genome could be present in multiple copies. Altogether, the complex pattern of colinearity among maize chromosomes suggests that current comparative cereal maps do not adequately represent the evolution and organization of the maize genome. PMID:11156615

  8. Systematic identification and correction of annotation errors in the genetic interaction map of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Atias, Nir; Kupiec, Martin; Sharan, Roded

    2016-01-01

    The yeast mutant collections are a fundamental tool in deciphering genomic organization and function. Over the last decade, they have been used for the systematic exploration of ∼6 000 000 double gene mutants, identifying and cataloging genetic interactions among them. Here we studied the extent to which these data are prone to neighboring gene effects (NGEs), a phenomenon by which the deletion of a gene affects the expression of adjacent genes along the genome. Analyzing ∼90,000 negative genetic interactions observed to date, we found that more than 10% of them are incorrectly annotated due to NGEs. We developed a novel algorithm, GINGER, to identify and correct erroneous interaction annotations. We validated the algorithm using a comparative analysis of interactions from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We further showed that our predictions are significantly more concordant with diverse biological data compared to their mis-annotated counterparts. Our work uncovered about 9500 new genetic interactions in yeast. PMID:26602688

  9. Systematic identification and correction of annotation errors in the genetic interaction map of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Atias, Nir; Kupiec, Martin; Sharan, Roded

    2016-03-18

    The yeast mutant collections are a fundamental tool in deciphering genomic organization and function. Over the last decade, they have been used for the systematic exploration of ∼6 000 000 double gene mutants, identifying and cataloging genetic interactions among them. Here we studied the extent to which these data are prone to neighboring gene effects (NGEs), a phenomenon by which the deletion of a gene affects the expression of adjacent genes along the genome. Analyzing ∼90,000 negative genetic interactions observed to date, we found that more than 10% of them are incorrectly annotated due to NGEs. We developed a novel algorithm, GINGER, to identify and correct erroneous interaction annotations. We validated the algorithm using a comparative analysis of interactions from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We further showed that our predictions are significantly more concordant with diverse biological data compared to their mis-annotated counterparts. Our work uncovered about 9500 new genetic interactions in yeast. PMID:26602688

  10. Construction of chromosome markers from the Lake Victoria cichlid Paralabidochromis chilotes and their application to comparative mapping.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, A; Terai, Y; Kobayashi, N; Yoshida, K; Suzuki, M; Nakanishi, A; Matsuda, Y; Watanabe, M; Okada, N

    2014-01-01

    Cichlid fishes in the African Great Lakes are known as a spectacular example of adaptive radiation in vertebrates. Four linkage maps have been constructed to identify the genes responsible for adaptation and speciation, and the genetic linkages of those genes are assumed to play an important role during adaptive evolution. However, it is difficult to analyze such linkages because the linkage groups of one species do not match well with those of the other species. Chromosome markers are a powerful tool for the direct identification of linkage homology between different species. We used information about the linkage map of the Lake Malawi cichlid (Labeotropheus fuelleborni/Metriaclima zebra) to isolate bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the BAC library of Paralabidochromis chilotes, Lake Victoria. We identified 18 of 22 P. chilotes chromosomes by single- and multi-color BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization using 19 BAC clones. Comparative mapping with the chromosome markers of P. chilotes in Astatotilapia burtoni (2n = 40) from Lake Tanganyika revealed the chromosome rearrangements that have occurred in this lineage. These chromosome markers will be useful for delineating the process of genome and chromosome evolution in African species. PMID:24217467

  11. Comparative mapping of the Grpr locus on the X chromosomes of man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, G.Ll.; Boyd, Y. )

    1993-07-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor has been previously cloned from both humans and mice. The authors have mapped the mouse gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (Grpr) locus using a polymorphic CA[sub n] repeat located in the 5[prime] untranslated region of the gene and a Mus spretus/Mus musculus interspecific backcross. The Grpr locus mapped between the Pdha-1 and Amg loci on the mouse X chromosome. Studies in man indicate that GRPR maps to the Xp21.2-p22.3 region of the human X chromosome and not to the Xp11-q11 interval as previously reported. The assignment of the GRPR locus to the distal Xp region is supported by the comparative map position in the mouse. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Application of Association Mapping to Understanding the Genetic Diversity of Plant Germplasm Resources

    PubMed Central

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y.; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor

    2008-01-01

    Compared to the conventional linkage mapping, linkage disequilibrium (LD)-mapping, using the nonrandom associations of loci in haplotypes, is a powerful high-resolution mapping tool for complex quantitative traits. The recent advances in the development of unbiased association mapping approaches for plant population with their successful applications in dissecting a number of simple to complex traits in many crop species demonstrate a flourish of the approach as a “powerful gene tagging” tool for crops in the plant genomics era of 21st century. The goal of this review is to provide nonexpert readers of crop breeding community with (1) the basic concept, merits, and simple description of existing methodologies for an association mapping with the recent improvements for plant populations, and (2) the details of some of pioneer and recent studies on association mapping in various crop species to demonstrate the feasibility, success, problems, and future perspectives of the efforts in plants. This should be helpful for interested readers of international plant research community as a guideline for the basic understanding, choosing the appropriate methods, and its application. PMID:18551188

  13. A genetic map in the Mimulus guttatus species complex reveals transmission ratio distortion due to heterospecific interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, L; Kelly, A J; Morgan, E; Willis, J H

    2001-01-01

    As part of a study of the genetics of floral adaptation and speciation in the Mimulus guttatus species complex, we constructed a genetic linkage map of an interspecific cross between M. guttatus and M. nasutus. We genotyped an F(2) mapping population (N = 526) at 255 AFLP, microsatellite, and gene-based markers and derived a framework map through repeated rounds of ordering and marker elimination. The final framework map consists of 174 marker loci on 14 linkage groups with a total map length of 1780 cM Kosambi. Genome length estimates (2011-2096 cM) indicate that this map provides thorough coverage of the hybrid genome, an important consideration for QTL mapping. Nearly half of the markers in the full data set (49%) and on the framework map (48%) exhibited significant transmission ratio distortion (alpha = 0.05). We localized a minimum of 11 transmission ratio distorting loci (TRDLs) throughout the genome, 9 of which generate an excess of M. guttatus alleles and a deficit of M. nasutus alleles. This pattern indicates that the transmission ratio distortion results from particular interactions between the heterospecific genomes and suggests that substantial genetic divergence has occurred between these Mimulus species. We discuss possible causes of the unequal representation of parental genomes in the F(2) generation. PMID:11779808

  14. An International Reference Consensus Genetic Map with 897 Marker Loci Based on 11 Mapping Populations for Tetraploid Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manish K.; Moretzsohn, Márcio C.; Sujay, Venkataswamy; Qin, Hongde; Hong, Yanbin; Faye, Issa; Chen, Xiaoping; BhanuPrakash, Amindala; Shah, Trushar M.; Gowda, Makanahally V. C.; Nigam, Shyam N.; Liang, Xuanqiang; Hoisington, Dave A.; Guo, Baozhu; Bertioli, David J.; Rami, Jean-Francois; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2012-01-01

    Only a few genetic maps based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) and backcross (BC) populations have been developed for tetraploid groundnut. The marker density, however, is not very satisfactory especially in the context of large genome size (2800 Mb/1C) and 20 linkage groups (LGs). Therefore, using marker segregation data for 10 RILs and one BC population from the international groundnut community, with the help of common markers across different populations, a reference consensus genetic map has been developed. This map is comprised of 897 marker loci including 895 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 2 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) loci distributed on 20 LGs (a01–a10 and b01–b10) spanning a map distance of 3, 863.6 cM with an average map density of 4.4 cM. The highest numbers of markers (70) were integrated on a01 and the least number of markers (21) on b09. The marker density, however, was lowest (6.4 cM) on a08 and highest (2.5 cM) on a01. The reference consensus map has been divided into 20 cM long 203 BINs. These BINs carry 1 (a10_02, a10_08 and a10_09) to 20 (a10_04) loci with an average of 4 marker loci per BIN. Although the polymorphism information content (PIC) value was available for 526 markers in 190 BINs, 36 and 111 BINs have at least one marker with >0.70 and >0.50 PIC values, respectively. This information will be useful for selecting highly informative and uniformly distributed markers for developing new genetic maps, background selection and diversity analysis. Most importantly, this reference consensus map will serve as a reliable reference for aligning new genetic and physical maps, performing QTL analysis in a multi-populations design, evaluating the genetic background effect on QTL expression, and serving other genetic and molecular breeding activities in groundnut. PMID:22815973

  15. A microsatellite-based genetic linkage map for channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed Central

    Waldbieser, G C; Bosworth, B G; Nonneman, D J; Wolters, W R

    2001-01-01

    Microsatellite loci were identified in channel catfish gene sequences or random clones from a small insert genomic DNA library. Outbred populations of channel catfish contained an average of eight alleles per locus and an average heterozygosity of 0.70. A genetic linkage map of the channel catfish genome (N = 29) was constructed from two reference families. A total of 293 microsatellite loci were polymorphic in one or both families, with an average of 171 informative meioses per locus. Nineteen type I loci, 243 type II loci, and one EST were placed in 32 multipoint linkage groups covering 1958 cM. Nine more type II loci were contained in three two-point linkage groups covering 24.5 cM. Twenty-two type II loci remained unlinked. Multipoint linkage groups ranged in size from 11.9 to 110.5 cM with an average intermarker distance of 8.7 cM. Seven microsatellite loci were closely linked with the sex-determining locus. The microsatellite loci and genetic linkage map will increase the efficiency of selective breeding programs for channel catfish. PMID:11404336

  16. Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping and The Genetic Basis of Heterosis in Maize and Rice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Wang, Shengchu; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Zeng, Zhao-Bang

    2008-01-01

    Despite its importance to agriculture, the genetic basis of heterosis is still not well understood. The main competing hypotheses include dominance, overdominance, and epistasis. NC design III is an experimental design that has been used for estimating the average degree of dominance of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and also for studying heterosis. In this study, we first develop a multiple-interval mapping (MIM) model for design III that provides a platform to estimate the number, genomic positions, augmented additive and dominance effects, and epistatic interactions of QTL. The model can be used for parents with any generation of selfing. We apply the method to two data sets, one for maize and one for rice. Our results show that heterosis in maize is mainly due to dominant gene action, although overdominance of individual QTL could not completely be ruled out due to the mapping resolution and limitations of NC design III. For rice, the estimated QTL dominant effects could not explain the observed heterosis. There is evidence that additive × additive epistatic effects of QTL could be the main cause for the heterosis in rice. The difference in the genetic basis of heterosis seems to be related to open or self pollination of the two species. The MIM model for NC design III is implemented in Windows QTL Cartographer, a freely distributed software. PMID:18791260

  17. The distribution of transgene insertion sites in barley determined by physical and genetic mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Salvo-Garrido, Haroldo; Travella, Silvia; Bilham, Lorelei J; Harwood, Wendy A; Snape, John W

    2004-01-01

    The exact site of transgene insertion into a plant host genome is one feature of the genetic transformation process that cannot, at present, be controlled and is often poorly understood. The site of transgene insertion may have implications for transgene stability and for potential unintended effects of the transgene on plant metabolism. To increase our understanding of transgene insertion sites in barley, a detailed analysis of transgene integration in independently derived transgenic barley lines was carried out. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to physically map 23 transgene integration sites from 19 independent barley lines. Genetic mapping further confirmed the location of the transgenes in 11 of these lines. Transgene integration sites were present only on five of the seven barley chromosomes. The pattern of transgene integration appeared to be nonrandom and there was evidence of clustering of independent transgene insertion events within the barley genome. In addition, barley genomic regions flanking the transgene insertion site were isolated for seven independent lines. The data from the transgene flanking regions indicated that transgene insertions were preferentially located in gene-rich areas of the genome. These results are discussed in relation to the structure of the barley genome. PMID:15280249

  18. Mapping the Genetic Basis of Symbiotic Variation in Legume-Rhizobium Interactions in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, Amanda J.; Heath, Katy D.; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Mutualisms are known to be genetically variable, where the genotypes differ in the fitness benefits they gain from the interaction. To date, little is known about the loci that underlie such genetic variation in fitness or whether the loci influencing fitness are partner specific, and depend on the genotype of the interaction partner. In the legume-rhizobium mutualism, one set of potential candidate genes that may influence the fitness benefits of the symbiosis are the plant genes involved in the initiation of the signaling pathway between the two partners. Here we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in Medicago truncatula in two different rhizobium strain treatments to locate regions of the genome influencing plant traits, assess whether such regions are dependent on the genotype of the rhizobial mutualist (QTL × rhizobium strain), and evaluate the contribution of sequence variation at known symbiosis signaling genes. Two of the symbiotic signaling genes, NFP and DMI3, colocalized with two QTL affecting average fruit weight and leaf number, suggesting that natural variation in nodulation genes may potentially influence plant fitness. In both rhizobium strain treatments, there were QTL that influenced multiple traits, indicative of either tight linkage between loci or pleiotropy, including one QTL with opposing effects on growth and reproduction. There was no evidence for QTL × rhizobium strain or genotype × genotype interactions, suggesting either that such interactions are due to small-effect loci or that more genotype-genotype combinations need to be tested in future mapping studies. PMID:23173081

  19. Quantitative trait loci mapping and genetic dissection for lint percentage in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Li, Chengqi; Wang, Qinglian

    2014-08-01

    Lint percentage is an important character of cotton yield components and it is also correlated with cotton fibre development. In this study, we used a high lint percentage variety, Baimian1, and a low lint percentage, TM-1 genetic standard for Gossypium hirsutum, as parents to construct a mapping populations in upland cotton (G. hirsutum). A quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) analysis of lint percentage was performed by using two mapping procedures; composite interval mapping (CIM), inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) and the F2:3 populations in 2 years. Six main-effect QTL (M-QTL) for lint percentage (four significant and two suggestive) were detected in both years by CIM, and were located on chr. 3, chr. 19, chr. 26 and chr. 5/chr. 19. Of the six QTL, marker intervals and favourable gene sources of the significant M-QTL, qLP-3(2010) and qLP-3(2011) were consistent. These QTL were also detected by ICIM, and therefore, should preferentially be used for markerassisted selection (MAS) of lint percentage. Another M-QTL, qLP-19(2010), was detected by two mapping procedures, and it could also be a candidate for MAS. We detected the interaction between two M-QTL and environment, and 11 epistatic QTL (E-QTL) and their interaction with environment by using ICIM. The study also found two EST-SSRs, NAU1187 and NAU1255, linked to M-QTL for lint percentage that could be candidate markers affecting cotton fibre development. PMID:25189232

  20. Seeking signatures of reinforcement at the genetic level: a hitchhiking mapping and candidate gene approach in the house mouse

    PubMed Central

    Caminade, Pierre; Thoma, Marios; Latour, Yasmin; Roux, Camille; Thoss, Michaela; Penn, Dustin J.; Ganem, Guila; Boursot, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement is the process by which prezygotic isolation is strengthened as a response to selection against hybridisation. Most empirical support for reinforcement comes from the observation of its possible phenotypic signature: an accentuated degree of prezygotic isolation in the hybrid zone as compared to allopatry. Here, we implemented a novel approach to this question by seeking for the signature of reinforcement at the genetic level. In the house mouse, selection against hybrids and enhanced olfactory-based assortative mate preferences are observed in a hybrid zone between the two European subspecies Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus, suggesting a possible recent reinforcement event. To test for the genetic signature of reinforcing selection and identify genes involved in sexual isolation, we adopted a hitchhiking mapping approach targeting genomic regions containing candidate genes for assortative mating in mice. We densely scanned these genomic regions in hybrid zone and allopatric samples using a large number of fast evolving microsatellite loci that allow the detection of recent selection events. We found a handful of loci showing the expected pattern of significant reduction of variability in populations close to the hybrid zone and showing assortative odour preference in mate choice experiments as compared to populations further away and displaying no such preference. These loci lie close to genes that we pinpoint as testable candidates for further investigation. PMID:26132782

  1. Seeking signatures of reinforcement at the genetic level: a hitchhiking mapping and candidate gene approach in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Smadja, Carole M; Loire, Etienne; Caminade, Pierre; Thoma, Marios; Latour, Yasmin; Roux, Camille; Thoss, Michaela; Penn, Dustin J; Ganem, Guila; Boursot, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Reinforcement is the process by which prezygotic isolation is strengthened as a response to selection against hybridization. Most empirical support for reinforcement comes from the observation of its possible phenotypic signature: an accentuated degree of prezygotic isolation in the hybrid zone as compared to allopatry. Here, we implemented a novel approach to this question by seeking for the signature of reinforcement at the genetic level. In the house mouse, selection against hybrids and enhanced olfactory-based assortative mate preferences are observed in a hybrid zone between the two European subspecies Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus, suggesting a possible recent reinforcement event. To test for the genetic signature of reinforcing selection and identify genes involved in sexual isolation, we adopted a hitchhiking mapping approach targeting genomic regions containing candidate genes for assortative mating in mice. We densely scanned these genomic regions in hybrid zone and allopatric samples using a large number of fast evolving microsatellite loci that allow the detection of recent selection events. We found a handful of loci showing the expected pattern of significant reduction in variability in populations close to the hybrid zone, showing assortative odour preference in mate choice experiments as compared to populations further away and displaying no such preference. These loci lie close to genes that we pinpoint as testable candidates for further investigation. PMID:26132782

  2. Development of a SNP resource and a genetic linkage map for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a species with increasing economic significance for the aquaculture industry. The genetic improvement of cod will play a critical role in achieving successful large-scale aquaculture. While many microsatellite markers have been developed in cod, the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is currently limited. Here we report the identification of SNPs from sequence data generated by a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) program, focusing on fish originating from Canadian waters. Results A total of 97976 ESTs were assembled to generate 13448 contigs. We detected 4753 SNPs that met our selection criteria (depth of coverage ≥ 4 reads; minor allele frequency > 25%). 3072 SNPs were selected for testing. The percentage of successful assays was 75%, with 2291 SNPs amplifying correctly. Of these, 607 (26%) SNPs were monomorphic for all populations tested. In total, 64 (4%) of SNPs are likely to represent duplicated genes or highly similar members of gene families, rather than alternative alleles of the same gene, since they showed a high frequency of heterozygosity. The remaining polymorphic SNPs (1620) were categorised as validated SNPs. The mean minor allele frequency of the validated loci was 0.258 (± 0.141). Of the 1514 contigs from which validated SNPs were selected, 31% have a significant blast hit. For the SNPs predicted to occur in coding regions (141), we determined that 36% (51) are non-synonymous. Many loci (1033 SNPs; 64%) are polymorphic in all populations tested. However a small number of SNPs (184) that are polymorphic in the Western Atlantic were monomorphic in fish tested from three European populations. A preliminary linkage map has been constructed with 23 major linkage groups and 924 mapped SNPs. Conclusions These SNPs represent powerful tools to accelerate the genetic improvement of cod aquaculture. They have been used to build a genetic linkage map that can be applied to quantitative trait

  3. An international reference consensus genetic map with 897 marker loci based on 11 mapping populations for tetraploid groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Only a few genetic maps based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) and backcross (BC) populations have been developed for tetraploid groundnut. The marker density, however, is not very satisfactory especially in the context of large genome size (2800 Mb/1C) and 20 linkage groups (LGs). Therefore, using ...

  4. Development of a SNP array and its application to genetic mapping and diversity assessment in pepper (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiaowen; Qin, Cheng; Tang, Xin; Zhou, Huangkai; Hu, Yafei; Zhao, Zicheng; Cui, Junjie; Li, Bo; Wu, Zhiming; Yu, Jiping; Hu, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    The development and application of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is in its infancy for pepper. Here, a set of 15,000 SNPs were chosen from the resequencing data to develop an array for pepper with 12,720 loci being ultimately synthesized. Of these, 8,199 (~64.46%) SNPs were found to be scorable and covered ~81.18% of the whole genome. With this array, a high-density interspecific genetic map with 5,569 SNPs was constructed using 297 F2 individuals, and genetic diversity of a panel of 399 pepper elite/landrace lines was successfully characterized. Based on the genetic map, one major QTL, named Up12.1, was detected for the fruit orientation trait. A total of 65 protein-coding genes were predicted within this QTL region based on the current annotation of the Zunla-1 genome. In summary, the thousands of well-validated SNP markers, high-density genetic map and genetic diversity information will be useful for molecular genetics and innovative breeding in pepper. Furthermore, the mapping results lay foundation for isolating the genes underlying variation in fruit orientation of Capsicum. PMID:27623541

  5. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  6. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Jiao, Shuo; Bien, Stephanie A; Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V; Curtis, Keith R; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hayes, Richard B; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jenkins, Mark A; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M; Newcomb, Polly A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Potter, John D; Schoen, Robert E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  7. Map of autosomal recessive genetic disorders in Saudi Arabia: concepts and future directions.

    PubMed

    Al-Owain, Mohammed; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair

    2012-10-01

    Saudi Arabia has a population of 27.1 million. Prevalence of many autosomal recessive disorders is higher than in other known populations. This is attributable to the high rate of consanguineous marriages (56%), the tribal structure, and large family size. Founder mutations have been recognized in many autosomal recessive disorders, many of which are overrepresented within certain tribes. On the other hand, allelic heterogeneity is also observed among common and rare autosomal recessive conditions. With the adoption of more advanced molecular techniques in the country in recent years in conjunction with international collaboration, the mapping of various autosomal recessive disorders has increased dramatically. Different genetic concepts pertinent to this highly inbred population are discussed here. Addressing such genetic disorders at the national level will become a cornerstone of strategic health care initiatives in the 21st century. Current efforts are hampered by many socio-cultural and health care related factors. Education about genetic diseases, establishment of a "national registry" and mutational database, and enhanced healthcare access are crucial for success of any preventative campaign. PMID:22903695

  8. An integrated map of genetic variation from 1,092 human genomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Through characterising the geographic and functional spectrum of human genetic variation, the 1000 Genomes Project aims to build a resource to help understand the genetic contribution to disease. We describe the genomes of 1,092 individuals from 14 populations, constructed using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome and exome sequencing. By developing methodologies to integrate information across multiple algorithms and diverse data sources we provide a validated haplotype map of 38 million SNPs, 1.4 million indels and over 14 thousand larger deletions. We show that individuals from different populations carry different profiles of rare and common variants and that low-frequency variants show substantial geographic differentiation, which is further increased by the action of purifying selection. We show that evolutionary conservation and coding consequence are key determinants of the strength of purifying selection, that rare-variant load varies substantially across biological pathways and that each individual harbours hundreds of rare non-coding variants at conserved sites, such as transcription-factor-motif disrupting changes. This resource, which captures up to 98% of accessible SNPs at a frequency of 1% in populations of medical genetics focus, enables analysis of common and low-frequency variants in individuals from diverse, including admixed, populations. PMID:23128226

  9. Genetic linkage mapping of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Oehlmann, R.; Summerville, G. P.; Yeh, G.; Weaver, E. J.; Jimenez, S. A.; Knowlton, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is an inherited chondrodystrophy that results in deformity of articular surfaces and in subsequent degenerative joint disease. The disease is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. An MED mutation has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis of DNA polymorphisms in a single large pedigree. Close linkage of MED to 130 tested chromosomal markers was ruled out by discordant inheritance patterns. However, strong evidence for linkage of MED to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19 was obtained. The most closely linked marker was D19S215, with a maximum LOD score of 6.37 at theta = .05. Multipoint linkage analysis indicated that MED is located between D19S212 and D19S215, a map interval of 1.7 cM. Discovery of the map location of MED in this family will facilitate identification of the mutant gene. The closely linked DNA polymorphisms will also provide the means to determine whether other inherited chondrodystrophies have underlying defects in the same gene. PMID:8279467

  10. A genetic linkage map of Cryptococcus neoformans variety neoformans serotype D (Filobasidiella neoformans).

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Robert E; Huang, Johnny C; Fung, Eula; Nielsen, Kirsten; Heitman, Joseph; Vilgalys, Rytas; Mitchell, Thomas G

    2004-01-01

    To construct a genetic linkage map of the heterothallic yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans (Filobasidiella neoformans), we crossed two mating-compatible strains and analyzed 94 progeny for the segregation of 301 polymorphic markers, consisting of 228 restriction site polymorphisms, 63 microsatellites, two indels, and eight mating-type (MAT)-associated markers. All but six markers showed no significant (P < 0.05) segregation distortion. At a minimum LOD score of 6.0 and a maximum recombination frequency of 0.30, 20 linkage groups were resolved, resulting in a map length of approximately 1500 cM. Average marker density is 5.4 cM (range 1-28.7 cM). Hybridization of selected markers to blots of electrophoretic karyotypes unambiguously assigned all linkage groups to chromosomes and led us to conclude that the C. neoformans genome is approximately 20.2 Mb, comprising 14 chromosomes ranging in size from 0.8 to 2.3 Mb, with a ratio of approximately 13.2 kb/cM averaged across the genome. However, only 2 of 12 ungrouped markers hybridized to chromosome 10. The hybridizations revealed at least one possible reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 8, 9, and 12. This map has been critical to genome sequence assembly and will be essential for future studies of quantitative trait inheritance. PMID:15238516

  11. An integrated genetic and physical map of the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease region

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, X.M.; Onuchic, L.F.; Daoust, M.

    1997-05-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is one of the most common hereditary renal cystic diseases in children. Genetic studies have recently assigned the only known locus for this disorder, PKHD1, to chromosome 6p21-p12. We have generated a YAC contig that spans {approximately}5 cM of this region, defined by the markers D6S1253-D6S295, and have mapped 43 sequence-tagged sites (STS) within this interval. This set includes 20 novel STSs, which define 12 unique positions in the region, and three ESTs. A minimal set of two YACs spans the segment D6S465-D6S466, which contains PKHD1, and estimates of their sizes based on information in public databases suggest that the size of the critical region is <3.1 Mb. Twenty-eight STSs map to this interval, giving an average STS density of <1/150 kb. These resources will be useful for establishing a complete trancription map of the PKHD1 region. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Genetic mapping of agronomic traits in false flax (Camelina sativa subsp. sativa).

    PubMed

    Gehringer, A; Friedt, W; Lühs, W; Snowdon, R J

    2006-12-01

    The crucifer oilseed plant false flax (Camelina sativa subsp. sativa) possesses numerous valuable agronomic attributes that make it attractive as an alternative spring-sown crop for tight crop rotations. The oil of false flax is particularly rich in polyunsaturated C18-fatty acids, making it a valuable renewable feedstock for the oleochemical industry. Because of the minimal interest in the crop throughout the 20th century, breeding efforts have been limited. In this study, a genetic map for C. sativa was constructed, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, in a population of recombinant inbred lines that were developed, through single-seed descent, from a cross between 'Lindo' and 'Licalla', 2 phenotypically distinct parental varieties. Three Brassica simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were also integrated into the map, and 1 of these shows linkage to oil-content loci in both C. sativa and Brassica napus. Fifty-five other SSR primer combinations showed monomorphic amplification products, indicating partial genome homoeology with the Brassica species. Using data from field trials with different fertilization treatments (0 and 80 kg N/ha) at multiple locations over 3 years, the map was used to localize quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for seed yield, oil content, 1000-seed mass, and plant height. Some yield QTLs were found only with the N0 treatment, and might represent loci contributing to the competitiveness of false flax in low-nutrient soils. The results represent a starting point for future marker-assisted breeding. PMID:17426770

  13. Genetic and radiation hybrid mapping of the hyperekplexia region on chromosome 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, S.G.; O'Connell, P. ); Dixon, M.J. ); Nigro, M.A. ); Kelts, K.A. ); Markand, O.N. ); Shiang, R.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Terry, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    Hyperekplexia, or startle disease (STHE), is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by muscular rigidity of central nervous system origin, particularly in the neonatal period, and by an exaggerated startle response to sudden, unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli. STHE responds dramatically to the benzodiazepine drug clonazepam, which acts at gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A) receptors. The STHE locus (STHE) was recently assigned to chromosome 5q, on the basis of tight linkage to the colony-stimulating factor 1-receptor (CSF1-R) locus in a single large family. The authors performed linkage analysis in the original and three additional STHE pedigrees with eight chromosome 5q microsatellite markers and placed several of the most closely linked markers on an existing radiation hybrid (RH) map of the region. The results provide strong evidence for genetic locus homogeneity and assign STHE to a 5.9-cM interval defined by CSF1-R and D5S379, which are separated by an RH map distance of 74 centirays (roughly 2.2-3.7 Mb). Two polymorphic markers (D5S119 and D5S209) lie within this region, but they could not be ordered with respect to STHE. RH mapping eliminated the candidate genes GABRA1 and GABRG2, which encode GABA-A receptor components, by showing that they are telomeric to the target region. 45 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. The Comparative Effect of Individually-Constructed vs. Collaboratively-Constructed Computer-Based Concept Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, So Young; Cifuentes, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    The researchers investigated the comparative effects of individually-constructed and collaboratively-constructed computer-based concept mapping on middle school science concept learning. One hundred and sixty one students completed the entire study. Using prior science performance scores to assure equivalence of student achievement across groups,…

  15. A cytogenetic and comparative map of camelid chromosome 36 and the minute in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Avila, Felipe; Baily, Malorie P; Merriwether, David A; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Rubes, Jiři; Kutzler, Michelle A; Chowdhary, Renuka; Janečka, Jan; Raudsepp, Terje

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in camelid genomics have provided draft sequence assemblies and the first comparative and gene maps for the dromedary (CDR) and the alpaca (LPA). However, no map information is currently available for the smallest camelid autosome-chr36. The chromosome is also of clinical interest because of its involvement in the minute chromosome syndrome (MCS) in infertile alpacas. Here, we developed molecular markers for camelid chr36 by direct sequencing CDR36 and LPA minute and by bioinformatics analysis of alpaca unplaced sequence scaffolds. We constructed a cytogenetic map for chr36 in the alpaca, llama, and dromedary and showed its homology to human chromosome 7 (HSA7) at 49.8-55.5 Mb. The chr36 map comprised seven markers, including two genes-ZPBP and WVC2. Comparative status of HSA7 was further refined by cytogenetic mapping of 16 HSA7 orthologs in camelid chromosomes 7 and 18 and by the analysis of HSA7-conserved synteny blocks across 11 vertebrate species. Finally, mapping chr36 markers in infertile alpacas confirmed that the minute chromosome was a derivative of chr36, but the small size was not a result of a large deletion or a translocation. Instead, cytogenetic mapping of 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA genes (nucleolus organizer region (NOR)) revealed that the size difference between chr36 homologs in infertile alpacas was due to a heterozygous presence of NOR, whereas chr36 in fertile alpacas had no NOR. We theorized that the heterozygous NOR might affect chr36 pairing, recombination, and segregation in meiosis and, thus fertility. PMID:25634498

  16. A reference consensus genetic map for molecular markers and economically important traits in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is among the earliest domesticated crops from the Near East. Today this legume is a key protein feed and food worldwide and continues to serve an important role in culinary traditions throughout Middle East, Mediterranean region, China and Ethiopia. Adapted to a wide range of soil types, the main faba bean breeding objectives are to improve yield, resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, seed quality and other agronomic traits. Genomic approaches aimed at enhancing faba bean breeding programs require high-quality genetic linkage maps to facilitate quantitative trait locus analysis and gene tagging for use in a marker-assisted selection. The objective of this study was to construct a reference consensus map in faba bean by joining the information from the most relevant maps reported so far in this crop. Results A combination of two approaches, increasing the number of anchor loci in diverse mapping populations and joining the corresponding genetic maps, was used to develop a reference consensus map in faba bean. The map was constructed from three main recombinant inbreed populations derived from four parental lines, incorporates 729 markers and is based on 69 common loci. It spans 4,602 cM with a range from 323 to 1041 loci in six main linkage groups or chromosomes, and an average marker density of one locus every 6 cM. Locus order is generally well maintained between the consensus map and the individual maps. Conclusion We have constructed a reliable and fairly dense consensus genetic linkage map that will serve as a basis for genomic approaches in faba bean research and breeding. The core map contains a larger number of markers than any previous individual map, covers existing gaps and achieves a wider coverage of the large faba bean genome as a whole. This tool can be used as a reference resource for studies in different genetic backgrounds, and provides a framework for transferring genetic information when using different

  17. Comparative genetics and genomics of nematodes: genome structure, development, and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ralf J; Streit, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Nematodes are found in virtually all habitats on earth. Many of them are parasites of plants and animals, including humans. The free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, is one of the genetically best-studied model organisms and was the first metazoan whose genome was fully sequenced. In recent years, the draft genome sequences of another six nematodes representing four of the five major clades of nematodes were published. Compared to mammalian genomes, all these genomes are very small. Nevertheless, they contain almost the same number of genes as the human genome. Nematodes are therefore a very attractive system for comparative genetic and genomic studies, with C. elegans as an excellent baseline. Here, we review the efforts that were made to extend genetic analysis to nematodes other than C. elegans, and we compare the seven available nematode genomes. One of the most striking findings is the unexpectedly high incidence of gene acquisition through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:21721943

  18. Genome-wide association and fine mapping of genetic loci predisposing to colon carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyuan; Lu, Yan; Liu, Hongbo; Wen, Weidong; Jia, Dongmei; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genetic determinants of colon tumorigenesis, 268 male mice from 33 inbred strains derived from different genealogies were treated with azoxymethane (AOM; 10 mg/kg) once a week for six weeks to induce colon tumors. Tumors were localized exclusively within the distal colon in each of the strains examined. Inbred mouse strains exhibit a large variability in genetic susceptibility to AOM-induced colon tumorigenesis. The mean colon tumor multiplicity ranged from 0 to 38.6 (mean = 6.5 ± 8.6) and tumor volume ranged from 0 to 706.5 mm(3) (mean = 87.4 ± 181.9) at 24 weeks after the first dose of AOM. AOM-induced colon tumor phenotypes are highly heritable in inbred mice, and 68.8% and 71.3% of total phenotypic variation in colon tumor multiplicity and tumor volume, respectively, are attributable to strain-dependent genetic background. Using 97,854 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of AOM-induced colon tumorigenesis and identified a novel susceptibility locus on chromosome 15 (rs32359607, P = 6.31 × 10(-6)). Subsequent fine mapping confirmed five (Scc3, Scc2, Scc12, Scc8, and Ccs1) of 16 linkage regions previously found to be associated with colon tumor susceptibility. These five loci were refined to less than 1 Mb genomic regions of interest. Major candidates in these loci are Sema5a, Fmn2, Grem2, Fap, Gsg1l, Xpo6, Rabep2, Eif3c, Unc5d, and Gpr65. In particular, the refined Scc3 locus shows high concordance with the human GWAS locus that underlies hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. These findings increase our understanding of the complex genetics of colon tumorigenesis, and provide important insights into the pathways of colorectal cancer development and might ultimately lead to more effective individually targeted cancer prevention strategies. PMID:22127497

  19. Structural Variation (SV) Markers in the Basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea and Their Application in the Construction of a Genetic Map.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Bingzhi; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Junjie; Lu, Yuanping; Zhang, Xiaoyin; Jiang, Yuji; Wu, Taju; van Peer, Arend Frans; Li, Shaojie; Xie, Baogui

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps are useful tools in genetic studies. Novel molecular markers and their applications have been developed in recent years. With the recent advancements in sequencing technology, the genomic sequences of an increasingly great number of fungi have become available. A novel type of molecular marker was developed to construct the first reported linkage map of the edible and economically important basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea by using 104 structural variation (SV) markers that are based on the genomic sequences. Because of the special and simple life cycle in basidiomycete, SV markers can be effectively developed by genomic comparison and tested in single spore isolates (SSIs). This stable, convenient and rapidly developed marker may assist in the construction of genetic maps and facilitate genomic research for other species of fungi. PMID:26204838

  20. Genome-wide patterns of genetic variation in worldwide Arabidopsis thaliana accessions from the RegMap panel

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Matthew W.; Hancock, Angela M.; Huang, Yu S.; Toomajian, Christopher; Atwell, Susanna; Auton, Adam; Muliyati, N. Wayan; Platt, Alexander; Sperone, F. Gianluca; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Nordborg, Magnus; Borevitz, Justin O.; Bergelson, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is native to Eurasia and naturalized across the world due to human disturbance. Its easy propagation and immense phenotypic variability make it an ideal model system for functional, ecological and evolutionary genetics. To date, analyses of its natural variation have involved small numbers of individuals or genetic markers. Here we genotype 1,307 world-wide accessions, including several regional samples, at 250K SNPs, enabling us to describe the global pattern of genetic variation with high resolution. Three complementary tests applied to these data reveal novel targets of selection. Furthermore, we characterize the pattern of historical recombination and observe an enrichment of hotspots in intergenic regions and repetitive DNA, consistent with the pattern observed for humans but strikingly different from other plant species. We are making seeds for this Regional Mapping (RegMap) panel publicly available; they comprise the largest genomic mapping resource available for a naturally occurring, non-human, species. PMID:22231484

  1. Structural Variation (SV) Markers in the Basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea and Their Application in the Construction of a Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Bingzhi; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Junjie; Lu, Yuanping; Zhang, Xiaoyin; Jiang, Yuji; Wu, Taju; van Peer, Arend Frans; Li, Shaojie; Xie, Baogui

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps are useful tools in genetic studies. Novel molecular markers and their applications have been developed in recent years. With the recent advancements in sequencing technology, the genomic sequences of an increasingly great number of fungi have become available. A novel type of molecular marker was developed to construct the first reported linkage map of the edible and economically important basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea by using 104 structural variation (SV) markers that are based on the genomic sequences. Because of the special and simple life cycle in basidiomycete, SV markers can be effectively developed by genomic comparison and tested in single spore isolates (SSIs). This stable, convenient and rapidly developed marker may assist in the construction of genetic maps and facilitate genomic research for other species of fungi. PMID:26204838

  2. Insight Into Genomic Changes Accompanying Divergence: Genetic Linkage Maps and Synteny of Lucania goodei and L. parva Reveal a Robertsonian Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Berdan, Emma L.; Kozak, Genevieve M.; Ming, Ray; Rayburn, A. Lane; Kiehart, Ryan; Fuller, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Linkage maps are important tools in evolutionary genetics and in studies of speciation. We performed a karyotyping study and constructed high-density linkage maps for two closely related killifish species, Lucania parva and L. goodei, that differ in salinity tolerance and still hybridize in their contact zone in Florida. Using SNPs from orthologous EST contigs, we compared synteny between the two species to determine how genomic architecture has shifted with divergence. Karyotyping revealed that L. goodei possesses 24 acrocentric chromosomes (1N) whereas L. parva possesses 23 chromosomes (1N), one of which is a large metacentric chromosome. Likewise, high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism−based linkage maps indicated 24 linkage groups for L. goodei and 23 linkage groups for L. parva. Synteny mapping revealed two linkage groups in L. goodei that were highly syntenic with the largest linkage group in L. parva. Together, this evidence points to the largest linkage group in L. parva being the result of a chromosomal fusion. We further compared synteny between Lucania with the genome of a more distant teleost relative medaka (Oryzias latipes) and found good conservation of synteny at the chromosomal level. Each Lucania LG had a single best match with each medaka chromosome. These results provide the groundwork for future studies on the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation and salinity tolerance in Lucania and other Fundulidae. PMID:24898707

  3. Integration of novel SSR and gene-based SNP marker loci in the chickpea genetic map and establishment of new anchor points with Medicago truncatula genome

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Zhu, Hongyan; Varghese, Nicy; Datta, Subhojit; Choi, Hong-Kyu; Horres, Ralf; Jüngling, Ruth; Singh, Jagbir; Kavi Kishor, P. B.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Hoisington, Dave A.; Kahl, Günter; Winter, Peter; Cook, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the development and mapping of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in chickpea. The mapping population is based on an inter-specific cross between domesticated and non-domesticated genotypes of chickpea (Cicer arietinum ICC 4958 × C. reticulatum PI 489777). This same population has been the focus of previous studies, permitting integration of new and legacy genetic markers into a single genetic map. We report a set of 311 novel SSR markers (designated ICCM—ICRISAT chickpea microsatellite), obtained from an SSR-enriched genomic library of ICC 4958. Screening of these SSR markers on a diverse panel of 48 chickpea accessions provided 147 polymorphic markers with 2–21 alleles and polymorphic information content value 0.04–0.92. Fifty-two of these markers were polymorphic between parental genotypes of the inter-specific population. We also analyzed 233 previously published (H-series) SSR markers that provided another set of 52 polymorphic markers. An additional 71 gene-based SNP markers were developed from transcript sequences that are highly conserved between chickpea and its near relative Medicago truncatula. By using these three approaches, 175 new marker loci along with 407 previously reported marker loci were integrated to yield an improved genetic map of chickpea. The integrated map contains 521 loci organized into eight linkage groups that span 2,602 cM, with an average inter-marker distance of 4.99 cM. Gene-based markers provide anchor points for comparing the genomes of Medicago and chickpea, and reveal extended synteny between these two species. The combined set of genetic markers and their integration into an improved genetic map should facilitate chickpea genetics and breeding, as well as translational studies between chickpea and Medicago. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1265-1) contains supplementary material, which is

  4. A Complex Recombination Pattern in the Genome of Allotetraploid Brassica napus as Revealed by a High-Density Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Bin; Fan, Chuchuan; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a crucial role in plant evolution. Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC), the most important oil crop in the Brassica genus, is an allotetraploid that originated through natural doubling of chromosomes after the hybridization of its progenitor species, B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and B. oleracea (2n = 18, CC). A better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between B. napus and B. rapa, B. oleracea, as well as Arabidopsis, which has a common ancestor with these three species, will provide valuable information about the generation and evolution of allopolyploidy. Based on a high-density genetic map with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of B. napus with Arabidopsis and its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Based on the collinear relationship of B. rapa and B. oleracea in the B. napus genetic map, the B. napus genome was found to consist of 70.1% of the skeleton components of the chromosomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea, with 17.7% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between homoeologous chromosomes between the A- and C-genome and 3.6% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between non-homologous chromosomes at both intra- and inter-genomic levels. The current study thus provides insights into the formation and evolution of the allotetraploid B. napus genome, which will allow for more accurate transfer of genomic information from B. rapa, B. oleracea and Arabidopsis to B. napus. PMID:25356735

  5. High-Resolution Genetic Mapping of Complex Traits from a Combined Analysis of F2 and Advanced Intercross Mice

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Clarissa C.; Carbonetto, Peter; Sokoloff, Greta; Park, Yeonhee J.; Abney, Mark; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic influences on anxiety disorders are well documented; however, the specific genes underlying these disorders remain largely unknown. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for conditioned fear and open field behavior, we used an F2 intercross (n = 490) and a 34th-generation advanced intercross line (AIL) (n = 687) from the LG/J and SM/J inbred mouse strains. The F2 provided strong support for several QTL, but within wide chromosomal regions. The AIL yielded much narrower QTL, but the results were less statistically significant, despite the larger number of mice. Simultaneous analysis of the F2 and AIL provided strong support for QTL and within much narrower regions. We used a linear mixed-model approach, implemented in the program QTLRel, to correct for possible confounding due to familial relatedness. Because we recorded the full pedigree, we were able to empirically compare two ways of accounting for relatedness: using the pedigree to estimate kinship coefficients and using genetic marker estimates of “realized relatedness.” QTL mapping using the marker-based estimates yielded more support for QTL, but only when we excluded the chromosome being scanned from the marker-based relatedness estimates. We used a forward model selection procedure to assess evidence for multiple QTL on the same chromosome. Overall, we identified 12 significant loci for behaviors in the open field and 12 significant loci for conditioned fear behaviors. Our approach implements multiple advances to integrated analysis of F2 and AILs that provide both power and precision, while maintaining the advantages of using only two inbred strains to map QTL. PMID:25236452

  6. Genetic mapping of two genes conferring resistance to powdery mildew in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vega, Elena; Trabanco, Noemí; Campa, Ana; Ferreira, Juan José

    2013-06-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a serious disease in many legume species, including the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This study investigated the genetic control behind resistance reaction to PM in the bean genotype, Cornell 49242. The results revealed evidence supporting a qualitative mode of inheritance for resistance and the involvement of two independent genes in the resistance reaction. The location of these resistance genes was investigated in a linkage genetic map developed for the XC RIL population. Contingency tests revealed significant associations for 28 loci out of a total of 329 mapped loci. Fifteen were isolated or formed groups with less than two loci. The thirteen remaining loci were located at three regions in linkage groups Pv04, Pv09, and Pv11. The involvement of Pv09 was discarded due to the observed segregation in the subpopulation obtained from the Xana genotype for the loci located in this region. In contrast, the two subpopulations obtained from the Xana genotype for the BM161 locus, linked to the Co-3/9 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv04), and from the Xana genotype for the SCAReoli locus, linked to the Co-2 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv11), exhibited monogenic segregations, suggesting that both regions were involved in the genetic control of resistance. A genetic dissection was carried out to verify the involvement of both regions in the reaction to PM. Two resistant recombinant lines were selected, according to their genotypes, for the block of loci included in the Co-2 and Co-3/9 regions, and they were crossed with the susceptible parent, Xana. Linkage analysis in the respective F2 populations supported the hypothesis that a dominant gene (Pm1) was located in the linkage group Pv11 and another gene (Pm2) was located in the linkage group Pv04. This is the first report showing the localization of resistance genes against powdery mildew in Phaseolus vulgaris and the results offer the opportunity to increase the efficiency of breeding

  7. A Simple Sequence Repeat- and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Genetic Linkage Map of the Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Jairin, Jirapong; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Yamagata, Yoshiyuki; Sanada-Morimura, Sachiyo; Mori, Kazuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Urio, Masahiro; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Matsumura, Masaya; Yasui, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed the first genetic linkage map for the major rice insect pest, the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens). The linkage map was constructed by integrating linkage data from two backcross populations derived from three inbred BPH strains. The consensus map consists of 474 simple sequence repeats, 43 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and 1 sequence-tagged site, for a total of 518 markers at 472 unique positions in 17 linkage groups. The linkage groups cover 1093.9 cM, with an average distance of 2.3 cM between loci. The average number of marker loci per linkage group was 27.8. The sex-linkage group was identified by exploiting X-linked and Y-specific markers. Our linkage map and the newly developed markers used to create it constitute an essential resource and a useful framework for future genetic analyses in BPH. PMID:23204257

  8. Using Genealogical Mapping and Genetic Neighborhood Sizes to Quantify Dispersal Distances in the Neotropical Passerine, the Black-Capped Vireo

    PubMed Central

    Athrey, Giridhar; Lance, Richard F.; Leberg, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal is a key demographic process, ultimately responsible for genetic connectivity among populations. Despite its importance, quantifying dispersal within and between populations has proven difficult for many taxa. Even in passerines, which are among the most intensely studied, individual movement and its relation to gene flow remains poorly understood. In this study we used two parallel genetic approaches to quantify natal dispersal distances in a Neotropical migratory passerine, the black-capped vireo. First, we employed a strategy of sampling evenly across the landscape coupled with parentage assignment to map the genealogical relationships of individuals across the landscape, and estimate dispersal distances; next, we calculated Wright’s neighborhood size to estimate gene dispersal distances. We found that a high percentage of captured individuals were assigned at short distances within the natal population, and males were assigned to the natal population more often than females, confirming sex-biased dispersal. Parentage-based dispersal estimates averaged 2400m, whereas gene dispersal estimates indicated dispersal distances ranging from 1600–4200 m. Our study was successful in quantifying natal dispersal distances, linking individual movement to gene dispersal distances, while also providing a detailed look into the dispersal biology of Neotropical passerines. The high-resolution information was obtained with much reduced effort (sampling only 20% of breeding population) compared to mark-resight approaches, demonstrating the potential applicability of parentage-based approaches for quantifying dispersal in other vagile passerine species. PMID:26461257

  9. Using Genealogical Mapping and Genetic Neighborhood Sizes to Quantify Dispersal Distances in the Neotropical Passerine, the Black-Capped Vireo.

    PubMed

    Athrey, Giridhar; Lance, Richard F; Leberg, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal is a key demographic process, ultimately responsible for genetic connectivity among populations. Despite its importance, quantifying dispersal within and between populations has proven difficult for many taxa. Even in passerines, which are among the most intensely studied, individual movement and its relation to gene flow remains poorly understood. In this study we used two parallel genetic approaches to quantify natal dispersal distances in a Neotropical migratory passerine, the black-capped vireo. First, we employed a strategy of sampling evenly across the landscape coupled with parentage assignment to map the genealogical relationships of individuals across the landscape, and estimate dispersal distances; next, we calculated Wright's neighborhood size to estimate gene dispersal distances. We found that a high percentage of captured individuals were assigned at short distances within the natal population, and males were assigned to the natal population more often than females, confirming sex-biased dispersal. Parentage-based dispersal estimates averaged 2400m, whereas gene dispersal estimates indicated dispersal distances ranging from 1600-4200 m. Our study was successful in quantifying natal dispersal distances, linking individual movement to gene dispersal distances, while also providing a detailed look into the dispersal biology of Neotropical passerines. The high-resolution information was obtained with much reduced effort (sampling only 20% of breeding population) compared to mark-resight approaches, demonstrating the potential applicability of parentage-based approaches for quantifying dispersal in other vagile passerine species. PMID:26461257

  10. Computational, Integrative, and Comparative Methods for the Elucidation of Genetic Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression microarray data can be used for the assembly of genetic coexpression network graphs. Using mRNA samples obtained from recombinant inbred Mus musculus strains, it is possible to integrate allelic variation with molecular and higher-order phenotypes. The depth of quantitative genetic analysis of microarray data can be vastly enhanced utilizing this mouse resource in combination with powerful computational algorithms, platforms, and data repositories. The resulting network graphs transect many levels of biological scale. This approach is illustrated with the extraction of cliques of putatively coregulated genes and their annotation using gene ontology analysis and cis-regulatory element discovery. The causal basis for coregulation is detected through the use of quantitative trait locus mapping. PMID:16046823

  11. Computational, Integrative, and Comparative Methods for the Elucidation of Genetic Coexpression Networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baldwin, Nicole E.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Kirov, Stefan; Langston, Michael A.; Snoddy, Jay R.; Williams, Robert W.; Zhang, Bing

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression microarray data can be used for the assembly of genetic coexpression network graphs. Using mRNA samples obtained from recombinant inbred Mus musculus strains, it is possible to integrate allelic variation with molecular and higher-order phenotypes. The depth of quantitative genetic analysis of microarray data can be vastly enhanced utilizing this mouse resource in combination with powerful computational algorithms, platforms, and data repositories. The resulting network graphs transect many levels of biological scale. This approach is illustrated with the extraction of cliques of putatively co-regulated genes and their annotation using gene ontology analysis and cis -regulatory element discovery.more » The causal basis for co-regulation is detected through the use of quantitative trait locus mapping.« less

  12. Anchoring linkage groups of the Rosa genetic map to physical chromosomes with tyramide-FISH and EST-SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Kirov, Ilya; Van Laere, Katrijn; De Riek, Jan; De Keyser, Ellen; Van Roy, Nadine; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    In order to anchor Rosa linkage groups to physical chromosomes, a combination of the Tyramide-FISH technology and the modern molecular marker system based on High Resolution Melting (HRM) is an efficient approach. Although, Tyramide-FISH is a very promising technique for the visualization of short DNA probes, it is very challenging for plant species with small chromosomes such as Rosa. In this study, we successfully applied the Tyramide-FISH technique for Rosa and compared different detection systems. An indirect detection system exploiting biotinylated tyramides was shown to be the most suitable technique for reliable signal detection. Three gene fragments with a size of 1100 pb-1700 bp (Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase, Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase and Orcinol O-Methyl Transferase) have been physically mapped on chromosomes 7, 4 and 1, respectively, of Rosa wichurana. The signal frequency was between 25% and 40%. HRM markers of these 3 gene fragments were used to include the gene fragments on the existing genetic linkage map of Rosa wichurana. As a result, three linkage groups could be anchored to their physical chromosomes. The information was used to check for synteny between the Rosa chromosomes and Fragaria. PMID:24755945

  13. Anchoring Linkage Groups of the Rosa Genetic Map to Physical Chromosomes with Tyramide-FISH and EST-SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Ilya; Van Laere, Katrijn; De Riek, Jan; De Keyser, Ellen; Van Roy, Nadine; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    In order to anchor Rosa linkage groups to physical chromosomes, a combination of the Tyramide-FISH technology and the modern molecular marker system based on High Resolution Melting (HRM) is an efficient approach. Although, Tyramide-FISH is a very promising technique for the visualization of short DNA probes, it is very challenging for plant species with small chromosomes such as Rosa. In this study, we successfully applied the Tyramide-FISH technique for Rosa and compared different detection systems. An indirect detection system exploiting biotinylated tyramides was shown to be the most suitable technique for reliable signal detection. Three gene fragments with a size of 1100 pb–1700 bp (Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase, Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase and Orcinol O-Methyl Transferase) have been physically mapped on chromosomes 7, 4 and 1, respectively, of Rosa wichurana. The signal frequency was between 25% and 40%. HRM markers of these 3 gene fragments were used to include the gene fragments on the existing genetic linkage map of Rosa wichurana. As a result, three linkage groups could be anchored to their physical chromosomes. The information was used to check for synteny between the Rosa chromosomes and Fragaria. PMID:24755945

  14. New insight into the man-mouse comparative map of the X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, H.J.; Reed, V.; Laval, S.H.; Boyd, Y. )

    1994-01-15

    Two conserved loci, DXHX674h and DXHX679h, which map to Xp11.22-Xp11.21 on the human X chromosome short arm, have been positioned between the loci for proteolipid protein (Plp) and the Ela subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdha1) in the distal region of the mouse X chromosome using Mus musculus x Mus spretus interspecific backcrosses. These data, together with previous comparative mapping studies on another conserved locus (DXF34) and the locus that encodes the erythroid transcription factor (GATA1), reveal that loci that map to the proximal region of the human X chromosome short arm lie in four different regions of the mouse X chromosome and that the human and mouse X chromosomes contain a minimum of eight conserved segments. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  15. COMPARING DENSE GALAXY CLUSTER REDSHIFT SURVEYS WITH WEAK-LENSING MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Zahid, H. Jabran; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it</