Science.gov

Sample records for comparative model analysis

  1. Wellness Model of Supervision: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Balkin, Richard S.; Oliver, Marvarene; Smith, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared the effectiveness of the Wellness Model of Supervision (WELMS; Lenz & Smith, 2010) with alternative supervision models for developing wellness constructs, total personal wellness, and helping skills among counselors-in-training. Participants were 32 master's-level counseling students completing their…

  2. Comparative analysis of condensation models within DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, Nikolay Y.; Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2014-12-09

    Two condensation process modeling approaches within DSMC methodology are compared. The first is based on the modified nucleation theory which correctly describes small clusters and the second on the kinetic theory and considers not only supercritical clusters, but clusters of all sizes including dimers. The relaxation of the size distribution function is calculated for the spatially homogeneous cases, where the monomer parameters are kept constant. As an example the vapour of Cu atoms is considered and importance of taking into account of the internal energies of clusters is shown. Peculiarities of the classical and kinetic approaches are discussed herein.

  3. Comparative analysis of existing disinfection models.

    PubMed

    Andrianarison, T; Jupsin, H; Ouali, A; Vasel, J-L

    2010-01-01

    For a long time Marais's model has been the main tool for disinfection prediction in waste stabilization ponds (WSPs), although various authors have developed other disinfection models. Some ten other empirical models have been listed over the past fifteen years. Unfortunately, their predictions of disinfection in a given pond are very different. The existing models are too empirical to give reliable predictions: often their explanatory variables were chosen arbitrarily. In this work, we try to demonstrate that if influent variables have daily variations, the use of their average values in simulations may overestimate the disinfection effect. New methods are thus needed to provide better fittings of the models. Better knowledge of the mechanisms involved is needed to improve disinfection models. PMID:20182074

  4. Comparative analysis of existing models for power-grid synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of power-grid networks is becoming an increasingly active area of research within the physics and network science communities. The results from such studies are typically insightful and illustrative, but are often based on simplifying assumptions that can be either difficult to assess or not fully justified for realistic applications. Here we perform a comprehensive comparative analysis of three leading models recently used to study synchronization dynamics in power-grid networks—a fundamental problem of practical significance given that frequency synchronization of all power generators in the same interconnection is a necessary condition for a power grid to operate. We show that each of these models can be derived from first principles within a common framework based on the classical model of a generator, thereby clarifying all assumptions involved. This framework allows us to view power grids as complex networks of coupled second-order phase oscillators with both forcing and damping terms. Using simple illustrative examples, test systems, and real power-grid datasets, we study the inherent frequencies of the oscillators as well as their coupling structure, comparing across the different models. We demonstrate, in particular, that if the network structure is not homogeneous, generators with identical parameters need to be modeled as non-identical oscillators in general. We also discuss an approach to estimate the required (dynamical) system parameters that are unavailable in typical power-grid datasets, their use for computing the constants of each of the three models, and an open-source MATLAB toolbox that we provide for these computations.

  5. A comparative analysis of acoustic energy models for churches.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Umberto; Cirillo, Ettore; Martellotta, Francesco

    2009-10-01

    Different models to improve prediction of energy-based acoustic parameters in churches have been proposed by different researchers [E. Cirillo and F. Martellotta, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 232-248 (2005); T. Zamarreño et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 234-250 (2006)]. They all suggested variations to the "revised" theory proposed by Barron and Lee [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 618-628 (1988)], starting from experimental observations. The present paper compares these models and attempts to generalize their use taking advantage of the measurements carried out in 24 Italian churches differing in style, typology, and location. The whole sample of churches was divided into two groups. The first was used to fine-tune existing models, with particular reference to the "mu model," which was originally tested only on Mudejar-Gothic churches. Correlations between model parameters and major typological and architectural factors were found, leading to a classification that greatly simplifies parameter choice. Finally, the reliability of each model was verified on the rest of the sample, showing that acoustic parameters can be predicted with reasonable accuracy provided that one of the specifically modified theories is used. The results show that the model requiring more input parameters performs slightly better than the other which, conversely, is simpler to apply. PMID:19813798

  6. Comparative analysis of modeled nitrogen removal by shellfish farms.

    PubMed

    Rose, Julie M; Bricker, Suzanne B; Ferreira, Joao G

    2015-02-15

    The use of shellfish aquaculture for nutrient removal and reduction of coastal eutrophication has been proposed. Published literature has indicated that nitrogen contained in harvested shellfish can be accurately estimated from shell length:nitrogen content ratios. The range of nitrogen that could be removed by a typical farm in a specific estuarine or coastal setting is also of interest to regulators and planners. Farm Aquaculture Resource Management (FARM) model outputs of nitrogen removal at the shellfish farm scale have been summarized here, from 14 locations in 9 countries across 4 continents. Modeled nitrogen removal ranged from 105 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (12 g m(-2) year(-1)) to 1356 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (152 g m(-2) year(-1)). Mean nitrogen removal was 520 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (58 g m(-2) year(-1)). These model results are site-specific in nature, but compare favorably to reported nitrogen removal effectiveness of agricultural best management practices and stormwater control measures. PMID:25534625

  7. A Comparative Analysis on Models of Higher Education Massification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Maoyuan; Luo, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Four financial models of massification of higher education are discussed in this essay. They are American model, Western European model, Southeast Asian and Latin American model and the transition countries model. The comparison of the four models comes to the conclusion that taking advantage of nongovernmental funding is fundamental to dealing…

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Community Wind Power DevelopmentModels

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Wind, Tom; Juhl, Dan; Grace, Robert; West, Peter

    2005-05-20

    For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned windpower development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for windpower. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon. We find that material differences in the competitiveness of each structure do exist, but that choosing the best structure for a given project will largely depend on the conditions at hand; e.g., the ability of the farmer(s) to utilize tax credits, preference for individual versus cooperative ownership, and the state and utility service territory in which the project will be located.

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Global Cropping Systems Models and Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. B.; You, L.; Wood, S.; Wood-Sichra, U.; Wu, W.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural practices have dramatically altered the land cover of the Earth, but the spatial extent and intensity of these practices is often difficult to catalogue. Cropland accounts for nearly 15 million km2 of the Earth's land cover - amounting to 12% of the Earth's ice-free land surface - yet information on the distribution and performance of specific crops is often available only through national or sub-national statistics. While remote sensing products offer spatially disaggregated information, those currently available on a global scale are ill-suited for many applications due to the limited separation of crop types within the area classified as cropland. Recently, however, there have been multiple independent efforts to incorporate the detailed information available from statistical surveys with supplemental spatial information to produce a spatially explicit global dataset specific to individual cropss for the year 2000. While these datasets provide analysts and decision makers with improved information on global cropping systems, the final global cropping maps differ from one another substantially. This study aims to explore and quantify systematic similarities and differences between four major global cropping systems products: the monthly irrigated and rainfed crop areas around the year 2000 (MIRAC2000) dataset, the spatial production allocation model (SPAM), the global agro-ecological zone (GAEZ) dataset, and the dataset developed by Monfreda et al., 2008. The analysis explores not only the final cropping systems maps but also the interdependencies of each product, methodological differences and modeling assumptions, which will provide users with information vital for discerning between datasets in selecting a product appropriate for each intended application.

  10. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskel...

  11. Mental Models about Seismic Effects: Students' Profile Based Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moutinho, Sara; Moura, Rui; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, meaningful learning takes a central role in science education and is based in mental models that allow the representation of the real world by individuals. Thus, it is essential to analyse the student's mental models by promoting an easier reconstruction of scientific knowledge, by allowing them to become consistent with the curricular…

  12. How to Construct More Accurate Student Models: Comparing and Optimizing Knowledge Tracing and Performance Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gong, Yue; Beck, Joseph E.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2011-01-01

    Student modeling is a fundamental concept applicable to a variety of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS). However, there is not a lot of practical guidance on how to construct and train such models. This paper compares two approaches for student modeling, Knowledge Tracing (KT) and Performance Factors Analysis (PFA), by evaluating their predictive…

  13. An Analysis Technique/Automated Tool for Comparing and Tracking Analysis Modes of Different Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towner, Robert L.; Band, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis technique was developed to compare and track mode shapes for different Finite Element Models. The technique may be applied to a variety of structural dynamics analyses, including model reduction validation (comparing unreduced and reduced models), mode tracking for various parametric analyses (e.g., launch vehicle model dispersion analysis to identify sensitivities to modal gain for Guidance, Navigation, and Control), comparing models of different mesh fidelity (e.g., a coarse model for a preliminary analysis compared to a higher-fidelity model for a detailed analysis) and mode tracking for a structure with properties that change over time (e.g., a launch vehicle from liftoff through end-of-burn, with propellant being expended during the flight). Mode shapes for different models are compared and tracked using several numerical indicators, including traditional Cross-Orthogonality and Modal Assurance Criteria approaches, as well as numerical indicators obtained by comparing modal strain energy and kinetic energy distributions. This analysis technique has been used to reliably identify correlated mode shapes for complex Finite Element Models that would otherwise be difficult to compare using traditional techniques. This improved approach also utilizes an adaptive mode tracking algorithm that allows for automated tracking when working with complex models and/or comparing a large group of models.

  14. Comparative quality analysis of models of total electron content in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. B.; Gorbachev, O. A.; Kholmogorov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a brief description and comparative analysis of the Klobuchar, GEMTEC, and NTCM-GL models of total electron content in the ionosphere. The quality of model performance against experimental data on the total electron content is compared. Statistical estimates for the residual positioning error are obtained for each of these models on the basis of the international Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Service data. The GEMTEC and NTCM-GL models are shown to have a higher positioning accuracy than the Klobuchar model. The best results of the ionospheric error correction are provided by the GEMTEC model.

  15. A comparative analysis on different nanofluid models for the oscillatory stagnation point flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Khan, A. U.; Saleem, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we have presented the comparative analysis of the oscillatory stagnation point flow of nanofluids. Both the phase flow model and Buongiorno model are discussed for oscillatory stagnation point flows and a comparison between experimental model and theoretical model is presented. The resulting partial differential equations for oscillatory two-dimensional flows are simplified in a fixed frame and a moving frame of reference subject to the assumed form of solutions. The homotopy analysis method is used to solve the reduced system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The consequences are examined through graphs and tables. It is also found that comparatively both the Boungiorno nanofluid model and phase flow model are of compatible order for a special set of parameters but generally such results do not hold.

  16. Multilevel Structural Equation Models for the Analysis of Comparative Data on Educational Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Harvey; Bonnet, Gerard; Rocher, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    The Programme for International Student Assessment comparative study of reading performance among 15-year-olds is reanalyzed using statistical procedures that allow the full complexity of the data structures to be explored. The article extends existing multilevel factor analysis and structural equation models and shows how this can extract richer…

  17. MultiMetEval: Comparative and Multi-Objective Analysis of Genome-Scale Metabolic Models

    PubMed Central

    Gevorgyan, Albert; Kierzek, Andrzej M.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2012-01-01

    Comparative metabolic modelling is emerging as a novel field, supported by the development of reliable and standardized approaches for constructing genome-scale metabolic models in high throughput. New software solutions are needed to allow efficient comparative analysis of multiple models in the context of multiple cellular objectives. Here, we present the user-friendly software framework Multi-Metabolic Evaluator (MultiMetEval), built upon SurreyFBA, which allows the user to compose collections of metabolic models that together can be subjected to flux balance analysis. Additionally, MultiMetEval implements functionalities for multi-objective analysis by calculating the Pareto front between two cellular objectives. Using a previously generated dataset of 38 actinobacterial genome-scale metabolic models, we show how these approaches can lead to exciting novel insights. Firstly, after incorporating several pathways for the biosynthesis of natural products into each of these models, comparative flux balance analysis predicted that species like Streptomyces that harbour the highest diversity of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in their genomes do not necessarily have the metabolic network topology most suitable for compound overproduction. Secondly, multi-objective analysis of biomass production and natural product biosynthesis in these actinobacteria shows that the well-studied occurrence of discrete metabolic switches during the change of cellular objectives is inherent to their metabolic network architecture. Comparative and multi-objective modelling can lead to insights that could not be obtained by normal flux balance analyses. MultiMetEval provides a powerful platform that makes these analyses straightforward for biologists. Sources and binaries of MultiMetEval are freely available from https://github.com/PiotrZakrzewski/MetEval/downloads. PMID:23272111

  18. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments.

    PubMed

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty. PMID:27148030

  19. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty. PMID:27148030

  20. Quantitative analysis of human-model agreement in visual saliency modeling: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Borji, Ali; Sihite, Dicky N; Itti, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Visual attention is a process that enables biological and machine vision systems to select the most relevant regions from a scene. Relevance is determined by two components: 1) top-down factors driven by task and 2) bottom-up factors that highlight image regions that are different from their surroundings. The latter are often referred to as "visual saliency." Modeling bottom-up visual saliency has been the subject of numerous research efforts during the past 20 years, with many successful applications in computer vision and robotics. Available models have been tested with different datasets (e.g., synthetic psychological search arrays, natural images or videos) using different evaluation scores (e.g., search slopes, comparison to human eye tracking) and parameter settings. This has made direct comparison of models difficult. Here, we perform an exhaustive comparison of 35 state-of-the-art saliency models over 54 challenging synthetic patterns, three natural image datasets, and two video datasets, using three evaluation scores. We find that although model rankings vary, some models consistently perform better. Analysis of datasets reveals that existing datasets are highly center-biased, which influences some of the evaluation scores. Computational complexity analysis shows that some models are very fast, yet yield competitive eye movement prediction accuracy. Different models often have common easy/difficult stimuli. Furthermore, several concerns in visual saliency modeling, eye movement datasets, and evaluation scores are discussed and insights for future work are provided. Our study allows one to assess the state-of-the-art, helps to organizing this rapidly growing field, and sets a unified comparison framework for gauging future efforts, similar to the PASCAL VOC challenge in the object recognition and detection domains. PMID:22868572

  1. Comparing model-based and model-free analysis methods for QUASAR arterial spin labeling perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Michael A; Woolrich, Mark W; Petersen, Esben T; Golay, Xavier; Payne, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Amongst the various implementations of arterial spin labeling MRI methods for quantifying cerebral perfusion, the QUASAR method is unique. By using a combination of labeling with and without flow suppression gradients, the QUASAR method offers the separation of macrovascular and tissue signals. This permits local arterial input functions to be defined and "model-free" analysis, using numerical deconvolution, to be used. However, it remains unclear whether arterial spin labeling data are best treated using model-free or model-based analysis. This work provides a critical comparison of these two approaches for QUASAR arterial spin labeling in the healthy brain. An existing two-component (arterial and tissue) model was extended to the mixed flow suppression scheme of QUASAR to provide an optimal model-based analysis. The model-based analysis was extended to incorporate dispersion of the labeled bolus, generally regarded as the major source of discrepancy between the two analysis approaches. Model-free and model-based analyses were compared for perfusion quantification including absolute measurements, uncertainty estimation, and spatial variation in cerebral blood flow estimates. Major sources of discrepancies between model-free and model-based analysis were attributed to the effects of dispersion and the degree to which the two methods can separate macrovascular and tissue signal. PMID:22711674

  2. Genome-scale metabolic modeling of Mucor circinelloides and comparative analysis with other oleaginous species.

    PubMed

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Klanchui, Amornpan; Tawornsamretkit, Iyarest; Tatiyaborwornchai, Witthawin; Laoteng, Kobkul; Meechai, Asawin

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel genome-scale metabolic model iWV1213 of Mucor circinelloides, which is an oleaginous fungus for industrial applications. The model contains 1213 genes, 1413 metabolites and 1326 metabolic reactions across different compartments. We demonstrate that iWV1213 is able to accurately predict the growth rates of M. circinelloides on various nutrient sources and culture conditions using Flux Balance Analysis and Phenotypic Phase Plane analysis. Comparative analysis of three oleaginous genome-scale models, including M. circinelloides (iWV1213), Mortierella alpina (iCY1106) and Yarrowia lipolytica (iYL619_PCP) revealed that iWV1213 possesses a higher number of genes involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid metabolisms that might contribute to its versatility in nutrient utilization. Moreover, the identification of unique and common active reactions among the Zygomycetes oleaginous models using Flux Variability Analysis unveiled a set of gene/enzyme candidates as metabolic engineering targets for cellular improvement. Thus, iWV1213 offers a powerful metabolic engineering tool for multi-level omics analysis, enabling strain optimization as a cell factory platform of lipid-based production. PMID:26911256

  3. Comparative analysis of numerical models of pipe handling equipment used in offshore drilling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlus, Witold; Ebbesen, Morten K.; Hansen, Michael R.; Choux, Martin; Hovland, Geir

    2016-06-01

    Design of offshore drilling equipment is a task that involves not only analysis of strict machine specifications and safety requirements but also consideration of changeable weather conditions and harsh environment. These challenges call for a multidisciplinary approach and make the design process complex. Various modeling software products are currently available to aid design engineers in their effort to test and redesign equipment before it is manufactured. However, given the number of available modeling tools and methods, the choice of the proper modeling methodology becomes not obvious and - in some cases - troublesome. Therefore, we present a comparative analysis of two popular approaches used in modeling and simulation of mechanical systems: multibody and analytical modeling. A gripper arm of the offshore vertical pipe handling machine is selected as a case study for which both models are created. In contrast to some other works, the current paper shows verification of both systems by benchmarking their simulation results against each other. Such criteria as modeling effort and results accuracy are evaluated to assess which modeling strategy is the most suitable given its eventual application.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Soft Computing Models in Prediction of Bending Rigidity of Cotton Woven Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruprasad, R.; Behera, B. K.

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative prediction of fabric mechanical properties is an essential requirement for design engineering of textile and apparel products. In this work, the possibility of prediction of bending rigidity of cotton woven fabrics has been explored with the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and two hybrid methodologies, namely Neuro-genetic modeling and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) modeling. For this purpose, a set of cotton woven grey fabrics was desized, scoured and relaxed. The fabrics were then conditioned and tested for bending properties. With the database thus created, a neural network model was first developed using back propagation as the learning algorithm. The second model was developed by applying a hybrid learning strategy, in which genetic algorithm was first used as a learning algorithm to optimize the number of neurons and connection weights of the neural network. The Genetic algorithm optimized network structure was further allowed to learn using back propagation algorithm. In the third model, an ANFIS modeling approach was attempted to map the input-output data. The prediction performances of the models were compared and a sensitivity analysis was reported. The results show that the prediction by neuro-genetic and ANFIS models were better in comparison with that of back propagation neural network model.

  5. Comparative analysis of Bouc-Wen and Jiles-Atherton models under symmetric excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudani, Antonino; Fulginei, Francesco Riganti; Salvini, Alessandro

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present paper is to validate the Bouc-Wen (BW) hysteresis model when it is applied to predict dynamic ferromagnetic loops. Indeed, although the Bouc-Wen model has had an increasing interest in last few years, it is usually adopted in mechanical and structural systems and very rarely for magnetic applications. Thus, for addressing this goal the Bouc-Wen model is compared with the dynamic Jiles-Atherton model that, instead, was ideated exactly for simulating magnetic hysteresis. The comparative analysis has involved saturated and symmetric hysteresis loops in ferromagnetic materials. In addition in order to identify the Bouc-Wen parameters a very effective recent heuristic, called Metric-Topological and Evolutionary Optimization (MeTEO) has been utilized. It is based on a hybridization of three meta-heuristics: the Flock-of-Starlings Optimization, the Particle Swarm Optimization and the Bacterial Chemotaxis Algorithm. Thanks to the specific properties of these heuristic, MeTEO allow us to achieve effective identification of such kind of models. Several hysteresis loops have been utilized for final validation tests with the aim to investigate if the BW model can follow the different hysteresis behaviors of both static (quasi-static) and dynamic cases.

  6. A comparative analysis of terrain stability models for predicting shallow landslides in colluvial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisina, C.; Scarabelli, S.

    2007-06-01

    Most of the slopes of the hilly areas of the Apennines are composed of colluvial soils originating from the weathering of the bedrock and down slope transportation. Shallow slides affect this superficial cover, depend largely on the surface topography and are a recurrent problem. SINMAP and SHALSTAB are terrain stability models that combine steady state hydrology assumptions with the infinite slope stability model to quantify shallow slope stability. They have a similar physical basis but they use different indices to quantify instability. The purposes of this study are to test and compare the approaches of SINMAP and SHALSTAB models for slope stability analysis and to compare the results of these analyses with the locations of the shallow landslides that occurred on November 2002 in an area of the Oltrepo Pavese (Northern Apennines). The territory of S. Giuletta, characterized by clayey-silty colluvial soils, represents the test site. The Digital Elevation Model was constructed from a 1:5000 scale contour map and was used to estimate the slope of the terrain as well as the potential soil moisture conditions. In situ and laboratory tests provided the basis for measuring values for soil hydraulic and geotechnical parameters (moisture content, soil suction, Atterberg limits, methylene blue dye adsorption, hydraulic conductivity). Soil thickness was extracted from a soil database. An inventory of landslide from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys was used to document sites of instability (mostly soil slips) and to provide a test of model performance by comparing observed landslide locations with model predictions. The study discusses the practical advantages and limitations of the two models in connection with the geological characteristics of the studied area, which could be representative of similar geological contexts in the Apennines.

  7. Conceptual model of iCAL4LA: Proposing the components using comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Siti Zulaiha; Mutalib, Ariffin Abdul

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses an on-going study that initiates an initial process in determining the common components for a conceptual model of interactive computer-assisted learning that is specifically designed for low achieving children. This group of children needs a specific learning support that can be used as an alternative learning material in their learning environment. In order to develop the conceptual model, this study extracts the common components from 15 strongly justified computer assisted learning studies. A comparative analysis has been conducted to determine the most appropriate components by using a set of specific indication classification to prioritize the applicability. The results of the extraction process reveal 17 common components for consideration. Later, based on scientific justifications, 16 of them were selected as the proposed components for the model.

  8. Comparative Analysis between Profits of the Two Models of a CC Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, A. G.; Rizwan, S. M.; Majumder, M. C.; Ramachandran, K. P.; Taneja, G.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the comparative analysis between profits of the two models of a two-unit CC plant with same/different installed capacity combination. The analysis is useful in deciding the optimum plant equipment capacity combinations and particular model suitability over the other to the existing situation. In plant model I, the actual plant situation with four EOT cranes (unit I, II 200 ton each) is analyzed. But, it is observed that equipment combination in terms of installed capacities as specified above could be analyzed by varying the installed capacity and thereby achieving a significant difference in the plant performance. Hence, plant model II explores a situation by replacing the 200 ton unit II cranes with 100 ton cranes and operating both the units at full installed capacity with priority of repair and operation to unit I. Upon failure in either unit, an inspection is carried out to decide the type of maintenance task to be performed. The actual plant downtime data is used for achieving the optimized reliability indices and comparison among both the models. Essential graphs are plotted to demonstrate the results and related comparison.

  9. A comparative analysis of hazard models for predicting debris flows in Madison County, VA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, Meghan M.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Morgan, Benjamin A.

    2001-01-01

    During the rainstorm of June 27, 1995, roughly 330-750 mm of rain fell within a sixteen-hour period, initiating floods and over 600 debris flows in a small area (130 km2) of Madison County, Virginia. Field studies showed that the majority (70%) of these debris flows initiated with a thickness of 0.5 to 3.0 m in colluvium on slopes from 17 o to 41 o (Wieczorek et al., 2000). This paper evaluated and compared the approaches of SINMAP, LISA, and Iverson's (2000) transient response model for slope stability analysis by applying each model to the landslide data from Madison County. Of these three stability models, only Iverson's transient response model evaluated stability conditions as a function of time and depth. Iverson?s model would be the preferred method of the three models to evaluate landslide hazards on a regional scale in areas prone to rain-induced landslides as it considers both the transient and spatial response of pore pressure in its calculation of slope stability. The stability calculation used in SINMAP and LISA is similar and utilizes probability distribution functions for certain parameters. Unlike SINMAP that only considers soil cohesion, internal friction angle and rainfall-rate distributions, LISA allows the use of distributed data for all parameters, so it is the preferred model to evaluate slope stability over SINMAP. Results from all three models suggested similar soil and hydrologic properties for triggering the landslides that occurred during the 1995 storm in Madison County, Virginia. The colluvium probably had cohesion of less than 2KPa. The root-soil system is above the failure plane and consequently root strength and tree surcharge had negligible effect on slope stability. The result that the final location of the water table was near the ground surface is supported by the water budget analysis of the rainstorm conducted by Smith et al. (1996).

  10. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

    2010-09-01

    The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential

  11. Modelling submerged coastal environments: Remote sensing technologies, techniques, and comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Chris

    Built upon remote sensing and GIS littoral zone characterization methodologies of the past decade, a series of loosely coupled models aimed to test, compare and synthesize multi-beam SONAR (MBES), Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry (ALB), and satellite based optical data sets in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, eco-region. Bathymetry and relative intensity metrics for the MBES and ALB data sets were run through a quantitative and qualitative comparison, which included outputs from the Benthic Terrain Modeller (BTM) tool. Substrate classification based on relative intensities of respective data sets and textural indices generated using grey level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were investigated. A spatial modelling framework built in ArcGIS(TM) for the derivation of bathymetric data sets from optical satellite imagery was also tested for proof of concept and validation. Where possible, efficiencies and semi-automation for repeatable testing was achieved using ArcGIS(TM) ModelBuilder. The findings from this study could assist future decision makers in the field of coastal management and hydrographic studies. Keywords: Seafloor terrain characterization, Benthic Terrain Modeller (BTM), Multi-beam SONAR, Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry, Satellite Derived Bathymetry, ArcGISTM ModelBuilder, Textural analysis, Substrate classification.

  12. Analysis of RNAseq datasets from a comparative infectious disease zebrafish model using GeneTiles bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Veneman, Wouter J; de Sonneville, Jan; van der Kolk, Kees-Jan; Ordas, Anita; Al-Ars, Zaid; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2015-03-01

    We present a RNA deep sequencing (RNAseq) analysis of a comparison of the transcriptome responses to infection of zebrafish larvae with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Mycobacterium marinum bacteria. We show how our developed GeneTiles software can improve RNAseq analysis approaches by more confidently identifying a large set of markers upon infection with these bacteria. For analysis of RNAseq data currently, software programs such as Bowtie2 and Samtools are indispensable. However, these programs that are designed for a LINUX environment require some dedicated programming skills and have no options for visualisation of the resulting mapped sequence reads. Especially with large data sets, this makes the analysis time consuming and difficult for non-expert users. We have applied the GeneTiles software to the analysis of previously published and newly obtained RNAseq datasets of our zebrafish infection model, and we have shown the applicability of this approach also to published RNAseq datasets of other organisms by comparing our data with a published mammalian infection study. In addition, we have implemented the DEXSeq module in the GeneTiles software to identify genes, such as glucagon A, that are differentially spliced under infection conditions. In the analysis of our RNAseq data, this has led to the possibility to improve the size of data sets that could be efficiently compared without using problem-dedicated programs, leading to a quick identification of marker sets. Therefore, this approach will also be highly useful for transcriptome analyses of other organisms for which well-characterised genomes are available. PMID:25503064

  13. Badminton instructional in Malaysian schools: a comparative analysis of TGfU and SDT pedagogical models.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Sanmuga

    2016-01-01

    Model based physical education curriculum of Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) is still at early stage of implementation in Malaysian schools whereby the technical or skill-led model continues to dominate the physical education curriculum. Implementing TGfU seems to be problematic and untested in this environment. Therefore, this study examined, the effects that a revised model of TGfU compared to Skill Drill Technical (SDT) a technical model had on learning movement skills in Badminton, including returning to base, decision making and skill execution whilst performing in a doubles game play and also explored teachers' perceptions of navigating between the two models. Participants aged 15.5 ± 1.0 years, N = 32, school Badminton players were randomly selected and assigned equally into groups of TGfU and SDT. Reflective data was gathered from two experienced physical education teachers who were involved in this study. Findings indicated for movement to the base in doubles game play indicated significant improvement, after intervention via TGfU. As for decision-making and skill execution in doubles game play, analysis revealed no significant difference after intervention. Findings from teachers reflection, indicated the importance of mini game play in both TGfU and SDT models, as the students enjoyed, and built up positive attitudes for both winning or losing in game situations. However, when negotiating the TGfU model, the teacher found it difficult at times to execute the pedagogical model, as students needed guidance to discuss aspects related to tactics. However, to keep this pedagogical model viable further research findings ought to be circulated among teachers in Malaysia and similar Southeast Asian counties. PMID:27516953

  14. A comparative analysis of the bistability switch for platelet aggregation by logic ODE based dynamical modeling.

    PubMed

    Mischnik, Marcel; Gambaryan, Stepan; Subramanian, Hariharan; Geiger, Jörg; Schütz, Claudia; Timmer, Jens; Dandekar, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    A kinetic description of the fragile equilibrium in thrombozytes regulating blood flow would be an important basis for rational medical interventions. Challenges for such a model include regulation by a complex bistability switch that determines the transition from reversible to irreversible aggregation and sparse data on the kinetics. A so far scarcely applied technique is given by the derivation of ordinary differential equations from Boolean expressions, which are called logic ODEs. We employ a combination of light-scattering based thrombocyte aggregation data, western blot and calcium measurements to compare three different ODE approaches regarding their suitability to achieve a data-consistent model of the switch. Our analysis reveals the standardized qualitative dynamical system approach (SQUAD) to be a better choice than classical mass action formalisms. Furthermore, we analyze the dynamical properties of the platelet aggregation threshold as a basis for medical interventions such as novel platelet aggregation inhibitors. PMID:24852796

  15. Comparative mRNA analysis of behavioral and genetic mouse models of aggression.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Tosto, Maria G; Pain, Oliver; Sluyter, Frans; Mineur, Yann S; Crusio, Wim E; de Boer, Sietse; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; Kesserwani, Jad; Robinson, Edward; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of aggression have traditionally compared strains, most notably BALB/cJ and C57BL/6. However, these strains were not designed to study aggression despite differences in aggression-related traits and distinct reactivity to stress. This study evaluated expression of genes differentially regulated in a stress (behavioral) mouse model of aggression with those from a recent genetic mouse model aggression. The study used a discovery-replication design using two independent mRNA studies from mouse brain tissue. The discovery study identified strain (BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J) × stress (chronic mild stress or control) interactions. Probe sets differentially regulated in the discovery set were intersected with those uncovered in the replication study, which evaluated differences between high and low aggressive animals from three strains specifically bred to study aggression. Network analysis was conducted on overlapping genes uncovered across both studies. A significant overlap was found with the genetic mouse study sharing 1,916 probe sets with the stress model. Fifty-one probe sets were found to be strongly dysregulated across both studies mapping to 50 known genes. Network analysis revealed two plausible pathways including one centered on the UBC gene hub which encodes ubiquitin, a protein well-known for protein degradation, and another on P38 MAPK. Findings from this study support the stress model of aggression, which showed remarkable molecular overlap with a genetic model. The study uncovered a set of candidate genes including the Erg2 gene, which has previously been implicated in different psychopathologies. The gene networks uncovered points at a Redox pathway as potentially being implicated in aggressive related behaviors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888158

  16. Comparative Modeling Analysis of the Hematopoiesis Dynamics in Mammals Exposed to Nonuniform and Uniform Acute Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Olga A

    2015-09-01

    Biologically motivated mathematical models of the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombopoietic, erythropoietic, granulopoietic, and lymphopoietic systems) in mammals (rodents) exposed to nonuniform acute irradiation are developed and thoroughly investigated. These models are based on earlier developed mathematical models, which are capable of predicting the dynamics of these systems in mammals (rodents) exposed to uniform acute/chronic irradiation. The developed models are the systems of nonlinear ordinary differential equations whose variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is found that these models are capable of reproducing a lesser depletion of the major hematopoietic lineages and faster recovery in rodents (rats, mice) after nonuniform acute irradiation than those after uniform acute irradiation at equal whole-body doses of such exposures. The nature of this phenomenon is elucidated in the framework of the models. Thorough comparative analysis of effects of nonuniform (partial) and uniform acute irradiation on the major hematopoietic lineages is performed. It is revealed that the lymphopoietic system is the most susceptible major hematopoietic lineage both to uniform and nonuniform (partial) acute irradiation. It is argued that the first-day level of the concentration of functional blood cells in this system (blood lymphocytes) after nonuniform (partial) acute irradiation can serve for early assessment of the risk of acute radiation syndrome. It is also shown that the modeling results on the first-day levels of the blood lymphocyte concentration after various partial acute exposures are in a very good agreement with the relevant experimental data. This agreement testifies to the applicability of the developed model of the lymphopoietic system to be used in the prognostic aims; in particular, for predicting the development of lymphocytopenia after partial acute irradiation. The modeling results imply that the

  17. Comparing the Fit of Item Response Theory and Factor Analysis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Cai, Li; Hernandez, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Linear factor analysis (FA) models can be reliably tested using test statistics based on residual covariances. We show that the same statistics can be used to reliably test the fit of item response theory (IRT) models for ordinal data (under some conditions). Hence, the fit of an FA model and of an IRT model to the same data set can now be…

  18. Computer-aided modelling and analysis of PV systems: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Koukouvaos, Charalambos; Kandris, Dionisis; Samarakou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Modern scientific advances have enabled remarkable efficacy for photovoltaic systems with regard to the exploitation of solar energy, boosting them into having a rapidly growing position among the systems developed for the production of renewable energy. However, in many cases the design, analysis, and control of photovoltaic systems are tasks which are quite complex and thus difficult to be carried out. In order to cope with this kind of problems, appropriate software tools have been developed either as standalone products or parts of general purpose software platforms used to model and simulate the generation, transmission, and distribution of solar energy. The utilization of this kind of software tools may be extremely helpful to the successful performance evaluation of energy systems with maximum accuracy and minimum cost in time and effort. The work presented in this paper aims on a first level at the performance analysis of various configurations of photovoltaic systems through computer-aided modelling. On a second level, it provides a comparative evaluation of the credibility of two of the most advanced graphical programming environments, namely, Simulink and LabVIEW, with regard to their application in photovoltaic systems. PMID:24772007

  19. Computer-Aided Modelling and Analysis of PV Systems: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Koukouvaos, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Modern scientific advances have enabled remarkable efficacy for photovoltaic systems with regard to the exploitation of solar energy, boosting them into having a rapidly growing position among the systems developed for the production of renewable energy. However, in many cases the design, analysis, and control of photovoltaic systems are tasks which are quite complex and thus difficult to be carried out. In order to cope with this kind of problems, appropriate software tools have been developed either as standalone products or parts of general purpose software platforms used to model and simulate the generation, transmission, and distribution of solar energy. The utilization of this kind of software tools may be extremely helpful to the successful performance evaluation of energy systems with maximum accuracy and minimum cost in time and effort. The work presented in this paper aims on a first level at the performance analysis of various configurations of photovoltaic systems through computer-aided modelling. On a second level, it provides a comparative evaluation of the credibility of two of the most advanced graphical programming environments, namely, Simulink and LabVIEW, with regard to their application in photovoltaic systems. PMID:24772007

  20. Comparative analysis of economic models in selected solar energy computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. W.; Barnes, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The economic evaluation models in five computer programs widely used for analyzing solar energy systems (F-CHART 3.0, F-CHART 4.0, SOLCOST, BLAST, and DOE-2) are compared. Differences in analysis techniques and assumptions among the programs are assessed from the point of view of consistency with the Federal requirements for life cycle costing (10 CFR Part 436), effect on predicted economic performance, and optimal system size, case of use, and general applicability to diverse systems types and building types. The FEDSOL program developed by the National Bureau of Standards specifically to meet the Federal life cycle cost requirements serves as a basis for the comparison. Results of the study are illustrated in test cases of two different types of Federally owned buildings: a single family residence and a low rise office building.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Global Digital Elevation Models and Ultra-Prominent Mountain Peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, Carlos H.

    2016-06-01

    Global Digital Elevation Models (GDEMs) are datasets of vital importance for regional-scale analysis in areas such as geomorphology, [paleo]climatology, oceanography and biodiversity. In this work I present a comparative assessment of the datasets ETOPO1 (1' resolution), GTOPO30, GLOBE, SRTM30 PLUS, GMTED2010 and ACE2 (30") against the altitude of the world's ultra prominent peaks. GDEMs' elevations show an expected tendency of underestimating the peak's altitude, but differences reach 3,500 m. None of the GDEMs captures the full range of elevation on Earth and they do not represent well the altitude of the most prominent peaks. Some of these problems could be addressed with the release of NASADEM, but the smoothing effect caused by moving-window resampling can only be tackled by using new techniques, such as scale-adaptative kernels and curvature-based terrain generalisation.

  2. A comparative molecular field analysis and molecular modelling studies on pyridylimidazole type of angiotensin II antagonists.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S E; Kim, S K; Lee, S H; Yi, K Y; Lee, D W

    1999-12-01

    A large number of compounds known as "AII (Angiotensin II) antagonists" have been developed for the treatment of various heart diseases such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal failure. Most of the currently known AII receptor antagonists share a similar chemical structure, consisting of nitrogen atoms, a lipophilic alkyl side chain and an acidic group. As a new series, we have designed and synthesized various pyridylimidazole derivatives. In this report we would like to discuss the structure-activity relationship of these series of compounds using the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) methods. We could come up with a good CoMFA model (cross-validated and conventional r2 values equal to 0.702 and 0.991, respectively) and the validity of the model was confirmed by synthesizing and measuring their biological activity of additional 6 compounds suggested by the model. This result provides additional information on the structural requirement for structurally diverse group of AII receptor antagonists. PMID:10658603

  3. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminov, Ildar; Tarasova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Tatyana; Avazov, Artur

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt) and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  4. Comparative analysis of autophagy and tauopathy related markers in cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer's disease animal models.

    PubMed

    Villamil-Ortiz, Javier G; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria P

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral ischemia (CI) are neuropathologies that are characterized by aggregates of tau protein, a hallmark of cognitive disorder and dementia. Protein accumulation can be induced by autophagic failure. Autophagy is a metabolic pathway involved in the homeostatic recycling of cellular components. However, the role of autophagy in those tauopathies remains unclear. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis to identify autophagy related markers in tauopathy generated by AD and CI during short-term, intermediate, and long-term progression using the 3xTg-AD mouse model (aged 6,12, and 18 months) and the global CI 2-VO (2-Vessel Occlusion) rat model (1,15, and 30 days post-ischemia). Our findings confirmed neuronal loss and hyperphosphorylated tau aggregation in the somatosensory cortex (SS-Cx) of the 3xTg-AD mice in the late stage (aged 18 months), which was supported by a failure in autophagy. These results were in contrast to those obtained in the SS-Cx of the CI rats, in which we detected neuronal loss and tauopathy at 1 and 15 days post-ischemia, and this phenomenon was reversed at 30 days. We proposed that this phenomenon was associated with autophagy induction in the late stage, since the data showed a decrease in p-mTOR activity, an association of Beclin-1 and Vps34, a progressive reduction in PHF-1, an increase in LC3B puncta and autophago-lysosomes formation were observed. Furthermore, the survival pathways remained unaffected. Together, our comparative study suggest that autophagy could ameliorates tauopathy in CI but not in AD, suggesting a differential temporal approach to the induction of neuroprotection and the prevention of neurodegeneration. PMID:26042033

  5. COMPARING THE UTILITY OF MULTIMEDIA MODELS FOR HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL EXPOSURE ANALYSIS: TWO CASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of models are available for exposure assessment; however, few are used as tools for both human and ecosystem risks. This discussion will consider two modeling frameworks that have recently been used to support human and ecological decision making. The study will compare ...

  6. Regional disaster impact analysis: comparing Input-Output and Computable General Equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koks, E. E.; Carrera, L.; Jonkeren, O.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Husby, T. G.; Thissen, M.; Standardi, G.; Mysiak, J.

    2015-11-01

    A large variety of models has been developed to assess the economic losses of disasters, of which the most common ones are Input-Output (IO) and Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) models. In addition, an increasing numbers of scholars has developed hybrid approaches; one that combines both or either of them in combination with non-economic methods. While both IO and CGE models are widely used, they are mainly compared on theoretical grounds. Few studies have compared disaster impacts of different model types in a systematic way and for the same geographical area, using similar input data. Such a comparison is valuable from both a scientific and policy perspective as the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the estimated losses are likely to vary with the chosen modelling approach (IO, CGE, or hybrid). Hence, regional disaster impact loss estimates resulting from a range of models facilitates better decisions and policy making. Therefore, in this study we analyze one specific case study, using three regional models: two hybrid IO models and a regionally calibrated version of a global CGE model. The case study concerns two flood scenarios in the Po-river basin in Italy. Modelling results indicate that the difference in estimated total (national) economic losses and the regional distribution of those losses may vary by up to a factor of seven between the three models, depending on the type of recovery path. Total economic impact, comprising all Italian regions, is negative in all models though.

  7. Understanding differences in predictions of HPV vaccine effectiveness: A comparative model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Nicolas; Brisson, Marc; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2010-07-26

    Mathematical models of HPV vaccine effectiveness and cost-effectiveness have produced conflicting results. The aim of this study was to use mathematical models to compare and isolate the impact of the assumptions most commonly made when modeling the effectiveness of HPV vaccines. Our results clearly show that differences in how we model natural immunity, herd immunity, partnership duration, HPV types, and waning of vaccine protection lead to important differences in the predicted effectiveness of HPV vaccines. These results are important and useful to assist modelers/health economists in choosing the appropriate level of complexity to include in their models, provide epidemiologists with insight on key data necessary to increase the robustness of model predictions, and help decision makers better understand the reasons underlying conflicting results from HPV models. PMID:20573580

  8. Genome sequence of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas: a comparative analysis within the Desulfovibrio genus*

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Pimentel, Catarina; Santos, Catia I; Clemente, Carla; Varela–Raposo, Ana; Resende, Daniela M; da Silva, Sofia M; de Oliveira, Luciana Márcia; Matos, Marcia; Costa, Daniela A; Flores, Orfeu; Ruiz, Jerónimo C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2014-01-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas is a model organism of sulfate-reducing bacteria of which energy metabolism and stress response have been extensively studied. The complete genomic context of this organism was however, not yet available. The sequencing of the D. gigas genome provides insights into the integrated network of energy conserving complexes and structures present in this bacterium. Comparison with genomes of other Desulfovibrio spp. reveals the presence of two different CRISPR/Cas systems in D. gigas. Phylogenetic analysis using conserved protein sequences (encoded by rpoB and gyrB) indicates two main groups of Desulfovibrio spp, being D. gigas more closely related to D. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans strains. Gene duplications were found such as those encoding fumarate reductase, formate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. Complexes not yet described within Desulfovibrio genus were identified: Mnh complex, a v-type ATP-synthase as well as genes encoding the MinCDE system that could be responsible for the larger size of D. gigas when compared to other members of the genus. A low number of hydrogenases and the absence of the codh/acs and pfl genes, both present in D. vulgaris strains, indicate that intermediate cycling mechanisms may contribute substantially less to the energy gain in D. gigas compared to other Desulfovibrio spp. This might be compensated by the presence of other unique genomic arrangements of complexes such as the Rnf and the Hdr/Flox, or by the presence of NAD(P)H related complexes, like the Nuo, NfnAB or Mnh. PMID:25055974

  9. Sensitivity analysis of PBL schemes by comparing WRF model and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzarini, A.; Angelini, F.; Ferrero, L.; Moscatelli, M.; Perrone, M. G.; Pirovano, G.; Riva, G. M.; Sangiorgi, G.; Toppetti, A. M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Bolzacchini, E.

    2014-09-01

    This work discusses the sources of model biases in reconstructing the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) height among five commonly used PBL parameterizations. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model was applied over the critical area of Northern Italy with 5 km of horizontal resolution, and compared against a wide set of experimental data for February 2008. Three non-local closure PBL schemes (Asymmetrical Convective Model version 2, ACM2; Medium Range Forecast, MRF; Yonsei University, YSU) and two local closure parameterizations (Mellor Yamada Janjic, MYJ; University of Washington Moist Turbulence, UW) were selected for the analysis. Vertical profiles of aerosol number concentrations and Lidar backscatter profiles were collected in the metropolitan area of Milan in order to derive the PBL hourly evolution. Moreover, radio-soundings of Milano Linate airport as well as surface temperature, mixing ratio and wind speed of several meteorological stations were considered too. Results show that all five parameterizations produce similar performances in terms of temperature, mixing ratio and wind speed in the city of Milan, implying some systematic errors in all simulations. However, UW and ACM2 use the same local closure during nighttime conditions, allowing smaller mean biases (MB) of temperature (ACM2 MB = 0.606 K, UW MB = 0.209 K), and wind speed (ACM2 MB = 0.699 m s-1, UW MB = 0.918 m s-1). All schemes have the same variations of the diurnal PBL height, since over predictions of temperature and wind speed are found to cause a general overestimation of mixing during its development in winter. In particular, temperature estimates seem to impact the early evolution of the PBL height, while entrainment fluxes parameterizations have major influence on the afternoon development. MRF, MYJ and ACM2 use the same approach in reconstructing the entrainment process, producing the largest overestimations of PBL height (MB ranges from 85.51-179.10 m). On the contrary, the

  10. Recent results on the spatiotemporal modelling and comparative analysis of Black Death and bubonic plague epidemics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christakos, G.; Olea, R.A.; Yu, H.-L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: This work demonstrates the importance of spatiotemporal stochastic modelling in constructing maps of major epidemics from fragmentary information, assessing population impacts, searching for possible etiologies, and performing comparative analysis of epidemics. Methods: Based on the theory previously published by the authors and incorporating new knowledge bases, informative maps of the composite space-time distributions were generated for important characteristics of two major epidemics: Black Death (14th century Western Europe) and bubonic plague (19th-20th century Indian subcontinent). Results: The comparative spatiotemporal analysis of the epidemics led to a number of interesting findings: (1) the two epidemics exhibited certain differences in their spatiotemporal characteristics (correlation structures, trends, occurrence patterns and propagation speeds) that need to be explained by means of an interdisciplinary effort; (2) geographical epidemic indicators confirmed in a rigorous quantitative manner the partial findings of isolated reports and time series that Black Death mortality was two orders of magnitude higher than that of bubonic plague; (3) modern bubonic plague is a rural disease hitting harder the small villages in the countryside whereas Black Death was a devastating epidemic that indiscriminately attacked large urban centres and the countryside, and while the epidemic in India lasted uninterruptedly for five decades, in Western Europe it lasted three and a half years; (4) the epidemics had reverse areal extension features in response to annual seasonal variations. Temperature increase at the end of winter led to an expansion of infected geographical area for Black Death and a reduction for bubonic plague, reaching a climax at the end of spring when the infected area in Western Europe was always larger than in India. Conversely, without exception, the infected area during winter was larger for the Indian bubonic plague; (5) during the

  11. Comparative Analysis of Yeast Metabolic Network Models Highlights Progress, Opportunities for Metabolic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Heavner, Benjamin D; Price, Nathan D

    2015-11-01

    We have compared 12 genome-scale models of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network published since 2003 to evaluate progress in reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network. We compared the genomic coverage, overlap of annotated metabolites, predictive ability for single gene essentiality with a selection of model parameters, and biomass production predictions in simulated nutrient-limited conditions. We have also compared pairwise gene knockout essentiality predictions for 10 of these models. We found that varying approaches to model scope and annotation reflected the involvement of multiple research groups in model development; that single-gene essentiality predictions were affected by simulated medium, objective function, and the reference list of essential genes; and that predictive ability for single-gene essentiality did not correlate well with predictive ability for our reference list of synthetic lethal gene interactions (R = 0.159). We conclude that the reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network is indeed gradually improving through the iterative process of model development, and there remains great opportunity for advancing our understanding of biology through continued efforts to reconstruct the full biochemical reaction network that constitutes yeast metabolism. Additionally, we suggest that there is opportunity for refining the process of deriving a metabolic model from a metabolic network reconstruction to facilitate mechanistic investigation and discovery. This comparative study lays the groundwork for developing improved tools and formalized methods to quantitatively assess metabolic network reconstructions independently of any particular model application, which will facilitate ongoing efforts to advance our understanding of the relationship between genotype and cellular phenotype. PMID:26566239

  12. Comparative Analysis of Yeast Metabolic Network Models Highlights Progress, Opportunities for Metabolic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Heavner, Benjamin D.; Price, Nathan D.

    2015-01-01

    We have compared 12 genome-scale models of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network published since 2003 to evaluate progress in reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network. We compared the genomic coverage, overlap of annotated metabolites, predictive ability for single gene essentiality with a selection of model parameters, and biomass production predictions in simulated nutrient-limited conditions. We have also compared pairwise gene knockout essentiality predictions for 10 of these models. We found that varying approaches to model scope and annotation reflected the involvement of multiple research groups in model development; that single-gene essentiality predictions were affected by simulated medium, objective function, and the reference list of essential genes; and that predictive ability for single-gene essentiality did not correlate well with predictive ability for our reference list of synthetic lethal gene interactions (R = 0.159). We conclude that the reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network is indeed gradually improving through the iterative process of model development, and there remains great opportunity for advancing our understanding of biology through continued efforts to reconstruct the full biochemical reaction network that constitutes yeast metabolism. Additionally, we suggest that there is opportunity for refining the process of deriving a metabolic model from a metabolic network reconstruction to facilitate mechanistic investigation and discovery. This comparative study lays the groundwork for developing improved tools and formalized methods to quantitatively assess metabolic network reconstructions independently of any particular model application, which will facilitate ongoing efforts to advance our understanding of the relationship between genotype and cellular phenotype. PMID:26566239

  13. Human experts' and a fuzzy model's predictions of outcomes of scoliosis treatment: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Eric; Pedrycz, Witold; Lou, Edmond

    2015-03-01

    Brace treatment is the most commonly used nonsurgical treatment for adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. However, brace treatment is not always successful and the factors influencing its success are not completely clear. This makes treatment outcome difficult to predict. A computer model which can accurately predict treatment outcomes could potentially provide valuable treatment recommendations. This paper describes a fuzzy system that includes a prediction model and a decision support engine. The model was constructed using conditional fuzzy c-means clustering to discover patterns in retrospective patient data. The model's ability to predict treatment outcome was compared to the ability of eight Scoliosis experts. The model and experts each predicted treatment outcome retrospectively for 28 braced patients, and these predictions were compared to the actual outcomes. The model outperformed all but one expert individually and performed similarly to the experts as a group. These results suggest that the fuzzy model is capable of providing meaningful treatment recommendations. This study offers the first model for this application whose performance has been shown to be at or above the human expert level. PMID:25494498

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Spatial Visualization Ability and Drafting Models for Industrial and Technology Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine significant positive effects among the use of three different types of drafting models, and to identify whether any differences exist towards promotion of spatial visualization ability for students in Industrial Technology and Technology Education courses. In particular, the study compared the use of…

  15. Comparative analysis of some models of gene regulation in mixed-substrate microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul

    2006-09-21

    Mixed-substrate microbial growth is of fundamental interest in microbiology and bioengineering. Several mathematical models have been developed to account for the genetic regulation of such systems, especially those resulting in diauxic growth. In this work, we compare the dynamics of three such models (Narang, 1998a. The dynamical analogy between microbial growth on mixtures of substrates and population growth of competing species. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 59, 116-121; Thattai and Shraiman, 2003. Metabolic switching in the sugar phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli. Biophys. J. 85(2), 744-754; Brandt et al., 2004. Modelling microbial adaptation to changing availability of substrates. Water Res. 38, 1004-1013). We show that these models are dynamically similar--the initial motion of the inducible enzymes in all the models is described by the Lotka-Volterra equations for competing species. In particular, the prediction of diauxic growth corresponds to "extinction" of one of the enzymes during the first few hours of growth. The dynamic similarity occurs because in all the models, the inducible enzymes possess properties characteristic of competing species: they are required for their own synthesis, and they inhibit each other. Despite this dynamic similarity, the models vary with respect to the range of dynamics captured. The Brandt et al. model always predicts the diauxic growth pattern, whereas the remaining two models exhibit both diauxic and non-diauxic growth patterns. The models also differ with respect to the mechanisms that generate the mutual inhibition between the enzymes. In the Narang model, mutual inhibition occurs because the enzymes for each substrate enhance the dilution of the enzymes for the other substrate. The Brandt et al. model superimposes upon this dilution effect an additional mechanism of mutual inhibition. In the Thattai and Shraiman model, the mutual inhibition is entirely due to competition for the phosphoryl groups. For quantitative

  16. Modelling formulations using gene expression programming--a comparative analysis with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Colbourn, E A; Roskilly, S J; Rowe, R C; York, P

    2011-10-01

    This study has investigated the utility and potential advantages of gene expression programming (GEP)--a new development in evolutionary computing for modelling data and automatically generating equations that describe the cause-and-effect relationships in a system--to four types of pharmaceutical formulation and compared the models with those generated by neural networks, a technique now widely used in the formulation development. Both methods were capable of discovering subtle and non-linear relationships within the data, with no requirement from the user to specify the functional forms that should be used. Although the neural networks rapidly developed models with higher values for the ANOVA R(2) these were black box and provided little insight into the key relationships. However, GEP, although significantly slower at developing models, generated relatively simple equations describing the relationships that could be interpreted directly. The results indicate that GEP can be considered an effective and efficient modelling technique for formulation data. PMID:21903163

  17. A comparative analysis of 9 multi-model averaging approaches in hydrological continuous streamflow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Richard; Gatien, Philippe; Renaud, Benoit; Brissette, François; Martel, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to test whether a weighted combination of several hydrological models can simulate flows more accurately than the models taken individually. In addition, the project attempts to identify the most efficient model averaging method and the optimal number of models to include in the weighting scheme. In order to address the first objective, streamflow was simulated using four lumped hydrological models (HSAMI, HMETS, MOHYSE and GR4J-6), each of which were calibrated with three different objective functions on 429 watersheds. The resulting 12 hydrographs (4 models × 3 metrics) were weighted and combined with the help of 9 averaging methods which are the simple arithmetic mean (SAM), Akaike information criterion (AICA), Bates-Granger (BGA), Bayes information criterion (BICA), Bayesian model averaging (BMA), Granger-Ramanathan average variant A, B and C (GRA, GRB and GRC) and the average by SCE-UA optimization (SCA). The same weights were then applied to the hydrographs in validation mode, and the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency metric was measured between the averaged and observed hydrographs. Statistical analyses were performed to compare the accuracy of weighted methods to that of individual models. A Kruskal-Wallis test and a multi-objective optimization algorithm were then used to identify the most efficient weighted method and the optimal number of models to integrate. Results suggest that the GRA, GRB, GRC and SCA weighted methods perform better than the individual members. Model averaging from these four methods were superior to the best of the individual members in 76% of the cases. Optimal combinations on all watersheds included at least one of each of the four hydrological models. None of the optimal combinations included all members of the ensemble of 12 hydrographs. The Granger-Ramanathan average variant C (GRC) is recommended as the best compromise between accuracy, speed of execution, and simplicity.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Induced vs. Spontaneous Models of Autoimmune Uveitis Targeting the Interphotoreceptor Retinoid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Qian, Haohua; Horai, Reiko; Chan, Chi-Chao; Falick, Yishay; Caspi, Rachel R.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of autoimmunity to the retina mimic specific features of human uveitis, but no model by itself reproduces the full spectrum of human disease. We compared three mouse models of uveitis that target the interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP): (i) the “classical” model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunization with IRBP; (ii) spontaneous uveitis in IRBP T cell receptor transgenic mice (R161H) and (iii) spontaneous uveitis in Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE)−/− mice. Disease course and severity, pathology and changes in visual function were studied using fundus imaging and histological examinations, optical coherence tomography and electroretinography. All models were on the B10.RIII background. Unlike previously reported, IRBP-induced EAU in B10.RIII mice exhibited two distinct patterns of disease depending on clinical scores developed after onset: severe monophasic with extensive destruction of the retina and rapid loss of visual signal, or lower grade with a prolonged chronic phase culminating after several months in retinal degeneration and loss of vision. R161H and AIRE−/− mice spontaneously developed chronic progressive inflammation; visual function declined gradually as retinal degeneration developed. Spontaneous uveitis in R161H mice was characterized by persistent cellular infiltrates and lymphoid aggregation, whereas AIRE−/− mice characteristically developed multi-focal infiltrates and severe choroidal inflammation. These data demonstrate variability and unique distinguishing features in the different models of uveitis, suggesting that each one can represent distinct aspects of uveitis in humans. PMID:24015215

  19. Comparative analysis of data collection methods for individualized modeling of radiologists' visual similarity judgments

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassi, Georgia; Xu, Songhua; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Hudson, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: We conducted an observer study to investigate how the data collection method affects the efficacy of modeling individual radiologists judgments regarding the perceptual similarity of breast masses on mammograms. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained prior to the study. Six observers of variable experience levels in breast imaging were recruited to assess the perceptual similarity of mammographic masses. The observers subjective judgments were collected using: (i) a rating method, (ii) a preference method, and (iii) a hybrid method combining rating and ranking. Personalized user models were developed with the collected data to predict observers opinions. The relative efficacy of each data collection method was assessed based on the classification accuracy of the resulting user models. Results: The hybrid data collection method produced significantly more accurate individualized user models of perceptual opinions with comparable and sometimes better time efficiency than the other two data collection methods. The user models derived from hybrid data were clearly superior even when developed with a dramatically smaller number of training cases. Conclusions: A hybrid method combining rating and ranking is an intuitive and efficient way for collecting subjective similarity judgments to model human perceptual opinions with a higher accuracy than other more commonly used data collection methods.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jianxun; Benson, Barbara; Tran, Huy; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA) but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct "knock-in" strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain. PMID:27494522

  1. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jianxun; Benson, Barbara; Tran, Huy; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA) but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct “knock-in” strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain. PMID:27494522

  2. Eliciting mixed emotions: a meta-analysis comparing models, types, and measures.

    PubMed

    Berrios, Raul; Totterdell, Peter; Kellett, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The idea that people can experience two oppositely valenced emotions has been controversial ever since early attempts to investigate the construct of mixed emotions. This meta-analysis examined the robustness with which mixed emotions have been elicited experimentally. A systematic literature search identified 63 experimental studies that instigated the experience of mixed emotions. Studies were distinguished according to the structure of the underlying affect model-dimensional or discrete-as well as according to the type of mixed emotions studied (e.g., happy-sad, fearful-happy, positive-negative). The meta-analysis using a random-effects model revealed a moderate to high effect size for the elicitation of mixed emotions (d IG+ = 0.77), which remained consistent regardless of the structure of the affect model, and across different types of mixed emotions. Several methodological and design moderators were tested. Studies using the minimum index (i.e., the minimum value between a pair of opposite valenced affects) resulted in smaller effect sizes, whereas subjective measures of mixed emotions increased the effect sizes. The presence of more women in the samples was also associated with larger effect sizes. The current study indicates that mixed emotions are a robust, measurable and non-artifactual experience. The results are discussed in terms of the implications for an affect system that has greater versatility and flexibility than previously thought. PMID:25926805

  3. NAS Demand Predictions, Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) Compared with Other Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeff; Dollyhigh, Samuel; Smith, Jeremy; Trani, Antonio; Baik, Hojong; Hinze, Nicholas; Ashiabor, Senanu

    2006-01-01

    The current work incorporates the Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) to predict the future demand for airline travel. TSAM is a multi-mode, national model that predicts the demand for all long distance travel at a county level based upon population and demographics. The model conducts a mode choice analysis to compute the demand for commercial airline travel based upon the traveler s purpose of the trip, value of time, cost and time of the trip,. The county demand for airline travel is then aggregated (or distributed) to the airport level, and the enplanement demand at commercial airports is modeled. With the growth in flight demand, and utilizing current airline flight schedules, the Fratar algorithm is used to develop future flight schedules in the NAS. The projected flights can then be flown through air transportation simulators to quantify the ability of the NAS to meet future demand. A major strength of the TSAM analysis is that scenario planning can be conducted to quantify capacity requirements at individual airports, based upon different future scenarios. Different demographic scenarios can be analyzed to model the demand sensitivity to them. Also, it is fairly well know, but not well modeled at the airport level, that the demand for travel is highly dependent on the cost of travel, or the fare yield of the airline industry. The FAA projects the fare yield (in constant year dollars) to keep decreasing into the future. The magnitude and/or direction of these projections can be suspect in light of the general lack of airline profits and the large rises in airline fuel cost. Also, changes in travel time and convenience have an influence on the demand for air travel, especially for business travel. Future planners cannot easily conduct sensitivity studies of future demand with the FAA TAF data, nor with the Boeing or Airbus projections. In TSAM many factors can be parameterized and various demand sensitivities can be predicted for future travel. These

  4. Comparative analysis for various redox flow batteries chemistries using a cost performance model

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Aladsair J.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Stephenson, David E.; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Reed, David M.; Li, Bin; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-10-20

    A robust performance-based cost model is developed for all-vanadium, iron-vanadium and iron chromium redox flow batteries. Systems aspects such as shunt current losses, pumping losses and thermal management are accounted for. The objective function, set to minimize system cost, allows determination of stack design and operating parameters such as current density, flow rate and depth of discharge (DOD). Component costs obtained from vendors are used to calculate system costs for various time frames. A 2 kW stack data was used to estimate unit energy costs and compared with model estimates for the same size electrodes. The tool has been shared with the redox flow battery community to both validate their stack data and guide future direction.

  5. Eliciting mixed emotions: a meta-analysis comparing models, types, and measures

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Raul; Totterdell, Peter; Kellett, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The idea that people can experience two oppositely valenced emotions has been controversial ever since early attempts to investigate the construct of mixed emotions. This meta-analysis examined the robustness with which mixed emotions have been elicited experimentally. A systematic literature search identified 63 experimental studies that instigated the experience of mixed emotions. Studies were distinguished according to the structure of the underlying affect model—dimensional or discrete—as well as according to the type of mixed emotions studied (e.g., happy-sad, fearful-happy, positive-negative). The meta-analysis using a random-effects model revealed a moderate to high effect size for the elicitation of mixed emotions (dIG+ = 0.77), which remained consistent regardless of the structure of the affect model, and across different types of mixed emotions. Several methodological and design moderators were tested. Studies using the minimum index (i.e., the minimum value between a pair of opposite valenced affects) resulted in smaller effect sizes, whereas subjective measures of mixed emotions increased the effect sizes. The presence of more women in the samples was also associated with larger effect sizes. The current study indicates that mixed emotions are a robust, measurable and non-artifactual experience. The results are discussed in terms of the implications for an affect system that has greater versatility and flexibility than previously thought. PMID:25926805

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Speed Profile Models for Wrist Pointing Movements

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Lev; Dipietro, Laura; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Following two decades of design and clinical research on robot-mediated therapy for the shoulder and elbow, therapeutic robotic devices for other joints are being proposed: several research groups including ours have designed robots for the wrist, either to be used as stand-alone devices or in conjunction with shoulder and elbow devices. However, in contrast with robots for the shoulder and elbow which were able to take advantage of descriptive kinematic models developed in neuroscience for the past 30 years, design of wrist robots controllers cannot rely on similar prior art: wrist movement kinematics has been largely unexplored. This study aimed at examining speed profiles of fast, visually evoked, visually guided, target-directed human wrist pointing movements. One thousand three-hundred ninety-eight (1398) trials were recorded from seven unimpaired subjects who performed center-out flexion/extension and abduction/adduction wrist movements and fitted with 19 models previously proposed for describing reaching speed profiles. A nonlinear, least squares optimization procedure extracted parameters’ sets that minimized error between experimental and reconstructed data. Models’ performances were compared based on their ability to reconstruct experimental data. Results suggest that the support-bounded log-normal is the best model for speed profiles of fast, wrist pointing movements. Applications include design of control algorithms for therapeutic wrist robots and quantitative metrics of motor recovery. PMID:23232435

  7. Molecular modeling and docking analysis of beta-lactamases with inhibitors: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Asad U

    Beta-lactamases are bacterial enzymes which impart resistance against β-lactam-antibiotics. CTX-Ms are the β-lactamases that target cephalosporin antibiotics (e.g. cefotaxime and ceftazidime) while SME-1, KPC-2, IMI-1 and SFC-1 target carbapenems. Clavulanic acid, sulbactam and tazobactam are traditional β-lactamase inhibitors while LN1-255 and NXL-104 whereas novel inhibitors, inhibiting the activity of these enzymes. Studying the binding pattern of these drugs is helpful in predicting the versatile inhibitors for betalactamases. The aims of the study were: describing the mode of interaction of CTX-M (modeled from the blaCTX-M gene of this study) and the said carbapenemases with their respective target drugs and inhibitors and to perform an in silico comparison of the efficacies of traditional and novel β-lactamase-inhibitors based on fitness score. The blaCTX-M marker was PCR-amplified from plasmid DNA of E. coli strain isolated from community-acquired urinary tract infection. E. coli C600 cells (harboring cloned blaCTX-M) were found positive for extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) production by the double-disk-synergy test. The three dimensional structures of CTX-M-15, SME-1 and IMI-1 were predicted by Swiss Model Server. The interaction between selected structures and inhibitors was performed by GOLD 5.0. On the basis of the docking score and binding pattern, we conclude that compound LN1-255 followed by tazobactam is best inhibitor against all the selected target enzymes as compared to clavulanate, sulbactam and NXL-104. Five conserved amino acids, Ser70, Ser130, Lys235, Thr236 and Gly237 were found crucial in stabilizing the complexes through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. PMID:23202428

  8. Local participation in biodiversity conservation initiatives: a comparative analysis of different models in South East Mexico.

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, María Elena; García-Frapolli, Eduardo; Pritchard, Diana J; Sánchez González, María Consuelo; Ruiz-Mallén, Isabel; Porter-Bolland, Luciana; Reyes-Garcia, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    In Mexico, biodiversity conservation is primarily implemented through three schemes: 1) protected areas, 2) payment-based schemes for environmental services, and 3) community-based conservation, officially recognized in some cases as Indigenous and Community Conserved Areas. In this paper we compare levels of local participation across conservation schemes. Through a survey applied to 670 households across six communities in Southeast Mexico, we document local participation during the creation, design, and implementation of the management plan of different conservation schemes. To analyze the data, we first calculated the frequency of participation at the three different stages mentioned, then created a participation index that characterizes the presence and relative intensity of local participation for each conservation scheme. Results showed that there is a low level of local participation across all the conservation schemes explored in this study. Nonetheless, the payment for environmental services had the highest local participation while the protected areas had the least. Our findings suggest that local participation in biodiversity conservation schemes is not a predictable outcome of a specific (community-based) model, thus implying that other factors might be important in determining local participation. This has implications on future strategies that seek to encourage local involvement in conservation. PMID:25105990

  9. A comparative hidden Markov model analysis pipeline identifies proteins characteristic of cereal-infecting fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungal pathogens cause devastating losses in economically important cereal crops by utilising pathogen proteins to infect host plants. Secreted pathogen proteins are referred to as effectors and have thus far been identified by selecting small, cysteine-rich peptides from the secretome despite increasing evidence that not all effectors share these attributes. Results We take advantage of the availability of sequenced fungal genomes and present an unbiased method for finding putative pathogen proteins and secreted effectors in a query genome via comparative hidden Markov model analyses followed by unsupervised protein clustering. Our method returns experimentally validated fungal effectors in Stagonospora nodorum and Fusarium oxysporum as well as the N-terminal Y/F/WxC-motif from the barley powdery mildew pathogen. Application to the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum reveals a secreted phosphorylcholine phosphatase that is characteristic of hemibiotrophic and necrotrophic cereal pathogens and shares an ancient selection process with bacterial plant pathogens. Three F. graminearum protein clusters are found with an enriched secretion signal. One of these putative effector clusters contains proteins that share a [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif in the N-terminal and show features not commonly associated with fungal effectors. This motif is conserved in secreted pathogenic Fusarium proteins and a prime candidate for functional testing. Conclusions Our pipeline has successfully uncovered conservation patterns, putative effectors and motifs of fungal pathogens that would have been overlooked by existing approaches that identify effectors as small, secreted, cysteine-rich peptides. It can be applied to any pathogenic proteome data, such as microbial pathogen data of plants and other organisms. PMID:24252298

  10. A Model for Carbohydrate Metabolism in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Deduced from Comparative Whole Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Aaron; Caron, Lise; Weber, Till; Maheswari, Uma; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Bowler, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Background Diatoms are unicellular algae responsible for approximately 20% of global carbon fixation. Their evolution by secondary endocytobiosis resulted in a complex cellular structure and metabolism compared to algae with primary plastids. Methodology/Principal Findings The whole genome sequence of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has recently been completed. We identified and annotated genes for enzymes involved in carbohydrate pathways based on extensive EST support and comparison to the whole genome sequence of a second diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana. Protein localization to mitochondria was predicted based on identified similarities to mitochondrial localization motifs in other eukaryotes, whereas protein localization to plastids was based on the presence of signal peptide motifs in combination with plastid localization motifs previously shown to be required in diatoms. We identified genes potentially involved in a C4-like photosynthesis in P. tricornutum and, on the basis of sequence-based putative localization of relevant proteins, discuss possible differences in carbon concentrating mechanisms and CO2 fixation between the two diatoms. We also identified genes encoding enzymes involved in photorespiration with one interesting exception: glycerate kinase was not found in either P. tricornutum or T. pseudonana. Various Calvin cycle enzymes were found in up to five different isoforms, distributed between plastids, mitochondria and the cytosol. Diatoms store energy either as lipids or as chrysolaminaran (a β-1,3-glucan) outside of the plastids. We identified various β-glucanases and large membrane-bound glucan synthases. Interestingly most of the glucanases appear to contain C-terminal anchor domains that may attach the enzymes to membranes. Conclusions/Significance Here we present a detailed synthesis of carbohydrate metabolism in diatoms based on the genome sequences of Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. This model provides novel

  11. Model dissection from earthquake time series: A comparative analysis using modern non-linear forecasting and artificial neural network approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sri Lakshmi, S.; Tiwari, R. K.

    2009-02-01

    This study utilizes two non-linear approaches to characterize model behavior of earthquake dynamics in the crucial tectonic regions of Northeast India (NEI). In particular, we have applied a (i) non-linear forecasting technique to assess the dimensionality of the earthquake-generating mechanism using the monthly frequency earthquake time series (magnitude ⩾4) obtained from NOAA and USGS catalogues for the period 1960-2003 and (ii) artificial neural network (ANN) methods—based on the back-propagation algorithm (BPA) to construct the neural network model of the same data set for comparing the two. We have constructed a multilayered feed forward ANN model with an optimum input set configuration specially designed to take advantage of more completely on the intrinsic relationships among the input and retrieved variables and arrive at the feasible model for earthquake prediction. The comparative analyses show that the results obtained by the two methods are stable and in good agreement and signify that the optimal embedding dimension obtained from the non-linear forecasting analysis compares well with the optimal number of inputs used for the neural networks. The constructed model suggests that the earthquake dynamics in the NEI region can be characterized by a high-dimensional chaotic plane. Evidence of high-dimensional chaos appears to be associated with "stochastic seasonal" bias in these regions and would provide some useful constraints for testing the model and criteria to assess earthquake hazards on a more rigorous and quantitative basis.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Leadership Development Models in Post-Baccalaureate Theological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiedis, Thomas Lee

    2009-01-01

    This research study was concerned with higher education, leadership development, and understanding and examining the training models that are employed to prepare men and women for Christian ministry. The study combines qualitative and quantitative research elements to examine the growing number of leadership development training models in…

  13. Computer simulation environment for comparative analysis of models for investment portfolio management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchev, Angel, Jr.; Marchev, Angel

    2013-12-01

    Building on the notion of systematically analyzing investment portfolio as a feedback system, there is a need of experimentation system. In this paper such system for experimenting with various traditional, classical, advanced, etc. models for portfolio management is described. The main objective is to have the ability to compete the models systematically on a unified data track.

  14. Bioinformatics investigation of therapeutic mechanisms of Xuesaitong capsule treating ischemic cerebrovascular rat model with comparative transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiangquan; Wei, Benjun; Chen, Hengwen; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Xuesaitong soft capsule (XST) which consists of panax notoginseng saponin (PNS) has been used to treat ischemic cerebrovascular diseases in China. The therapeutic mechanism of XST has not been elucidated yet from prospective of genomics and bioinformatics. Methods: A transcriptome analysis was performed to review series concerning middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model and XST intervention after MCAO from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were compared between blank group and model group, model group and XST group. Functional enrichment and pathway analysis were performed. Protein-Protein interaction network was constructed. The overlapping genes from two DEGs sets were screened out and profound analysis was performed. Results: Two series including 22 samples were obtained. 870 DEGs were identified between blank group and model group, and 1189 DEGs were identified between model group and XST group. GO terms and KEGG pathways of MCAO and XST intervention were significantly enriched. PPI networks were constructed to demonstrate the gene-gene interactions. The overlapping genes from two DEGs sets were highlighted. ANTXR2, FHL3, PRCP, TYROBP, TAF9B, FGFR2, BCL11B, RB1CC1 and MBNL2 were the pivotal genes and possible action sites of XST therapeutic mechanisms. Conclusion: MCAO is a pathological process with multiple. PMID:27347353

  15. A Technique Using Principal Component Analysis to Compare Seasonal Cycles of Earth Radiation from CERES and Model Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Mlynczak, Pamela E.; Potter, Gerald L.

    2012-01-01

    A method for quantitatively comparing the seasonal cycles of two global data sets is presented. The seasonal cycles of absorbed solar radiation (ASR) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) have been computed from an eight-year data set from the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometers and from a model data set produced by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Global Modeling and Assimilation Office. To compare the seasonal cycles from these two data sets, principal component (PC) analysis is used, where the PCs express the time variations and the corresponding empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) describe the geographic variations. Ocean has a long thermal response time compared to land, so land and ocean are separated for the analysis. The root-mean square values for the seasonal cycles of ASR and OLR are extremely close for the two data sets. The first three PCs are quite close, showing that the time responses and magnitudes over the globe are very similar. The agreement between the two sets of PCs is quantified by computing the matrix of inner products of the two sets. For ASR over land, the first PCs of CERES and the model agree to better than 99.9%. The EOF maps are similar for most of the globe, but differ in a few places, and the agreement of the EOF maps is likewise quantified. Maps of differences between the annual cycles show regions of agreement and disagreement.

  16. Comparative Analysis of the ESA and NASA Interplanetary Meteoroid Enviroment Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kruger, Harald; Soja, Rachel; Sterken, Veerle; Sternovsky, Zotan; Strub, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Meteoroid environment models are used to assess the hazard arising from meteoroid impacts onto space structures. We have analyzed the current meteoroid models of ESA (IMEM) and of NASA (MEM). These models are based on different sets of measurements. MEM is based on radar meteor observations, lunar impact cratering rate, and on zodiacal light observations while IMEM is based on orbital element distributions of comets and asteroids, the lunar impact cratering rate, thermal radiation observations, and on in situ dust measurements. Both models describe the cratering flux at 1AU quite well; however, the flux of mm-sized meteoroids differs by a factor two due to the different assumed relative speeds. At other heliocentric distances from Mercury to Mars the predicted fluxes differ by up to 2 orders of magnitude between the two models. The current knowledge of the interplanetary meteoroid environment as exemplified by these meteoroid models is insufficient to provide reliable assessment of the risk of meteoroid impacts for human travel in interplanetary space.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Point-of-View Modeling for Industrial and Technology Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.; Fantz, Todd D.; Jones, Millie

    2013-01-01

    Enrollment in technology education at the college level has been declining, so it is becoming essential for technology teacher educators to investigate ways to increase the enrollment in their programs. Technology teacher educators are exploring the extent to which distance-learning technologies such as video modeling can be used by industrial and…

  18. A Comparative Analysis of MMPI-2 Malingering Detection Models among Inmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffan, Jarrod S.; Morgan, Robert D.; Lee, Jeahoon; Sellbom, Martin

    2010-01-01

    There are several strategies, or models, for combining the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) validity indicators to detect malingered psychiatric symptoms. Some scholars have recommended that an elevated F (Infrequency) score should be followed by the inspection of Fp (Infrequency-Psychopathology), whereas a recent…

  19. Literacy Models and the Reconstruction of History Education: A Comparative Discourse Analysis of Two Lesson Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross; Reich, Gabriel A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents discourse analyses of two lesson plans designed for secondary school history classes. Although the plans focus on the same topic, they rely on different models of content area literacy: disciplinary literacy, or reading and writing like experts in a given domain, and critical literacy, or reading and writing to address…

  20. Large eddy simulation of fine water sprays: comparative analysis of two models and computer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoy, A. S.; Snegirev, A. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    The model and the computer code FDS, albeit widely used in engineering practice to predict fire development, is not sufficiently validated for fire suppression by fine water sprays. In this work, the effect of numerical resolution of the large scale turbulent pulsations on the accuracy of predicted time-averaged spray parameters is evaluated. Comparison of the simulation results obtained with the two versions of the model and code, as well as that of the predicted and measured radial distributions of the liquid flow rate revealed the need to apply monotonic and yet sufficiently accurate discrete approximations of the convective terms. Failure to do so delays jet break-up, otherwise induced by large turbulent eddies, thereby excessively focuses the predicted flow around its axis. The effect of the pressure drop in the spray nozzle is also examined, and its increase has shown to cause only weak increase of the evaporated fraction and vapor concentration despite the significant increase of flow velocity.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Methods to Induce Myocardial Infarction in a Closed-Chest Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Isorni, Marc-Antoine; Casanova, Amaury; Piquet, Julie; Bellamy, Valérie; Pignon, Charly; Puymirat, Etienne; Menasche, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop a rabbit model of closed-chest catheter-induced myocardial infarction. Background. Limitations of rodent and large animal models justify the search for clinically relevant alternatives. Methods. Microcatheterization of the heart was performed in 47 anesthetized 3-4 kg New Zealand rabbits to test five techniques of myocardial ischemia: free coils (n = 4), interlocking coils (n = 4), thrombogenic gelatin sponge (n = 4), balloon occlusion (n = 4), and alcohol injection (n = 8). In order to limit ventricular fibrillation, an antiarrhythmic protocol was implemented, with beta-blockers/amiodarone before and xylocaine infusion during the procedure. Clinical, angiographic, and echographic data were gathered. End points included demonstration of vessel occlusion (TIMI flow grades 0 and 1 on the angiogram), impairment of left ventricular function at 2 weeks after procedure (by echocardiography), and pathologically confirmed myocardial infarction. Results. The best arterial access was determined to be through the right carotid artery. The internal mammary guiding catheter 4-Fr was selected as the optimal device for selective intracoronary injection. Free coils deployed prematurely and tended to prolapse into the aorta. Interlocking coils did not deploy completely and failed to provide reliable results. Gelatin sponge was difficult to handle, adhered to the catheter, and could not be clearly visualized by fluoroscopy. Balloon occlusion yielded inconsistent results. Alcohol injection was the most efficient and reproducible method for inducing myocardial infarction (4 out of 6 animals), the extent of which could be fine-tuned by using a coaxial balloon catheter as a microcatheter (0.52 mm) to achieve a superselective injection of 0.2 mL of alcohol. This approach resulted in a 20% decrease in LVEF and infarcted myocardium was confirmed histologically. Conclusions. By following a stepwise approach, a minimally invasive, effective, and reproducible

  2. Comparative analysis of methods for modeling the penetration and plane-parallel motion of conical projectiles in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, V. G.; Bragov, A. M.; Konstantinov, A. Yu.; Kotov, V. L.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the accuracy of known and new modeling methods using the hypothesis of local and plane sections for solution of problems of the impact and plane-parallel motion of conical bodies at an angle to the free surface of the half-space occupied by elastoplastic soil. The parameters of the local interaction model that is quadratic in velocity are determined by solving the one-dimensional problem of the expansion of a spherical cavity. Axisymmetric problems for each of the meridional section are solved simultaneously neglecting mass and momentum transfer in the circumferential direction and using an approach based on the hypothesis of plane sections. The dynamic and kinematic parameters of oblique penetration obtained using modified models are compared with the results of computer simulation in a three-dimensional formulation. The results obtained with regard to the contact stress distribution along the generator of the pointed cone are in satisfactory agreement.

  3. Can cyanobacteria serve as a model of plant photorespiration? - a comparative meta-analysis of metabolite profiles.

    PubMed

    Orf, Isabel; Timm, Stefan; Bauwe, Hermann; Fernie, Alisdair R; Hagemann, Martin; Kopka, Joachim; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration is a process that is crucial for the survival of oxygenic phototrophs in environments that favour the oxygenation reaction of Rubisco. While photorespiration is conserved among cyanobacteria, algae, and embryophytes, it evolved to different levels of complexity in these phyla. The highest complexity is found in embryophytes, where the pathway involves four cellular compartments and respective transport processes. The complexity of photorespiration in embryophytes raises the question whether a simpler system, such as cyanobacteria, may serve as a model to facilitate our understanding of the common key aspects of photorespiration. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of publicly available metabolite profiles from the embryophyte Arabidopsis thaliana and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 grown under conditions that either activate or suppress photorespiration. The comparative meta-analysis evaluated the similarity of metabolite profiles, the variability of metabolite pools, and the patterns of metabolite ratios. Our results show that the metabolic signature of photorespiration is in part conserved between the compared model organisms under conditions that favour the oxygenation reaction. Therefore, our findings support the claim that cyanobacteria can serve as prokaryotic models of photorespiration in embryophytes. PMID:26969741

  4. Comparing Categorization Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Ratcliff, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments are presented that competitively test rule- and exemplar-based models of human categorization behavior. Participants classified stimuli that varied on a unidimensional axis into 2 categories. The stimuli did not consistently belong to a category; instead, they were probabilistically assigned. By manipulating these assignment…

  5. Comparative analysis for various redox flow batteries chemistries using a cost performance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Alasdair; Viswanathan, Vilayanur; Stephenson, David; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin; Reed, David; Li, Bin; Balducci, Patrick; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Sprenkle, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The total energy storage system cost is determined by means of a robust performance-based cost model for multiple flow battery chemistries. Systems aspects such as shunt current losses, pumping losses and various flow patterns through electrodes are accounted for. The system cost minimizing objective function determines stack design by optimizing the state of charge operating range, along with current density and current-normalized flow. The model cost estimates are validated using 2-kW stack performance data for the same size electrodes and operating conditions. Using our validated tool, it has been demonstrated that an optimized all-vanadium system has an estimated system cost of < 350 kWh-1 for 4-h application. With an anticipated decrease in component costs facilitated by economies of scale from larger production volumes, coupled with performance improvements enabled by technology development, the system cost is expected to decrease to 160 kWh-1 for a 4-h application, and to 100 kWh-1 for a 10-h application. This tool has been shared with the redox flow battery community to enable cost estimation using their stack data and guide future direction.

  6. The comparative analysis of model and prototype test results of Bulb turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benišek, M.; Božić, I.; Ignjatović, B.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents the problem of the hydropower plant oblique water inflow and its influence on the turbines operation. Oblique water inflow on the low head hydropower plant with bulb turbines influences turbine characteristics. The characteristics change occurs due to swirl incidence in the turbine inlet which spreads to the guide vanes inlet. Downstream, the flow conditions change is caused in the turbine runner in relation to the flow conditions without swirl inflow. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of swirl flow incidence in the turbine conduit. With the aim of presenting and analyzing the oblique water inflow consequences on the hydropower plant operation, the existing turbine model tests results, performed in the laboratories, and the in situ prototype testing results have been used.

  7. Heat flow and gravity responses over salt bodies: A comparative model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Corrigan, J.; Sweat, M.

    1995-07-01

    Two-dimensional numerical modeling of sea-floor heat flow and water-bottom gravity responses to systematic variations in simple subsurface salt body geometries provides insight on the relative usefulness of these two data types for extracting salt geometry information. For a given salt body geometry, diffusion of heat through overlying sediments results in a dramatic decrease in the amplitude of heat flow anomalies as the depth to the top of the salt body increases. For top-of-salt depths greater than about 1 km, the heat flow response is insensitive to the length of salt feeder stocks and to the thickness of salt tongues/sheets. This shallow depth-to-top-of-salt sensitivity range, in addition to a number of environmental factors that can adversely affect interpretation of heat flow anomalies in terms of heat refraction towards and through salt bodies, severely limits the usefulness of sea-floor heat flow data for constraining aspects of salt body geometry. For gravity data, the critical factor for addressing salt body geometry is the distribution of salt relative to the sediment-salt density crossover depth (above and below which salt is more and less dense, respectively, than the surrounding sediment). Except when ht relevant geometry information being sought (presence and/or length of feeder stock, thickness of salt tongue or sheet) is near the density crossover depth, the geometry-related information content of the gravity field is greater than that of the heat flow field. Based on these model results, measurement uncertainty considerations, and data limitations, the authors conclude that gravity data generally offer an order of magnitude greater resolution capability than sea-floor heat flow data for addressing salt body geometry issues of exploration interest.

  8. Accuracy of Bolton analysis measured in laser scanned digital models compared with plaster models (gold standard) and cone-beam computer tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jooseong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of Bolton analysis obtained from digital models scanned with the Ortho Insight three-dimensional (3D) laser scanner system to those obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and traditional plaster models. Methods CBCT scans and plaster models were obtained from 50 patients. Plaster models were scanned using the Ortho Insight 3D laser scanner; Bolton ratios were calculated with its software. CBCT scans were imported and analyzed using AVIZO software. Plaster models were measured with a digital caliper. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results Anterior and overall Bolton ratios obtained by the three different modalities exhibited excellent agreement (> 0.970). The mean differences between the scanned digital models and physical models and between the CBCT images and scanned digital models for overall Bolton ratios were 0.41 ± 0.305% and 0.45 ± 0.456%, respectively; for anterior Bolton ratios, 0.59 ± 0.520% and 1.01 ± 0.780%, respectively. ICC results showed that intraexaminer error reliability was generally excellent (> 0.858 for all three diagnostic modalities), with < 1.45% discrepancy in the Bolton analysis. Conclusions Laser scanned digital models are highly accurate compared to physical models and CBCT scans for assessing the spatial relationships of dental arches for orthodontic diagnosis. PMID:26877978

  9. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of a forest stand in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The approach tested for calculating the water consumption by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time-series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results show that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  10. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-09-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of forest stands in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The tested approach for calculating the water use by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results reveal that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  11. A comparative sensitivity analysis focused on wet deposition models for the Fukushima and Chernobyl atmospheric dispersion events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Roustan, Yelva; Quélo, Denis; Bocquet, Marc; Winiarek, Victor

    2014-05-01

    In order to model the transport of radionuclides bound to atmospheric particles and the ground contamination at the synoptic scale, the wet deposition is a crucial point. Usually, the wet deposition is divided in two different mechanisms, the below-cloud scavenging (washout) and the in-cloud scavenging (rainout). Since the micro-physics of both deposition processes is not well known yet, the modeling of the wet deposition of particles at the synoptic scale is uncertain and difficult to validate. This leads to an abundance of wet deposition models, none of them being fully adequate. The existing models of particle scavenging can be distinguished by the nature and the number of physical parameters they rely on. For instance the scavenging coefficient variability can be determined only by the rainfall intensity or take into account the rainfall intensity and the particle size distribution. Beyond their intrinsic formulations, the deposition models are sensitive to the input data necessary to use them, cloud height for instance. Finally, the simulated ground deposition is more or less sensitive to the choices of the overall-models involved in the atmospheric transport of particles and the meteorology in general. For accidental atmospheric releases, the uncertainties linked to the source-term are for instance crucial, what justifies the use of different ones in the study. The Polyphemus air quality system is used to perform the simulations of the radioactive dispersion, considering Caesium-137 as particulate matter for the accidental releases from the Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear power plants. In this study, two different approaches are used. In the first one, the influence of the different components taking part in the scavenging modeling are confronted separately (whether the scavenging models or the overall models). The second approach is a global sensitivity analysis computed both on the Chernobyl and Fukushima cases. It relies on simulations performed with

  12. A Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifying FGF23 Regulated Genes in the Kidney of a Mouse CKD Model

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aline; Huang, Jinsong; Li, Hua; Jiao, Yan; Gu, Weikuan; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Elevations of circulating Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and progression of renal failure in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Efforts to identify gene products whose transcription is directly regulated by FGF23 stimulation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR)/α-Klotho complexes in the kidney is confounded by both systemic alterations in calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D metabolism and intrinsic alterations caused by the underlying renal pathology in CKD. To identify FGF23 responsive genes in the kidney that might explain the association between FGF23 and adverse outcomes in CKD, we performed comparative genome wide analysis of gene expression profiles in the kidney of the Collagen 4 alpha 3 null mice (Col4a3−/−) model of progressive kidney disease with kidney expression profiles of Hypophosphatemic (Hyp) and FGF23 transgenic mouse models of elevated FGF23. The different complement of potentially confounding factors in these models allowed us to identify genes that are directly targeted by FGF23. This analysis found that α-Klotho, an anti-aging hormone and FGF23 co-receptor, was decreased by FGF23. We also identified additional FGF23-responsive transcripts and activation of networks associated with renal damage and chronic inflammation, including lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) signaling pathways. Finally, we found that FGF23 suppresses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression in the kidney, thereby providing a pathway for FGF23 regulation of the renin-angiotensin system. These gene products provide a possible mechanistic links between elevated FGF23 and pathways responsible for renal failure progression and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22970174

  13. Comparative analysis of autophagy and tauopathy related markers in cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer’s disease animal models

    PubMed Central

    Villamil-Ortiz, Javier G.; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria P.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebral ischemia (CI) are neuropathologies that are characterized by aggregates of tau protein, a hallmark of cognitive disorder and dementia. Protein accumulation can be induced by autophagic failure. Autophagy is a metabolic pathway involved in the homeostatic recycling of cellular components. However, the role of autophagy in those tauopathies remains unclear. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis to identify autophagy related markers in tauopathy generated by AD and CI during short-term, intermediate, and long-term progression using the 3xTg-AD mouse model (aged 6,12, and 18 months) and the global CI 2-VO (2-Vessel Occlusion) rat model (1,15, and 30 days post-ischemia). Our findings confirmed neuronal loss and hyperphosphorylated tau aggregation in the somatosensory cortex (SS-Cx) of the 3xTg-AD mice in the late stage (aged 18 months), which was supported by a failure in autophagy. These results were in contrast to those obtained in the SS-Cx of the CI rats, in which we detected neuronal loss and tauopathy at 1 and 15 days post-ischemia, and this phenomenon was reversed at 30 days. We proposed that this phenomenon was associated with autophagy induction in the late stage, since the data showed a decrease in p-mTOR activity, an association of Beclin-1 and Vps34, a progressive reduction in PHF-1, an increase in LC3B puncta and autophago-lysosomes formation were observed. Furthermore, the survival pathways remained unaffected. Together, our comparative study suggest that autophagy could ameliorates tauopathy in CI but not in AD, suggesting a differential temporal approach to the induction of neuroprotection and the prevention of neurodegeneration. PMID:26042033

  14. Comparative Protein Structure Modeling Using Modeller

    PubMed Central

    Eswar, Narayanan; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Madhusudhan, M.S.; Eramian, David; Shen, Min-yi; Pieper, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Functional characterization of a protein sequence is one of the most frequent problems in biology. This task is usually facilitated by accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structure of the studied protein. In the absence of an experimentally determined structure, comparative or homology modeling can sometimes provide a useful 3-D model for a protein that is related to at least one known protein structure. Comparative modeling predicts the 3-D structure of a given protein sequence (target) based primarily on its alignment to one or more proteins of known structure (templates). The prediction process consists of fold assignment, target-template alignment, model building, and model evaluation. This unit describes how to calculate comparative models using the program MODELLER and discusses all four steps of comparative modeling, frequently observed errors, and some applications. Modeling lactate dehydrogenase from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvLDH) is described as an example. The download and installation of the MODELLER software is also described. PMID:18428767

  15. Comparative Analysis of Four Manpower Nursing Requirements Models. Health Manpower References. [Nurse Planning Information Series, No. 6].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Robert T.; Ro, Kong-Kyun

    The analysis and description of four manpower nursing requirements models-- the Pugh-Roberts, the Vector, the Community Systems Foundation (CSF), and the Western Interstate Commission of Higher Education (WICHE)--are presented in this report. The introduction provides an overview of the project which was designed to analyze these different models.…

  16. Comparative analysis of meteorological performance of coupled chemistry-meteorology models in the context of AQMEII phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Dominik; Savage, Nicholas; Jorba, Oriol; Eder, Brian; Giordano, Lea; Badia, Alba; Balzarini, Alessandra; Baró, Rocío; Bianconi, Roberto; Chemel, Charles; Curci, Gabriele; Forkel, Renate; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Hirtl, Marcus; Hodzic, Alma; Honzak, Luka; Im, Ulas; Knote, Christoph; Makar, Paul; Manders-Groot, Astrid; van Meijgaard, Erik; Neal, Lucy; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San Jose, Roberto; Schröder, Wolfram; Sokhi, Ranjeet S.; Syrakov, Dimiter; Torian, Alfreida; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Yahya, Khairunnisa; Zabkar, Rahela; Zhang, Yang; Hogrefe, Christian; Galmarini, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Air pollution simulations critically depend on the quality of the underlying meteorology. In phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII-2), thirteen modeling groups from Europe and four groups from North America operating eight different regional coupled chemistry and meteorology models participated in a coordinated model evaluation exercise. Each group simulated the year 2010 for a domain covering either Europe or North America or both. Here were present an operational analysis of model performance with respect to key meteorological variables relevant for atmospheric chemistry processes and air quality. These parameters include temperature and wind speed at the surface and in the vertical profile, incoming solar radiation at the ground, precipitation, and planetary boundary layer heights. A similar analysis was performed during AQMEII phase 1 (Vautard et al., 2012) for offline air quality models not directly coupled to the meteorological model core as the model systems investigated here. Similar to phase 1, we found significant overpredictions of 10-m wind speeds by most models, more pronounced during night than during daytime. The seasonal evolution of temperature was well captured with monthly mean biases below 2 K over all domains. Solar incoming radiation, precipitation and PBL heights, on the other hand, showed significant spread between models and observations suggesting that major challenges still remain in the simulation of meteorological parameters relevant for air quality and for chemistry-climate interactions at the regional scale.

  17. A Comparative of business process modelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangkawarow, I. R. H. T.; Waworuntu, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this era, there is a lot of business process modeling techniques. This article is the research about differences of business process modeling techniques. For each technique will explain about the definition and the structure. This paper presents a comparative analysis of some popular business process modelling techniques. The comparative framework is based on 2 criteria: notation and how it works when implemented in Somerleyton Animal Park. Each technique will end with the advantages and disadvantages. The final conclusion will give recommend of business process modeling techniques that easy to use and serve the basis for evaluating further modelling techniques.

  18. Comparative metabolomic analysis reveals a reactive oxygen species-dominated dynamic model underlying chilling environment adaptation and tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Luo, Wei; Zhao, Yuan; Xu, Yunyuan; Song, Shuhui; Chong, Kang

    2016-09-01

    Cold, a major environmental stress for plants, has been studied intensively for decades. Its response system has been revealed, especially at the transcriptional level. The mechanisms underlying recovery growth and environmental adaptation, however, remain unknown. Taking advantage of a naturally existing system, two subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) with significant divergence in chilling tolerance, we analyzed representative japonica and indica varieties, Nipponbare and 93-11, using comparative metabolomic analysis at six time points covering chilling treatment and recovery. In total, 223 known metabolites were detected. During chilling treatment, significant biochemical changes were centered on antioxidation. During recovery, a wide-ranging chilling response was observed. Large-scale amino acid accumulation occurred, consistent with the appearance of chilling injury. At the mid-treatment stage, the accumulation of antioxidation-related compounds appeared earlier in Nipponbare than in 93-11, consistent with the higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in japonica vs indica varieties. A significant contribution of ROS-mediated gene regulation, rather than the C-repeat binding factor/dehydration-responsive-element binding factor (CBF/DREB) regulon, to the more vigorous transcriptional stress response in Nipponbare was revealed by RNA-seq. Accordingly, during recovery, the induction of stress-tolerant-related metabolites was more active in the chilling-tolerant variety Nipponbare. Senescence-related compounds accumulated only in the chilling-sensitive variety 93-11. Our study uncovers the dynamic metabolic models underlying chilling response and recovery, and reveals a ROS-dominated rice adaptation mechanism to low-temperature environments. PMID:27198693

  19. Comparing hemodynamic models with DCM

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Klaas Enno; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Drysdale, Peter M.; Robinson, Peter A.; Friston, Karl J.

    2007-01-01

    The classical model of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses by Buxton et al. [Buxton, R.B., Wong, E.C., Frank, L.R., 1998. Dynamics of blood flow and oxygenation changes during brain activation: the Balloon model. Magn. Reson. Med. 39, 855–864] has been very important in providing a biophysically plausible framework for explaining different aspects of hemodynamic responses. It also plays an important role in the hemodynamic forward model for dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of fMRI data. A recent study by Obata et al. [Obata, T., Liu, T.T., Miller, K.L., Luh, W.M., Wong, E.C., Frank, L.R., Buxton, R.B., 2004. Discrepancies between BOLD and flow dynamics in primary and supplementary motor areas: application of the Balloon model to the interpretation of BOLD transients. NeuroImage 21, 144–153] linearized the BOLD signal equation and suggested a revised form for the model coefficients. In this paper, we show that the classical and revised models are special cases of a generalized model. The BOLD signal equation of this generalized model can be reduced to that of the classical Buxton model by simplifying the coefficients or can be linearized to give the Obata model. Given the importance of hemodynamic models for investigating BOLD responses and analyses of effective connectivity with DCM, the question arises which formulation is the best model for empirically measured BOLD responses. In this article, we address this question by embedding different variants of the BOLD signal equation in a well-established DCM of functional interactions among visual areas. This allows us to compare the ensuing models using Bayesian model selection. Our model comparison approach had a factorial structure, comparing eight different hemodynamic models based on (i) classical vs. revised forms for the coefficients, (ii) linear vs. non-linear output equations, and (iii) fixed vs. free parameters, ε, for region-specific ratios of intra- and extravascular signals. Using fMRI data

  20. A new method for comparing rankings through complex networks: model and analysis of competitiveness of major European soccer leagues.

    PubMed

    Criado, Regino; García, Esther; Pedroche, Francisco; Romance, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we show a new technique to analyze families of rankings. In particular, we focus on sports rankings and, more precisely, on soccer leagues. We consider that two teams compete when they change their relative positions in consecutive rankings. This allows to define a graph by linking teams that compete. We show how to use some structural properties of this competitivity graph to measure to what extend the teams in a league compete. These structural properties are the mean degree, the mean strength, and the clustering coefficient. We give a generalization of the Kendall's correlation coefficient to more than two rankings. We also show how to make a dynamic analysis of a league and how to compare different leagues. We apply this technique to analyze the four major European soccer leagues: Bundesliga, Italian Lega, Spanish Liga, and Premier League. We compare our results with the classical analysis of sport ranking based on measures of competitive balance. PMID:24387553

  1. A new method for comparing rankings through complex networks: Model and analysis of competitiveness of major European soccer leagues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado, Regino; García, Esther; Pedroche, Francisco; Romance, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we show a new technique to analyze families of rankings. In particular, we focus on sports rankings and, more precisely, on soccer leagues. We consider that two teams compete when they change their relative positions in consecutive rankings. This allows to define a graph by linking teams that compete. We show how to use some structural properties of this competitivity graph to measure to what extend the teams in a league compete. These structural properties are the mean degree, the mean strength, and the clustering coefficient. We give a generalization of the Kendall's correlation coefficient to more than two rankings. We also show how to make a dynamic analysis of a league and how to compare different leagues. We apply this technique to analyze the four major European soccer leagues: Bundesliga, Italian Lega, Spanish Liga, and Premier League. We compare our results with the classical analysis of sport ranking based on measures of competitive balance.

  2. Comparative stress analysis of delayed and immediate loading of a single implant in an edentulous maxilla model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Esaki, Daisuke; Matsuzaki, Tatsuya; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Stress distribution in peri-implant bone in an edentulous maxilla following delayed and immediate loading implant and the effect of implant length on the maximum stress were evaluated by using two kinds of finite element analyses. A threaded implant was loaded with a 100 N vertical force, either immediately or delayed, and examined by finite element analysis with a simple contact relation or a bonding interaction between the implant and the bone, respectively. Higher stresses were observed in cortical bone around the implant neck following delayed loading and in the trabecular bone around the implant threading in the immediate loading model. The maximum stress in the immediate loading model was dramatically higher than in delayed loading. Increased implant length caused decrease in bone stresses in both loading models. Though the stress level was higher, the decrease in the maximum trabecular bone stress in immediate loading was profound. PMID:25342982

  3. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models. PMID:27364600

  4. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F.; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E.; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C.; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models. PMID:27364600

  5. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistrymore » of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.« less

  6. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistry of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.

  7. Analysis of academic programs: comparing nursing and other university majors in the application of a quality, potential and cost model.

    PubMed

    Booker, Kathy; Hilgenberg, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Nursing is often considered expensive in the cost analysis of academic programs. Yet nursing programs have the power to attract many students, and the national nursing shortage has resulted in a high demand for nurses. Methods to systematically assess programs across an entire university academic division are often dissimilar in technique and outcome. At a small, private, Midwestern university, a model for comprehensive program assessment, titled the Quality, Potential and Cost (QPC) model, was developed and applied to each major offered at the university through the collaborative effort of directors, chairs, deans, and the vice president for academic affairs. The QPC model provides a means of equalizing data so that single measures (such as cost) are not viewed in isolation. It also provides a common language to ensure that all academic leaders at an institution apply consistent methods for assessment of individual programs. The application of the QPC model allowed for consistent, fair assessments and the ability to allocate resources to programs according to strategic direction. In this article, the application of the QPC model to School of Nursing majors and other selected university majors will be illustrated. PMID:20637441

  8. Quantum analytical modeling and simulation of CNT on insulator (COI) and CNT on nothing (CON) FET: a comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sudipta; Bandyopadhyay, Dipan; Dutta, Pranab Kishore; Sarkar, Subir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive performance analysis by quantum analytical modeling of CNT on insulator (COI) and CNT on nothing (CON) FET having channel length 20 nm has been proposed and investigated on the basis of 2D Poisson's Equation and solution of 1-D Schrodinger's Equation and validated using ATLAS 2D simulator. As classical approximations fail to describe carrier quantization, charge inversion and potential profile of a device at sub-100 nm regime, here for the first time an analytical model in quantum mechanical aspect for COI/CON devices has been derived. Effects of high-k dielectrics in place of conventional SiO2 over the device characteristics have been thoroughly discussed. Moreover, all noticeable benefits of our device to the so called SOI/SON architecture have also been vividly justified.

  9. Implementation and comparative analysis of the optimisations produced by evolutionary algorithms for the parameter extraction of PSP MOSFET model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadia, Sarman K.; Thakker, R. A.; Bhatt, Kirit R.

    2016-05-01

    The study proposes an application of evolutionary algorithms, specifically an artificial bee colony (ABC), variant ABC and particle swarm optimisation (PSO), to extract the parameters of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) model. These algorithms are applied for the MOSFET parameter extraction problem using a Pennsylvania surface potential model. MOSFET parameter extraction procedures involve reducing the error between measured and modelled data. This study shows that ABC algorithm optimises the parameter values based on intelligent activities of honey bee swarms. Some modifications have also been applied to the basic ABC algorithm. Particle swarm optimisation is a population-based stochastic optimisation method that is based on bird flocking activities. The performances of these algorithms are compared with respect to the quality of the solutions. The simulation results of this study show that the PSO algorithm performs better than the variant ABC and basic ABC algorithm for the parameter extraction of the MOSFET model; also the implementation of the ABC algorithm is shown to be simpler than that of the PSO algorithm.

  10. Comparative analysis of various real-time data assimilation approaches for assimilating streamflow into a hydrologic routing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Seong Jin; Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Lee, Haksu; Liu, Yuqiong; Seo, Dong Jun; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    Reliable water depth estimation is an extremely important issue in operational early flood warning systems. Different water system models have been implemented in the last decades, and, in parallel, data assimilation approaches have been introduced in order to reduce the uncertainty of such models. The goal of this study is to compare the performances of a distributed hydrologic routing model with streamflow assimilation using six different data assimilation methods, including direct insertion, nudging, Kalman filter, Ensemble Kalman filter, Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman filter and variational method. The model used in this study is a 3-parameter Muskingum (O'Donnell 1985) which was implemented in the Trinity River, within the Dallas-Fort-Worth Metroplex area in Texas, USA. The first methodological step is to discretize the river reach into multiple 1-km sub-reaches in order to estimate water depth in a distributed fashion. Then, different data assimilation approaches were implemented using the state-space approach formulation of the Muskingum model proposed by Georgakakos (1990). Finally, streamflow observations were assimilated at two points where flow sensors are located. The results of this work pointed out that assimilation of streamflow observations can noticeably improve the hydrologic routing model prediction and that ensemble definition is particularly important for both Ensemble Kalman filter and Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman filter. This study is part of the FP7 European Project WeSenseIt Citizen Water Observatory (www.http://wesenseit.eu/) and NSF Project Integrated Sensing and Prediction of urban Water for Sustainable Cities (http://ispuw.uta.edu/nsf)

  11. Two-Year versus One-Year Head Start Program Impact: Addressing Selection Bias by Comparing Regression Modeling with Propensity Score Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leow, Christine; Wen, Xiaoli; Korfmacher, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This article compares regression modeling and propensity score analysis as different types of statistical techniques used in addressing selection bias when estimating the impact of two-year versus one-year Head Start on children's school readiness. The analyses were based on the national Head Start secondary dataset. After controlling for…

  12. Observed & Modeled Changes in the Onset of Spring: A Preliminary Comparative Analysis by Geographic Regions of the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enquist, C.

    2012-12-01

    Phenology, the study of seasonal life cycle events in plants and animals, is a well-recognized indicator of climate change impacts on people and nature. Models, experiments, and observational studies show changes in plant and animal phenology as a function of environmental change. Current research aims to improve our understanding of changes by enhancing existing models, analyzing observations, synthesizing previous research, and comparing outputs. Local to regional climatology is a critical driver of phenological variation of organisms across scales. Because plants respond to the cumulative effects of daily weather over an extended period, timing of life cycle events are effective integrators of climate data. One specific measure, leaf emergence, is particularly important because it often shows a strong response to temperature change, and is crucial for assessment of processes related to start and duration of the growing season. Schwartz et al. (2006) developed a suite of models (the "Spring Indices") linking plant development from historical data from leafing and flowering of cloned lilac and honeysuckle with basic climatic drivers to monitor changes related to the start of the spring growing season. These models can be generated at any location that has daily max-min temperature time series. The new version of these models is called the "Extended Spring Indices," or SI-x (Schwartz et al. in press). The SI-x model output (first leaf date and first bloom date) are produced similarly to the original models (SI-o), but do not incorporate accumulated chilling hours; rather energy accumulation starts for all stations on January 1. This change extends the locations SI model output can be generated into the sub-tropics, allowing full coverage of the conterminous USA. Both SI model versions are highly correlated, with mean bias and mean absolute differences around two days or less, and a similar bias and absolute errors when compared to cloned lilac data. To

  13. Comparative analysis of collaboration networks

    SciTech Connect

    Progulova, Tatiana; Gadjiev, Bahruz

    2011-03-14

    In this paper we carry out a comparative analysis of the word network as the collaboration network based on the novel by M. Bulgakov 'Master and Margarita', the synonym network of the Russian language as well as the Russian movie actor network. We have constructed one-mode projections of these networks, defined degree distributions for them and have calculated main characteristics. In the paper a generation algorithm of collaboration networks has been offered which allows one to generate networks statistically equivalent to the studied ones. It lets us reveal a structural correlation between word network, synonym network and movie actor network. We show that the degree distributions of all analyzable networks are described by the distribution of q-type.

  14. Comparative analysis of H&E and Prussian blue staining in a mouse model of cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Grigoryan, Mher Mahoney; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Sumbria, Rachita K; Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Cribbs, David H; Fisher, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are microscopic hemorrhages with deposits of blood products in the brain, which can be visualized with MRI and are implicated in cerebrovascular diseases. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Perl's Prussian blue are popular staining methods used to localize cerebral microbleeds in pathology. This paper compared these two staining techniques in a mouse model of cerebral microbleeds. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cerebral microhemorrhages. C57B6 mice were treated with LPS (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at baseline and at 24 hr. The brains were extracted 48 hr after the first injection and adjacent coronal sections were stained with H&E and Prussian blue to compare the effectiveness of the two staining techniques. H&E-positive stains were increased with LPS treatment and were correlated with grossly visible microhemorrhages on the brain surface; Prussian blue-positive stains, by comparison, showed no significant increase with LPS treatment and did not correlate with either H&E-positive stains or surface microhemorrhages. H&E staining is thus a more reliable indicator of acute bleeding events induced by LPS in this model within a short time span. PMID:25063000

  15. Comparative analysis of sensitivity of different light-scattering techniques to blood oxygenation on the basis of multilayer tissue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Mikhail Yu.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-08-01

    This paper compares sensitivity to blood oxygenation of different schemes of detecting light scattered from or transmitted through a slab of tissue considered in the frames of a multilayer model. Comparison is made from the viewpoint of the sensitivity to oxygen saturation of certain blood volume confined within lower layers of different average thicknesses mimicking the upper and lower plexuses of skin, dermis and hypodermis. The model also includes upper layers, mimicking stratum corneum and epidermis, consisting of prickle and basal cell layers. The following signals were simulated with Monte Carlo technique and compared: diffuse scattering indicatrice, OCT signal, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance, time-of-flight and spectrophotometry signals. The optical parameters of the layers were chosen within the ranges corresponding to experimental data published in literature and our own OCT measurements. Heyney-Greenstein function was used as a phase function for all considered layers with anisotropy factor value varying for various layers. Blood fractions of different layers were chosen according to available data for diastolic state. We considered two wavelengths of 660 and 890 nm, located at different sides of the isobestic point of 805 nm, where the absorption coefficients of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin are equal. These wavelengths are used in pulse oximetry. Our simulation results show, that the highest sensitivity to changes in oxygen content in blood is at the wavelength of 660 nm, where the difference between absorption coefficient values is significant. For this wavelength all the techniques except OCT show good sensitivity to blood oxygenation in the model tissue. For the second wavelength goniophotometry, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance, and spectorphotometry exhibit sensitivity to oxygenation, but it is lower than for 660 nm due to a smaller absorption coefficient mismatch.

  16. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Two Mouse Models of Autism: Transcriptome Profiling of the BTBR and En2 (-/-) Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Corradi, Zelia; Monsorno, Katia; Fedrizzi, Tarcisio; Ricceri, Laura; Scattoni, Maria L; Bozzi, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    (-/-) DEGs. Weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA) performed on BTBR and En2 (-/-) hippocampal transcriptomes together identified six modules significantly enriched in ASD-related genes. Each of these modules showed a specific enrichment profile in neuronal and glial genes, as well as in genes associated to ASD comorbidities such as epilepsy and SCZ. Our data reveal significant transcriptional similarities and differences between the BTBR and En2 (-/-) hippocampus, indicating that transcriptome analysis of ASD mouse models may contribute to identify novel molecular targets for pharmacological studies. PMID:27610074

  17. Comparative Analysis of Single-Species and Polybacterial Wound Biofilms Using a Quantitative, In Vivo, Rabbit Ear Model

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Akhil K.; Geringer, Matthew R.; Hong, Seok J.; Leung, Kai P.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The recent literature suggests that chronic wound biofilms often consist of multiple bacterial species. However, without appropriate in vivo, polybacterial biofilm models, our understanding of these complex infections remains limited. We evaluate and compare the effect of single- and mixed-species biofilm infections on host wound healing dynamics using a quantitative, in vivo, rabbit ear model. Methods Six-mm dermal punch wounds in New Zealand rabbit ears were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus strain UAMS-1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, or both, totaling 10∧6 colony-forming units/wound. Bacterial proliferation and maintenance in vivo were done using procedures from our previously published model. Wounds were harvested for histological measurement of wound healing, viable bacterial counts using selective media, or inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α) expression via quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Biofilm structure was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For comparison, biofilm deficient mutant UAMS-929 replaced strain UAMS-1 in some mixed-species infections. Results Bacterial counts verified the presence of both strains UAMS-1 and PAO1 in polybacterial wounds. Over time, strain PAO1 became predominant (p<0.001). SEM showed colocalization of both species within an extracellular matrix at multiple time-points. Compared to each monospecies infection, polybacterial biofilms impaired all wound healing parameters (p<0.01), and increased expression of IL-1β and TNF-α (p<0.05). In contrast, mixed-species infections using biofilm-deficient mutant UAMS-929 instead of wild-type strain UAMS-1 showed less wound impairment (p<0.01) with decreased host cytokine expression (p<0.01), despite a bacterial burden and distribution comparable to that of mixed-wild-type wounds. Conclusions This study reveals that mixed-species biofilms have a greater impact on wound healing dynamics than their monospecies counterparts. The increased

  18. Comparative analysis of protein expression of three stem cell populations: models of cytokine delivery system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Roche, Stephane; D'Ippolito, Gianluca; Gomez, L Adriana; Bouckenooghe, Thomas; Lehmann, Sylvain; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Schiller, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Several mechanisms mediate the regenerative and reparative capacity of stem cells, including cytokine secretion; therefore these cells can act as delivery systems of therapeutic molecules. Here we begin to address the molecular and cellular basis of their regenerative potential by characterizing the proteomic profile of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and marrow isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells, followed by analysis of the secretory profile of the latter stem cell population. Proteomic analysis establishes the closer relationship between hMSCs and MIAMI cells, while hESCs are more divergent. However, MIAMI cells appear to have more proteins in common with hESCs than hMSCs. Proteins characteristic of hMSCs include transgelin-2, phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 (PEBP1), Heat-Shock 20 kDa protein (HSP20/HSPβ6), and programmed cell death 6-interacting protein (PDC6I) among others. MIAMI cells are characterized by the high level expression of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isoenzyme L1 (UCHL1), 14-3-3 zeta, HSP27 (HSPβ1), and tropomyosin 4 and 3. For hESC, elongation factor Tu (EFTu), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) and the peroxiredoxins 1, 2, and 6 (PRDX1, PRDX2, and PRDX6) were the most characteristic. Secretome analysis indicates that MIAMI cells secrete higher levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Fractalkine, Interleukin-6, interlukin-8, and growth related oncogene (GRO), compared to hMSCs. These soluble mediators are known to play key roles in angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, atheroprotection, immunomodulation, neuroprotection, axonal growth, progenitor cell migration, and prevention of apoptosis. All these roles are consistent with a reparative pro-survival secretory phenotype. We further discuss the potential of these cells as therapeutic vehicles. PMID:22285475

  19. Comparative analysis of some representative models of viscosity versus pressure in the case of various hydrocarbons and their mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boned, C.; Et-Tahir, A.; Lagourette, B.; Xans, P.; Gao, Guanghua

    1996-01-01

    A critical study of some representative models has been conducted with the experimental determinations of the viscosity of ten pure substances and three binary systems measured as a function of temperature T (25°C, 40°C, 60°C, 80°C, 90°C) and pressure P(≤ 100 MPa). The pure substances were: toluene, p-xylene, m-xylene, o-xylene, methylcyclohexane, methylnaphtalene, decahydronaphtalene, phenyldodecane, heptamethylnonane and tetramethylpentadecane (pristane). The three binaries were: toluene + tetramethylpentadecane, toluene + methylnaphtalene and toluene + heptamethylnonane, for molar fractions x of toluene ranging between 0 and 1. The three binaries are highly “contrasted” systems, i.e. systems in which the viscosities of the pure components are very different for each P, T pair. In all, 547 experimental determinations were carried out, the 279 experimental data for viscosity of the pure substances and 268 data concerning the mixtures ( x ≠ 0 and 1) were used to make a critical analysis of the various representative models, These included an empirical representation of variations of versus T on each isobar, a self-referencing model developed in our laboratory, a corresponding states model with one reference, various mixing rules with or without adjustable parameters, a combination of the self-referencing model and mixing rules, a method based on the Bloomfield and Dewan excess viscosity, and a group contribution method, comparison of the results showed the self-referencing method to be of particular interest, Moreover when coupled with mixing rules without adjustable parameters it was able to account satisfactorily for the variations η( P, T, x) of the mixtures, on the simple basis of knowledge if the viscosity of the components of the system, at 25°C and at atmospheric pressure, For all the binaries an average absolute deviation of 9.5% was observed. Finally it appears that the introduction of the pressure parameter does not alter the usual

  20. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  1. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  2. Explaining differences in the lifespan and replicative capacity of cells: a general model and comparative analysis of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Hayward, April; Hou, Chen; Burleigh, J Gordon

    2012-10-01

    A better understanding of the factors that govern individual cell lifespan and the replicative capacity of cells (i.e. Hayflick's limit) is important for addressing disease progression and ageing. Estimates of cell lifespan in vivo and the replicative capacity of cell lines in culture vary substantially both within and across species, but the underlying reasons for this variability remain unclear. Here, we address this issue by presenting a quantitative model of cell lifespan and cell replicative capacity. The model is based on the relationship between cell mortality and metabolic rate, which is supported with data for different cell types from ectotherms and endotherms. These data indicate that much of the observed variation in cell lifespan and cell replicative capacity is explained by differences in cellular metabolic rate, and thus by the three primary factors that control metabolic rate: organism size, organism temperature and cell size. Individual cell lifespan increases as a power law with both body mass and cell mass, and decreases exponentially with increasing temperature. The replicative capacity of cells also increases with body mass, but is independent of temperature. These results provide a point of departure for future comparative studies of cell lifespan and replicative capacity in the laboratory and in the field. PMID:22810428

  3. Convergence analysis of a finite element skull model of Herpestes javanicus (Carnivora, Mammalia): implications for robust comparative inferences of biomechanical function.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Flynn, John J

    2015-01-21

    Predictions of skull biomechanical capability based on virtual models constitute a valuable data source for testing hypotheses about craniodental form and feeding behavior. Such comparative analyses also inform dietary reconstruction in extinct species. 3D modeling using Finite Element (FE) methods is a common technique applied to the comparative analysis of craniodental function in extinct and extant vertebrates. However, taxonomically diverse skull models in the literature often are not directly comparable to each other, in part because of distinctions in how boundary conditions are defined, but also because of substantial differences in the number of FEs composing the models. In this study, we test whether a conventional convergence test is adequate in identifying the minimum number of FEs needed to achieve internally stable results for a single species. We constructed a series of skull models of Herpestes javanicus, and simulated unilateral biting across the dentition; the models differed in the number of FEs, degrees of freedom at the joint and bite point constraints, and type of tetrahedral FEs used. We found that convergence patterns differed across constraint types, FE quantities, and bite position simulated. Four-noded tetrahedral (tet-4) FE models with relaxed constraints produced the most stable measurements compared to over-constrained tet-4 models and to relaxed tet-10 models. In absence of an optimal FE quantity from convergence testing, we propose a broadly applicable sub-sampling protocol, whereby average measurement values across multiple models per specimen are used for among-species comparisons. A regime of sampling three low FE quantity models produced the closest estimates of mean measurement values relative to larger model sets, being within the 95% bootstrap estimated confidence intervals. Future studies should focus on identifying sources of variation associated with other FE modeling protocols, so that they can be accounted for before

  4. Comparative artificial neural network and partial least squares models for analysis of Metronidazole, Diloxanide, Spiramycin and Cliquinol in pharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoudary, Mahmoud M.; Abdel Salam, Randa A.; Hadad, Ghada M.

    2014-09-01

    Metronidazole (MNZ) is a widely used antibacterial and amoebicide drug. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid and specific analytical method for the determination of MNZ in mixture with Spiramycin (SPY), Diloxanide (DIX) and Cliquinol (CLQ) in pharmaceutical preparations. This work describes simple, sensitive and reliable six multivariate calibration methods, namely linear and nonlinear artificial neural networks preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-ANN) and principle component analysis (PCA-ANN) as well as partial least squares (PLS) either alone or preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-PLS) for UV spectrophotometric determination of MNZ, SPY, DIX and CLQ in pharmaceutical preparations with no interference of pharmaceutical additives. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like ANN can handle it. Analytical performance of these methods was statistically validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity. The developed methods indicate the ability of the previously mentioned multivariate calibration models to handle and solve UV spectra of the four components’ mixtures using easy and widely used UV spectrophotometer.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Transpetrosal Approaches to the Internal Acoustic Meatus Using Three-Dimensional Radio-Anatomical Models

    PubMed Central

    Zador, Zsolt; de Carpentier, John

    2015-01-01

    Background The transcrusal approach that involves partial removal of the labyrinth was recently described to approach lesions of the cerebellopontine angle. It carries the benefit of hearing preservation and was suggested to have equivalent exposure of the petroclival surface compared with the transcochlear/transotic approaches. The current study was designed to assess if the transcrusal approach could achieve as good access to the internal auditory meatus (IAM) as the more destructive translabyrinthine exposure. Methods Fifty disease-free high-resolution computed tomography scans of the temporal bone were reviewed. Surgical freedom, angle of attack, and angle of trajectory to the internal acoustic canal were measured in three-dimensional models. Results Surgical freedom and angles of attack showed steady increments with the progression of petrous bone resection from the retrolabyrinthine-transcrusal-translabyrinthine approaches. The angle of access to the IAM axis was dramatically reduced in the translabyrinthine approach compared with the transcrusal and retrolabyrinthine approaches (37.51 ± 5.7, 24.56 ± 4.6, and 3.17 ± 2.85 degrees, respectively; n = 50; average plus or minus standard deviation, p < 0.001). Conclusion Using this novel radio-anatomical system, we demonstrate the advantage of the translabyrinthine approach to the axis of the internal auditory canal. The transcrusal approach lags behind the translabyrinthine corridor and should be considered alongside the subtemporal and retrosigmoid approaches designed to spare hearing. PMID:26225322

  6. Gradient Matching Methods for Computational Inference in Mechanistic Models for Systems Biology: A Review and Comparative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Benn; Husmeier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Parameter inference in mathematical models of biological pathways, expressed as coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs), is a challenging problem in contemporary systems biology. Conventional methods involve repeatedly solving the ODEs by numerical integration, which is computationally onerous and does not scale up to complex systems. Aimed at reducing the computational costs, new concepts based on gradient matching have recently been proposed in the computational statistics and machine learning literature. In a preliminary smoothing step, the time series data are interpolated; then, in a second step, the parameters of the ODEs are optimized, so as to minimize some metric measuring the difference between the slopes of the tangents to the interpolants, and the time derivatives from the ODEs. In this way, the ODEs never have to be solved explicitly. This review provides a concise methodological overview of the current state-of-the-art methods for gradient matching in ODEs, followed by an empirical comparative evaluation based on a set of widely used and representative benchmark data. PMID:26636071

  7. Gradient Matching Methods for Computational Inference in Mechanistic Models for Systems Biology: A Review and Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Benn; Husmeier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Parameter inference in mathematical models of biological pathways, expressed as coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs), is a challenging problem in contemporary systems biology. Conventional methods involve repeatedly solving the ODEs by numerical integration, which is computationally onerous and does not scale up to complex systems. Aimed at reducing the computational costs, new concepts based on gradient matching have recently been proposed in the computational statistics and machine learning literature. In a preliminary smoothing step, the time series data are interpolated; then, in a second step, the parameters of the ODEs are optimized, so as to minimize some metric measuring the difference between the slopes of the tangents to the interpolants, and the time derivatives from the ODEs. In this way, the ODEs never have to be solved explicitly. This review provides a concise methodological overview of the current state-of-the-art methods for gradient matching in ODEs, followed by an empirical comparative evaluation based on a set of widely used and representative benchmark data. PMID:26636071

  8. [Comparative assessment of the risk of handling of objects with an analysis protocol and the use of digital human models].

    PubMed

    Di Gironimo, G; Patalano, S; Liotti, F; Conserva, U; Paruccini, E

    2005-01-01

    In this work the Authors propose a methodology based on the use of an ergonomic software in alternative to the traditional methods to evaluate muscular-skeletal diseases caused by incongruous postures or conditions of mechanical overload. This methodology allows to simulate, in a virtual environment, both a workplace and a digital human model whose behaviours are similar, from a kinematical and a dynamical point of view, to that ones of a real person. Through the simulation in a virtual environment of an operation of Manual Material Handling (MMH) in a pharmaceutics industry, the Authors have evaluated, in real time, the strengths and the reaction-moments in the axial, sagittal and lateral plane on the L4 and L5 lumbar vertebras and on the shoulder of the workers. In the work the single movements carried out by the operator are analysed using manikins of different percentiles. The results are compared with the ones coming from the use of the traditional methods to evaluate muscular skeletal disease. PMID:15915686

  9. A Comparative Analysis on the Response of a Wind-Turbine Model to Atmospheric and Terrain Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, K. B.; Chamorro, L. P.; Guala, M.

    2016-02-01

    In a series of wind-tunnel experiments conducted at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, a wind-turbine model was exposed to three different thermal regimes (neutral, weakly stable and weakly convective flows) in three simple arrangements relevant to wind-farm applications: single turbine in the boundary-layer, aligned turbine-turbine, and an upwind three-dimensional sinusoidal hill aligned with the turbine. Results focus on the spatial evolution of large-scale motions developing over the different thermal and topographic boundary conditions, and on their influence on the mean and fluctuating angular velocity of the turbine rotor. As compared to the single turbine case, both the upwind hill and turbine caused a reduction in the mean angular velocity regardless of the thermal regime; the turbine angular velocity fluctuations always decreased with a turbine upwind, which depleted the energy of the large structures of the flow; however such fluctuations decreased (increased) under stably stratified (convective) conditions when the hill was present. Pre-multiplied spectra of the rotor angular velocity and two-point correlation contours of the streamwise velocity component confirmed a non-trivial link between thermal stratification and terrain complexity. It is inferred that the thermal effects occurring in the three different boundary-layer regimes modulate the spanwise motion of the hill wake and define whether the hill shelters or exposes the turbine to enhanced large-scale energetic motions.

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Neurotrophic Factors CDNF and GDNF in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Garea-Rodríguez, Enrique; Eesmaa, Ave; Lindholm, Päivi; Schlumbohm, Christina; König, Jessica; Meller, Birgit; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Helms, Gunther; Saarma, Mart; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) belongs to a newly discovered family of evolutionarily conserved neurotrophic factors. We demonstrate for the first time a therapeutic effect of CDNF in a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of Parkinson's disease in marmoset monkeys. Furthermore, we tested the impact of high chronic doses of human recombinant CDNF on unlesioned monkeys and analyzed the amino acid sequence of marmoset CDNF. The severity of 6-OHDA lesions and treatment effects were monitored in vivo using 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) SPECT. Quantitative analysis of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT showed a significant increase of dopamine transporter binding activity in lesioned animals treated with CDNF. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a well-characterized and potent neurotrophic factor for dopamine neurons, served as a control in a parallel comparison with CDNF. By contrast with CDNF, only single animals responded to the treatment with GDNF, but no statistical difference was observed in the GDNF group. However, increased numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons, observed within the lesioned caudate nucleus of GDNF-treated animals, indicate a strong bioactive potential of GDNF. PMID:26901822

  11. Developing discriminate model and comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes and pathways for bloodstream samples of diabetes mellitus type 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus of type 2 (T2D), also known as noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes, is a common disease. It is estimated that more than 300 million people worldwide suffer from T2D. In this study, we investigated the T2D, pre-diabetic and healthy human (no diabetes) bloodstream samples using genomic, genealogical, and phonemic information. We identified differentially expressed genes and pathways. The study has provided deeper insights into the development of T2D, and provided useful information for further effective prevention and treatment of the disease. Results A total of 142 bloodstream samples were collected, including 47 healthy humans, 22 pre-diabetic and 73 T2D patients. Whole genome scale gene expression profiles were obtained using the Agilent Oligo chips that contain over 20,000 human genes. We identified 79 significantly differentially expressed genes that have fold change ≥ 2. We mapped those genes and pinpointed locations of those genes on human chromosomes. Amongst them, 3 genes were not mapped well on the human genome, but the rest of 76 differentially expressed genes were well mapped on the human genome. We found that most abundant differentially expressed genes are on chromosome one, which contains 9 of those genes, followed by chromosome two that contains 7 of the 76 differentially expressed genes. We performed gene ontology (GO) functional analysis of those 79 differentially expressed genes and found that genes involve in the regulation of cell proliferation were among most common pathways related to T2D. The expression of the 79 genes was combined with clinical information that includes age, sex, and race to construct an optimal discriminant model. The overall performance of the model reached 95.1% accuracy, with 91.5% accuracy on identifying healthy humans, 100% accuracy on pre-diabetic patients and 95.9% accuract on T2D patients. The higher performance on identifying pre-diabetic patients was

  12. Least-Squares Regression and Spectral Residual Augmented Classical Least-Squares Chemometric Models for Stability-Indicating Analysis of Agomelatine and Its Degradation Products: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Ibrahim A; Abdelrahman, Maha M; El Ghobashy, Mohamed R; Ali, Nesma A

    2016-01-01

    Two accurate, sensitive, and selective stability-indicating methods are developed and validated for simultaneous quantitative determination of agomelatine (AGM) and its forced degradation products (Deg I and Deg II), whether in pure forms or in pharmaceutical formulations. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and spectral residual augmented classical least-squares (SRACLS) are two chemometric models that are being subjected to a comparative study through handling UV spectral data in range (215-350 nm). For proper analysis, a three-factor, four-level experimental design was established, resulting in a training set consisting of 16 mixtures containing different ratios of interfering species. An independent test set consisting of eight mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The results presented indicate the ability of mentioned multivariate calibration models to analyze AGM, Deg I, and Deg II with high selectivity and accuracy. The analysis results of the pharmaceutical formulations were statistically compared to the reference HPLC method, with no significant differences observed regarding accuracy and precision. The SRACLS model gives comparable results to the PLSR model; however, it keeps the qualitative spectral information of the classical least-squares algorithm for analyzed components. PMID:26987554

  13. Validity of Intraoral Scans Compared with Plaster Models: An In-Vivo Comparison of Dental Measurements and 3D Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dental measurements have been commonly taken from plaster dental models obtained from alginate impressions can. Through the use of an intraoral scanner, digital impressions now acquire the information directly from the mouth. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of the intraoral scans compared to plaster models. Materials and Methods Two types of dental models (intraoral scan and plaster model) of 20 subjects were included in this study. The subjects had impressions taken of their teeth and made as plaster model. In addition, their mouths were scanned with the intraoral scanner and the scans were converted into digital models. Eight transverse and 16 anteroposterior measurements, 24 tooth heights and widths were recorded on the plaster models with a digital caliper and on the intraoral scan with 3D reverse engineering software. For 3D surface analysis, the two models were superimposed by using best-fit algorithm. The average differences between the two models at all points on the surfaces were computed. Paired t-test and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the validity of measurements from the intraoral scan compared to those from the plaster model. Results There were no significant differences between the plaster models and intraoral scans, except for one measurement of lower intermolar width. The Bland-Altman plots of all measurements showed that differences between the two models were within the limits of agreement. The average surface difference between the two models was within 0.10 mm. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the intraoral scans are clinically acceptable for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry and can be used in place of plaster models. PMID:27304976

  14. Comparative analysis of meteorological performance of coupled chemistry-meteorology models in the context of AQMEII phase 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution simulations critically depend on the quality of the underlying meteorology. In phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII-2), thirteen modeling groups from Europe and four groups from North America operating eight different regional...

  15. Comparative analysis of the secretome from a model filarial nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis) reveals maximal diversity in gravid female parasites.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Stuart D; Babayan, Simon A; Lhermitte-Vallarino, Nathaly; Gray, Nick; Xia, Dong; Martin, Coralie; Kumar, Sujai; Taylor, David W; Blaxter, Mark L; Wastling, Jonathan M; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2014-10-01

    Filarial nematodes (superfamily Filarioidea) are responsible for an annual global health burden of ∼6.3 million disability-adjusted life-years, which represents the greatest single component of morbidity attributable to helminths affecting humans. No vaccine exists for the major filarial diseases, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis; in part because research on protective immunity against filariae has been constrained by the inability of the human-parasitic species to complete their lifecycles in laboratory mice. However, the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis has become a popular experimental model, as BALB/c mice are fully permissive for its development and reproduction. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of excretory-secretory products from L. sigmodontis across five lifecycle stages and identifications of host proteins associated with first-stage larvae (microfilariae) in the blood. Applying intensity-based quantification, we determined the abundance of 302 unique excretory-secretory proteins, of which 64.6% were present in quantifiable amounts only from gravid adult female nematodes. This lifecycle stage, together with immature microfilariae, released four proteins that have not previously been evaluated as vaccine candidates: a predicted 28.5 kDa filaria-specific protein, a zonadhesin and SCO-spondin-like protein, a vitellogenin, and a protein containing six metridin-like ShK toxin domains. Female nematodes also released two proteins derived from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Notably, excretory-secretory products from all parasite stages contained several uncharacterized members of the transthyretin-like protein family. Furthermore, biotin labeling revealed that redox proteins and enzymes involved in purinergic signaling were enriched on the adult nematode cuticle. Comparison of the L. sigmodontis adult secretome with that of the human-infective filarial nematode Brugia malayi (reported previously in three independent published studies

  16. Comparative Analysis of the Secretome from a Model Filarial Nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis) Reveals Maximal Diversity in Gravid Female Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Stuart D.; Babayan, Simon A.; Lhermitte-Vallarino, Nathaly; Gray, Nick; Xia, Dong; Martin, Coralie; Kumar, Sujai; Taylor, David W.; Blaxter, Mark L.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Makepeace, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Filarial nematodes (superfamily Filarioidea) are responsible for an annual global health burden of ∼6.3 million disability-adjusted life-years, which represents the greatest single component of morbidity attributable to helminths affecting humans. No vaccine exists for the major filarial diseases, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis; in part because research on protective immunity against filariae has been constrained by the inability of the human-parasitic species to complete their lifecycles in laboratory mice. However, the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis has become a popular experimental model, as BALB/c mice are fully permissive for its development and reproduction. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of excretory-secretory products from L. sigmodontis across five lifecycle stages and identifications of host proteins associated with first-stage larvae (microfilariae) in the blood. Applying intensity-based quantification, we determined the abundance of 302 unique excretory-secretory proteins, of which 64.6% were present in quantifiable amounts only from gravid adult female nematodes. This lifecycle stage, together with immature microfilariae, released four proteins that have not previously been evaluated as vaccine candidates: a predicted 28.5 kDa filaria-specific protein, a zonadhesin and SCO-spondin-like protein, a vitellogenin, and a protein containing six metridin-like ShK toxin domains. Female nematodes also released two proteins derived from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Notably, excretory-secretory products from all parasite stages contained several uncharacterized members of the transthyretin-like protein family. Furthermore, biotin labeling revealed that redox proteins and enzymes involved in purinergic signaling were enriched on the adult nematode cuticle. Comparison of the L. sigmodontis adult secretome with that of the human-infective filarial nematode Brugia malayi (reported previously in three independent published studies

  17. Emergent structures and understanding from a comparative uncertainty analysis of the FUSE rainfall-runoff modelling platform for >1,100 catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, J. E.; Odoni, N. A.; Coxon, G.; Bloomfield, J.; Clark, M. P.; Greene, S.; Johnes, P.; Macleod, C.; Reaney, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    If we are to learn about catchments and their hydrological function then a range of analysis techniques can be proposed from analysing observations to building complex physically based models using detailed attributes of catchment characteristics. Decisions regarding which technique is fit for a specific purpose will depend on the data available, computing resources, and the underlying reasons for the study. Here we explore defining catchment function in a relatively general sense expressed via a comparison of multiple model structures within an uncertainty analysis framework. We use the FUSE (Framework for Understanding Structural Errors - Clark et al., 2008) rainfall-runoff modelling platform and the GLUE (Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation - Beven and Freer, 2001) uncertainty analysis framework. Using these techniques we assess two main outcomes: 1) Benchmarking our predictive capability using discharge performance metrics for a diverse range of catchments across the UK 2) evaluating emergent behaviour for each catchment and/or region expressed as ';best performing' model structures that may be equally plausible representations of catchment behaviour. We shall show how such comparative hydrological modelling studies show patterns of emergent behaviour linked both to seasonal responses and to different geoclimatic regions. These results have implications for the hydrological community regarding how models can help us learn about places as hypothesis testing tools. Furthermore we explore what the limits are to such an analysis when dealing with differing data quality and information content from ';pristine' to less well characterised and highly modified catchment domains. This research has been piloted in the UK as part of the Environmental Virtual Observatory programme (EVOp), funded by NERC to demonstrate the use of cyber-infrastructure and cloud computing resources to develop better methods of linking data and models and to support scenario analysis

  18. Sociological analysis and comparative education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woock, Roger R.

    1981-12-01

    It is argued that comparative education is essentially a derivative field of study, in that it borrows theories and methods from academic disciplines. After a brief humanistic phase, in which history and philosophy were central for comparative education, sociology became an important source. In the mid-50's and 60's, sociology in the United States was characterised by Structural Functionalism as a theory, and Social Survey as a dominant methodology. Both were incorporated into the development of comparative education. Increasingly in the 70's, and certainly today, the new developments in sociology are characterised by an attack on Positivism, which is seen as the philosophical position underlying both functionalism and survey methods. New or re-discovered theories with their attendant methodologies included Marxism, Phenomenological Sociology, Critical Theory, and Historical Social Science. The current relationship between comparative education and social science is one of uncertainty, but since social science is seen to be returning to its European roots, the hope is held out for the development of an integrated social theory and method which will provide a much stronger basis for developments in comparative education.

  19. Comparative power spectrum analysis of EEG activity in spontaneously hypertensive and Wistar rats in kainate model of temporal model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Kortenska, Lidia; Marinov, Pencho; Boyanov, Kiril

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we have reported that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibit higher susceptibility than Wistar rats in kainate (KA) model of epilepsy. The aim of the present study is to compare the baseline of EEG signals in SHRs and Wistar rats using Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) during the three phases of KA model (acute, latent and chronic). The SHRs showed higher baseline relative power of delta waves in the left frontal cortex and lower gamma-HF waves in the left frontal and left/right parietal cortex, respectively, compared to Wistar rats. During the acute phase, both absolute and relative power of fast EEG bands (gamma-HF) was lower in the left/right frontal and the left/right parietal cortex in SHRs compared to Wistar rats. During the latent phase, no difference in the power of the investigated bands was detected between the two strains. During the chronic epileptic phase, the SHRs were characterized with higher power of HF oscillations than Wistar rats both in the frontal and parietal cortex without brain lateralization while theta, alpha and beta bands were with diminished power in the left parietal cortex of SHRs compared to normotensive Wistar rats. Taken together, the presented results suggest that the increased delta waves and lower gamma-HF waves in the frontal/parietal cortex are associated with a higher seizure susceptibility of SHRs compared to Wistar rats while fastest oscillations has a critical role in seizure generation and propagation of hypertensive rats. PMID:27040713

  20. A Comparative Analysis of the Meaning of Model Minority among Ethnic Koreans in China and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Koreans have been successful in nesting their educational achievement into places like China and the United States, where they have earned the title of "model minority". This research is a comparison of the manner in which the model minority stereotype is handled by Korean Chinese and Korean Americans. The gathered data leads us to argue that…

  1. A comparative analysis of transcription factor binding models learned from PBM, HT-SELEX and ChIP data.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, Yaron; Shamir, Ron

    2014-04-01

    Understanding gene regulation is a key challenge in today's biology. The new technologies of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) and high-throughput SELEX (HT-SELEX) allow measurement of the binding intensities of one transcription factor (TF) to numerous synthetic double-stranded DNA sequences in a single experiment. Recently, Jolma et al. reported the results of 547 HT-SELEX experiments covering human and mouse TFs. Because 162 of these TFs were also covered by PBM technology, for the first time, a large-scale comparison between implementations of these two in vitro technologies is possible. Here we assessed the similarities and differences between binding models, represented as position weight matrices, inferred from PBM and HT-SELEX, and also measured how well these models predict in vivo binding. Our results show that HT-SELEX- and PBM-derived models agree for most TFs. For some TFs, the HT-SELEX-derived models are longer versions of the PBM-derived models, whereas for other TFs, the HT-SELEX models match the secondary PBM-derived models. Remarkably, PBM-based 8-mer ranking is more accurate than that of HT-SELEX, but models derived from HT-SELEX predict in vivo binding better. In addition, we reveal several biases in HT-SELEX data including nucleotide frequency bias, enrichment of C-rich k-mers and oligos and underrepresentation of palindromes. PMID:24500199

  2. A Comparative Analysis of a Game-Based Mobile Learning Model in Low-Socioeconomic Communities of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Paul; Buckner, Elizabeth; Kim, Hyunkyung; Makany, Tamas; Taleja, Neha; Parikh, Vallabhi

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effectiveness of a game-based mobile learning model for children living in underdeveloped regions with significant contextual variations. Data for this study came from a total of 210 children between the ages of 6-14 years old from six marginalized communities in India. The findings reveal that children with little or no…

  3. Comparative statistical analysis of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Landais, Francois; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, we aim to provide a statistical and comparative description of topographic fields by using the huge amount of topographic data available for different bodies in the solar system, including Earth, Mars, the Moon etc.. Our goal is to characterize and quantify the geophysical processes involved by a relevant statistical description. In each case, topographic fields exhibit an extremely high variability with details at each scale, from millimeter to thousands of kilometers. This complexity seems to prohibit global descriptions or global topography models. Nevertheless, this topographic complexity is well-known to exhibit scaling laws that establish a similarity between scales and permit simpler descriptions and models. Indeed, efficient simulations can be made using the statistical properties of scaling fields (fractals). But realistic simulations of global topographic fields must be multi (not mono) scaling behaviour, reflecting the extreme variability and intermittency observed in real fields that can not be generated by simple scaling models. A multiscaling theory has been developed in order to model high variability and intermittency. This theory is a good statistical candidate to model the topography field with a limited number of parameters (called the multifractal parameters). After a global analysis of Mars (Landais et. al, 2015) we have performed similar analysis on different body in the solar system including the Moon, Venus and mercury indicating that the mulifractal parameters might be relevant to explain the competition between several processes operating on multiple scales

  4. Bivariate random effects models for meta-analysis of comparative studies with binary outcomes: methods for the absolute risk difference and relative risk.

    PubMed

    Chu, Haitao; Nie, Lei; Chen, Yong; Huang, Yi; Sun, Wei

    2012-12-01

    Multivariate meta-analysis is increasingly utilised in biomedical research to combine data of multiple comparative clinical studies for evaluating drug efficacy and safety profile. When the probability of the event of interest is rare, or when the individual study sample sizes are small, a substantial proportion of studies may not have any event of interest. Conventional meta-analysis methods either exclude such studies or include them through ad hoc continuality correction by adding an arbitrary positive value to each cell of the corresponding 2 × 2 tables, which may result in less accurate conclusions. Furthermore, different continuity corrections may result in inconsistent conclusions. In this article, we discuss a bivariate Beta-binomial model derived from Sarmanov family of bivariate distributions and a bivariate generalised linear mixed effects model for binary clustered data to make valid inferences. These bivariate random effects models use all available data without ad hoc continuity corrections, and accounts for the potential correlation between treatment (or exposure) and control groups within studies naturally. We then utilise the bivariate random effects models to reanalyse two recent meta-analysis data sets. PMID:21177306

  5. Comparative analysis of quantum cascade laser modeling based on density matrices and non-equilibrium Green's functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindskog, M. Wacker, A.; Wolf, J. M.; Liverini, V.; Faist, J.; Trinite, V.; Maisons, G.; Carras, M.; Aidam, R.; Ostendorf, R.

    2014-09-08

    We study the operation of an 8.5 μm quantum cascade laser based on GaInAs/AlInAs lattice matched to InP using three different simulation models based on density matrix (DM) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formulations. The latter advanced scheme serves as a validation for the simpler DM schemes and, at the same time, provides additional insight, such as the temperatures of the sub-band carrier distributions. We find that for the particular quantum cascade laser studied here, the behavior is well described by simple quantum mechanical estimates based on Fermi's golden rule. As a consequence, the DM model, which includes second order currents, agrees well with the NEGF results. Both these simulations are in accordance with previously reported data and a second regrown device.

  6. Extracellular vesicles derived from mesenchymal stromal cells may possess increased therapeutic potential for acute kidney injury compared with conditioned medium in rodent models: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, GUANGYUAN; WANG, DANDAN; MIAO, SHUAI; ZOU, XIANGYU; LIU, GUOHUA; ZHU, YINGJIAN

    2016-01-01

    The potential involvement of the endocrine/paracrine mechanisms in the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) therapy for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been increasingly studied. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to systematically review the therapeutic role of MSC-conditioned medium (CM) or MSCs released by extracellular vesicles (Evs) for the treatment of AKI in rodent models. Studies were identified using PubMed and Scopus databases using a custom search strategy and eligibility criteria. Data regarding serum creatinine (SCr) concentration, CM or Evs, measurement time point, AKI model (toxic or non-toxic) and other parameters, including delivery route, animal type and animal numbers, were extracted. Pooled analysis and subgroup analysis as well as multivariable meta-regression were performed. Heterogeneity and publication bias were also investigated. A total of 13 studies were included and analyzed. Pooled analysis showed reduced SCr (0.93 [0.67, 1.20], mg/dl) in rodent models of AKI after CM/Evs therapy. The results of the subgroup analysis suggested that Evs induced an increased therapeutic effect, in the form of SCr reduction, as compared with CM (P=0.05). There were also other significant influential factors for SCr reduction including measurement time point (P=0.0004) and therapeutic time point (P<0.0001) after surgery. By contrast, parameters such as delivery route, injury type and cell type were not significant influential factors. Multivariable meta-regression analysis showed that measurement time point (P=0.041), therapeutic time point (P=0.03), Evs or CM (P=0.0003) and cell type (P<0.0001) were influential factors in the reduction of SCr. The present meta-analysis indicates that CM or Evs derived from MSCs are able to improve the impaired renal function in rodents modelling AKI. Compared with CM, Evs may produce a more marked therapeutic effect in recovery from renal failure. In addition, CM or Evs administration in early stages of AKI may result in

  7. Comparative analysis of remotely-sensed data products via ecological niche modeling of avian influenza case occurrences in Middle Eastern poultry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ecological niche modeling integrates known sites of occurrence of species or phenomena with data on environmental variation across landscapes to infer environmental spaces potentially inhabited (i.e., the ecological niche) to generate predictive maps of potential distributions in geographic space. Key inputs to this process include raster data layers characterizing spatial variation in environmental parameters, such as vegetation indices from remotely sensed satellite imagery. The extent to which ecological niche models reflect real-world distributions depends on a number of factors, but an obvious concern is the quality and content of the environmental data layers. Methods We assessed ecological niche model predictions of H5N1 avian flu presence quantitatively within and among four geographic regions, based on models incorporating two means of summarizing three vegetation indices derived from the MODIS satellite. We evaluated our models for predictive ability using partial ROC analysis and GLM ANOVA to compare performance among indices and regions. Results We found correlations between vegetation indices to be high, such that they contain information that overlaps broadly. Neither the type of vegetation index used nor method of summary affected model performance significantly. However, the degree to which model predictions had to be transferred (i.e., projected onto landscapes and conditions not represented on the landscape of training) impacted predictive strength greatly (within-region model predictions far out-performed models projected among regions). Conclusion Our results provide the first quantitative tests of most appropriate uses of different remotely sensed data sets in ecological niche modeling applications. While our testing did not result in a decisive "best" index product or means of summarizing indices, it emphasizes the need for careful evaluation of products used in modeling (e.g. matching temporal dimensions and spatial resolution) for

  8. Analysis of genetic population structure in Acacia caven (Leguminosae, Mimosoideae), comparing one exploratory and two Bayesian-model-based methods

    PubMed Central

    Pometti, Carolina L.; Bessega, Cecilia F.; Saidman, Beatriz O.; Vilardi, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian clustering as implemented in STRUCTURE or GENELAND software is widely used to form genetic groups of populations or individuals. On the other hand, in order to satisfy the need for less computer-intensive approaches, multivariate analyses are specifically devoted to extracting information from large datasets. In this paper, we report the use of a dataset of AFLP markers belonging to 15 sampling sites of Acacia caven for studying the genetic structure and comparing the consistency of three methods: STRUCTURE, GENELAND and DAPC. Of these methods, DAPC was the fastest one and showed accuracy in inferring the K number of populations (K = 12 using the find.clusters option and K = 15 with a priori information of populations). GENELAND in turn, provides information on the area of membership probabilities for individuals or populations in the space, when coordinates are specified (K = 12). STRUCTURE also inferred the number of K populations and the membership probabilities of individuals based on ancestry, presenting the result K = 11 without prior information of populations and K = 15 using the LOCPRIOR option. Finally, in this work all three methods showed high consistency in estimating the population structure, inferring similar numbers of populations and the membership probabilities of individuals to each group, with a high correlation between each other. PMID:24688293

  9. Preservation of protein clefts in comparative models

    PubMed Central

    Piedra, David; Lois, Sergi; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparative, or homology, modelling of protein structures is the most widely used prediction method when the target protein has homologues of known structure. Given that the quality of a model may vary greatly, several studies have been devoted to identifying the factors that influence modelling results. These studies usually consider the protein as a whole, and only a few provide a separate discussion of the behaviour of biologically relevant features of the protein. Given the value of the latter for many applications, here we extended previous work by analysing the preservation of native protein clefts in homology models. We chose to examine clefts because of their role in protein function/structure, as they are usually the locus of protein-protein interactions, host the enzymes' active site, or, in the case of protein domains, can also be the locus of domain-domain interactions that lead to the structure of the whole protein. Results We studied how the largest cleft of a protein varies in comparative models. To this end, we analysed a set of 53507 homology models that cover the whole sequence identity range, with a special emphasis on medium and low similarities. More precisely we examined how cleft quality – measured using six complementary parameters related to both global shape and local atomic environment, depends on the sequence identity between target and template proteins. In addition to this general analysis, we also explored the impact of a number of factors on cleft quality, and found that the relationship between quality and sequence identity varies depending on cleft rank amongst the set of protein clefts (when ordered according to size), and number of aligned residues. Conclusion We have examined cleft quality in homology models at a range of seq.id. levels. Our results provide a detailed view of how quality is affected by distinct parameters and thus may help the user of comparative modelling to determine the final quality and

  10. Comparative Analysis between [(18)F]Fludarabine-PET and [(18)F]FDG-PET in a Murine Model of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, Narinée; Dhilly, Martine; Guillouet, Stéphane; Leporrier, Michel; Barré, Louisa

    2016-06-01

    Lymphoma research has advanced thanks to introduction of [(18)F]fludarabine, a positron-emitting tool. This novel radiotracer has been shown to display a great specificity for lymphoid tissues. However, in a benign process such as inflammation, the uptake of this tracer has not been questioned. Indeed, in inflammatory zones, elevated glucose metabolism rate may result in false-positives with [(18)F]FDG-PET Imaging. In the present investigation, it has been argued that cells, involved in inflammation, might be less avid of [(18)F]fludarabine. To generate inflammation, Swiss mice were intramuscularly injected with 0.1 mL of turpentine oil into the right front paw. Imaging sessions with (18)F-labeled tracers named above were conducted on days 5 and 25 after inoculation. For each animal, volumes of interest (VOI), delineating the muscle of the inflamed (IP) and normal paws (NP), were determined on PET scans. For characterization of inflammation, muscle samples from IP and NP were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). In early (day 5) inflammation, [(18)F]FDG accumulation was 4.00 ± 1.65 times greater in the IP than in the contralateral NP; for [(18)F]fludarabine, this IP/NP ratio was 1.31 ± 0.28, resulting in a significant difference between radiotracer groups (p < 0.01). In late (day 25) inflammation, the IP/NP ratios were 2.07 ± 0.49 and 1.03 ± 0.07, for [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]fludarabine, respectively (p < 0.001). [(18)F]Fludarabine showed significantly weaker uptake in inflammation when compared with [(18)F]FDG. This encouraging finding suggests that [(18)F]fludarabine-PET might well be a robust approach for distinguishing tumor from inflammatory tissue, avoiding false-positive PET results and thus enabling an accurate imaging of lymphoma. PMID:27080099

  11. Comparative Analysis of the Flax Immune Receptors L6 and L7 Suggests an Equilibrium-Based Switch Activation Model.

    PubMed

    Bernoux, Maud; Burdett, Hayden; Williams, Simon J; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Chunhong; Newell, Kim; Lawrence, Gregory J; Kobe, Bostjan; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Anderson, Peter A; Dodds, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are central components of the plant immune system. L6 is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing NLR from flax (Linum usitatissimum) conferring immunity to the flax rust fungus. Comparison of L6 to the weaker allele L7 identified two polymorphic regions in the TIR and the nucleotide binding (NB) domains that regulate both effector ligand-dependent and -independent cell death signaling as well as nucleotide binding to the receptor. This suggests that a negative functional interaction between the TIR and NB domains holds L7 in an inactive/ADP-bound state more tightly than L6, hence decreasing its capacity to adopt the active/ATP-bound state and explaining its weaker activity in planta. L6 and L7 variants with a more stable ADP-bound state failed to bind to AvrL567 in yeast two-hybrid assays, while binding was detected to the signaling active variants. This contrasts with current models predicting that effectors bind to inactive receptors to trigger activation. Based on the correlation between nucleotide binding, effector interaction, and immune signaling properties of L6/L7 variants, we propose that NLRs exist in an equilibrium between ON and OFF states and that effector binding to the ON state stabilizes this conformation, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the active form of the receptor to trigger defense signaling. PMID:26744216

  12. Comparative analysis of immune responses to Russian spring-summer encephalitis and Omsk hemorrhagic fever viruses in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; Juelich, Terry; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV) and Russian spring-summer encephalitis virus (RSSEV) are tick-borne flaviviruses that have close homology but different pathology and disease outcomes. Previously, we reported that C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice were excellent models to study the pathology and clinical signs of human RSSEV and OHFV infection. In the study described here, we found that RSSEV infection induced robust release of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1β, RANTES and KC) in the brain at 9 and 11dpi, together with moderate to low Th1 and Th2 cytokines. In contrast, OHFV infection stimulated an early and prominent induction of IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-12p70, MCP-1, MIP-1α and MIP-1β in the spleen of infected mice. Collectively our data suggest that a differential host response to infection may lead to the alternate disease outcomes seen following OHFV or RSSEV infection. PMID:20875909

  13. Comparative analysis of the influence of Fructus Ligustri Lucidi on a rat lumbar disc herniation model.

    PubMed

    Han, Ya-Xin; Liang, Dong; Han, Xiao-Rui; Liang, De-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a term used for a group of conditions, including back pain, femoral nerve pain and sciatica. Currently available treatments and surgical options are insufficient for patients with LDH. Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) is a herb that is used for treating age-associated diseases. The results of the present study suggested that FLL may be used for treatment of patients with LDH. In the present study, matrix metalloproteinase-1, -3, -8 and -9 (MMP-1, -3, -8 and -9) protein and mRNA expression downregulation was observed in patients with LDH according to western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. By contrast, upregulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression was observed in patients with LDH, according to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Mechanical allodynia was observed in rats with LDH not treated with FLL; however, not in FLL‑treated rats. IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α expression levels in the serum from untreated rats were significantly higher than that of the FLL‑treated rat models. Protein expression levels of MMPs in FLL-treated rats were lower than those in untreated rats. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between FLL and protein expression levels require further investigation. PMID:25816023

  14. Comparative strain analysis of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection and clinical outcomes in a canine model of granulocytic anaplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scorpio, Diana G; Dumler, J Stephen; Barat, Nicole C; Cook, Judith A; Barat, Christopher E; Stillman, Brett A; DeBisceglie, Kristen C; Beall, Melissa J; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy

    2011-03-01

    A pilot study was conducted to determine whether existing human or canine strains of Anaplasma phagocytophilum would reproduce clinical disease in experimentally inoculated dogs similar to dogs with naturally acquired granulocytic anaplasmosis. Six hounds were inoculated intravenously with one human and two canine strains of A. phagocytophilum that were propagated in vitro in HL-60 cells or in infected autologous neutrophils. Infected dogs were monitored for lethargy, anorexia, petechiae, lymphadenopathy, and fever. Dogs were assessed for complete blood count (CBC), serum chemistry, and serology (IFA and SNAP® 4Dx®); for A. phagocytophilum blood load by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; and for cytokine production. Prominent clinical signs were generalized lymphadenopathy and scleral injection; only one dog developed fever lasting 4 days. Notable laboratory alterations included sustained leukopenia and thrombocytopenia in all dogs. A. phagocytophilum morulae were noted in blood between days 10 and 11, although all dogs retained A. phagocytophilum DNA in blood through day 60. All dogs seroconverted by days 10-15 by IFA, and by days 17-30 by SNAP 4Dx; cytokine analyses revealed 10-fold increases in interleukin-2 and interleukin-18 in the neutrophil-propagated 98E4 strain-infected dog. All A. phagocytophilum strains produced infection, although canine 98E4 strain reproduced clinical signs, hematologic changes, and inflammatory cytokine elevations most consistent with granulocytic anaplasmosis when recognized clinically. Therefore, this strain should be considered for use in future studies of A. phagocytophilum canine infection models. PMID:20846015

  15. A comparative analysis of inhibitors of the glycolysis pathway in breast and ovarian cancer cell line models.

    PubMed

    Xintaropoulou, Chrysi; Ward, Carol; Wise, Alan; Marston, Hugh; Turnbull, Arran; Langdon, Simon P

    2015-09-22

    Many cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy production and targeting of this pathway is a potential strategy to inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, inhibition of five glycolysis pathway molecules (GLUT1, HKII, PFKFB3, PDHK1 and LDH) using 9 inhibitors (Phloretin, Quercetin, STF31, WZB117, 3PO, 3-bromopyruvate, Dichloroacetate, Oxamic acid, NHI-1) was investigated in panels of breast and ovarian cancer cell line models. All compounds tested blocked glycolysis as indicated by increased extracellular glucose and decreased lactate production and also increased apoptosis. Sensitivity to several inhibitors correlated with the proliferation rate of the cell lines. Seven compounds had IC50 values that were associated with each other consistent with a shared mechanism of action. A synergistic interaction was revealed between STF31 and Oxamic acid when combined with the antidiabetic drug metformin. Sensitivity to glycolysis inhibition was also examined under a range of O2 levels (21% O2, 7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) and greater resistance to the inhibitors was found at low oxygen conditions (7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) relative to 21% O2 conditions. These results indicate growth of breast and ovarian cancer cell lines is dependent on all the targets examined in the glycolytic pathway with increased sensitivity to the inhibitors under normoxic conditions. PMID:26259240

  16. A comparative analysis of inhibitors of the glycolysis pathway in breast and ovarian cancer cell line models

    PubMed Central

    Xintaropoulou, Chrysi; Ward, Carol; Wise, Alan; Marston, Hugh; Turnbull, Arran; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy production and targeting of this pathway is a potential strategy to inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, inhibition of five glycolysis pathway molecules (GLUT1, HKII, PFKFB3, PDHK1 and LDH) using 9 inhibitors (Phloretin, Quercetin, STF31, WZB117, 3PO, 3-bromopyruvate, Dichloroacetate, Oxamic acid, NHI-1) was investigated in panels of breast and ovarian cancer cell line models. All compounds tested blocked glycolysis as indicated by increased extracellular glucose and decreased lactate production and also increased apoptosis. Sensitivity to several inhibitors correlated with the proliferation rate of the cell lines. Seven compounds had IC50 values that were associated with each other consistent with a shared mechanism of action. A synergistic interaction was revealed between STF31 and Oxamic acid when combined with the antidiabetic drug metformin. Sensitivity to glycolysis inhibition was also examined under a range of O2 levels (21% O2, 7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) and greater resistance to the inhibitors was found at low oxygen conditions (7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) relative to 21% O2 conditions. These results indicate growth of breast and ovarian cancer cell lines is dependent on all the targets examined in the glycolytic pathway with increased sensitivity to the inhibitors under normoxic conditions. PMID:26259240

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Cardioprotective Properties of Opioid Receptor Agonists in a Rat Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Leonid N.; Lishmanov, Yury B.; Oeltgen, Peter R.; Barzakh, Eva I.; Krylatov, Andrey V.; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V.; Pei, Jian-Ming; Brown, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that opioid receptor (OR) mediated cardioprotection is agonist-specific when administered prior to coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion in a rat model. Methods Anesthetized open-chest male Wistar rats were subjected to 45 minutes of left coronary artery occlusion and 2 hours of reperfusion. Opioid agonists were infused 15 minutes prior to coronary artery occlusion. Two control groups and 15 opioid treated groups were studied. Controls were infused with either saline alone (n = 16) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) plus hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in saline (n = 19). The μ selective agonist DAMGO was infused at either 150 nmol/kg (n = 15) or 1500 nmol/kg (n = 14), and Dermorphin-H was infused at 150 nmol/kg (n = 14). The δ1 selective agonist D-Pen2,5 Enkephalin (DPDPE) was infused at 150 nmol/kg (n = 16) or 1500 nmol/kg (n = 14). The δ2 selective agonists Deltorphin II (n = 16), Deltorphin-Dvariant (n = 15) and Deltorphin-E (n = 14) were infused at 150 nmol/kg. The selective κ1 opioid agonist U-50488 was infused at 240 nmol/kg (n = 14), 1500 nmol/kg (n = 14), and 2,400 nmol/kg (n = 14). The selective κ2 opioid agonist GR-89696 was infused at 150 nmol/kg (n = 14) and 1500 nmol/kg (n = 15). Orphinan FQ (Nociceptin), also referred to as OR Ligand1 (ORL1), was infused at 220 nmol/kg (n = 15) and 1500 nmol/kg (n = 15). The infarct size/area at risk (IS/AAR) ratio was determined after reperfusion by negative staining with patent blue violet dye. Hemodynamic parameters including heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were determined. Results Pretreatment with the δ2 OR agonist Deltorphin II (150 nmol/kg) significantly reduced the IS/AAR ratio, while Deltorphin-Dvariant and Deltorphin-E did not exhibit an infarct sparing effect at that treatment dose. Activation of δ1 OR by DPDPE, κ1 OR by U-50488, κ2 OR by U-50488, μ OR by DAMGO, Dermophin-H, and Nociceptin had

  18. Comparative pathway analysis of radiocesium in the Hudson River Estuary: environmental measurements and regulatory dose assessment models.

    PubMed

    Linsalata, P; Hickman, D; Cohen, N

    1986-09-01

    This work summarizes the measurements and associated environmental dosimetry of reactor-released 137Cs and 134Cs and weapons-produced 137Cs in samples of water, shoreline sediment and fish collected from 1971 to 1980 in the Hudson River Estuary. Trends observed in annual mean concentrations and the resultant dose implications for man from each source are discussed. The human exposure pathways examined are: fish consumption, water consumption, swimming and recreational use of the shoreline. Based on environmental measurements, a maximum, adult, whole-body, 50-y committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) of 0.79 mu Sv (79 mu rem) is estimated from fish consumption in 1971, the year of maximum reactor discharge of the radiocesiums. For comparison, during the period 1974-79, mean estimates (+/- 1 SD) of the CEDE based on environmental measurements and attributed to other pathways are as follows: consumption of indigenous fish species caught downstream of the reactor outfall, 0.05 +/- 0.02 mu Sv (5 +/- 2 mu rem); consumption of fresh water sampled upstream of the reactors, 0.02 +/- 0.03 mu Sv (2 +/- 3 mu rem); and swimming, 10(-4) +/- 10(-4) mu Sv (0.01 +/- 0.01 mu rem). In addition, external, whole-body exposure resulting from recreational use of the shoreline 1.6 km downstream of the reactors is estimated to be 1.2 X 10(-8) C kg-1 (46 +/- 11 mu R yr-1). The above dose estimates are based on consumption factors of 3.9 and 803 kg y-1 (fish and water, respectively) and on usage factors of 50 and 140 h y-1 (swimming and shoreline recreation, respectively). Differences in dose estimates obtained from these long-term environmental measurements and from assessment models currently recommended for use by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are discussed. PMID:3744830

  19. Transpolar potential saturation models compared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G.; Raeder, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2004-09-01

    We compare four explanations of transpolar potential saturation: (1) the magnetic field at the stagnation point weakens, thereby limiting magnetic reconnection; (2) a dimple develops at the stagnation point, which limits the inflow rate to the reconnection line; (3) the magnetopause becomes blunt and the bow shock recedes, thus giving more room for the solar wind to flow around the magnetosphere, thereby reducing the need for magnetic reconnection; (4) the region 1 current system usurps the Chapman-Ferraro current system and saturates when the J × B force it generates balances solar wind ram pressure. The paper's point is that all four mechanisms involve a limit on the strength of the region 1 current system and that the criterion for the onset of transpolar potential saturation in each mechanism is that the region 1 current system generates a magnetic field that is about as strong as the dipole field at the dayside magnetopause. This circumstance prevents tests to discriminate between the four mechanisms based on predictions that relate to their dependencies on the region 1 current system. The group as a whole, however, can be tested to see whether their common criterion that relates the onset of transpolar potential saturation to the total current flowing in the region 1 system holds. The criterion can be formulated in terms of predictions that relate transpolar potential saturation to the strength of the interplanetary electric field, solar wind ram pressure, and ionospheric conductance. Published data analyses and MHD simulations reasonably confirm these predictions.

  20. [A model-based meta-analysis to compare urate-lowering response rate of febuxostat and allopurinol in gout patient].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Li, Liang; Zhou, Tian-Yan; Lu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to compare the urate-lowering response rate of febuxostat and allopurinol in gout patient using a model-based meta-analysis. The literature search identified 22 clinical trials of gout with a total of 43 unique treatment arms that met our inclusion criteria, and a total of 6 365 gout patients were included in the study. The response rates of allopuriol and febuxostat were characterized by Tmax model and Emax model respectively, and the effect of baseline serum uric acid (sUA) and patient type on the drug effect was tested. The results showed that allopurinol can reach an average maximum response rate of 50.8% while febuxostat can reach a 100% response rate within a very short time, and the ED50 was 34.3 mg. Covariate analysis revealed that baseline sUA has a negative effect on response rate of allopurinol, and a positive effect on the predicted ED50 of febuxostat. For patients who had shown inadequate response to prior allopurinol treatment, the average response rate was about half that of the allopurinol responder patients. PMID:25920196

  1. Osteolytica: An automated image analysis software package that rapidly measures cancer-induced osteolytic lesions in in vivo models with greater reproducibility compared to other commonly used methods☆

    PubMed Central

    Evans, H.R.; Karmakharm, T.; Lawson, M.A.; Walker, R.E.; Harris, W.; Fellows, C.; Huggins, I.D.; Richmond, P.; Chantry, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Methods currently used to analyse osteolytic lesions caused by malignancies such as multiple myeloma and metastatic breast cancer vary from basic 2-D X-ray analysis to 2-D images of micro-CT datasets analysed with non-specialised image software such as ImageJ. However, these methods have significant limitations. They do not capture 3-D data, they are time-consuming and they often suffer from inter-user variability. We therefore sought to develop a rapid and reproducible method to analyse 3-D osteolytic lesions in mice with cancer-induced bone disease. To this end, we have developed Osteolytica, an image analysis software method featuring an easy to use, step-by-step interface to measure lytic bone lesions. Osteolytica utilises novel graphics card acceleration (parallel computing) and 3-D rendering to provide rapid reconstruction and analysis of osteolytic lesions. To evaluate the use of Osteolytica we analysed tibial micro-CT datasets from murine models of cancer-induced bone disease and compared the results to those obtained using a standard ImageJ analysis method. Firstly, to assess inter-user variability we deployed four independent researchers to analyse tibial datasets from the U266-NSG murine model of myeloma. Using ImageJ, inter-user variability between the bones was substantial (± 19.6%), in contrast to using Osteolytica, which demonstrated minimal variability (± 0.5%). Secondly, tibial datasets from U266-bearing NSG mice or BALB/c mice injected with the metastatic breast cancer cell line 4T1 were compared to tibial datasets from aged and sex-matched non-tumour control mice. Analyses by both Osteolytica and ImageJ showed significant increases in bone lesion area in tumour-bearing mice compared to control mice. These results confirm that Osteolytica performs as well as the current 2-D ImageJ osteolytic lesion analysis method. However, Osteolytica is advantageous in that it analyses over the entirety of the bone volume (as opposed to selected 2-D images

  2. Osteolytica: An automated image analysis software package that rapidly measures cancer-induced osteolytic lesions in in vivo models with greater reproducibility compared to other commonly used methods.

    PubMed

    Evans, H R; Karmakharm, T; Lawson, M A; Walker, R E; Harris, W; Fellows, C; Huggins, I D; Richmond, P; Chantry, A D

    2016-02-01

    Methods currently used to analyse osteolytic lesions caused by malignancies such as multiple myeloma and metastatic breast cancer vary from basic 2-D X-ray analysis to 2-D images of micro-CT datasets analysed with non-specialised image software such as ImageJ. However, these methods have significant limitations. They do not capture 3-D data, they are time-consuming and they often suffer from inter-user variability. We therefore sought to develop a rapid and reproducible method to analyse 3-D osteolytic lesions in mice with cancer-induced bone disease. To this end, we have developed Osteolytica, an image analysis software method featuring an easy to use, step-by-step interface to measure lytic bone lesions. Osteolytica utilises novel graphics card acceleration (parallel computing) and 3-D rendering to provide rapid reconstruction and analysis of osteolytic lesions. To evaluate the use of Osteolytica we analysed tibial micro-CT datasets from murine models of cancer-induced bone disease and compared the results to those obtained using a standard ImageJ analysis method. Firstly, to assess inter-user variability we deployed four independent researchers to analyse tibial datasets from the U266-NSG murine model of myeloma. Using ImageJ, inter-user variability between the bones was substantial (±19.6%), in contrast to using Osteolytica, which demonstrated minimal variability (±0.5%). Secondly, tibial datasets from U266-bearing NSG mice or BALB/c mice injected with the metastatic breast cancer cell line 4T1 were compared to tibial datasets from aged and sex-matched non-tumour control mice. Analyses by both Osteolytica and ImageJ showed significant increases in bone lesion area in tumour-bearing mice compared to control mice. These results confirm that Osteolytica performs as well as the current 2-D ImageJ osteolytic lesion analysis method. However, Osteolytica is advantageous in that it analyses over the entirety of the bone volume (as opposed to selected 2-D images), it

  3. Comparing Techniques for Certified Static Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cachera, David; Pichardie, David

    2009-01-01

    A certified static analysis is an analysis whose semantic validity has been formally proved correct with a proof assistant. The recent increasing interest in using proof assistants for mechanizing programming language metatheory has given rise to several approaches for certification of static analysis. We propose a panorama of these techniques and compare their respective strengths and weaknesses.

  4. Twenty-five-gauge vitrectomy versus 23-gauge vitrectomy in the management of macular diseases: a comparative analysis through a Health Technology Assessment model.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Andrea; Charrier, Lorena; Lovato, Emanuela; Panico, Claudio; Mariotti, Cesare; Dapavo, Giancarlo; Chiuminatto, Roberto; Siliquini, Roberta; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2014-04-01

    Small-gauge vitreoretinal techniques have been shown to be safe and effective in the management of a wide spectrum of vitreoretinal diseases. However, the costs of the new technologies may represent a critical issue for national health systems. The aim of the study is to plan a Health Technology Assessment (HTA) by performing a comparative analysis between the 23- and 25-gauge techniques in the management of macular diseases (epiretinal membranes, macular holes, vitreo-macular traction syndrome). In this prospective study, 45-80-year-old patients undergoing vitrectomy surgery for macular disease were enrolled at the Torino Eye Hospital. In the HTA model we assessed the safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost and financial evaluation of 23-gauge compared with 25-gauge vitrectomies. Fifty patients entered the study; 14 patients underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy and 36 underwent 25-gauge vitrectomy. There was no statistically significant difference in post-operative visual acuity at 1 year between the two groups. No cases of retinal detachment or endophtalmitis were registered at 1-year follow-up. The 23-gauge technique was slightly more expensive than the 25-gauge: the total surgical costs were EUR1217.70 versus EUR1164.84 (p = 0.351). We provide a financial comparison between new vitreoretinal procedures recently introduced in the market and reimbursed by the Italian National Health System and we also stimulate a critical debate about the expensive technocratic model of medicine. PMID:24014147

  5. Modeling corrosion inhibition efficacy of small organic molecules as non-toxic chromate alternatives using comparative molecular surface analysis (CoMSA).

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Michael; Breedon, Michael; Cole, Ivan S; Barnard, Amanda S

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally many structural alloys are protected by primer coatings loaded with corrosion inhibiting additives. Strontium Chromate (or other chromates) have been shown to be extremely effectively inhibitors, and find extensive use in protective primer formulations. Unfortunately, hexavalent chromium which imbues these coatings with their corrosion inhibiting properties is also highly toxic, and their use is being increasingly restricted by legislation. In this work we explore a novel tridimensional Quantitative-Structure Property Relationship (3D-QSPR) approach, comparative molecular surface analysis (CoMSA), which was developed to recognize "high-performing" corrosion inhibitor candidates from the distributions of electronegativity, polarizability and van der Waals volume on the molecular surfaces of 28 small organic molecules. Multivariate statistical analysis identified five prototypes molecules, which are capable of explaining 71% of the variance within the inhibitor data set; whilst a further five molecules were also identified as archetypes, describing 75% of data variance. All active corrosion inhibitors, at a 80% threshold, were successfully recognized by the CoMSA model with adequate specificity and precision higher than 70% and 60%, respectively. The model was also capable of identifying structural patterns, that revealed reasonable starting points for where structural changes may augment corrosion inhibition efficacy. The presented methodology can be applied to other functional molecules and extended to cover structure-activity studies in a diverse range of areas such as drug design and novel material discovery. PMID:27362530

  6. Comparing the Discrete and Continuous Logistic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2008-01-01

    The solutions of the discrete logistic growth model based on a difference equation and the continuous logistic growth model based on a differential equation are compared and contrasted. The investigation is conducted using a dynamic interactive spreadsheet. (Contains 5 figures.)

  7. A rabbit maxillary sinus model with simultaneous customized-implant placement: Comparative microscopic analysis for the evaluation of surface-treated implants.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Hyunmin; Lee, Sang-Bae; Zhang, Chenghao; Otgonbold, Jamiyandori; Cho, Jang-Gi; Han, Jin Soo

    2015-08-01

    We describe the use of a rabbit maxillary sinus model, characterized by thin osseous tissue and low bone density, for the evaluation of surface-treated implants by histologically and histomorphometrically comparing the osseointegration patterns depending on the surface treatment methods. Twenty rabbits were randomly assigned to two groups of 10 animals, one receiving 5 × 3 mm customized implants (machined, MA or sandblasted and acid etched, SLA) placed in sinus and the other receiving implants placed in a tibia. Histological observation of the implant placed in sinus shows relatively more active new bone formation, characterized by trabecular bone pattern underneath the cortical bone in sinus as compared with that in tibia. Histomorphometric analysis in the rabbits receiving implants in a tibia, the NBIC (%) associated with the SLA surface implant was greater than that associated with the MA implant at 2 weeks (55.63 ± 8.65% vs. 47.87 ± 10.01%; P > 0.05) and at 4 weeks (61.76 ± 9.49% vs. 42.69 ± 10.97%; P < 0.05). Among rabbits receiving implants in a sinus, the NBIC (%) associated with the SLA surface implant was significantly greater than that associated with the MA surface implant both at 2 weeks (37.25 ± 7.27% vs. 20.98 ± 6.42%; P < 0.05) and at 4 weeks (48.82 ± 6.77% vs. 31.51 ± 9.14%; P < 0.05). As a result, we suggest that the maxillary sinus model is an appropriate animal model for assessing surface-treated implants and may be utilized for the evaluation of surface-treated implants in poor bone quality environment. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:697-706, 2015. PMID:26085304

  8. An analysis of selected elements of the environment in the outflow model compared with measurements of agricultural basin in central Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyszkowski, S.; Bartczak, A.; Glazik, R.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the supra-regional importance of areas of intensive agriculture, it is important to identify factors, that are affecting the size of the drainage basin. One of the methods that will allow to determine relations is the spatial valorization of environmental elements, that affect the circulation of water. Such analysis was performed for highly agricultural region in the central part of Poland (52° 30'N, 18° 50'E). The study area was Zglowiaczka basin, which covers an area of 1.495,6 km2.With the help of GIS methods and tools, there have been designated from thematic maps these factors of natural environment elements, that influence the size of the outflow. Basing on topographic maps at 1:25000 scale, river network, river length has been calculated, hydrographic objects such as lakes, swamps, marshes have been inventoried and the land use has been partly assessed. For the evaluation of the terrain there has been used a DTM in the form of a raster, that was created on the base of analyzing photogrametric materials. Its accuracy is similar to topographic maps at 1:10000 scale, with 1m vertical resolution. It was mainly used to determine the slopes, and watersheds deletion. It was also required to determine the length of some contours of the catchment's - the material needed for the expected value of runoff in the model. To determine the land use - mainly for agricultural use of crop type, Corine Land Cover 2000 was used. To determine the lithology and as a result - the infiltration, there were used both geological and soil maps. These elements formed the background, on which the spatial variation of river streamflow was marked and compared. Zglowiaczka basin was divided into several sub-basins. The analysis was performed for the entire basin in general and using the same methods for sub-basins as well. Each time model data was compared with the actual values gained from the field work (flow measurements and from recorders. The poster presents the comparison of

  9. Comparative Environmental Threat Analysis: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, J. B.; Reiling, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews how carrying capacity for different environmental problems is operationalized. Discusses whether it is possible to compare threats, using the exceeding of carrying capacity as a yardstick. Points out problems in comparative threat analysis using three case studies: threats to European groundwater resources, threats to ecosystems in Europe,…

  10. Structural modeling and docking studies of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase from Leishmania major and Homo sapiens: a comparative analysis for Leishmaniasis treatment.

    PubMed

    Capriles, Priscila V S Z; Baptista, Luiz Phillippe R; Guedes, Isabella A; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R; Custódio, Fabio L; Alves-Ferreira, Marcelo; Dardenne, Laurent E

    2015-02-01

    Leishmaniases are caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania and are considered the second-highest cause of death worldwide by parasitic infection. The drugs available for treatment in humans are becoming ineffective mainly due to parasite resistance; therefore, it is extremely important to develop a new chemotherapy against these parasites. A crucial aspect of drug design development is the identification and characterization of novel molecular targets. In this work, through an in silico comparative analysis between the genomes of Leishmania major and Homo sapiens, the enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (R5PI) was indicated as a promising molecular target. R5PI is an important enzyme that acts in the pentose phosphate pathway and catalyzes the interconversion of d-ribose-5-phosphate (R5P) and d-ribulose-5-phosphate (5RP). R5PI activity is found in two analogous groups of enzymes called RpiA (found in H. sapiens) and RpiB (found in L. major). Here, we present the first report of the three-dimensional (3D) structures and active sites of RpiB from L. major (LmRpiB) and RpiA from H. sapiens (HsRpiA). Three-dimensional models were constructed by applying a hybrid methodology that combines comparative and ab initio modeling techniques, and the active site was characterized based on docking studies of the substrates R5P (furanose and ring-opened forms) and 5RP. Our comparative analyses show that these proteins are structural analogs and that distinct residues participate in the interconversion of R5P and 5RP. We propose two distinct reaction mechanisms for the reversible isomerization of R5P to 5RP, which is catalyzed by LmRpiB and HsRpiA. We expect that the present results will be important in guiding future molecular modeling studies to develop new drugs that are specially designed to inhibit the parasitic form of the enzyme without significant effects on the human analog. PMID:25528729

  11. High Altitude Long Endurance UAV Analysis Model Development and Application Study Comparing Solar Powered Airplane and Airship Station-Keeping Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, Thomas A.; Nickol, Craig L.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    There have been ongoing efforts in the Aeronautics Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center to develop a suite of integrated physics-based computational utilities suitable for modeling and analyzing extended-duration missions carried out using solar powered aircraft. From these efforts, SolFlyte has emerged as a state-of-the-art vehicle analysis and mission simulation tool capable of modeling both heavier-than-air (HTA) and lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicle concepts. This study compares solar powered airplane and airship station-keeping capability during a variety of high altitude missions, using SolFlyte as the primary analysis component. Three Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) concepts were designed for this study: an airplane (Operating Empty Weight (OEW) = 3285 kilograms, span = 127 meters, array area = 450 square meters), a small airship (OEW = 3790 kilograms, length = 115 meters, array area = 570 square meters), and a large airship (OEW = 6250 kilograms, length = 135 meters, array area = 1080 square meters). All the vehicles were sized for payload weight and power requirements of 454 kilograms and 5 kilowatts, respectively. Seven mission sites distributed throughout the United States were selected to provide a basis for assessing the vehicle energy budgets and site-persistent operational availability. Seasonal, 30-day duration missions were simulated at each of the sites during March, June, September, and December; one-year duration missions were simulated at three of the sites. Atmospheric conditions during the simulated missions were correlated to National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) historical data measurements at each mission site, at four flight levels. Unique features of the SolFlyte model are described, including methods for calculating recoverable and energy-optimal flight trajectories and the effects of shadows on solar energy collection. Results of this study indicate that: 1) the airplane concept attained longer periods of on

  12. Comparative analysis of rigidity across protein families.

    PubMed

    Wells, S A; Jimenez-Roldan, J E; Römer, R A

    2009-01-01

    We present a comparative study in which 'pebble game' rigidity analysis is applied to multiple protein crystal structures, for each of six different protein families. We find that the main-chain rigidity of a protein structure at a given hydrogen bond energy cutoff is quite sensitive to small structural variations, and conclude that the hydrogen bond constraints in rigidity analysis should be chosen so as to form and test specific hypotheses about the rigidity of a particular protein. Our comparative approach highlights two different characteristic patterns ('sudden' or 'gradual') for protein rigidity loss as constraints are removed, in line with recent results on the rigidity transitions of glassy networks. PMID:19773604

  13. Comparative analysis of planetary laser ranging concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkx, D.; Bauer, S.; Noomen, R.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.; Visser, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    Laser ranging is an emerging technology for tracking interplanetary missions, offering improved range accuracy and precision (mm-cm), compared to existing DSN tracking. The ground segment uses existing Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology, whereas the space segment is modified with an active system. In a one-way system, such as that currently being used on the LRO spacecraft (Zuber et al., 2010), only an active detector is required on the spacecraft. For a two-way system, such as that tested by using the laser altimeter system on the MESSENGER spacecraft en route to Mercury (Smith et al., 2006), a laser transmitter system is additionally placed on the space segment, which will asynchronously fire laser pulses towards the ground stations. Although the one-way system requires less hardware, clock errors on both the space and ground segments will accumulate over time, polluting the range measurements. For a two-way system, the range measurements are only sensitive to clock errors integrated over the the two-way light time.We investigate the performance of both one- and two-way laser range systems by simulating their operation. We generate realizations of clock error time histories from Allan variance profiles, and use them to create range measurement error profiles. We subsequently perform the orbit determination process from this data to quanitfy the system's performance. For our simulations, we use two test cases: a lunar orbiter similar to LRO and a Phobos lander similar to the Phobos Laser Ranging concept (Turyshev et al., 2010). For the lunar orbiter, we include an empirical model for unmodelled non-gravitational accelerations in our truth model to include errors ihe dynamics. We include the estimation of clock parameters over a number of arc lengths for our simulations of the one-way range system and use a variety of state arc durations for the lunar orbiter simulations.We perform Monte Carlo simulations and generate true error distributions for both

  14. Comparative morphometric analysis of microglia in the spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Yamada, Jun; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Jinno, Shozo

    2016-05-01

    It has long been recognized that reactive microglia undergo a series of phenotypic changes accompanying morphological transformation. However, the morphological classification of microglia has not yet been achieved. To address this issue, here we morphometrically analysed three-dimensionally reconstructed ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1-immunoreactive (Iba1(+) ) microglia in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that microglia were objectively divided into four groups: type S (named after surveillant microglia) and types R1, R2 and R3 (named after reactive microglia). For the purpose of comparative morphometry, we also analysed two pharmacological disease models using wild-type mice: 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced axonopathy and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. Type S microglia showed a typical ramified morphology of surveillant microglia, and were mostly observed in wild-type controls. Type R1 microglia were seen at the early stage of disease in SOD1(G93A) mice, and also frequently occurred in IDPN-treated mice. They exhibited small cell bodies with shorter and simple processes. Type R2 microglia were morphologically similar to type R1 microglia, but only transiently occurred in the middle stage of disease in SOD1(G93A) mice and in IDPN-treated mice. Type R3 microglia exhibited a bushy shape, and were observed in the end stage of disease in SOD1(G93A) mice and in LPS-treated mice. These findings indicate that microglia of SOD1(G93A) mice can be classified into four types, and also suggest that the phenotypic changes may be induced by the events related to axonopathy and neuroinflammation. PMID:26946061

  15. Comparing models of Red Knot population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, Conor

    2015-01-01

    Predictive population modeling contributes to our basic scientific understanding of population dynamics, but can also inform management decisions by evaluating alternative actions in virtual environments. Quantitative models mathematically reflect scientific hypotheses about how a system functions. In Delaware Bay, mid-Atlantic Coast, USA, to more effectively manage horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) harvests and protect Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations, models are used to compare harvest actions and predict the impacts on crab and knot populations. Management has been chiefly driven by the core hypothesis that horseshoe crab egg abundance governs the survival and reproduction of migrating Red Knots that stopover in the Bay during spring migration. However, recently, hypotheses proposing that knot dynamics are governed by cyclical lemming dynamics garnered some support in data analyses. In this paper, I present alternative models of Red Knot population dynamics to reflect alternative hypotheses. Using 2 models with different lemming population cycle lengths and 2 models with different horseshoe crab effects, I project the knot population into the future under environmental stochasticity and parametric uncertainty with each model. I then compare each model's predictions to 10 yr of population monitoring from Delaware Bay. Using Bayes' theorem and model weight updating, models can accrue weight or support for one or another hypothesis of population dynamics. With 4 models of Red Knot population dynamics and only 10 yr of data, no hypothesis clearly predicted population count data better than another. The collapsed lemming cycle model performed best, accruing ~35% of the model weight, followed closely by the horseshoe crab egg abundance model, which accrued ~30% of the weight. The models that predicted no decline or stable populations (i.e. the 4-yr lemming cycle model and the weak horseshoe crab effect model) were the most weakly supported.

  16. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my. PMID:26666970

  17. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my PMID:26666970

  18. Fold assessment for comparative protein structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2007-11-01

    Accurate and automated assessment of both geometrical errors and incompleteness of comparative protein structure models is necessary for an adequate use of the models. Here, we describe a composite score for discriminating between models with the correct and incorrect fold. To find an accurate composite score, we designed and applied a genetic algorithm method that searched for a most informative subset of 21 input model features as well as their optimized nonlinear transformation into the composite score. The 21 input features included various statistical potential scores, stereochemistry quality descriptors, sequence alignment scores, geometrical descriptors, and measures of protein packing. The optimized composite score was found to depend on (1) a statistical potential z-score for residue accessibilities and distances, (2) model compactness, and (3) percentage sequence identity of the alignment used to build the model. The accuracy of the composite score was compared with the accuracy of assessment by single and combined features as well as by other commonly used assessment methods. The testing set was representative of models produced by automated comparative modeling on a genomic scale. The composite score performed better than any other tested score in terms of the maximum correct classification rate (i.e., 3.3% false positives and 2.5% false negatives) as well as the sensitivity and specificity across the whole range of thresholds. The composite score was implemented in our program MODELLER-8 and was used to assess models in the MODBASE database that contains comparative models for domains in approximately 1.3 million protein sequences. PMID:17905832

  19. Comparative analysis of septic injury-inducible genes in phylogenetically distant model organisms of regeneration and stem cell research, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Altincicek, Boran; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    their common ancestor for more than five hundred millions of years. The present study is the first analysis of immune-inducible genes of these two phylogenetically distant model organisms of regeneration and provide numerous candidate genes that we can use as a starting point for comparative examination of interrelationships between immunity and homeostasis. PMID:18439314

  20. Comparative analysis of the Λb→Λ ℓ+ℓ- decay in the SM, SUSY, and RS model with custodial protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Olgun, A. T.; Tavukoǧlu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We comparatively analyze the rare Λb→Λ ℓ+ℓ- channel in the standard model, supersymmetry, and Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection (RSc). Using the parametrization of the matrix elements entering the low-energy effective Hamiltonian in terms of form factors, we calculate the corresponding differential decay width and lepton forward-backward asymmetry in these models. We compare the results obtained with the most recent data from LHCb as well as lattice QCD results on the considered quantities. It is obtained that the standard model, with the form factors calculated in light-cone QCD sum rules, cannot reproduce some experimental data on the physical quantities under consideration, but the supersymmetry model can do it. The RSc model predictions are roughly the same as the standard model, and there are no considerable differences between the predictions of these two models. In the case of differential decay rate, the data in the range 4 GeV2/c4≤q2≤6 GeV2/c4 cannot be described by any of the considered models.

  1. Effect of genetic algorithm as a variable selection method on different chemometric models applied for the analysis of binary mixture of amoxicillin and flucloxacillin: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Khalid A. M.; Nassar, Mohammed W. I.; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B.; Serag, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Different chemometric models were applied for the quantitative analysis of amoxicillin (AMX), and flucloxacillin (FLX) in their binary mixtures, namely, partial least squares (PLS), spectral residual augmented classical least squares (SRACLS), concentration residual augmented classical least squares (CRACLS) and artificial neural networks (ANNs). All methods were applied with and without variable selection procedure (genetic algorithm GA). The methods were used for the quantitative analysis of the drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and real market sample via handling the UV spectral data. Robust and simpler models were obtained by applying GA. The proposed methods were found to be rapid, simple and required no preliminary separation steps.

  2. Effect of genetic algorithm as a variable selection method on different chemometric models applied for the analysis of binary mixture of amoxicillin and flucloxacillin: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Attia, Khalid A M; Nassar, Mohammed W I; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B; Serag, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Different chemometric models were applied for the quantitative analysis of amoxicillin (AMX), and flucloxacillin (FLX) in their binary mixtures, namely, partial least squares (PLS), spectral residual augmented classical least squares (SRACLS), concentration residual augmented classical least squares (CRACLS) and artificial neural networks (ANNs). All methods were applied with and without variable selection procedure (genetic algorithm GA). The methods were used for the quantitative analysis of the drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and real market sample via handling the UV spectral data. Robust and simpler models were obtained by applying GA. The proposed methods were found to be rapid, simple and required no preliminary separation steps. PMID:26641286

  3. National Launch System comparative economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, A.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of economic benefits (or losses), in the form of the life cycle cost savings, resulting from the development of the National Launch System (NLS) family of launch vehicles. The analysis was carried out by comparing various NLS-based architectures with the current Shuttle/Titan IV fleet. The basic methodology behind this NLS analysis was to develop a set of annual payload requirements for the Space Station Freedom and LEO, to design launch vehicle architectures around these requirements, and to perform life-cycle cost analyses on all of the architectures. A SEI requirement was included. Launch failure costs were estimated and combined with the relative reliability assumptions to measure the effects of losses. Based on the analysis, a Shuttle/NLS architecture evolving into a pressurized-logistics-carrier/NLS architecture appears to offer the best long-term cost benefit.

  4. Image analysis in comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lundsteen, C.; Maahr, J.; Christensen, B.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a new technique by which genomic imbalances can be detected by combining in situ suppression hybridization of whole genomic DNA and image analysis. We have developed software for rapid, quantitative CGH image analysis by a modification and extension of the standard software used for routine karyotyping of G-banded metaphase spreads in the Magiscan chromosome analysis system. The DAPI-counterstained metaphase spread is karyotyped interactively. Corrections for image shifts between the DAPI, FITC, and TRITC images are done manually by moving the three images relative to each other. The fluorescence background is subtracted. A mean filter is applied to smooth the FITC and TRITC images before the fluorescence ratio between the individual FITC and TRITC-stained chromosomes is computed pixel by pixel inside the area of the chromosomes determined by the DAPI boundaries. Fluorescence intensity ratio profiles are generated, and peaks and valleys indicating possible gains and losses of test DNA are marked if they exceed ratios below 0.75 and above 1.25. By combining the analysis of several metaphase spreads, consistent findings of gains and losses in all or almost all spreads indicate chromosomal imbalance. Chromosomal imbalances are detected either by visual inspection of fluorescence ratio (FR) profiles or by a statistical approach that compares FR measurements of the individual case with measurements of normal chromosomes. The complete analysis of one metaphase can be carried out in approximately 10 minutes. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Applying the Rasch Model to Measure Mobility of Women: A Comparative Analysis of Mobility of Informal Workers in Fisheries in Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Menon, Nikhila

    2016-01-01

    Mobility or freedom and ability to move is gendered in many cultural contexts. In this paper I analyse mobility associated with work from the capability approach perspective of Sen. This is an empirical paper which uses the Rasch Rating Scale Model (RSM) to construct the measure of mobility of women for the first time in the development studies discourse. I construct a measure of mobility (latent trait) of women workers engaged in two types of informal work, namely, peeling work and fish vending, in fisheries in the cultural context of India. The scale measure enables first, to test the unidimensionality of my construct of mobility of women and second, to analyse the domains of mobility of women workers. The comparative analysis of the scale of permissibility of mobility constructed using the RSM for the informal women workers shows that women face constraints on mobility in social and personal spaces in the socially advanced state of Kerala in India. Work mobility does not expand the real freedoms, hence work mobility can be termed as bounded capability which is a capability limited or bounded by either the social, cultural and gender norms or a combination of all of these. Therefore at the macro level, growth in informal employment in sectors like fisheries which improve mobility of women through work mobility does not necessarily expand the capability sets by contributing to greater freedoms and transformational mobility. This paper has a significant methodological contribution in that it uses an innovative method for the measurement of mobility of women in the development studies discipline. PMID:26784381

  6. Comparative proteome analysis of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis grown on β-glucans from different sources and a model for their utilization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinyang; Cheung, Peter C K

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that β-glucans from different sources, which are considered as potential prebiotics, could enhance growth of bifidobacteria. To elucidate the metabolic pathway of β-glucans in the widely used probiotic B. longum subsp. infantis, a comparative proteomic analysis was carried out along with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), real-time RT-PCR, and enzyme activity assay on samples obtained from cultures grown on β-glucans derived from barley, seaweed, and mushroom. Results showed that 77 spots were found to be differentially expressed among different cultures, and 17 of them were predicted to play a role in β-glucan catabolism, including ABC transporter for sugars, enolase, and phosphotransferase system protein. Among them, 6 genes encoding for 6 proteins were shown to be induced by β-glucans at the transcriptional level and had higher abundance. The enzyme activity assay detected intracellular glucanase activity present in the cultures grown on the β-glucans from seaweed and mushroom. On the basis of the above results, a model for catabolism of β-glucans in B. infantis is proposed as follows: β-glucan molecules in the medium are transported into the cell through the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transport system and PTS (phosphotransferase system) proteins followed by hydrolysis through action of intracellular glucanase to glucose, which is subsequently incorporated into the central fermentative pathway 'bifid shunt'. This study for the first time reveals the possible degradation pathway of β-glucans by B. infantis, which has implications for potential use of these β-glucans as novel prebiotics in development of synbiotic application. PMID:23577653

  7. Homology modeling of major intrinsic proteins in rice, maize and Arabidopsis: comparative analysis of transmembrane helix association and aromatic/arginine selectivity filters

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Anjali; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2007-01-01

    Background The major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) facilitate the transport of water and neutral solutes across the lipid bilayers. Plant MIPs are believed to be important in cell division and expansion and in water transport properties in response to environmental conditions. More than 30 MIP sequences have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, maize and rice. Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), Nod26-like intrinsic protein (NIPs) and small and basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) are subfamilies of plant MIPs. Despite sequence diversity, all the experimentally determined structures belonging to the MIP superfamily have the same "hour-glass" fold. Results We have structurally characterized 39 rice and 31 maize MIPs and compared them with that of Arabidopsis. Homology models of 105 MIPs from all three plant species were built. Structure-based sequence alignments were generated and the residues in the helix-helix interfaces were analyzed. Small residues (Gly/Ala/Ser/Thr) are found to be highly conserved as a group in the helix-helix interface of MIP structures. Individual families sometimes prefer one or another of the residues from this group. The narrow aromatic/arginine (ar/R) selectivity filter in MIPs has been shown to provide an important constriction for solute permeability. Ar/R regions were analyzed and compared between the three plant species. Seventeen TIP, NIP and SIP members from rice and maize have ar/R signatures that are not found in Arabidopsis. A subgroup of rice and maize NIPs has small residues in three of the four positions in the ar/R tetrad, resulting in a wider constriction. These MIP members could transport larger solute molecules. Conclusion Small residues are group-conserved in the helix-helix interface of MIP structures and they seem to be important for close helix-helix interactions. Such conservation might help to preserve the hour-glass fold in MIP structures. Analysis and comparison of ar

  8. Comparative performance analysis of mobile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaee-Rad, Reza; Aleksic, Milivoje

    2012-01-01

    Cell-phone display performance (in terms of color quality and optical efficiency) has become a critical factor in creating a positive user experience. As a result, there is a significant amount of effort by cell-phone OEMs to provide a more competitive display solution. This effort is focused on using different display technologies (with significantly different color characteristics) and more sophisticated display processors. In this paper, the results of a mobile-display comparative performance analysis are presented. Three cell-phones from major OEMs are selected and their display performances are measured and quantified. Comparative performance analysis is done using display characteristics such as display color gamut size, RGB-channels crosstalk, RGB tone responses, gray tracking performance, color accuracy, and optical efficiency.

  9. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  10. Urea kinetic modeling: comparing the options.

    PubMed

    Hoenich, N A; Keir, M J; Hildreth, K; Woffindin, C; Goodall, R; Vanholder, R; Ward, M K

    1993-09-01

    In this study 6 commercially produced kinetic modeling packages utilizing a variable volume, single pool urea model, as well as formulae to determine the delivery of therapy, have been compared by applying to each the same set of rigorously collected data for a group of 12 patients. Comparison of the kinetically derived parameters (urea generation rate [G], urea distribution volume [V], delivery of therapy [Kt/V], and normalized protein catabolic rate [nPCR]) showed that the values obtained for both G and V differed between packages owing to the numerical methods and the clearance used in the solution of the differential equations. Although a broad agreement between the values established for Kt/V and nPCR was noted, the 95% limits of agreement indicated that it would be prudent to exercise caution when comparing results established by different modeling packages. PMID:8240076

  11. Nuclear matrix elements for 0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays: Comparative analysis of the QRPA, shell model and IBM predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Civitarese, Osvaldo; Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    In this work we report on general properties of the nuclear matrix elements involved in the neutrinoless double β{sup −} decays (0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays) of several nuclei. A summary of the values of the NMEs calculated along the years by the Jyväskylä-La Plata collaboration is presented. These NMEs, calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), are compared with those of the other available calculations, like the Shell Model (ISM) and the interacting boson model (IBA-2)

  12. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ainur B.; Izekenova, Aigulsum; Abikulova, Akmaral

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Materials and Methods: Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Results: Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. Conclusion: The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level. PMID:24516484

  13. Comparative analysis of two hydrological models with different glacier parameterisations for climate impact assessment and water resources management in the Syrdarya Basin, Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Abror; Duethmann, Doris; Agaltseva, Natalya; Merkushkin, Alexander; Pak, Alexander; Kriegel, David; Huss, Matthias; Güntner, Andreas; Merz, Bruno; Unger-Shayesteh, Katy; Mannig, Birgit; Paeth, Heiko; Vorogushyn, Sergiy

    2014-05-01

    Central Asian river basins in general and zones of run-off formation in particular are currently experiencing the impact of increasing temperatures and changes in precipitation. The headwaters thus exhibit negative glacier mass balances, decreasing glacierisation, changes in snow cover characteristics and changing runoff response. These changes are likely to intensify in future under the changing climate. Both hydropower industry and irrigated agriculture in the downstream areas strongly depend on the water amount, its seasonal and long-term distribution. This fact calls for an effort to reliably assess water availability in the runoff formation zone of Central Asia in order to improve water management policy in the region. One of the approaches to assessment of water resources is the evaluation of climate scenarios with the climate-and-hydrology model chain. Application of several models allows reducing the modeling uncertainty and proceeding with more robust water balance components assessment. We present the comparison of the two hydrological models AISHF (Automated Information System for Hydrological Forecasting) developed at the Centre for Hydrometeorology of Uzbekistan and WASA run at GFZ Potsdam, implemented for the Naryn and Karadarya basins (Syrdarya). These models use different parameterization and calibration schemes. Whereas in the AISHF model glacier dynamics is considered in scenarios of glacier area loss, the WASA model simulates continuous glacier mass balance, glacier area and volume evolution based on meteorological drivers. Consideration of initial glacier volume and its temporal dynamics can be essential for climate impact assessment in transient model simulations. The impact of climate change scenarios, developed with the regional climate model REMO at the University of Würzburg, are compared with respect to total discharge dynamics and runoff contributions from glacier, snowmelt and rainfall. Implications of water availability assessment

  14. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, G R

    2003-01-01

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles. PMID:14561348

  15. Comparative transcriptome analysis of four prymnesiophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Koid, Amy E; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C; Caron, David A; Heidelberg, Karla B

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists. PMID:24926657

  16. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Four Prymnesiophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Koid, Amy E.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C.; Caron, David A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists. PMID:24926657

  17. A Framework for the Comparative Analysis of Farm Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Joseph J.

    Presenting a model for the comparative analysis of farm organizations, this paper analyzes the farm firm as a complex organization; identifies key structural dimensions of an agricultural production unit; and reviews various organizational perspectives for their utility in understanding and explaining the behavior of farm operations and farm…

  18. Comparative genome analysis of Basidiomycete fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Henrissat, Bernard; Nagy, Laszlo; Brown, Daren; Held, Benjamin; Baker, Scott; Blanchette, Robert; Boussau, Bastien; Doty, Sharon L.; Fagnan, Kirsten; Floudas, Dimitris; Levasseur, Anthony; Manning, Gerard; Martin, Francis; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan; Wolfe, Ken; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-08-07

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To better understand the genetic diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycetes including 6 newly sequenced genomes. These genomes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) found in only one organism. Correlations between lifestyle and certain gene families are evident. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes in Agaricomycotina suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of wood decay genes, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has typical ligninolytic class II fungal peroxidases (PODs). This prediction is supported by growth assays in which both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics. Based on this, we suggest that the white/brown rot dichotomy may be inadequate to describe the full range of wood decaying fungi. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  19. Value of Organoids from Comparative Epithelia Models.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Julia S; de Jonge, Hugo R; Forrest, John N

    2015-12-01

    Organoids have tremendous therapeutic potential. They were recently defined as a collection of organ-specific cell types, which self-organize through cell-sorting, develop from stem cells, and perform an organ specific function. The ability to study organoid development and growth in culture and manipulate their genetic makeup makes them particularly suitable for studying development, disease, and drug efficacy. Organoids show great promise in personalized medicine. From a single patient biopsy, investigators can make hundreds of organoids with the genetic landscape of the patient of origin. This genetic similarity makes organoids an ideal system in which to test drug efficacy. While many investigators assume human organoids are the ultimate model system, we believe that the generation of epithelial organoids of comparative model organisms has great potential. Many key transport discoveries were made using marine organisms. In this paper, we describe how deriving organoids from the spiny dogfish shark, zebrafish, and killifish can contribute to the fields of comparative biology and disease modeling with future prospects for personalized medicine. PMID:26604860

  20. Value of Organoids from Comparative Epithelia Models

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Julia S.; de Jonge, Hugo R.; Forrest, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Organoids have tremendous therapeutic potential. They were recently defined as a collection of organ-specific cell types, which self-organize through cell-sorting, develop from stem cells, and perform an organ specific function. The ability to study organoid development and growth in culture and manipulate their genetic makeup makes them particularly suitable for studying development, disease, and drug efficacy. Organoids show great promise in personalized medicine. From a single patient biopsy, investigators can make hundreds of organoids with the genetic landscape of the patient of origin. This genetic similarity makes organoids an ideal system in which to test drug efficacy. While many investigators assume human organoids are the ultimate model system, we believe that the generation of epithelial organoids of comparative model organisms has great potential. Many key transport discoveries were made using marine organisms. In this paper, we describe how deriving organoids from the spiny dogfish shark, zebrafish, and killifish can contribute to the fields of comparative biology and disease modeling with future prospects for personalized medicine. PMID:26604860

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of compartmentalised Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are membrane bound signalling hubs that operate from both the cell surface and endomembrane compartments. However, the extent to which intracellular pools of Ras can contribute to cell signalling is debated. To address this, we have performed a global screen of compartmentalised Ras signalling. We find that whilst ER/Golgi- and endosomal-Ras only generate weak outputs, Ras localised to the mitochondria or Golgi significantly and distinctly influence both the abundance and phosphorylation of a wide range of proteins analysed. Our data reveal that ~80% of phosphosites exhibiting large (≥1.5-fold) changes compared to control can be modulated by organellar Ras signalling. The majority of compartmentalised Ras-specific responses are predicted to influence gene expression, RNA splicing and cell proliferation. Our analysis reinforces the concept that compartmentalisation influences Ras signalling and provides detailed insight into the widespread modulation of responses downstream of endomembranous Ras signalling. PMID:26620772

  2. Comparative Genome Analysis of Basidiomycete Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Morin, Emmanuelle; Nagy, Laszlo; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Hibbett, David; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, symbionts, and plant and animal pathogens. To better understand the diversity of phenotypes in basidiomycetes, we performed a comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete fungi spanning the diversity of the phylum. Phylogenetic patterns of lignocellulose degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Patterns of secondary metabolic enzymes give additional insight into the broad array of phenotypes found in the basidiomycetes. We suggest that the profile of an organism in lignocellulose-targeting genes can be used to predict its nutritional mode, and predict Dacryopinax sp. as a brown rot; Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots.

  3. A comparative analysis of the model calculated and GPS-observed TEC variations before the Haiti, 2010 and Japan, 2011 earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgaladze, Alexander; Karpov, Mikhail; Zolotov, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    Model simulations of the ionosphere Total Electron Content (TEC) variations have been performed for the Haiti January 12, 2010 and Japan March 11, 2011 earthquakes. Calculations have been carried out using the global numerical Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The seismogenic impacts in the model have been set as lower boundary conditions for the electric potential equation. Namely, the vertical electric currents of ~ 20 nA/m2 flowing from the ionosphere to the Earth have been set at the near-epicenter area of ~ 250 by 2000 km. The simulated relative (%) TEC disturbances for both events have been compared to each other and to the corresponding GPS-observed data. The common features persisting at both observed and modeled TEC variations are: (1) the appearance of positive disturbances 20 - 40% by magnitude at night hours for 2 - 4 days before the earthquake, (2) the geomagnetic conjugation of the effects and (3) the lack of migration (movements) of the TEC deviations during their lifetime (of ~ 8 hours). Main differences between the considered events (Haiti and Japan), both modeled and observed, are most evidently pronounced in the TEC disturbances' maximum location relative to the geomagnetic equator. In case of the Haiti earthquake the strongest by magnitude TEC disturbances are located near the magnetically conjugated to the earthquake's epicenter region at the Southern hemisphere, while in case of the Japan earthquake - near the epicenter at the Northern hemisphere. We have attributed this difference to the different seasons the events have taken place in. The asymmetry of the Haiti model TEC disturbances relative to the magnetic meridian of the earthquake's epicenter is in agreement with the GPS-observed one. In case of the Japan earthquake the asymmetry of the TEC deviations relative to the magnetic meridian of the earthquake's epicenter is negligible in the observations, while in the model results it is similar to the Haiti case. In order to remove this asymmetry

  4. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  5. Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-07

    Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Genome Sequences with VISTA

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dubchak, Inna

    VISTA is a comprehensive suite of programs and databases developed by and hosted at the Genomics Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. They provide information and tools designed to facilitate comparative analysis of genomic sequences. Users have two ways to interact with the suite of applications at the VISTA portal. They can submit their own sequences and alignments for analysis (VISTA servers) or examine pre-computed whole-genome alignments of different species. A key menu option is the Enhancer Browser and Database at http://enhancer.lbl.gov/. The VISTA Enhancer Browser is a central resource for experimentally validated human noncoding fragments with gene enhancer activity as assessed in transgenic mice. Most of these noncoding elements were selected for testing based on their extreme conservation with other vertebrates. The results of this enhancer screen are provided through this publicly available website. The browser also features relevant results by external contributors and a large collection of additional genome-wide conserved noncoding elements which are candidate enhancer sequences. The LBL developers invite external groups to submit computational predictions of developmental enhancers. As of 10/19/2009 the database contains information on 1109 in vivo tested elements - 508 elements with enhancer activity.

  7. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Two Mouse Models of Autism: Transcriptome Profiling of the BTBR and En2−/− Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Corradi, Zelia; Monsorno, Katia; Fedrizzi, Tarcisio; Ricceri, Laura; Scattoni, Maria L.; Bozzi, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    /− DEGs. Weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA) performed on BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal transcriptomes together identified six modules significantly enriched in ASD-related genes. Each of these modules showed a specific enrichment profile in neuronal and glial genes, as well as in genes associated to ASD comorbidities such as epilepsy and SCZ. Our data reveal significant transcriptional similarities and differences between the BTBR and En2−/− hippocampus, indicating that transcriptome analysis of ASD mouse models may contribute to identify novel molecular targets for pharmacological studies. PMID:27610074

  8. Comparative Modal Analysis of Sieve Hardware Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    The CMTB Thwacker hardware operates as a testbed analogue for the Flight Thwacker and Sieve components of CHIMRA, a device on the Curiosity Rover. The sieve separates particles with a diameter smaller than 150 microns for delivery to onboard science instruments. The sieving behavior of the testbed hardware should be similar to the Flight hardware for the results to be meaningful. The elastodynamic behavior of both sieves was studied analytically using the Rayleigh Ritz method in conjunction with classical plate theory. Finite element models were used to determine the mode shapes of both designs, and comparisons between the natural frequencies and mode shapes were made. The analysis predicts that the performance of the CMTB Thwacker will closely resemble the performance of the Flight Thwacker within the expected steady state operating regime. Excitations of the testbed hardware that will mimic the flight hardware were recommended, as were those that will improve the efficiency of the sieving process.

  9. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  10. Comparative Analysis of Cystatin Superfamily in Platyhelminths

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Aijiang

    2015-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG) was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW), a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution. PMID:25853513

  11. Towards using a full spectrum of early clinical trial data: a retrospective analysis to compare potential longitudinal categorical models for molecular targeted therapies in oncology.

    PubMed

    Colin, Pierre; Micallef, Sandrine; Delattre, Maud; Mancini, Pierre; Parent, Eric

    2015-09-30

    Following the pattern of phase I clinical trials for cytotoxic drugs, dose-finding clinical trials in oncology of molecularly targeted agents (MTA) aim at determining the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). In classical phase I clinical trials, MTD is generally defined by the number of patients with short-term major treatment toxicities (usually called dose-limiting toxicities, DLT), occurring during the first cycle of study treatment (e.g. within the first 3weeks of treatment). However, S. Postel-Vinay (2011) highlighted that half of grade 3 to 4 toxicities, usually considered as DLT, occur after the first cycle of MTA treatment. In addition, MTAs could induce other moderate (e.g. grade 2) toxicities which could be taken into account depending on their clinical importance, chronic nature and duration. Ignoring these late toxicities may lead to an underestimation of the drug toxicity and to wrong dose recommendations for phase II and III clinical trials. Some methods have been proposed, such as the time-to-event continuous reassessment method (Cheung 2000 and Mauguen 2011), to take into account the late toxicities. We suggest approaches based on longitudinal models (Doussau 2013). We compare several models for longitudinal data, such as transitional or marginal models, to take into account all relevant toxicities occurring during the entire length of the patient treatment (and not just the events within a predefined short-term time-window). These models allow the statistician to benefit from a larger amount of safety data which could potentially improve that accuracy in MTD assessment. PMID:26059319

  12. Comparative network analysis via differential graphlet communities

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Serene W H; Cercone, Nick; Jurisica, Igor

    2015-01-01

    While current protein interaction data provides a rich resource for molecular biology, it mostly lacks condition-specific details. Abundance of mRNA data for most diseases provides potential to model condition-specific transcriptional changes. Transcriptional data enables modeling disease mechanisms, and in turn provide potential treatments. While approaches to compare networks constructed from healthy and disease samples have been developed, they do not provide the complete comparison, evaluations are performed on very small networks, or no systematic network analyses are performed on differential network structures. We propose a novel method for efficiently exploiting network structure information in the comparison between any graphs, and validate results in non-small cell lung cancer. We introduce the notion of differential graphlet community to detect deregulated subgraphs between any graphs such that the network structure information is exploited. The differential graphlet community approach systematically captures network structure differences between any graphs. Instead of using connectivity of each protein or each edge, we used shortest path distributions on differential graphlet communities in order to exploit network structure information on identified deregulated subgraphs. We validated the method by analyzing three non-small cell lung cancer datasets and validated results on four independent datasets. We observed that the shortest path lengths are significantly longer for normal graphs than for tumor graphs between genes that are in differential graphlet communities, suggesting that tumor cells create "shortcuts" between biological processes that may not be present in normal conditions. PMID:25283527

  13. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  14. Predictive and comparative analysis of Ebolavirus proteins.

    PubMed

    Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-01-01

    Ebolavirus is the pathogen for Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF). This disease exhibits a high fatality rate and has recently reached a historically epidemic proportion in West Africa. Out of the 5 known Ebolavirus species, only Reston ebolavirus has lost human pathogenicity, while retaining the ability to cause EHF in long-tailed macaque. Significant efforts have been spent to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structures of Ebolavirus proteins, to study their interaction with host proteins, and to identify the functional motifs in these viral proteins. Here, in light of these experimental results, we apply computational analysis to predict the 3D structures and functional sites for Ebolavirus protein domains with unknown structure, including a zinc-finger domain of VP30, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalytic domain and a methyltransferase domain of protein L. In addition, we compare sequences of proteins that interact with Ebolavirus proteins from RESTV-resistant primates with those from RESTV-susceptible monkeys. The host proteins that interact with GP and VP35 show an elevated level of sequence divergence between the RESTV-resistant and RESTV-susceptible species, suggesting that they may be responsible for host specificity. Meanwhile, we detect variable positions in protein sequences that are likely associated with the loss of human pathogenicity in RESTV, map them onto the 3D structures and compare their positions to known functional sites. VP35 and VP30 are significantly enriched in these potential pathogenicity determinants and the clustering of such positions on the surfaces of VP35 and GP suggests possible uncharacterized interaction sites with host proteins that contribute to the virulence of Ebolavirus. PMID:26158395

  15. Comparative metagenome analysis of an Alaskan glacier.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Sulbha; Lohia, Ruchi; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    The temperature in the Arctic region has been increasing in the recent past accompanied by melting of its glaciers. We took a snapshot of the current microbial inhabitation of an Alaskan glacier (which can be considered as one of the simplest possible ecosystems) by using metagenomic sequencing of 16S rRNA recovered from ice/snow samples. Somewhat contrary to our expectations and earlier estimates, a rich and diverse microbial population of more than 2,500 species was revealed including several species of Archaea that has been identified for the first time in the glaciers of the Northern hemisphere. The most prominent bacterial groups found were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Firmicutes were not reported in large numbers in a previously studied Alpine glacier but were dominant in an Antarctic subglacial lake. Representatives of Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes were among the most numerous, likely reflecting the dependence of the ecosystem on the energy obtained through photosynthesis and close links with the microbial community of the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) of nucleotide word frequency revealed distinct sequence clusters for different taxonomic groups in the Alaskan glacier community and separate clusters for the glacial communities from other regions of the world. Comparative analysis of the community composition and bacterial diversity present in the Byron glacier in Alaska with other environments showed larger overlap with an Arctic soil than with a high Arctic lake, indicating patterns of community exchange and suggesting that these bacteria may play an important role in soil development during glacial retreat. PMID:24712530

  16. Ring Current Dynamics in Moderate and Strong Storms: Comparative Analysis of TWINS and IMAGE/HENA Data with the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Goldstein, J.; Valek, P.; McComas, D. J.; Brandt, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present a comparative study of ring current dynamics during strong and moderate storms. The ring current during the strong storm is studied with IMAGE/HENA data near the solar cycle maximum in 2000. The ring current during the moderate storm is studied using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data from the Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral- Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission during the solar minimum in 2008. For both storms, the local time distributions of ENA emissions show signatures of postmidnight enhancement (PME) during the main phases. To model the ring current and ENA emissions, we use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM). CRCM results show that the main-phase ring current pressure peaks in the premidnight-dusk sector, while the most intense CRCM-simulated ENA emissions show PME signatures. We analyze two factors to explain this difference: the dependence of charge-exchange cross section on energy and pitch angle distributions of ring current. We find that the IMF By effect (twisting of the convection pattern due to By) is not needed to form the PME. Additionally, the PME is more pronounced for the strong storm, although relative shielding and hence electric field skewing is well developed for both events.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Effect of Density, Insertion Angle and Reinsertion on Pull-Out Strength of Single and Two Pedicle Screw Constructs Using Synthetic Bone Model

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vicky; Kumar, Gurunathan Saravana

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study. Purpose To determine the effect of density, insertion angle and reinsertion on pull-out strength of pedicle screw in single and two screw-rod configurations. Overview of Literature Pedicle screw pull-out studies have involved single screw construct, whereas two screws and rod constructs are always used in spine fusions. Extrapolation of results using the single screw construct may lead to using expensive implants or increasing the fusion levels specifically in osteoporotic bones. Methods Single screw and two screw pull-out strength tests were carried out according to American Society for Testing and Materials F 543-07 on foam models to test the effect of density, insertion angle and reinsertion using poly axial pedicle screws. Results Bone density was the most significant factor deciding the pull-out strength in both single and two screw constructs. The difference in pull-out strength between single screw and two screw configurations in extremely osteoporotic bone model (80 kg/m3) was 78%, whereas in the normal bone model it was 48%. Axial pull-out value was highest for the single screw configuration; in the two screw configuration the highest pull-out strength was at 10°–15°. There was an 18% reduction in pull-out strength due to reinsertion in single screw configuration. The reinsertion effect was insignificant in the two screw configuration. Conclusions A significant difference in response of various factors on holding power of pedicle screw between single and two-screw configurations is evident. The percentage increase in pull-out strength between single and two screw constructs is higher for osteoporotic bone when compared to normal bone. Reinsertion has no significant effect on pull-out strength in the two screw rod configuration. PMID:27340518

  18. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Evapotranspiration Using Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BAE, H.; Ji, H.; Lee, B.; Nam, K.; Jang, B.; Lee, C.; Jung, H.

    2013-12-01

    The eddy covariance method has been widely used to quantify evapotranspiration. However, independent measurements of energy components such as latent heat flux, sensible heat flux often lead to under-measurements, this is commonly known as a lack of closure of the surface energy balance. In response to this methodological problem, this study is addressed specifically to correction of the latent and heat sensible fluxes. The energy components observed in agricultural and grassland from January 2013 were measured using the eddy covariance method. As a result of the comparison of the available energy (Rn-G) with the sum of the latent and sensible heat fluxes, R-Squared values were 0.72 in the agricultural land, 0.78 in the grassland, indicating that the latent and sensible heat fluxes were under-measured. The obtained latent and sensible heat fluxes were then modified using the Bowen-ratio closure method. After this correction process, the values of the sum of the latent and sensible heat fluxes have increased by 39.7 percent in the agricultural land, 32.2 percent in the grassland respectively. Evapotranspiration will be calculated with both the unmodified and modified latent heat flux values, the results will be then thoroughly compared. The results will be finally verified by comparison with evapotranspiration obtained from energy balance based model.

  20. Breastfeeding policy: a globally comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raub, Amy; Earle, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the extent to which national policies guaranteeing breastfeeding breaks to working women may facilitate breastfeeding. Methods An analysis was conducted of the number of countries that guarantee breastfeeding breaks, the daily number of hours guaranteed, and the duration of guarantees. To obtain current, detailed information on national policies, original legislation as well as secondary sources on 182 of the 193 Member States of the United Nations were examined. Regression analyses were conducted to test the association between national policy and rates of exclusive breastfeeding while controlling for national income level, level of urbanization, female percentage of the labour force and female literacy rate. Findings Breastfeeding breaks with pay are guaranteed in 130 countries (71%) and unpaid breaks are guaranteed in seven (4%). No policy on breastfeeding breaks exists in 45 countries (25%). In multivariate models, the guarantee of paid breastfeeding breaks for at least 6 months was associated with an increase of 8.86 percentage points in the rate of exclusive breastfeeding (P < 0.05). Conclusion A greater percentage of women practise exclusive breastfeeding in countries where laws guarantee breastfeeding breaks at work. If these findings are confirmed in longitudinal studies, health outcomes could be improved by passing legislation on breastfeeding breaks in countries that do not yet ensure the right to breastfeed. PMID:24052676

  1. Development of intelligent systems based on Bayesian regularization network and neuro-fuzzy models for mass detection in mammograms: A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahersia, Hela; Boulehmi, Hela; Hamrouni, Kamel

    2016-04-01

    Female breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world. Several efforts in artificial intelligence have been made to help improving the diagnostic accuracy at earlier stages. However, the identification of breast abnormalities, like masses, on mammographic images is not a trivial task, especially for dense breasts. In this paper we describe our novel mass detection process that includes three successive steps of enhancement, characterization and classification. The proposed enhancement system is based mainly on the analysis of the breast texture. First of all, a filtering step with morphological operators and soft thresholding is achieved. Then, we remove from the filtered breast region, all the details that may interfere with the eventual masses, including pectoral muscle and galactophorous tree. The pixels belonging to this tree will be interpolated and replaced by the average of the neighborhood. In the characterization process, measurement of the Gaussian density in the wavelet domain allows the segmentation of the masses. Finally, a comparative classification mechanism based on the Bayesian regularization back-propagation networks and ANFIS techniques is proposed. The tests were conducted on the MIAS database. The results showed the robustness of the proposed enhancement method. PMID:26831269

  2. Mathematical Model analysis of Wallstent and Aneurx: dynamic responses of bare-metal endoprosthesis compared with those of stent-graft.

    PubMed

    Canic, Suncica; Ravi-Chandar, K; Krajcer, Zvonimir; Mirkovic, Dragan; Lapin, Serguei

    2005-01-01

    We performed this study in order to analyze the mechanical properties of bare-metal Wallstent endoprostheses and of AneuRx stent-grafts and to compare their responses to hemodynamic forces. Mathematical modeling, numerical simulations, and experimental measurements were used to study the 2 structurally different types of endoprostheses. Our findings revealed that a single bare-metal Wallstent endoprosthesis is 10 times more flexible (elastic) than is the wall of the aneurysmal abdominal aorta. Graphs showing the changes in the diameter and length of the stent when exposed to a range of internal and external pressures were obtained. If the aorta is axially stiff and resists length change, a force as large as 1 kg can act in the axial direction on the aortic wall. If the stent is not firmly anchored, it will migrate. In contrast, a fabric-covered, fully supported, stent-graft such as the AneuRx is significantly less compliant than the aorta or the bare-metal stent. During each cardiac cycle, the stent frame tends to move due to its higher elasticity, while the fabric resists movement, which might break the sutures that join the fabric to the frame. Elevated local transmural pressure, detected along the prosthesis graft, can contribute to material fatigue. PMID:16429893

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Neurotrophic Factors CDNF and GDNF in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garea-Rodríguez, Enrique; Eesmaa, Ave; Lindholm, Päivi; Schlumbohm, Christina; König, Jessica; Meller, Birgit; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Helms, Gunther; Saarma, Mart; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) belongs to a newly discovered family of evolutionarily conserved neurotrophic factors. We demonstrate for the first time a therapeutic effect of CDNF in a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of Parkinson’s disease in marmoset monkeys. Furthermore, we tested the impact of high chronic doses of human recombinant CDNF on unlesioned monkeys and analyzed the amino acid sequence of marmoset CDNF. The severity of 6-OHDA lesions and treatment effects were monitored in vivo using 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) SPECT. Quantitative analysis of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT showed a significant increase of dopamine transporter binding activity in lesioned animals treated with CDNF. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a well-characterized and potent neurotrophic factor for dopamine neurons, served as a control in a parallel comparison with CDNF. By contrast with CDNF, only single animals responded to the treatment with GDNF, but no statistical difference was observed in the GDNF group. However, increased numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons, observed within the lesioned caudate nucleus of GDNF-treated animals, indicate a strong bioactive potential of GDNF. PMID:26901822

  4. Uses of Phage Display in Agriculture: Sequence Analysis and Comparative Modeling of Late Embryogenesis Abundant Client Proteins Suggest Protein-Nucleic Acid Binding Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A. Bruce; Payne, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins—Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins—has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules. PMID:23956788

  5. Comparing Results from Constant Comparative and Computer Software Methods: A Reflection about Qualitative Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putten, Jim Vander; Nolen, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared qualitative research results obtained by manual constant comparative analysis with results obtained by computer software analysis of the same data. An investigated about issues of trustworthiness and accuracy ensued. Results indicated that the inductive constant comparative data analysis generated 51 codes and two coding levels…

  6. Comparing modelled fire dynamics with charcoal records for the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücher, Tim; Brovkin, Victor; Kloster, Silvia; Marlon, Jennifer; Power, Mitch

    2014-05-01

    An Earth System model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2, and land surface model JSBACH that includes dynamic vegetation, carbon cycle, and fire regime are used for simulation of natural fire dynamics through the last 8,000 years. To compare the fire model results with the charcoal reconstructions, several output variables of the fire model (burned area, carbon emissions) and several approaches of model output processing are tested. The z-scores out of charcoal dataset have been calculated for the period 8,000 to 200 BP to exclude a period of strong anthropogenic forcing during the last two centuries. The model analysis points mainly to an increasing fire activity during the Holocene for most of the investigated areas, which is in good correspondence to reconstructed fire trends out of charcoal data for most of the tested regions, while for few regions such as Europe the simulated trend and the reconstructed trends are different. The difference between the modeled and reconstructed fire activity could be due to absence of the anthropogenic forcing in the model simulations, but also due to limitations of model assumptions for modeling fire dynamics. For the model trends, the usage of averaging or z-score processing of model output resulted in similar directions of trend. Therefore, the approach of fire model output processing does not effect results of the model-data comparison. Global fire modeling is still in its infancy; improving our representations of fire through validation exercises such as what we present here is thus essential before testing hypotheses about the effects of extreme climate changes on fire behavior and potential feedbacks that result from those changes. Brücher, T., Brovkin, V., Kloster, S., Marlon, J. R., and Power, M. J.: Comparing modelled fire dynamics with charcoal records for the Holocene, Clim. Past Discuss., 9, 6429-6458, doi:10.5194/cpd-9-6429-2013, 2013.

  7. Comparative analysis of the immunologic response induced by the Sterne 34F2 live spore Bacillus anthracis vaccine in a ruminant model.

    PubMed

    Ndumnego, Okechukwu C; Köhler, Susanne M; Crafford, Jannie; van Heerden, Henriette; Beyer, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The Sterne 34F2 live spore vaccine (SLSV) developed in 1937 is the most widely used veterinary vaccine against anthrax. However, literature on the immunogenicity of this vaccine in a target ruminant host is scarce. In this study, we evaluated the humoral response to the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (rPA), a recombinant bacillus collagen-like protein of anthracis (rBclA), formaldehyde inactivated spores (FIS) prepared from strain 34F2 and a vegetative antigen formulation prepared from a capsule and toxin deficient strain (CDC 1014) in Boer goats. The toxin neutralizing ability of induced antibodies was evaluated using an in vitro toxin neutralization assay. The protection afforded by the vaccine was also assessed in vaccinates. Anti-rPA, anti-FIS and lethal toxin neutralizing titres were superior after booster vaccinations, compared to single vaccinations. Qualitative analysis of humoral responses to rPA, rBclA and FIS antigens revealed a preponderance of anti-FIS IgG titres following either single or double vaccinations with the SLSV. Antibodies against FIS and rPA both increased by 350 and 300-fold following revaccinations respectively. There was no response to rBclA following vaccinations with the SLSV. Toxin neutralizing titres increased by 80-fold after single vaccination and 700-fold following a double vaccination. Lethal challenge studies in naïve goats indicated a minimum infective dose of 36 B. anthracis spores. Single and double vaccination with the SLSV protected 4/5 and 3/3 of goats challenged with>800 spores respectively. An early booster vaccination following the first immunization is suggested in order to achieve a robust immunity. Results from this study indicate that this crucial second vaccination can be administered as early as 3 months after the initial vaccination. PMID:27496738

  8. Chinese Science Policy: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Maurice N., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Lists the assumptions inherent in a liberal model of science and explains how the Chinese model combines a contemporary challenge to this liberal model with a strong positive valuation of science. Explains the problems and patterns related to scientific development in China and the Soviet Union. (GS)

  9. Comparative analysis of in situ versus ex situ perfusion on flow and microcirculation in kidney procurement: research on a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The first crucial step in transplantation appears to be the effective rinsing of the graft during organ procurement. Even though there is strong suspicion that ex situ perfusion results in better rinsing of the graft, there is no proof for this hypothesis. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences of in situ and ex situ kidney perfusion in a porcine model. Methods Standardised multiorgan procurement was performed in 15 German landrace pigs. Perfusion was carried out using histidine–tryptophan–ketoglutarate solution (HTK) under the application of pressure. In one kidney, in situ perfusion via the aorta was carried out while the second kidney received ex situ perfusion via the renal artery (RA). Perfusate flow inside the aorta and the RA was recorded at different pressure steps. In order to visualise the effect on the microcirculation, different coloured microparticles (MPs; 10 μm) were administered via the aorta or RA. Subsequently, frozen sections of the explanted kidneys were analysed histologically and MPs were evaluated quantitatively. Results Ex situ kidney perfusion resulted in significantly improved flow rates (P<0.0001) compared with in situ perfusion. By applying ex situ perfusion it was even possible to attain physiological flow levels on the RA under the application of external pressure of 150 to 200 mmHg. The amount of MPs was able to highlight the positive impact of ex situ perfusion on microcirculation of the kidney graft (P<0.0001). Conclusions The use of MPs represents a valuable tool for quantitative investigation and illustration of kidney perfusion in experimental setups. Additional ex situ perfusion is able to improve the quality of kidney perfusion. PMID:23837545

  10. Developmental changes in hepatic glucose metabolism in a newborn piglet model: A comparative analysis for suckling period and early weaning period.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunyan; Wang, Qinhua; Wang, Jing; Tan, Bie; Fan, Zhiyong; Deng, Ze-yuan; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-19

    The liver glucose metabolism, supplying sufficient energy for glucose-dependent tissues, is important in suckling or weaned animals, although there are few studies with piglet model. To better understand the development of glucose metabolism in the piglets during suckling period and early weaning period, we determined the hepatic glycogen content, and investigated the relative protein expression of key enzymes of glucogenesis (GNG) and mRNA levels of some glucose metabolism-related genes. During suckling period, the protein level of G6Pase in the liver of suckling piglets progressively declined with day of age compared with that of newborn piglets (at 1 day of age), whereas the PEPCK level stabilized until day 21 of age, indicating that hepatic GNG capacity gradually weakened in suckling piglets. The synthesis of hepatic glycogen, which was consistent with the fluctuation of glycolytic key genes PFKL and PKLR that gradually decreased after birth and was more or less steady during latter suckling period, although both the mRNA levels of GCK and key glucose transporter GLUT2 presented uptrend in suckling piglets. However, early weaning significantly suppressed the hepatic GNG in the weaned piglets, especially at d 3-5 of weaning period, then gradually recovered at d 7 of weaning period. Meanwhile, PFKL, PKLR and GLUT2 showed the similar trend during weaning period. On the contrast, the hepatic glycogen reached the maximum value when the G6Pase and PEPCK protein expression were at the lowest level, although the GCK level maintained increasing through 7 days of weaning period. Altogether, our study provides evidence that hepatic GNG and glycolysis in newborn piglets were more active than other days during suckling period, and early weaning could significantly suppressed glucose metabolism in liver, but this inhibition would progressively recover at day 7 after weaning. PMID:26802463

  11. Comparable Worth: An Analysis and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Civil Rights, Washington, DC.

    This report discusses sex-based wage discrimination, the role of comparable worth doctrine in analyzing or combating such discrimination, and the appropriateness of the remedial prescriptions that comparable worth doctrine envisions. The report consists of a brief introduction and five chapters. Chapter 1 presents a brief overview of women in the…

  12. Human Capital Development: Comparative Analysis of BRICs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardichvili, Alexandre; Zavyalova, Elena; Minina, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article is to conduct macro-level analysis of human capital (HC) development strategies, pursued by four countries commonly referred to as BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). Design/methodology/approach: This analysis is based on comparisons of macro indices of human capital and innovativeness of the economy and a…

  13. MANAGEMENT AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DATASET ENSEMBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Geveci, Berk

    2010-05-17

    The primary Phase I technical objective was to develop a prototype that demonstrates the functionality of all components required for an end-to-end meta-data management and comparative visualization system.

  14. A comparative analysis of the activity of ligands acting at P2X and P2Y receptor subtypes in models of neuropathic, acute and inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Andó, RD; Méhész, B; Gyires, K; Illes, P; Sperlágh, B

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was undertaken to compare the analgesic activity of antagonists acting at P2X1, P2X7, and P2Y12 receptors and agonists acting at P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6 receptors in neuropathic, acute, and inflammatory pain. Experimental approach: The effect of the wide spectrum P2 receptor antagonist PPADS, the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG), the P2X1 receptor antagonist (4,4′,4″,4-[carbonylbis(imino-5,1,3-benzenetriyl-bis(carbonylimino))]tetrakis-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid, octasodium salt (NF449) and (8,8′-[carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylenecarbonylimino)]bis-1,3,5-naphthalene-trisulphonic acid, hexasodium salt (NF023), the P2Y12 receptor antagonist (2,2-dimethyl-propionic acid 3-(2-chloro-6-methylaminopurin-9-yl)-2-(2,2-dimethyl-propionyloxymethyl)-propylester (MRS2395), the selective P2Y1 receptor agonist ([[(1R,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-[6-amino-2-(methylthio)-9H-purin-9-yl]-2,3-dihydroxybicyclo[3.1.0]hex-1-yl]methyl] diphosphoric acid mono ester trisodium salt (MRS2365), the P2Y2/P2Y4 agonist uridine-5′-triphosphate (UTP), and the P2Y4/P2Y6 agonist uridine-5′-diphosphate (UDP) were examined on mechanical allodynia in the Seltzer model of neuropathic pain, on acute thermal nociception, and on the inflammatory pain and oedema induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Key results: MRS2365, MRS2395 and UTP, but not the other compounds, significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia in the neuropathic pain model, with the following rank order of minimal effective dose (mED) values: MRS2365 > MRS2395 > UTP. All compounds had a dose-dependent analgesic action in acute pain except BBG, which elicited hyperalgesia at a single dose. The rank order of mED values in acute pain was the following: MRS2365 > MRS2395 > NF449 > NF023 > UDP = UTP > PPADS. MRS2365 and MRS2395 had a profound, while BBG had a mild effect on inflammatory pain, with a following rank order of mED values: MRS2395 > MRS2365 > BBG. None of the tested

  15. Modeller's attitude in catchment modelling: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Ten modellers have been invited to predict, independently from each other, the discharge of the artificial Chicken Creek catchment in North-East Germany for simulation period of three years, providing them only soil texture, terrain and meteorological data. No data concerning the discharge or other sources of state variables and fluxes within the catchment have been provided. Modellers had however the opportunity to visit the experimental catchment and inspect areal photos of the catchments since its initial development stage. This study has been a unique comparative study focussing on how different modellers deal with the key issues in predicting the discharge in ungauged catchments: 1) choice of the model structure; 2) identification of model parameters; 3) identification of model initial and boundary conditions. The first general lesson learned during this study was that the modeller is just part of the entire modelling process and has a major bearing on the model results, particularly in ungauged catchments where there are more degrees of freedom in making modelling decisions. Modellers' attitudes during the stages of the model implementation and parameterisation have been deeply influenced by their own experience from previous modelling studies. A common outcome was that modellers have been mainly oriented to apply process-based models able to exploit the available data concerning the physical properties of the catchment and therefore could be more suitable to cope with the lack of data concerning state variables or fluxes. The second general lesson learned during this study was the role of dominant processes. We believed that the modelling task would have been much easier in an artificial catchment, where heterogeneity were expected to be negligible and processes simpler, than in catchments that have evolved over a longer time period. The results of the models were expected to converge, and this would have been a good starting point to proceed for a model

  16. Comparative Modelling of the Spectra of Cool Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebzelter, T.; Heiter, U.; Abia, C.; Eriksson, K.; Ireland, M.; Neilson, H.; Nowotny, W; Maldonado, J; Merle, T.; Peterson, R.; Plez, B.; Short, C. I.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Worley, C.; Aringer, B.; Bladh, S.; de Laverny, P.; Goswami, A.; Mora, A.; Norris, R. P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Scholz, M.; Thevenin, F.; Tsuji, T.; Kordopatis, G.

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to extract information from the spectra of stars depends on reliable models of stellar atmospheres and appropriate techniques for spectral synthesis. Various model codes and strategies for the analysis of stellar spectra are available today. Aims. We aim to compare the results of deriving stellar parameters using different atmosphere models and different analysis strategies. The focus is set on high-resolution spectroscopy of cool giant stars. Methods. Spectra representing four cool giant stars were made available to various groups and individuals working in the area of spectral synthesis, asking them to derive stellar parameters from the data provided. The results were discussed at a workshop in Vienna in 2010. Most of the major codes currently used in the astronomical community for analyses of stellar spectra were included in this experiment. Results. We present the results from the different groups, as well as an additional experiment comparing the synthetic spectra produced by various codes for a given set of stellar parameters. Similarities and differences of the results are discussed. Conclusions. Several valid approaches to analyze a given spectrum of a star result in quite a wide range of solutions. The main causes for the differences in parameters derived by different groups seem to lie in the physical input data and in the details of the analysis method. This clearly shows how far from a definitive abundance analysis we still are.

  17. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals vertebrate phylotypic period during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Naoki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    One of the central issues in evolutionary developmental biology is how we can formulate the relationships between evolutionary and developmental processes. Two major models have been proposed: the 'funnel-like' model, in which the earliest embryo shows the most conserved morphological pattern, followed by diversifying later stages, and the 'hourglass' model, in which constraints are imposed to conserve organogenesis stages, which is called the phylotypic period. Here we perform a quantitative comparative transcriptome analysis of several model vertebrate embryos and show that the pharyngula stage is most conserved, whereas earlier and later stages are rather divergent. These results allow us to predict approximate developmental timetables between different species, and indicate that pharyngula embryos have the most conserved gene expression profiles, which may be the source of the basic body plan of vertebrates. PMID:21427719

  18. MHD models compared with Artemis observations at -60 Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencturk Akay, Iklim; Sibeck, David; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2016-07-01

    The distant magnetotail has been one of the least studied magnetic regions of the Earth's magnetosphere compared to the other near Earth both dayside and nightside magnetospheric regions owing to the limited number of spacecraft observations. Since 2011, ARTEMIS spacecraft give an excellent opportunity to study the magnetotail at lunar distances in terms of data quality and parameter space. This also gives opportunities to improve the magnetotail models at -60 Re and encourages the modelling studies of the distant magnetotail. Using ARTEMIS data in distant magnetotail, we create magnetic field and plasma flow vector maps in different planes and separated with IMF orientation to understand the magnetotail dynamics at this distance. For this study, we use CCMC's Run-on-Request resources of the MHD models; specifically SWMF-BATS-R-US, OpenGGCM, and LFM and perform the similar analysis with the models. Our main purpose in this study is to measure the performance of the MHD models at -60 Re distant magnetotail by comparing the model results with Artemis observations. In the literature, such a comprehensive comparative study is lacking in the distant tail. Preliminary results show that in general all three models underestimate the magnetic field structure while overestimating the flow speed. In the cross-sectional view, LFM seems to produce the better agreement with the observations. A clear dipolar magnetic field structure is seen with dawn-dusk asymmetry in all models owing to slight positive IMF By but the effect was found to be exaggerated. All models show tailward flows at this distance of the magnetotail, most possibly owing to the magnetic reconnection at the near Earth tail distances. A detailed comparison of several tail characteristics from the models will be presented and discussions will be given with respect to the observations from Artemis at this distance.

  19. Comparative analysis of Orem's and King's theories.

    PubMed

    Hanucharurnkul, S

    1989-05-01

    Dorothea Orem and Imogene King are two nursing theorists who are contributing significantly to the development of nursing knowledge. This paper compares the similarities and differences in their strategies for theory development, their views of nursing metaparadigm concepts, and their theories of nursing system and goal attainment in terms of scope, usefulness, and their unique contribution to nursing science. PMID:2738232

  20. Comparative analysis of methane-seepage structures on the Vestnesa Ridge and in the Nyegga area on the Norwegian-Barents-Svalbard Margin - a model for their formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, S.; Mienert, J.; Petersen, C. J.; Hustoft, S.

    2009-04-01

    The flow of fluids through marine sediments is one of the most dominant and pervasive processes in continental margins. These processes control the evolution of a sedimentary basin and its seafloor environment, and have implications for hydrocarbon exploration and seabed ecosystems. Many seep sites at the seafloor are associated with large but complex faunal communities that have received significant attention in recent years. However, there is a need for a better understanding of the driving mechanism of fluid flow in various geological settings, the accumulation of fluids in the subsurface and their focused flow through conduits and/or faults to the seabed. Hundreds of gas-seepage sites occur in the Nyegga area on the mid-Norwegian margin and on the Vestnesa Ridge offshore western Svalbard. Seismic data shows that fluid flow structures, so-called chimneys, pierce through hemipelagic marine clays and extend over a depth of more than 600 m. The seafloor expressions of these structures are mostly small depressions with a diameter of up to 600 m and a depth of up to 20 m. However, new high-resolution 3D seismic data shows that there is a pronounced difference in acoustic character between seepage structures in the Nyegga area and on the Vestnesa Ridge. Chimneys in the Nyegga area appear as nearly-vertical columnar zones of complete acoustic transparency with occasional amplitude anomalies at the chimney wall and mostly high seafloor-reflection amplitudes. In contrast, chimneys on the Vestnesa Ridge show as upwards-meandering contorted structures with discontinuous reflectors at the chimney walls, and have variable amplitude anomalies throughout the structure and at the seafloor. Recent observations of methane flares in the water column imply that the Vestnesa Ridge vent system is active now. On the contrary, the age of the Nyegga chimneys is dated to approximately 10-15 ka before present. Moreover, velocity analysis shows that the chimneys at Nyegga contain a high

  1. Comparative 3-D Modeling of tmRNA

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Jody; Zwieb, Christian; Müller, Florian; Wower, Iwona; Wower, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Background Trans-translation releases stalled ribosomes from truncated mRNAs and tags defective proteins for proteolytic degradation using transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). This small stable RNA represents a hybrid of tRNA- and mRNA-like domains connected by a variable number of pseudoknots. Comparative sequence analysis of tmRNAs found in bacteria, plastids, and mitochondria provides considerable insights into their secondary structures. Progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of template switching, which constitutes an essential step in trans-translation, is hampered by our limited knowledge about the three-dimensional folding of tmRNA. Results To facilitate experimental testing of the molecular intricacies of trans-translation, which often require appropriately modified tmRNA derivatives, we developed a procedure for building three-dimensional models of tmRNA. Using comparative sequence analysis, phylogenetically-supported 2-D structures were obtained to serve as input for the program ERNA-3D. Motifs containing loops and turns were extracted from the known structures of other RNAs and used to improve the tmRNA models. Biologically feasible 3-D models for the entire tmRNA molecule could be obtained. The models were characterized by a functionally significant close proximity between the tRNA-like domain and the resume codon. Potential conformational changes which might lead to a more open structure of tmRNA upon binding to the ribosome are discussed. The method, described in detail for the tmRNAs of Escherichia coli, Bacillus anthracis, and Caulobacter crescentus, is applicable to every tmRNA. Conclusion Improved molecular models of biological significance were obtained. These models will guide in the design of experiments and provide a better understanding of trans-translation. The comparative procedure described here for tmRNA is easily adopted for the modeling the members of other RNA families. PMID:15958166

  2. Comparing Work Skills Analysis Tools. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Kathryn

    This document outlines the processes and outcomes of a research project conducted to review work skills analysis tools (products and/or services) that profile required job skills and/or assess individuals' acquired skills. The document begins with a brief literature review and discussion of pertinent terminology. Presented next is a list of…

  3. General Education Requirements: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Darrell B.; Koeppel, Katie

    2009-01-01

    While "general education" is a phrase heavily used in higher education, Leskes and Wright note that it has multiple meanings: it can refer to those courses that a college or university requires all of its students must pass as a condition for graduation, a common curriculum, a distribution requirement, or even core texts. This analysis of general…

  4. Comparing Package Programs for Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimberley, Ronald C.

    1978-01-01

    Earlier comparisons of packaged programs for factor analysis are updated because of recent revision in some programs. The top status of SPSS is no longer so apparent as formerly. BMD and SAS now have expanded options. SAS has flexibility and convenience. (Author)

  5. Comparative Lifecycle Energy Analysis: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jeffrey; Canzoneri, Diana

    1992-01-01

    Explores the position that more energy is conserved through recycling secondary materials than is generated from municipal solid waste incineration. Discusses one component of a lifecycle analysis--a comparison of energy requirements for manufacturing competing products. Includes methodological issues, energy cost estimates, and difficulties…

  6. Comparing modeled fire dynamics with charcoal records for the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruecher, T.; Brovkin, V.; Kloster, S.; Marlon, J. R.; Power, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    An Earth System model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2, and land surface model JSBACH that includes dynamic vegetation, carbon cycle, and fire regime are used for simulation of natural fire dynamics through the last 8,000 years. To compare the fire model results with the charcoal reconstructions, several output variables of the fire model (burned area, carbon emissions) and several approaches of model output processing are tested. The z-scores out of charcoal dataset have been calculated for the period 8,000 to 200 BP to exclude a period of strong anthropogenic forcing during the last two centuries. The model analysis points mainly to an increasing fire activity during the Holocene for most of the investigated areas, which is in good correspondence to reconstructed fire trends out of charcoal data for most of the tested regions, while for few regions such as Europe the simulated trend and the reconstructed trends are different. The difference between the modeled and reconstructed fire activity could be due to absence of the anthropogenic forcing in the model simulations, but also due to limitations of model assumptions for modeling fire dynamics. For the model trends, the usage of averaging or z-score processing of model output resulted in similar directions of trend. Therefore, the approach of fire model output processing does not effect results of the model-data comparison. Global fire modeling is still in its infancy; improving our representations of fire through validation exercises such as what we present here is thus essential before testing hypotheses about the effects of extreme climate changes on fire behavior and potential feedbacks that result from those changes.

  7. Compare and Contrast Program Planning Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper will examine the differences and similarities between two program planning models, Tyler and Caffarella, to reveal their strengths and weaknesses. When adults are involved in training sessions, there are various program planning models that can be used, depending on the goal of the training session. Researchers developed these models…

  8. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  9. Light beam deflector performance: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zook, J D

    1974-04-01

    The performance of various types of analog light beam deflectors is summarized, and their relative positions in a deflector hierarchy are defined. The three types of deflectors considered are (1) mechanical (galvanometer) mirror deflectors, (2) acoustooptic deflectors, and (3) analog electrooptic deflectors. Material figures of merit are defined and compared, and the theoretical trade-off between speed and resolution is given for each type of deflector. PMID:20126095

  10. Comparative analysis of plant oil based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziejewski, M.; Goettler, H.J.; Haines, H.; Huong, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the evaluation results from the analysis of different blends of fuels using the 13-mode standard SAE testing method. Six high oleic safflower oil blends, six ester blends, six high oleic sunflower oil blends, and six sunflower oil blends were used in this portion of the investigation. Additionally, the results from the repeated 13-mode tests for all the 25/75% mixtures with a complete diesel fuel test before and after each alternative fuel are presented.