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Sample records for comparative ultrasound biomicroscopic

  1. A New Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Sign seen after Deep Sclerectomy (Dolphin Head Sign)

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Ahmed M; Cheweikh, Hala M El; Allam, Riham SHM

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe a new ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) sign seen in patients who underwent deep sclerectomy (DS) as a surgical procedure for the management of uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The presence of this sign in ultrasound biomicroscopy is suggested to be an indicator of successful surgery. We would like to name this sign as the “dolphin head sign.” Design: Prospective interventional study. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight eyes of 17 patients with POAG underwent DS with intraoperative mitomycin C (MMC) 0.3% applied for 2 minutes under the superficial scleral flap. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 6 months. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was done at the third postoperative month to evaluate the surgical area in both successful and failed cases. Results: The study included 28 eyes of 17 patients. The mean age of the study group was 42.90 ± 14.37 years (20–64 years). The study included 10 females and 7 males. The mean preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) was 24.57 ± 6.37 mm Hg (20-38 mm Hg). The mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.57 ± 0.3 (0.05–1.00). Complete success has been achieved in 21 eyes (75%) during the follow-up period, with a mean IOP of 12.00 ± 3.86 mm Hg (6–20 mm Hg). The dolphin head sign was demonstrated only in successful cases, whereas the unsuccessful cases failed to show the typical sign. Conclusion: The presence of a “dolphin head” configuration in UBM images could be taken as an indicator of successful DS. How to cite this article: Abdelrahman AM, El Cheweikh HM, El-Fayoumi DMS, Allam RSHM. A New Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Sign seen after Deep Sclerectomy (Dolphin Head Sign). J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2016;10(2):56-59. PMID:27536048

  2. The suitability of the ultrasound biomicroscope for establishing texture in giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Roters, S.; Szurman, P.; Engels, B.; Brunner, R.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To establish whether ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) is a helpful tool in locating the arterial segment responsible in patients with segmental attacks in giant cell arteritis
METHODS—The superficial temporal arteries of 19 patients with suspected giant cell arteritis were examined with the UBM before biopsy.
RESULTS—20 specimens provided the histological proof of giant cell arteritis in five patients. Side differences, a dark perivascular halo, and high reflexivity of the intra-arterial space were found.
CONCLUSION—it is assumed that there are two types of arteritic inflammation: (1) the occlusion of intra-arterial space due to intimal fibrosis (UBM: high reflexive "filling"), and (2) inflammation of the perivascular zone with oedematous thickening and infiltration of the media (UBM: dark halo) and its combination. UBM is helpful in obtaining an indication of the side and segment for biopsy.

 PMID:11466252

  3. Ultrasound biomicroscopic evaluation of anterior segment cysts as a risk factor for ocular hypertension and closure angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Dusak, Abdurrahim; Baykara, Mehmet; Ozkaya, Guven; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Ozcetin, Hikmet; Tuncel, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between the ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) features of anterior-segment cysts (ASCs) and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) as a risk factor for closed-angle glaucoma (CAG). METHODS Totally 24 eyes with recently diagnosed ASCs were divided into two groups. First group with ASC and ocular normotension (n=13), second group with ASC and ocular hypertension (n=11). An ophthalmologic examination, including tonometry, slit-lamp biomicroscopy (SLBM), gonioscopy, fundoscopy, pentacam, and UBM, was performed. The features of the ASCs were compared with the IOP. RESULTS ASCs were accurately diagnosed and delineated in 24 eyes using UBM. IOP was elevated in those ASCs with a secondary aetiology (P=0.027), iridociliary location (P=0.006), deformed shape (P=0.013), increased size (P=0.001) and elongated pupillary aperture (P=0.009). However, the count (P=0.343) of ASCs, anterior chamber depth (ACD; P=0.22) and axial lenght (AL; P=0.31) were not associated with ocular hypertension. Correlations were found between the IOP and ASC size (r=-0.712; P=0.003), anterior chamber angle (ACA; r=-0.985; P<0.001), angle opening area (AOA; r=0.885; P<0.001), angulation of iris (r=-0.776, P<0.001), and affected iris quadrant (r =-0.655, P=0.002). CONCLUSION Ocular hypertension in some eyes with ASC might be associated with various mechanisms, including secondary aetiology, iridociliary location, deformed shape, increased size and elongated pupill, which can be determined by UBM. PMID:23991389

  4. Ultrasound biomicroscopic findings of the iridocorneal angle in live healthy and glaucomatous dogs

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, Takashi; KAWATA, Manabu; OTA, Mitsuharu

    2015-01-01

    By using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), the cross-sectional structures of the entire iridocorneal angle (ICA) which are unable to assess with gonioscopic examination were evaluated objectively and quantitatively in live healthy and glaucomatous dogs. The ICAs of normotensive eyes in healthy dogs with normal open angle (NOR), a predisposition to primary closed angle glaucoma (PCAG) (PREDIS) and suffering from unilateral PCAG (UNI), as well as the ICAs of hypertensive eyes with acute and chronic PCAG (ACG and CRG), were assessed. The opening of the ciliary cleft in PREDIS was smaller than that in NOR. In UNI, the opening and area of the ciliary cleft were significantly decreased compared with those of NOR and PREDIS. ACG had widespread structural abnormalities including marked decrease in the ciliary cleft and scleral venous plexus, and a thinner sclera than those in normotensive eyes, whereas the ICA collapsed in CRG with the thinnest sclera. Medical therapy-responsive glaucomatous cases had wider ciliary cleft and scleral venous plexus than unresponsive ones. These findings suggest that the ciliary cleft and scleral venous plexus of the ICA are key structures contributing to not only the pathophysiology of canine glaucoma but also the responsiveness to medical therapy in glaucomatous eyes, and cross-sectional entire structures of the ICA should be evaluated quantitatively with UBM when diagnosing and managing canine glaucoma. PMID:26212256

  5. Development of a fast-scanning combined ultrasound-photoacoustic biomicroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemp, Roger J.; Lu, Huihong; Mathewson, Kory; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka; Jiang, Yan; Walsh, Andrew; Chen, Xuhui

    2009-02-01

    Recently a realtime photoacoustic microscopy system has been demonstrated. Unfortunately, however, displayed B-scan images were sometimes difficult to interpret as there was little structural context. In this work, we provide structural context for photoacoustic microscopy images by adding ultrasound biomicroscopy as a complementary and synergistic modality. Our system uses a voice-coil translation stage capable of 1" lateral translation, and can operate in excess of 15 Hz for 1-cm translations, providing up to 30 ultrasound frames per second. The frame-rate of the photoacoustic acquisitions is limited by the 20-Hz pulse-repetition rate of the laser, but can be increased with a faster-repetition-rate laser. Data from the system is streamed in real time from a 2GS/s PCI data acquisition card to the host PC at rates as high as 200 MB/s. The system should prove useful for various in vivo studies, including combined ultrasound Doppler and photoacoustic imaging.

  6. Reliability of measurements of rat lateral gastrocnemius architectural parameters obtained from ultrasound biomicroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Carolina Carneiro; Martins, Natália Santos da Fonseca; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Machado, João Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This study used ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to quantify the pennation angle (PA) and muscle thickness (MT) of rat skeletal muscle and evaluated the reliability and reproducibility of the method by statistical analysis, determining the coefficient of variation (CV), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and typical error of measurement. A UBM system with a center frequency of 40 MHz was used to acquire images of the right lateral gastrocnemius of ten male Wistar rats on two different days and with two ankle positions (90° or 150°). Two independent measurements of the PA and MT were randomly performed in each of three picture frames. The analysis resulted in CVs of 10.47% and 4.81% for the PA and the MT, respectively, for the ankle at 90° and 9.24% and 5.98% for the ankle at 150°. Additionally, the ICC values ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for the PA and 0.57 to 0.99 for the MT. Statistically significant differences between the ankle positions were observed for the PA (p = 0.00013). The reliability of the PA and MT measurements for the rat right lateral gastrocnemius, determined from the ultrasound biomicroscopy images, was high (>0.90) for the methodology proposed. This finding indicates the potential of ultrasound biomicroscopy for quantitative muscle characterization and the longitudinal examination of tissue adaptation to different conditions of use, disease and rehabilitation. PMID:24505306

  7. An ultrasound biomicroscopic and water jet ultrasound indentation method for detecting the degenerative changes of articular cartilage in a rabbit model of progressive osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Aijun; Wan, Wenbo; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-06-01

    It is important to assess the early degeneration of articular cartilage associated with osteoarthritis (OA) for early intervention and treatment planning. Previously, we have developed a high frequency ultrasound and water jet indentation method for the morphologic, acoustic and mechanical assessment of articular cartilage, using the enzymatic digestion as a model of osteoarthritic degeneration. No naturally degenerated articular cartilage has been tested with the developed method. In this study, we aimed to determine the usefulness of the developed method for detecting the natural degeneration of articular cartilage in a standard surgical model of OA in rabbits. Forty adult New Zealand white female rabbits were used in this study, which included 30 experimental rabbits undergoing the right anterior cruciate ligament transection surgery and 10 control rabbits. At the 3rd, 6th, and 9th week post-surgery, 10 experimental rabbits were sacrificed, respectively, for assessment of the knee cartilage quality. The cartilage at the medial and lateral femoral condyles and tibial plateaus (four points) was measured by the high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy, the water jet ultrasound indentation and a contact mechanical indentation test before a histopathologic analysis for grading of degeneration severity. Measured parameters were compared among different groups classified either by post-surgery time or by histopathologic grade. The results showed a general trend of increase for ultrasound roughness index and a general trend of decrease for integrated reflection coefficient, stiffness coefficient from water-jet indentation and Young's modulus (E) from the mechanical indentation with the increase of post-surgery time. Comparisons among groups with different histopathologic grades showed similar trend with the increase of degeneration severity. The water jet ultrasound indentation method was demonstrated to be an effective method to measure the mechanical properties of the

  8. Excimer laser phototherapeutic keratectomy in eyes with anterior corneal dystrophies: preoperative and postoperative ultrasound biomicroscopic examination and short-term clinical outcomes with and without an antihyperopia treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Rapuano, Christopher J

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the use of high-frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) in determining the depth of corneal pathology in eyes undergoing excimer laser phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) for primary or recurrent anterior stromal corneal dystrophies. Corneal clarity, visual acuity and refractive changes in eyes with and without an antihyperopia treatment were also analyzed. METHODS: Twenty eyes of 14 patients with anterior stromal corneal dystrophies were treated with PTK. Eyes were evaluated preoperatively and 6 to 8 weeks postoperatively with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, manifest refraction, keratometry, computerized corneal topography, ultrasound pachymetry, and UBM. RESULTS: Nineteen of 20 corneas (95%) had greatly improved corneal clarity after PTK. Mean uncorrected Snellen vision improved from 20/102 to 20/69 and best corrected vision improved from 20/62 to 20/38. Nine eyes (45%) improved 2 or more lines of uncorrected vision, and 13 eyes (65%) improved 2 or more lines of best corrected vision. Mean change in spherical equivalent was just -0.92 diopters (D); however, the range was large (-13 to +3.88 D). UBM measurement of central corneal pathology did not correlate with the actual PTK ablation depth (P = .07). The amount of antihyperopia treatment did not correlate with changes in manifest refraction spherical equivalent, keratometry, or computerized corneal topography readings, but did correlate with length of time until corneal reepithelialization after PTK (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: PTK resulted in improvements in corneal clarity and visual acuity in most patients with superficial corneal stromal dystrophies. UBM was not an effective tool to accurately measure the depth of corneal pathology preoperatively. The combined approach of minimizing ablation depth and selective use of an antihyperopia treatment resulted in minimal mean change in spherical equivalent; however, the range was large. PTK is a very good minimally invasive technique to improve vision in

  9. 21 CFR 886.1850 - AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. 886.1850 Section 886.1850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a thin, intense beam of light. (b) Classification. Class II....

  10. 21 CFR 886.1850 - AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. 886.1850 Section 886.1850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... microscope intended for use in eye examination that projects into a patient's eye through a control...

  11. Comparative evaluation of ultrasound scanner accuracy in distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, F. P.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to develop and compare two different automatic methods for accuracy evaluation in ultrasound phantom measurements on B-mode images: both of them give as a result the relative error e between measured distances, performed by 14 brand new ultrasound medical scanners, and nominal distances, among nylon wires embedded in a reference test object. The first method is based on a least squares estimation, while the second one applies the mean value of the same distance evaluated at different locations in ultrasound image (same distance method). Results for both of them are proposed and explained.

  12. Comparing Ultrasound and Mechanical Steering in a Biodiesel Production Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.; Ferreira, Jerusa R. L.

    The analysis of the kinetics of the transesterification reaction is crucial to compare different routes or routes with different catalysts or reaction accelerators. The use of ultrasound is considereda method for accelerating the biodiesel production. However, little effort has been done and is reported in the literature about how and under what conditions the use of ultrasound really speeds up the process, or the conditions under which its use is unnecessary or even harmful, burdening the process. Two dissimilar energy injections into a typical route were tested: ultrasound (@ 1 MHz and no heating) and mechanical steering (with heating), both applied in an 8:1 ratio of soybean oil and methanol, adding 1% of KOH as catalyzer. As results, during the first 10 minutes of reaction ultrasound showed unbearable effect on the transesterification, whilst mechanical steering and heating achieved almost 70% of conversion ratio. However, during the following 10 minutes, the mechanical steering and heating got nothing more than 80% of conversion, a considerable less efficient process than ultrasound assisted one, which achieved more than 90%. The straightforward explanation is that ultrasound continually inserts energy in a slower rate, what can result in a more stable conversion scenario. On the other hand, mechanical steering and heating provides more energy at a glance, but cannot push the final conversion rate beyond a limit, as the transesterification is a double-way chemical process. The instability mechanical steering and heating settles in the reaction medium pulls the components back to their original states more than pushes than to the converted equilibrium state of the matter.

  13. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to ... no known risks for ultrasound at present, it is highly recommended that pregnant women consult their physician ...

  14. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  15. Diagnostic Usefulness of Transrectal Ultrasound Compared with Transvaginal Ultrasound Assessment in Young Korean Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Da Eun; Park, So Yun; Lee, Sa Ra; Chung, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the diagnostic performance of transrectal ultrasound in virgin patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, compared with conventional transvaginal ultrasound assessment. Methods Ultrasound examinations were performed in 963 Korean women, with transvaginal transducers in 677 women and transrectal transducers in 286 women at Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital. Transvaginal ultrasound examinations were performed in 494 normal control women and 183 PCOS patients according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) PCOS diagnostic criteria. In virgin patients, transrectal ultrasound examinations were performed in 141 normal control women and 145 PCOS patients. ROC curves were calculated for ovarian volume and follicle number. Results By transvaginal ultrasound examination, the ovarian volume showed an area under the ROC curve (AURC) of 0.838. An ovarian volume decision threshold > 7 cm3 had a sensitivity of 73.0% and a specificity of 84.2% for the diagnosis of PCOS. The follicle number showed an AURC of 0.886. A follicle number decision threshold ≥ 9 had a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 87.2% for the diagnosis of PCOS. By transrectal ultrasound examination, the ovarian volume and the follicle number showed AURCs of 0.815 as same thresholds with a sensitivity of 67.2% and 66.4%, respectively and a specificity of 86.8% each. Ovarian volume and follicle number by transvaginal and transrectal ultrasound assessment had a high diagnostic power for PCOS screening. Conclusion Transrectal ultrasound assessment is as effective as conventional transvaginal ultrasound for the detection of PCOS in virgin patients. PMID:26793680

  16. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make images of organs and structures inside the body. ... An ultrasound machine makes images so that organs inside the body can be examined. The machine sends out high- ...

  17. Breast imaging with ultrasound tomography: a comparative study with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranger, Bryan; Littrup, Peter; Duric, Neb; Li, Cuiping; Schmidt, Steven; Lupinacci, Jessica; Myc, Lukasz; Szczepanski, Amy; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype relative to magnetic resonance (MR) for imaging overall breast anatomy and accentuating tumors relative to background tissue. The study was HIPAA compliant, approved by the Institutional Review Board, and performed after obtaining the requisite informed consent. Twenty-three patients were imaged with MR and the UST prototype. T1 weighted images with fat saturation, with and without gadolinium enhancement, were used to examine anatomical structures and tumors, while T2 weighted images were used to identify cysts. The UST scans generated sound speed, attenuation, and reflection images. A qualitative visual comparison of the MRI and UST images was then used to identify anatomical similarities. A more focused approach that involved a comparison of reported masses, lesion volumes, and breast density was used to quantify the findings from the visual assessment. Our acoustic tomography prototype imaged distributions of fibrous stroma, parenchyma, fatty tissues, and lesions in patterns similar to those seen in the MR images. The range of thresholds required to establish tumor volume equivalency between MRI and UST suggested that a universal threshold for isolating masses relative to background tissue is feasible with UST. UST has demonstrated the ability to visualize and characterize breast tissues in a manner comparable to MRI. Thresholding techniques accentuate masses relative to background anatomy, which may prove clinically useful for early cancer detection.

  18. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make images of organs and structures inside ... examined. The machine sends out high-frequency sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives ...

  19. A comparative study in ultrasound breast imaging classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Edirisinghe, Eran A.; Bez, Helmut E.

    2009-02-01

    American College of Radiology introduces a standard in classification, the breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS), standardize the reporting of ultrasound findings, clarify its interpretation, and facilitate communication between clinicians. The effective use of new technologies to support healthcare initiatives is important and current research is moving towards implementing computer tools in the diagnostics process. Initially a detailed study was carried out to evaluate the performance of two commonly used appearance based classification algorithms, based on the use of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and two dimensional linear discriminant analysis (2D-LDA). The study showed that these two appearance based classification approaches are not capable of handling the classification of ultrasound breast image lesions. Therefore further investigations in the use of a popular feature based classifier - Support Vector Machine (SVM) was conducted. A pre-processing step before feature based classification is feature extraction, which involve shape, texture and edge descriptors for the Region of Interest (ROI). The input dataset to SVM classification is from a fully automated ROI detection. We achieve the success rate of 0.550 in PCA, 0.500 in LDA, and 0.931 in SVM. The best combination of features in SVM classification is to combine the shape, texture and edge descriptors, with sensitivity 0.840 and specificity 0.968. This paper briefly reviews the background to the project and then details the ongoing research. In conclusion, we discuss the contributions, limitations, and future plans of our work.

  20. Atherosclerotic Calcification Detection: A Comparative Study of Carotid Ultrasound and Cone Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Jashari, Fisnik; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Johansson, Elias; Ahlqvist, Jan; Arnerlöv, Conny; Garoff, Maria; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Wester, Per; Henein, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Arterial calcification is often detected on ultrasound examination but its diagnostic accuracy is not well validated. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of carotid ultrasound B mode findings in detecting atherosclerotic calcification quantified by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: We analyzed 94 carotid arteries, from 88 patients (mean age 70 ± 7 years, 33% females), who underwent pre-endarterectomy ultrasound examination. Plaques with high echogenic nodules and posterior shadowing were considered calcified. After surgery, the excised plaques were examined using CBCT, from which the calcification volume (mm3) was calculated. In cases with multiple calcifications the largest calcification nodule volume was used to represent the plaque. Carotid artery calcification by the two imaging techniques was compared using conventional correlations. Results: Carotid ultrasound was highly accurate in detecting the presence of calcification; with a sensitivity of 88.2%. Based on the quartile ranges of calcification volumes measured by CBCT we have divided plaque calcification into four groups: <8; 8–35; 36–70 and >70 mm3. Calcification volumes ≥8 were accurately detectable by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 96%. Of the 21 plaques with <8 mm3 calcification volume; only 13 were detected by ultrasound; resulting in a sensitivity of 62%. There was no difference in the volume of calcification between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Conclusion: Carotid ultrasound is highly accurate in detecting the presence of calcified atherosclerotic lesions of volume ≥8 mm3; but less accurate in detecting smaller volume calcified plaques. Further development of ultrasound techniques should allow better detection of early arterial calcification. PMID:26307978

  1. Ultrasound and Cadaveric Prosections as Methods for Teaching Cardiac Anatomy: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griksaitis, Michael J.; Sawdon, Marina A.; Finn, Gabrielle M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of two cardiac anatomy teaching modalities, ultrasound imaging and cadaveric prosections, for learning cardiac gross anatomy. One hundred and eight first-year medical students participated. Two weeks prior to the teaching intervention, students completed a pretest to assess their prior knowledge and to ensure that…

  2. Comparative evaluation of despeckle filtering in ultrasound imaging of the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Loizou, Christos P; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Christodoulou, Christodoulos I; Istepanian, Robert S H; Pantziaris, Marios; Nicolaides, Andrew

    2005-10-01

    It is well-known that speckle is a multiplicative noise that degrades the visual evaluation in ultrasound imaging. The recent advancements in ultrasound instrumentation and portable ultrasound devices necessitate the need of more robust despeckling techniques for enhanced ultrasound medical imaging for both routine clinical practice and teleconsultation. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative evaluation of despeckle filtering based on texture analysis, image quality evaluation metrics, and visual evaluation by medical experts in the assessment of 440 (220 asymptomatic and 220 symptomatic) ultrasound images of the carotid artery bifurcation. In this paper a total of 10 despeckle filters were evaluated based on local statistics, median filtering, pixel homogeneity, geometric filtering, homomorphic filtering, anisotropic diffusion, nonlinear coherence diffusion, and wavelet filtering. The results of this study suggest that the first order statistics filter lsmv, gave the best performance, followed by the geometric filter gf4d, and the homogeneous mask area filter lsminsc. These filters improved the class separation between the asymptomatic and the symptomatic classes based on the statistics of the extracted texture features, gave only a marginal improvement in the classification success rate, and improved the visual assessment carried out by the two experts. More specifically, filters lsmv or gf4d can be used for despeckling asymptomatic images in which the expert is interested mainly in the plaque composition and texture analysis; and filters lsmv, gf4d, or lsminsc can be used for the despeckling of symptomatic images in which the expert is interested in identifying the degree of stenosis and the plaque borders. The proper selection of a despeckle filter is very important in the enhancement of ultrasonic imaging of the carotid artery. Further work is needed to evaluate at a larger scale and in clinical practice the performance of the proposed

  3. Ultrasound-based transient elastography compared to magnetic resonance elastography in soft tissue-mimicking gels.

    PubMed

    Oudry, Jennifer; Vappou, Jonathan; Choquet, Philippe; Willinger, Rémy; Sandrin, Laurent; Constantinesco, André

    2009-11-21

    Ultrasound-based transient elastography (TE) and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) are increasingly used methods for the clinical evaluation of soft tissue mechanical properties and their alteration under diseased conditions. This study proposes a comparison between magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and ultrasound-based transient elastography (TE). Both methods were tested on the same soft tissue-mimicking gels in a common frequency range in order to allow for direct quantitative comparison. For the four gels tested, relatively good agreement was found between the shear moduli measured by both methods, with an averaged relative difference of 23%. This study demonstrates that under the assumption of homogeneous media that are significantly more elastic than viscous, quantitative results obtained by both methods are comparable. PMID:19887718

  4. Automated Breast Ultrasound: Dual-Sided Compared with Single-Sided Imaging.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric D; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Goodsitt, Mitchel M; Lashbrook, Chris; Zafar, Fouzaan; Kripfgans, Oliver D; Thomenius, Kai; Carson, Paul L

    2016-09-01

    The design and performance of a mammographically configured, dual-sided, automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) 3-D imaging system are described. Dual-sided imaging (superior and inferior) is compared with single-sided imaging to aid decisions on clinical implementation of the more complex, but potentially higher-quality dual-sided imaging. Marked improvement in image quality and coverage of the breast is obtained in dual-sided ultrasound over single-sided ultrasound. Among hypo-echoic masses imaged, there are increases in the mean contrast-to-noise ratio of 57% and 79%, respectively, for spliced dual-sided versus superior or inferior single-sided imaging. The fractional breast volume coverage, defined as the percentage volume in the transducer field of view that is imaged with clinically acceptable quality, is improved from 59% in both superior and inferior single-sided imaging to 89% in dual-sided imaging. Applying acoustic coupling to the breast requires more effort or sophisticated methods in dual-sided imaging than in single-sided imaging. PMID:27264914

  5. /sup 201/Tl perfusion study of ''ischemic'' ulcers of the leg: prognostic ability compared with Doppler ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.E.; Stewart, C.A.; Kwong, P.; Sakimura, I.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium 201 perfusion analysis was compared with Doppler ultrasound as a means of determining the healing potential of an ischemic ulcer of the leg in 27 patients. The degree of hyperemia was determined by comparative point counting of the 201Tl distribution in and about the ulcer. Using established Doppler criteria and a hyperemia ratio greater than 1.5:1, ultrasound alone correctly predicted healing in 15 out of 23 cases and 201Tl in 20 out of 23. Ultrasound correctly predicted non-healing in 3 out of 6 cases, compared with 5 out of 6 for 201Tl. The positive predictive value of the 201Tl study was 63%, versus 27% for ultrasound, and the negative predictive value was 95% for 201Tl and 83% for ultrasound. The accuracy of 201Tl and ultrasound was 86% and 62%, respectively. This limited study suggests that 201Tl perfusion scanning is a useful noninvasive test of ulcer healing potential and may be more sensitive than Doppler ultrasound.

  6. Ultrasound aspects in therapy-naive CIDP compared to long-term treated CIDP.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Vittore, Debora; Schubert, Victoria; Rasenack, Maria; Décard, Bernhard F; Heiling, Bianka; Hammer, Nadin; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the use of nerve ultrasound (NUS) along with the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines and clinical scores in untreated, recently diagnosed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) vs. long-lasting treated CIDP. NUS and nerve conduction studies (NCS) of predefined nerves/cervical roots were performed in CIDP on diagnostic onset and "chronic-CIDP" (diagnosis and therapy >6 months), compared to controls. Nerve morphology was quantified using the modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS, which is the sum of 3 ultrasound scores derived at 12 predefined measurement points and the homogeneity score (HS) in ulnar, median, and tibial nerve. 21 onset-CIDP, 21 "chronic-CIDP", and 21 age-matched controls were included. No differences in clinical scores or in the number of electrophysiologically affected nerves existed between the groups. Significantly enlarged cross-sectional areas of the nerves and diameters of the roots ensued already in onset-CIDP; however, with proximal predominance, whilst in chronic-CIDP, nerve enlargement was more prominent and ubiquitous. Increased UPS scores were shown in both patient groups compared to the controls. Significant differences between the patient groups were found particularly in the peripheral nerve score UPSA. Evaluation by means of HS revealed that the nerves in onset-CIDP were mostly regionally enlarged (often sparing distal segments) whereas in chronic-CIDP, nerves were more generalized enlarged. Onset- and chronic-CIDP show enlarged nerves and therefore increased mUPSS, however, nerve enlargement shows a more generalized pattern in chronic-CIDP compared to disease onset and correlates with disease duration and delayed therapy start, but not with disability. PMID:27017343

  7. Liver metastases: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Vito; Grazhdani, Hektor; Fioravanti, Cristina; Rosignuolo, Maria; Calliada, Fabrizio; Messineo, Daniela; Bernieri, Maria Giulia; Redler, Adriano; Catalano, Carlo; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando

    2014-08-01

    The development of ultrasound contrast agents with excellent tolerance and safety profiles has notably improved liver evaluation with ultrasound (US) for several applications, especially for the detection of metastases. In particular, contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) allows the display of the parenchymal microvasculature, enabling the study and visualization of the enhancement patterns of liver lesions in real time and in a continuous manner in all vascular phases, which is similar to contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical studies have reported that the use of a contrast agent enables the visualization of more metastases with significantly improved sensitivity and specificity compared to baseline-US. Furthermore, studies have shown that CEUS yields sensitivities comparable to CT. In this review, we describe the state of the art of CEUS for detecting colorectal liver metastases, the imaging features, the literature reports of metastases in CEUS as well as its technique, its clinical role and its potential applications. Additionally, the updated international consensus panel guidelines are reported in this review with the inherent limitations of this technique and best practice experiences. PMID:25110428

  8. Advanced noise reduction in placental ultrasound imaging using CPU and GPU: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zombori, G.; Ryan, J.; McAuliffe, F.; Rainford, L.; Moran, M.; Brennan, P.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of different implementations of 3D anisotropic diffusion speckle noise reduction technique on ultrasound images. In this project we are developing a novel volumetric calcification assessment metric for the placenta, and providing a software tool for this purpose. The tool can also automatically segment and visualize (in 3D) ultrasound data. One of the first steps when developing such a tool is to find a fast and efficient way to eliminate speckle noise. Previous works on this topic by Duan, Q. [1] and Sun, Q. [2] have proven that the 3D noise reducing anisotropic diffusion (3D SRAD) method shows exceptional performance in enhancing ultrasound images for object segmentation. Therefore we have implemented this method in our software application and performed a comparative study on the different variants in terms of performance and computation time. To increase processing speed it was necessary to utilize the full potential of current state of the art Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Our 3D datasets are represented in a spherical volume format. With the aim of 2D slice visualization and segmentation, a "scan conversion" or "slice-reconstruction" step is needed, which includes coordinate transformation from spherical to Cartesian, re-sampling of the volume and interpolation. Combining the noise filtering and slice reconstruction in one process on the GPU, we can achieve close to real-time operation on high quality data sets without the need for down-sampling or reducing image quality. For the GPU programming OpenCL language was used. Therefore the presented solution is fully portable.

  9. Transverse vs torsional ultrasound: prospective randomized contralaterally controlled study comparing two phacoemulsification-system handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Assil, Kerry K; Harris, Lindsay; Cecka, Jeannie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare surgical efficiency and multiple early clinical outcome variables in eyes undergoing phacoemulsification using either transversal or torsional ultrasound systems. Setting Assil Eye Institute, Beverly Hills, CA, USA. Design Prospective, randomized, clinician-masked, contralaterally controlled single-center evaluation. Patients and methods Patients seeking cataract removal in both eyes with implantation of multifocal intraocular lenses were randomly assigned to one of two treatment rooms for phacoemulsification with either a transverse ultrasound system or torsional handpiece system. The contralateral eye was treated at a later date with the alternate device. A total of 54 eyes of 27 patients having similar degrees of cataract, astigmatism, and visual potential were included. All operative data were collected for analysis, and patients were followed for 3 months after surgery. Results Similar visual acuity was reported at all postoperative visits between the two groups. Mean phacoemulsification time and total power required were both significantly lower with the transverse system than with the torsional technique (P<0.05 for both). Similarly, mean total balanced salt solution used was significantly less with the transverse system vs torsional (P<0.05). Postoperative safety demonstrated significantly lower endothelial cell loss at 1 day and 1 month (P<0.05) with transverse vs torsional. Macular swelling was less at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months with transverse vs torsional, although the difference did not achieve significance (P=0.1) at any single time point. Clinically detectable corneal edema was reported less frequently at all postoperative time points with the transverse system. Conclusion The transverse ultrasound system was found to be possibly associated with less balanced salt-solution use, less phacoemulsification time, and less power required than the torsional phaco system. Postoperative data suggested that improved phaco efficiency may

  10. Comparative accuracy of mammography and ultrasound in women with breast symptoms according to age and breast density.

    PubMed

    Devolli-Disha, Emine; Manxhuka-Kërliu, Suzana; Ymeri, Halit; Kutllovci, Arben

    2009-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second most common cause of death from cancer in women.The aim of this studywas to determine which is more accurate imaging test mammography or ultrasound for diagnosis of breast cancer based on the women's age and breast density. We examined 546 patients with breast symptoms, by clinical breast examination, mammography and ultrasound. A total of 546 breast lesions were examined by histopathology analyses. Histopathology results revealed the presence of 259 invasive cancers, and 287 benign lesions. Sensitivity varied significantly with age and breast density. In the 259 women who had both tests, ultrasound had a higher sensitivity than mammography in women younger than 45 years, whereas mammography had a higher sensitivity than ultrasound in women older than 60 years. The sensitivity according to age was 52,1% for mammography and 72,6% for ultrasound. The specificity according to age was 88, 5% for ultrasound and 73, 9% for mammography. Comparing the sensitivity of mammography and ultrasound according to the breast density indicates that mammographic sensitivity was 82,2% among women with predominantly fatty breast, but 23.7% in women with heterogeneous dense breasts, with the increase of fibro glandular density the level of sensitivity with mammography decreases, while ultrasonographic sensitivity was 71,1% among women with predominantly fatty breast and 57,0% for heterogeneous dense breasts. Our data indicate that sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound was statistically significantly greater than mammography in patients with breast symptoms for the detection of breast cancer and benign lesions particularly in dense breast and in young women. PMID:19485945

  11. A multi-centre randomised trial comparing ultrasound vs mammography for screening breast cancer in high-risk Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Shen, S; Zhou, Y; Xu, Y; Zhang, B; Duan, X; Huang, R; Li, B; Shi, Y; Shao, Z; Liao, H; Jiang, J; Shen, N; Zhang, J; Yu, C; Jiang, H; Li, S; Han, S; Ma, J; Sun, Q

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chinese women tend to have small and dense breasts and ultrasound is a common method for breast cancer screening in China. However, its efficacy and cost comparing with mammography has not been evaluated in randomised trials. Methods: At 14 breast centres across China during 2008–2010, 13 339 high-risk women aged 30–65 years were randomised to be screened by mammography alone, ultrasound alone, or by both methods at enrolment and 1-year follow-up. Results: A total of 12 519 and 8692 women underwent the initial and second screenings, respectively. Among the 30 cancers (of which 15 were stage 0/I) detected, 5 (0.72/1000) were in the mammography group, 11 (1.51/1000) in the ultrasound group, and 14 (2.02/1000) in the combined group (P=0.12). In the combined group, ultrasound detected all the 14 cancers, whereas mammography detected 8, making ultrasound more sensitive (100 vs 57.1%, P=0.04) with a better diagnostic accuracy (0.999 vs 0.766, P=0.01). There was no difference between mammography and ultrasound in specificity (100 vs 99.9%, P=0.51) and positive predictive value (72.7 vs 70.0% P=0.87). To detect one cancer, the costs of ultrasound, mammography, and combined modality were $7876, $45 253, and $21 599, respectively. Conclusions: Ultrasound is superior to mammography for breast cancer screening in high-risk Chinese women. PMID:25668012

  12. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines traditional ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create ...

  13. A Comparative Study of Fibroid Ablation Rates Using Radio Frequency or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Xin; He Guangbin; Zhang Jun; Han Zenghui; Yu Ming; Zhang Miaomiao; Tang Yu; Fang Ling; Zhou Xiaodong

    2010-08-15

    This study compared the technical success of fibroid devascularization using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and radio frequency (RF) to provide an experimental basis for the clinical selection of a suitable, minimally invasive method for treating uterine fibroids. Patients were randomly divided into two groups and treated with HIFU or RF accordingly. The two groups of patients were divided again into subgroups A, B, and C based on fibroid diameter and subgroups A', B', and C' based on fibroid blood supply grades. The fibroid diameters in subgroups A, B, and C were 2.0 cm {<=} D < 4.0 cm, 4.0 cm {<=} D<6.0 cm and 6.0 cm {<=} D<8.0 cm, respectively, and fibroid blood supplies were classified into three grades corresponding to subgroups A', B', and C', respectively. The complete ablation rates of the two treatments were compared by contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Both treatments were effective, but the general complete ablation rate of RF was higher than that of HIFU (p < 0.05). The comparison between the two treatments in subgroup A and subgroup A' showed that the complete ablation rate of HIFU was as good as that of RF (p > 0.05). In other subgroups, the complete ablation rates of RF were better than those of HIFU (p < 0.05). No severe complications were observed after these two treatments. RF can be applied for the majority of fibroids. As a noninvasive therapy, HIFU could be the preferred method for the treatment of small, hypovascular fibroids.

  14. Sensory and Quality Evaluation of Traditional Compared with Power Ultrasound Processed Corn (Zea Mays) Tortilla Chips.

    PubMed

    Janve, Bhaskar; Yang, Wade; Sims, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Power ultrasound reduces the traditional corn steeping time from 18 to 1.5 h during tortilla chips dough (masa) processing. This study sought to examine consumer (n = 99) acceptability and quality of tortilla chips made from the masa by traditional compared with ultrasonic methods. Overall appearance, flavor, and texture acceptability scores were evaluated using a 9-point hedonic scale. The baked chips (process intermediate) before and after frying (finished product) were analyzed using a texture analyzer and machine vision. The texture values were determined using the 3-point bend test using breaking force gradient (BFG), peak breaking force (PBF), and breaking distance (BD). The fracturing properties determined by the crisp fracture support rig using fracture force gradient (FFG), peak fracture force (PFF), and fracture distance (FD). The machine vision evaluated the total surface area, lightness (L), color difference (ΔE), Hue (°h), and Chroma (C*). The results were evaluated by analysis of variance and means were separated using Tukey's test. Machine vision values of L, °h, were higher (P < 0.05) and ΔE was lower (P < 0.05) for fried and L, °h were significantly (P < 0.05) higher for baked chips produced from ultra-sonication as compare to traditional. Baked chips texture for ultra-sonication was significantly higher (P < 0.05) on BFG, BPD, PFF, and FD. Fried tortilla chips texture were higher significantly (P < 0.05) in BFG and PFF for ultra-sonication than traditional processing. However, the instrumental differences were not detected in sensory analysis, concluding possibility of power ultrasound as potential tortilla chips processing aid. PMID:25939826

  15. Ozil® versus conventional ultrasound phacoemulsification: a randomized comparative study.

    PubMed

    Maalej, Afef; Khallouli, Asma; Wathek, Cheima; Rannen, Riadh

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare and assess the performance and the postoperative outcomes of torsional mode and ultrasound (US) mode performed in the phacoemulsification of cataract with different nuclear densities. This is a randomized comparative clinical study. Two groups of 75 eyes (the first operated by Ozil(®) and the second by US) were comparable in age, gender, cataract density, corneal incision size, and intraocular lens type. We assessed peroperative parameters: US time (UST) and cumulative dissipated energy (CDE). Postoperative outcome measures were corneal edema and final best-corrected visual acuity. The UST was significantly lower in the ozil(®) group for all nucleus grades (73.43 s ± 8.3 with US vs. 46.02 s ± 23 with Ozil(®)) (p = 0.0003). The CDE was lower in the Ozil(®) group for grade III and IV cataract (p = 0.005). However, no significant difference was noted for grade II cataract (p = 0.07). Immediate postoperative corneal edema was significantly harder in the US group (p = 0.00002). The mean one month postoperative visual acuity was 0.2 ± 0.03 logMAR and 0.15 ± 0.07 logMAR, respectively, in the US group and the Ozil(®) group (p = 0.06). Ozil(®) mode seems to dissipate less energy in the eye than US mode. The visual outcome at one month is comparable in the two groups. PMID:25155201

  16. Critical assessment of intramodality 3D ultrasound imaging for prostate IGRT compared to fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Hermans, Jolanda; Voncken, Robert; Heuvelmans, Denys; Gubbels, Carol; Fontanarosa, Davide; Visser, Peter; Lutgens, Ludy; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: A quantitative 3D intramodality ultrasound (US) imaging system was verified for daily in-room prostate localization, and compared to prostate localization based on implanted fiducial markers (FMs).Methods: Thirteen prostate patients underwent multiple US scans during treatment. A total of 376 US-scans and 817 matches were used to determine the intra- and interoperator variability. Additionally, eight other patients underwent daily prostate localization using both US and electronic portal imaging (EPI) with FMs resulting in 244 combined US-EPI scans. Scanning was performed with minimal probe pressure and a correction for the speed of sound aberration was performed. Uncertainties of both US and FM methods were assessed. User variability of the US method was assessed.Results: The overall US user variability is 2.6 mm. The mean differences between US and FM are: 2.5 {+-} 4.0 mm (LR), 0.6 {+-} 4.9 mm (SI), and -2.3 {+-} 3.6 mm (AP). The intramodality character of this US system mitigates potential errors due to transducer pressure and speed of sound aberrations.Conclusions: The overall accuracy of US (3.0 mm) is comparable to our FM workflow (2.2 mm). Since neither US nor FM can be considered a gold standard no conclusions can be drawn on the superiority of either method. Because US imaging captures the prostate itself instead of surrogates no invasive procedure is required. It requires more effort to standardize US imaging than FM detection. Since US imaging does not involve a radiation burden, US prostate imaging offers an alternative for FM EPI positioning.

  17. Automatic Cataract Classification based on Ultrasound Technique Using Machine Learning: A comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caxinha, Miguel; Velte, Elena; Santos, Mário; Perdigão, Fernando; Amaro, João; Gomes, Marco; Santos, Jaime

    This paper addresses the use of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the cataract classification based on ultrasound technique. Ultrasound A-scan signals were acquired in 220 porcine lenses. B-mode and Nakagami images were constructed. Ninety-seven parameters were extracted from acoustical, spectral and image textural analyses and were subjected to feature selection by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Bayes, K Nearest-Neighbors (KNN), Fisher Linear Discriminant (FLD) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were tested. The classification of healthy and cataractous lenses shows a good performance for the four classifiers (F-measure ≥92.68%) with SVM showing the highest performance (90.62%) for initial versus severe cataract classification.

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Ultrasound Velocity in Binary Liquid Systems of PPG by Mathematical and Experimental Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayathri, A.; Venugopal, T.; Venkatramanan, K.

    The estimation of the speed of ultrasound is the fundamental requirement for investigating the transport properties of liquid and solid systems. Ultrasonic velocities of liquid mixtures containing polar and non-polar groups are of considerable importance in understanding inter-molecular interaction between component molecules and they find applications in several industrial and technological processes. There are many standard mathematical methods available to measure the ultrasonic velocity. In the present study, interferometric technique is planned for experimental measurement of ultrasound velocity. In this paper, the speed of ultrasound waves in Polypropylene Glycol (PPG 400, PPG 4000) in toluene has been estimated for different concentrations (2%, 4%, 6%, 8% & 10%) at 303K and these experimental values compared with theoretical values obtained by using various mathematical methods like Nomotto's Relation, Vandeal Vangeal Relation, Impedance Relation, and Rao's specific sound velocity. The most reliable method that matches with experimental method is identified using Average Percentage Error (APE) and analysed in the light of molecular interactions occurring in the binary liquid systems. Comparison of evaluated theoretical velocities with experimental values will reveal the nature of interaction between component molecules in the mixtures. Such theoretical study is useful in defining a comprehensive theoretical model for a specific liquid mixture. Also, various molecular interaction parameters like free volume, internal pressure, viscous relaxation time, inter atomic free length, etc are calculated and discussed in terms of polymer-solvent interactions.

  19. A randomised controlled trial comparing meat-based with human cadaveric models for teaching ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chuan, A; Lim, Y C; Aneja, H; Duce, N A; Appleyard, R; Forrest, K; Royse, C F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study was to compare novices' acquisition of the technical skills of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia using either a meat phantom model or fresh-frozen human cadavers. The primary outcome was the time taken to successfully perform an ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block on a cadaver; secondary outcomes were the cumulative score of errors, and best image quality of the sciatic nerve achieved. After training, the median (IQR [range]) time taken to perform the block was 311(164-390 [68-600]) s in the meat model trained group and 210 (174-354 [85-600]) s in the fresh-frozen cadaver trained group (p = 0.24). Participants made a median (IQR [range]) of 18 (14-33 [8-55]) and 15 (12-22 [8-44]) errors in the two groups respectively (p = 0.39). The image quality score was also not different, with a median (IQR [range]) of 62.5 (59.4-65.6 [25.0-100.0])% vs 62.5 (62.5-75.0 [25.0-87.5])% respectively (p = 0.58). The training and deliberate feedback improved all participants' block performance, the median (IQR [range]) times being 310 (206-532 [110-600]) s before and 240 (174-354 [85-600]) s after training (p = 0.02). We conclude that novices taught ultrasound scanning and needle guidance skills using an inexpensive and easily constructed meat model perform similarly to those trained on a cadaveric model. PMID:26993374

  20. Note: Comparative experimental studies on the performance of 2-2 piezocomposite for medical ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Marinozzi, F; Bini, F; Biagioni, A; Grandoni, A; Spicci, L

    2013-09-01

    The paper reports the experimental investigation of the behavior of 2-2 Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)-polymer composite transducers array for clinical ultrasound equipments. Several 2-2 plate composites having the same dicing pitch of 0.11 mm and different volume fractions were manufactured and investigated. Measurements were performed through different techniques such as electrical impedance, pulse-echo, and Laser Doppler Vibrometer. With the last one, maps of the surface displacement were presented relative to thickness mode and first lateral mode resonance frequencies. The transducers with volume fractions of the 40% resulted markedly inefficient, whereas the largest bandwidth and best band shape were achieved by the 50%. PMID:24089885

  1. A randomized controlled cross-over trial and cost analysis comparing endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration and fine needle biopsy*

    PubMed Central

    Aadam, A. Aziz; Wani, Sachin; Amick, Ashley; Shah, Janak N.; Bhat, Yasser M.; Hamerski, Christopher M.; Klapman, Jason B.; Muthusamy, V. Raman; Watson, Rabindra R.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Keswani, Rajesh N.; Keefer, Laurie; Das, Ananya; Komanduri, Srinadh

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Techniques to optimize endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue acquisition (EUS-TA) in a variety of lesion types have not yet been established. The primary aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic yield (DY) of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) to endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for pancreatic and non-pancreatic masses. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients referred for EUS-TA underwent randomization to EUS-FNA or EUS-FNB at four tertiary-care medical centers. A maximum of three passes were allowed for the initial method of EUS-TA and patients were crossed over to the other arm based on on-site specimen adequacy. Results: A total of 140 patients were enrolled. The overall DY was significantly higher with specimens obtained by EUS-FNB compared to EUS-FNA (90.0 % vs. 67.1 %, P = 0.002). While there was no difference in the DY between the two groups for pancreatic masses (FNB: 91.7 % vs. FNA: 78.4 %, P = 0.19), the DY of EUS-FNB was higher than the EUS-FNA for non-pancreatic lesions (88.2 % vs. 54.5 %, P = 0.006). Specimen adequacy was higher for EUS-FNB compared to EUS-FNA for all lesions (P = 0.006). There was a significant rescue effect of crossover from failed FNA to FNB in 27 out of 28 cases (96.5 %, P = 0.0003). Decision analysis showed that the strategy of EUS-FNB was cost saving compared to EUS-FNA over a wide range of cost and outcome probabilities. Conclusions: Results of this RCT and decision analysis demonstrate superior DY and specimen adequacy for solid mass lesions sampled by EUS-FNB. PMID:27227104

  2. A Comparative Study of Three Speckle Reducing Methods for Intima-Media Thickness Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Mehravar; Arabfard, Masoud; Rafati Rahimzadeh, Mehrdad; Voshtani, Hasan; Moladoust, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ultrasonic evaluation of intima-media thickness (IMT) is an early marker of assessing the development of atherosclerosis and determining cardiovascular risk. To attain the best possible diagnosis, it is essential that medical images be clear, sharp and without noise and artifacts. Objectives: Comparison of speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD), discrete (DTD) and continuum topological derivative (CTD) on B-mode ultrasound images of common carotid and brachial arteries throughout the cardiac cycle. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional design, an examination was performed on forty-two human subjects with a mean age of 44 ± 6 years from April 2013 to June 2013. This study was approved by the ethics committees of Kashan University of Medical Sciences and Beheshti Hospital. An ultrasonic examination of common carotid and brachial arteries of forty-two human subjects was performed. The program was designed in MATLAB software to extract consecutive B-mode images and apply region of interest (ROI) on the IMT of the common carotid and brachial arteries. Then, three different noise reduction filters with the Canny edge detection were used in ROI separately. Finally, the program measured the image quality metrics. Results: According to values of eleven different image quality metrics (mentioned in the main text), there was a significant difference between CTD, DTD and SRAD filters with the Canny edge detection status in the common carotid and brachial arteries throughout the cardiac cycle (all P values < 0.001). For example, peak signal to noise ratios (PSNR) using CTD, DTD and SRAD filters were 95.43 ± 0.64, 88.86 ± 0.82 and 73.02 ± 0.20 in common carotid and 96.39 ± 1.25, 92.58 ± 0.11 and 88.27 ± 0.63 in brachial arteries, respectively (both P values < 0.001). Conclusions: By measuring image quality metrics, this study showed that DTD and CTD filters with the Canny edge detection respectively, are better than SRAD filter with the Canny

  3. Volumetric breast density evaluation by ultrasound tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: a preliminary comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myc, Lukasz; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Ranger, Bryan; Lupinacci, Jessica; Schmidt, Steven; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    Since a 1976 study by Wolfe, high breast density has gained recognition as a factor strongly correlating with an increased incidence of breast cancer. These observations have led to mammographic density being designated a "risk factor" for breast cancer. Clinically, the exclusive reliance on mammography for breast density measurement has forestalled the inclusion of breast density into statistical risk models. This exclusion has in large part been due to the ionizing radiation associated with the method. Additionally, the use of mammography as valid tool for measuring a three dimensional characteristic (breast density) has been criticized for its prima facie incongruity. These shortfalls have prompted MRI studies of breast density as an alternative three-dimensional method of assessing breast density. Although, MRI is safe and can be used to measure volumetric density, its cost has prohibited its use in screening. Here, we report that sound speed measurements using a prototype ultrasound tomography device have potential for use as surrogates for breast density measurement. Accordingly, we report a strong positive linear correlation between volume-averaged sound speed of the breast and percent glandular tissue volume as assessed by MR.

  4. Comparative sensitivity of human and bovine erythrocytes to sonolysis by 1-MHz ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, M W; Sherman, T A; Brayman, A A

    2000-10-01

    This project tested the hypothesis that human erythrocytes, being larger than bovine erythrocytes, would be the more sensitive to sonolysis induced by inertial cavitation. The rationale behind this hypothesis was an earlier demonstration that, among sized populations of erythrocytes, an inverse relation existed between erythrocyte volume and mechanically-induced shear forces in the surrounding medium; viz, the larger the cell, the less shear force required to rupture the cell's membrane. At low erythrocyte densities (i.e., approximately 5% hematocrit) the hypothesis was supported; at high cell densities (i.e., approximately 35% hematocrit) it was not supported. The data are consistent with an ultrasound (US)-induced symmetric implosion of affected gas nuclei as causing the effect at low cell densities; under such conditions there is ample spacing among cells for US-induced symmetric growth and collapse of gas nuclei and the concomitant production of radially-expanding shock waves (which lyse the cells); at high cell densities there is not sufficient spacing among cells for US-induced symmetric growth and collapse of bubbles and an alternative mechanism, possibly asymmetric bubble collapse, becomes operational. PMID:11120370

  5. [Comparative evaluation of bone mineral density in Mexican women using x-ray bone densitometry and ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Llaca Rodríguez, V; Aguilera Pérez, R; Ahued Ahued, R; Rio de la Loza, F; Mendoza Torres, L J; Coria Soto, I; Zambrana Castañeda, M M

    2000-03-01

    With lifestyle changes in women, smoking and use of beverages with caffeine, and sedentarism increasing, so the risk factors for decalcification, increase; which is a public health problem by the higher incidence of osteoporotic fractures, as the age advances, specially in the postmenopause woman, which means a greater secondary morbidity-mortality; an important cause of physical disability, which directly affects psychoemotional wellbeing in women. In this study two methods of bone densitometry, were used; one of x ray, and other with ultrasound in 138 women during postmenopause with an average index of corporal mass of 29. Both results were compared of bone density, T measurement with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Double densitometry, was done in the 138 patients of lumbar spine with DEXA equipment, and of calcaneum with DTU-one equipment, by the same technician, finding the difference of T punctuation in this double study. PMID:10808616

  6. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    SciTech Connect

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  7. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    IVUS; Ultrasound - coronary artery; Endovascular ultrasound; Intravascular echocardiography ... A tiny ultrasound wand is attached to the top of a thin tube called a catheter. This ultrasound catheter is inserted ...

  8. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound records sound waves reflecting off moving objects, such as blood, to ...

  9. Computer-aided diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction using ultrasound images with DWT, GLCM and HOS methods: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Vidya, K Sudarshan; Ng, E Y K; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chou, Siaw Meng; Tan, Ru San; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial Infarction (MI) or acute MI (AMI) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Precise and timely identification of MI and extent of muscle damage helps in early treatment and reduction in the time taken for further tests. MI diagnosis using 2D echocardiography is prone to inter-/intra-observer variability in the assessment. Therefore, a computerised scheme based on image processing and artificial intelligent techniques can reduce the workload of clinicians and improve the diagnosis accuracy. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) of infarcted and normal ultrasound images will be useful for clinicians. In this study, the performance of CAD approach using Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), second order statistics calculated from Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and Higher-Order Spectra (HOS) texture descriptors are compared. The proposed system is validated using 400 MI and 400 normal ultrasound images, obtained from 80 patients with MI and 80 normal subjects. The extracted features are ranked based on t-value and fed to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to obtain the best performance using minimum number of features. The features extracted from DWT coefficients obtained an accuracy of 99.5%, sensitivity of 99.75% and specificity of 99.25%; GLCM have achieved an accuracy of 85.75%, sensitivity of 90.25% and specificity of 81.25%; and HOS obtained an accuracy of 93.0%, sensitivity of 94.75% and specificity of 91.25%. Among the three techniques presented DWT yielded the highest classification accuracy. Thus, the proposed CAD approach may be used as a complementary tool to assist cardiologists in making a more accurate diagnosis for the presence of MI. PMID:25912990

  10. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. Methods A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. Results When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Conclusion Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this

  11. Comparative assessments of the effects of alcohol exposure on fetal brain development using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2013-02-01

    The developing fetal brain is vulnerable to a variety of environmental agents including maternal ethanol consumption. Preclinical studies on the development and amelioration of fetal teratology would be significantly facilitated by the application of high resolution imaging technologies like optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (US). This study investigates the ability of these imaging technologies to measure the effects of maternal ethanol exposure on brain development, ex vivo, in fetal mice. Pregnant mice at gestational day 12.5 were administered ethanol (3 g/Kg b.wt.) or water by intragastric gavage, twice daily for three consecutive days. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and imaged. Three-dimensional images of the mice fetus brains were obtained by OCT and high-resolution US, and the volumes of the left and right ventricles of the brain were measured. Ethanol-exposed fetuses exhibited a statistically significant, 2-fold increase in average left and right ventricular volumes compared with the ventricular volume of control fetuses, with OCT-derived measures of 0.38 and 0.18 mm3, respectively, whereas the boundaries of the fetal mouse lateral ventricles were not clearly definable with US imaging. Our results indicate that OCT is a useful technology for assessing ventriculomegaly accompanying alcohol-induced developmental delay. This study clearly demonstrated advantages of using OCT for quantitative assessment of embryonic development compared with US imaging.

  12. Comparative assessments of the effects of alcohol exposure on fetal brain development using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C; Larin, Kirill V

    2013-02-01

    The developing fetal brain is vulnerable to a variety of environmental agents including maternal ethanol consumption. Preclinical studies on the development and amelioration of fetal teratology would be significantly facilitated by the application of high resolution imaging technologies like optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (US). This study investigates the ability of these imaging technologies to measure the effects of maternal ethanol exposure on brain development, ex vivo, in fetal mice. Pregnant mice at gestational day 12.5 were administered ethanol (3 g/Kg b.wt.) or water by intragastric gavage, twice daily for three consecutive days. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and imaged. Three-dimensional images of the mice fetus brains were obtained by OCT and high-resolution US, and the volumes of the left and right ventricles of the brain were measured. Ethanol-exposed fetuses exhibited a statistically significant, 2-fold increase in average left and right ventricular volumes compared with the ventricular volume of control fetuses, with OCT-derived measures of 0.38 and 0.18 mm3, respectively, whereas the boundaries of the fetal mouse lateral ventricles were not clearly definable with US imaging. Our results indicate that OCT is a useful technology for assessing ventriculomegaly accompanying alcohol-induced developmental delay. This study clearly demonstrated advantages of using OCT for quantitative assessment of embryonic development compared with US imaging. PMID:23386196

  13. Comparing a volume based template approach and ultrasound guided freehand approach in multicatheter interstitial accelerated partial breast irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Vicky Y.; Buhari, Shaik A.; Tan, Poh Wee; Tan, Yun Inn; Leong, Yuh Fun; Earnest, Arul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Currently, there are two described methods of catheter insertion for women undergoing multicatheter interstitial accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). These are a volume based template approach (template) and a non-template ultrasound guidance freehand approach (non-template). We aim to compare dosimetric endpoints between the template and non-template approach. Material and methods Twenty patients, who received adjuvant multicatheter interstitial APBI between August 2008 to March 2010 formed the study cohort. Dosimetric planning was based on the RTOG 04-13 protocol. For standardization, the planning target volume evaluation (PTV-Eval) and organs at risk were contoured with the assistance of the attending surgeon. Dosimetric endpoints include D90 of the PTV-Eval, Dose Homogeneity Index (DHI), V200, maximum skin dose (MSD), and maximum chest wall dose (MCD). A median of 18 catheters was used per patient. The dose prescribed was 34 Gy in 10 fractions BID over 5 days. Results The average breast volume was 846 cm3 (526-1384) for the entire cohort and there was no difference between the two groups (p = 0.6). Insertion time was significantly longer for the non-template approach (mean 150 minutes) compared to the template approach (mean: 90 minutes) (p = 0.02). The planning time was also significantly longer for the non-template approach (mean: 240 minutes) compared to the template approach (mean: 150 minutes) (p < 0.01). The template approach yielded a higher D90 (mean: 95%) compared to the non-template approach (mean: 92%) (p < 0.01). There were no differences in DHI (p = 0.14), V200 (p = 0.21), MSD (p = 0.7), and MCD (p = 0.8). Conclusions Compared to the non-template approach, the template approach offered significant shorter insertion and planning times with significantly improved dosimetric PTV-Eval coverage without significantly compromising organs at risk dosimetrically. PMID:25097558

  14. Management of myofascial pain by therapeutic ultrasound and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Shalu; Ranjan, Vikash; Misra, Deepankar; Panjwani, Sapna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present comparative study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of Th US and TENS in the management of myofascial pain in TMD patients. Materials and Methods: The present randomized comparative study was on 90 patients who were further assigned in three different groups each having 30 patients; Group I was healthy control patients, Group II was receiving Th US therapy, and Group III was receiving TENS therapy. All the 90 patients were further evaluated for maximum inter incisor subjective evaluation regarding muscle pain, impediment to daily life, massage impression on visual analog scale (VAS) scale, and intensity and duration used in Th US massage. Results: The masseter muscle thickness in control group was 12.00 (standard deviation [SD] ±1.1) mm when compared with TMD patient of 13.00 (SD ± 1.1) mm before treatment. Statistical significant findings on VAS score of muscle pain, impediment to daily life, and massage impression were observed in Th US. After treatment, the anechoic areas disappeared or were reduced in Th US group by 95.6% and in TENS by 74.4%. Conclusion: Th US appeared to be subjectively better which was related to VAS score of massage impression, muscle pain, and impediment to daily life after treatment as well as sonographically related to existence of anechoic areas. PMID:27011739

  15. The Automated Breast Volume Scanner (ABVS): initial experiences in lesion detection compared with conventional handheld B-mode ultrasound: a pilot study of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Farrokh, Andre; Hille, Ursula; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Gyapong, Samuel; Soliman, Amr A; Degenhardt, Friedrich; Hillemanns, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The idea of an automated whole breast ultrasound was developed three decades ago. We present our initial experiences with the latest technical advance in this technique, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) ACUSON S2000(™). Volume data sets were collected from 50 patients and a database containing 23 women with no detectable lesions in conventional ultrasound (BI-RADS(®)-US 1), 13 women with clearly benign lesions (BI-RADS(®)-US 2), and 14 women with known breast cancer (BI-RADS(®)-US 5) was created. An independent examiner evaluated the ABVS data on a separate workstation without any prior knowledge of the patients' histories. The diagnostic accuracy for the experimental ABVS was 66.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52.9-79.1). The independent examiner detected all breast cancers in the volume data resulting in a calculated sensitivity of 100% in the described setting (95% CI: 73.2%-100%). After the ABVS examination, there were a high number of requests for second-look ultrasounds in 47% (95% CI: 30.9-63.5) of the healthy women (with either a clearly benign lesion or no breast lesions at all in conventional handheld ultrasound). Therefore, the specificity remained at 52.8% (95% CI: 35.7-69.2). When comparing the concordance of the ABVS with the gold standard (conventional handheld ultrasound), Cohen's Kappa value as an estimation of the inter-rater reliability was κ = 0.37, indicating fair agreement. In conclusion, the ABVS must still be regarded as an experimental technique for breast ultrasound, which definitely needs to undergo further evaluation studies. PMID:22114526

  16. The Automated Breast Volume Scanner (ABVS): initial experiences in lesion detection compared with conventional handheld B-mode ultrasound: a pilot study of 50 cases

    PubMed Central

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Farrokh, Andre; Hille, Ursula; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Gyapong, Samuel; Soliman, Amr A; Degenhardt, Friedrich; Hillemanns, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The idea of an automated whole breast ultrasound was developed three decades ago. We present our initial experiences with the latest technical advance in this technique, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) ACUSON S2000™. Volume data sets were collected from 50 patients and a database containing 23 women with no detectable lesions in conventional ultrasound (BI-RADS®-US 1), 13 women with clearly benign lesions (BI-RADS®-US 2), and 14 women with known breast cancer (BI-RADS®-US 5) was created. An independent examiner evaluated the ABVS data on a separate workstation without any prior knowledge of the patients’ histories. The diagnostic accuracy for the experimental ABVS was 66.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52.9–79.1). The independent examiner detected all breast cancers in the volume data resulting in a calculated sensitivity of 100% in the described setting (95% CI: 73.2%–100%). After the ABVS examination, there were a high number of requests for second-look ultrasounds in 47% (95% CI: 30.9–63.5) of the healthy women (with either a clearly benign lesion or no breast lesions at all in conventional handheld ultrasound). Therefore, the specificity remained at 52.8% (95% CI: 35.7–69.2). When comparing the concordance of the ABVS with the gold standard (conventional handheld ultrasound), Cohen’s Kappa value as an estimation of the inter-rater reliability was κ = 0.37, indicating fair agreement. In conclusion, the ABVS must still be regarded as an experimental technique for breast ultrasound, which definitely needs to undergo further evaluation studies. PMID:22114526

  17. Lab-on-fiber platforms for ultrasound detection: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaquinto, M.; Ricciardi, A.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2015-09-01

    Sub-wavelength metallo-dielectric gratings integrated on optical fibers tip and supporting plasmonic resonances were numerically investigated in their behavior as acousto-optical transducers. Different configurations have been analyzed and compared among them in terms of sensitivity, defined as reflectivity intensity variation (at fixed wavelength) with respect to dielectric layer thickness changes. Our results demonstrate that the maximum sensitivity is obtained when an interaction between different plasmonic modes occurs. Sensitivity enhancement up to a factor of 3 with respect to Fabry- Perot cavity like transducer with same materials and sizes can be achieved.

  18. Comparative study of lesions created by high-intensity focused ultrasound using sequential discrete and continuous scanning strategies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingbo; Liu, Zhenbo; Zhang, Dong; Tang, Mengxing

    2013-03-01

    Lesion formation and temperature distribution induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) were investigated both numerically and experimentally via two energy-delivering strategies, i.e., sequential discrete and continuous scanning modes. Simulations were presented based on the combination of Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation and bioheat equation. Measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms sonicated by a 1.12-MHz single-element focused transducer working at an acoustic power of 75 W. Both the simulated and experimental results show that, in the sequential discrete mode, obvious saw-tooth-like contours could be observed for the peak temperature distribution and the lesion boundaries, with the increasing interval space between two adjacent exposure points. In the continuous scanning mode, more uniform peak temperature distributions and lesion boundaries would be produced, and the peak temperature values would decrease significantly with the increasing scanning speed. In addition, compared to the sequential discrete mode, the continuous scanning mode could achieve higher treatment efficiency (lesion area generated per second) with a lower peak temperature. The present studies suggest that the peak temperature and tissue lesion resulting from the HIFU exposure could be controlled by adjusting the transducer scanning speed, which is important for improving the HIFU treatment efficiency. PMID:21914564

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  20. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  2. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  3. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  4. A comparative sonochemical reaction that is independent of the intensity of ultrasound and the geometry of the exposure apparatus.

    PubMed

    Sostaric, Joe Z

    2008-09-01

    Sonolysis of aqueous solutions of n-alkyl anionic surfactants results in the formation of secondary carbon-centered radicals (-*CH-). The yield of -*CH- depends on the bulk surfactant concentration up to a maximum attainable radical yield (the 'plateau yield') where an increasing surfactant concentration (below the critical micelle concentration) no longer affects the -*CH- yield. In an earlier study it was found that the ratio of -*CH- detected following sonolysis of aqueous solutions of sodium pentane sulfonate (SPSo) to that of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (i.e. CH(SPSo)/CH(SDS)) depended on the frequency of sonolysis, but was independent of the ultrasound intensity, at the plateau concentrations [J.Z. Sostaric, P. Riesz, Adsorption of surfactants at the gas/solution interface of cavitation bubbles: an ultrasound intensity-independent frequency effect in sonochemistry, J. Phys. Chem. B 106 (2002) 12537-12548]. In the current study, it was found that the CH(SPSo)/CH(SDS) ratio depended only on the ultrasound frequency and did not depend on the geometry of the ultrasound exposure apparatus considered. PMID:18472292

  5. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    PubMed

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p < 0.001). Among patients with surgical conditions, the difference between ultrasonography (US) and CT diagnoses was significant in groups 2 (p = 0.046) and 3 (p =  .001). The impact of the change in diagnosis in surgical patients imaged with two modalities was significant in the group as a whole and in each age group separately. Non-diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden. PMID:26453370

  6. Comparative study of the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and low-level laser therapy on bone defects in tibias of rats.

    PubMed

    Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Feitosa, Suellen Maurin; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Bossini, Paulo; Oliveira, Poliani; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and to compare the effects of low intensity ultra-sound (LIPUS) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) during the process of bone healing by means of histopathological and morphometric analysis. The animals were randomly distributed into three groups of 30 animals each: the control group (bone defect without treatment); the laser-treated group: (bone defect treated with laser), and the LIPUS-treated (bone defect treated with ultrasound). Each group was further divided into three different subgroups (n = 10) and on days 7, 13, and 25 post-injury, rats were killed with an intra-peritoneal injection of general anesthetic. The rats were treated with a 30-mW/cm(2) low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and a 830-nm laser at 50 J/cm(2). The results showed intense new bone formation surrounded by highly vascularized connective tissue presenting a slight osteogenic activity, with primary bone deposition being observed in the group exposed to laser in the intermediary (13 days) and late stages of repair (25 days). This was confirmed by morphometric analysis in which significant statistical differences (p < 0.05) were noticed when compared to the control. No remarkable differences were noticed in the specimens treated with ultrasound with regard to the amount of newly formed bone in comparison to the control group. Taken together, our results indicate that laser therapy improves bone repair in rats as depicted by histopathological and morphometric analysis, mainly at the late stages of recovery. Moreover, it seems that this therapy was more effective than US to accelerate bone healing. PMID:20521077

  7. Disaster Response Team FAST Skills Training with a Portable Ultrasound Simulator Compared to Traditional Training: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Michael T.; Bailitz, John; Horowitz, Russ; Khishfe, Basem; Cosby, Karen; Sergel, Michelle J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-hospital focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) has been effectively used to improve patient care in multiple mass casualty events throughout the world. Although requisite FAST knowledge may now be learned remotely by disaster response team members, traditional live instructor and model hands-on FAST skills training remains logistically challenging. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of a novel portable ultrasound (US) simulator with traditional FAST skills training for a deployed mixed provider disaster response team. Methods We randomized participants into one of three training groups stratified by provider role: Group A. Traditional Skills Training, Group B. US Simulator Skills Training, and Group C. Traditional Skills Training Plus US Simulator Skills Training. After skills training, we measured participants’ FAST image acquisition and interpretation skills using a standardized direct observation tool (SDOT) with healthy models and review of FAST patient images. Pre- and post-course US and FAST knowledge were also assessed using a previously validated multiple-choice evaluation. We used the ANOVA procedure to determine the statistical significance of differences between the means of each group’s skills scores. Paired sample t-tests were used to determine the statistical significance of pre- and post-course mean knowledge scores within groups. Results We enrolled 36 participants, 12 randomized to each training group. Randomization resulted in similar distribution of participants between training groups with respect to provider role, age, sex, and prior US training. For the FAST SDOT image acquisition and interpretation mean skills scores, there was no statistically significant difference between training groups. For US and FAST mean knowledge scores, there was a statistically significant improvement between pre- and post-course scores within each group, but again there was not a statistically

  8. One-pot synthesis of indenonaphthopyrans catalyzed by copper(II) triflate: a comparative study of reflux and ultrasound methods.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Kadir; Ozturkcan, S Arda; Uluer, Mehmet; Turgut, Zuhal

    2014-01-01

    An effective and environment-friendly protocol for the synthesis of indenonaphthopyrans has been developed by one-pot reaction of 2-naphthol, various aromatic aldehydes and 1,3-indandione, in the presence of copper(II) triflate as the catalyst while using reflux (Method A) and ultrasound (Method B). The Method B approach offers the advantages of a simple reaction method, short reaction time, excellent yield, and showcases the economic importance of the catalysts for such processes. PMID:25286219

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL LASER AND LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND ASSOCIATED WITH BIOSILICATE® ON THE PROCESS OF BONE REPAIR IN THE RAT TIBIA

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Poliani de; Fernandes, Kelly Rosseti; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Pastor, Fabio Alexandre Casarin; Nonaka, Keico Okino; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Verify the effects of the association between Biosilicate® and ultrasound and, Biosilicate® and laser in bone consolidation process of rats, through the biomechanical and histological analysis. Methods: Forthy male rats were used. The animals were randomized into four groups (n=10): control group fracture no treated (CGF); group treated with Biosilicate® (BG); group treated with Biosilicate® and laser (BLG); group treated with Biosilicate® and ultrasound (BUG). Results: The biomechanical analysis showed no significant difference among any groups after 14 days post-surgery. In the morphometric analysis, the control group showed moderate presence of new formed bone tissue inside the defects areas and the Biosilicate® group showed similar results. Despite those facts, the biomaterial osteogenic potential was demonstrated by the great amount of cells and bone tissue around the particles. Curiously, the Biosilicate® plus laser or ultrasound groups showed lower amounts of bone tissue deposition when compared with control fracture and Biosilicate® groups. Conclusion: The data from this study can conclude that Biosilicate® was able to accelerate and optimized the bone consolidation, through the modulation of the inflammatory process and the stimulation of new bone formation. However, when resources were associated, there are no positive results. PMID:27027088

  10. A comparative study of ultrasound and laser light diffraction techniques for particle size determination in dairy beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S.; Berrut, S.; Goodenough, T. I. J.; Rajendram, V. S.; Pinfield, V. J.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2006-02-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of milkfat droplets of raw and homogenized milk was determined by a diagnostic ultrasound technique that was initially calibrated with colloidal silica. The quality of the fit between ultrasound theory and experiment is discussed and provides a basis for comparison with the reference laser light scattering technique. The predicted ultrasonic attenuation was determined from the ECAH (Epstein P S and Carhart R R 1953 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 25 553-65, Allegra J R and Hawley S A 1972 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51 1545-64) model using thermophysical data for milkfat and milk serum. New thermophysical properties of milkfat were established. The experimental data were obtained with the Ultrasizer spectrometer. Both techniques were affected by the milk proteins and could provide only qualitative milkfat PSD for the raw and the homogenized milk samples. Therefore, they showed their limitations to characterize multiple emulsions. However, preliminary results are shown for the ultrasound technique that account for the impact of the protein on the measured data and hence obtain quantitative results for the milkfat size distributions.

  11. A comparative sonochemical reaction that is independent of the intensity of ultrasound and the geometry of the exposure apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Sostaric, Joe Z.

    2009-01-01

    Sonolysis of aqueous solutions of n-alkyl anionic surfactants results in the formation of secondary carbon-centered radicals (—•CH—). The yield of —•CH— depends on the bulk surfactant concentration up to a maximum attainable radical yield (the ‘plateau yield’) where an increasing surfactant concentration (below the critical micelle concentration) no longer affects the —•CH— yield. In an earlier study it was found that the ratio of —•CH— detected following sonolysis of aqueous solutions of sodium pentane sulfonate (SPSo) to that of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (i.e., CHSPSo/CHSDS) depended on the frequency of sonolysis, but was independent of the ultrasound intensity, at the plateau concentrations (J. Phys. Chem. B 106 (2002) 12537-12548). In the current study, it was found that the CHSPSo/CHSDS ratio depended only on the ultrasound frequency and did not depend on the geometry of the ultrasound exposure apparatus considered. PMID:18472292

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is used to see organs in and near the digestive ... Ultrasound is a way to see the inside of the body using high-frequency sound waves. Endoscopic ...

  13. Scrotal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotal sac to help transmit the sound waves. A handheld probe (the ultrasound transducer) is then ... The ultrasound machine sends out high-frequency sound waves. These waves reflect off areas in the scrotum ...

  14. Pregnancy ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3D ultrasound References Richards DS. Obstetrical ultrasound: Imaging, dating, and growth. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson ... the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A. ...

  15. Added value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared to mammography, ultrasound and 3-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seymer, A; Keinrath, P; Holzmannhofer, J; Pirich, C; Hergan, K; Meissnitzer, M W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively analyse the diagnostic value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared with that of mammography (MG), breast ultrasound and MRI of the breast. Methods: Within a 15-month period, 67 patients with 92 breast lesions rated as Category IV or V according to the breast imaging reporting and data system detected with MG and/or ultrasound were included into the study. After the injection of 740–1110 MBq of Technetium-99m (99mTc) SestaMIBI intravenously, scintigrams were obtained in two projections comparable to MG. The BSGI was analysed visually and semi-quantitatively by calculating a relative uptake factor (X). With the exception of two patients with cardiac pacemakers, all patients underwent 3-T breast MRI. Biopsy results were obtained as the reference standard in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values, accuracy and area under the curve were calculated for each modality. Results: Among the 92 lesions, 67 (72.8%) were malignant. 60 of the 67 cancers of any size were detected by BSGI with an overall sensitivity of 90%, only exceeded by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 99%. The sensitivity of BSGI for lesions <1 cm declined significantly to 60%. Overall specificity of ultrasound was only 20%. Specificity, accuracy and positive-predictive value were the highest for BSGI (56%, 80% and 85%, respectively). X was significantly higher for malignant lesions (mean, 4.27) and differed significantly between ductal types (mean, 4.53) and the other histopathological entities (mean, 3.12). Conclusion: Semi-quantitative BSGI with calculation of the relative uptake factor (X) can help to characterize breast lesions. BSGI negativity may obviate the need for biopsy of breast lesions >1 cm with low or intermediate prevalence for malignancy. Advances in knowledge: Compared with morphological imaging modalities, specificity, positive

  16. A comparative study on the contour tracking algorithms in ultrasound tongue images with automatic re-initialization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kele; Gábor Csapó, Tamás; Roussel, Pierre; Denby, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    The feasibility of an automatic re-initialization of contour tracking is explored by using an image similarity-based method in the ultrasound tongue sequences. To this end, the re-initialization method was incorporated into current state-of-art tongue tracking algorithms, and a quantitative comparison was made between different algorithms by computing the mean sum of distances errors. The results demonstrate that with automatic re-initialization, the tracking error can be reduced from an average of 5-6 to about 4 pixels, a result obtained by using a large number of hand-labeled frames and similarity measurements to extract the contours, which results in improved performance. PMID:27250201

  17. Ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography using energy-scaled amplitude ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Shin, Junseob; Huang, Lianjie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound attenuation of breast tumors is related to their types and pathological states, and can be used to detect and characterize breast cancer. Particularly, ultrasound scattering attenuation can infer the margin properties of breast tumors. Ultrasound attenuation tomography quantitatively reconstructs the attenuation properties of the breast. Our synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays records both ultrasound reflection and transmission signals. We develop an ultrasound attenuation tomography method using ultrasound energy-scaled amplitude decays of ultrasound transmission signals and conduct ultrasound attenuation tomography using a known sound-speed model. We apply our ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography method to a breast phantom dataset, and compare the ultrasound attenuation tomography results with conventional beamforming ultrasound images obtained using reflection signals. We show that ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography complements beamforming images in identifying breast lesions.

  18. Interventional ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, H.H.; Kristensen, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: Introduction to interventional ultrasound/handling of aspirated material/general principles of fine needle aspiration cytology/procedure and principles in ultrasonically guided puncture/puncture of focal liver lesions/intraoperative puncture of the liver guided by ultrasound/Interventional ultrasound in cancer therapy/Interventional echocardiography/Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: Are there any risks./Puncture of renal mass lesions/Intrauterine needle diagnosis/Percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  19. Infrared thermography and ultrasound C-scan for non-destructive evaluation of 3D carbon fiber materials: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, Francois; Maldague, Xavier; West, Lucas; Joncas, Simon; Leduc, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    3D Carbon fiber polymer matrix composites (3D CF PMCs) are increasingly used for aircraft construction due to their exceptional stiffness and strength-to-mass ratios. However, defects are common in the 3D combining areas and are challenging to inspect. In this paper, Stitching is used to decrease these defects, but causes some new types of defects. Infrared NDT (non-destructive testing) and ultrasound NDT are used. In particular, a micro-laser line thermography technique (micro-LLT) and a micro-laser spot thermography (micro-LST) with locked-in technique are used to detect the micro-defects. In addition, a comparative study is conducted by using pulsed thermography (PT), vibrothermography (VT). In order to confirm the types of the defects, microscopic inspection is carried out before NDT work, after sectioning and polishing a small part of the sample..

  20. A comparative approach of four different image registration techniques for quantitative assessment of coronary artery calcium lesions using intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Dey, Nilanjan; Chakraborty, Sayan; Saba, Luca; Kumar, Dinesh; Godia, Elisa Cuadrado; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Gupta, Ajay; Radeva, Petia; Laird, John R; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2015-02-01

    In IVUS imaging, constant linear velocity and a constant angular velocity of 1800 rev/min causes displacement of the calcium in subsequent image frames. To overcome this error in intravascular ultrasound video, IVUS image frames must be registered prior to the lesion quantification. This paper presents a comprehensive comparison of four registration methods, namely: Rigid, Affine, B-Splines and Demons on five set of calcium lesion quantification parameters namely: (i) the mean lesion area, (ii) mean lesion arc, (iii) mean lesion span, (iv) mean lesion length, and (v) mean lesion distance from catheter. Using our IRB approved data of 100 patient volumes, our results shows that all four registrations showed a decrease in five calcium lesion parameters as follows: for Rigid registration, the values were: 4.92%, 5.84%, 5.89%, 5.27%, and 4.57%, respectively, for Affine registration the values were: 6.06%, 6.51%, 7.28%, 6.50%, and 5.94%, respectively, for B-Splines registration the values were: 7.35%, 8.03%, 9.54%, 8.18%, and 7.62%, respectively, and for Demons registration the five parameters were 7.32%, 8.02%, 10.11%, 7.94%, and 8.92% respectively. The relative overlap of identified lesions decreased by 5.91% in case of Rigid registration, 6.23% in case of Affine registration, 4.48% for Demons registration, whereas it increased by 3.05% in case of B-Splines registration. Rigid and Affine transformation-based registration took only 0.1936 and 0.2893 s per frame, respectively. Demons and B-Splines framework took only 0.5705 and 0.9405 s per frame, respectively, which were significantly slower than Rigid and Affine transformation based image registration. PMID:25523233

  1. Clinical Applicability of Assessment of Jugular Flow over the Individual Cardiac Cycle Compared with Current Ultrasound Methodology.

    PubMed

    Sisini, Francesco; Tessari, Mirko; Menegatti, Erica; Vannini, Maria Elena; Gianesini, Sergio; Tavoni, Valentina; Gadda, Giacomo; Gambaccini, Mauro; Taibi, Angelo; Zamboni, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in measuring cerebral venous outflow with ultrasound (US). However, results obtained with the current US Doppler methodology, which uses just a single value of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the vessel, are highly variable and inconclusive. The product of CSA and time-averaged velocity in the case of pulsatile vessels may be a possible source of error, particularly for a pulsatile vein like the internal jugular vein (IJV), where the cardiac pump transmits a sequence of well-established waves along the conduit. We herein propose a novel technique for US IJV flow assessment that accurately accounts for IJV CSA variations during the cardiac cycle. Five subjects were investigated with a high-resolution real-time B-mode video, synchronized with an electrocardiography trace. In this approach, CSA variations representing the pulsatility of the IJV are overlapped with the velocity curve obtained by the usual spectral Doppler trace. The overlap is then phased point by point using the electrocardiography pacemaker. This allows us to experimentally measure the velocity variation in relation to the change in CSA precisely, ultimately enabling calculation of IJV flow. (i) The sequence of CSA variation with respect to the electrocardiography waves corresponds exactly to the jugular venous pulse as measured in physiology. (ii) The methodology permits us to phase the velocity and CSA, which is ultimately what is currently lacking to precisely calculate the flow in the IJV with US. (iii) The time-averaged flow, calculated with the described technique, is very close to that calculated assuming a constant IJV CSA, whereas the time-dependent flow shows differs as much as 40%. (iv) Finally, we tested the accuracy of the technique with a methodology that may allow for universal assessment of the accuracy of each personal US-based evaluation of flow rate. PMID:27108038

  2. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided paravertebral block with ropivacaine versus bupivacaine for post-operative pain relief in children undergoing thoracotomy for patent ductus arteriosus ligation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, Kolli S; Patnaik, Sathya Swaroop; Sunil, C; Bansal, Tripti

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Thoracotomy incision following patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) ligation surgery is often associated with severe post-operative pain that has deleterious effects on respiratory function. We aimed to assess pain relief with thoracic paravertebral block using either bupivacaine or ropivacaine in these surgeries. Methods: One hundred paediatric patients of age group between 2 and 10 years undergoing PDA ligation surgery were randomised either to bupivacaine or ropivacaine group in this prospective double-blinded study. After induction of general anaesthesia, the ultrasound-guided paravertebral block was carried out using 0.25% bupivacaine 0.4 ml/kg in Group B patients and 0.2% ropivacaine 0.4 ml/kg in Group R patients. Monitoring included minimum mandatory monitoring with pulse rate, pulseoximetry (SpO2), electrocardiogram, blood pressure, temperature during surgery and also in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Additionally, modified objective pain score (MOPS) was used in ICU for assessment of pain for 12 h after surgery. Incidence of complications was noted. Results: Mean values of MOPSs were comparable in both the groups. The time to rescue analgesic was 8 to 10 h in over 80% of patients in both the groups. More patients had hypotension and bradycardia in bupivacaine group compared to ropivacaine group. Conclusion: Paravertebral injection of 0.4 ml/kg of either 0.2% ropivacaine or 0.25% bupivacaine provided equipotent analgesia, but ropivacaine had a better side effect profile. Ultrasound-guided paravertebral block is a safe and effective mode of analgesia in paediatric patients undergoing thoracotomy. PMID:26379293

  3. Comparative study of linear and curvilinear ultrasound probes to assess quadriceps rectus femoris muscle mass in healthy subjects and in patients with chronic respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, S; Suh, E; Thompson, A; Connolly, B; Ramsay, M; Harding, R; Puthucheary, Z; Moxham, J; Hart, N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound measurements of rectus femoris cross-sectional area (RFCSA) are clinically useful measurements in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and critically ill patients. Technical considerations as to the type of probe used, which affects image resolution, have limited widespread clinical application. We hypothesised that measurement of RFCSA would be similar with linear and curvilinear probes. Methods Four studies were performed to compare the use of the curvilinear probe in measuring RFCSA. Study 1 investigated agreement of RFCSA measurements using linear and curvilinear probes in healthy subjects, and in patients with chronic respiratory disease. Study 2 investigated the intra-rater and inter-rater agreement using the curvilinear probe. Study 3 investigated the agreement of RFCSA measured from whole and spliced images using the linear probe. Study 4 investigated the applicability of ultrasound in measuring RFCSA during the acute and recovery phases of an exacerbation of COPD. Results Study 1 showed demonstrated no difference in the measurement of RFCSA using the curvilinear and linear probes (308±104 mm2 vs 320±117 mm2, p=0.80; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)>0.97). Study 2 demonstrated high intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of RFCSA measurement with ICC>0.95 for both. Study 3 showed that the spliced image from the linear probe was similar to the whole image RFCSA (308±103.5 vs 263±147 mm2, p=0.34; ICC>0.98). Study 4 confirmed the clinical acceptability of using the curvilinear probe during an exacerbation of COPD. There were relationships observed between admission RFCSA and body mass index (r=+0.65, p=0.018), and between RFCSA at admission and physical activity levels at 4 weeks post-hospital discharge (r=+0.75, p=0.006). Conclusions These studies have demonstrated that clinicians can employ whole and spliced images from the linear probe or use images from the curvilinear probe, to measure RFCSA. This will extend

  4. Randomized Trial Comparing the Flexible 19G and 25G Needles for Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Solid Pancreatic Mass Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Bang, Ji Young; Hebert-Magee, Shantel; Trevino, Jessica; Eltoum, Isam; Frost, Andra; Hasan, Muhammad K.; Logue, Amy; Hawes, Robert; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although a large gauge needle can procure more tissue at endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), its advantage over smaller needles is unclear. This study compared flexible 19G and 25G needles for EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic masses. Methods This was a randomized trial of patients undergoing EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Main outcome measure was to compare median number of passes for on-site diagnosis. Secondary measures were to compare specimen bloodiness, complications, technical failures, and histological core tissue procurement. Results One hundred patients were randomized to EUS-FNA using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Median of 1 pass was required to achieve on-site diagnosis of 96% and 92% (P = 0.68) in 19G and 25G cohorts. There was no significant difference in technical failure (0% vs 2%, P = 0.99) or adverse events (2% vs 0%, P = 0.99) between 19G and 25G cohorts. Although histological core tissue procurement was significantly better with flexible 19G needle (88% vs 44%, P < 0.001), specimens were bloodier (severe bloodiness, 36% vs 4%; P < 0.001). Conclusions As there is no significant difference in the performance of flexible 19G and 25G needles, needle choice for sampling pancreatic masses should be based on endoscopist preference and need for histology. PMID:25232713

  5. Ultrasound-guided Central Line Insertion and Standard Peripherally Inserted Catheter Placement in Preterm Infants: Comparing Results from Prospective Study in a Single-center

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamod, Dany Antanios; Zeidan, Smart; Al Bizri, Ayah; Baaklini, Georges; Nassif, Yolla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among preterm infants, the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is the standard line for central venous access; however, its placement exposes them to hypothermia and pain. Ultrasound (US)-guided central line insertion may be less morbid than standard PICC line. Aims: To determine the ease, success rate, and morbidity associated with US-guided central line insertion in the internal jugular vein (IJV) by comparing it to the standard PICC line placement. Materials and Methods: This is a single-center nonrandomized prospective study evaluating preterm infants between October 2013 and June 2014. Patients were allocated into two groups: The standard group (control group) who underwent blind PICC line insertion and the intervention group who underwent a percutaneous US-guided central line insertion in the IJV. The epicutaneo-cava-catheter was used in both groups. Results: Fifty neonates were enrolled on study. A statistically difference in favor of US-IJV insertion was noted concerning the rate of successful first attempt (P < 0.001), insertion (P = 0.001), and procedure duration (P < 0.001) and number of trials (P < 0.001) compared to PICC. No difference in complications (P = 1.000) was noted. Conclusion: US guided catheterization of the IJV technique is faster than PICC line insertion with higher rates of successful first attempt and insertion, less procedure duration and fewer number of trials compared to PICC line insertion. There were no differences in complications. PMID:27298814

  6. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Automated Breast Volume Scanner Compared with Handheld Ultrasound in Pre-Operative Breast Invasive Ductal Carcinomas: A Pilot Study of 51 Cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaoli; Wei, Shuping; Xie, Yingdong; Guan, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the work described here was to compare the accuracy of conventional handheld ultrasound (HHUS) with that of an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) in 3-D assessment of pre-operative invasive ductal carcinomas. HHUS and ABVS were used in 51 patients to obtain the largest tumor diameter, tumor volume and tumor surface area. The volumetric measurement was also obtained from ABVS data with medical software. With tumor size and volume on pathology as the gold standard, Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare variability. Correlation coefficients and receiver operating characteristic curves were established for all measurements for T2 classification. The correlation coefficients of all ABVS measurements were stronger than those of HHUS measurements, with the ABVS volumetric measurement significantly different with a higher accuracy of 88.24% (45/51) and predicting T-classification with higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (0.936). Therefore, 3-D measurements provide stronger correlations with pathology in tumor size measurement. However, more clinical trials are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27339762

  7. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery.

  8. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy and Scheimpflug Imaging in Anterior Megalophthalmos: Changes Seen after Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nawani, Nishant; Jain, Arun K; Singh, Ramandeep

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. With this report we describe ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) findings in a patient with anterior megalophthalmos before and after undergoing phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. Methods. Phacoemulsification was carried out for nuclear sclerosis in both eyes of a patient diagnosed with anterior megalophthalmos. The patient was subjected to detailed ophthalmic examination including ultrasound biomicroscopy and Scheimpflug imaging prior to and after surgery. Preoperative ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed a deep anterior chamber with posterior bowing of the midperipheral iris in both eyes. The ciliary processes were inserted on the posterior surface of the iris. UBM was repeated postoperatively as well. Results. Phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation (IOL) were carried out successfully in both eyes. The IOLs were well centered and captured within the anterior capsulorhexis. The anterior chambers were hyperdeep, 6.24 mm (OD) and 6.08 mm (OS), respectively. The posterior bowing of the midperipheral iris was absent, with the iris having a more flat profile. Conclusion. UBM findings in anterior megalophthalmos seemed to partially resolve after cataract surgery. The anterior chamber deepens appreciably as well. PMID:26064734

  9. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... germ cell neoplasms, sex-cord stromal tumors. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ... oviduct, ovary, ultrasound imaging of pelvic structures. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  10. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  11. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Performed Ultrasound is a painless method that uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the ... neck to help with the transmission of the sound waves. Next, the technician moves a wand, called a ...

  12. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Breast ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to examine the breasts. How the Test is ... to the left or right. The device sends sound waves to the breast tissue. The sound waves help ...

  13. Pregnancy ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... findings that might indicate an increased risk for Down syndrome A pregnancy ultrasound may also be done in ... weeks of pregnancy to look for signs of Down syndrome or other problems in the developing baby. This ...

  14. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  15. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  16. [Interventional ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Sánchez, N; Fernández Canedo, I; Valdés Vilches, L; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    High-frequency ultrasound has become increasingly used in dermatology. This technique is accessible, non-invasive, and rapid and provides information in real time. Consequently, it has become of great diagnostic value in dermatology. However, high-frequency ultrasound also has a promising future as a complementary technique in interventional diagnostic procedures, even though its application in this field has been little studied by dermatologists. PMID:26895944

  17. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  18. Comparative study of multi-enzyme production from typical agro-industrial residues and ultrasound-assisted extraction of crude enzyme in fermentation with Aspergillus japonicus PJ01.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-jun; Xia, Jin-lan; Shan, Yang; Nie, Zhen-yuan

    2015-10-01

    Submerged fermentation (SmF) and solid-state fermentation (SSF) of Aspergillus japonicus PJ01 for multi-enzyme complexes (MEC) production were comparatively studied. The results showed that orange peel and wheat bran were the best substrates for MEC production in SmF and SSF, respectively. After 72 h of cultivation under SmF, the maximal pectinase, CMCase, and xylanase activities reached 2610, 85, and 335 U/gds (units/gram dry substrate), respectively; while after 72 h of cultivation under SSF, these three enzymes' activities reached 966, 58, and 1004 U/gds, respectively. Effects of ultrasound on extraction of crude enzymes from SSF medium were determined, the maximal activities of pectinase, CMCase, and xylanase increased to 1.20, 1.48, and 1.30-fold, respectively. Apparent different mycelia growths of SSF and SmF were observed by scanning electron microscopy; and different isoforms of the crude enzyme extracts from SSF and SmF were presented by zymogram analysis. PMID:26260269

  19. A comparative study on the effect of conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwave and ultrasound treatments on the antioxidant activity of five fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Sangeeta; Mahnot, Nikhil Kumar; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2016-06-01

    A comparative study on the effect of conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwave and ultrasound treatments on the phytochemical and antioxidant activities of juices from carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.), black jamun (Syzygium cumuni L.Skeels.), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var lanatus), pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr) and litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) was carried out. Depending on the type of fruit sample and treatment, increase or decrease in phytochemical values was observed. Overall, sonication had a positive effect on the total flavonoid content in all the juice samples followed by microwave treatment with exceptions in some cases. High-performance liquid chromatography study showed the presence of different phenolic acids depending on the sample type. The phenolic acids in some processed carambola juice samples showed decrease or complete destruction, while in some cases, an increase or appearance of newer phenolic acid originally not detected in the fresh juice was observed as seen in conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwaved at 600 W and sonicated juices. Both microwaved and sonicated samples were found to have positive effect on the phenolic content and antioxidant activity with exceptions in some cases. Therefore, microwave and sonication treatment could be used in place of thermal pasteurisation depending on the sample requirements. PMID:26190045

  20. A comparative study of contrast enhanced ultrasound and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and characterization of hepatic hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Zhu, Zheng; Huang, Beijian; Ding, Hong; Mao, Feng; Li, Chaolun; Zeng, Mengsu; Zhou, Jianjun; Wang, Ling; Wang, Wenping; Chen, Yue

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to compare contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CEMRI) for the detection and characterization of hepatic hemangiomas. Included in this retrospective study were 83 histopathologically confirmed lesions of hemangioma in 66 hospitalized patients who underwent both CEUS and CEMRI and received surgery. The enhancement patterns on CEUS and CEMRI in each lesion were compared and analyzed. In addition, data obtained by the two modalities were then compared with the pathological findings to determine their value in differential diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. CEUS diagnosed 78 lesions of hemangioma against 80 by CEMRI. There were no statistical significant differences in the diagnostic value between CEUS and CEMRI in terms of sensitivity (88.0% vs. 92.8%), specificity (99.0% vs. 99.4%), accuracy (97.3% vs. 98.4%), positive predictive value (93.6% vs. 96.3%), and negative predictive value (98.0% vs. 98.8%) (p > 0.05, all). In the arterial phase, the main enhancement pattern on both CEUS and CEMRI was peripheral nodular enhancement (73 vs. 76), but lesions with diffuse enhancement on CEUS outnumbered those on CEMRI (3 vs. 1) and lesions with circular enhancement on CEMRI outnumbered those on CEUS (3 vs. 2). In the portal venous phase and delayed phase, the main enhancement pattern was hyperechoic change on CEUS and hyperintense on CEMRI (66 vs. 65), some lesions presented isoechoic change (12 vs. 15). These results suggested CEUS, an equivalent to CEMRI, may have an added diagnostic value in hemangiomas. PMID:25971695

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided puncture suture device versus metal clip for gastric defect closure after endoscopic full-thickness resection: A randomized, comparative, porcine study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Beibei; Guo, Jintao; Ge, Nan; Sun, Siyu; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Guoxin; Feng, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The secure closure of the wall defect is a critical stage of endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR). The aim of this study was to compare the closure of post-EFTR defects using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided puncture suture device (PSD) with the metal clip (MC) technique in a randomized, comparative, porcine study. Methods: We performed a randomized comparative survival study that included 18 pigs. The circular EFTR defects with a diameter of approximately 20 mm were closed with either a PSD or MC. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined preoperatively and on a postoperative day (POD) 1, 3, and 7. Three animals from each group were sacrificed at the end of the 7th, 14th, and 30th POD. Tissue samples retrieved from the closure sites were examined macroscopically and microscopically. Results: Resection and closure were performed in 18 pigs (100%) without major perioperative complications. The mean closure time was significantly longer in the MC group than in the PSD group (25.00 ± 3.16 min vs. 1.56 ± 0.39 min; P < 0.05). Preoperative and POD 7 serum levels of IL-6 did not differ between the two groups. However, on POD 1, the IL-6 levels were observed to be significantly greater in the MC group than in the PSD group (P < 0.005). No significant differences between the PSD and MC groups were observed at necropsy. Conclusion: In this in vivo porcine model, PSD is a feasible device that achieves post-EFTR defect closure with a much shorter closure time and with less immunological responses than the MC technique. PMID:27503160

  2. Ultrasound focusing images in superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukihiro; Tamura, Shin-ichiro

    2002-03-01

    We study theoretically ultrasound focusing in periodic multilayered structures, or superlattices, by solving the wave equation with the Green function method and calculating the transmitted ultrasound amplitude images of both the longitudinal and transverse modes. The constituent layers assumed are elastically isotropic but the periodically stacked structure is anisotropic. Thus anisotropy of ultrasound propagation is predicted even at low frequencies and it is enhanced significantly at higher frequencies due to the zone-folding effect of acoustic dispersion relations. An additional effect studied is the interference of ultrasound (known as the internal diffraction), which can be recognized when the propagation distance is comparable to the ultrasound wavelength. Numerical examples are developed for millimetre-scale Al/polymer multilayers used recently for imaging experiment with surface acoustic waves.

  3. [Quantitative ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Barkmann, R; Glüer, C-C

    2006-10-01

    Methods of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can be used to obtain knowledge about bone fragility. Comprehensive study results exist showing the power of QUS for the estimation of osteoporotic fracture risk. Nevertheless, the variety of technologies, devices, and variables as well as different degrees of validation of the single devices have to be taken into account. Using methods to simulate ultrasound propagation, the complex interaction between ultrasound and bone could be understood and the propagation could be visualized. Preceding widespread clinical use, it has to be clarified if patients with low QUS values will profit from therapy, as it has been shown for DXA. Moreover, the introduction of quality assurance measures is essential. The user should know the limitations of the methods and be able to interpret the results correctly. Applied in an adequate manner QUS methods could then, due to lower costs and absence of ionizing radiation, become important players in osteoporosis management. PMID:16896637

  4. Comparatively studying the ultrasound present in a mild two-stage approach on the content of functional groups in modified MWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Run; Liang, Shaolei; Li, Guangfen; Zhang, Yanxia; Shi, Le

    2016-04-01

    A two-stage approach assisted with ultrasound for oxidation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with ultra-high content of functional groups was utilized. The effect of ultrasound on the content of functional groups of the modified MWCNTs from different stages was analyzed by FE-SEM, HR-TEM, FTIR, Raman, TGA, XPS and triple double-backward titration method. The results confirm that more oxygen-containing functional groups were grafted on MWCNT with little damage to the structure integrity of nanotubes. The particle size distribution and the dispersion photography of MWCNTs in water and in ethanol further show a better dispersion of modified MWCNTs in polar solvent.

  5. Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  6. Ultrasound despeckling for contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Tay, Peter C; Garson, Christopher D; Acton, Scott T; Hossack, John A

    2010-07-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  7. Doppler ultrasound surveillance in deep tunneling compressed-air work with Trimix breathing: bounce dive technique compared to saturation-excursion technique.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, T P van Rees; Sterk, W; de Boer, A G E M; van der Beek, A J; Verhoeven, A C; van Dijk, F J H

    2008-01-01

    The Western Scheldt Tunneling Project in The Netherlands provided a unique opportunity to evaluate two deep-diving techniques with Doppler ultrasound surveillance. Divers used the bounce diving techniques for repair and maintenance of the TBM. The tunnel boring machine jammed at its deepest depth. As a result the work time was not sufficient. The saturation diving technique was developed and permitted longer work time at great depth. Thirty-one divers were involved in this project. Twenty-three divers were examined using Doppler ultrasound. Data analysis addressed 52 exposures to Trimix at 4.6-4.8 bar gauge using the bounce technique and 354 exposures to Trimix at 4.0-6.9 bar gauge on saturation excursions. No decompression incidents occurred with either technique during the described phase of the project. Doppler ultrasound revealed that the bubble loads assessed in both techniques were generally low. We find out, that despite longer working hours, shorter decompression times and larger physical workloads, the saturation-excursion technique was associated with significant lower bubble grades than in the bounce technique using Doppler Ultrasound. We conclude that the saturation-excursion technique with Trimix is a good option for deep and long exposures in caisson work. The Doppler technique proved valuable, and it should be incorporated in future compressed-air work. PMID:19175196

  8. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing the effects of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound to standard care in healing venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Gary W; Orgill, Dennis P; Serena, Thomas E; Novoung, Aksone; O'Connell, Jessica B; Li, William W; Driver, Vickie R

    2015-01-01

    Current scientific evidence suggests venous leg ulcers (VLUs) that do not respond to guideline-defined care may have a wound microenvironment that is out of physiological balance. A prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was conducted to compare percent wound size reduction, proportions healed, pain, and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in patients randomized to standard care (SC) alone or SC and 40 kHz noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound (NLFU) treatments 3 times per week for 4 weeks. One hundred, twelve (112) eligible participants with documented venous stasis, a VLU >30 days' duration, measuring 4 cm2 to 50 cm2, and demonstrated arterial flow were enrolled. Of these, 81 reduced <30% in size during the 2-week run-in study phase and were randomized (SC, n = 40; NLFU+SC, n = 41). Median age of participants was 59 years; 83% had multiple complex comorbidities. Index ulcers were 56% recurrent, with a median duration of 10.3 months (range 1 month to 204.5 months) and median ulcer area of 11.0 cm2 (range 3.7 cm2-41.3 cm2). All participants received protocol-defined SC compression (30-40 mm Hg), dressings to promote a moist wound environment, and sharp debridement at the bedside for a minimum of 1 time per week. Ulcer measurements were obtained weekly using digital planimetry. Pain and QOL scores were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment using the Visual Analog Scale and the Short Form-36 Health Survey. After 4 weeks of treatment, average wound size reduction was 61.6% ± 28.9 in the NLFU+SC compared to 45% ± 32.5 in the SC group (P = 0.02). Reductions in median (65.7% versus 44.4%, P = 0.02) and absolute wound area (9.0 cm2 versus 4.1 cm2, P = 0.003) as well as pain scores (from 3.0 to 0.6 versus 3.0 to 2.4, P = 0.01) were also significant. NLFU therapy with guideline-defined standard VLU care should be considered for healing VLUs not responding to SC alone. The results of this study warrant further research on barriers to healing and the

  9. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  10. Comparative study of the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and low-level laser therapy on injured muscle repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Toma, Renata Luri; Feitosa, Suellen Maurin; Fernandes, Kelly; de Oliveira, Poliani; Parizotto, N.; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2011-03-01

    Muscle tissue is one of the most frequently affected by injury, whether during sports activities, or work activities. In this context, biochemical and biophysical resources have been studied to minimize the time of muscle regeneration. Among these, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (US) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) may be highlighted. Despite a series of evidences about the positive effects of these resources in the process of tissue regeneration, the cellular and morphological changes triggered by LLLT and U.S. are still largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of US and LLLT on muscle repair after cryolesion by means of histopathological analysis and immunohistochemistry for COX-2. A total of thirty five male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 4 groups: intact control group; injured control group: muscle injured animals without any treatment; laser treated group: muscle injured animals treated with 830 nm laser and ultra-sound treated group: muscle injured animals treated with US. The treatments started 24 hours post-surgery and were performed during 6 sessions. The animals exposed to lasertherapy pointed out minor degenerative changes of muscle tissue. In the same way, exposure to ultrasound was able to reduce tissue injuries induced by cryolesion, but less intense than laser therapy. Strong COX-2 positive cells were found in rats submitted to cryolesion only, whereas COX-2 immunoexpression was lower in laser treated or ultrasound treated groups. In summary, this study reveals that both lasertherapy and ultrasound have positive effects on muscle repair in rats.

  11. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  12. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:25807772

  13. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  14. Tracked ultrasound elastography (TRUE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman

    Medical ultrasound research has experienced a renaissance in the past decade leading to innovations in flow mapping, elasticity and thermal imaging, measurement of optical properties, beamforming, and image enhancement. In this thesis, we focus on ultrasound elastography, an emerging imaging modality with great potential to become a part of several ultrasound diagnostic applications. Elastography images the stiffness of soft tissue by applying a mechanical stimulus and estimating the disturbance created by this stimulus. In freehand elastography, soft tissue is palpated by hand using the ultrasound transducer. The elastography image is generated by comparing the pre- and post-compression images to form a displacement map which is then differentiated to produce the final strain map. To achieve the best result in freehand elastography, the sonographer must compress and decompress the tissue uniformly in a specific direction with adequate compression. This can be a difficult task even for trained users. A small rotational or out-of-plane motion in the collected ultrasound frames can render them unusable for elastography. This has made freehand elastography highly qualitative and user-dependent. We tackle this issue by incorporating the extra information from a position sensor attached to the ultrasound transducer. Our aim is to show that the localization information of ultrasound images may be utilized to improve the quality and reliability of freehand elastography. For this purpose, we have developed a frame selection scheme that finds pairs of images with optimal compression and minimal lateral and out-of-plane displacement. Relying on the localization information, our algorithm merges multiple strain images computed from the selected frame pairs. This method is applicable to both 2D and 3D elastography. Our 3D elastography does not require for the transducer to be held still during the acquisition of each volume. Instead, the sonographer freely palpates the tissue

  15. Assessment of carotid plaque neovascularization by contrast-enhanced ultrasound and high sensitivity C-reactive protein test in patients with acute cerebral infarction: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Yin, Xiaohua; Xu, Weixin; Jin, Lin; Lu, Min; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-07-01

    Vulnerable carotid plaque easily ruptures and causes cerebral infarction. Plaque inflammation and neovascularization have both been shown as important characteristics in vulnerable plaque. We assessed neovascularization within carotid plaque using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and also assessed inflammation, using high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) testing, in acute cerebral infarction patients. A total of 106 patients with acute cerebral infarction and 40 controls were enrolled in the study. All subjects had been previously found to have carotid atherosclerotic plaques, and the plaques were classified as soft plaque, hard plaque, mixed plaque, and calcified plaque, using carotid artery ultrasound. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound was performed on the plaques for quantitative analysis and hs-CRP levels were measured. The results showed that plaque enhancement was present in 81.1 % of cerebral infarction patients and 40.0 % of controls. The contrast parameters for cerebral infarction patients were significantly different from controls. For cerebral infarction patients, soft plaque showed the highest enhanced percentage, 95.1 %, with contrast parameters significantly different to other types of plaque. The hs-CRP levels of enhanced cerebral infarction patients were higher than in non-enhanced patients. Correlation analysis in cerebral infarction patients showed that hs-CRP levels were closely related to the contrast parameters. Acute cerebral infarction patients showed intense contrast enhancement and inflammation in carotid plaque, and different types of plaque had various degrees of enhancement, suggesting that contrast-enhanced ultrasound and hs-CRP might be used for plaque risk stratification. PMID:27021564

  16. A study comparing ultrasound images of tongue movements between open bite children and normal children in the early mixed dentition period.

    PubMed

    Kikyo, T; Saito, M; Ishikawa, M

    1999-09-01

    The tongue surface movement of young patients with or without open bite was evaluated by ultrasound images taken on the posterior part of the tongue on the frontal plane to determine whether there is any relationship between the tongue movement and open bite malocclusion in the early mixed dentition period. The standardized reproducible ultrasound images were obtained using ultrasound diagnostic equipment that was fabricated in a cephalostat unit having a probe stabilizer. At the central portion of the tongue, no significant differences were detected in the duration or the momentum of tongue surface movement on a frontal plane was detected between the patients with and without open bite during swallowing. The farther the region was from the central portion, however, the longer the duration and the bigger the momentum of the tongue surface movement was found in the open bite group. Based on this evidence, it is suggested that an open-bite child swallows by using a tongue thrust motion that forms using a large depressed area in the tongue, whereas a normal child without tongue thrust forms a rather narrow groove in the central portion of the tongue when swallowing. PMID:12160259

  17. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  18. Ultrasound Fracture Diagnosis in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Amponsah, David; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; vanHolsbeeck, Marnix

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This ground-based investigation accumulated high-level clinical evidence on the sensitivity and specificity of point of care ultrasound performed by expert and novice users for the rapid diagnosis of musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries. We developed preliminary educational methodologies to provide just-in-time training of novice users by creating multi-media training tools and imaging procedures for non expert operators and evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of non-expert performed musculoskeletal ultrasound to diagnose acute injuries in a Level 1 Trauma Center. Methods: Patients with potential MSK injuries were identified in the emergency room. A focused MSK ultrasound was performed by expert operators and compared to standard radiographs. A repeat examination was performed by non-expert operators who received a short, just-in-time multimedia education aid. The sensitivity and specificity of the expert and novice ultrasound examinations were compared to gold standard radiography. Results: Over 800 patients were enrolled in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of expert performed ultrasound exceeded 98% for MSK injuries. Novice operators achieved 97% sensitivity and 99% specificity for targeted examinations with the greatest error in fractures involving the hand and foot. Conclusion: Point of care ultrasound is a sensitive and specific diagnostic test for MSK injury when performed by experts and just-in-time trained novice operators.

  19. High definition 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, A K; Krumm, J C; Kozlowski, D M; Kuhlmann, J L; Wilson, C; Little, C; Dickey, F M; Kwok, K S; Rogers, B; Walsh, N

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated high definition and improved resolution using a novel scanning system integrated with a commercial ultrasound machine. The result is a volumetric 3D ultrasound data set that can be visualized using standard techniques. Unlike other 3D ultrasound images, image quality is improved from standard 2D data. Image definition and bandwidth is improved using patent pending techniques. The system can be used to image patients or wounded soldiers for general imaging of anatomy such as abdominal organs, extremities, and the neck. Although the risks associated with x-ray carcinogenesis are relatively low at diagnostic dose levels, concerns remain for individuals in high risk categories. In addition, cost and portability of CT and MRI machines can be prohibitive. In comparison, ultrasound can provide portable, low-cost, non-ionizing imaging. Previous clinical trials comparing ultrasound to CT were used to demonstrate qualitative and quantitative improvements of ultrasound using the Sandia technologies. Transverse leg images demonstrated much higher clarity and lower noise than is seen in traditional ultrasound images. An x-ray CT scan was provided of the same cross-section for comparison. The results of our most recent trials demonstrate the advantages of 3D ultrasound and motion compensation compared with 2D ultrasound. Metal objects can also be observed within the anatomy. PMID:10168958

  20. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  1. Ultrasound and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  2. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  3. Case Study Using Ultrasound to Treat /[turned r]/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modha, Geetanjalee; Bernhardt, B. May; Church, Robyn; Bacsfalvi, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound has shown promise as visual feedback in remediation of /[turned r]/.Aims: To compare treatment for [turned r] with and without ultrasound.Methods & Procedures: A Canadian English-speaking adolescent participated in a case study with a no treatment baseline, alternating treatment blocks with and without ultrasound and a final…

  4. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated. PMID:26486330

  5. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nirupama; Needles, Andrew; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionizing irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of preclinical and clinical ultrasound systems , the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic. PMID:20541656

  6. High definition ultrasound imaging for battlefield medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.; Morimoto, A.K.; Kozlowski, D.M.; Krumm, J.C.; Dickey, F.M.; Rogers, B; Walsh, N.

    1996-06-23

    A team has developed an improved resolution ultrasound system for low cost diagnostics. This paper describes the development of an ultrasound based imaging system capable of generating 3D images showing surface and subsurface tissue and bone structures. We include results of a comparative study between images obtained from X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and ultrasound. We found that the quality of ultrasound images compares favorably with those from CT. Volumetric and surface data extracted from these images were within 7% of the range between ultrasound and CT scans. We also include images of porcine abdominal scans from two different sets of animal trials.

  7. Ultrasound Annual, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 edition of Ultrasound Annual features a state-of-the-art assessment of real-time ultrasound technology and a look at improvements in real-time equipment. Chapters discuss important new obstetric applications of ultrasound in measuring fetal umbilical vein blood flow and monitoring ovarian follicular development in vivo and in vitro fertilization. Other topics covered include transrectal prostate ultrasound using a linear array system; ultrasound of the common bile duct; ultrasound in tropical diseases; prenatal diagnosis of craniospinal anomalies; scrotal ultrasonography; opthalmic ultrasonography; and sonography of the upper abdominal venous system.

  8. Breast Ultrasound: Indications and Findings.

    PubMed

    Gundry, Kathleen R

    2016-06-01

    Breast ultrasound is a widely used adjuvant to mammography for the detection of breast cancer. This chapter will review some of the basic ultrasound technical factors and techniques, describe findings on ultrasound with an emphasis on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System terminology, and present the indications for breast ultrasound. New innovations in breast ultrasound, such as elastography, ultrasound contrast, 3-dimensional, and automated whole-breast ultrasound, will be reviewed. Ultrasound-guided breast procedures are also presented. PMID:26974219

  9. Prenatal ultrasound - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100197.htm Prenatal ultrasound - series To use the sharing features on this ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prenatal Testing Ultrasound A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  10. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  11. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  12. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  13. Comparing focused ultrasound and uterine artery embolization for uterine fibroids – Rationale and Design of the Fibroid Interventions: Reducing Symptoms Today and Tomorrow (FIRSTT) trial

    PubMed Central

    Bouwsma, Esther V.A.; Hesley, Gina K.; Woodrum, David A.; Weaver, Amy L.; Leppert, Phyllis C.; Peterson, Lisa G.; Stewart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To present the rational, design and methodology of the FIRSTT study (Fibroid Interventions: Reducing Symptoms Today and Tomorrow, NCT00995878, clinicaltrials.gov). Design Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT) Setting Two Academic Medical Centers Patient(s) Premenopausal women with symptomatic uterine fibroids. Intervention(s) Participants are randomized to two FDA-approved minimally invasive treatments for uterine leiomyomas: uterine artery embolization (UAE) and MRI guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS). Main Outcome Measure(s) The primary endpoint is defined as the need for an additional intervention for fibroid symptoms following treatment. Secondary outcomes consist of group differences in symptom alleviation, recovery trajectory, health related quality of life, impairment of ovarian reserve, treatment complications and the economic impact of these issues. Results The trial is currently in the phase of active recruitment. Conclusions This RCT will provide important evidence-based information for patients and health care providers regarding optimal minimally invasive treatment approach for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas. PMID:21794858

  14. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  15. Synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Baxter, John S. H.; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Jayaranthe, Uditha L.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound calibration allows for ultrasound images to be incorporated into a variety of interventional applica­ tions. Traditional Z- bar calibration procedures rely on wired phantoms with an a priori known geometry. The line fiducials produce small, localized echoes which are then segmented from an array of ultrasound images from different tracked probe positions. In conventional B-mode ultrasound, the wires at greater depths appear blurred and are difficult to segment accurately, limiting the accuracy of ultrasound calibration. This paper presents a novel ultrasound calibration procedure that takes advantage of synthetic aperture imaging to reconstruct high resolution ultrasound images at arbitrary depths. In these images, line fiducials are much more readily and accu­ rately segmented, leading to decreased calibration error. The proposed calibration technique is compared to one based on B-mode ultrasound. The fiducial localization error was improved from 0.21mm in conventional B-mode images to 0.15mm in synthetic aperture images corresponding to an improvement of 29%. This resulted in an overall reduction of calibration error from a target registration error of 2.00mm to 1.78mm, an improvement of 11%. Synthetic aperture images display greatly improved segmentation capabilities due to their improved resolution and interpretability resulting in improved calibration.

  16. Mist separation and sonochemiluminescence under pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tuziuti, Toru

    2012-04-12

    Differences in the amount of water-mist separation and the intensity of luminol chemiluminescence for pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) ultrasound at 135 kHz have been investigated. The amount of mist generated is estimated using the cooling rate of a copper plate sprayed with the mist. For pulsed operation with an appropriate duty cycle, the cooling rate and the cooling rate per input power to the transducer are higher by 4 and 12 times compared to CW operation, respectively. This is due to the amplitude of the pulsed ultrasound being higher than that for CW ultrasound. Relatively low power pulsed operation can successfully produce both a higher sonochemiluminescence (SCL) intensity and cooling rate than those for CW ultrasound. The sonochemical reaction for pulsed ultrasound occurs at the same input power threshold as that for mist separation, whereas for CW ultrasound, the former threshold is lower than the latter. A higher number of large bubbles is produced with CW ultrasound than that with pulsed ultrasound. To achieve a sound pressure amplitude sufficient for mist separation near the surface of a liquid, it is necessary to expel these bubbles by changing the sound field from resonant standing waves to progressive waves that give rise to capillary waves on the liquid surface. PMID:22443489

  17. Accelerated heavy ions and the lens. IV. Biomicroscopic and cytopathological analyses of the lenses of mice irradiated with 600 MeV/amu sup 56 Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Worgul, B.V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E. )

    1989-11-01

    The lenses of mice exposed to 600 MeV/amu iron ions were evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and cytopathological analyses. The doses ranged from 0.05 to 1.6 Gy, and the lenses were assessed at several intervals postirradiation. Cataract, the development of which is dependent on both time and dose, is significantly more advanced in all of the exposed mice when compared to the unirradiated controls. The great difference between the severity of the cataracts caused by 0.05 Gy (the lowest dose used) and those that developed spontaneously in the control animals is an indication that 0.05 Gy may far exceed the threshold dose for the production of cataracts by accelerated iron ions. Cytopathologically, a similar dose dependence was observed for a number of end points including micronucleation, interphase death, and meridional row disorganization. In addition the exposure to the 56Fe ions produced a long-term effect on the mitotic population and a pronounced focal loss of epithelial cytoarchitecture. The microscopic changes support the view that the mechanism of heavy-ion-induced cataractogenesis is the same as that for cataracts caused by low-LET radiation.

  18. Temperature estimation with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Matthew

    Hepatocelluar carcinoma is the fastest growing type of cancer in the United States. In addition, the survival rate after one year is approximately zero without treatment. In many instances, patients with hepatocelluar carcinoma may not be suitable candidates for the primary treatment options, i.e. surgical resection or liver transplantation. This has led to the development of minimally invasive therapies focused on destroying hepatocelluar by thermal or chemical methods. The focus of this dissertation is on the development of ultrasound-based image-guided monitoring options for minimally invasive therapies such as radiofrequency ablation. Ultrasound-based temperature imaging relies on relating the gradient of locally estimated tissue displacements to a temperature change. First, a realistic Finite Element Analysis/ultrasound simulation of ablation was developed. This allowed evaluation of the ability of ultrasound-based temperature estimation algorithms to track temperatures for three different ablation scenarios in the liver. It was found that 2-Dimensional block matching and a 6 second time step was able to accurately track the temperature over a 12 minute ablation procedure. Next, a tissue-mimicking phantom was constructed to determine the accuracy of the temperature estimation method by comparing estimated temperatures to that measured using invasive fiber-optic temperature probes. The 2-Dimensional block matching was able to track the temperature accurately over the entire 8 minute heating procedure in the tissue-mimicking phantom. Finally, two separate in-vivo experiments were performed. The first experiment examined the ability of our algorithm to track frame-to-frame displacements when external motion due to respiration and the cardiac cycle were considered. It was determined that a frame rate between 13 frames per second and 33 frames per second was sufficient to track frame-to-frame displacements between respiratory cycles. The second experiment examined

  19. Obstetric ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Joshua F; Brost, Brian C

    2013-06-01

    Obstetric ultrasound is becoming an increasingly important part of the practice of maternal-fetal medicine. Thus, it is important to develop rigorous and effective training curricula for obstetrics and gynecology residents and maternal-fetal medicine fellows. Traditionally, this training has come almost entirely from exposure to ultrasound in the clinical setting. However, with the increased complexity of modern ultrasound and advent of duty-hour restrictions, a purely clinical training model is no longer viable. With the advent of high-fidelity obstetric ultrasound simulators, a significant amount of training can occur in a non-clinical setting which allows learners to obtain significant skill prior to their first patient ultrasound encounter and obtain proficiency in a shorter period of time. In this manuscript we discuss the available obstetric ultrasound simulators and ways to construct a comprehensive ultrasound training curricula to meet the increasing demands of modern maternal-fetal medicine. PMID:23721777

  20. Schlemm’s Canal and Trabecular Meshwork in Eyes with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: A Comparative Study Using High-Frequency Ultrasound Biomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaoqin; Li, Mu; Chen, Zhiqi; Zhu, Ying; Song, Yinwei; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated in vivo changes in Schlemm’s canal and the trabecular meshwork in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Relationships between Schlemm’s canal diameter, trabecular meshwork thickness, and intraocular pressure (IOP) were examined. Forty POAG patients and 40 normal individuals underwent 80-MHz Ultrasound Biomicroscopy examinations. The Schlemm’s canal and trabecular meshwork were imaged in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal regions. Normal individuals had an observable Schlemm’s canal in 80.3% of sections, a meridional canal diameter of 233.0±34.5 μm, a coronal diameter of 44.5±12.6 μm and a trabecular meshwork thickness of 103.9±11.1 μm, in POAG patients, Schlemm’s canal was observable in 53.1% of sections, a meridional canal diameter of 195.6±31.3 μm, a coronal diameter of 35.7±8.0 μm, and a trabecular meshwork thickness of 88.3±13.2 μm, which significantly differed from normal (both p <0.001). Coronal canal diameter (r = -0.623, p < 0.001) and trabecular meshwork thickness (r = -0.663, p < 0.001) were negatively correlated with IOP, but meridional canal diameter was not (r = -0.160, p = 0.156). Schlemm’s canal was observable in 50.5% and 56.6% of POAG patients with normal (<21 mmHg) and elevated (>21 mmHg) IOP, respectively (χ = 1.159, p = 0.282). Coronal canal diameter was significantly lower in the elevated IOP group (32.6±4.9 μm) than in the normal IOP group (35.7±8.0 μm, p < 0.001). This was also true of trabecular meshwork thickness (81.9±10.0 μm vs. 97.1±12.0 μm, p < 0.001). In conclusion, eyes with POAG had fewer sections with an observable Schlemm’s canal. Canal diameter and trabecular meshwork thickness were also lower than normal in POAG patients. Schlemm’s canal coronal diameter and trabecular meshwork thickness were negatively correlated with IOP. PMID:26726880

  1. Schlemm's Canal and Trabecular Meshwork in Eyes with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: A Comparative Study Using High-Frequency Ultrasound Biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoqin; Li, Mu; Chen, Zhiqi; Zhu, Ying; Song, Yinwei; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated in vivo changes in Schlemm's canal and the trabecular meshwork in eyes with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Relationships between Schlemm's canal diameter, trabecular meshwork thickness, and intraocular pressure (IOP) were examined. Forty POAG patients and 40 normal individuals underwent 80-MHz Ultrasound Biomicroscopy examinations. The Schlemm's canal and trabecular meshwork were imaged in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal regions. Normal individuals had an observable Schlemm's canal in 80.3% of sections, a meridional canal diameter of 233.0±34.5 μm, a coronal diameter of 44.5±12.6 μm and a trabecular meshwork thickness of 103.9±11.1 μm, in POAG patients, Schlemm's canal was observable in 53.1% of sections, a meridional canal diameter of 195.6±31.3 μm, a coronal diameter of 35.7±8.0 μm, and a trabecular meshwork thickness of 88.3±13.2 μm, which significantly differed from normal (both p <0.001). Coronal canal diameter (r = -0.623, p < 0.001) and trabecular meshwork thickness (r = -0.663, p < 0.001) were negatively correlated with IOP, but meridional canal diameter was not (r = -0.160, p = 0.156). Schlemm's canal was observable in 50.5% and 56.6% of POAG patients with normal (<21 mmHg) and elevated (>21 mmHg) IOP, respectively (χ = 1.159, p = 0.282). Coronal canal diameter was significantly lower in the elevated IOP group (32.6±4.9 μm) than in the normal IOP group (35.7±8.0 μm, p < 0.001). This was also true of trabecular meshwork thickness (81.9±10.0 μm vs. 97.1±12.0 μm, p < 0.001). In conclusion, eyes with POAG had fewer sections with an observable Schlemm's canal. Canal diameter and trabecular meshwork thickness were also lower than normal in POAG patients. Schlemm's canal coronal diameter and trabecular meshwork thickness were negatively correlated with IOP. PMID:26726880

  2. Aesthetic ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

  3. Neonatal urological ultrasound: diagnostic inaccuracies and pitfalls.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, N W; Gough, D C; Cohen, S J

    1989-01-01

    Ninety one patients with urinary tract abnormalities diagnosed before birth were reviewed. Diagnoses based on prenatal and postnatal ultrasound scans alone were compared with the final diagnoses after full urological investigations, with operative or necropsy confirmation in 79 cases. The results confirmed that ultrasound examination before birth usually detects nonspecific abnormalities and although scanning after birth is more accurate it is not absolutely reliable. A diagnosis of "multicystic kidney' made on ultrasound scan alone is especially prone to error. Such mistakes can be avoided if full urological investigation is undertaken in every case. PMID:2665660

  4. Ultrasound-accelerated enzymatic synthesis of sugar esters in nonaqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yong-mei; Wu, Qi; Cai, Ying; Lin, Xian-fu

    2005-09-26

    Comparative studies of enzymatic synthesis of glucose esters under ultrasound and shaking were carried out in nonaqueous media. The influence of solvents, enzymes, chain length of the acyl donors, the power of the ultrasound bath, and intermittent ultrasound on the enzymatic synthesis was investigated. Among the eight solvents selected, pyridine was the most appropriate with alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis whether under ultrasound or shaking. The acceleration effect of ultrasound with Novozym 435 and the alkaline protease from B. subtilis-catalyzed transesterification increased with the chain length of acyl donors, decreasing from C(10) to C(4). We also investigated the influence of the power (50, 100, and 120 W) of the ultrasound irradiation and the manner of operation (continuous ultrasound, 10 min ultrasound/20 min shaking without ultrasound) on the transesterification. The results showed that higher power and continual operational gave the better acceleration. Ultrasound did not change the character and selectivity of the enzyme in the transesterification. PMID:16040020

  5. Impact of ultrasound video transfer on the practice of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Andre J.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Grant, Edward G.; Valentino, Daniel J.; Rahbar, Darius; Kiszonas, Mike; Franco, Ricky; Melany, Michelle; Narin, Sherelle L.; Ragavendra, Nagesh

    1996-05-01

    Sonography can be highly dependent on real-time imaging and as such is highly physician intensive. Such situations arise mostly during complicated ultrasound radiology studies or echocardiology examinations. Under those circumstances it would be of benefit to transmit real-time images beyond the immediate area of the ultrasound laboratory when a physician is not on location. We undertook this study to determine if both static and dynamic image transfer to remote locations might be accomplished using an ultrafast ATM network and PACS. Image management of the local image files was performed by a commercial PACS from AGFA corporation. The local network was Ethernet based, and the global network was based on Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM, rates up to 100 Mbits/sec). Real-time image transfer involved two teaching hospitals, one of which had 2 separate ultrasound facilities. Radiologists consulted with technologists via telephone while the examinations were being performed. The applications of ATM network providing real time video for ultrasound imaging in a clinical environment and its potential impact on health delivery and clinical teaching. This technology increased technologist and physician productivity due to the elimination of commute time for physicians and waiting time for technologists and patients. Physician confidence in diagnosis increased compared to reviewing static images alone. This system provided instant access for radiologists to real-time scans from remote sites. Image quality and frame rate were equivalent to the original. The system increased productivity by allowing physicians to monitor studies at multiple sites simultaneously.

  6. Ultrasound-assisted temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction method for simultaneous determination of anethole, estragole, and para-anisaldehyde in different plant extracts and human urine: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Maryam; Haji-Esfandiari, Sudabeh; Barfi, Behruz; Ghanbari, Hanieh

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the performances of four ionic-liquid-based microextraction methods, ionic-liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME), ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (IL-USA-ME), temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction (TC-IL-DLME), and ultrasound-assisted temperature-controlled ionic-liquid dispersive liquid-phase microextraction (USA-TC-IL-DLME), were investigated for extraction of three bioactive compounds (anethole, estragole, and anisaldehyde) from different plant extracts and human urine. Anethole and estragole were chosen because they can alter cellular processes positively or negatively, and an efficient method is needed for their extraction and sensitive determination in the samples mentioned. Because there is no previous report on the separation of anethole and estragole (structural isomers), first, simultaneous gradient elution and flow programming were used. The microextraction methods were then applied and compared for analysis of these compounds in plant extracts and human urine by use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effect of conditions on extraction efficiency was studied and under the optimum conditions, the best enrichment factors (58-64), limits of detection (14-18 ng mL(-1)), limits of quantification (47-60 ng mL(-1)), and recovery (94.4-101.7 %) were obtained by use of USA-TC-IL-DLME. The optimized conditions were used to determine anethole, estragole, and para-anisaldehyde in fennel, anise, and tarragon extracts and in human urine. PMID:24817361

  7. Diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound: part 2. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jay; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2009-02-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound involves the use of high-frequency sound waves to image soft tissues and bony structures in the body for the purposes of diagnosing pathology or guiding real-time interventional procedures. Recently, an increasing number of physicians have integrated musculoskeletal ultrasound into their practices to facilitate patient care. Technological advancements, improved portability, and reduced costs continue to drive the proliferation of ultrasound in clinical medicine. This increased interest creates a need for education pertaining to all aspects of musculoskeletal ultrasound. The primary purpose of this article is to review diagnostic ultrasound technology and its potential clinical applications in the evaluation and treatment of patients with neurological and musculoskeletal disorders. After reviewing this article, physicians should be able to (1) list the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound compared to other available imaging modalities; (2) describe how ultrasound machines produce images using sound waves; (3) discuss the steps necessary to acquire and optimize an ultrasound image; (4) understand the difference ultrasound appearances of tendons, nerves, muscles, ligaments, blood vessels, and bones; and (5) identify multiple applications for diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound. Part 2 of this 2-part article will focus on the clinical applications of musculoskeletal ultrasound in clinical practice, including the ultrasonographic appearance of normal and abnormal tissues as well as specific diagnostic and interventional applications in major body regions. PMID:19627890

  8. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy are shown. Systems using both linear and non-linear propagation of ultrasound are described. The blood velocity can also be non-invasively visualized using ultrasound and the basic signal processing for doing this is introduced. Examples for spectral velocity estimation, color flow imaging and the new vector velocity images are presented. PMID:17092547

  10. Ultrasound elastography: principles, techniques, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dewall, Ryan J

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an emerging set of imaging modalities used to image tissue elasticity and are often referred to as virtual palpation. These techniques have proven effective in detecting and assessing many different pathologies, because tissue mechanical changes often correlate with tissue pathological changes. This article reviews the principles of ultrasound elastography, many of the ultrasound-based techniques, and popular clinical applications. Originally, elastography was a technique that imaged tissue strain by comparing pre- and postcompression ultrasound images. However, new techniques have been developed that use different excitation methods such as external vibration or acoustic radiation force. Some techniques track transient phenomena such as shear waves to quantitatively measure tissue elasticity. Clinical use of elastography is increasing, with applications including lesion detection and classification, fibrosis staging, treatment monitoring, vascular imaging, and musculoskeletal applications. PMID:23510006

  11. Intravascular ultrasound imaging following balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tobis, J M; Mahon, D J; Moriuchi, M; Honye, J; McRae, M

    1991-01-01

    Despite its long history and reliability, contrast angiography has several inherent limitations. Because it is a two-dimensional projection image of the lumen contour, the wall thickness cannot be measured and the plaque itself is not visualized. This results in an underestimation of the amount of atherosclerotic disease by angiography. An assessment of atherosclerosis could be improved by an imaging modality: (1) that has an inherent larger magnification than angiography and (2) that directly visualizes the plaque. Intravascular ultrasound fulfils these criteria. This presentation will provide evidence that intravascular ultrasound may prove complimentary or even superior to angiography as an imaging modality. Intravascular ultrasound demonstrates excellent representations of lumen and plaque morphology of in vitro specimens compared with histology. There is very close intraobserver and interobserver variability of measurements made from intravascular ultrasound images. Phantom studies of stenoses in a tube model demonstrate that angiography can misrepresent the severity of stenosis when the lumen contour is irregular and not a typical ellipse, whereas intravascular ultrasound reproduces the cross-sectional morphology more accurately since it images the artery from within. In vitro studies of the atherosclerotic plaque tissue characteristics compare closely with the echo representation of fibrosis, calcification, and lipid material. In addition, in vitro studies of balloon angioplasty demonstrate that intravascular ultrasound accurately represents the changes in the structure of artery segments following balloon dilatation. PMID:1833473

  12. Ultrasound assisted biogas production from landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Oz, Nilgün Ayman Yarimtepe, Canan Can

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Effect of low frequency ultrasound pretreatment on leachate was investigated. • Three different ultrasound energy inputs (200, 400 and 600 W/l) was applied. • Low-frequency ultrasound treatment increased soluble COD in landfill leachate. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased biogas production about 40%. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased total methane production rate about 20%. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to increase biogas production and methane yield from landfill leachate in anaerobic batch reactors by using low frequency ultrasound as a pretreatment step. In the first part of the study, optimum conditions for solubilization of organic matter in leachate samples were investigated using various sonication durations at an ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz. The level of organic matter solubilization during ultrasonic pretreatment experiments was determined by calculating the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) to total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD). The sCOD/tCOD ratio was increased from 47% in raw leachate to 63% after 45 min sonication at 600 W/l. Non-parametric Friedman’s test indicated that ultrasonic pretreatment has a significant effect on sCOD parameter for leachate (p < 0.05). In the second part of the study, anaerobic batch reactors were operated for both ultrasonically pretreated and untreated landfill leachate samples in order to assess the effect of sonication on biogas and methane production rate. In anaerobic batch reactor feed with ultrasonically pretreated leachate, 40% more biogas was obtained compared to the control reactor. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare biogas and methane production rates for raw and pretreated leachate samples and it has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment significantly enhanced biogas and methane production rates from leachate (p < 0.05) in anaerobic batch reactors. The overall results showed that low frequency

  13. Ultrasound in placental disorders.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Francesco; Bhide, Amar

    2014-04-01

    The definition of placenta previa based on ultrasound findings is more practical, and the traditional definition (implantation of the placenta in the lower uterine segment) needs to be revised. The term 'placenta previa' should only be used when the placental edge overlaps or is within 2 cm of the internal cervical orifice in late pregnancy. If the placental edge is located further than 2 cm but within 3.5 cm from the internal cervical orifice, the placenta should be termed 'low-lying'. Unless the placental edge at least reaches the internal orifice at mid-trimester, symptomatic placenta previa in the third trimester will not be encountered. Caesarean section is the recommended mode of delivery for placenta previa at term. Attempt at vaginal delivery is appropriate for low-lying placenta, but the possibility of post-partum haemorrhage should be kept in mind. The incidence of invasive placentation, such as placenta accrete, has progressively risen in the past 3 decades, possibly as a consequence of increasing caesarean section rates. Ultrasound has a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 97% for the identification of all forms of invasive placentation. Chorioangiomas are benign non-trophoblastic placental tumours with excessive vascular proliferation within the stroma of chronic villi. They are usually asymptomatic, although occasionally can be associated with adverse fetal outcomes. Chorioangiomas usually appear as well-circumscribed, rounded, hypo-echoic lesions next to the chorionic surface. Iatrogenic delivery or prenatal intervention are two options, if fetal compromise is present. Prenatal detection leads to a dramatic increase in survival compared with those cases unsuspected antenatally. PMID:24461676

  14. Assisted ultrasound applications for the production of safe foods.

    PubMed

    Sango, D M; Abela, D; McElhatton, A; Valdramidis, V P

    2014-05-01

    Ultrasound requires high power and longer treatment times to inactivate micro-organisms when compared to ultrasound combined with other technologies. Previous reports have shown that the effectiveness of ultrasound as a decontamination technology can be increased by combining it with another treatment such as pressure, heat and antimicrobial solutions. Assisted ultrasound, the combination of ultrasound with another technology, is more energy efficient, and it has less impact on the food properties. In this review paper, the power ultrasound antimicrobial mechanisms of action, the antimicrobial effects of ultrasound in combination with other physical processes and antimicrobial solutions are comprehensively discussed. Furthermore, the present interest on using these technologies as alternative processing and decontamination methods is presented. Research outputs on the application of ultrasound combined with physical processes are showcased including applications of thermosonication, manosonication, manothermosonication and osmosonication. Antimicrobial efficacy, energy requirements and optimal operation conditions of the different assisted ultrasound technologies are critically discussed, and their impact on the food industry for future applications is presented. Overall, this review paper highlights the importance and recent developments of assisted ultrasound for enhancing food safety. PMID:24506803

  15. Evaluation of targeting errors in ultrasound-assisted radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael; Rohling, Robert; Duzenli, Cheryl; Clark, Brenda; Archip, Neculai

    2014-01-01

    A method for validating the start-to-end accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-based patient positioning system for radiotherapy is described. A radiosensitive polymer gel is used to record the actual dose delivered to a rigid phantom after being positioned using 3D ultrasound guidance. Comparison of the delivered dose with the treatment plan allows accuracy of the entire radiotherapy treatment process, from simulation to 3D ultrasound guidance, and finally delivery of radiation, to be evaluated. The 3D ultrasound patient positioning system has a number of features for achieving high accuracy and reducing operator dependence. These include using tracked 3D ultrasound scans of the target anatomy acquired using a dedicated 3D ultrasound probe during both the simulation and treatment sessions, automatic 3D ultrasound-to-ultrasound registration, and use of infra-red LED (IRED) markers of the optical position sensing system for registering simulation CT to ultrasound data. The mean target localization accuracy of this system was 2.5mm for four target locations inside the phantom, compared to 1.6mm obtained using the conventional patient positioning method of laser alignment. Since the phantom is rigid, this represents the best possible set-up accuracy of the system. Thus, these results suggest that 3D ultrasound-based target localization is practically feasible and potentially capable of increasing the accuracy of patient positioning for radiotherapy in sites where day-to-day organ shifts are greater than 1mm in magnitude. PMID:18723271

  16. Diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound: part 1. Fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jay; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound involves the use of high-frequency sound waves to image soft tissues and bony structures in the body for the purposes of diagnosing pathology or guiding real-time interventional procedures. Recently, an increasing number of physicians have integrated musculoskeletal ultrasound into their practices to facilitate patient care. Technological advancements, improved portability, and reduced costs continue to drive the proliferation of ultrasound in clinical medicine. This increased interest creates a need for education pertaining to all aspects of musculoskeletal ultrasound. The primary purpose of this article is to review diagnostic ultrasound technology and its potential clinical applications in the evaluation and treatment of patients with neurologic and musculoskeletal disorders. After reviewing this article, physicians should be able to (1) list the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound compared with other available imaging modalities, (2) describe how ultrasound machines produce images using sound waves, (3) discuss the steps necessary to acquire and optimize an ultrasound image, (4) understand the different ultrasound appearances of tendons, nerves, muscles, ligaments, blood vessels, and bones, and (5) identify multiple applications for diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound in musculoskeletal practice. Part 1 of this 2-part article reviews the fundamentals of clinical ultrasonographic imaging, including relevant physics, equipment, training, image optimization, and scanning principles for diagnostic and interventional purposes. PMID:19627875

  17. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Melissa; Bricker, Leanne; Neilson, James P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnostic ultrasound is a sophisticated electronic technology, which utilises pulses of high frequency sound to produce an image. Diagnostic ultrasound examination may be employed in a variety of specific circumstances during pregnancy such as after clinical complications, or where there are concerns about fetal growth. Because adverse outcomes may also occur in pregnancies without clear risk factors, assumptions have been made that routine ultrasound in all pregnancies will prove beneficial by enabling earlier detection and improved management of pregnancy complications. Routine screening may be planned for early pregnancy, late gestation, or both. The focus of this review is routine early pregnancy ultrasound. Objectives To assess whether routine early pregnancy ultrasound for fetal assessment (i.e. its use as a screening technique) influences the diagnosis of fetal malformations, multiple pregnancies, the rate of clinical interventions, and the incidence of adverse fetal outcome when compared with the selective use of early pregnancy ultrasound (for specific indications). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009). Selection criteria Published, unpublished, and ongoing randomised controlled trials that compared outcomes in women who experienced routine versus selective early pregnancy ultrasound (i.e. less than 24 weeks’ gestation). We have included quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data for each included study. We used the Review Manager software to enter and analyse data. Main results Routine/revealed ultrasound versus selective ultrasound/concealed: 11 trials including 37505 women. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy reduces the failure to detect multiple pregnancy by 24 weeks’ gestation (risk ratio (RR) 0.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.17). Routine scan is associated with a reduction in

  18. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H. Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited to the evaluation of the pediatric musculoskeletal system because of the increased ratio of cartilage to bone in the immature skeleton. The purpose of this article is to review the current uses of musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric patients. Hip sonography is widely accepted; other applications are increasing in popularity. PMID:11387111

  19. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. PMID:24838227

  20. Effects of ultrasound and sodium lauryl sulfate on the transdermal delivery of hydrophilic permeants: Comparative in vitro studies with full-thickness and split-thickness pig and human skin.

    PubMed

    Seto, Jennifer E; Polat, Baris E; Lopez, Renata F V; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    2010-07-01

    The simultaneous application of ultrasound and the surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate (referred to as US/SLS) to skin enhances transdermal drug delivery (TDD) in a synergistic mechanical and chemical manner. Since full-thickness skin (FTS) and split-thickness skin (STS) differ in mechanical strength, US/SLS treatment may have different effects on their transdermal transport pathways. Therefore, we evaluated STS as an alternative to the well-established US/SLS-treated FTS model for TDD studies of hydrophilic permeants. We utilized the aqueous porous pathway model to compare the effects of US/SLS treatment on the skin permeability and the pore radius of pig and human FTS and STS over a range of skin electrical resistivity values. Our findings indicate that the US/SLS-treated pig skin models exhibit similar permeabilities and pore radii, but the human skin models do not. Furthermore, the US/SLS-enhanced delivery of gold nanoparticles and quantum dots (two model hydrophilic macromolecules) is greater through pig STS than through pig FTS, due to the presence of less dermis that acts as an artificial barrier to macromolecules. In spite of greater variability in correlations between STS permeability and resistivity, our findings strongly suggest the use of 700microm-thick pig STS to investigate the in vitro US/SLS-enhanced delivery of hydrophilic macromolecules. PMID:20346994

  1. [Ultrasound imaging of Dupuytren's contracture].

    PubMed

    Créteur, V; Madani, A; Gosset, N

    2010-06-01

    Dupuytren's contracture is characterized by two underlying lesions, nodules and cords. These involve the palmar fascia at the distal palmar crease, especially at the level of the third and fourth rays with progressive disabling finger contracture. The superficial palmar aponeurosis appears as a thin echogenic lamellar structure overlying the flexor tendons. The demonstration of hypoechoic bands adhering to the marging of the flexor tendons and deep surface of the dermis appears to be pathognomonic of the disease. Compared to tendons, early nodules are hypoechoic and typically hypervascular whereas older nodules are iso- to hyperechoic, without hypervascular Doppler signal. Ultrasound can sometimes demonstrate arterial encasement by fibrous or scarring tissue. Ultrasound therefore is very useful for the differential diagnosis of pathologies involving the palmar surface of the hand, for the early detection of Dupuytren's contracture, and for the detection of complication, especially vascular. These data may have an impact on management. PMID:20808269

  2. ULTRASOUND INCREASES THE RATE OF BACTERIAL CELL GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.; Ross, S. Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound was employed to increase the growth rate of bacterial cells attached to surfaces. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli cells adhered to and grew on a polyethylene surface in the presence of ultrasound. It was found that low frequency ultrasound (70 kHz) of low acoustic intensity (<2 W/cm2) increased the growth rate of the cells compared to growth without ultrasound. However, at high intensity levels, cells were partially removed from the surface. Ultrasound also enhanced planktonic growth of S. epidermidis and other planktonic bacteria. It is hypothesized that ultrasound increases the rate of transport of oxygen and nutrients to the cells and increases the rate of transport of waste products away from the cells, thus enhancing their growth. PMID:12790676

  3. A novel de-noising method for B ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Da-Yong; Mo, Jia-qing; Yu, Yin-Feng; Lv, Xiao-Yi; Yu, Xiao; Jia, Zhen-Hong

    2015-12-01

    B ultrasound as a kind of ultrasonic imaging, which has become the indispensable diagnosis method in clinical medicine. However, the presence of speckle noise in ultrasound image greatly reduces the image quality and interferes with the accuracy of the diagnosis. Therefore, how to construct a method which can eliminate the speckle noise effectively, and at the same time keep the image details effectively is the research target of the current ultrasonic image de-noising. This paper is intended to remove the inherent speckle noise of B ultrasound image. The novel algorithm proposed is based on both wavelet transformation of B ultrasound images and data fusion of B ultrasound images, with a smaller mean squared error (MSE) and greater signal to noise ratio (SNR) compared with other algorithms. The results of this study can effectively remove speckle noise from B ultrasound images, and can well preserved the details and edge information which will produce better visual effects.

  4. Portable ultrasound: the next generation arrives.

    PubMed

    Ault, Mark J; Rosen, Bradley T

    2010-07-01

    PURPOSE: A new category of handheld devices has recently emerged that are even smaller than current portable models, with their main advantages being increased portability and affordability relative to their counterparts. However, these new devices have not yet been thoroughly evaluated in the clinical setting. METHODS: A prospective, non-blinded, three-phase study was designed to evaluate a handheld ultrasound device as compared to a common compact ultrasound machine for the performance of paracenteses and thoracenteses on human patients. RESULTS: For the vast majority of straight-forward evaluations, the handheld device was sufficient to safely complete the procedure without further imaging. For difficult cases with smaller fluid collections or anatomic aberrations, further localization with the common compact machine continued to be useful to improve the operator's confidence in the findings. CONCLUSION: This novice handheld device represents only one of what appears to be a growing number of new ultra-portable ultrasound devices on the market. These devices represent a new and exciting form of ultrasound technology that may benefit patients and physicians in multiple venues. While they are unlikely to replace standard ultrasound devices for many of the more complex applications, their extreme portability allows for ultrasound imaging in more diverse situations that has previously been practical. Based on our limited experience, the image quality is adequate and the learning curve is reasonable. Future integration of PDA technology could further the utility of these devices and additional study will be important to further define their appropriate niche and clinical utility. PMID:21151494

  5. Simplified stereo-optical ultrasound plane calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoßbach, Martin; Noll, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Image guided therapy is a natural concept and commonly used in medicine. In anesthesia, a common task is the injection of an anesthetic close to a nerve under freehand ultrasound guidance. Several guidance systems exist using electromagnetic tracking of the ultrasound probe as well as the needle, providing the physician with a precise projection of the needle into the ultrasound image. This, however, requires additional expensive devices. We suggest using optical tracking with miniature cameras attached to a 2D ultrasound probe to achieve a higher acceptance among physicians. The purpose of this paper is to present an intuitive method to calibrate freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems employing a rigid stereo camera system. State of the art methods are based on a complex series of error prone coordinate system transformations which makes them susceptible to error accumulation. By reducing the amount of calibration steps to a single calibration procedure we provide a calibration method that is equivalent, yet not prone to error accumulation. It requires a linear calibration object and is validated on three datasets utilizing di erent calibration objects: a 6mm metal bar and a 1:25mm biopsy needle were used for experiments. Compared to existing calibration methods for freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems, we are able to achieve higher accuracy results while additionally reducing the overall calibration complexity. Ke

  6. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M.; Brugge, William R.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26491078

  7. Quantitative Ultrasound Assessment of the Rat Cervix

    PubMed Central

    McFarlin, Barbara L.; O’Brien, William D.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zachary, James F.; White-Traut, Rosemary C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this research was to detect cervical ripening with a new quantitative ultrasound technique. Methods Cervices of 13 nonpregnant and 65 timed pregnant (days 15, 17, 19, 20, and 21 of pregnancy) Sprague Dawley rats were scanned ex vivo with a 70-MHz ultrasound transducer. Ultrasound scatterer property estimates (scatterer diameter [SD], acoustic concentration [AC], and scatterer strength factor [SSF]) from the cervices were quantified and then compared to hydroxyproline and water content. Insertion loss (attenuation) was measured in 3 rats in each of the 6 groups. Discriminant analysis was used to predict gestational age group (cervical ripening) from the ultrasound variables SD, SSF, and AC. Results Differences were observed between the groups (SD, AC, and SSF; P < .0001). Quantitative ultrasound measures changed as the cervix ripened: (1) SD increased from days 15 to 21; (2) AC decreased from days 15 to 21; and (3) SSF was the greatest in the nonpregnant group and the least in the day 21 group. Cervix hydroxyproline content increased as pregnancy progressed (P < .003) and correlated with group, SD, AC, and SSF (P < .001). Discriminant analysis of ultrasound variables predicted 56.4% of gestational group assignment (P < .001) and increased to 77% within 2 days of the predicted analysis. Cervix insertion loss was greatest for the nonpregnant group and least for the day 21 group. Conclusions Quantitative ultrasound predicted cervical ripening in the rat cervix, but before use in humans, quantitative ultrasound will need to predict gestational age in the later days of gestation with more precision. PMID:16870896

  8. Ultrasound simulation in bone.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jonathan J; Luo, Gangming; Siffert, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    The manner in which ultrasound interacts with bone is of key interest in therapy and diagnosis alike. These may include applications directly to bone, as, for example, in treatment to accelerate the healing of bone fractures and in assessment of bone density in osteoporosis, or indirectly in diagnostic imaging of soft tissue with interest in assessing exposure levels to nearby bone. Because of the lack of analytic solutions to virtually every "practical problem" encountered clinically, ultrasound simulation has become a widely used technique for evaluating ultrasound interactions in bone. This paper provides an overview of the use of ultrasound simulation in bone. A brief description of the mathematical model used to characterize ultrasound propagation in bone is first provided. A number of simulation examples are then presented that explain how simulation may be utilized in a variety of practical configurations. The focus of this paper in terms of examples presented is on diagnostic applications in bone, and, in particular, for assessment of osteoporosis. However, the use of simulation in other areas of interest can easily be extrapolated from the examples presented. In conclusion, this paper describes the use of ultrasound simulation in bone and demonstrates the power of computational methods for ultrasound research in general and tissue and bone applications in particular. PMID:18599409

  9. Beating the blues: is there any music in fighting cyanobacteria with ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Lürling, Miquel; Tolman, Yora

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis that cyanobacteria can be controlled by commercially available ultrasound transducers was tested in laboratory experiments with cultures of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp., Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Microcystis aeruginosa and the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus that were grown in the absence or presence of ultrasound (mix of 20, 28 and 44 kHz). The Scenedesmus experiment also included a treatment with the zooplankton grazer Daphnia magna. Chlorophyll-a and biovolume-based growth of Anabaena was significantly lower in ultrasound exposed cultures than in controls. Particle based growth rates were higher in ultrasound treatments. Filaments were significantly shorter in ultrasound exposed cultures reflecting filament breakage. Photosystem II efficiency was not affected by ultrasound. In Cylindrospermopsis chlorophyll-a based growth rates and photosystem II efficiencies were similar in controls and ultrasound treatments, but biovolume-based growth was significantly lower in ultrasound exposed cultures compared to controls. Despite biovolume growth rates of the filamentous cyanobacteria were reduced in ultrasound treatments compared to controls, growth remained positive implying still a population increase. In Microcystis and Scenedesmus growth rates were similar in controls and ultrasound treatments. Hence, no effect of ultrasound on these phytoplankton species was found. Ultrasound should not be viewed "environmental friendly" as it killed all Daphnia within 15 min, releasing Scenedesmus from grazing control in the cultures. Based on our experiments and critical literature review, we conclude that there is no music in controlling cyanobacteria in situ with the commercially available ultrasound transducers we have tested. PMID:25240117

  10. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  11. Ultrasound assessment of schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Botelho, M C; Holtfreter, M C; Akpata, R; El Scheich, T; Neumayr, A; Brunetti, E; Hatz, C; Dong, Y; Dietrich, C F

    2016-07-01

    In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued an ultrasound field protocol for assessing the morbidity due to Schistosoma (S.) haematobium and S. mansoni. The experience with this classification has recently been reviewed systematically. The WHO protocol was well accepted worldwide. Here we review the use of ultrasound to assess the morbidity due to schistosomiasis with emphasis on easy, quick, and reproducible ways that can be used in the field. Findings obtained with high-end ultrasound scanners in the hospital setting that might eventually have applications in the field are also described. PMID:27429103

  12. Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

  13. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye (vitreous hemorrhage) Cancer of the retina ( retinoblastoma ), under the retina, or in other parts of ... Cataract removal Melanoma of the eye Retinal detachment Retinoblastoma Ultrasound Update Date 2/23/2015 Updated by: ...

  14. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pelvic area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  15. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  16. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  17. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  18. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  19. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  20. Measurements in ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.B.; Kurtz, A.B.; Goldberg, P.

    1988-01-01

    This book gathers all published and original data pertaining to anatomical measurements as projected on ultrasound scans. It covers all major anatomic regions and organ systems, including abdomen, pelvic, obstetrical, head and neck, and heart.

  1. Ultrasound in perinatology

    SciTech Connect

    Maklad, N.F.

    1986-01-01

    This 19th volume in the series Clinics in Diagnostic Ultrasound provides an overview and update of some of the recent applications of ultrasound (US) in the pernatal period. Prenatal topics include estimation of gestational age; evaluation of intrauterine growth retardation, non-immune hydrops, and fetal urinary abnormalities; fetal echocardiography; and biophysical scoring. The discussion of postnatal topics includes US studies of the head and abdomen, echocardiography, and interventional procedures.

  2. Breast ultrasound tomography with total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb

    2009-01-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A new ultrasound breast imaging device (CURE) with a ring array of transducers has been designed and built at Karmanos Cancer Institute, which acquires both reflection and transmission ultrasound signals. To extract the sound-speed information from the breast data acquired by CURE, we have developed an iterative sound-speed image reconstruction algorithm for breast ultrasound transmission tomography based on total-variation (TV) minimization. We investigate applicability of the TV tomography algorithm using in vivo ultrasound breast data from 61 patients, and compare the results with those obtained using the Tikhonov regularization method. We demonstrate that, compared to the Tikhonov regularization scheme, the TV regularization method significantly improves image quality, resulting in sound-speed tomography images with sharp (preserved) edges of abnormalities and few artifacts.

  3. METRIC (MREnterography or ulTRasound in Crohn’s disease): a study protocol for a multicentre, non-randomised, single-arm, prospective comparison study of magnetic resonance enterography and small bowel ultrasound compared to a reference standard in those aged 16 and over

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Crohn’s disease (CD) is a lifelong, relapsing and remitting inflammatory condition of the intestine. Medical imaging is crucial for diagnosis, phenotyping, activity assessment and detecting complications. Diverse small bowel imaging tests are available but a standard algorithm for deployment is lacking. Many hospitals employ tests that impart ionising radiation, of particular concern to this young patient population. Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and small bowel ultrasound (USS) are attractive options, as they do not use ionising radiation. However, their comparative diagnostic accuracy has not been compared in large head to head trials. METRIC aims to compare the diagnostic efficacy, therapeutic impact and cost effectiveness of MRE and USS in newly diagnosed and relapsing CD. Methods METRIC (ISRCTN03982913) is a multicentre, non-randomised, single-arm, prospective comparison study. Two patient cohorts will be recruited; those newly diagnosed with CD, and those with suspected relapse. Both will undergo MRE and USS in addition to other imaging tests performed as part of clinical care. Strict blinding protocols will be enforced for those interpreting MRE and USS. The Harvey Bradshaw index, C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin will be collected at recruitment and 3 months, and patient experience will be assessed via questionnaires. A multidisciplinary consensus panel will assess all available clinical and imaging data up to 6 months after recruitment of each patient and will define the standard of reference for the presence, localisation and activity of disease against which the diagnostic accuracy of MRE and USS will be judged. Diagnostic impact of MRE and USS will be evaluated and cost effectiveness will be assessed. The primary outcome measure is the difference in per patient sensitivity between MRE and USS for the correct identification and localisation of small bowel CD. Discussion The trial is open at 5 centres with 46 patients

  4. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A.; TenCate, James A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  5. High-resolution imaging with a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Simonetti, Francesco; Williamson, Michael; Rosenberg, Robert; Heintz, Philip; Sandoval, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    It is difficult for ultrasound to image small targets such as breast microcalcifications. Synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging has recently developed as a promising tool to improve the capabilities of medical ultrasound. We use two different tissueequivalent phantoms to study the imaging capabilities of a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system for imaging small targets. The InnerVision ultrasound system DAS009 is an investigational system for real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. We use the system to image the two phantoms, and compare the images with those obtained from clinical scanners Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. Our results show that synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging produces images with higher resolution and less image artifacts than Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. In addition, we study the effects of sound speed on synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and demonstrate that an accurate sound speed is very important for imaging small targets.

  6. The ultrasound-assisted aqueous extraction of rice bran oil.

    PubMed

    Khoei, Maryam; Chekin, Fereshteh

    2016-03-01

    In this work, aqueous extraction of rice bran oil was done without and with ultrasound pretreatment. Key factors controlling the extraction and optimal operating conditions were identified. The highest extraction efficiency was found at pH=12, temperature of 45°C, agitation speed of 800rpm and agitation time of 15min, ultrasound treatment time of 70min and ultrasound treatment temperature of 25°C. Moreover, extraction yields were compared to ultrasound-assisted aqueous extraction and Soxhlet extraction. The results showed that the yield of rice bran oil at ultrasound-assisted aqueous extraction was close to the yield of oil extracted by hexane Soxhlet extraction. This result implied that the yield of rice bran oil was significantly influenced by ultrasound. With regard to quality, the oil extracted by ultrasound-assisted aqueous process had a lower content of free fatty acid and lower color imparting components than the hexane-extracted oil. Also, effect of parboiling of paddy on hexane and ultrasound-assisted aqueous extraction was studied. Both extraction methods gives higher percentage of oil from par boiled rice bran compared with raw rice bran. This may be due to the fact that parboiling releases the oil. PMID:26471585

  7. Comparing cost-effectiveness between endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosis of common bile duct stone in patients with predefined risks: A study from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Netinatsunton, Nisa; Attasaranya, Siriboon; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Witeerungrot, Teepawit; Jongboonyanuparp, Theeratus; Piratvisuth, Teerha; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) achieves results comparable to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the diagnosis of common bile duct (CBD) stone, but studies from the western have shown EUS to be less expensive in patients with intermediate risk for CBD stones. The aim of this study was to compare the costs of EUS and ERCP in the diagnosis of CBD stones in a developing country. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done with 141 patients with suspected CBD stones, categorized as having high or intermediate risk for CBD stone. All underwent EUS, and the high-risk patients had ERCP after the EUS. For intermediate-risk patients, an ERCP was done at the discretion of the attending physician. The CBD stone was confirmed by ERCP in patients who underwent both EUS and ERCP. Patients who received EUS only were followed up every 3 months for 1 year. The false negative rate in patients with EUS and ERCP was estimated in the clinical follow-up. Result: One hundred and forty-one patients (141: 83 females, 58 males) with a mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of 55.71 ±18.68 years were recruited. Ninety-four (94) patients underwent both EUS and ERCP. ERCP confirmed the diagnosis in 83 of 85 patients (97.6%) with CBD stone detected by EUS. Forty-seven (47) patients with a negative EUS and no ERCP done were symptom-free during the follow-up. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of EUS were 97.6%, 80%, 97.6%, and 80% respectively. An EUS-based strategy for high-risk patients was 15% more expensive than an ERCP-based strategy, but the EUS-based strategy reduced the cost to 37.78% less than the ERCP-based strategy in intermediate-risk patients. The EUS-based strategy was cost-saving when the CBD stone prevalence was less than 52.5%. Conclusion: EUS is safer and less costly than ERCP for CBD stone diagnosis in patients with intermediate risk. PMID:27386473

  8. Pocket ultrasound devices for focused echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pocket ultrasound devices have recently been developed and may be particularly useful for emergency assessment. These devices can be stored in a pocket but share only some technical features with conventional echocardiographic machines. Two-dimensional imaging and color flow mode are available, with possible adjustments of global gain and depth, but Doppler features are lacking. These devices are particularly fitted for focused echocardiography. In this issue, a trial compares a pocket ultrasound device with a conventional echocardiographic machine for focused echocardiography in patients admitted to the emergency department. This commentary will put these findings into perspective. PMID:22748159

  9. Improved heating efficiency with High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound using a new ultrasound source excitation.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Timothy A

    2009-01-01

    High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is quickly becoming one of the best methods to thermally ablate tissue noninvasively. Unlike RF or Laser ablation, the tissue can be destroyed without inserting any probes into the body minimizing the risk of secondary complications such as infections. In this study, the heating efficiency of HIFU sources is improved by altering the excitation of the ultrasound source to take advantage of nonlinear propagation. For ultrasound, the phase velocity of the ultrasound wave depends on the amplitude of the wave resulting in the generation of higher harmonics. These higher harmonics are more efficiently converted into heat in the body due to the frequency dependence of the ultrasound absorption in tissue. In our study, the generation of the higher harmonics by nonlinear propagation is enhanced by transmitting an ultrasound wave with both the fundamental and a higher harmonic component included. Computer simulations demonstrated up to a 300% increase in temperature increase compared to transmitting at only the fundamental for the same acoustic power transmitted by the source. PMID:19963801

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound using ultrasound probes for the diagnosis of early esophageal and gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Oda, Ichiro; Nonaka, Satoru; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka

    2012-06-16

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) devices were first designed and manufactured more than 30 years ago, and since then investigators have reported EUS is effective for determining both the staging and the depth of invasion of esophageal and gastric cancers. We review the present status, the methods, and the findings of EUS when used to diagnose and stage early esophageal and gastric cancer. EUS using high-frequency ultrasound probes is more accurate than conventional EUS for the evaluation of the depth of invasion of superficial esophageal carcinoma. The rates of accurate evaluation of the depth of invasion by EUS using high-frequency ultrasound probes were 70%-88% for intramucosal cancer, and 83%-94% for submucosal invasive cancer. But the sensitivity of EUS using high-frequency ultrasound probes for the diagnosis of submucosal invasive cancer was relatively low, making it difficult to confirm minute submucosal invasion. The accuracy of EUS using high-frequency ultrasound probes for early gastric tumor classification can be up to 80% compared with 63% for conventional EUS, although the accuracy of EUS using high-frequency ultrasound probes relatively decreases for those patients with depressed-type lesions, undifferentiated cancer, concomitant ulceration, expanded indications, type 0-I lesions, and lesions located in the upper-third of the stomach. A 92% overall accuracy rate was achieved when both the endoscopic appearance and the findings from EUS using high-frequency ultrasound probes were considered together for tumor classification. Although EUS using high-frequency ultrasound probes has limitations, it has a high depth of invasion accuracy and is a useful procedure to distinguish lesions in the esophagus and stomach that are indicated for endoscopic resection. PMID:22720122

  11. AMUM LECTURE: Therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques.

  12. Medical ultrasound systems

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue. PMID:22866226

  13. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  14. Ultrasound in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David S.; South, Donna A.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Arbeille, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Physiology of the human body in space has been a major concern for space-faring nations since the beginning of the space era. Ultrasound (US) is one of the most cost effective and versatile forms of medical imaging. As such, its use in characterizing microgravity-induced changes in physiology is being realized. In addition to the use of US in related ground-based studies, equipment has also been modified to fly in space. This involves alteration to handle the stresses of launch and different power and cooling requirements. Study protocols also have been altered to accommodate the microgravity environment. Ultrasound studies to date have shown a pattern of adaptation to microgravity that includes changes in cardiac chamber sizes and vertebral spacing. Ultrasound has been and will continue to be an important component in the investigation of physiological and, possibly, pathologic changes occurring in space or as a result of spaceflight.

  15. Ultrasound waveform tomography with the second-order total-generalized-variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Youzuo; Huang, Lianjie

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound waveform tomography with the total-variation regularization could improve reconstructions of tumor margins, but the reconstructions usually contain unwanted blocky artifacts. We develop a new ultrasound waveform tomography method with a second-order total-generalized-variation regularization scheme to improve tomographic reconstructions of breast tumors and remove blocky artifacts in reconstruction results. We validate our new method using numerical phantom data and real phantom data acquired using our synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays. Compared to reconstructions of ultrasound waveform tomography with modified total-variation regularization, our new ultrasound waveform tomography yields accurate sound-speed reconstruction results with significantly reduced artifacts.

  16. [Lung ultrasound in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Yousef, N

    2016-03-01

    Lung ultrasound (LU) is becoming a bedside point-of-care technique in critical care and emergency medicine as it is performed and immediately interpreted by the clinician. LU is quick, easy, relatively inexpensive, and provides accurate diagnostic information when compared with conventional lung imaging methods, such as CT scans and chest radiographs, with the additional advantage of being non-irradiating, adapted to bedside use, and easily repeatable with no side effects for the patient. LU is easy to learn, does not require sophisticated ultrasound machines or settings, and shows low intra- and interobserver variability when a standardized approach is used. A comprehensive and standardized ultrasound semiology has been described and validated in both adults and children. In summary, LU allows for quick easy recognition of a normally aerated lung in contrast to an interstitial or alveolar pattern. Recognition of these patterns may be even easier in neonates due to their small size and the absence of obesity and heavy musculature. Specific LU findings have been described for some types of neonatal lung injury, such as neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the neonate, meconium aspiration syndrome, and neonatal pneumonia. In the newborn, LU has proved its usefulness in predicting the need for hospital admission and/or intubation based on simple LU patterns. A recently proposed LU score, adapted for the neonate, correlates well with oxygenation status, independently of gestational age and underlying respiratory condition. The score reliably predicts the need for surfactant treatment in preterm babies less than 34 weeks gestation treated with nasal CPAP from birth. LU is a promising tool with numerous potential applications that warrant future studies. However, like every technique, LU has its limitations and should not completely replace standard radiography. LU can nevertheless largely reduce exposure to ionizing radiation by limiting the

  17. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  18. Wavelet-based ultrasound image denoising: performance analysis and comparison.

    PubMed

    Rizi, F Yousefi; Noubari, H Ahmadi; Setarehdan, S K

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound images are generally affected by multiplicative speckle noise, which is mainly due to the coherent nature of the scattering phenomenon. Speckle noise filtering is thus a critical pre-processing step in medical ultrasound imaging provided that the diagnostic features of interest are not lost. A comparative study of the performance of alternative wavelet based ultrasound image denoising methods is presented in this article. In particular, the contourlet and curvelet techniques with dual tree complex and real and double density wavelet transform denoising methods were applied to real ultrasound images and results were quantitatively compared. The results show that curvelet-based method performs superior as compared to other methods and can effectively reduce most of the speckle noise content of a given image. PMID:22255196

  19. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  20. Ultrasound stylet for non-image-guided ventricular catheterization.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Nathaniel K; Chiarelli, Peter A; Su, David K; Chang, Jason J; MacConaghy, Brian; Murthy, Revathi; Toms, Peter; Robb, Terrence L; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Browd, Samuel R; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Urgent ventriculostomy placement can be a lifesaving procedure in the setting of hydrocephalus or elevated intracranial pressure. While external ventricular drain (EVD) insertion is common, there remains a high rate of suboptimal drain placement. Here, the authors seek to demonstrate the feasibility of an ultrasound-based guidance system that can be inserted into an existing EVD catheter to provide a linear ultrasound trace that guides the user toward the ventricle. METHODS The ultrasound stylet was constructed as a thin metal tube, with dimensions equivalent to standard catheter stylets, bearing a single-element, ceramic ultrasound transducer at the tip. Ultrasound backscatter signals from the porcine ventricle were processed by custom electronics to offer real-time information about ventricular location relative to the catheter. Data collected from the prototype device were compared with reference measurements obtained using standard clinical ultrasound imaging. RESULTS A study of porcine ventricular catheterization using the experimental device yielded a high rate of successful catheter placement after a single pass (10 of 12 trials), despite the small size of pig ventricles and the lack of prior instruction on porcine ventricular architecture. A characteristic double-peak signal was identified, which originated from ultrasound reflections off of the near and far ventricular walls. Ventricular dimensions, as obtained from the width between peaks, were in agreement with standard ultrasound reference measurements (p < 0.05). Furthermore, linear ultrasound backscatter data permitted in situ measurement of the stylet distance to the ventricular wall (p < 0.05), which assisted in catheter guidance. CONCLUSIONS The authors have demonstrated the ability of the prototype ultrasound stylet to guide ventricular access in the porcine brain. The alternative design of the device makes it potentially easy to integrate into the standard workflow for bedside EVD

  1. Ultrasound induced green solvent extraction of oil from oleaginous seeds.

    PubMed

    Sicaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Vian, Maryline Abert; Fine, Frédéric; Carré, Patrick; Tostain, Sylvain; Chemat, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction of rapeseed oil was investigated and compared with conventional extraction for energy efficiency, throughput time, extraction yield, cleanness, processing cost and product quality. A multivariate study enabled us to define optimal parameters (7.7 W/cm(2) for ultrasonic power intensity, 40 °C for processing temperature, and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/15) for ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from oilseeds to maximize lipid yield while reducing solvent consumption and extraction time using response surface methodology (RSM) with a three-variable central composite design (CCD). A significant difference in oil quality was noted under the conditions of the initial ultrasound extraction, which was later avoided using ultrasound in the absence of oxygen. Three concepts of multistage cross-current extraction were investigated and compared: conventional multistage maceration, ultrasound-assisted maceration and a combination, to assess the positive impact of using ultrasound on the seed oil extraction process. The study concludes that ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil is likely to reduce both economic and ecological impacts of the process in the fat and oil industry. PMID:26964955

  2. Information contained in the radiating ultrasound during ultrasonic welding

    PubMed

    Masuzawa; Ohdaira

    2000-03-01

    During ultrasonic welding, unnecessary ultrasound together with audible sound is radiated into the air. Audible sound is noisy and uncomfortable, and ultrasound may have bed effects on adjacent equipment. However, it is considered that these sounds potentially contain useful information such as welding state. This article reports the relationship between radiated ultrasound and the change of the welding state during ultrasonic welding. It is known that the welding state can be presumed from the change of the mechanical load impedance, which can be calculated from resonant frequency, motional voltage and the driving current of the vibrating system for the welder when a constant-velocity motional-feedback power oscillator is used. In this study, radiated ultrasound picked up with a microphone and an amplifier is recorded and analyzed with a personal computer. Analyzed results are compared with the change of the mechanical load impedance that is also calculated from the recorded data of the resonant frequency, motional voltage and the driving current of the vibrating system for the welding. Experiments were made on the ultrasonic welding of plastic rods. The relationship between the parameters of radiated ultrasound and the electrical parameters of the vibrating system were compared. The peak amplitude of the radiated ultrasound and the mechanical impedance versus time were very similar. It is shown in this study that radiated ultrasound contains lots of useful information. PMID:10829736

  3. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  4. Ultrasound and the IRB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist researchers in writing their research protocols and subject consent forms so that both the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and subjects are assured of the minimal risk associated with diagnostic B-scan ultrasound as it is used in speech research. There have been numerous epidemiological studies on fetal…

  5. Validity and reliability of an ultrasound system for estimating adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, Jeremy P; Barnes, Jeremy T; Wagganer, Jason D; Wilson, Jacob M; Lowery, Ryan P; Green, Cody E; Pujol, Thomas J

    2014-03-01

    When health professionals measure the fitness levels of clients, body composition is usually estimated. In field settings, body composition is commonly estimated with skinfolds or bioelectrical impedance analysis. Recently, a portable ultrasound device has been manufactured to estimate what percentage of body mass is composed of adipose tissue (AT%). A reported advantage of using ultrasound is that inter- and intrarater variations may be minimized when compared with the skinfold technique. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was twofold; 1) to determine the validity of a portable ultrasound device compared with skinfolds and 2) determine the reliability of the portable ultrasound device. Participants had their measurements taken in the following order: urine specific gravity, body mass, height, skinfolds and ultrasound determined. Participants had their urine specific gravity and ultrasound determined AT% estimates measured again 48 h later. The current pilot study found that the ultrasound was not a valid estimate of AT% when compared with the skinfold estimate (TE > 4%). In addition, the 1-site estimate from the ultrasound was more reliable than the 3-site estimate of AT%. These data are of importance to practitioners because it demonstrates that while the ultrasound is not a valid estimate compared with skinfolds, the 1-site estimate may be able to track changes in AT% over time, making the ultrasound an option for assessing changes in body composition. PMID:23879395

  6. Neural network ultrasound image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Alexander C.; Brown, David G.; Pastel, Mary S.

    1993-09-01

    Neural network based analysis of ultrasound image data was carried out on liver scans of normal subjects and those diagnosed with diffuse liver disease. In a previous study, ultrasound images from a group of normal volunteers, Gaucher's disease patients, and hepatitis patients were obtained by Garra et al., who used classical statistical methods to distinguish from among these three classes. In the present work, neural network classifiers were employed with the same image features found useful in the previous study for this task. Both standard backpropagation neural networks and a recently developed biologically-inspired network called Dystal were used. Classification performance as measured by the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve was generally excellent for the back propagation networks and was roughly comparable to that of classical statistical discriminators tested on the same data set and documented in the earlier study. Performance of the Dystal network was significantly inferior; however, this may be due to the choice of network parameter. Potential methods for enhancing network performance was identified.

  7. Ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis in acute arterial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Culp, William C; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2008-08-01

    In vitro and animal studies have shown that thrombolysis with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) can be enhanced with ultrasound. Ultrasound delivers mechanical pressure waves to the clot, thus exposing more thrombus surface to circulating drug. Moreover, intravenous gaseous microspheres with ultrasound have been shown to be a potential alternative to fibrinolytic agents to recanalize discrete peripheral thrombotic arterial occlusions or acute arteriovenous graft thromboses. Small phase I-II randomized and non-randomized clinical trials have shown promising results concerning the potential applications of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis in the setting of acute cerebral ischemia. CLOTBUST was an international four-center phase II trial, which demonstrated that, in patients with acute ischemic stroke, transcranial Doppler (TCD) monitoring augments tPA-induced arterial recanalization (sustained complete recanalization rates: 38% vs. 13%) with a non-significant trend toward an increased rate of clinical recovery from stroke, as compared with placebo. The rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) were similar in the active and placebo group (4.8% vs. 4.8%). Smaller single-center clinical trials using transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCD) reported recanalization rates ranging from 27% to 64% and sICH rates of 0-18%. A separate clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of therapeutic low-frequency ultrasound was discontinued because of a concerning sICH rate of 36% in the active group. To further enhance the ability of tPA to break up thrombi, current ongoing clinical trials include phase II studies of a single beam 2 MHz TCD with perflutren-lipid microspheres. Moreover, potential enhancement of intra-arterial tPA delivery is being clinically tested with 1.7-2.1 MHz pulsed wave ultrasound (EKOS catheter) in ongoing phase II-III clinical trials. Intravenous platelet-targeted microbubbles with low-frequency ultrasound are currently

  8. Studies on the use of power ultrasound in leather dyeing.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Venkatasubramanian; Rao, Paruchuri Gangadhar

    2003-03-01

    Uses of power ultrasound for acceleration/performing the chemical as well as physical processes are gaining importance. In conventional leather processing, the diffusion of chemicals through the pores of the skin/hide is achieved by the mechanical agitation caused by the paddle or drumming action. In this work, the use of power ultrasound in the dyeing of leather has been studied with the aim to improve the exhaustion of dye for a given processing time, to reduce the dyeing time and to improve the quality of dyed leather. The effect of power ultrasound in the dyeing of full chrome cow crust leather in a stationary condition is compared with dyeing in the absence of ultrasound as a control experiment both in a stationary as well as conventional drumming condition. An ultrasonic cleaner (150 W and 33 kHz) was used for the experiments. Actual power dissipated into the system was calculated from the calorimetric measurement. Experiments were carried out with variation in type of dye, amount of dye offer, temperature and time. The results show that there is a significant improvement in the percentage exhaustion of dye due to the presence of ultrasound, when compared to dyeing in absence of ultrasound. Experiments on equilibrium dye uptake carried out with or without ultrasound suggest that ultrasound help to improve the kinetics of leather dyeing. The results indicate that leathers dyed in presence of ultrasound have higher colour values, better dye penetration and fastness properties compared to control leathers. The physical testing results show that strength properties of the dyed leathers are not affected due to the application of ultrasound under the given process conditions. Apparent diffusion coefficient during the initial stage of dyeing process, both in presence and in absence of ultrasound was calculated. The values show that ultrasound helps in improving the apparent diffusion coefficient more for the difficult dyeing conditions such as in the case of metal

  9. Ultrasound propagation in the micropores of track membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.; González, B.; Apel, P. Yu.; Orelovitch, O. L.; Mitrofanov, A. V.

    2005-09-01

    Air-coupled and high-frequency ultrasonic spectroscopy is used to study ultrasound transmission through track membranes (TMs). Observed behavior, anomalous compared to that observed for other membranes, suggests independent ultrasound propagation through the pores. This is proved experimentally by studying frequency dependence of some acoustical parameters and by closing the pore aperture at the TM surface. This changes boundary conditions so that such wave is inhibited. Ultrasound propagation in such small pores opens up a new way to investigate gas behavior under rarefied conditions and provides a new technique to characterize TMs.

  10. A resonance-free nano-film airborne ultrasound emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, Maxim; Harrer, Andrea; Prager, Jens; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Beck, Uwe; Lange, Thorid; Weise, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a novel thermo-acoustic approach for the generation of broad band airborne ultrasound and investigate the applicability of resonance-free thermo-acoustic emitters for very short high pressure airborne ultrasound pulses. We report on measurements of thermo-acoustic emitter consisting of a 30 nm thin metallic film on a usual soda-lime glass substrate, generating sound pressure values of more than 140 dB at 60 mm distance from the transducer and compare the results with conventional piezoelectric airborne ultrasound transducers. Our experimental investigations show that such thermo-acoustic devices can be used as broad band emitters using pulse excitation.

  11. Laser ultrasound technology for fault detection on carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyrkammer, Robert; Reitinger, Bernhard; Grün, Hubert; Sekelja, Jakov; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The marching in of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) to mass production in the aeronautic and automotive industry requires reliable quality assurance methods. Laser ultrasound (LUS) is a promising nondestructive testing technique for sample inspection. The benefits compared to conventional ultrasound (US) testing are couplant free measurements and an easy access to complex shapes due to remote optical excitation and detection. Here the potential of LUS is present on composite test panels with relevant testing scenarios for industry. The results are evaluated in comparison to conventional ultrasound used in the aeronautic industry.

  12. Breast ultrasound waveform tomography: using both transmission and reflection data, and numerical virtual point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Lin, Youzuo; Zhang, Zhigang; Labyed, Yassin; Tan, Sirui; Nguyen, Nghia; Hanson, Kenneth; Sandoval, Daniel; Williamson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound transmission tomography usually generates low-resolution breast images. We improve sound-speed reconstructions using ultrasound waveform tomography with both transmission and reflection data. We validate the improvement using computer-generated synthetic-aperture ultrasound transmission and reflection data for numerical breast phantoms. Our tomography results demonstrate that using both transmission and reflection data in ultrasound waveform tomography greatly enhances the resolution and accuracy of tomographic reconstructions compared to ultrasound waveform tomography using either transmission data or reflection data alone. To verify the capability of our novel ultrasound waveform tomography, we design and manufacture a new synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays for clinical studies. The distance of the two transducer arrays is adjustable for accommodating different sizes of the breast. The parallel transducer arrays also allow us to easily scan the axillary region to evaluate the status of axillary lymph nodes and detect breast cancer in the axillary region. However, synthetic-aperture ultrasound reflection data acquired by firing each transducer element sequentially are usually much weaker than transmission data, and have much lower signal-to-noise ratios than the latter. We develop a numerical virtual-point-source method to enhance ultrasound reflection data using synthetic-aperture ultrasound data acquired by firing each transducer element sequentially. Synthetic-aperture ultrasound reflection data for a breast phantom obtained using our numerical virtual-point-source method reveals many coherent ultrasound reflection waveforms that are weak or invisible in the original synthetic-aperture ultrasound data. Ultrasound waveform tomography using both transmission and reflection data together with numerical virtual-point-source method has great potential to produce high-resolution tomographic

  13. Ultrasound Effect on Cancerous versus Non-Cancerous Cells.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Aharon; Amar-Lewis, Eliz; Yudilevitch, Yana; Isaacson, Carol; Laster, Brenda; Kost, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have found that cancer cells whose metastatic potential is low are more vulnerable to mechanical stress-induced trauma to their cytoskeleton compared with benign cells. Because ultrasound induces mechanical stresses on cells and tissues, it is postulated that there may be a way to apply ultrasound to tumors to reduce their ability to metastasize. The difference between low-malignant-potential cancer cells and benign cells could be a result of their different responses to the mechanical stress insonation induced. This hypothesis was tested in vitro and in vivo. Low-malignant-potential cells were found to be more sensitive to insonation, resulting in a significantly higher mortality rate compared with that of benign cells, 89% versus 21%, respectively. This effect can be controlled by varying ultrasound parameters: intensity, duration, and duty cycle. Thus, the results presented in this study suggest the application of ultrasound to discriminate between benign and malignant cells. PMID:27067417

  14. An image registration based ultrasound probe calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Kumar, Dinesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Narayanan, Ram

    2012-02-01

    Reconstructed 3D ultrasound of prostate gland finds application in several medical areas such as image guided biopsy, therapy planning and dose delivery. In our application, we use an end-fire probe rotated about its axis to acquire a sequence of rotational slices to reconstruct 3D TRUS (Transrectal Ultrasound) image. The image acquisition system consists of an ultrasound transducer situated on a cradle directly attached to a rotational sensor. However, due to system tolerances, axis of probe does not align exactly with the designed axis of rotation resulting in artifacts in the 3D reconstructed ultrasound volume. We present a rigid registration based automatic probe calibration approach. The method uses a sequence of phantom images, each pair acquired at angular separation of 180 degrees and registers corresponding image pairs to compute the deviation from designed axis. A modified shadow removal algorithm is applied for preprocessing. An attribute vector is constructed from image intensity and a speckle-insensitive information-theoretic feature. We compare registration between the presented method and expert-corrected images in 16 prostate phantom scans. Images were acquired at multiple resolutions, and different misalignment settings from two ultrasound machines. Screenshots from 3D reconstruction are shown before and after misalignment correction. Registration parameters from automatic and manual correction were found to be in good agreement. Average absolute differences of translation and rotation between automatic and manual methods were 0.27 mm and 0.65 degree, respectively. The registration parameters also showed lower variability for automatic registration (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.50 mm, σrotation = 0.52 degree) compared to the manual approach (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.62 mm, σrotation = 0.78 degree).

  15. Tumor Functional and Molecular Imaging Utilizing Ultrasound and Ultrasound-Mediated Optical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Baohong; Rychak, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor functional and molecular imaging has significantly contributed to cancer preclinical research and clinical applications. Among typical imaging modalities, ultrasonic and optical techniques are two commonly used methods; both share several common features such as cost efficiency, absence of ionizing radiation, relatively inexpensive contrast agents, and comparable maximum-imaging depth. Ultrasonic and optical techniques are also complementary in imaging resolution, molecular sensitivity, and imaging space (vascular and extravascular). The marriage between ultrasonic and optical techniques takes advantages of both techniques. This review introduces tumor functional and molecular imaging using microbubble-based ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical imaging techniques. PMID:23219728

  16. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative. PMID:22124008

  17. Nanobubbles for enhanced ultrasound imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tinghui; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Rongqin; Zheng, Bowen; Cheng, Du; Zhang, Xinling; Shuai, Xintao

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and initial applications of nanobubbles (NBs) have shown promising results in recent years. A small particle size is a basic requirement for ultrasound contrast-enhanced agents that penetrate tumor blood vessel pores to allow for targeted imaging and therapy. However, the nanoscale size of the particles used has the disadvantage of weakening the imaging ability of clinical diagnostic ultrasound. In this work, we fabricated a lipid NBs contrast-enhanced ultrasound agent and evaluated its passive targeting ability in vivo. The results showed that the NBs were small (436.8 ± 5.7 nm), and in vitro ultrasound imaging suggested that the ultrasonic imaging ability is comparable to that of microbubbles (MBs). In vivo experiments confirmed the ability of NBs to passively target tumor tissues. The NBs remained in the tumor area for a longer period because they exhibited enhanced permeability and retention. Direct evidence was obtained by direct observation of red fluorescence-dyed NBs in tumor tissue using confocal laser scanning microscopy. We have demonstrated the ability to fabricate NBs that can be used for the in vivo contrast-enhanced imaging of tumor tissue and that have potential for drug/gene delivery. PMID:22393289

  18. Ultrasound-enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Gamerith, Caroline; Ghazaryan, Gagik; Ortner, Andreas; Herrero Acero, Enrique; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-10-01

    The application of ultrasound was found to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). After a short activation phase up to 6.6times increase in the amount of released products was found. PET powder with lower crystallinity of 8% was hydrolyzed faster when compared to PET with 28% crystallinity. Ultrasound activation was found to be around three times more effective on powders vs. films most likely due to a larger surface area accessible to the enzyme. PMID:27481467

  19. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  20. Ultrasound-Assisted Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. E.; Sun, Da-Wen

    Freezing is a well-known preservation method widely used in the food industry. The advantages of freezing are to a certain degree counterbalanced by the risk of damage caused by the formation and size of ice crystals. Over recent years new approaches have been developed to improve and control the crystallization process, and among these approaches sonocrystallization has proved to be very useful, since it can enhance both the nucleation rate and the crystal growth rate. Although ultrasound has been successfully used for many years in the evaluation of various aspects of foods and in medical applications, the use of power ultrasound to directly improve processes and products is less popular in food manufacturing. Foodstuffs are very complex materials, and research is needed in order to define the specific sound parameters that aid the freezing process and that can later be used for the scale-up and production of commercial frozen food products.

  1. Ultrasound promoted catalytic liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol for Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Xin, Fang; Li, Xunfeng; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The apparent kinetic of the ultrasound assisted liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol over Raney nickel catalyst was determined in the temperature range of 346-353 K. Comparison of the effects of ultrasound and mechanical agitation on the isopropanol dehydrogenation was investigated. The ultrasound assisted dehydrogenation rate was significantly improved when relatively high power density was used. Moreover, the Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump (IAH-CHP) with ultrasound irradiation, in which the endothermic reaction is exposure to ultrasound, was proposed. A mathematical model was established to evaluate its energy performance in term of the coefficient of performance (COP) and the exergy efficiency, into which the apparent kinetic obtained in this work was incorporated. The operating performances between IAH-CHP with ultrasound and mechanical agitation were compared. The results indicated that the superiority of the IAH-CHP system with ultrasound was present even if more than 50% of the power of the ultrasound equipment was lost. PMID:25246094

  2. Manipulating neuronal activity with low frequency transcranial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michele Elizabeth

    Stimulation of the rodent cerebral cortex is used to investigate the underlying biological basis for the restorative effects of slow wave sleep. Neuronal activation by optogenetic and ultrasound stimulation elicits changes in action potentials across the cerebral cortex that are recorded as electroencephalograms. Optogenetic stimulation requires an invasive implantation procedure limiting its application in human studies. We sought to determine whether ultrasound stimulation could be as effective as optogenetic techniques currently used, in an effort to further understand the physiological and metabolic requirements of sleep. We successfully recorded electroencephalograms in response to transcranial ultrasound stimulation of the barrel cortex at 1 and 7 Hz frequencies, comparing them to those recorded in response to optogenetic stimuli applied at the same frequencies. Our results showed application of a 473 nm blue LED positioned 6 cm above the skull and ultrasound stimulation at an output voltage of 1000 mVpp produced electroencephalograms with physiological responses of similar amplitude. We concluded that there exists an intensity-proportionate response in the optogenetic stimulation, but not with ultrasound stimulation at the frequencies we surveyed. Activation of neuronal cells in response to optogenetic stimulation in a Thy1-ChR2 transgenic mouse line is specifically targeted to pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex. ChR2 responses to optogenetic stimulation are mediated by a focal activation of neuronal ion channels. We measured electrophysiological responses to ultrasound stimulation, comparing them to those recorded from optogenetic stimuli. Our results show striking similarities between ultrasound-induced responses and optogenetically-induced responses, which may indicate that transcranial ultrasound stimulation is also mediated by ion channel dependent processes in cerebral cortical neurons. The biophysical substrates for electrical excitability of

  3. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  4. Black Endobronchial Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Samjot S; Harris, Kassem; Ylagan, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    The infrequent bronchoscopic finding of black airway pigmentation due to a variety of causes has been labeled as "Black Bronchoscopy." Black bronchioalveolar lavage has been sometimes described in tobacco, marijuana, and crack cocaine smokers. To add to this interesting panorama of bronchoscopic findings, we describe cases of black endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspirates due to metastatic melanoma and anthracotic lymph nodes. PMID:26348692

  5. Clinical ophthalmic ultrasound improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. B.; Piro, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital synthetic aperture techniques to obtain high resolution ultrasound images of eye and orbit was proposed. The parameters of the switched array configuration to reduce data collection time to a few milliseconds to avoid eye motion problems in the eye itself were established. An assessment of the effects of eye motion on the performance of the system was obtained. The principles of synthetic techniques are discussed. Likely applications are considered.

  6. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  7. Obstetric Ultrasound Simulator With Task-Based Training and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Kutarnia, Jason; Belady, Petra; Pedersen, Peder C

    2015-10-01

    The increasing use of point-of-care (POC) ultrasound presents a challenge in providing efficient training to POC ultrasound users for whom formal training is not readily available. In response to this need, we developed an affordable compact laptop-based obstetric ultrasound training simulator. It offers a realistic scanning experience, task-based training, and performance assessment. The position and orientation of the sham transducer are tracked with 5 DoF on an abdomen-sized scan surface with the shape of a cylindrical segment. On the simulator, user interface is rendered a virtual torso whose body surface models the abdomen of the pregnant scan subject. A virtual transducer scans the virtual torso by following the sham transducer movements on the scan surface. A given 3-D training image volume is generated by combining several overlapping 3-D ultrasound sweeps acquired from the pregnant scan subject using a Markov random field-based approach. Obstetric ultrasound training is completed through a series of tasks, guided by the simulator and focused on three aspects: basic medical ultrasound, orientation to obstetric space, and fetal biometry. The scanning performance is automatically evaluated by comparing user-identified anatomical landmarks with reference landmarks preinserted by sonographers. The simulator renders 2-D ultrasound images in real time with 30 frames/s or higher with good image quality; the training procedure follows standard obstetric ultrasound protocol. Thus, for learners without access to formal sonography programs, the simulator is intended to provide structured training in basic obstetrics ultrasound. PMID:25993700

  8. Comparison of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed-wave and B-mode Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    Pulsed ultrasound was found to induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in mice about 25 years ago but remains a poorly understood risk factor for pulmonary diagnostic ultrasound. In early research using laboratory fixed beam ultrasound, thresholds for PCH had frequency variation from 1-4 MHz similar to the Mechanical Index. In recent research, thresholds for B mode diagnostic ultrasound from 1.5-12 MHz had little dependence on frequency. To compare the diagnostic ultrasound method to laboratory pulsed exposure, thresholds for fixed beam ultrasound were determined using comparable methods at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz. PCH thresholds were lower for simple fixed-beam pulse modes than for B mode and in approximate agreement with early research. However, for comparable timing parameters, PCH thresholds had little dependence on ultrasonic frequency. These findings suggest that the MI may not be directly useful as a dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound.

  9. Smart Ultrasound Remote Guidance Experiment (SURGE)- Concept of Operations Evaluation for Using Remote Guidance Ultrasound for Planetary Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor, IV; Peterson, Sean; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Ebert, Douglas; Ham, David; Amponsah, David; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Use of remote guidance (RG) techniques aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has enabled astronauts to collect diagnostic-level ultrasound images. Exploration class missions will require this cohort of (typically) non-formally trained sonographers to operate with greater autonomy given the longer communication delays (2 seconds for ISS vs. >6 seconds for missions beyond the Moon) and communication blackouts. To determine the feasibility and training requirements for autonomous ultrasound image collection by non-expert ultrasound operators, ultrasound images were collected from a similar cohort using three different image collection protocols: RG only, RG with a computer-based learning tool (LT), and autonomous image collection with LT. The groups were assessed for both image quality and time to collect the images. Methods Subjects were randomized into three groups: RG only, RG with LT, and autonomous with LT. Each subject received 10 minutes of standardized training before the experiment. The subjects were tasked with making the following ultrasound assessments: 1) bone fracture and 2) focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) to assess a patient s abdomen. Human factors-related questionnaire data were collected immediately after the assessments. Results The autonomous group did not out-perform the two groups that received RG. The mean time for the autonomous group to collect images was less than the RG groups, however the mean image quality for the autonomous group was less compared to both RG groups. Discussion Remote guidance continues to produce higher quality ultrasound images than autonomous ultrasound operation. This is likely due to near-instant feedback on image quality from the remote guider. Expansion in communication time delays, however, diminishes the capability to provide this feedback, thus requiring more autonomous ultrasound operation. The LT has the potential to be an excellent training and coaching component for

  10. Intraventricular haemorrhage and periventricular leucomalacia: ultrasound and autopsy correlation.

    PubMed Central

    Trounce, J Q; Fagan, D; Levene, M I

    1986-01-01

    The brains of 30 infants who died after at least one real time ultrasound scan were examined after fixation. The ultrasound diagnosis of either periventricular haemorrhage or periventricular leucomalacia was compared with the macroscopic and histological appearances. Each hemisphere was considered separately for both periventricular haemorrhage and periventricular leucomalacia. The accuracy of ultrasound diagnosis for periventricular haemorrhage was 88%, with sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 85%. The accuracy for periventricular leucomalacia was 90%, with sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 93%. Ultrasound was shown to diagnose the entire range of periventricular leucomalacia lesions. Three hemispheres showed the appearance of prolonged flare, and this correlated with extensive spongiosis and microcalcification of the periventricular white matter, although no macroscopic lesion was seen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3545096

  11. Numerical simulation of piezoelectric effect of bone under ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    The piezoelectric effect of bone under ultrasound irradiation was numerically simulated using an elastic finite-difference time-domain method with piezoelectric constitutive equations (PE-FDTD method). First, to demonstrate the validity of the PE-FDTD method, the ultrasound propagation in piezoelectric ceramics was simulated and then compared with the experimental results. The simulated and experimental waveforms propagating through the ceramics were in good agreement. Next, the piezoelectric effect of human cortical bone on the ultrasound propagation was investigated by PE-FDTD simulation. The simulated result showed that the difference between the waveforms propagating through the bone without and with piezoelectricity was negligible. Finally, the spatial distributions of the electric fields in a human femur induced by ultrasound irradiation were simulated. The electric fields were changed by a bone fracture, which depended on piezoelectric anisotropy. In conclusion, the PE-FDTD method is considered to be useful for investigating the piezoelectric effect of bone.

  12. Screening MR imaging versus screening ultrasound: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Mary C; Newell, Mary S

    2013-08-01

    Data support greater sensitivity of MR imaging compared with mammography and ultrasound in high-risk populations, in particular BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 carriers. Screening ultrasound improves cancer yield versus mammography alone in high-risk patients and in patients with dense breasts and is less expensive. Drawbacks include low positive predictive value, operator dependence, and significant physician time expenditure. Advances, such as refinement of automated whole-breast ultrasound, new outcomes data from ultrasound-detected masses in BI-RADS 3 and 4a categories, and development of new MR imaging sequences that allow rapid screening, potentially without use of contrast, will likely reveal the most appropriate tool over time. PMID:23928240

  13. American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... In | My Account | Renew | Join About Us Leadership History Awards Committees Mission & Constitution Join/Renew Communities Basic Science and Instrumentation Cardiovascular Ultrasound Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Dermatology ...

  14. Emergency ultrasound in the prehospital setting: the impact of environment on examination outcomes.

    PubMed

    Snaith, B; Hardy, M; Walker, A

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to compare ultrasound examinations performed within a land ambulance (stationary and moving) with those completed in a simulated emergency department (ED) to determine the feasibility of undertaking ultrasound examinations within the UK prehospital care environment. The findings suggest that abdominal aortic aneurysm and extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma emergency ultrasound examinations can be performed in the stationary or moving land ambulance environment to a standard consistent with those performed in the hospital ED. PMID:21450758

  15. Quantitative determination of fatty tissue on body surface in obese children by ultrasound method.

    PubMed

    Czinner, A; Várady, M

    1992-01-01

    Authors compared a new ultrasound method with the recognized anthropometrical examination in obese children. Between the two methods the determination of body fat did not indicate any divergence. In extreme obesity they considered the advantage of ultrasound examination more reliable. A further advantage of the ultrasound method is that it is well documentable, reproducible and is not invasive. In this way the therapeutic result is well followable. PMID:1560996

  16. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  17. Real-time ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Unmin; Kim, Yongmin

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound elastography can provide tissue stiffness information that is complementary to the anatomy and blood flow information offered by conventional ultrasound machines, but it is computationally challenging due to many time-consuming modules and a large amount of data. To facilitate real-time implementations of ultrasound elastography, we have developed new methods that can significantly reduce the computational burden of common processing components in ultrasound elastography, such as the crosscorrelation analysis and spatial filtering applied to displacement and strain estimates. Using the new correlation-based search algorithm, the computational requirement of correlation-based search does not increase with the correlation window size. For typical parameters used in ultrasound elastography, the computation in correlation-based search can be reduced by a factor of more than 30. Median filtering is often performed to suppress the spike-like noise that results from correlation-based search. For fast median filtering, we have developed a method that efficiently finds a new median value utilizing the sort result of the previous pixel. With careful mapping of the new algorithms on digital signal processors, our work has led to development of a clinical ultrasound machine supporting real-time elastography. Our methods can help real-time implementations of various applications including ultrasound elastography, which could lead to increased use of ultrasound elastography in the clinic.

  18. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  19. Ultrasound Detection of Lung Hepatization

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Andrea; Nagdev, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound interrogation of the thorax can aide the clinician in determining the cause of the respiratory dysfunction. Often plain radiographs are not sufficient to differentiate pathology. We present a case in which bedside ultrasound defined the pathology without the need for further imaging. PMID:21079701

  20. Endobronchial ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, Christian; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques have recently become available as advanced diagnostic tools for tissue characterization. Strain elastography is a real-time technique used with transcutaneous ultrasound (US) and endoscopic US. Convincing evidence is available demonstrating a significant value of strain elastography for the discrimination of benign and malignant lymph nodes (LNs). This paper reviews preliminary data demonstrating the feasibility of performing real-time elastography during endobronchial US (EBUS) and a potential application of this technique for selection of LNs for EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with lung cancer and extrathoracic malignancies. PMID:27503154

  1. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years, from being a supplementary diagnostic aid available only in large medical centers to being a core diagnostic and therapeutic tool that is widely available. Although formal recommendations and practice guidelines have not been developed, there are considerable data supporting the use of EUS for its technical accuracy in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary and gastrointestinal pathology. Endosonography is now routine practice not only for pathologic diagnosis and tumor staging but also for drainage of cystic lesions and celiac plexus neurolysis. In this article, we cover the use of EUS in biliary and pancreatic intervention, ablative therapy, enterostomy, and vascular intervention. PMID:27118942

  2. Integrated medical school ultrasound: development of an ultrasound vertical curriculum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physician-performed focused ultrasonography is a rapidly growing field with numerous clinical applications. Focused ultrasound is a clinically useful tool with relevant applications across most specialties. Ultrasound technology has outpaced the education, necessitating an early introduction to the technology within the medical education system. There are many challenges to integrating ultrasound into medical education including identifying appropriately trained faculty, access to adequate resources, and appropriate integration into existing medical education curricula. As focused ultrasonography increasingly penetrates academic and community practices, access to ultrasound equipment and trained faculty is improving. However, there has remained the major challenge of determining at which level is integrating ultrasound training within the medical training paradigm most appropriate. Methods The Ohio State University College of Medicine has developed a novel vertical curriculum for focused ultrasonography which is concordant with the 4-year medical school curriculum. Given current evidenced-based practices, a curriculum was developed which provides medical students an exposure in focused ultrasonography. The curriculum utilizes focused ultrasonography as a teaching aid for students to gain a more thorough understanding of basic and clinical science within the medical school curriculum. The objectives of the course are to develop student understanding in indications for use, acquisition of images, interpretation of an ultrasound examination, and appropriate decision-making of ultrasound findings. Results Preliminary data indicate that a vertical ultrasound curriculum is a feasible and effective means of teaching focused ultrasonography. The foreseeable limitations include faculty skill level and training, initial cost of equipment, and incorporating additional information into an already saturated medical school curriculum. Conclusions Focused

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  4. What's new in urologic ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Lal, Anupam; Naranje, Priyanka; Pavunesan, Santhosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an imaging technology that has evolved swiftly and has come a long way since its beginnings. It is a commonly used initial diagnostic imaging modality as it is rapid, effective, portable, relatively inexpensive, and causes no harm to human health. In the last few decades, there have been significant technological improvements in the equipment as well as the development of contrast agents that allowed ultrasound to be even more widely adopted for urologic imaging. Ultrasound is an excellent guidance tool for an array of urologic interventional procedures and also has therapeutic application in the form of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for tumor ablation. This article focuses on the recent advances in ultrasound technology and its emerging clinical applications in urology. PMID:26166960

  5. Doppler ultrasound studies in pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Tinkanen, H; Kujansuu, E

    1992-01-01

    Ten women with tubo-ovarian abscess caused by pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) were investigated by transvaginal Doppler ultrasound during the acute and healing phases of the infection. The pulsatility index (PI) of the uterine arteries was measured and compared with the values obtained from 19 healthy women. Each control patient was investigated three times during a single menstrual cycle. In PID patients, the PI values were significantly lower than in controls in the same phase of the menstrual cycle. When C-reactive protein was > 50, the PI values were lowest and reverted to normal values when the infection subsided. In a case of chronic infection, the PI did not rise to normal despite normal infection parameters. Doppler ultrasound seems to offer a new method of assessing PID. PMID:1487185

  6. Accuracy of ED Bedside Ultrasound for Identification of gallstones: retrospective analysis of 575 studies

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, William; Fox, J. Christian; Potts, Brian; Zlidenny, Alexander; McDonough, JoAnne; Anderson, Craig L.; Larson, Jarrod; Barajas, Graciela; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the ability of emergency department (ED) physicians to diagnose cholelithiasis with bedside ultrasound. Methods ED gallbladder ultrasounds recorded over 37 months were compared to radiology ultrasound interpretation. Results Of 1,690 ED gallbladder ultrasound scans performed during this period, radiology ultrasound was performed in 575/1690 (34%) cases. ED physician bedside interpretation was 88% sensitive [95% CI, 84–91] and 87% specific [95% CI, 82–91], while positive predictive value (PPV) was 91% [88–94%] and negative predictive value (NPV) was 83% [78–87%], using radiology interpretation as the criterion reference. Conclusion ED physician ultrasound of the gallbladder for cholelithiasis is both sensitive and specific. PMID:19561694

  7. Procedural ultrasound in pediatric patients: techniques and tips for accuracy and safety.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is becoming more prevalent in pediatric emergency departments as a critical adjunct to both diagnosis and procedure guidance. It is cost-effective, safe for unstable patients, and easily repeatable as a patient's clinical status changes. Point-of-care ultrasound does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation and may care ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine is relatively new, the body of literature evaluating its utility is small, but growing. Data from adult emergency medicine, radiology, critical care, and anesthesia evaluating the utility of ultrasound guidance must be extrapolated to pediatric emergency medicine. This issue will review the adult literature and the available pediatric literature comparing ultrasound guidance to more traditional approaches. Methods for using ultrasound guidance to perform various procedures, and the pitfalls associated with each procedure, will also be described. PMID:27232771

  8. [The efficacy of ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block with hockey stick typed probe].

    PubMed

    Iwase, Naoto; Fukui, Hidekimi; Yuunaiyama, Youko; Kaneko, Kouki; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block with a hockey stick typed probe in plane approach. Individual difference of infraorbital anatomy makes it difficult to puncture the infraorbital for a man, and the risks include bleeding, double vision and paranasal sinus puncture. The advantage of ultrasound-guided nerve block has been reported. Compared with conventional land mark method approach, ultrasound technique is thought to be easy to perform, more quickly and safely without any complications. From our results, we have demonstrated that ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block assisted by hockey stick typed probe could become one of the safe methods for this purpose. PMID:24228458

  9. Active ultrasound pattern injection system (AUSPIS) for interventional tool guidance.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M

    2014-01-01

    Accurate tool tracking is a crucial task that directly affects the safety and effectiveness of many interventional medical procedures. Compared to CT and MRI, ultrasound-based tool tracking has many advantages, including low cost, safety, mobility and ease of use. However, surgical tools are poorly visualized in conventional ultrasound images, thus preventing effective tool tracking and guidance. Existing tracking methods have not yet provided a solution that effectively solves the tool visualization and mid-plane localization accuracy problem and fully meets the clinical requirements. In this paper, we present an active ultrasound tracking and guiding system for interventional tools. The main principle of this system is to establish a bi-directional ultrasound communication between the interventional tool and US imaging machine within the tissue. This method enables the interventional tool to generate an active ultrasound field over the original imaging ultrasound signals. By controlling the timing and amplitude of the active ultrasound field, a virtual pattern can be directly injected into the US machine B mode display. In this work, we introduce the time and frequency modulation, mid-plane detection, and arbitrary pattern injection methods. The implementation of these methods further improves the target visualization and guiding accuracy, and expands the system application beyond simple tool tracking. We performed ex vitro and in vivo experiments, showing significant improvements of tool visualization and accurate localization using different US imaging platforms. An ultrasound image mid-plane detection accuracy of ±0.3 mm and a detectable tissue depth over 8.5 cm was achieved in the experiment. The system performance is tested under different configurations and system parameters. We also report the first experiment of arbitrary pattern injection to the B mode image and its application in accurate tool tracking. PMID:25337784

  10. Active Ultrasound Pattern Injection System (AUSPIS) for Interventional Tool Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate tool tracking is a crucial task that directly affects the safety and effectiveness of many interventional medical procedures. Compared to CT and MRI, ultrasound-based tool tracking has many advantages, including low cost, safety, mobility and ease of use. However, surgical tools are poorly visualized in conventional ultrasound images, thus preventing effective tool tracking and guidance. Existing tracking methods have not yet provided a solution that effectively solves the tool visualization and mid-plane localization accuracy problem and fully meets the clinical requirements. In this paper, we present an active ultrasound tracking and guiding system for interventional tools. The main principle of this system is to establish a bi-directional ultrasound communication between the interventional tool and US imaging machine within the tissue. This method enables the interventional tool to generate an active ultrasound field over the original imaging ultrasound signals. By controlling the timing and amplitude of the active ultrasound field, a virtual pattern can be directly injected into the US machine B mode display. In this work, we introduce the time and frequency modulation, mid-plane detection, and arbitrary pattern injection methods. The implementation of these methods further improves the target visualization and guiding accuracy, and expands the system application beyond simple tool tracking. We performed ex vitro and in vivo experiments, showing significant improvements of tool visualization and accurate localization using different US imaging platforms. An ultrasound image mid-plane detection accuracy of ±0.3 mm and a detectable tissue depth over 8.5 cm was achieved in the experiment. The system performance is tested under different configurations and system parameters. We also report the first experiment of arbitrary pattern injection to the B mode image and its application in accurate tool tracking. PMID:25337784