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Sample records for complejo articular temporomandibular

  1. Absence of the articular disc in the tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Sugisaki, M; Abe, S

    2013-12-01

    The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint is a constant structure in mammals. According to Parsons' report in 1900, however, it is absent in four animals: the armadillo, two kinds of monotremes and the Tasmanian devil. Thereafter, no research was performed to confirm this observation. The aim of this study was to determine by anatomical and histological examination whether the Tasmanian devil has an articular disc in its temporomandibular joint. Six fresh frozen corpses and one dry skull of Tasmanian devils were obtained from the School of Zoology, University of Tasmania. The corpses were dissected and the morphology of the temporomandibular joint was carefully observed by gross anatomical and histological examination. The structure of the temporomandibular joint of the dry skull was examined macroscopically and by micro-computed tomography. In all cases, absence of the articular disc in the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint was morphologically confirmed. The surface layer of both the condyle and the glenoid fossa comprised a thick fibrous tissue. Micro-computed tomography revealed dense and fine trabecular bone in the condyle. The thick fibrous tissue covering the condyle and high-density trabecular bone in the condyle might play a role in absorption against powerful mastication and heavy loading of the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint. PMID:23438215

  2. The relationship between the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and jaw muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Schmolke, C

    1994-01-01

    The anatomy of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its possible relationships to other structures near the joint are not fully understood. A 3-dimensional analysis based on sagittal, frontal and horizontal serial sections through the human temporomandibular joint region was therefore undertaken. Capsular elements which directly connect the temporal bone with the mandible were seen only on the lateral side of the joint. In the posterior, anterior and medial regions of the joint the upper and lower laminae of the articular disc are attached separately either to the temporal bone or to the mandibular condyle. The shaping of the articular cavities and the texture of the joint capsule permit movements of the articular disc predominantly in the anteromedial direction. On the entire medial side of the joint the articular disc and its capsular attachments are in close contact with the fascia of the lateral pterygoid muscle whereby a small portion of the upper head of this muscle inserts directly into the anteromedial part of the articular disc. Thus both the upper and the lower heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle are likely to influence the position of the articular disc directly during temporomandibular joint movements. Laterally, the articular disc is attached to the fascia of the masseter muscle, and part of the lateral ligament inserts into the temporalis fascia. Since these attachments are relatively weak, neither the temporalis nor the masseter muscles are considered to act directly on the articular disc; instead, via afferents from muscle spindles, they may take part in signalling the position of the temporomandibular joint components, including that of the articular disc. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8014124

  3. Viscoelastic properties of the pig temporomandibular joint articular soft tissues of the condyle and disc.

    PubMed

    Kuboki, T; Shinoda, M; Orsini, M G; Yamashita, A

    1997-11-01

    It has been suggested that a sustained loading condition such as clenching could compress the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articular soft tissues. However, there is still no clear understanding of how the TM joint articular tissues respond under compression. To answer this question, we performed in vitro indentation tests on fresh articular discs and cartilage-bone systems of the condyles of 10 Yorkshire pigs (aged 7 months) using a self-developed indentation tester. The indenter was 5 mm in diameter and was controlled by means of a computer-aided feedback mechanism. Bilateral condyles from the same mandible were uniformly prepared; one was used for measurements under sustained compression (SC) and the other for measurements under intermittent compression (IC). The displacements of the indenter induced by a SC of 10, 20, and 30 Newtons (N, units of force) for 10 min and by an IC, also of 10, 20, and 30 N, with one-second duration and two-second intervals for 10 min were measured by means of a displacement sensor with a resolution of 0.001 mm. From these data, the indentation curves of the articular discs and the cartilage-bone systems were calculated. Both the disc and the articular cartilage showed characteristic displacement vs. time curves-namely, an instantaneous deformation upon load application, followed by a time-dependent creep phase of asymptotically increasing deformation under constant load. However, the indentation curves of the two tissues were not identical: The deformation of the articular cartilage was dose-dependent, but that of the disc was not. Moreover, the articular cartilage deformed significantly less under IC than under SC. This difference was not found in the disc. It can be concluded that both the disc and the articular cartilage of the pig temporomandibular joint have viscoelastic properties against compression; however, the disc is stiffer than the articular cartilage. PMID:9372793

  4. Is Mandibular Fossa Morphology and Articular Eminence Inclination Associated with Temporomandibular Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Akhlaghian, Marzieh; Abolvardi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Finding a significant relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology and the incidence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) may help early prediction and prevention of these problems. Purpose The purpose of the present study was to determine the morphology of mandibular fossa and the articular eminence inclination in patients with TMD and in control group using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method The CBCT data of bilateral TMJs of 40 patients with TMD and 23 symptom-free cases were evaluated. The articular eminence inclination, as well as the glenoid fossa depth and width of the mandibular fossa were measured. The paired t-test was used to compare these values between two groups. Results The articular eminence inclination and glenoid fossa width and depth were significantly higher in patients with TMD than in the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The articular eminence inclination was steeper in patients with TMD than in the control group. Glenoid fossa width and depth were higher in patients with TMD than that in the control group. This information may shed light on the relationship between TMJ morphology and the incidence of TMD. PMID:27284559

  5. Fracture of the articular disc in the temporomandibular joint: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    An, S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Disc fracture of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a little-known pathological condition owing to its extreme rarity. We report two cases of elderly patients who were diagnosed with disc fracture of the TMJ based on MRI, and we review related reports. On physical examination, an incomplete bite and mild joint pain were observed on the affected side in both patients. An MRI showed a complete fracture in the intermediate zone of the articular disc in the TMJ; the posterior fragment was displaced posteriorly, causing occlusal change in the closed position of the condyle and an incomplete bite. Conservative treatment including manual manipulation, physical therapy and oral appliance had no effect on the occlusal abnormality. Although the inciting cause of the disc fracture remained unclear, the degenerative changes in the joint may have been a factor by increasing the brittleness and reducing the elasticity of the disc. PMID:25308829

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Condylar Changes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement and Articular Disc Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Joao Roberto; Wolford, Larry Miller; Cassano, Daniel Serra; da Porciuncula, Guilherme; Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate condylar changes 1 year after bimaxillary surgical advancement with or without articular disc repositioning using longitudinal quantitative measurements in 3-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) models. Methods Twenty-seven patients treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) underwent cone-beam computed tomography before surgery immediately after surgery and at 1-year follow-up. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging before surgery to assess disc displacements. Ten patients without disc displacement received MMA only. Seventeen patients with articular disc displacement received MMA with simultaneous TMJ disc repositioning (MMA-Drep). Pre- and postsurgical 3D models were superimposed using a voxel-based registration on the cranial base. Results The location, direction, and magnitude of condylar changes were displayed and quantified by graphic semitransparent overlays and 3D color-coded surface distance maps. Rotational condylar displacements were similar in the 2 groups. Immediately after surgery, condylar translational displacements of at least 1.5 mm occurred in a posterior, superior, or mediolateral direction in patients treated with MMA, whereas patients treated with MMA-Drep presented more marked anterior, inferior, and mediolateral condylar displacements. One year after surgery, more than half the patients in the 2 groups presented condylar resorptive changes of at least 1.5 mm. Patients treated with MMA-Drep presented condylar bone apposition of at least 1.5 mm at the superior surface in 26.4%, the anterior surface in 23.4%, the posterior surface in 29.4%, the medial surface in 5.9%, or the lateral surface in 38.2%, whereas bone apposition was not observed in patients treated with MMA. Conclusions One year after surgery, condylar resorptive changes greater than 1.5 mm were observed in the 2 groups. Articular disc repositioning facilitated bone apposition in localized condylar regions in patients treated with MMA

  7. Relationship of articular soft tissue contour and shape to the underlying eminence and slope profile in young adult temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Pullinger, A G; Bibb, C A; Ding, X; Baldioceda, F

    1993-11-01

    This study examined whether the overall shape of the articular soft tissue overlying the posterior slope and articular eminence of the temporal bone could be predicted by the underlying osseous contour in a histologic model of 51 central sagittal sections of young adult temporomandibular joints. Articular soft tissue and bone contours were traced, and osseous landmarks identified on the basis of joint geometry. Soft tissue thickness measurements were made under low power light microscopy. Seven categories of articular soft tissue pattern were identified. The soft tissue uniformly followed the osseous contour in only one (14%). A progressive increase in soft tissue thickness from the middle of the posterior slope to the articular crest was the most common pattern (35%) but did not describe most of the sample that was more asymmetric. Pattern was poorly predicted by the shape and slope of the temporal bone outline or by dental factors that describe anterior guidance and did not relate to disk displacement. The articular soft tissue compensated for flatter eminence slopes and osseous irregularities and maintained an intact surface. This study has clinical implications for radiographic interpretation of disk space, condyle translation pathways, and the integrity of the functional articular surface. PMID:8247507

  8. Evaluation of Pain Regression in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction Treated by Intra-Articular Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regression of temporomandibular pain as a result of intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction previously subjected to prosthetic treatment. Materials and Methods. The baseline study material consisted of 10 patients, both males and females, aged 28 to 53 years, previously treated due to painful temporomandibular joint dysfunction using occlusal splints. All patients were carried out to a specialist functional assessment of the dysfunction using the Polish version of the RDC/TMD questionnaire axis I and II. Intra-articular injections were preceded by a preparation of PRP. The injection sites were determined by the method used during arthroscopic surgical procedures. Following aspiration, 0.5 mL of plasma was injected into each temporomandibular joint. Results. The comparison of the intensity of pain during all examinations suggests a beneficial effect of the procedure being performed as the mean VAS score was 6.5 at examination I, 2.8 at examination II, and 0.6 at examination III. Conclusion. Application of the intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma into the temporomandibular joints has a positive impact on the reduction of the intensity of pain experienced by patients treated for temporomandibular joint dysfunction. PMID:25157351

  9. Primary intra- and juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical analysis of 8 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Qiu, Ya-Ting; Qiu, Wei-Liu; Zheng, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze primary intra- and juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint. Patients and methods: This study retrospectively reviewed eight patients (seven venous malformations and one lymphatico-venous malformation) who were treated for intra- or juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint from November 2005 to January 2011. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively. Results: According to MRI findings, vascular malformations involving TMJ could be divided into 3 types; homogenous, lacunar and mixed types. All patients underwent surgical resection, and the final clinical diagnoses were confirmed by postoperative histopathology and immunohistochemical examinations. All treated patients had no clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence. Conclusion: Owing to the lower incidence and nonspecific clinical presentations, preoperative diagnosis of vascular malformations involving the TMJ region is very difficult. The classification based on MRI manifestations is proposed first, then it may greatly help in the initial diagnosis. Surgical resection is considered the first option for these TMJ lesions with excellent results. PMID:25932158

  10. Effects of mandibular advancement surgery on the temporomandibular joint and muscular and articular adaptive changes-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bermell-Baviera, A; Bellot-Arcís, C; Montiel-Company, J M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the anatomical changes to the condyle and articular disc following mandibular advancement surgery, the adaptation of the masticatory muscles, and the improvement or worsening of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with pre-existing disorders and those who developed them following surgery. Four databases were searched systematically: PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane Library. Of the 544 articles initially selected, 219 were duplicates and a further 165 were excluded on the basis of their titles and abstracts. On reading the full text, 89 were excluded because they were of no interest and 43 because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the remaining 28 articles, six were excluded because they were considered of low quality and 22 articles were reviewed. Mandibular advancement surgery with condyle repositioning is associated with less TMD. Condylar resorption is a physiological process with a multifactorial aetiology. It is accelerated following mandibular advancement surgery but is not a contraindication to this procedure. Despite the large number of studies on the effects of mandibular advancement surgery on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), this surgery can neither be said to improve nor to worsen TMJ health. PMID:26644217

  11. Ultrastructure of the articular surface of the condyle in temporomandibular arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Toller, P A; Wilcox, J H

    1978-02-01

    The ultrastructure of the surface of normal human mandibular condyles is described and compared with specimens from condyles in cases of degenerative joint disease (arthropathy). Normal surfaces exhibited a nearly structurless layer about 2 microns thick, which seemed to correspond with the lamina splendens of other joints. The underlying structure of dense interlacing bundles of collagen is described. Surfaces of all pathologic condyles showed loss of lamina splendens, alteration of collagen size, and evidence of dissociation of both the collagen and its surrounding ground substance. Deeper levels showed aggregations of bizarre structures, which the authors term "vermiform bodies," and which appear to be collections of abnormal amounts and types of elastic tissue. Its distribution suggests a stress elastosis, which may contribute to the loss of mechanical integrity of articular surfaces in arthropathy. The surface changes may be reflected at the clinical level as impairment of the normal low-friction qualities of joint components associated with limitation of movement and joint sounds. PMID:272604

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Yura, Shinya; Nobata, Koji; Shima, Tsuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing a perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is poor with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We recently reported that a high signal-intensity area is usually found on fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI in the joint space between the articular disc and cartilage surface in joints in which the disc is displaced. A discrete image with an area of high signal-intensity in the middle of the articular disc may indicate perforation or rupture. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of diagnosis of a perforated articular disc by fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI with that of arthroscopy. We studied 50 joints in 50 patients with closed lock of the TMJ who were examined with MRI and then by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope. The agreement between the two methods of diagnosis was assessed using the κ coefficient. Evidence of perforation of the disc on MRI and arthroscopically was found in the same 7 joints; there was complete concordance (κ=1.00, p<0.001). The accuracy of diagnosis of perforation of a disc by fat-saturated MRI was therefore the same as that by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope. PMID:21723011

  13. Comparative study in patients with symptomatic internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: analgesic outcomes of arthrocentesis with or without intra-articular morphine and tramadol.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, A; Satilmis, T; Basa, S

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to find out whether pain was better controlled if morphine or tramadol was injected intra-articularly after arthrocentesis with Ringer's lactate in patients with painful temporomandibular joints (TMJ). This placebo-controlled, double-blind study involved 30 patients who had not responded to conservative treatment and who were divided randomly into 3 groups of 10 patients each. All patients had arthrocentesis, and the drugs were given as intra-articular injections immediately after the procedure. One group was give 5% Ringer's lactate 1ml, the second morphine 1mg, and the third tramadol 50mg. Visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain were recorded at maximum mouth opening and at rest before intra-articular injection and after 15 and 30min; at 1, 2, 3, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48h; and at 1, 3, and 6 monthly follow-up. The mean (SD) VAS decreased from 6.90 (1.45) to 2.6 (2.5) in the control group, from 7.30 (1.64) to 1.20 (0.79) in the morphine group (p=0.005), and from 7.10 (1.73) to 1.50 (1.78) in the tramadol group (p=0.005). We conclude that morphine given by intra-articular injection after arthrocentesis gives a significant, sustained (6 months) improvement in pain relief compared with simple arthrocentesis alone. The effect was similar with tramadol except that it was shorter lived. PMID:25623934

  14. Expression of lumican related to CD34 and VEGF in the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Kiga, N.; Tojyo, I.; Matsumoto, T.; Hiraishi, Y.; Shinohara, Y.; Fujita, S.

    2010-01-01

    Lumican belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan (SLRP) gene family and has been reported to exist in the cornea, intervertebral disc and tendon. Lumican plays a significant role in the assembly and regulation of collagen fibres. The human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is made up of fibrocartilage with an extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen and proteoglycans. The existence and behaviour of lumican have not been studied in the human TMJ disc. Therefore, we used immunohistochemical methods to detect lumican, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and histochemical staining with toluidine blue in 13 human TMJ specimens (10 surgically removed and 3 obtained from autopsy). In both normal and deformed discs we observed staining with toluidine blue. We found that the area of metachromasia inside the deformed disc was uneven and expression of lumican was strong in the areas negative for metachromasia. Staining of VEGF and CD34 inside the deformed disc was seen. We confirmed the expression of lumican in the human TMJ disc and showed that a large number of fibroblast-like cells existed in the area of strong lumican expression. These new findings about the behaviour of lumican suggest that it may play a key role in the generation of a new collagen network by fibroblast-like cells. PMID:20819773

  15. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  16. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  17. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  18. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Frederick; Steinkeler, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease process caused by muscle hyperfunction or parafunction, traumatic injuries, hormonal influences, and articular changes. Symptoms of TMD include decreased mandibular range of motion, muscle and joint pain, joint crepitus, and functional limitation or deviation of jaw opening. Only after failure of noninvasive options should more invasive and nonreversible treatments be initiated. Treatment can be divided into noninvasive, minimally invasive, and invasive options. Temporomandibular joint replacement is reserved for severely damaged joints with end-stage disease that has failed all other more conservative treatment modalities. PMID:23809304

  19. Effects of several temporomandibular disorders on the stress distributions of temporomandibular joint: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Qian, Yingli; Zhang, Yuanli; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate stress distributions in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) for comparison with healthy TMJs. A model of mandible and normal TMJs was developed according to CT images. The interfaces between the discs and the articular cartilages were treated as contact elements. Nonlinear cable elements were used to simulate disc attachments. Based on this model, seven models of various TMDs were established. The maximum stresses of the discs with anterior, posterior, medial and lateral disc displacement (ADD, PDD, MDD and LDD) were 12.09, 9.33, 10.71 and 6.07 times magnitude of the identically normal disc, respectively. The maximum stresses of the posterior articular eminences in ADD, PDD, MDD, LDD, relaxation of posterior attachments and disc perforation models were 21, 59, 46, 21, 13 and 15 times greater than the normal model, respectively. TMDs could cause increased stresses in the discs and posterior articular eminences. PMID:25587737

  20. Morphological characteristics of the temporomandibular joint in the pouch young of the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Kawashima, S; Amemiya, T

    2015-04-01

    We recently reported the absence of the articular disc, which is a constant structure in mammals, in the temporomandibular joint of the adult Tasmanian devil. However, whether the articular disc disappears with growth of the animal was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pouch young of the Tasmanian devil has the articular disc. The temporomandibular joint of a fresh carcass of the pouch young, whose crown-rump length was 43 mm, was examined microscopically and by microcomputed tomography. The absence of the articular disc in the pouch young temporomandibular joint was histologically confirmed. It is suggested that the articular disc of the Tasmanian devil is naturally absent. PMID:24809824

  1. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  2. Temporomandibular joint disorders' impact on pain, function, and disability.

    PubMed

    Chantaracherd, P; John, M T; Hodges, J S; Schiffman, E L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders ("TMJ intra-articular status"), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability ("TMD impact"). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject's most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, -0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. PMID:25572112

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008 Previous Next Related Articles: Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) Are You Biting Off More Than You Can Chew? Equilibration May Lessen TMD Pain Fender-benders: Source of TMD? First Comes ...

  5. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  6. Temporomandibular joint involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pallak; Amarnath, Janardhan; Ravindra, Setru Veerabhadrappa; Rallan, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has varied from 4% to 35%. It is more common in men and produces generalised stiffness in involved joints. Clinician should be suspicious of AS when a patient reports with painful restricted movements of joint, neck or back and with no trauma history. Conventional radiographic methods have allowed the demonstration of TMJ abnormalities in patients with AS, but CT is necessary to establish joint space relations and bony morphology. We describe a case of severe AS with TMJ involvement in a 40-year-old female patient and demonstrated TMJ changes on CT. A CT was able to demonstrate articular cartilage changes, disc- and joint abnormalities. Thus, if conventional radiographs in a symptomatic patient with rheumatic diseases are unable to demonstrate changes, CT can provide valuable additional information of the changes in the TMJ. PMID:23645650

  7. Imaging the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Katzberg, R.W.; Manzione, J.V.; Westesson, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book encompasses all imaging modalities as they apply to the Temporomandibular Joint and its disorders. The volume employs correlative line drawings to elaborate on diagnostic images. It helps teach methods of TMJ imaging and describes findings identified by different imaging modalities to both radiologists and dental clinicians.

  8. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  9. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  10. Fibrous Ankylosis of the Temporomandibular Joint in a Young Child.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nigel R; Meena, Manoj; Dinkar, Ajit D; Khorate, Manisha M

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an intracapsular union of the disccondyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between the condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and articular eminence. The leading causes include trauma and infection. It can be a serious and disabling condition that leads to difficulties in mastication, swallowing, speaking, esthetics and oral hygiene. Disturbances of facial and mandibular growth and acute compromise of the airway invariably result in physical and psychological disability. Treatment should be initiated as soon as the condition is recognized, with the main objective of re-establishing joint function and harmonious jaw function. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of unilateral fibrous ankylosis of the right TMJ in a three-year-old girl. PMID:26349799

  11. Clinical treatment of a ruptured temporomandibular joint disc: morphological changes at 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Lucas; Porto, Felipe; Agarwal, Sachin; Grossman, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is a disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This case report chronicles the diagnosis and treatment of a patient for whom this pathological condition was accompanied by a rupture of the articular disc. The patient presented with loud sounds in the left TMJ and an irregular mandibular occlusal plane due to condylar intrusion in the glenoid fossa on the ipsilateral side. A noninvasive treatment was selected. A 4-month follow-up revealed remission of the articular sounds, and tissue regeneration was noted. These improvements remained visible at 5-year follow-up. PMID:24598507

  12. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  13. Temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  14. Stem Cells for Temporomandibular Joint Repair and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shipin; Yap, Adrian U J; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) represent a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles and/or associated structures. They are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain. As a group, they are often multi-factorial in nature and have no common etiology or biological explanations. TMD can be broadly divided into masticatory muscle and TMJ disorders. TMJ disorders are characterized by intra-articular positional and/or structural abnormalities. The most common type of TMJ disorders involves displacement of the TMJ articular disc that precedes progressive degenerative changes of the joint leading to osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, progress made in the development of stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering have provided alternative methods to attenuate the disease symptoms and even replace the diseased tissue in the treatment of TMJ disorders. Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from the synovia of TMJ, suggesting an important role in the repair and regeneration of TMJ. The seminal discovery of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have provided promising cell sources for drug discovery, transplantation as well as for tissue engineering of TMJ condylar cartilage and disc. This review discusses the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based treatments for TMJ disorders through innovative approaches of cell-based therapeutics, tissue engineering and drug discovery. PMID:26123357

  15. Posttraumatic temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Helen E; Quinn, Peter D; Granquist, Eric; Chou, Joli C

    2009-05-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has many essential functions. None of its components are exempt from injury. Facial asymmetry, malocclusion, disturbances in growth, osteoarthritis, and ankylosis can manifest as complications from trauma to the TMJ. The goals of initial treatment include achievement of pretraumatic function, restoration of facial symmetry, and resolution of pain. These same objectives hold true for late repairs and reconstruction of the TMJ apparatus. Treatment is demanding, and with opposing approaches. The following article explores various treatment options for problems presenting as a result of a history of trauma to the TMJ. PMID:22110802

  16. Temporomandibular disorders and headaches.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Bassiur, Jennifer P

    2014-05-01

    Headache and temporomandibular disorders should be treated together but separately. If there is marked limitation of opening, imaging of the joint may be necessary. The treatment should then include education regarding limiting jaw function, appliance therapy, instruction in jaw posture, and stretching exercises, as well as medications to reduce inflammation and relax the muscles. The use of physical therapies, such as spray and stretch and trigger point injections, is helpful if there is myofascial pain. Tricyclic antidepressants and the new-generation antiepileptic drugs are effective in muscle pain conditions. Arthrocentesis and/or arthroscopy may help to restore range of motion. PMID:24703543

  17. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. PMID:27475510

  18. Role of Articular Disc in Condylar Regeneration of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hidetaka; Fujita, Tadashi; ShIrakura, Maya; Tsuka, Yuji; Fujii, Eri; Terao, Akiko; Tanimoto, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    The articular disc in the temporomandibular joint plays an important role in mandibular growth. Functional appliances induce regeneration of the condyle even after condylectomy. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the articular disc in regeneration of the condyle after unilateral condylectomy with use of a functional appliance in growing rats. Fifty growing rats were subjected to unilateral condylectomy and then half of them underwent discectomy. The functional appliance was applied to half of the rats in each group to induce regeneration of the condyle. Four and eight weeks later, morphometric and histologic analyses of the mandible were performed. Regeneration of the condyle was demonstrated in the two condylectomy groups. In the condylectomy+appliance group, the shape and cartilage of the condyle were equivalent to a normal condyle. However, regeneration of the condyle was not observed in the two discectomy groups even with the use of the functional appliance. The articular disc appears to be crucial in the regeneration of a damaged condyle, suggesting that defects or damage to the articular disc may influence mandibular growth and regeneration or repair of the condyle. PMID:25030880

  19. Myofascial Temporomandibular Disorder.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, César; Svensson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been discussed for more than 70 years without reaching consensus on causes, etiological factors, pathophysiology, or rationale management. Indeed, TMD pain remains an enigma and a diagnostic and management challenge for many clinicians. Perhaps the many and often conflicting views on TMD pain by different health care providers are routed in professional traditions, personal beliefs, experience, and clinical training. This review aims to provide an updated and critical discussion on what is known and supported by scientific evidence about myofascial TMD pain and which gaps there still may be in our understanding of this condition. It has not been the intention to make a systematic review on all aspects of TMD but rather to point out some of the more recent (and important) pieces of information that may help us to better appreciate TMD pain as a complex and multifaceted pain disorder manifested in the craniofacial system. PMID:26717949

  20. Temporomandibular joints: high-resolution computed tomographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was performed in 43 patients. Exquisite detail of the face, skull base, and TMJs was obtained with CT using soft tissue and bone algorithms, narrow collimation, and multiplanar images. In 10 patients clinically suspected of joint derangement, CT results were in close agreement with surgical findings and arthrography in 13/15 joints. CT showed indirect signs of disc dislocation, and the dislocated disc itself in 81% of affected joints. In two patients, arthrography with CT proved to be more helpful than conventional arthrography alone. CT without intra-articular contrast material provided information not appreciated on conventional radiogaphs in 28 patients (65%) and was particularly helpful in evaluating patients with disc pathosis and trauma. Early experience with CT of the TMJ shows that it is an excellent method of evaluation at acceptable radiation exposure levels that adds essential information not seen on standard radiographs.

  1. Genetic Influences on Temporomandibular Joint Development and Growth.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J; Jing, Junjun; Feng, Jian Q

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small synovial joint at which the mandible articulates with the skull during movements involved in speaking and mastication. However, the secondary cartilage lining its joint surfaces is indicative of a very different developmental history than limb cartilages. This review summarizes our current knowledge of genes that regulate the formation of primary components of the TMJ, as well as genes that regulate postnatal growth of the TMJ. Although the TMJ is regulated by some of the same genes that are important in limb joints, others appear unique to the TMJ or have different actions. Runx2, Sox9, and members of the TGF-β/BMP family are critical drivers of chondrogenesis during condylar cartilage morphogenesis, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is important for formation of the articular disc and cavitation. Osterix (Osx) is a critical regulator of endochondral bone formation during postnatal TMJ growth. PMID:26589922

  2. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  3. Early-onset osteoarthritis of mouse temporomandibular joint induced by partial discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, L.; Polur, I.; Lim, C.; Servais, J. M.; Dobeck, J.; Li, Y.; Olsen, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study is to characterize mouse temporomandibular joint (TMJ) following partial discectomy, since there is no documentation of whether or not partial discectomy can induce early-onset osteoarthritis (OA) in mouse TMJ. Methods Partial discs of TMJ in mice were removed by microsurgery. Histology was performed to characterize articular cartilages from the TMJ of mice. The morphology of the articular cartilages was evaluated using a modified Mankin scoring system. Immunohistostaining was carried out to examine the expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), a type II collagen receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13), and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in the articular cartilage of condyles from the mouse TMJ. Results Articular cartilage degeneration was seen in the mouse TMJ post discectomy, including increased proteoglycan staining in the extracellular matrix at 4 weeks, the appearance of chondrocyte clusters at 8 weeks, reduced proteoglycan staining and fibrillation at 12 weeks and the loss of articular cartilage at 16 weeks. Increased immunostaining for Ddr2, Mmp-13, and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments was detected. Conclusion Results indicate that partial discectomy induces early-onset OA in mouse TMJ and that increased expression of Mmp-13, likely due to the elevated expression of Ddr2, may be one of the factors responsible for the early-onset OA in mouse TMJ. PMID:19230720

  4. Human temporomandibular joint morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carini, Francesco; Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Caradonna, Carola; Messina, Pietro; Valenza, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphogenesis was studied. Ranging in age of fetuses examined was from 6 to14 weeks' gestation. Our results showed the condyle so first element that appear between 6 degrees and 8 degrees week (condylar blastema). After a week appear temporal elements. Disk appear at the same time of glenoid blastema and it reaches an advanced differentation before of the condyle and temporal element, so these don't effect machanical compression on mesenchyma where we find the disk. So we think that the disk result of genetic expression and it isn't the result of mechanical compression. The inferior joint cavity appear to 12 week. The superior joint cavity appear to 13-14 week. In conclusion, the appearance of the condyle is the first event during TMJ morphogenesis, with its initial bud, in form of a mesenchymal thickening, becoming detectable between the sixth and eight week of development, when all the large joints of the limbs are already well defined. PMID:18333411

  5. On the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint and the muscles that act upon it: observations on the gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus.

    PubMed

    El Adli, Joseph J; Deméré, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    The temporomandibular joint and its associated musculature are described in a neonate gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) and serve as the basis for direct anatomical comparisons with the temporomandibular region in other clades of baleen whales (Mysticeti). Members of the right whale/bowhead whale clade (Balaenidae) are known to possess a synovial lower jaw joint, while members of the rorqual clade (Balaenopteridae) have a nonsynovial temporomandibular joint characterized by a highly flexible fibrocartilaginous pad and no joint capsule. In contrast, the gray whale possesses a modified temporomandibular joint (intermediate condition), with a vestigial joint cavity lacking a fibrous capsule, synovial membrane, and articular disk. In addition, the presence of a rudimentary fibrocartilaginous pad appears to be homologous to that seen in balaenopterid mysticetes. The intrinsic temporomandibular musculature in the gray whale was found to include a multibellied superficial masseter and a single-bellied deep masseter. The digastric and internal pterygoid muscles in E. robustus are enlarged relative to the condition documented in species of Balaenoptera. A relatively complex insertion of the temporalis muscle on the dentary is documented in the gray whale and the low, knob-like process on the gray whale dentary is determined to be homologous with the prominent coronoid process of rorquals. Comparison with the anatomy of the temporomandibular musculature in rorquals reveals an increased importance of alpha rotation of the dentary in the gray whale. This difference in muscular morphology and lines of muscle action is interpreted as representing adaptations for suction feeding. PMID:25737135

  6. Pharmacologic Treatment for Temporomandibular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Dym, Harry; Bowler, Dustin; Zeidan, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacologic agents play an integral role in the overall management of temporomandibular joint disorder. The general dentist should be familiar with the different classes of drugs currently in use for dealing with this often complex medical/dental problem. PMID:27040290

  7. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  8. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tatsurou; Konoo, Tetsuro; Habu, Manabu; Oda, Masafumi; Kito, Shinji; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Nishida, Ikuko; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Saeki, Katsura; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Terashita, Masamichi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a “double contour-like structure” (DCLS) of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated. PMID:23316233

  9. Inaudible temporomandibular joint vibrations.

    PubMed

    Widmalm, Sven E; Bae, Hanna E K; Djurdjanovic, Dragan; McKay, Duane C

    2006-07-01

    The aim was to test the hypothesis that inaudible vibrations with significant amounts of energy increasing during jaw movements can be recorded in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) area. Twenty one subjects, who could perform wide opening movements without feeling discomfort, 12 with and 9 without TMJ sounds audible at conventional auscultation with a stethoscope, were included. Recordings were made during opening-closing, 2/s without tooth contact, and during mandibular rest, using accelerometers with a flat frequency response between the filter cutoff frequencies 0.1 Hz and 1000 Hz. The signals were digitized using a 24 bits card and sampled with the rate 96000 Hz. Power spectral analyses, and independent and paired samples t-tests were used in the analysis of the vibration power observed in frequency bands corresponding to audible and inaudible frequencies. An alpha-level of 5% was chosen for accepting a difference as being significant. In the group with audible sounds, about 47% of the total vibration energy was in the inaudible area below 20 Hz during opening-closing and about 76% during mandibular rest. In the group without audible sounds, the corresponding proportions were significantly different, 85% vs. 69%. The energy content of the vibrations, both those below and those above 20 Hz, increased significantly during jaw movement in both groups. Furthermore, percentage of signal energy above 20 Hz showed a noticeable increase in the group of subjects with audible sounds. This can physically be explained by decreased damping properties of damaged tissues surrounding the TMJ. Vibrations in the TMJ area can be observed with significant portions in the inaudible area below 20 Hz both during mandibular rest and during jaw movements whether or not the subjects have audible joint sounds. Further studies are needed to identify sources and evaluate possible diagnostic value. PMID:16933462

  10. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

    PubMed Central

    PORPORATTI, André Luís; COSTA, Yuri Martins; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; CALDERON, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH) on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I) Muscular TMD (n=64); II) Muscular TMD+PH (n=48); III) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173); IV) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115). All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1) A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2) Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3) no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management. PMID:25004051

  11. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  12. Lubricin protects the temporomandibular joint surfaces from degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adele; Duran, Juanita; Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4-/- mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4-/- mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:25188282

  13. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice

    PubMed Central

    KUMAGAI, KENICHI; SUZUKI, SATSUKI; KANRI, YORIAKI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; FUJII, KEISUKE; WAKE, MASAHIRO; SUZUKI, RYUJI; HAMADA, YOSHIKI

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40–50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:26171147

  14. [Gout in the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Deferm, J T; Barkhuysen, R; de Rooy, J; Coppen, C; Merkx, M Aw

    2016-06-01

    A 76-year-old woman, with a medical history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, presented herself to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon with a sudden pre-auricular swelling of the right temporomandibular joint. As a result of the atypical clinical appearance and signs of local destruction in the initial panoramic x-ray, a malign process was first eliminated from consideration. With the aid of extensive diagnostics and an open biopsy, the diagnosis of gout was established. PMID:27275659

  15. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansur; Schiffman, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) affect 5% to 12% of the United States population. This article discusses common conditions related to temporomandibular joints, including disc displacements, inflammatory disturbances, loose joint bodies, traumatic disturbances, and developmental conditions. Also addressed are the appropriate imaging modalities and diagnostic criteria for TMD. PMID:26614951

  16. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  17. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  18. Evaluation of condylar positions in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mahdavi, Pirooze; Bagherpour, Ali; Darijani, Mansoreh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the condylar position in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and a normal group by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods In the TMD group, 25 patients (5 men and 20 women) were randomly selected among the ones suffering from TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The control group consisted of 25 patients (8 men and 17 women) with normal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) who were referred to the radiology department in order to undergo CBCT scanning for implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. Linear measurements from the superior, anterior, and posterior joint spaces between the condyle and glenoid fossa were made through defined landmarks in the sagittal view. The inclination of articular eminence was also determined. Results The mean anterior joint space was 2.3 mm in the normal group and 2.8 mm in the TMD group, respectively. The results showed that there was a significant correlation between the superior and posterior joint spaces in both the normal and TMD groups, but it was only in the TMD group that the correlation coefficient among the dimensions of anterior and superior spaces was significant. There was a significant correlation between the inclination of articular eminence and the size of the superior and posterior spaces in the normal group. Conclusion The average dimension of the anterior joint space was different between the two groups. CBCT could be considered a useful diagnostic imaging modality for TMD patients. PMID:27358820

  19. [Articular cartilage regeneration using scaffold].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Yoshiyuki; Hattori, Koji; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2008-12-01

    The self-healing capacity of articular cartilage for repair is limited. For articular cartilage injury, several surgical techniques are used in clinical practice, namely drilling, abrasion arthroplasty, microfracture, or autologous osteochondral grafting, while various methods of autologous chondrocyte transplantation to cartilage defect sites have been reported since 1990s. In a case of chondrocyte transplantation to cartilage defect site, the use of proper scaffold is important. Currently, collagen gel or PLGA is used widely as a scaffold. PMID:19043192

  20. The intra-articular distance within the TMJ during free and loaded closing movements.

    PubMed

    Huddleston Slater, J J; Visscher, C M; Lobbezoo, F; Naeije, M

    1999-12-01

    Previous studies on free opening and closing movements of the mandible have demonstrated that the opening movement traces of the condylar kinematic center (i.e., the condylar point for which the protrusive and the opening movement traces coincide) lie closer to the articular eminence than the closing traces. This indicates the presence of an intra-articular distance within the joint during free closing. Since the mandible behaves like a class III biomechanical lever, a counteracting mechanical load on the mandible during closing will press the condyle-disc complex against the articular eminence. Therefore, in this study the hypothesis was tested that the difference between opening and closing movement traces of the kinematic center is reduced when the closing movements are counteracted by a mechanical load. From 10 healthy participants, 20-second movement recordings were obtained by a six-degrees-of-freedom opto-electronic jaw movement recording system (OKAS-3D) for three types of movements: (1) free opening and closing movements, (2) free opening and loaded closing movements (i.e., the participants closed against a small or high manually applied downward-directed force to the chin), and (3) gum chewing. Off-line, the opening and closing movement traces of the kinematic center were reconstructed, and the average difference between the traces (the intra-articular distance) was calculated. The average intraarticular distance was significantly smaller during loaded closing than during free closing, whereas no significant differences were found in the intra-articular distances between the loaded situations of low and high manual loading and contralateral chewing (ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni multiple comparisons of means test, p<0.005). In conclusion, loading of the mandible during closing movements reduces the intra-articular distance within the temporomandibular joint. PMID:10598911

  1. Management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Reza; Mercuri, Louis G

    2015-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a pathologic condition where the mandible is fused to the fossa by bony or fibrotic tissues. This interferes with mastication, speech, oral hygiene, and normal life activities, and can be potentially life threatening when struggling to acquire an airway in an emergency. Trauma is the most common cause of TMJ ankylosis, followed by infection. Diagnosis of TMJ ankylosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging studies. The management goal in TMJ ankylosis is to increase the patient's mandibular function, correct associated facial deformity, decrease pain, and prevent reankylosis. PMID:25483442

  2. [Condylar fracture and temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    This article summarized the advances in treatment and research of temporomandibular joint surgery in the last 5 years which was presented in "The 2nd Condyle Fracture and Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis Symposium". The content includes 5 parts: non-surgical treatment of children condyle fracture and long-term follow-up, the improvement of operative approach for condyle fracture and key techniques, the importance and the method for the simultanesous reduction of disc in condylar fracture treatment, the development of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis similar to hypertrophic non-union and the improved safety and accuracy by applying digital surgery in joint surgery. PMID:26980648

  3. Chitosan-Based Thermosensitive Hydrogel for Controlled Drug Delivery to the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Wael M; Haider, Mohamed; Kawas, Sausan Al; Kandil, Nadia G; Harding, David R K

    2016-05-01

    Intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) and corticosteroids have been extensively used in treating temporomandibular disorders. However, rapid clearance from the site of injection is a major concern that is commonly managed by frequent dosing, which is not without complications. This study aimed to determine the suitability of thermosensitive chitosan-based hydrogels for intra-articular controlled release of drugs in the rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A series of hydrogels were prepared using different chitosan (Ch) to β-glycerophosphate (β-GP) ratios. The gelation time, swelling ratio, the shape, and surface morphology of the prepared gels were investigated to select the formulation with optimum characteristics. The left TMJ in 13 adult male New Zealand white rabbits was injected with 0.2 mL of Chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/HA while the right TMJ was injected with 0.2 mL of control solution of HA. Hyaluronic acid concentrations in experimental and control groups were measured using Hyaluronan Quantikine Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Kit. In vitro characterization showed that both the Ch:β-GP ratio and incorporation of HA had a significant effect on gelation time, degree of swelling, and surface morphology of the hydrogels. No morphological changes were observed in the joints in both groups. The mean concentration of HA in the experimental joints after 7 days (1339.79 ± 244.98 μg/g) was significantly higher than that in the control (474.52 ± 79.36 μg/g). In conclusion, the chitosan-based thermosensitive hydrogel can be considered as a promising controlled drug release system to the TMJ in a rabbit model that would potentially overcome many of the current limitations of intra-articular formulations. PMID:27100649

  4. Temporomandibular juxtaarticular chondroma: case report.

    PubMed

    Vázquez Mahía, Inés; López-Cedrún Cembranos, José Luis; Ferreras Granado, José; Lorenzo Franco, Fernanda

    2007-03-01

    Chondromas are benign tumours composed of mature hyaline cartilage. We present here the first case in the English language medical literature of juxtaarticular chondroma of the temporomandibular joint in the parotid region. Within the rarity of cartilage disorders of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), this particular condition is a diagnostic curiosity. The patient, a 54 year old woman, presented a right preauricular tumour of 3.5 cm. which had been developing for 4 years. It was not painful but there was a recent symptomology of TMJ dysfunction, with pain and clicks. The diagnostic possibilities of a parotid pleomorphic adenoma and of a cartilage tumour of the TMJ suggested a difficult preoperative differential diagnosis, which influenced our approach regarding therapy. The tumour was excised, preserving the parotid gland. This enabled us to confirm the histological diagnosis of chondroma, composed solely of chondroide tissue. We have described the clinical characteristics of our case, and carried out a review of the relevant literature, emphasising the differential diagnoses. PMID:17322809

  5. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  6. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Methods Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Conclusions Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death

  7. The Biomechanical Effect of Different Denture Base Materials on the Articular Disc in Complete Denture Wearers: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    El-Zawahry, Mohamed M.; El-Ragi, Ahmed A.; El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; Ibraheem, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different denture base materials on the stress distribution in TMJ articular disc (AD) in complete denture wearers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A three dimensional Finite Element (FEA) models of an individual temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was built on the basis CT scan. The FEA model consisted of four parts: the condyle, the articular disc, the denture base, and the articular eminence skull. Acrylic resin and chrome-cobalt denture base materials were studied. Static loading of 300N was vertically applied to the central fossa of the mandibular second premolar. Stress and strain were calculated to characterize the stress/strain patterns in the disc. RESULTS: The maximum tensile stresses were observed in the anterior and posterior bands of (AD) on load application with the two denture base materials. The superior boundaries of the glenoid fossa showed lower stress than those on the inferior boundaries facing the condyle. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of the present study it may be concluded that: The denture base material may have an effect in stress-strain pattern in TMJ articular disc. The stiffer denture base material, the better the distribution of the load to the underling mandibular supporting structures & reducing stresses induced in the articular disc. PMID:27275270

  8. Fracture of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chin-Purcell, M V; Lewis, J L

    1996-11-01

    Crack formation and propagation is a significant element of the degeneration process in articular cartilage. In order to understand this process, and separate the relative importance of structural overload and material failure, methods for measuring the fracture toughness of cartilage are needed. In this paper, two such methods are described and used to measure fracture properties of cartilage from the canine patella. A modified single edge notch (MSEN) specimen was used to measure J, and a trouser tear test was used to measure T, both measures of fracture toughness with units of kN/m. A pseudo-elastic modulus was also obtained from the MSEN test. Several potential error sources were examined, and results for the MSEN test compared with another method for measuring the fracture parameter for urethane rubber. Good agreement was found. The two test methods were used to measure properties of cartilage from the patellae of 12 canines: 4-9 specimens from each of 12 patellae, with 5 right-left pairs were tested. Values of J ranged from 0.14-1.2 kN/m. J values correlated with T and were an average of 1.7 times larger than T. A variety of failure responses was seen in the MSEN tests, consequently a grade of 0 to 3 was assigned to each test, where 0 represented a brittle-like crack with minimal opening and 3 represented plastic flow with no crack formation. The initial cracks in 12/82 specimens did not propagate and were assigned to grade 3. The method for reducing data in the MSEN test assumed pseudo-elastic response and could not be used for the grade 3 specimens. Stiffness did not correlate with J. Neither J nor T was statistically different between right-left pairs, but varied between animals. The test methods appear useful for providing a quantitative measure of fracture toughness for cartilage and other soft materials. PMID:8950659

  9. [MRI of the temporomandibular joint--the gold standard].

    PubMed

    Barmeir, E; Teich, S; Gutmcher, Z

    2014-04-01

    MRI has been established as the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), as it allows for a noninvasive detailed evaluation of the joint that is not otherwise available. During the last decade, the introduction of dynamic (cine-mode) MR imaging has made functional evaluation feasible in addition to the morphologic study of the joint. The major advantage of MRI is its ability to study the articular disc and its congruity as well as its location relative to the condyle in both closed- and open-mouth positions. Due to its high contrast resolution, MRI is unique in demonstrating joint effusion, bone edema and sclerosis, rupture of the retrodiscal layers and impairment of the lateral pterigoid muscle. In Mor-Mar Imaging Center we performed during the last two years MRI studies of the TMJ in 234 subjects, 172 (74%) female and 62 (26%) male patients. The average age of the patients was 29 years. In this article we present our experience in the evaluation of TMD and review the main indications and findings. In addition, our experience in optimizing the MRI sequence protocols in both static and dynamic modes are discussed. MRI examinations provide the clinician with anatomic and physiologic information that can guide treatment decisions. It has a special role in monitoring and evaluating treatment results, both conservative and surgical. PMID:25252468

  10. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc. PMID:22582815

  11. Widespread pain in temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pei Feng; Maixner, William; Khan, Asma A

    2011-03-01

    SUMMARY Chronic widespread pain (CWP) represents pain involving several regions of the body. Various psychological and social risk factors such as poor general health status, sleep disturbance, fatigue and high psychological distress have been identified for the development of CWP. Numerous chronic pain conditions are comorbid, resulting in the development of CWP in many of these patients. Temporomandibular disorder is one of the most extensively studied chronic musculoskeletal pain condition in terms of its comorbidity with CWP and fibromyalgia. It has been proposed that these comorbid pain disorders share common denominators, including exposure to certain environmental events, elevated psychological distress, pain amplification and genetic predisposition. Increased awareness of CWP is important for improved diagnoses and more effective pain management. Patients with CWP can be effectively managed in multidisciplinary pain clinics. PMID:24646357

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Amandeep; Naik, Shobha; Pai, Anuradha; Anuradha, Ardra

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT) in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease. PMID:25684928

  13. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  16. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  17. Differences in articular-eminence inclination between medieval and contemporary human populations.

    PubMed

    Kranjčić, Josip; Vojvodić, Denis; Žabarović, Domagoj; Vodanović, Marin; Komar, Daniel; Mehulić, Ketij

    2012-08-01

    The articular-eminence inclination is an important element in the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint and the entire masticatory system; however, very little is known about this inclination in archaeological human populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the values of, in addition to the differences between, the articular-eminence inclination in medieval and contemporary human populations. The study was carried out on two dry skull groups. The first group consisted of 14 dry skulls from the medieval culture group Bijelo Brdo (BB) of East Croatia, and the other consisted of 137 recent dry skulls from the osteologic collection of the Institute of Anatomy (IA) in Zagreb. All BB skulls were dentulous, whereas the IA skulls were divided into dentulous and edentulous groups. The articular-eminence inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal plane on digital images of the skull's two lateral views using AutoCAD computer software. The mean value of the articular-eminence inclination in the BB sample group (49.57°) was lower, with a statistical significance (p<0.01), than those of the IA dentulous (61.56°), the IA edentulous (62.54°), and all the combined IA (61.99°) specimens. Because the values of the articular-eminence inclination can vary a lot with reference to the number of specimens and the different methods used for measuring, the obtained values yield only orientational information. Further investigations including a larger number of medieval specimens are needed to confirm the results obtained from this study. PMID:22721644

  18. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3f/f; Col2a1-CreERT2 (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  19. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3(f/f); Col2a1-CreER(T2) (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  20. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst: a case example and an anatomical explanation to support the articular theory within cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Capek, Stepan; Koutlas, Ioannis G; Strasia, Rhys P; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The authors describe the case of an intraneural ganglion cyst involving a cranial nerve (V3), which was found to have a joint connection in support of an articular origin within the cranial nerves. An inferior alveolar intraneural cyst was incidentally discovered on a plain radiograph prior to edentulation. It was resected from within the mandibular canal with no joint connection perceived at surgery. Histologically, the cyst was confirmed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. Reinterpretation of the preoperative CT scan showed the cyst arising from the temporomandibular joint. This case is consistent with the articular (synovial) theory of intraneural ganglion cysts. An anatomical explanation and potential joint connection are provided for this case as well as several other cases of intraneural cysts in the literature, and thus unifying cranial nerve involvement with accepted concepts of intraneural ganglion cyst formation and propagation. PMID:25658786

  1. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  2. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  3. Anatomy of the temporomandibular joint in the cat: a study by microdissection, cryosection and vascular injection.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Jorge; Agut, Amalia; Rodríguez, María Jesús; Sarriá, Ricardo; Latorre, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    The minute anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is of great clinical relevance in cats owing to a high number of lesions involving this articulation. However, the precise anatomy is poorly documented in textbooks and scientific articles. The aim of this study was to describe, in detail, the TMJ anatomy and its relationship with other adjacent anatomical structures in the cat. Different anatomical preparations, including vascular and articular injection, microdissection, cryosection and plastination, were performed in 12 cadaveric cats. All TMJ anatomical structures were identified and described in detail. A thorough understanding of the TMJ anatomy is essential to understand the clinical signs associated with TMJ disorders, to locate lesions precisely and to accurately interpret the results in all diagnostic imaging techniques. PMID:23015066

  4. Characteristics of temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular joint complaint

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Guo, Xiaoqian; Sun, Xiaoxue; Wang, Ning; Xie, Min; Zhang, Jianqiang; Lv, Yuan; Han, Weili; Hu, Min; Liu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was to investigate whether there was statistical difference between the bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: TMJ CBCT images of 123 cases were used to preliminarily determine the indicators suitable for the measuring method. TMJ CBCT image reconstruction was performed and 19 indicators were measured. Thirty-six cases without TMJ complaint served as controls. The comparison of bilateral TMJs was analyzed by paired t-test to find out the indicators without statistical significance. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds who underwent CBCT at the hospital were enrolled for the comparative study. The measured values were analyzed by paired t-test to determine the indicators with statistical difference. Results: In the control group, only radius value of bilateral TMJ was different statistically (P < 0.05). In the TMJ complaint group, the vertical 60° joint space of the bilateral TMJ was statistically different (P < 0.05) and the rest of the measured values showed no statistical difference. Conclusions: In the patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, the vertical 60° joint space of the symptomatic side was significantly increased comparing with the asymptomatic side. PMID:26629112

  5. Bayesian belief network analysis applied to determine the progression of temporomandibular disorders using MRI

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the applicability of a Bayesian belief network (BBN) to MR images to diagnose temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Our aim was to determine the progression of TMDs, focusing on how each finding affects the other. Methods: We selected 1.5-T MRI findings (33 variables) and diagnoses (bone changes and disc displacement) of patients with TMD from 2007 to 2008. There were a total of 295 cases with 590 sides of temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The data were modified according to the research diagnostic criteria of TMD. We compared the accuracy of the BBN using 11 algorithms (necessary path condition, path condition, greedy search-and-score with Bayesian information criterion, Chow–Liu tree, Rebane–Pearl poly tree, tree augmented naïve Bayes model, maximum log likelihood, Akaike information criterion, minimum description length, K2 and C4.5), a multiple regression analysis and an artificial neural network using resubstitution validation and 10-fold cross-validation. Results: There were 191 TMJs (32.4%) with bone changes and 340 (57.6%) with articular disc displacement. The BBN path condition algorithm using resubstitution validation and 10-fold cross-validation was >99% accurate. However, the main advantage of a BBN is that it can represent the causal relationships between different findings and assign conditional probabilities, which can then be used to interpret the progression of TMD. Conclusions: Osteoarthritic bone changes progressed from condyle to articular fossa and finally to mandibular bone contours. Disc displacement was directly related to severe bone changes. Early bone changes were not directly related to disc displacement. TMJ functional factors (condylar translation, bony space and disc form) and age mediated between bone changes and disc displacement. PMID:25472616

  6. Influence of orthodontic treatment on temporomandibular disorders. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cañigral, Aránzazu; López-Caballo, José L.; Brizuela, Aritza; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; del Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Vega, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this literature systematic review was to evaluate the possible association between malocclusions, orthodontic treatment and development of temporomandibular disorders. Material and Methods: A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Results The search strategy resulted in 61 articles. After selection according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria 9 articles qualified for the final analysis. The articles which linked orthodontics and development of temporomandibular disorders showed very discrepant results. Some indicated that orthodontic treatment could improve signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, but none of them obtained statistically significant differences. Conclusions According to the authors examined, there is no evidence for a cause-effect relationship between orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular disorders, or that such treatment might improve or prevent them. More longitudinal studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship. Key words:Malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders, orthodontics and facial pain, orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular dysfunction. PMID:26155354

  7. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  8. Temporomandibular joint internal derangements: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Vogler, J.B. III; Morrish, R.B. Jr.; Goldman, S.M.; Capra, R.E.; Proctor, E.

    1984-08-01

    Two hundred patients with suspected displaced temporomandibular joint meniscus were studied with computed tomography. In 75 cases confirmation of the CT diagnosis was subsequently obtained via surgery or arthrography; correlation was found in 73 cases (97%), with one false-negative and one false-positive examination. When meniscus displacement was graded as mild, moderate, or severe, those cases diagnosed as moderate or severe were more likely to require surgery. The technique and interpretation of this technique is described; in most cases CT can replace arthrography in diagnosing displaced temporomandibular joint menisci.

  9. Temporomandibular joint multidisciplinary team clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nabeela; Poate, Tim; Nacher-Garcia, Cristina; Pugh, Nicola; Cowgill, Helen; Page, Lisa; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) commonly present to oral and maxillofacial departments and are increasingly being managed by a subspecialist group of surgeons. We review the outcomes of patients attending a specialist TMJ multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic. All patients are simultaneously reviewed by a consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, consultant in oral medicine, specialist physiotherapist, and maxillofacial prosthetist, and they can also see a consultant liaison psychiatrist. They are referred from primary, secondary, and tertiary care when medical and surgical treatment in the routine TMJ clinic has failed, and are triaged by the attending maxillofacial surgeon. On discharge they are returned to the care of the referring practitioner. We review the outcomes of patients attending this clinic over a 2-year period and show improvements in pain scores and maximal incisal opening, as well as quality of life outcome measures. All units in the UK with an interest in the management of diseases of the TMJ should consider establishing this type of clinic and should use available resources and expertise to maximise outcomes. PMID:25179688

  10. Effect of clenching on biomechanical response of human mandible and temporomandibular joint to traumatic force analyzed by finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sugiura, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Masayoshi; Kang, Yu B.; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to analyze the effect of clenching on the biomechanical response of human mandible and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to traumatic force by the finite element (FE) method. Material and Methods: FE models of the mandible and the TMJ in resting and clenching positions were prepared. Distribution and magnitude of von Mises stress were analyzed by applying force as a point load in the symphyseal, canine, body and angle regions of the mandible. In addition, strain energy density (SED) at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissue of TMJ was analyzed. Results: In the resting position, von Mises stress was mainly concentrated at the condylar neck and in the retromolar region of the mandible. In the clenching position, the stress at the condylar neck decreased in all loadings. The stress in the retromolar region similary decreased in the symphyseal, canine and body loading, respectively; however, higher stress was observed in the retromolar region on the loading side in the angle loading. High SED was generated at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissues of TMJ in the resting position. The SED in these tissues decreased in all loadings in the clenching position. Conclusions: Clenching generally reduces stress at the condylar neck and in the retromolar region of the mandible, and strain energy at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissue of TMJ by traumatic forces on the mandible; however, clenching induces greater stress in the retromolar region on the loading side by traumatic force to the angle region. Key words:Mandibular, temporomandibular joint, traumatic force, clenching, finite element analysis. PMID:23524422

  11. Correlation Between Clinical Findings of Temporomandibular Disorders and MRI Characteristics of Disc Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Sheikh, Soheyl; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Deepak; Gupta, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is a common condition that is best evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The first step in MR imaging of the TMJ is to evaluate the articular disk, or meniscus, in terms of its morphologic features and its location relative to the condyle in both closed- and open-mouth positions. Disk location is of prime importance because the presence of a displaced disk is a critical sign of TMJ dysfunction. However, disk displacement is also frequently seen in asymptomatic volunteers. It is important for the maxillofacial radiologist to detect early MR imaging signs of dysfunction, thereby avoiding the evolution of this condition to its advanced and irreversible phase which is characterized by osteoarthritic changes such as condylar flattening or osteophytes. Further the MR imaging techniques will allow a better understanding of the sources of TMJ pain and of any discrepancy between imaging findings and patient symptoms. Henceforth, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether MRI findings of various degrees of disk displacement could be correlated with the presence or absence of clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. Materials and Methods : In this clinical study, 44 patients (88 TMJs) were examined clinically and divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients with clinical signs and symptoms of TMDs either unilaterally or bilaterally and considered as study group. Group 2 consisted of 22 patients with no signs and symptoms of TMDs and considered as control group. MRI was done for both the TMJs of each patient. Displacement of the posterior band of articular disc in relation to the condyle was quantified as anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR), anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR), posterior disc displacement (PDD). Results : Disk displacement was found in 18 (81.8%) patients of 22 symptomatic subjects in Group 1

  12. Condylar hyperplasia following unilateral temporomandibular joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Machon, V; Levorova, J; Hirjak, D; Foltan, R

    2015-06-01

    Total joint replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TJR) can be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications. We report herein the occurrence of a postoperative open bite malocclusion, the result of condylar hyperplasia affecting the non-operated joint at 1 year after unilateral total joint replacement. PMID:25662429

  13. Temporomandibular joint dislocation: experiences from Zaria, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Fomete, Benjamin; Obiadazie, Athanasius Chukwudi; Idehen, Kelvin; Okeke, Uche

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint may occur for various reasons. Although different invasive methods have been advocated for its treatment, this study highlights the value of non-invasive treatment options even in chronic cases in a resource-poor environment. Materials and Methods A seven-year retrospective analysis of all patients managed for temporomandibular joint dislocation in our department was undertaken. Patient demographics, risk factors associated with temporomandibular joint dislocation and treatment modalities were retrieved from patient records. Results In all, 26 patients were managed over a seven-year period. Males accounted for 62% of the patients, and yawning was the most frequent etiological factor. Conservative treatment methods were used successfully in 86.4% of the patients managed. Two (66.7%) of the three patients who needed surgical treatment developed complications, while only one (5.3%) patient who was managed conservatively developed complications. Conclusion Temporomandibular joint dislocation appears to be associated with male sex, middle age, yawning, and low socio-economic status, although these observed relationships were not statistically significant. Non-invasive methods remain an effective treatment option in this environment in view of the low socio-economic status of the patients affected. PMID:25045637

  14. Dietary correlates of temporomandibular joint morphology in New World primates.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Claire E

    2011-11-01

    Previous analyses of the masticatory apparatus have demonstrated that the shape of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is functionally and adaptively linked to variation in feeding behavior and diet in primates. Building on previous research, this study presents an analysis of the link between diet and TMJ morphology in the context of functional and dietary differences among New World primates. To evaluate this proposed relationship, I used three-dimensional morphometric methods to quantify TMJ shape across a sample of 13 platyrrhine species. A broad interspecific analysis of this sample found strong relationships among TMJ size, TMJ shape, and diet, suggesting that both size and diet are significant factors influencing TMJ morphology in New World primates. However, it is likely that at least some of these differences are related to a division of dietary categories along clade lines. A series of hypotheses related to load resistance capabilities and range of motion in the TMJ were then tested among small groups of closely related taxa with documented dietary differences. These pairwise analyses indicate that some aspects of TMJ morphology can be used to differentiate among closely related species with different diets. However, not all of my predictions were upheld. The anteroposterior dimensions of the TMJ were most strongly consistent with hypothesized differences in ingestive/masticatory behaviors and jaw gape, whereas the predictions generated for variation in entoglenoid and articular tubercle height were not upheld. These results imply that while some features can be reliably associated with increased load resistance and facilitation of wider jaw gapes in the masticatory apparatus, other features are less strongly correlated with masticatory function. PMID:21920583

  15. Neocartilage integration in temporomandibular joint discs: physical and enzymatic methods

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; Arzi, Boaz; Prouty, Shannon M.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues with adjacent native tissues presents a significant challenge to the field. Specifically, the avascularity and low cellularity of cartilage elicit the need for additional efforts in improving integration of neocartilage within native cartilage. Self-assembled neocartilage holds significant potential in replacing degenerated cartilage, though its stabilization and integration in native cartilage require further efforts. Physical and enzymatic stabilization methods were investigated in an in vitro model for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc degeneration. First, in phase 1, suture, glue and press-fit constructs were compared in TMJ disc intermediate zone defects. In phase 1, suturing enhanced interfacial shear stiffness and strength immediately; after four weeks, a 15-fold increase in stiffness and a ninefold increase in strength persisted over press-fit. Neither suture nor glue significantly altered neocartilage properties. In phase 2, the effects of the enzymatic stabilization regimen composed of lysyl oxidase, CuSO4 and hydroxylysine were investigated. A full factorial design was employed, carrying forward the best physical method from phase 1, suturing. Enzymatic stabilization significantly increased interfacial shear stiffness after eight weeks. Combined enzymatic stabilization and suturing led to a fourfold increase in shear stiffness and threefold increase in strength over press-fit. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of a collagen-rich interface. Enzymatic treatment additionally enhanced neocartilage mechanical properties, yielding a tensile modulus over 6 MPa and compressive instantaneous modulus over 1200 kPa at eight weeks. Suturing enhances stabilization of neocartilage, and enzymatic treatment enhances functional properties and integration of neocartilage in the TMJ disc. Methods developed here are applicable to other orthopaedic soft tissues, including knee meniscus and hyaline articular

  16. Direct sagital computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Manzione, J.V.; Seltzer, S.E.; Katzberg, R.W.; Hammerschlag, S.B.; Chiango, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a common clinical problem that has been reported to affect 4%-28% of adults. Temporomandibular joint arthrography has shown that many of these patients have intraarticular abnormalities involving the meniscus. A noninvasive test that could demonstrate the meniscus as well as bony abnormalities of the joint would be an important advance. In an attempt to develop such a noninvasive test, we have performed direct sagittal computed tomography (CT) on cadaver temporomandibular joints and have correlated the images with anatomic sections. We are currently applying this technique clinically and report one representative example in which direct sagittal computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint accurately demonstrated an anteriorly displaced meniscus.

  17. Extra and Intra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R K; Banskota, B; Rijal, S; Banskota, A K

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is not so rare intra-articular condition secondary to synovial metaplasia, that affects the knee joint. Extra-articular synovial chondromatosis however is an extremely rare condition that usually involves the synovial sheath or bursa of the foot or hand. We present two cases of synovial chondromatosis, one intra and one extra-articular. The first case was a 25 year old lady who presented with pain, swelling and restricted range of motion of left knee and was found to have an intra-articular synovial chondromatosis which was treated successfully by joint debridement. The second case was that of a 22 year old man who presented with right knee pain and was diagnosed to have an extra-articular synovial chondromatosis of his right medial hamstring tendon sheath, excision of which resulted in complete relief of symptoms. PMID:27549506

  18. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  19. Radiation dose in temporomandibular joint zonography

    SciTech Connect

    Coucke, M.E.; Bourgoignie, R.R.; Dermaut, L.R.; Bourgoignie, K.A.; Jacobs, R.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphology and function can be evaluated by panoramic zonography. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was applied to evaluate the radiation dose to predetermined sites on a phantom eye, thyroid, pituitary, and parotid, and the dose distribution on the skin of the head and neck when the TMJ program of the Zonarc panoramic x-ray unit was used. Findings are discussed with reference to similar radiographic techniques.

  20. Temporomandibular Disorders: The Habitual Chewing Side Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Mora, Urbano; López-Cedrún, José; Mora, María J.; Otero, Xosé L.; Santana-Penín, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side) and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. Methods The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms) was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. Results Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher’s exact test, P = .003) and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002) were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88) degrees versus 46.16(7.25) degrees; P = .001), and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35) degrees versus 48.32(9.53) degrees P = .036) on the symptomatic side. Discussion The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, “habitual chewing side syndrome”, instead of the nonspecific symptom-based “temporomandibular joint disorders”; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side. PMID:23593156

  1. Predisposition for temporomandibular joint disorders: loose ligaments.

    PubMed

    Deodato, Francesco; Trusendi, Raffaello; Giorgetti, Roberto; Scalese, Marco U

    2006-07-01

    Loose ligaments are often a predisposing factor of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This causal factor was analyzed in 701 subjects presenting at the TMJ and Posture Center of Siena University with TMJ pain or dysfunction. Along with the conventional jaw examination, a Carter and Wilkinson test as modified by Beighton was also done. We found a correlation among the parameters of age, gender, TMJ disorder, joint pain, muscle pain, and loose ligaments. PMID:16933458

  2. Laser arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Gerard, N; Hendler, B H

    1995-04-01

    Laser surgery is very different than traditional surgery. The clinician must be familiar with the physical properties of the laser to use this instrument safely and properly. Various lasers are available for use in oral and maxillofacial surgery and dentistry, namely the carbon dioxide laser, the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser (Ho:YAG). Only the Ho:YAG laser has been used with effectiveness in temporomandibular joint arthroscopic surgery. PMID:8935004

  3. Modeling the biomechanics of articular eminence function in anthropoid primates

    PubMed Central

    Terhune, Claire E

    2011-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cranial component of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the articular eminence (AE). This bar of bone is the primary surface upon which the condyle translates and rotates during movements of the mandible, and is therefore the primary point at which forces are transmitted from the mandible to the cranium during loading of the masticatory apparatus. The shape of the AE is highly variable across primates, and the raised eminence of humans has often been considered a defining feature of the human TMJ, yet few data exist to address whether this variation is functionally significant. This study used a broad interspecific sample of anthropoid primates to elaborate upon and test the predictions of a previously proposed model of AE function. This model suggests that AE inclination acts to resist non-normal forces at the TMJ, thereby maximizing bite forces (BFs). AE inclination was predicted to covary with two specific features of the masticatory apparatus: height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane; and inclination of the masticatory muscles. A correlate of this model is that taxa utilizing more resistant food objects should also exhibit relatively more inclined AEs. Results of the correlation analyses found that AE inclination is strongly correlated with height of the TMJ above the occlusal plane, but less so with inclination of the masticatory muscles. Furthermore, pairwise comparisons of closely related taxa with documented dietary differences found that the AE is consistently more inclined in taxa that utilize more resistant food items. These data preliminarily suggest that variation in AE morphology across anthropoid primates is functionally related to maximizing BFs, and add to the growing dataset of masticatory morphologies linked to feeding behavior. PMID:21923720

  4. Orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders: a curriculum proposal for postgraduate programs.

    PubMed

    Greene, Charles S; Stockstill, John; Rinchuse, Donald; Kandasamy, Sanjivan

    2012-07-01

    In a previous article, we reported the results of a survey of American and Canadian orthodontic postgraduate programs to determine how the topics of occlusion, temporomandibular joint, and temporomandibular disorders were currently being taught. Based on the finding of considerable diversity among those programs, we decided to write a curriculum proposal for temporomandibular disorders that would be compatible with and satisfy the current curriculum guidelines for postgraduate orthodontic programs. These guidelines arose from a combination of the requirements published by the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation and the written guide (July 2010) of the American Board of Orthodontics for the its clinical examination. The proposed curriculum, based on the latest scientific evidence in the temporomandibular disorder field, gives program directors a template for covering these subjects thoroughly. At the same time, they can focus on related orthodontic issues, so that their future graduates will be prepared to deal with patients who either have or later develop temporomandibular disorder problems. PMID:22748986

  5. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. Material and Methods A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts’ analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. Results No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Conclusions Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general. PMID:27489610

  6. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  7. Interaction of strain and interleukin-1 in articular cartilage: effects, on proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Robert J.; Buckley, Michael J.; Studer, Rebecca K.; Evans, Chris H.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    In temporomandibular joint disorders, the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) initiates an inflammatory process disrupting cartilage homeostasis, ultimately leading to cartilage destruction. Additionally, mechanical stimuli affect articular chondrocyte metabolism. While articular chondrocytes generate nitric oxide (NO) in the presence of IL-1 proteoglycan synthesis is consecutively suppressed. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of proinflammatory cytokines and mechanical strain in the form of cyclic tensile stretch on proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes, as compared to the NO competitive inhibitor L-N-monomethyl arginine (LMA), and to assess whether this effect is secondarily related to the activity of growth factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Lapine articular chondrocytes were exposed to one of four different treatment regimens: no cyclic tensile stretch, IL-1, cyclic tensile stretch, or IL-1 plus cyclic tensile stretch. NO production was determined as medium nitrite accumulation. TGF-β-bioactivity in chondrocyte conditioned medium was measured with the mink-lung epithelial cell bioassay. Proteoglycan synthesis was measured as the incorporation of 35-[S]-sodium sulfate into macromolecules separated from unincorporated label by gel filtration on PD-10 columns. In resting chondrocyte cultures, only baseline levels of NO were measured and the application of stretch for 24 h did not affect NO production. Addition of IL-1 provoked a large increase in NO synthesis which was abrogated in the presence of LMA. Application of stretch decreased the IL-1 induced NO synthesis, but did not modify the effect of LMA (being a competitive inhibitor of the inducible NO synthase) inhibiting IL-1 induced NO production. Glucosaminoglycan production was noted as proteoglycan synthesis showing almost no effect of cyclic stretch alone in comparison to the control condition, which correlates with the missing NO

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, L.O.C.; Lodi, F.R.; Gomes, T.S.; Marques, S.R.; Oshima, C.T.F.; Lancellotti, C.L.P.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J.F.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks. PMID:22073371

  9. Influence of unilateral disc displacement on the stress response of the temporomandibular joint discs during opening and mastication

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Palomar, A; Doblaré, M

    2007-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint plays a crucial role in human mastication acting as a guide of jaw movements. During these movements, the joint is subjected to loads which cause stresses and deformations in its cartilaginous structures. A perfect balance between the two sides of the joint is essential to maintain the physiological stress level within the tissues. Therefore, it has been suggested that a derangement of the joint is a contributing factor in the development of mandibular asymmetry, especially if problems of the temporomandibular joint start in childhood or adolescence. To analyze the movement of the mandible and the stresses undergone by the discs, two finite element models of the human temporomandibular joint including the masticatory system were developed, one corresponding to a healthy joint and the other with a unilateral anterior disc displacement with their movement controlled by muscle activation. A fibre-reinforced porohyperelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the articular discs. The stress distribution was analyzed in both models during free opening and closing, and during the introduction of a resistant force between incisors or molars. It was found that a slight unilateral anterior disc displacement does not lead to mandibular asymmetry but to a slight decrease of the maximum gape. With the introduction of a restriction between incisors, the maximum stresses moved to the anterior band in contrast to what happened if the restriction was imposed between molars where maximum stresses were located more posteriorly. Finally, the presence of a unilateral displacement of the disc involved a strong change in the overall behaviour of the joint including also the healthy side, where the maximum stresses moved to the posterior part. PMID:17725577

  10. Transcriptional regulation of Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) by 17β-estradiol in immortalized baboon temporomandibular joint disc cells

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Jennifer S.; Babu, Ramya Akula Suresh; Navarro, Mary M.; LeBaron, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) affect a significant portion of the U.S. population with the majority seeking treatment being women of childbearing age. Due to this striking sexual dimorphism it has been postulated that there is a role for sex hormones in the maintenance of normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is a secreted lubricating molecule required for maintaining low frictional levels within articular joints, however its role in the TMJ is not well characterized. In this study we describe the development of immortalized baboon cells isolated from specific regions of the TMJ disc and their use in the investigation of PRG4 expression and localization patterns in the TMJ. We identified conserved estrogen response elements within the 5′ flanking region of the PRG4 gene of several species, and found that treatment of baboon TMJ disc cells with estrogen led to reduced PRG4 promoter activity and mRNA expression in vitro. The observed negative regulation of PRG4 by estrogen could lead to increased friction and degradation of joint components over time. This study, for the first time, provides evidence of the regulatory potential of estrogen on PRG4 gene expression and suggests a novel etiology for the gender disparity observed among TMD patients. PMID:24621258

  11. Morphological Study of the Articular Disc and Capillary of the Retrodiscal Tissue in a Type 2 Spontaneous Diabetes Mellitus Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Mamoru; Toda, Isumi; Kawashima, Wataru; Yoshimoto, Gaku; Fang, Yi-Ru; Xu, Yuan Jin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Takemura, Akimichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate morphological changes at the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint and capillary of the retrodiscal tissue in a rat model for type 2 spontaneous diabetes mellitus (DM) (i.e., Goto-Kakizaki [GK] rats) compared to normal Wistar rats. A total of 20 experimental rats were used in this study; the rats were categorized into the normal (n = 10 male 8-week-old Wistar rats) and DM (n = 10 male 8-week-old GK rats) groups. Hematoxylin-eosin stained specimens were obtained from 5 rats from each group. Image analyses of the hematoxylin-eosin stained specimens were conducted using light micrographs, which allowed comparisons of the thickness of the anterior, central, and posterior parts of the articular disc. Afterwards, the microvascular corrosion cast specimens were obtained from 5 rats from each group. The diameter of the capillary of the retrodiscal tissue was determined by analyzing scanning electron micrographs of the microvascular corrosion cast specimens. Student's t-test was used to test for statistical significant differences between the 2 groups. Differences were considered significant when p < 0.01. We found that the thickness of the anterior, central, and posterior parts of the articular disc, and the diameter of the capillary of the retrodiscal tissue was significantly lower in the DM vs. normal group. Therefore, we consider that DM-associated the hyperglycemia causes atrophy of the articular disc and microangiopathy of the capillary of the retrodiscal tissue in GK rats. PMID:27319300

  12. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  13. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Results Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. Conclusion This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties

  14. Quantitative Radiological Diagnosis Of The Temporomandibular Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Steven L.; Heffez, Leslie B.

    1989-05-01

    Recent impressive technological advances in imaging techniques for the human temporomandibular (tm) joint, and in enabling geometric algorithms have outpaced diagnostic analyses. The authors present a basis for systematic quantitative diagnoses that exploit the imaging advancements. A reference line, coordinate system, and transformations are described that are appropriate for tomography of the tm joint. These yield radiographic measurements (disk displacement) and observations (beaking of radiopaque dye and disk shape) that refine diagnostic classifications of anterior displacement of the condylar disk. The relevance of these techniques has been clinically confirmed. Additional geometric invariants and procedures are proposed for future clinical verification.

  15. Intrauterine temporomandibular joint dislocation: prenatal sonographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-09-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  16. Imaging Approach to Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morales, H; Cornelius, R

    2016-03-01

    Internal derangement is the most common temporomandibular joint disorder. Degenerative osteoarthritis and trauma are next in frequency. Less common pathology includes rheumatoid arthritis, synovial chondromatosis, calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, tumors, infection, and osteonecrosis. We provide a systematic approach to facilitate interpretation based on major anatomic structures: disc-attachments, joint space, condyle, and lateral pterygoid muscle. Relevant graphic anatomy and state of the art imaging are discussed in correlation with current clinical and therapeutic highlights of pathologic entities affecting the joint. PMID:26374243

  17. Myogenous temporomandibular disorders: diagnostic and management considerations.

    PubMed

    Fricton, James

    2007-01-01

    Myogenous temporomandibular disorders (or masticatory myalgia) are characterized by pain and dysfunction that arise from pathologic and functional processes in the masticatory muscles. There are several distinct muscle disorder subtypes in the masticatory system, including myofascial pain, myositis, muscle spasm, and muscle contracture. The major characteristics of masticatory myalgia include pain, muscle tenderness, limited range of motion, and other symptoms (eg, fatigability, stiffness, subjective weakness). Comorbid conditions and complicating factors also are common and are discussed. Management follows with stretching, posture, and relaxation exercises, physical therapy, reduction of contributing factors, and as necessary, muscle injections. PMID:17185060

  18. Intrauterine Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation: Prenatal Sonographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  19. Articular cartilage: structure and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Becerra, José; Andrades, José A; Guerado, Enrique; Zamora-Navas, Plácido; López-Puertas, José M; Reddi, A Hari

    2010-12-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) has no or very low ability of self-repair, and untreated lesions may lead to the development of osteoarthritis. One method that has been proven to result in long-term repair or isolated lesions is autologous chondrocyte transplantation. However, first generation of these cells' implantation has limitations, and introducing new effective cell sources can improve cartilage repair. AC provides a resilient and compliant articulating surface to the bones in diarthrodial joints. It protects the joint by distributing loads applied to it, so preventing potentially damaging stress concentrations on the bone. At the same time it provides a low-friction-bearing surface to enable free movement of the joint. AC may be considered as a visco- or poro-elastic fiber-composite material. Fibrils of predominantly type II collagen provide tensile reinforcing to a highly hydrated proteoglycan gel. The tissue typically comprises 70% water and it is the structuring and retention of this water by the proteoglycans and collagen that is largely responsible for the remarkable ability of the tissue to support compressive loads. PMID:20836752

  20. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT IN 1018 ASYMPTOMATIC HORSES: A MULTI-INSTITUTION STUDY.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Kneissl, Sibylle; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Zwick, Timo; Zekas, Lisa; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bienert-Zeit, Astrid

    2016-05-01

    Published descriptions of nonseptic arthritis of the equine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare and large studies investigating variations in the TMJ for asymptomatic horses are lacking. The objectives of this cross-sectional, retrospective, multi-institutional study were to describe anatomical variations in the TMJ detected using computed tomography (CT) in an equid population asymptomatic for TMJ disease and determine whether these variations were associated with patient signalment, reason for CT examination, or CT slice width. Medical records at eight hospitals were searched for horses that had head/neck CT scans and no clinical signs of TMJ disease. Age, breed, sex, clinical presentation, and CT slice width data were recorded. Alterations in CT contour and density of the mandibular condyles, mandibular fossae, and TMJ intra-articular discs were described for each horse. Generalized logistic regression was used to test associations between anatomical variations and horse age. A total of 1018 horses were sampled. Anatomical variations were found in TMJ CT images for 40% of horses and 29% of joints. These were dichotomous with regard to age. Horses <1 year old commonly had alterations in the shape and density of the mandibular condyle. Older horses commonly had spherical hypodensities within the mandibular condyles consistent with bone cysts; and hyperdense regions of the intra-articular disc consistent with dystrophic mineralization. Findings indicated that TMJ anatomic variations were common in CT images of younger and older horses asymptomatic for TMJ disease. Future studies are needed to more definitively characterize these CT variations using gross pathology and histopathology. PMID:26773281

  1. Clinical, radiographic and MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint in patients with different rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Helenius, L M J; Tervahartiala, P; Helenius, I; Al-Sukhun, J; Kivisaari, L; Suuronen, R; Kautiainen, H; Hallikainen, D; Lindqvist, C; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the condition of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with different rheumatic diseases, and report correlations between the clinical, radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The 67 patients were divided into four groups: 16 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 15 with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 18 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 18 with spondyloarthropathy (SPA). They were clinically examined, and panoramic tomography, lateral panoramic radiography and MRI of the TMJ were performed. MRI showed reduced articular cartilage in 25% (4/16) of RA, 0% (0/15) of MCTD, 17% (3/18) of AS and 17% (3/18) of SPA patients. Condylar changes included erosion, osteophytes and abnormal shape. Disc alterations included perforation, abnormal anterior position and decreased movement. These abnormalities were most frequent in RA patients, and least frequent in MCTD and SPA patients. Crepitation and reduced maximum opening of the mouth correlated with abnormalities of the disc and articular cartilage as shown by MRI. Severe condylar erosion in panoramic tomograms significantly correlated with MRI findings of condylar erosion (P<0.01), diminished thickness of condylar cartilage, abnormal condylar shape, and abnormal shape of the temporal surface of the TMJ (P< or =0.001). The presence of crepitation, limited mandibular movement and/or pain on movement of the jaw often indicated structural damage to the TMJ. Panoramic radiographs provide an alternative method to MRI but, to obtain a more detailed anatomic picture, MRI is recommended for patients with acute unexplained pain or as part of preoperative work up. A panoramic recording is not indicated when MRI is planned. PMID:17052893

  2. Diagnostic concordance between MRI and electrovibratography of the temporomandibular joint of subjects with disc displacement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Deregibus, A; Castroflorio, T; De Giorgi, I; Burzio, C; Debernardi, C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic concordance of MRI and electrovibratography (EVG) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the diagnosis of articular disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and articular disc displacement without reduction (ADDw/oR). Methods: 50 patients (12 males, 38 females; mean age 37.46 ± 15.64 years) with a hypothesis of disc displacement were selected. For each patient an MRI of the TMJ was performed. MRIs were evaluated sorting the 100 TMJs by kind of pathology (no pathology, ADDwR, ADDw/oR, and joint hypermobility). Afterwards, the patients had an EVG exam. The EVG exams were performed with vibration transducers over each TMJ, enabling simultaneous, bilateral recording of vibrations emanating from joint sounds during the opening and closing movements. The presence of a sound peak was compared with the MRI diagnosis of ADDwR, while a multipeak aspect was compared with ADDw/oR diagnosis using Cohen's kappa test. Results: The presence of a peak-shaped track has high specificity for ADDwR (90.27%). The Cohen's kappa calculated for the ADDwR was 0.5615 (good–moderate). The presence of a multipeak-shaped track has low specificity (65.22%) and sensitivity (70.42%). The Cohen's kappa calculated for the ADDw/oR was 0.2992 (poor). Conclusions: The present study recommends the use of EVG to support the clinical diagnosis of a disc displacement with reduction when MRI is not available or when subjects cannot be investigated by MRI. PMID:23420863

  3. Assessing the reliability of MRI-CBCT image registration to visualize temporomandibular joints

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, J L; Alsufyani, N; Jibri, Z; Lai, H; Major, P W

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate image quality of two methods of registering MRI and CBCT images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), particularly regarding TMJ articular disc–condyle relationship and osseous abnormality. Methods: MR and CBCT images for 10 patients (20 TMJs) were obtained and co-registered using two methods (non-guided and marker guided) using Mirada XD software (Mirada Medical Ltd, Oxford, UK). Three radiologists independently and blindly evaluated three types of images (MRI, CBCT and registered MRI-CBCT) at two times (T1 and T2) on two criteria: (1) quality of MRI-CBCT registrations (excellent, fair or poor) and (2) TMJ disc–condylar position and articular osseous abnormalities (osteophytes, erosions and subcortical cyst, surface flattening, sclerosis). Results: 75% of the non-guided registered images showed excellent quality, and 95% of the marker-guided registered images showed poor quality. Significant difference was found between the non-guided and marker-guided registration (χ2 = 108.5; p < 0.01). The interexaminer variability of the disc position in MRI [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50 at T1, 0.56 at T2] was lower than that in MRI-CBCT registered images [ICC = 0.80 (0.52–0.92) at T1, 0.84 (0.62–0.93) at T2]. Erosions and subcortical cysts were noticed less frequently in the MRI-CBCT images than in CBCT images. Conclusions: Non-guided registration proved superior to marker-guided registration. Although MRI-CBCT fused images were slightly more limited than CBCT alone to detect osseous abnormalities, use of the fused images improved the consistency among examiners in detecting disc position in relation to the condyle. PMID:25734241

  4. Inhibition of β-Catenin Signaling in Articular Chondrocytes Results in Articular Cartilage Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei; Chen, Mo; Zuscik, Michael; Wu, Qiuqian; Wang, Yong-Jun; Rosier, Randy N.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Chen, Di

    2009-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease whose molecular mechanism is currently unknown. Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been demonstrated to play a critical role in the development and function of articular chondrocytes. To determine the role of β-catenin signaling in articular chondrocyte function, we generated Col2a1-ICAT–transgenic mice to inhibit β-catenin signaling in chondrocytes. Methods The expression of the ICAT transgene was determined by immunostaining and Western blot analysis. Histologic analyses were performed to determine changes in articular cartilage structure and morphology. Cell apoptosis was determined by TUNEL staining and the immunostaining of cleaved caspase 3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins. Expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bax proteins and caspase 9 and caspase 3/7 activities were examined in primary sternal chondrocytes isolated from 3-day-old neonatal Col2a1-ICAT–transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates and in primary chicken and porcine articular chondrocytes. Results Expression of the ICAT transgene was detected in articular chondrocytes of the transgenic mice. Associated with this, age-dependent articular cartilage destruction was observed in Col2a1-ICAT– transgenic mice. A significant increase in cell apoptosis in articular chondrocytes was identified by TUNEL staining and the immunostaining of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP proteins in these transgenic mice. Consistent with this, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression were decreased and caspase 9 and caspase 3/7 activity were increased, suggesting that increased cell apoptosis may contribute significantly to the articular cartilage destruction observed in Col2a1-ICAT–transgenic mice. Conclusion Inhibition of β-catenin signaling in articular chondrocytes causes increased cell apoptosis and articular cartilage destruction in Col2a1-ICAT–transgenic mice. PMID:18576323

  5. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 2: conservative management

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate management of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) requires an understanding of the underlying dysfunction associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding structures. A comprehensive examination process, as described in part 1 of this series, can reveal underlying clinical findings that assist in the delivery of comprehensive physical therapy services for patients with TMD. Part 2 of this series focuses on management strategies for TMD. Physical therapy is the preferred conservative management approach for TMD. Physical therapists are professionally well-positioned to step into the void and provide clinical services for patients with TMD. Clinicians should utilize examination findings to design rehabilitation programs that focus on addressing patient-specific impairments. Potentially appropriate plan of care components include joint and soft tissue mobilization, trigger point dry needling, friction massage, therapeutic exercise, patient education, modalities, and outside referral. Management options should address both symptom reduction and oral function. Satisfactory results can often be achieved when management focuses on patient-specific clinical variables. PMID:24976744

  6. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  7. Intra-articular therapy in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, I; Raynauld, J; Haraoui, B

    2003-01-01

    The medical literature was reviewed from 1968–2002 using Medline and the key words "intra-articular" and "osteoarthritis" to determine the various intra-articular therapies used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are the most frequently used intra-articular therapies in osteoarthritis. Other intra-articular substances such as orgotein, radiation synovectomy, dextrose prolotherapy, silicone, saline lavage, saline injection without lavage, analgesic agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucosamine, somatostatin, sodium pentosan polysulfate, chloroquine, mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid ester, lactic acid solution, and thiotepa cytostatica have been investigated as potentially therapeutic in the treatment of arthritic joints. Despite the lack of strong, convincing, and reproducible evidence that any of the intra-articular therapies significantly alters the progression of osteoarthritis, corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are widely used in patients who have failed other therapeutic modalities for lack of efficacy or toxicity. As a practical approach for a knee with effusion, steroid injections should be considered while the presence of symptomatic "dry" knees may favour the hyaluronic acid approach. The virtual absence of serious side effects, coupled with the perceived benefits, make these approaches attractive. PMID:12954956

  8. Temporomandibular joint: true sagittal computed tomography with meniscus visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Sartorix, D.J.; Neumann, C.H.; Riley, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Accessory patient support equipment was constructed that allows patient positioning for true sagittal projection of the temporomandibular joint using a GE 8800 CT/T scanner. Range of motion abnormalities, osseous alterations of the mandibular condyle and temporal bone, joint-space narrowing, and meniscal configuration may be demonstrated. The technique has potential advantages over other CT projections and sagittal reconstruction for evaluation of temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

  9. Prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Sena, Marina Fernandes; de Mesquita, Késsia Suênia F.; Santos, Fernanda Regina R.; Silva, Francisco Wanderley G. P.; Serrano, Kranya Victoria D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents, verifying the methodological variations. DATA SOURCES: Research conducted in Medline, PubMed, Lilacs and BBO databases, including manuscripts (except reviews and case reports) published from 1990 to 2012. The descriptors were "temporomandibular joint syndrome", "temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome", "temporomandibular joint disorders", "prevalence studies", and "cross-sectional studies"; the words "dysfunction", "disorder", "temporomandibular", "children", "adolescents", "prevalence", "frequency", and "transversal" were used. DATA SYNTHESIS: Seventeen articles were selected, and the TMD frequency varied from 16 to 68%. Regarding the methodological criteria, only three articles (18%) reported sample size determination, three (18%) clearly described the sample selection process by stratified selection technique, and nine studies (53%) carried out the calibration of the examiners. The diagnostic criteria used in the studies were: Helkimo index (n=2; 12%), Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (n=4; 24%), the jaw index (n=1; 6%), clinical protocols (n=10; 59%), and anamnestic questionnaires (n=6; 35%). CONCLUSIONS: The TMD prevalence in children and adolescents varies in the literature. Appropriate and standardized methods are needed to identify, with greater validity, the presence of TMD in this population, allowing a better understanding of the pathological aspects in order to address more effective preventive and therapeutic procedures. PMID:24473961

  10. Injecting vascular endothelial growth factor into the temporomandibular joint induces osteoarthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pei; Jiao, ZiXian; Zheng, Ji Si; Xu, Wei Feng; Zhang, Shang Yong; Qin, An; Yang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can initiate osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study we evaluated the effects of intra-articular injection of exogenous VEGF in the TMJ in mice on the early stage. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley mice were equally divided into 3 groups. In the vegf group, the mice received an injection of VEGF solution (50 μL) in the TMJ once a week over a period of 4 weeks. In the sham group, the mice received an injection of saline (50 μL). The control group did not receive any injection. Four mice from each group were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Gradual prominent cartilage degeneration was observed in the vegf group. Additionally, this group showed higher expressions of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-13, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and a higher number of apoptotic chondrocytes and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive chondrocytes. Micro-computed tomography (CT) revealed prominent subchondral bone resorption in the vegf group, with a high number of osteoclasts in the subchondral bone. In vitro study demonstrated that VEGF can promote osteoclast differentiation. In conclusion, our study found that VEGF can initiate TMJ OA by destroying cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:26531672

  11. Congenital deformities and developmental abnormalities of the mandibular condyle in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kaneyama, Keiseki; Segami, Natsuki; Hatta, Toshihisa

    2008-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) consists of the mandibular condyle and the articular eminence of the temporal bone. The morphological development of the TMJ during prenatal life lags behind other joints in terms of both the timing of its appearance and its progress. At birth, the joint is still largely underdeveloped. There are many causes of the various growth disturbances and abnormalities of the mandibular condyle and related structures. Growth disturbances in the development of the mandibular condyle may occur in utero late in the first trimester and may result in disorders such as aplasia or hypoplasia of the mandibular condyle. Meanwhile, hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle is not visible at birth and seems to be gradually acquired during growth. In the present review article, the congenital abnormalities of the mandibular condyle are classified morphologically into three major groups and two subgroups from a clinical standpoint: (1) hypoplasia or aplasia of the mandibular condyle, including (i) primary condylar aplasia and hypoplasia, (ii) secondary condylar hypoplasia; (2) hyperplasia; and (3) bifidity. In addition, the molecular-based etiology of anomalies of the mandibular condyle is also discussed. PMID:18778456

  12. A retrospective study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis secondary to surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-lin; Long, Xing; Deng, Mo-hong; Han, Qian-chao; Meng, Qing-gong; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the incidence of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after open operations for fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analysed possible risk factors in a total of 385 patients with 492 condylar fractures who had been operated on in our department from 2001 to 2010. Sixteen patients developed postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ with 26 joints (5%) affected during a follow-up of 6 months-10 years. Of the 492 condylar fractures, the most common ones that were associated with postoperative ankylosis were those of the condylar head (20/248), followed by the condylar neck (6/193). Subcondylar fractures did not cause postoperative ankylosis (0/51). Among the 16 patients with postoperative ankylosis, 13 had associated anterior mandibular fractures. Long-screw (bicortical screw) fixation of fractures of the condylar head seemed to be associated with a lower incidence of postoperative ankylosis than fixation by miniplate and wire or removal of the fractured fragment. The articular discs were damaged in all ankylosed joints, and the remaining fractured fragment was found in 10 ankylosed joints after fractures of the condylar head. The results suggest that fractures of the condylar head are more prone to lead to postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ, and that the possible risk factors seem to include the technique used for fixation and damage to the disc, together with an anterior mandibular fracture with the fractured fragment remaining. PMID:24485809

  13. HLA analysis in patients with degenerative diseases of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Learreta, Jorge A; Bono, Andrea E; Durst, Andreas C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HLA alleles, specifically HLA-DR alleles, and to correlate them with clinical and radiological features of patients with degenerative processes (DP) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The final goal was to determine which allele can be used to identify patients having more aggressive forms of the articular pathologies. Thirty-two (32) Caucasian patients with DP of the TMJ were included in the study. The SSOP (Luminex Corp., Austin, TX) method was used to determine class II HLA alleles. The presence of HLA-II DR in patients with DP of the TMJ was 98%. The presence of HLA was significantly higher in patients with DP of the TMJ than in healthy subjects (66%) (p=0.003). HLA DR52 was significantly more frequent in patients than in healthy individuals (40.62% vs. 13.79%, p = 0.041). While the percentage of DR11 positive individuals was also higher among patients than among healthy control subjects, the association with DP of the TMJ was not significant (p=0.220). Patients having the DR52 allele had higher deformation or DP. It was concluded that HLA-DR54 and DR11 alleles are associated with a higher susceptibility to DP of the TMJ, and HLA-DR54 and DR52 are associated with a higher severity of DP. PMID:21370767

  14. Removal of a Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint Using Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Gabriel Pires; Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Pastore, Patrícia Radaic; Prati, Alexandre Javaroni

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis of synovial chrondromatosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) requires a combined assessment consisting of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic examinations. The purpose of this study is to report in 1 patient the removal of a single large cartilaginous nodule floating in the upper joint compartment using arthroscopy. A 30-year-old woman was referred to our department complaining about pain in preauricular area and restricted mouth opening. Imaging of magnetic resonance reveals anterior disc displacement and right joint effusion. Arthroscopy of TMJ was performed for diagnosis and treatment. During the arthroscopy a large loose body was identified and removed with a biopsy forceps; lavage was conducted with ringer solution. Hyaluronic acid was injected in TMJ at surgery, 1 and 3 months after surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed articular disc on position and no effusion. The patient was followed up of 1 year without sign and symptoms. Arthroscopic procedure of TMJ was effective in diagnosis and removal of a solitary loose body of synovial chrondromatosis. Viscosupplementation appers to offer benefits in controlling pain and functional improvements. PMID:27244213

  15. Arthroscopic eminoplasty for habitual dislocation of the temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Segami, N; Kaneyama, K; Tsurusako, S; Suzuki, T

    1999-12-01

    A unique surgical technique, arthroscopic eminoplasty was undertaken in 16 joints of 11 patients with habitual dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). There were 10 joints with subluxation and 6 joints with complete dislocation in 4 male and 7 female patients with a mean age of 33 +/- 20 years. The procedure consisted of conventional diagnostic arthroscopy, followed by shaving of approximately 3 to 5 mm in height of the articular eminence with an electric motorized shaver with bone files, depending on the bone thickness as detected by preoperative imaging. The arthroscopic eminoplasty was accomplished without any peri- or postoperative complication. During the postoperative follow-up period of 19 months on average (6-36 months), all patients were free of dislocation of the TMJ, except for one joint. The patients could open their mouth 42 +/- 6 mm without arthralgia 2 weeks after surgery, and finally 47 +/- 7 mm without any subjective symptom but small joint noises (clicking or crepitus) in 10 joints. On postoperative radiographs only minor changes of the mandibular condyle were apparent in four joints. Arthroscopic eminoplasty might become a significant procedure for habitual dislocation of the TMJ and seems to produce results comparable to open arthrotomy. Further study will be required to assess this method as an acceptable modality in the future. PMID:10870759

  16. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis: cone beam computed tomography findings, clinical features, and correlations.

    PubMed

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Kiliç, N; Sümbüllü, M A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and associations between clinical signs and symptoms and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) findings of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Seventy-six patients (total 117 TMJ) with osteoarthritis were included in this study. Clinical signs and symptoms and CBCT findings were reviewed retrospectively. A considerable decrease in mandibular motions and mastication efficiency, and considerable increase in joint sounds and general pain complaints were observed. The most frequent condylar bony changes were erosion (110 joints, 94.0%), followed by flattening (108 joints, 92.3%), osteophytes (93 joints, 79.5%), hypoplasia (22 joints, 18.8%), sclerosis (14 joints, 12.0%), and subchondral cyst (four joints, 3.4%). Flattening of the articular eminence and pneumatization were each observed in five joints. Forty-one patients had bilateral degeneration and 35 had unilateral degeneration. Hypermobility was detected in 47 degenerative joints. Masticatory efficiency was negatively correlated with both condylar flattening and sclerosis, and general pain complaints was positively correlated with condylar flattening. Condylar erosion, flattening, osteophytes, pain, joint sounds, reduced jaw movements, and worsened mastication were common findings in TMJ-OA in the present study. Poor correlations were found between osseous changes and clinical signs and symptoms of TMJ-OA. CBCT is a powerful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of TMJ-OA. PMID:26194774

  17. Occlusal changes secondary to temporomandibular joint conditions: a critical review and implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    CALDAS, Waleska; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; JANSON, Guilherme; Paulo César Rodrigues, CONTI

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and malocclusion is an extremely critical issue in dentistry. Contrary to the old concept that malocclusion causes TMD, occlusal changes, especially those observed as sudden, may be secondary and reflect joint or muscle disorders due to the obvious connection between these structures and the dental occlusion. Objectives The aim of this article is to present the most commonly occlusal changes secondary to TMD. Methods The clinical presentation of these conditions is discussed. Details regarding diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients presenting TMD prior or during treatment are also presented. Conclusions All plans for irreversible therapy should be preceded by a meticulous analysis of TMD signs and symptoms in such a way that patients are not submitted to irreversible treatment, based on an untrue occlusal relationship, secondary to articular and/or muscular disorders. When present, TMD symptoms must always be controlled to reestablish a “normal” occlusion and allow proper treatment strategy. PMID:27556214

  18. Ear pain following temporomandibular surgery originating from the temporomandibular joint or the cranial nervous tissue? A case report.

    PubMed

    Geerse, Wouter K; von Piekartz, Harry J M

    2015-02-01

    A patient presenting with local pain and limitation of movement in the temporomandibular region following surgery of the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is described. Manual techniques like distraction of the TMJ combined with motor control exercises to restore TMJ function were not sufficient to relieve the patient's symptoms and her orofacial functions. However, during manual assessment and treatment of cranial nervous tissue, in this case the auriculotemporal nerve and its interface, pain was relieved and orofacial functions improved. PMID:24948551

  19. Temporomandibular disorders. A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.; Sanchis, Jose M.; Carbonell, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the risk factors and clinical manifestations of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (axis I) versus an age and gender matched control group. Study Design: A total of 162 patients explored according to the RDC/TMD (mean age 40.6±18.8 years, range 7-90; 11.1% males and 88.9% females) were compared with 119 controls, measuring differences in TMD risk factors (sleep disturbances, stress, psychoactive medication, parafunctions, loss of posterior support, ligament hyperlaxity) and clinical variables (joint sounds, painful muscle and joint palpation, maximum aperture). Results: Myofascial pain (MFP) (single or multiple diagnoses) was the most frequent diagnosis (42%). The most common diagnostic combination was MFP plus arthralgia (16.0%). Statistically significant differences were observed in clenching (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1.4-3.8) and in maximum active aperture (MAA) on comparing the two groups both globally (TMD vs. controls) (patients 36.7±8.6 mm, controls 43.1±5.8 mm; F=45.41, p = 0.000) and on comparing according to diagnostic categories. MFP explained most of the observed differences in the risk factors: stress perception (OR=1.98;I.C.:1.01-3.89), psychoactive medication (OR=2.21; I.C.:1.12-4.37), parafunctions (OR=2.14;I.C.:1.12-4.11), and ligament laxity (OR=2.6;I.C.:1.01-6.68). Joint sounds were more frequent in patients with MFP (39.7% vs. 24.0%; χ2=4.66; p=0.03), and painful joint palpation was more common in patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR)(15.9% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 5.2; p = 0.02) and osteoarthrosis (20.8% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 7.0; p = 0.008). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMDs in the general population. Significant differences are observed in clenching and MAA between patients and controls considered both globally and for each diagnostic category individually. The analyzed risk

  20. Simulaciones hidrodinámicas de flujos complejos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Ibáñez Cabanell, José

    Son muchos los escenarios astrofísicos en que los procesos hidrodinámicos juegan un papel clave. En la complejidad que encierra la descripción de dichos procesos destaca el de la correcta simulación de flujos complejos donde la presencia de ondas de choque fuertes que, eventualmente, interaccionan entre ellas o también la presencia de inestabilidades (Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, etc.) suponen un verdadero desafío numérico. Los códigos hidrodinámicos basados en la solución de un problema de valores iniciales discontinuo (problema de Riemann) son, en la actualidad, los más robustos en el campo de la dinámica de fluidos computacional. En esta charla se dará un resumen de los fundamentos de dichas técnicas numéricas (esquemas de alta resolución de captura de choques) y se ilustrará su potencialidad mostrando una amplia gama de resultados en diferentes aplicaciones astrofísicas.

  1. Association between temporomandibular disorders and obesity.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Eunmi; Han, Kyungdo; Yun, Kyoung-In

    2016-08-01

    Psychological stress can induce altered eating patterns, and studies have indicated that there is a correlation between temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and psychological stress. This study investigated the relationship between TMD and body mass index (BMI) in a large representative sample of the South Korean population using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Men and women with TMD showed decreased prevalence of abdominal obesity. Women with TMD had lower age, lower BMI, lower metabolic syndromic waist circumference, lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome, and lower prevalence of diabetes compared with the group without TMD. However, males with TMD didn't show any statistically significant difference between BMI, and metabolic syndromic waist circumference compared with the group without TMD, although there were similar tendencies in the female subject groups. Overall, TMD was associated with decreased BMI and abdominal obesity in women. PMID:27349686

  2. Relationship between oral tori and temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Sirirungrojying, S; Kerdpon, D

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the presence of oral tori and parafunctional activity (clenching, grinding teeth and/or bruxism) between temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients and control subjects. Fifty-nine TMD and 353 control subjects were included. The groups were similar in sex and age distribution. There was no significant difference in prevalence of torus palatinus (TP) between TMD and control group (P = 0.2), while torus mandibularis (TM) was more common in TMD than in control group (P < 0.0005). Parafunctional habit was more common in TMD patients than in the control group (P < 0.0005). There was no significant association between size of TM and Helkimo's dysfunction index (P = 0.4). The results show that the prevalence of TM and parafunctional activity was higher in TMD than control patients. TM might be useful as an indicator of increased risk of TMD in some patients. PMID:10858740

  3. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, S.L.; Lanzetta, M.L.

    1985-06-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.

  4. [Interdisciplinary treatment of temporomandibular inflammation in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Gönner-Ozkan, V; Meyer, P; Tzaribachev, N

    2010-03-01

    Involvement of the temporomandibular joints in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis usually leads to destruction of the mandibular condyles with consistent growth disturbances and facial anomalies. Due to its frequently silent course, temporomandibular arthritis tends to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. In addition to drug therapy, orthodontics and physiotherapy are essential to prevent further progression and restore lost temporomandibular function. PMID:20107815

  5. Pneumatized Articular Eminence and Assessment of Its Prevalence and Features on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Khojastepour, Leila; Ezoddini, Fatemeh; Zeighami, Noshafarin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Pneumatized articular eminence or tubercle (PAT) is an air cell cavity in the zygomatic process of the temporal bone. Pneumatization of articular eminence may be seen incidentally on panoramic radiographs (PRs) as a unilocular or multilocular radiolucent defect. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and the pattern of PAT on PR in an Iranian population. Materials and Methods: A total of 3,098 PRs belonging to 1,735 females and 1,363 males were retrospectively investigated for the presence and radiographic features of PAT. All PRs were taken for routine dental examination. Chi-square test, univariate odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI) and binary logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Results: Overall, PAT was found in 2.1 % of cases including 41 females and 23 males (with a mean age of 33.23±12.43 and 35.64±13.24 years, respectively, range 19–69 years). There were 40 unilateral and 24 bilateral cases (total: 88 PATs) including 49 unilocular and 39 multilocular cases. There was no significant difference in PAT between males and females or different age groups (P>0.05 and all CIs included 1.00). Binary logistic regression indicated that there was no relationship between the presence of PAT and age or sex. Conclusion: Knowledge about this anatomical variation is helpful for clinicians who are planning to perform temporomandibular joint surgery. They should assess the radiographic imaging thoroughly before the surgery. It can also provide valuable information to understand the differential diagnosis of pathological entities in this region. PMID:26622277

  6. Extraction Techniques for the Decellularization of Tissue Engineered Articular Cartilage Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Benjamin D.; Eleswarapu, Sriram V.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2009-01-01

    Several prior studies have been performed to determine the feasibility of tissue decellularization to create a non-immunogenic xenogenic tissue replacement for bladder, vasculature, heart valves, knee meniscus, temporomandibular joint disc, ligament, and tendon. However, limited work has been performed with articular cartilage, and no studies have examined the decellularization of tissue engineered constructs. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of different decellularization treatments on articular cartilage constructs, engineered using a scaffoldless approach, after 4 wks of culture, using a two-phased approach. In the first phase, five different treatments were examined: 1) 1% SDS, 2) 2% SDS, 3) 2% Tributyl phosphate, 4) 2% Triton X-100, and 5) Hypotonic followed by hypertonic solution. These treatments were applied for either 1 h or 8 h, followed by a 2 h wash in PBS. Following this wash, the constructs were assessed histologically, biochemically for cellularity, GAG, and collagen content, and biomechanically for compressive and tensile properties. In phase II, the best treatment from phase I was applied for 1, 2, 4, 6, or 8 h in order to optimize the application time. Treatment with 2% SDS for 1 h or 2 h significantly reduced the DNA content of the tissue, while maintaining the biochemical and biomechanical properties. On the other hand, 2% SDS for 6 h or 8 h resulted in complete histological decellularization, with complete elimination of cell nuclei on histological staining, although GAG content and compressive properties were significantly decreased. Overall, 2% SDS, for 1 or 2 h, appeared to be the most effective agent for cartilage decellularization, as it resulted in decellularization while maintaining the functional properties. The results of this study are exciting as they indicate the feasibility of creating engineered cartilage that may be non-immunogenic as a replacement tissue. PMID:19395023

  7. Contour mapping of the TMJ temporal component and the relationship to articular soft tissue thickness and disk displacement.

    PubMed

    Pullinger, A G; Bibb, C A; Ding, X; Baldioceda, F

    1993-11-01

    The osseous architecture of central sagittal histologic sections of the temporal component of 51 temporomandibular joints of young adults at autopsy was studied to determine if this predicted the thickness of the overlying articular soft tissue and disk displacement. Geometric groupings of fossa-eminence shapes were generated using a hierarchical cluster analysis of the osseous fossa-eminence sigmoid curve, size, and slope. Six cluster groups were evolved and tested for relationship to soft tissue thickness measured at the eminence crest, mid-point of the eminence slope, closed pack location of the condyle, the inflection point, and the depth of the fossa. Soft tissue thickness at the inflection point and depth of the fossa was remarkably constant between cluster groups. Increased soft tissue thickness at the eminence crest and lower part of the posterior slope was weakly correlated to a flatter eminence slope and curve, explaining 10% to 20% of the variance (r2). There were no relationships between the parameters studied to the fossa curvature. An ANOVA showed no statistical difference in the posterior slope angle between the categories of disk position (p = 0.715) or to the six cluster groupings. The results suggest that the osseous contours seen on radiographs may not accurately predict the actual articular surface of the temporal component. PMID:8247506

  8. Intra-articular risks of suprapatellar nailing.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Michael J; Collinge, Cory A; Patzkowski, Jeanne C; Masini, Brendan D; Blease, Robert E; Hsu, Joseph R

    2012-12-01

    To determine the risks to local anatomy near the starting point for tibial nailing during suprapatellar nailing, 15 fresh-frozen hemipelvis specimens were nailed using a suprapatellar technique. After nail passage, the menisci and articular surfaces, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion, intermeniscal ligament, and fat pad were assessed for injury. The distance from the entry portal to the menisci, articular surfaces, and ACL insertion was determined. Medial meniscus injury occurred in 1 (6.7%) specimen and medial articular injury in 2 (13%). Nails passed through the fat pad in all specimens; intermeniscal ligament injury occurred in 3 (20%) specimens. The ACL insertion and lateral structures were not injured in any specimen. The distance from the entry portal margin to the lateral and medial menisci was 6.46±2.47 mm and 4.74±3.17 mm, respectively. The distances to the lateral and medial articular margins measured 10.33±3.62 mm and 6.54±3.57 mm, respectively. The distance to the ACL insertion averaged 5.80±3.94 mm. Suprapatellar nailing is associated with a risk of injury to anterior knee structures comparable to other nailing techniques. Additional clinical studies are warranted to further define the role of this technique in the management of tibial fractures. PMID:23550286

  9. Body Weight Independently Affects Articular Cartilage Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Denning, W. Matt; Winward, Jason G.; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J. Ty; Seeley, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key points Walking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration. Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  10. Temporomandibular joint disorders and maxillomandibular malformations: role of condylar "repositionin" plate.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Noemi; Matteini, Claudio; Incisivo, Veronica; Belli, Evaristo; Evaristo, Belli

    2009-05-01

    Even if the relationship between condylar position and/or temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and dentofacial deformity is controversial in literature, several patients presenting malocclusion refer to pain and TMDs as the main trouble. There are also various opinions concerning the alterations or improvements of temporomandibular joint symptoms after orthognathic surgery. In agreement with the experience of Universität Würzburg, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of splint technique to reproduce centric condyle positioning in bimaxillary osteotomy surgeries for the patients with skeletal-facial disorders and coexisting TMDs. The present study is based on a sample of patients with maxillomandibular malocclusion and coexisting TMDs who underwent bimaxillary osteotomy surgeries with splint technique. All patients underwent a protocol consisting of various steps: Pretreatment evaluation consisted of a questionnaire on subjective symptoms, clinical examinations, photographs of the occlusion, plaster casts, bite registrations, examination of the posture; instrumental examinations; panoramic, teleradiography, and cephalometric analysis; stratigraphy of TMD; and electromyography. Presurgical treatment consisted of therapy by modified Farrar splint associated with a pharmacologic therapy for the acute symptoms; orthodontic treatment associated with a global reeducation of the posture and a pompage of the masticatory muscles; and manufacturing of an occlusal splint in the most posterior asymptomatic position. Surgical treatment consisted of bimaxillary osteotomies performed after registering condyle position by a "repositioning" plate. The condyle position is guided by the intermaxillary fixation with the interposition of the occlusal splint. Surgery on maxillary is performed through Le Fort I osteotomy and fixation. Later, sagittal splint osteotomy of mandible is performed. Position of ramus and TMD complex is guided by the positioning of the plates

  11. Surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint ankyloses: meniscus conservation and relocation.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Claudio; Reale, Gabriele; Calvani, Francesco; Cascone, Piero

    2013-03-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint is a serious complication, mainly after trauma and local or systemic infection. In rare cases, ankylosis is associated with systemic disease such as ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. According to the functional restriction and the provoked disturbances of facial growth in the youth, an early and effective therapy is desirable. There is a wide variety of surgical approaches to temporomandibular joint ankylosis, ranging from chondro-osseous grafts to prothesis. In the article the authors present the clinical case of a 60-year-old patient who, at the age of 6, accidentally fell from a height of about 2 m. In 60 years old, after removing the temporomandibular ankylosis with surgical technique, patient showed a marked improvement of mandibular kinetics. PMID:23524812

  12. An Interesting Case of Gunshot Injury to the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mário Sergio Medeiros; Giongo, Caroline Comis; Antonello, Guilherme de Marco; Couto, Ricardo Torres do; Filho, Ruy de Oliveira Veras; Junior, Otacílio Luiz Chagas

    2014-01-01

    The head and face are relatively common sites of gunshot injury, and the temporomandibular joint is often affected. These wounds usually produce major deformity and functional impairment, particularly when the temporomandibular joint is affected or when structures such as the facial nerve are damaged. Complications may include mandibular displacement at maximum mouth opening and in protrusion, limited mouth opening, limited lateral movement of the jaw, anterior open bite, and, more rarely, temporomandibular ankylosis. Projectiles that strike the mandible usually cause comminuted fractures; maxillary wounds, in turn, are most commonly perforating. The present report describes a case of gunshot injury in which the projectile lodged within the mandibular fossa but did not cause any fractures. Oral and maxillofacial trauma surgeons must be aware of the different types of gunshot injury, as they produce distinct patterns of tissue destruction due to projectile trajectory and release of kinetic energy into surrounding tissue. PMID:25709756

  13. Alterations in intermediate filaments expression in disc cells from the rat temporomandibular joint following exposure to continuous compressive force

    PubMed Central

    Magara, Jin; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Suzuki, Akiko; Kawano, Yoshiro; Ono, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2012-01-01

    The articular disc in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that serves in load relief and stabilizing in jaw movements is a dense collagenous tissue consisting of extracellular matrices and disc cells. The various morphological configurations of the disc cells have given us diverse names, such as fibroblasts, chondrocyte-like cells and fibrochondrocytes; however, the characteristics of these cells have remained to be elucidated in detail. The disc cells have been reported to exhibit heterogeneous immunoreaction patterns for intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin and vimentin in the adult rat TMJ. Because these intermediate filaments accumulate in the disc cells as tooth eruption proceeds during postnatal development, it might be surmised that the expression of these intermediate filaments in the disc cells closely relates to mechanical stress. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine the effect of a continuous compressive force on the immunoexpression of these intermediate filaments and an additional intermediate filament – muscle-specific desmin – in the disc cells of the TMJ disc using a rat experimental model. The rats wore an appliance that exerts a continuous compressive load on the TMJ. The experimental period with the appliance was 5 days as determined by previous studies, after which some experimental animals were allowed to survive another 5 days after removal of the appliance. Histological observations demonstrated that the compressive force provoked a remarkable acellular region and a decrease in the thickness of the condylar cartilage of the mandible, and a sparse collagen fiber distribution in the articular disc. The articular disc showed a significant increase in the number of desmin-positive cells as compared with the controls. In contrast, immunopositive cells for GFAP, nestin and vimentin remained unchanged in number as well as intensity. At 5 days after removal of the appliance, both the disc

  14. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40–70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. PMID:26096083

  15. Articular synovial chondromatosis of the finger.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazufumi; Hashimoto, Tomohisa; Kimura, Kazumasa; Ozeki, Satoru

    2014-10-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of synovial chondromatosis of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the right ring finger, which was resected through both dorsal and volar incisions. To our knowledge there have been only 17 reported cases of articular synovial chondromatosis of the digital joint so far. We present a case affecting the metacarpophalangeal joint with a review of scattered information found in other 17 reports. PMID:23596991

  16. Surface of articular cartilage: immunohistological studies.

    PubMed

    Duance, V C

    1983-10-01

    Using several physical techniques the surface of articular cartilage has been reported to be structurally different from the deeper layers. In this paper using immunohistochemical methods, the surface has been shown to contain a characteristically different collagen, Type I in contrast to Type II which is the major collagen of cartilage. These results support previous proposals for a surface layer, or lamina splendens, the presence of which would be of considerable importance in understanding the degradation of cartilage in arthritides. PMID:6678620

  17. Sleep bruxism and myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Karen G.; Sirois, David A.; Janal, Malvin N.; Wigren, Pia E.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many dentists believe that sleep bruxism (SB) is a pathogenic factor in myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but almost all supportive data rely on patients’ self-reports rather than on direct observation. Methods The authors administered a structured self-report interview to determine whether a large and well-characterized sample of patients with myofascial TMD (124 women) experienced SB more often than did matched control participants (46 women). The authors then used data from a two-night laboratory-based polysomnographic (PSG) study to determine whether the case participants exhibited more SB than the control participants. Results The results of independent sample t tests and χ2 analyses showed that, although self-reported rates of SB were significantly higher in case participants (55.3 percent) than in control participants (15.2 percent), PSG-based measures showed much lower and statistically similar rates of SB in the two groups (9.7 percent and 10.9 percent, respectively). Grinding noises were common in both case participants (59.7 percent) and control participants (78.3 percent). Conclusions Most case participants did not exhibit SB, and the common belief that SB is a sufficient explanation for myofascial TMD should be abandoned. Clinical Implications Although other reasons to consider treating SB may exist, misplaced concern about SB’s sustaining or exacerbating a chronic myofascial TMD condition should not be used to justify SB treatment. PMID:23115152

  18. Osteochondritis dissecans of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Campos, P S F; Freitas, C E; Pena, N; Gonzalez, M O D; Almeida, S M; Mariz, A C R; Lorens, F G L

    2005-05-01

    A case is reported of a 43-year-old female patient presenting bilateral osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in different stages for each side, associated with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the right condyle. Additionally observed was anterior disk displacement without reduction for both sides. We have proposed an adaptation of the previous classification of OCD for cases affecting the TMJ. We have also stressed the fundamental role of panoramic radiography on the diagnosis of stage 3 and stage 4 OCD of the TMJ. In relation to MRI, we have recommended sagittal (slice thickness of 2 mm) and coronal (slice thickness of 1 mm) fast spin-echo proton density-weighted sequences to better identify bone lesions (stage 1 and 2) and also localize osteochondral loose bodies; and coronal (slice thickness of 1 mm) fat-suppressed fast spin-echo T2 weighted sequence to better evaluate OCD (stable or unstable) and the features of the occasionally associated AVN (acute or chronic). PMID:15897292

  19. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  20. [Total temporomandibular joint replacement with alloplastic prosthesis].

    PubMed

    García-Huerta, Marco Antonio; Romero-Flores, Jovita; Mena-Gómez, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Three total temporomandibular joint (TMJ) replacement surgeries were performed on two patients with TMJ ankylosis using W. Lorenz system. The first surgery was performed on a female patient with osseous ankylosis who had no mandibular movement since she was 18 months old. The second surgery was on a patient with fibrous ankylosis who had an interincisive opening distance of 12 mm. Her condition was the result of a three year old subcondylar fracture which didn't receive any treatment. The first patient had total replacement of both TMJs, while the other just one TMJ. The follow up until today has been of eight months with an interincisive opening of 29 mm in the first patient and 34 mm in the other. There has not been any mandibular deviation during opening, nor postoperative pain in both cases. Facial nerve affection was not permanent in both patients. For all of this, we can conclude that total TMJ replacement is an effective treatment with stable results in patients with TMJ ankylosis. PMID:23234748

  1. Temporomandibular disorders and bruxism. Part I.

    PubMed

    Kevilj, R; Mehulic, K; Dundjer, A

    2007-01-01

    Correct functioning of the entire stomatognathic system is achieved by a compatible relationship of all its parts. Four determinants, by their mutual harmonious activity, dictate the function of the entire system: the teeth, periodontium with supporting structure, muscles, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and CNS. In such a complex system a disorder of any integrative part causes disturbances also in other parts of the system. Changed functions can arise through organic disorder, and also iatrogenically by inadequate conservative, prosthetic, surgical or orthodontic therapy. For this reason it is often difficult to recognise the primary cause. The first responses of the system to the disorder are adaptive mechanisms which occur within one or more integrative parts, and depending on their intensity and duration symptoms grow more prominent. Tissue response can be ortho- or parafunctional. Attempts are made to exclude psychoemotional influences and the obstacle eliminated by either abrasion, clenching or grinding of the teeth. If the obstacle is not eliminated by abrasion, the cause of such functional disorder becomes the trigger for parafunctional activity. From a review of the relevant literature it can be concluded that parafunctional activity is caused by changed occlusion, with determined psychological habits of the patient and specific tissue response of the stomatognathic system. Therefore, therapy of these disorders is made more difficult and includes a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:17912197

  2. Temporomandibular joint replacement: a New Zealand perspective.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, B; Buchanan, J; Cliff, J

    2014-05-01

    Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement (TMJ TJR) has been performed in New Zealand utilizing the TMJ Concepts patient-fitted system since 2000. The data analysed in this study were collected retrospectively from questionnaires sent to all maxillofacial surgeons in New Zealand who had implanted TMJ Concepts devices between 2000 and 2011. A total of 63 devices were implanted in 42 patients (13 males, 29 females) during this 12-year period. The primary indication for TMJ TJR was end-stage joint disease resulting from ankylosis and arthritis. The mean age of the patients was 47 years (range 7-80 years). The most common complication reported was transient facial nerve impairment in 4.8% of the patients. Objective results, measured as the maximal incisional opening, improved by a mean of 17.3mm (P<0.01); 90% of patients reported improved quality of life. New Zealand oral and maxillofacial surgeons have concluded that TMJ TJR using the TMJ Concepts prosthesis is a reliable treatment option for the management of end-stage TMJ disease. PMID:24332584

  3. Inflammatory pseudotumour of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Y; Yau, A Y; Ziai, K; Maducdoc, M M; Djalilian, H R

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck inflammatory pseudotumors (IPs) are rare, idiopathic, non-neoplastic lesions that most commonly affect the orbit, but may involve other areas such as the larynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinuses, and meninges. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left-sided hearing loss, aural fullness, and otalgia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a soft-tissue mass in the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Histopathologic examination showed overlying squamous epithelium with hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, subepithelial fibrosis, and chronic inflammatory infiltrate, which were consistent with an IP. Radiologic images and MRI indicated an ill-defined soft tissue involving the roof and posterior aspect of the TMJ, extending into the anterior external auditory canal. Our case was treated with a 2-week course of high dose prednisone (1 mg/kg) and a 2-week taper with resolution of symptoms. Two years after treatment, the patient shows no evidence of recurrence on MRI. PMID:26891541

  4. Assessment of temporomandibular injury and orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Talley, R L

    1995-01-01

    Every individual has physical faults which makes him less than a perfect biological specimen. This is the foundation for the legal "eggshell principal." Most of us do not have perfect skeletal formation, muscular adaptation, neurological or vascular systems. Additionally, we may not have complete symmetry and ideal form to our cranium or mandible. Our dentitions are imperfect. All of these imperfections play a role in every injury. The variances of normal that are seen in any medical or dental population, must be accepted; therefore, a given injury can have tremendously varied sequelae, depending on the person receiving it. The patho-physiology resultant from an accident may not parallel the severity of the motor vehicle accident, fall or blow. Prompt and proper evaluation of the individual-turned-patient is imperative. Referral to a dentist, competent in providing the necessary evaluation of the injury, is the responsibility of those individuals attending to the injured person's physical, emotional, and financial trauma. Their physician, dentist, attorney or counselor should take the responsibility of providing proper referral. The four most dangerous words in medicine and dentistry today are: "It Will Go Away." People often develop serious sequelae by assuming that their problem will "go away" by just leaving it alone long enough or by simply ignoring it. With proper evaluation and management, most trauma related temporomandibular injuries can be corrected or at least be properly managed. PMID:9526244

  5. Hereditary uricemia and articular gout in chickens.

    PubMed

    Cole, R K; Austic, R E

    1980-05-01

    Ten generations of selection for uricemia and articular gout have led to the development of the HUA line which is characterized by a threefold increase in plasma level of uric acid when compared to the control LUA line, even when fed diets containing normal levels of protein. Articular gout results in many cases, especially among adult males fed a normal breeder diet. Restriction protein level of the diet delays or prevents the development of articular gout in mature males of the HUA line. The data suggest that relatively few genes are responsible for the defect in renal transport of uric acid which underlies the uricemia and gout. The association of lower levels of uric acid with dominant white plumage color suggests a linkage of a major recessive gene for the I gene. Ambient temperature, because of its effect on food consumption, influences the level of uric acid in blood plasma. The HUA line and its control (LUA line), both sex-linked dwarfs, would appear to provide an excellent animal model for the experimental study of gout in man. PMID:7393846

  6. Vitrification of intact human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jomha, Nadr M; Elliott, Janet A W; Law, Garson K; Maghdoori, Babak; Forbes, J Fraser; Abazari, Alireza; Adesida, Adetola B; Laouar, Leila; Zhou, Xianpei; McGann, Locksley E

    2012-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries do not heal and large defects result in osteoarthritis with major personal and socioeconomic costs. Osteochondral transplantation is an effective treatment for large joint defects but its use is limited by the inability to store cartilage for long periods of time. Cryopreservation/vitrification is one method to enable banking of this tissue but decades of research have been unable to successfully preserve the tissue while maintaining cartilage on its bone base - a requirement for transplantation. To address this limitation, human knee articular cartilage from total knee arthroplasty patients and deceased donors was exposed to specified concentrations of 4 different cryoprotective agents for mathematically determined periods of time at lowering temperatures. After complete exposure, the cartilage was immersed in liquid nitrogen for up to 3 months. Cell viability was 75.4 ± 12.1% determined by membrane integrity stains and confirmed with a mitochondrial assay and pellet culture documented production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and collagen II similar to controls. This report documents successful vitrification of intact human articular cartilage on its bone base making it possible to bank this tissue indefinitely. PMID:22698720

  7. Various Spectrum of MRI Findings in Articular and Para-articular Tuberculosis: Pictorial Assay.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Hiten; Chiripal, Priyanka

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a health-related issue in India. Musculoskeletal tuberculosis is noted to occur dramatically as isolates, primarily accounting for large numbers of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis since early diagnosis is always a priority; with good prognosis, it is a curable disease. Delayed treatment is associated with severe morbidity. Musculoskeletal tuberculosis accounts for a large number of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. In this article, we describe various articular and para-articular MRI spectrum findings that are seen in patients with tuberculosis. MRI is the perfect modality to study the extent of involvement and its related complications. PMID:26730089

  8. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reconstruct the temporomandibular joint. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  9. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reconstruct the temporomandibular joint. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  10. Duplex Doppler ultrasound study of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Stagnitti, A.; Marini, A.; Impara, L.; Drudi, F.M.; Lo mele, L.; Lillo Odoardi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The anatomy and physiology of the temporomandibular joint can be studied clinically and by diagnostic imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiography (X-ray) and computed tomography (CT) have thus for many years contributed to the study of the kinetics in the mandibular condyle. However, also duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination is widely used in the study of structures during movement, particularly vascular structures. Materials and methods A total of 30 patients were referred by the Department of Orthodontics to the Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “La Sapienza”. All patients underwent duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination of the temporomandibular joint using Toshiba APLIO SSA-770A equipment and duplex Doppler multi-display technique, which allows simultaneous display of US images and color Doppler signals. A linear phased array probe with crystal elements was used operating at a basic frequency of 6 MHz during pulsed Doppler spectral analysis and 7.5 MHz during US imaging. Results In normal patients a regular alternation in the spectral Doppler waveforms was obtained, while in patients with temporomandibular joint meniscus dysfunction there was no regularity in the sum of the Fourier series with an unsteady waveform pattern related to irregular movements of the temporomandibular joint. Conclusions In all cases duplex Doppler US examination proved able to differentiate between normal and pathological patients and among the latter this technique permitted identification of the most significant aspects of the dysfunctional diseases. PMID:23397016

  11. Case-Based Learning for Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Glenn T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The use of interactive computer-based simulation of cases of chronic orofacial pain and temporomandibular joint disfunction patients for clinical dental education is described. Its application as a voluntary study aid in a third-year dental course is evaluated for effectiveness and for time factors in case completion. (MSE)

  12. [Temporomandibular ankylosis in Gabon (apropos of 13 case reports)].

    PubMed

    Rives, J M; Cantaloube, D; Kremer, A

    1988-01-01

    The authors report on 13 cases of temporomandibular ankylosis observed in Gabon. Based on an epidemiologic and etio-pathogenic study, they dwell on the existing therapy of this affection, i.e. broad osteotomy with silicone interposition followed by mechanotherapy prolonged in time. Prophylaxis is discussed in the framework of Primary Health Care. PMID:3405073

  13. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  14. Condylar bony changes in patients with temporomandibular disorders: a CBCT study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Diagnosis of osteoarthritis most commonly depends on clinical and radiographic findings. The present study attempted to observe the bony changes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patients from all age groups. Materials and Methods The first-visit clinical records and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data of 440 TMJs from 220 consecutive TMJ patients were reviewed retrospectively. Results The most frequent condylar bony change observed was sclerosis (133 joints, 30.2%) followed by surface erosion (129 joints, 29.3%), flattening of the articular surface (112 joints, 25.5%), and deviation in form (58 joints, 13.2%), which included 33 TMJs in a cane-shape, 16 with a lateral or medial pole depression, 6 with posterior condylar surface flattening, and 3 with a bifid-shaped condyle. Fifty-three joints (12.0%) showed hypoplastic condyles but only 1 joint showed hyperplasia. Osteophyte was found in 35 joints (8.0%) and subcortical cyst in 24 joints (5.5%), 5 of which had surface erosion as well. One hundred nineteen joints (27.0%) had only one kind of condylar bony change, 66 joints (15.0%) had two, 52 joints (11.8%) had three, 12 joints (5.0%) had four, and 6 joints (1.4%) had five kinds of condylar bony changes at the same time. Eighty-five (65.9%) of 129 joints with surface erosion had pain recorded at the chief complaint. Conclusion With more widespread use of CBCT, more specific or detailed guidelines for osteoarthritis are needed. PMID:23301212

  15. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Leale, Dustin M.; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure–function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure–function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter’s hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  16. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J M; Leale, Dustin M; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure-function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure-function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter's hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  17. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Avila, F J; Chávez-López, M; Chavira-González, J R; Ramos-Remus, C

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthrosis (OA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday's life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1) the presence of pain; 2) difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3) the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%). Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005). We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16%) patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily. PMID:23884028

  18. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    PIZOLATO, Raquel Aparecida; FERNANDES, Frederico Silva de Freitas; GAVIÃO, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. Material and methods Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls), aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years) with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) (axis I) and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40), TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68), TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33), and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11). Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (α=0.05). Results A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. Conclusions There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/. PMID:21986655

  19. Effect of pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate and the other factors related to outcome in patients with non-reducing disk displacement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Goto, S; Kasahara, T; Kawamura, H; Motegi, K

    2001-06-01

    We retrospectively examined the effect of pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the other factors influencing outcome in patients with non-reducing disk displacement of the TMJ. Fifty-nine patients underwent pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate into the TMJ. As control, 62 patients were observed without any treatment. Both groups were observed for 12 months. The relation between outcome and the following clinical characteristics was also studied: sex, age, range of motion for maximal mouth opening, TMJ pain, TMJ noise, tenderness of masticatory muscles, locking duration, intercuspal occlusions, angle of posterior slope of articular eminence and degenerative bony changes of the condyle. Logistic regression analysis revealed that pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate was related to a good outcome. Clinical characteristics of presentation significantly related to a good outcome were a large maximal mouth opening, a short locking duration, and a steep posterior slope of articular eminence. We conclude that pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate into the TMJ is an effective treatment method for non-reducing disk displacement of the TMJ and that some clinical characteristics also influence outcome. PMID:11420900

  20. Changes in temporomandibular joint morphology in class II patients treated with fixed mandibular repositioning and evaluated through 3D imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, M A Q; Alsufyani, N; Flores-Mir, C; Nebbe, B; Major, P W

    2015-11-01

    To estimate the effects of skeletal class II malocclusion treatment using fixed mandibular repositioning appliances on the position and morphology of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Two independent reviewers performed comprehensive electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM reviews and Scopus (until May 5, 2015). The references of the identified articles were also manually searched. All studies investigating morphological changes of the TMJ articular disc, condyle and glenoid fossa with 3D imaging following non-surgical fixed mandibular repositioning appliances in growing individuals with class II malocclusions were included in the analysis. Of the 269 articles initially reviewed, only 12 articles used magnetic resonance imaging and two articles used computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT images. Treatment effect on condyle and glenoid fossa was discussed in eight articles. Treatment effect on TMJ articular disc position and morphology was discussed in seven articles. All articles showed a high risk of bias due to deficient methodology: inadequate consideration of confounding variables, blinding of image assessment, selection or absence of control group and outcome measurement. Reported changes in osseous remodelling, condylar and disc position were contradictory. The selected articles failed to establish conclusive evidence of the exact nature of TMJ tissue response to fixed mandibular repositioning appliances. PMID:26260422

  1. Effect of psychological stress on the structure of the temporomandibular joint and the expression of MMP-3 and TIMP-3 in the cartilage in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Liu, Haixia; Xiao, Peng; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Hongyu

    2014-10-01

    Our aim was to observe the effects of psychological stress on the structure of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and to evaluate the expression of matrix metallopeptidase-3 (MMP-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) in condylar chondrocytes in rats. The rats were divided into 3 groups of 12 according to the duration of psychological stress: 3 weeks or 6 weeks, and 6 weeks of recovery. A fourth group of 12 rats was used as controls. Each rat was evaluated by the open-field test and the weight measured. The results confirmed psychological stress in 24 of the 36 rats (67%). The tissues of the TMJ were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and pathological changes were studied under a light microscope. MMP-3 and TIMP-3 expression was investigated using the SP kit. The experimental groups showed thinning of articular cartilage, shedding of collagen fibres, cracks in the articular discs, and other structural changes that were aggravated with time, from three weeks to six weeks. The 6-week recovery group showed an improvement in these changes, which indicated the initiation of joint repair. The MMP-3 expression rate correlated with the degree of joint lesion, while the TIMP-3 rate showed an opposite trend and was highest in the 6-week recovery group. Our findings clearly indicate that psychological stress may play an important part in the development of TMJ diseases in rats; further studies should be made to extrapolate the results to other models before clinical use. PMID:25060974

  2. [Improvement of outcomes by primary treatment for temporomandibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shigeru; Kino, Koji; Iwaki, Hiroshi; Amagasa, Teruo

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the current state of the temporomandibular joint disorder treatment in our clinic and to confirm the therapeutic outcomes. The subjects in this study were recruited from among the patients with temporomandibular disorders who attended the Temporomandibular Disorder Special Clinic, Department of Oral Surgery, Hitachi Yokohama Hospital during one year period from February 2007 to January 2008. A total of 100 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders were selected for the study. Pain intensity and the degree to which daily function was limited before and after treatment were evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) score was evaluated simultaneously, and the correlation with changes in symptom was evaluated. The median (25th, 75th percentiles) of pain intensity (VAS value) before treated was 45 (25.0, 65.0) and the degree of limitation of daily function (VAS value) was 15 (0.0, 50.0). The median (25th, 75th percentiles) of pain intensity at 4 weeks after was 10 (0.0, 30.0), and significantly lower than that before treatment (p = 0.000). The degree of limitation of daily function was 0 (0.0, 10.0), also significantly lower than that before treatment (p = 0.000). The BDI-II score decreased from 8 (2.0, 11.8) before treatment to 5 (2.0, 11.0, p = 0.024) and showed no significant correlation with the improvement in outcomes by primary treatment for temporomandibular disorders. PMID:19044015

  3. Oral health status and temporomandibular disorders in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Zoran; Uhac, Ivone; Buković, Dino; Cabov, Tomislav; Kovacević, Daniela; Grzić, Renata

    2005-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology involving the central nervous system. Certain clinical manifestations affect the oro-facial region. Three in particular should be of interest to the dentist: trigeminal neuralgia, sensory neuropathy of the trigeminal nerve and facial palsy. The aim of this study was to determine the oral health status, the frequency of subjective symptoms and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) subtype according to Research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) among MS patients. Examinees in this study were 50 patients suffering from MS, who were at least once treated during their disease in the Clinic Hospital Center, Rijeka, Clinic for Neurology. All examinees had to meet the diagnostic criteria for clinically and laboratory confirmed MS, according to Poser. The results show the difference in mean DMFT (decayed, missing, filled teeth) between MS and the control group. The number of decayed and missing teeth was higher, but the number of filled teeth was significantly lower in MS group. Eighty-two per cent of the subjects with MS had a least one symptom of dysfunction compared with 24% of the subjects in the healthy control group. In the present study, pain, the pain during mouth opening, the difficulty with mouth opening and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds were more commonly reported in the MS group than in the control group. This study shows a statistically significant excess of dental caries and temporomandibular disorders among MS patients compared with the control group. These results suggest that MS is a possible etiological factor in temporomandibular disorders. PMID:16417141

  4. Distinguishing ankle and knee articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Cole, Ada A; Margulis, Arkady; Kuettner, Klaus E

    2003-06-01

    Degenerative changes in the tall and femoral distal cartilages of more than 2,000 tissue donors were graded based on the appearance of articular cartilage and osteophytes. In the ankle and the knee the degenerative changes increased with age; however, the rate of degeneration in the ankle was slower than in the knee. The degenerative changes in the ankle were more severe in men than in women, were predominantly bilateral, and seemed to be correlated with weight. The slower rate of change in the ankle may be caused, in part, by the biochemical and biomechanical tissue properties that distinguish ankle cartilage from that of the knee. PMID:12911243

  5. Treatment of articular fractures with continuous passive motion.

    PubMed

    Onderko, Laura Lynn; Rehman, Saqib

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a review of the basic science and current research on the use of continuous passive motion therapy after surgery for an intra-articular fracture. This information is useful for surgeons in the postoperative management of intra-articular fractures in determining the best course of treatment to reduce complications and facilitate quicker recovery. PMID:23827837

  6. Correlation of stress and muscle activity of patients with different degrees of temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tosato, Juliana de Paiva; Caria, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; Gomes, Cid Andre Fidelis de Paula; Berzin, Fausto; Politti, Fabiano; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Temporomandibular disorder is one of the many different adverse health conditions that can be triggered by stress. Therefore, a biopsychosocial model has been proposed to characterize the multifactorial nature of temporomandibular disorder. The aim of the present study was investigate the correlation of salivary cortisol levels with the activities of the masseter and anterior temporal muscles of patients with different degrees of temporomandibular disorder. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine women between 18 and 40 years of age with a diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders were evaluated using the Fonseca Index to determine the degree of the disorder. Salivary cortisol levels were determined and surface electromyography was used to evaluate electrical activity in the masticatory muscles. [Results] Positive correlations were found among the degree of temporomandibular disorder, electromyographic activity and salivary cortisol: as women with more severe temporomandibular disorder had greater electrical activity in the muscles analyzed, especially the anterior temporal muscle, and higher levels of cortisol. [Conclusion] Muscle activity was greater among individuals with severe temporomandibular disorder and positive correlations were found among electromyographic activity, salivary cortisol and the degree of temporomandibular disorder severity. PMID:25995595

  7. Analysis of magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and pain in temporomandibular joints with and without degenerative changes of the condyle.

    PubMed

    Campos, M I G; Campos, P S F; Cangussu, M C T; Guimarães, R C; Line, S R P

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics in 104 TMJs with and 58 without degenerative changes of the condyle, such as osteophytes, erosion, avascular necrosis, subcondral cyst and intra-articular loose bodies. TMJ images were also assessed for flattening, retropositioning and hypomobility of condyle and disc displacement. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR) and the presence of degenerative bony changes (p=0.00). Flattening, retropositioning and hypomobility of condyle showed no significant difference in relation to the presence or absence of degenerative bony changes. Retropositioning of the condyle was significantly associated to disc displacement with reduction (DDwR) (p=0.00), while condylar hypomobility was significantly more frequent in TMJ with DDwoR (p<0.05). Independent of the presence or type of DD, TMJ pain was more frequent in the presence of degenerative bony changes. When considering only DDwR, TMJ pain was significantly associated to a degenerative condition (p=0.03). When there were no degenerative bony changes, TMJ pain was significantly more frequent in DDwoR (p=0.04). Despite the present findings, the absence of symptoms in some patients with condylar bony changes suggests that the diagnosis of osteoarthritis should be established by evaluation of magnetic resonance images in association with clinical examination. PMID:18440778

  8. Rabbit model for osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint as a basis for assessment of outcomes after intervention.

    PubMed

    Artuzi, Felipe Ernesto; Langie, Renan; Abreu, Maíra Cavallet de; Quevedo, Alexandre Silva; Corsetti, Adriana; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis can be induced in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by primary or secondary trauma, or overloading of the joint. We have therefore systematically evaluated the histological progression of experimental osteoarthritis induced by a high concentration of monosodium iodoacetate into the rabbit TMJ. These findings may contribute to the establishment of a protocol to investigate the benefits of treatment of osteoarthritis of the TMJ. We used 21 male New Zealand rabbits; the 15 in the test group were given an intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate 10mg/ml into the right TMJ and were killed after 60 (n=5), 80 (n=5), and 100 days (n=5). The six in the control group were given an injection of saline into the right TMJ. The assessment system for osteoarthritis based on six grades was used for the histological analysis of severity. The model was effective in producing histological changes in the cartilage consistent with those found in osteoarthritis at all time points. The within-group analysis indicated that the disease did not progress after 60 days. The successful induction of osteoarthritis in this way, its stabilisation after 60 days, and the appropriate size of the animal suggest that this experimental model is ideal for future studies of the effectiveness of treatment in osteoarthritis of the TMJ. PMID:26872897

  9. Low-level laser therapy stimulates tissue repair and reduces the extracellular matrix degradation in rats with induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; de Souza Pires, Ivan Luiz; de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize morphological and biochemistry action of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into groups with 12 animals each: (AG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and (LG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and treated with LLLT (830 nm, 30 mW, 3 J/cm(2)). Right TMJs in the AG group were used as noninjected control group (CG). Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of 50 μl Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) and LLLT began 1 week after arthritis induction. Histopathological analysis was performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Toluidine Blue, and picrosirius. Biochemical analysis was determined by the total concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and evaluation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Statistical analysis was performed using paired and unpaired t tests, with p < 0.05. Compared to AG, LG had minor histopathological changes in the TMJ, smaller thickness of the articular disc in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001), high birefringence of collagen fibers in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001) on the articular disc, and statistically lower activity of MMP-2 latent (p < 0.0001), MMP-2 active (P = 0.02), MMP-9 latent (p < 0.0001), and MMP-9 active (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that LLLT can increase the remodeling and enhancing tissue repair in TMJ with induced arthritis. PMID:27147076

  10. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  11. Toward patient-specific articular contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Henak, Corinne R.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of contacting cartilage layers is fundamentally important to understanding the development, homeostasis and pathology of diarthrodial joints. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of both the materials and the contact problem itself, numerical methods such as the finite element method are typically incorporated to obtain solutions. Over the course of five decades, we have moved from an initial qualitative understanding of articular cartilage material behavior to the ability to perform complex, three-dimensional contact analysis, including multiphasic material representations. This history includes the development of analytical and computational contact analysis methods that now provide the ability to perform highly nonlinear analyses. Numerical implementations of contact analysis based on the finite element method are rapidly advancing and will soon enable patient-specific analysis of joint contact mechanics using models based on medical image data. In addition to contact stress on the articular surfaces, these techniques can predict variations in strain and strain through the cartilage layers, providing the basis to predict damage and failure. This opens up exciting areas for future research and application to patient-specific diagnosis and treatment planning applied to a variety of pathologies that affect joint function and cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25698236

  12. Imaging of articular cartilage: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    RONGA, MARIO; ANGERETTI, GLORIA; FERRARO, SERGIO; DE FALCO, GIOVANNI; GENOVESE, EUGENIO A.; CHERUBINO, PAOLO

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard method for non-invasive assessment of joint cartilage, providing information on the structure, morphology and molecular composition of this tissue. There are certain minimum requirements for a MRI study of cartilage tissue: machines with a high magnetic field (> 1.5 Tesla); the use of surface coils; and the use of T2-weighted, proton density-weighted fast-spin echo (T2 FSE-DP) and 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted gradient echo (3D-FS T1W GRE) sequences. For better contrast between the different joint structures, MR arthography is a method that can highlight minimal fibrillation or fractures of the articular surface and allow evaluation of the integrity of the native cartilage-repair tissue interface. To assess the biochemical composition of cartilage and cartilage repair tissue, various techniques have been proposed for studying proteoglycans [dGEMRIC, T1rho mapping, sodium (23Na) imaging MRI, etc.], collagen, and water distribution [T2 mapping, “magnetisation transfer contrast”, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and so on]. Several MRI classifications have been proposed for evaluating the processes of joint degeneration (WORMS, BLOKS, ICRS) and post-surgical maturation of repair tissue (MOCART, 3D MOCART). In the future, isotropic 3D sequences set to improve image quality and facilitate the diagnosis of disorders of articular structures adjacent to cartilage. PMID:25606557

  13. [Articular chondrocalcinosis after 80 years of age].

    PubMed

    Memin, Y; Monville, C; Ryckewaert, A

    1978-02-01

    In 108 women over 80 (mean age 88,4 years, extremes 80 and 99 years) hospitalized in a geriatric service for various reasons, radiograms were made of both knees in the frontal aspect on standard film to detect calcinosis of the meniscus and chondrocalcinosis of the joint. In 25 women (23.1%) the radiographs revealed calcinosis of the meniscus with or without chondrocalcinosis. In these 25 cases a lateral X-ray was also made of the two knees, frontal X-rays were made of the pelvis, thumbs and shoulders. In 22 cases (88%) these revealed calcification of the fibrocartilages or articular cartilages in joints other than the knee. Seven of the 25 women had at least one attack of articular inflammation (especially of the knee) resembling a pseudo-gout crisis. The frequency of chronic arthropathies resembling arthroses was high in the 25 patients with chondrocalcinosis: 8 (32%) had an internal or external femoro-tibial arthrosis, as against 11 of the 83 patients (13%) of the same age without chondrocalcinosis, a significant difference. Eleven of the 25 women had signs of femororotular arthrosis on the lateral X-rays of the knees, 5 had coxarthrosis (with in 3 cases a radiological image of fibrocartilaginous or coxofemoral cartilaginous calcification). One women had chronic radiocarpal arthropathy evocative or chondrocalcinosis. Ten had a scaphotrapezoidal arthrosis, 5 arthrosis of the shoulder, 3 with radiological aspect of glenohumeral chondrocalcinosis. PMID:644241

  14. Bite force and temporomandibular disorder in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wenneberg, B; Kjellberg, H; Kiliaridis, S

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional condition of the stomatognathic system in children suffering from juvenile chronic arthritis, with respect to bite force and temporomandibular disorder in relation to radiographic abnormalities of the mandibular condyle, occlusal factors and systemic disease parameters. Thirty-five children with juvenile chronic arthritis were compared to 89 healthy children with an Angle Class I occlusion and 62 children with an Angle Class II malocclusion. Subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorder and radiographic mandibular condylar changes were more common in children with juvenile chronic arthritis than in the two comparison groups. Maximal molar and incisal bite forces and maximal molar bite force endurance times were also significantly reduced in children with juvenile chronic arthritis. It is concluded that the differences between the groups are caused mainly by the systemic inflammatory disease itself, but a functional influence of weakened masticatory muscles cannot be excluded. PMID:7472737

  15. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of “TMJ arthroscopic surgery”, this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results. PMID:25737901

  16. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer™, an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient's pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline. PMID:24019797

  17. [Can orthodontic treatment generate temporomandibular disorders and pain? A review].

    PubMed

    Gebeile-Chauty, Sarah; Robin, Olivier; Messaoudi, Yassine; Aknin, Jean-Jacques

    2010-03-01

    While considered for years to play the primary role in the etiology of temporo-mandibular joint disturbances (TMD), occlusal discrepancies are now considered to be just one causative factor among many. Recent studies, literature reviews or meta-analyses, and longitudinal studies with follow-up of children treated for many years all conclude that there is no risk of orthodontic treatment giving rise to episodes of temporo-mandibular disorders. The signs of TMD appearing during the course of orthodontic treatment should be considered in the context of the epidemiology of the disorder, which is characterized by a strong increase in its occurrence during adolescence. In conclusion, it should be stated that if orthodontic treatment can no longer be considered as one of the etiopathogenic factors in the TMD complex, there are no scientific arguments to justify the converse, that there are indications for orthodontic treatment whose sole goal would be the treatment of TMD. PMID:20359451

  18. Body posture evaluations in subjects with internal temporomandibular joint derangement.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Wagner Cesar; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify possible relationships between global body posture and temporomandibular joint internal derangement (TMJ-id), by comparing 30 subjects presenting typical TMJ-id signs to 20 healthy subjects. Body posture was assessed using the analysis of muscle chains on several photographs. Results show a higher frequency of lifted shoulders (p=0.04) and of changes in the antero-internal hip chain (p=0.02) in the test group, but no further differences were found significant between the control and test groups. The test group was then divided into three subgroups according to the Helkimo index of temporomandibular disorder severity. Again, no significant differences were found between the subgroups. However, there was a trend noticed in the group with the most severe dysfunction, to present a forward head and shoulders posture. Results are discussed in light of previous studies using the same sample. PMID:19891257

  19. Regional 3D superimposition to assess temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, J; Gomes, L C R; Benavides, E; Nguyen, T; Paniagua, B; Styner, M; Boen, V; Gonçalves, J R; Cevidanes, L H S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the reliability of regional three-dimensional registration and superimposition methods for assessment of temporomandibular joint condylar morphology across subjects and longitudinally. Methods: The sample consisted of cone beam CT scans of 36 patients. The across-subject comparisons included 12 controls, mean age 41.3 ± 12.0 years, and 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 41.3 ± 14.7 years. The individual longitudinal assessments included 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 37.8 ± 16.7 years, followed up at pre-operative jaw surgery, immediately after and one-year post-operative. Surface models of all condyles were constructed from the cone beam CT scans. Two previously calibrated observers independently performed all registration methods. A landmark-based approach was used for the registration of across-subject condylar models, and temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis vs control group differences were computed with shape analysis. A voxel-based approach was used for registration of longitudinal scans calculated x, y, z degrees of freedom for translation and rotation. Two-way random intraclass correlation coefficients tested the interobserver reliability. Results: Statistically significant differences between the control group and the osteoarthritis group were consistently located on the lateral and medial poles for both observers. The interobserver differences were ≤0.2 mm. For individual longitudinal comparisons, the mean interobserver differences were ≤0.6 mm in translation errors and 1.2° in rotation errors, with excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.75). Conclusions: Condylar registration for across-subjects and longitudinal assessments is reliable and can be used to quantify subtle bony differences in the three-dimensional condylar morphology. PMID:24170802

  20. Diagnosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis in children.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Priya; Thomas, Ann; Sowmya, B

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis involves fusion of the mandibular condyle with the base of the skull. It results in functional, esthetic, and psychosocial limitations, if it affects children at an early age. Hence, it is important to recognize and diagnose the pathology and provide immediate treatment alternatives to improve the patient condition. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic perspective of TMJ ankylosis in children, and the use of 3D computed tomography as an effective diagnostic aid. PMID:25001450

  1. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  2. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christropher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT) in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD. PMID:26213970

  3. Dislocation of the Temporomandibular Joint and Relocation Procedures.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas; Hedderick, Viki; Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation requires prompt medical attention due to the crucial impact of airway, nutrition acquisition, and communication. Recognition of this injury by the practitioner, based on clinical presentation and history, is paramount for identification of accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment of TMJ dislocation. Relocation or reduction methods vary on the basis of the severity of the injury and whether it is an acute or chronic dislocation. PMID:27482989

  4. Temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia patients: are there different pain onset?

    PubMed

    Fujarra, Fábio J C; Kaziyama, Helena Hideko Seguchi; Siqueira, Silvia Regina D T de; Yeng, Lin Tchia; Camparis, Cinara M; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli de

    2016-03-01

    Objective To identify temporomandibular disorders (TMD) symptoms in two groups of fibromyalgia patients according to the temporal relation between the onset of facial pain (FP) and generalized body pain (GBP). Cross-sectional study design: Fifty-three consecutive women with fibromyalgia and FP were stratified according to the onset of orofacial pain: Group-A (mean age 47.30 ± 14.20 years old), onset of FP preceded GBP; Group-B (mean age 51.33 ± 11.03 years old), the FP started concomitant or after GBP. Clinical assessment Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and the Visual Analogue Scale. Results Myofascial pain with mouth opening limitation (p = 0.038); right disc displacement with reduction (p = 0.012) and jaw stiffness (p = 0.004) were predominant in Group A. Myofascial pain without mouth opening limitation (p = 0.038) and numbness/burning were more common in Group B. Conclusion All patients had temporomandibular joint symptoms, mainly muscle disorders. The prevalence of myofascial pain with limited mouth opening and right TMJ disc displacement with reduction were higher in Group A. PMID:27050847

  5. [Diagnosis and treatment of temporo-mandibular disorders in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Bocquet, Emmanuelle; Moreau, Alexis; Danguy, Michel; Danguy, Chantal

    2010-03-01

    Orthodontists are fully prepared to treat the problems of occlusion that they are called upon to deal with every day. On the other hand temporo-mandibular joint disorders present more obscure difficulties from the point of view of detection and diagnosis as well the management of their treatment. That is why a profound understanding of the anatomical and physiological functioning of the temporo-mandibular joint has become indispensable for today's orthodontists who are now asked to detect and diagnose an assortment of TMJ disturbances whose etiology may vary greatly. By performing a rigorous diagnostic procedure, based on a thorough clinical examination supported by careful axiographic and radiological studies, of temporo-mandibular malfunctioning and its underlying etiological causes, which are primarily dento-alveolar and occlusal in nature, orthodontists will be able to adopt an appropriate therapeutic approach that might be purely orthodontic or multi-disciplinary and carried out with the collaboration of specialists in occlusion, oral surgery, and even osteopathy. PMID:20359450

  6. Risk factors for temporomandibular disorder: Binary logistic regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Bruno G.; de-Sousa, Stéphanie T.; de Mello, Victor V C.; da-Silva-Barbosa, André C.; de-Assis-Morais, Mariana P L.; Barbosa-Vasconcelos, Márcia M V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the influence of socioeconomic and demographic factors (gender, economic class, age and marital status) on the occurrence of temporomandibular disorder. Study Design: One hundred individuals from urban areas in the city of Recife (Brazil) registered at Family Health Units was examined using Axis I of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) which addresses myofascial pain and joint problems (disc displacement, arthralgia, osteoarthritis and oesteoarthrosis). The Brazilian Economic Classification Criteria (CCEB) was used for the collection of socioeconomic and demographic data. Then, it was categorized as Class A (high social class), Classes B/C (middle class) and Classes D/E (very poor social class). The results were analyzed using Pearson’s chi-square test for proportions, Fisher’s exact test, nonparametric Mann-Whitney test and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results: None of the participants belonged to Class A, 72% belonged to Classes B/C and 28% belonged to Classes D/E. The multivariate analysis revealed that participants from Classes D/E had a 4.35-fold greater chance of exhibiting myofascial pain and 11.3-fold greater chance of exhibiting joint problems. Conclusions: Poverty is a important condition to exhibit myofascial pain and joint problems. Key words:Temporomandibular joint disorders, risk factors, prevalence. PMID:24316706

  7. Chiropractic Treatment of Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pavia, Steven; Fischer, Rebecca; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to describe chiropractic treatment of 14 patients who presented with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). Methods This is a retrospective case series of 14 patients, including 13 adults and 1 child. The majority of these patients were undergoing chiropractic care for spine-related conditions when they presented with additional TMD signs and symptoms. They were evaluated and treated with Activator Methods International published protocols relative to the temporomandibular joint before the addition of treatment to the suprahyoid muscles. Results All pre- and postadjustment assessments were recorded using a numeric pain scale. The resulting average showed a reduction in the patients’ pain scores from the initial visit of 8.3 ± 1.6 to the last visit at 1.4 ± 1.1 with an 80.9% ± 15.4% improvement. The average number of visits was 13.6 ± 8.2. Conclusion All patients selected for this case series showed a reduction of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms. PMID:26793040

  8. Management of the Temporomandibular Joint after Ablative Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius; Grätz, Klaus; Obwegeser, Joachim; Gujer, Astrid Kruse

    2014-01-01

    Management of the temporomandibular joint in ablative head and neck surgery is controversial with no standardized approach. The aim of the study was to establish risk-based guidelines for the management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery. Analysis of all patients' records receiving ablative surgery involving the temporomandibular joint in the Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, University Hospital of Zürich, from 2001 to 2012, was performed, identifying 15 patients and 14 reconstructive procedures. A literature search was done identifying all relevant literature on current approaches. Applicable cohorts were constructed, and relevant risks were extrapolated. Evaluated studies are not uniform in their reporting with nonhomogeneous patient groups. A diverse approach is used in the management of these patients with complications such as infection, ankylosis, limited mouth opening, plate penetration in the skull base, and plate loosening. Risk factors for complications appear to be radiation, costochondral graft, disk loss, and plate use alone. Clinical data suggest use of a plate with metal condyle reconstructions and previous radiation therapy as potential risks factors. Employing literature evidence and cumulated clinical data, a risk-based flowchart was developed to assist surgical decision making. Risk factors such as radiation, disk preservation, and soft tissue conditions are important complication-associated factors when planning surgery. Free vascularized fibula grafts appear to have the least complications that must be weighed against donor site morbidity. PMID:25379124

  9. Value of the nuclear medical scan in the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Craemer, T.D.; Ficara, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    A total of 125 patients with temporomandibular joint complaints underwent nuclear medical scans of their joints as part of their diagnostic work-ups. The scan results were compared with the radiographic and arthrogram findings of these patients. The results suggest that the nuclear medical scan is not a highly reliable diagnostic aid for the majority of temporomandibular joint patients.

  10. Bilateral Temporomandibular Joint Replacement Using Computer-Assisted Surgical Simulation and Three-Dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jaeyoung; Cho, Jinyong; Kim, Hyeon Min

    2016-07-01

    The dental occlusion is the important reference for replacement of the temporomandibular joint. If a patient does not have normal occlusion, few considerations are needed for temporomandibular joint replacement. The custom-made prosthesis, typically fabricated with a stereolithographic model, is probably the optimized solution currently available. However the ready-made stock from Biomet Microfixation System (Jacksonville, FL) is the only available product, which is authorized by the government ministry in South Korea, for replacement of the temporomandibular joint. This report presents a patient with the problems that were retrognathic "bird face" profile subsequent to severe bilateral condylar resorption and temporomandibular joint ankylosis without enough natural teeth for occlusion. Bilateral temporomandibular joint replacement using the ready-made prosthesis was done by reestablishing the mandibular position with new occlusion and improved facial profile via the virtual surgical planning and stereolithographic model simulation. PMID:27315318

  11. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Jun; Abula, Kahaer; Inoue, Makiko; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration. PMID:25574420

  12. Simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and consolidation measurement of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M; Momot, Konstantin I

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  13. Tissue Engineering of Articular Cartilage with Biomimetic Zones

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Travis J.; Malda, Jos; Sah, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage is a persistent and increasing problem with the aging population, and treatments to achieve biological repair or restoration remain a challenge. Cartilage tissue engineering approaches have been investigated for over 20 years, but have yet to achieve the consistency and effectiveness for widespread clinical use. One of the potential reasons for this is that the engineered tissues do not have or establish the normal zonal organization of cells and extracellular matrix that appears critical for normal tissue function. A number of approaches are being taken currently to engineer tissue that more closely mimics the organization of native articular cartilage. This review focuses on the zonal organization of native articular cartilage, strategies being used to develop such organization, the reorganization that occurs after culture or implantation, and future prospects for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage with biomimetic zones. PMID:19203206

  14. Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Consolidation Measurement of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  15. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  16. A literature review of lasers and articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vangsness, C T; Ghaderi, B

    1993-05-01

    Articles from the English literature concerning lasers and articular cartilage were reviewed. Different experimental methods and laser systems were analyzed. Many studies lacked scientific validity. Future investigations with sound biologic foundations are recommended. PMID:8327386

  17. Extra-Articular Ganglion Cysts around the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Eun; Panchal, Karnav; Kim, Young-Yul; Ji, Jong-Hun; Park, Sung-Ryeoll; Park, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to report clinical results of open excision of extra-articular ganglion cysts around the knee joint combined with arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies if present. Materials and Methods Of the total 107 cases of cystic lesions around the knee, 23 cases of extra-articular ganglion cysts were reviewed between January 2006 and July 2011. There were 13 males and 10 females with a mean age of 48 years (range, 30 to 73 years). The mean follow-up duration was 40 months (range, 30 to 60 months). Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was done in all cases. Open surgical excision of the cyst was performed after arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies in all but 1 case. At the last follow-up, Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were evaluated and MRI was conducted to detect recurrence. Results The mean Lysholm and IKDC scores showed significant improvement (p=0.005 and 0.013, respectively).The location of the cysts was anterior in 9, lateral in 7, medial in 6, and posterosuperior in 1. Intra-articular pathologies were found in 16/23 cases (69.6%). In 10/23 cases (43%), the cyst was connected to the knee joint. Three months postoperative MRI did not show any recurrence of ganglion cysts except for 1 case. Conclusions In the treatment of extra-articular ganglion cysts, MRI can be useful for detecting intra-articular lesions and connecting orifices, and arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies with open excision of the cyst should be considered as a viable treatment option. PMID:26672721

  18. ACTIVATION OF B-CATENIN SIGNALLING LEADS TO TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Li, S.; Xie, W.; Shen, J.; Im, H-J.; Holz, J.D.; Wang, M.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.; Chen, D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive research in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanism of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the constitutive activation of β-catenin in the middle and deep layers of the articular cartilage can compromise the homeostasis of this tissue in the TMJ. Co12CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with RosamT/mG reporter mice to determine Cre recombination efficiency. Co12CreERT2 mice were then crossed with β-cateninflox (ex3)/+ mice to generate β-catenin conditional activation mice, β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER. TMJ samples were harvested when the mice were 1-, 3- or 6-month-old and evaluated using histology, histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were further crossed with Mmp13flox/flox and Adamts5−/− mice to generate β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Co12ER and β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER)/Adamts5−/− double mutant mice to investigate the role of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in the development of TMJ disorder. High levels of Cre-recombination were seen in Co12CreERT2;RosamT/mG mice. Progressive TMJ defects developed in 1-, 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice, as revealed by histology and histomorphometry. Results further demonstrated that the defects observed in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were significantly decelerated after deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene in (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)co12ER or β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER/ Adamts5−/− double mutant mice. In summary, we found that β-catenin is a critical gene in the induction of TMJ cartilage degeneration, and over-expressing β-catenin in TMJ cartilage leads to defects assembling an OA-like phenotype. Deletion of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice ameliorates the development of TMJ defects. This study suggests that Mmp13 and Adamts5 could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TMJ disorders. PMID:25340802

  19. Activation of β-catenin signalling leads to temporomandibular joint defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Li, S; Xie, W; Shen, J; Im, H J; Holz, J D; Wang, M; Diekwisch, T G; Chen, D

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive research in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanism of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the constitutive activation of β-catenin in the middle and deep layers of the articular cartilage can compromise the homeostasis of this tissue in the TMJ. Col2CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with RosamT/mG reporter mice to determine Cre recombination efficiency. Col2CreERT2 mice were then crossed with β-cateninflox(ex3)+ mice to generate β-catenin conditional activation mice, β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER. TMJ samples were harvested when the mice were 1-, 3- or 6-month-old and evaluated using histology, histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER mice were further crossed with Mmp13flox/flox and Adamts5-/- mice to generate (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Col2ER and β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER)/Adamts5-/- double mutant mice to investigate the role of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in the development of TMJ disorder. High levels of Cre-recombination were seen in Col2CreERT2;RosamT/mGmice. Progressive TMJ defects developed in 1-, 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER mice, as revealed by histology and histomorphometry. Results further demonstrated that the defects observed in β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER mice were significantly decelerated after deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene in (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Col2ER or β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER/Adamts5-/- double mutant mice. In summary, we found that β-catenin is a critical gene in the induction of TMJ cartilage degeneration, and over-expressing β-catenin in TMJ cartilage leads to defects assembling an OA-like phenotype. Deletion of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in β-catenin(ex3)Col2ER mice ameliorates the development of TMJ defects. This study suggests that Mmp13 and Adamts5 could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TMJ disorders. PMID:25340802

  20. Articular cartilage: from formation to tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Hyaline cartilage is the nonlinear, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, poro-viscoelastic connective tissue that serves as friction-reducing and load-bearing cushion in synovial joints and is vital for mammalian skeletal movements. Due to its avascular nature, low cell density, low proliferative activity and the tendency of chondrocytes to de-differentiate, cartilage cannot regenerate after injury, wear and tear, or degeneration through common diseases such as osteoarthritis. Therefore severe damage usually requires surgical intervention. Current clinical strategies to generate new tissue include debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte transplantation, and mosaicplasty. While articular cartilage was predicted to be one of the first tissues to be successfully engineered, it proved to be challenging to reproduce the complex architecture and biomechanical properties of the native tissue. Despite significant research efforts, only a limited number of studies have evolved up to the clinical trial stage. This review article summarizes the current state of cartilage tissue engineering in the context of relevant biological aspects, such as the formation and growth of hyaline cartilage, its composition, structure and biomechanical properties. Special attention is given to materials development, scaffold designs, fabrication methods, and template-cell interactions, which are of great importance to the structure and functionality of the engineered tissue. PMID:26923076

  1. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. Results The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. Conclusion The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:23525363

  2. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Eastern Pacific Harbour Seal (Phoca vitulina richardii).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    .2%) in seven animals. Periapical lesions were found in four skulls (2.1% of the total number of specimens). None of the specimens showed signs of enamel hypoplasia. More than half (55.6%) of alveoli, either with or without teeth, showed signs of alveolar bony changes consistent with periodontitis. A total of 178 specimens (91.8%) had at least one tooth associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 67 specimens (34.5%). The most common articular surface to be affected was the left mandibular fossa of the temporal bone, with lesions in 44 cases (32.8% of all lesions). In 13 specimens (6.7%) all articular surfaces were affected. Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the Eastern Pacific harbor seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases as found in this study may play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of this species. PMID:25824118

  3. A possible barrier function of the articular surface.

    PubMed

    Takada, N; Wada, I; Sugimura, I; Sakuma, E; Maruyama, H; Matsui, N

    1999-12-01

    Since MacConaill first reported the existence of a thin additional layer of the articular cartilage and named it the lamina splendens, there have been various opinions as to the role of this layer in the lubrication of the articular surface. We studied the superficial portion of the articular cartilage in the 20 day-old and 30 day-old rats using light and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we studied the articular cartilage of the rat whose "cover layer" had been removed mechanically. Also, intraarticular latex beads injection, intraarticular dye injection using lithium carmine and supravital staining experiments were performed. On day 20, dye injected intraarticularly was clearly observed by light microscopy in chondrocytes situated in the deeper layers. The dye injected in the 30 day-old rats, however, was not seen in the chondrocytes but was found only in the superficial layer. Dye was found in the chondrocytes when supravital staining was performed in the articular cartilage of 30 day-old rats after mechanical removal of the cover layer. By transmission electron microscopy, a superficial layer consisted of fine filamentous structures was observed on the articular surface of the 30 day-old rats. The cover layer was destroyed by intraarticular injected latex beads in 30 day-old rats. These findings strongly support the idea that the cover layer acts as a barrier against substances which invade from the surface of the articular cartilage. The development period of the cover layer coincides with the initiation of weight bearing, and joint cartilage debris and pressure changes might further promote maturation. PMID:10659579

  4. Clinical assessment of patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Stern, Ilanit; Greenberg, Martin S

    2013-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis of chronic pain disorders of the mouth, jaws, and face is frequently complex. It is common for patients with chronic orofacial pain to consult multiple clinicians and receive ineffective treatment before a correct diagnosis is reached. This problem is a significant public health concern. Clinicians can minimize error by starting the diagnostic procedure with a careful, accurate history and thorough head and neck examination followed by a thoughtfully constructed differential diagnosis. The possibility that the patient has symptoms of a life-threatening underlying disease rather than a more common dental, sinus, or temporomandibular disorder must always be considered. PMID:23809299

  5. A conservative surgical approach to temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Cocilovo, Francesco; Olivo, Marco; Ferronato, Giuseppe; Manfredini, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    The current article describes a case of a patient with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis undergoing surgery performed with a tailored technique for condylar reshaping. A patient with posttraumatic bilateral TMJ ankylosis underwent interpositional arthroplasty with temporalis fascia, and focus was put on the need to maintain the vertical height of the mandible. The postoperative course was uneventful, and positive outcomes were kept during a 1-year follow-up span. The adoption of surgical strategies aiming at restoring a condylar shape as similar as possible to the natural one may be important in the light of the search for surgeries providing and/or recreating normal function of the TMJ. PMID:24705240

  6. Bilateral Traumatic Temporomandibular Joint Luxation in a Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Rosenthal, Karen L; Chandler, Heidi K; Wheeler, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) luxation was diagnosed postmortem in a female, 6-mo-old CD rat (Rattus norvegicus) after probable head entrapment and subsequent disentanglement from a protective jacket. Clinical antemortem signs included inability to close her mouth, prehend food and drink water, anxiety, and linear skin erosions extending down the right and left commissures of the mouth. Radiography revealed rostral displacement of the mandible with concomitant malocclusion. The combination of clinical signs, acute nature of the presentation, and torn appearance of the protective jacket were strongly indicative of a traumatic etiology. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of TMJ luxation in a rat. PMID:22330578

  7. Component Approach to the Temporomandibular Joint and Coronoid Process

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Miles J.; Clune, James; Steinbacher, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region is challenging. The conventional direct preauricular incision permits only limited access to the TMJ and surrounding structures, therefore risking injury to the facial nerve during retraction. The ideal approach allows sufficient exposure, preservation of underlying neurovascular structures, and achieves an optimal aesthetic outcome. We describe a preauricular posttragal incision with a superficial musculoaponeurotic system flap to allow wide exposure of the zygomatic arch, TMJ, condyle, and coronoid process. We postulate that this approach improves access, lessens the amount of retraction required, and creates a more inconspicuous scar. PMID:25383157

  8. Component approach to the temporomandibular joint and coronoid process.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Miles J; Clune, James; Steinbacher, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region is challenging. The conventional direct preauricular incision permits only limited access to the TMJ and surrounding structures, therefore risking injury to the facial nerve during retraction. The ideal approach allows sufficient exposure, preservation of underlying neurovascular structures, and achieves an optimal aesthetic outcome. We describe a preauricular posttragal incision with a superficial musculoaponeurotic system flap to allow wide exposure of the zygomatic arch, TMJ, condyle, and coronoid process. We postulate that this approach improves access, lessens the amount of retraction required, and creates a more inconspicuous scar. PMID:25383157

  9. Neurology of the temporomandibular joints: an experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on anaesthetized cats are described in which the reflex effects of stimulation of the mechanoreceptors in the temporomandibular joints on the ipsilateral and contralateral mandibular muscles were studied. The effects on this reflex activity and on dynamic manidublar muscle activity of the production of temporary and permanent dysfunction of the mechanoreceptors in different regions of the joint capsule were also studied. The significance of the findings in relation to the maintenance of normal jaw posture and the disturbance of mandibular muscular function by trauma, disease, and malocclusion is discussed. PMID:1259326

  10. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a rabbit osteoarthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, N-T.; Cui, Y-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that systemic injection of rapamycin can prevent the development of osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in human chondrocytes and reduce the severity of experimental OA. However, the systemic injection of rapamycin leads to many side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of intra-articular injection of Torin 1, which as a specific inhibitor of mTOR which can cause induction of autophagy, is similar to rapamycin, on articular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit osteoarthritis model and to investigate the mechanism of Torin 1’s effects on experimental OA. Methods Collagenase (type II) was injected twice into both knees of three-month-old rabbits to induce OA, combined with two intra–articular injections of Torin 1 (400 nM). Degeneration of articular cartilage was evaluated by histology using the Mankin scoring system at eight weeks after injection. Chondrocyte degeneration and autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR).Beclin-1 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression were examined by Western blotting. Results Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 significantly reduced degeneration of the articular cartilage after induction of OA. Autophagosomes andBeclin-1 and LC3 expression were increased in the chondrocytes from Torin 1-treated rabbits. Torin 1 treatment also reduced MMP-13 and VEGF expression at eight weeks after collagenase injection. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in collagenase-induced OA, at least partially by autophagy activation, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for preventing cartilage degeneration and treating OA. Cite this article: N-T. Cheng, A. Guo, Y-P. Cui. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Arthur B; Laor, Tal

    2013-12-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can affect the temporomandibular joint. With advances in medical imaging in more recent decades, there has been an increase in awareness of the spectrum of pathology that can affect the temporomandibular joint in children with JIA. This pathology can lead to symptoms ranging from decreased chewing ability, jaw and facial pain, headaches and malocclusion to craniofacial morphological changes such as a retrognathic mandible. The purpose of this review is to suggest an MR imaging protocol for the temporomandibular joint and to illustrate normal and abnormal appearances of the joint in children with JIA. PMID:24257698

  12. Remobilization does not fully restore immobilization induced articular cartilage atrophy.

    PubMed

    Haapala, J; Arokoski, J P; Hyttinen, M M; Lammi, M; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V; Helminen, H J; Kiviranta, I

    1999-05-01

    The recovery of articular cartilage from immobilization induced atrophy was studied. The right hind limbs of 29-week-old beagle dogs were immobilized for 11 weeks and then remobilized for 50 weeks. Cartilage from the immobilized knee was compared with tissue from age matched control animals. After the immobilization period, uncalcified articular cartilage glycosaminoglycan concentration was reduced by 20% to 23%, the reduction being largest (44%) in the superficial zone. The collagen fibril network showed no significant changes, but the amount of collagen crosslinks was reduced (13.5%) during immobilization. After remobilization, glycosaminoglycan concentration was restored at most sites, except for in the upper parts of uncalcified cartilage in the medial femoral and tibial condyles (9% to 17% less glycosaminoglycans than in controls). The incorporation of 35SO4 was not changed, and remobilization also did not alter the birefringence of collagen fibrils. Remobilization restored the proportion of collagen crosslinks to the control level. The changes induced by joint unloading were reversible at most sites investigated, but full restoration of articular cartilage glycosaminoglycan concentration was not obtained in all sites, even after remobilization for 50 weeks. This suggests that lengthy immobilization of a joint can cause long lasting articular cartilage proteoglycan alterations at the same time as collagen organization remains largely unchanged. Because proteoglycans exert strong influence on the biomechanical properties of cartilage, lengthy immobilization may jeopardize the well being of articular cartilage. PMID:10335301

  13. The Functions of BMP3 in Rabbit Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Yiting; Shi, Yanping; Lei, Chen; Du, Bo; Li, Xuemin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in skeletal development and repair. Previously, we found fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) induced up-regulation of BMP2, 3, 4 in the process of rabbit articular cartilage repair, which resulted in satisfactory repair effects. As BMP2/4 show a clearly positive effect for cartilage repair, we investigated the functions of BMP3 in rabbit articular cartilage repair. In this paper, we find that BMP3 inhibits the repair of partial-thickness defect of articular cartilage in rabbit by inducing the degradation of extracellular matrix, interfering with the survival of chondrocytes surrounding the defect, and directly inhibiting the expression of BMP2 and BMP4. Meanwhile BMP3 suppress the repair of full-thickness cartilage defect by destroying the subchondral bone through modulating the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and directly increasing the expression of BMP4. Although BMP3 has different functions in the repair of partial and full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in rabbit, the regulation of BMP expression is involved in both of them. Together with our previous findings, we suggest the regulation of the BMP signaling pathway by BMP3 is essential in articular cartilage repair. PMID:26528966

  14. The Functions of BMP3 in Rabbit Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Yiting; Shi, Yanping; Lei, Chen; Du, Bo; Li, Xuemin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in skeletal development and repair. Previously, we found fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) induced up-regulation of BMP2, 3, 4 in the process of rabbit articular cartilage repair, which resulted in satisfactory repair effects. As BMP2/4 show a clearly positive effect for cartilage repair, we investigated the functions of BMP3 in rabbit articular cartilage repair. In this paper, we find that BMP3 inhibits the repair of partial-thickness defect of articular cartilage in rabbit by inducing the degradation of extracellular matrix, interfering with the survival of chondrocytes surrounding the defect, and directly inhibiting the expression of BMP2 and BMP4. Meanwhile BMP3 suppress the repair of full-thickness cartilage defect by destroying the subchondral bone through modulating the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and directly increasing the expression of BMP4. Although BMP3 has different functions in the repair of partial and full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in rabbit, the regulation of BMP expression is involved in both of them. Together with our previous findings, we suggest the regulation of the BMP signaling pathway by BMP3 is essential in articular cartilage repair. PMID:26528966

  15. Targeting TGFβ Signaling in Subchondral Bone and Articular Cartilage Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Gehau; Cao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disease, and there is no disease-modifying therapy for OA currently available. Targeting of articular cartilage alone may not be sufficient to halt this disease progression. Articular cartilage and subchondral bone act as a functional unit. Increasing evidence indicates that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis of both articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Activation of extracellular matrix latent TGFβ at the appropriate time and location is the prerequisite for its function. Aberrant activation of TGFβ in the subchondral bone in response to abnormal mechanical loading environment induces formation of osteroid islets at onset of osteoarthritis. As a result, alteration of subchondral bone structure changes the stress distribution on the articular cartilage and leads to its degeneration. Thus, inhibition of TGFβ activity in the subchondral bone may provide a new avenue of treatment for OA. In this review, we will respectively discuss the role of TGFβ in homeostasis of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as a novel target for OA therapy. PMID:24745631

  16. Leptin plays a catabolic role on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jia-peng; Chen, Wei-ping; Feng, Jie; Hu, Peng-fei; Shi, Zhong-li; Wu, Li-dong

    2010-10-01

    Leptin has been shown to play a crucial role in the regulation of body weight. There is also evidence that this adipokine plays a key role in the process of osteoarthritis. However, the precise role of leptin on articular cartilage metabolism is not clear. We investigate the role of leptin on articular cartilage in vivo in this study. Recombinant rat leptin (100 μg) was injected into the knee joints of rats, 48 h later, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and protein levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2, MMP-9), cathepsin D, and collagen II from articular cartilage were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot. Two important aggrecanases ADAMTS-4 and -5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5) were also analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Besides, articular cartilage was also assessed for proteoglycan/GAG content by Safranin O staining. Leptin significantly increased both gene and protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, cathepsin D, and collagen II, while decreased bFGF markedly in cartilage. Moreover, the gene expression of ADAMTS-4 and -5 were markedly increased, and histologically assessed depletion of proteoglycan in articular cartilage was observed after treatment with leptin. These results strongly suggest that leptin plays a catabolic role on cartilage metabolism and may be a disadvantage factor involve in the pathological process of OA. PMID:19876764

  17. Is high-resolution ultrasonography suitable for the detection of temporomandibular joint involvement in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, AT; Kahl-Nieke, B; Feddersen, J; Habermann, CR

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of high-resolution ultrasonography for the detection of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) changes in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: We investigated prospectively 20 children (17 female and 3 male; mean age 11.06 years, standard deviation 3.43 years) with TMJ disorders caused by JIA, over a period of 16 months. Using a 12 MHz array transducer, four images in each TMJ (160 images) were acquired. Each image was analysed with regard to five different aspects (condylar erosion, thickness of the condylar disc, synovial thickness, joint effusion and enlargement of the intra-articular space). Results: Diagnosis of JIA was ensured for every child and involvement of the TMJ was proven by MRI. Overall 287 changes (35.9%) were detected by using high-resolution ultrasonography. On 124 images (77.5%) condylar erosions were diagnosed; on 55 images (34.4%) synovial thickness was abnormal; on 48 images (30%) we could see higher thickness of the condylar disc; on 40 images (25%) irregularities of the bony surface were detected; and on 20 images (12.5%) we found joint effusion. Conclusion: High-resolution ultrasonography could be a sufficient diagnostic method, especially for the detection of condylar involvement in children with JIA, even if not all parts of the TMJ are visible for ultrasonography. High-resolution ultrasonography is a valuable tool in particular situations: (i) when MRI examination is not available; (ii) when children fear MRI examination; (iii) in more advanced stages of JIA; and (iv) for monitoring the progression of TMJ involvement and response of therapy. PMID:23439686

  18. Effect of biomechanical disturbance of the temporomandibular joint on the prevalence of internal derangement in mandibular asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Buranastidporn, B; Hisano, M; Soma, K

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the relationship between biomechanical changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and internal derangement (ID) symptoms in mandibular asymmetry. Posteroanterior cephalograms (PA) of 140 patients with TMJ ID associated with mandibular asymmetry were used to investigate the inclination of the frontal occlusal plane (FOP), and were analysed in conjunction with the results of a report providing information on ID symptoms. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model (FEM) of the entire mandible was created to investigate the distribution of TMJ forces during clenching. The inclination of the FOP was modified to simulate various degrees of vertical asymmetry. The stresses on the TMJ on the ipsilateral and contralateral sides were analysed and their values were compared with those of the standard model. The results showed that the symptomatic sides were significantly related to the degree of inclination of the FOP. Increasing its angulation resulted in a decrease of the symptoms on the ipsilateral side and an increase of those on the contralateral side. The analysis showed that stress-distribution patterns and overall stresses of the articular disc were influenced by the angulation of inclination of the FOP. These mechanical changes exhibited a distinct relationship with the prevalence of ID in the patients. These results suggest that disturbances in the stresses either in amount or direction due to occlusal inclination can be responsible for ID. Therefore, an attempt to establish a flat occlusal plane is an important orthodontic treatment objective in maintaining the normal health and structure of the TMJ. PMID:16230327

  19. Observing the development of the temporomandibular joint in embryonic and post-natal mice using various staining methods

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, WENNA; LI, XIHAI; GAO, BIZHEN; GAN, HUIJUAN; LIN, XUEJUAN; LIAO, LINGHONG; LI, CANDONG

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint that is essential for the movement and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ develops from two mesenchymal condensations, and is composed of the glenoid fossa that originates from the otic capsule by intramembranous ossification, the mandibular condyle of the temporal bone and a fibrocartilagenous articular disc derived from a secondary cartilaginous joint by endochondral ossification. However, the development of the TMJ remains unclear. In the present study, the formation and development of the mouse TMJ was investigated between embryonic day 13.5 and post-natal day 180 in order to elucidate the morphological and molecular alterations that occur during this period. TMJ formation appeared to proceed in three stages: Initiation or blastema stage; growth and cavitation stage; and the maturation or completion stage. In order to investigate the activity of certain transcription factors on TMJ formation and development, the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM), sex determining region Y-box 9, runt-related transcription factor 2, Indian hedgehog homolog, Osterix, collagen I, collagen II, aggrecan, total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), MMP-9 and MMP-13 were detected in the TMJ using in situ and/or immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that the transcription factors, ECM and MMP serve critical functions in the formation and development of the mouse TMJ. In summary, the development of the mouse TMJ was investigated, and the molecular regulation of mouse TMJ formation was partially characterized. The results of the present study may aid the systematic understanding of the physiological processes underlying TMJ formation and development in mice. PMID:26893634

  20. Masticatory function in temporomandibular dysfunction patients: electromyographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Berretin-Felix, Giédre; Genaro, Katia Flores; Trindade, Inge Elly Kiemle; Trindade Júnior, Alceu Sergio

    2005-12-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a complex disturbance that involves the masticatory muscles and/or temporomandibular joint, causing damage to the masticatory function. This study evaluated the electromyographic activity of the masseter muscle during habitual mastication of bread, apple, banana, cashew nut and paraffin film (Parafilm M) in 25 adult subjects, of both gender, with TMD. The results were compared to those of a control group, composed of 15 adult subjects, of both sexes, free of signs and/or symptoms of TMD. The MYO-TRONICS Inc., K6-I computer software was used for electromyographic processing and analyzed the following parameters: duration of the act, duration of the masticatory cycle and number of cycles. No significant differences were found between subjects in the control group and individuals with TMD as to duration of the masticatory act and of the masticatory cycle, considering all materials used for mastication. The duration of the masticatory act and cycle was longer during mastication of paraffin film in both groups. The number of masticatory cycles was higher for mastication of apple in comparison to mastication of banana, in both groups. It can be concluded that the consistency of foods influences the duration parameters of the act, duration of the cycle and the number of masticatory cycles, and the behavior of the masticatory muscles in individuals with TMD during habitual mastication is similar to that verified in individuals without TMD. PMID:20865220

  1. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 1: anatomy and examination/diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a heterogeneous group of diagnoses affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues. A variety of methods for evaluating and managing TMD have been proposed within the physical therapy profession but these sources are not peer-reviewed and lack updates from scientific literature. The dental profession has provided peer-reviewed sources that lack thoroughness with respect to the neuromusculoskeletal techniques utilized by physical therapists. The subsequent void creates the need for a thorough, research informed, and peer-reviewed source regarding TMD evaluation and management for physical therapists. This paper is the first part in a two-part series that seeks to fill the current void by providing a brief but comprehensive outline for clinicians seeking to provide services for patients with TMD. Part one focuses on anatomy and pathology, arthro- and osteokinematics, epidemiology, history taking, and physical examination as they relate to TMD. An appreciation of the anatomical and mechanical features associated with the TMJ can serve as a foundation for understanding a patient’s clinical presentation. Performance of a thorough patient history and clinical examination can guide the clinician toward an improved diagnostic process. PMID:24976743

  2. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ryan Chin Taw; Kassam, Karim; Eccles, Simon; Hensher, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO) till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1) much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2) reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3) reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients. PMID:27190665

  3. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Ryan Chin Taw; Kassam, Karim; Eccles, Simon; Hensher, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO) till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1) much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2) reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3) reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients. PMID:27190665

  4. Optoelectronic pantography diagnostics of temporomandibular disorders in patients with bruxism.

    PubMed

    Mehulić, Ketij; Gospić, Renata Kevilj; Dundjer, Alenko; Skrinjarić, Tomislav; Stefancić, Sanja; Vojvodić, Denis; Perinić, Margareta

    2009-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is a joint term that encompasses a number of clinical symptoms that involve the teeth, masticatory musculature and temporomandibular joints (TMJ). They are a frequent cause of orofacial medical conditions. The aetiology of disorders is complex and individual etiologic factors are not sufficiently defined. Bruxism, in its centric or eccentric form, is becoming a frequent problem for dentists. The purpose of this study is to show factors of the condyle leading in patients with bruxism by optoelectronic pantography, and to establish the possibility of using optoelectronic pantography in the diagnostic procedure of TMD. Patients were selected (N = 42), with incomplete sets of teeth, without prosthodontic appliances and with traces and symptoms of TMD. After completing the history questionnaire a clinical check up and plaster cast analysis patients with bruxism were selected (N = 22) and without bruxism (N = 20). During the study optoelectronic String-condylocomp LR3, Dentron, D-Höchberg (software JAWS 30) was used. This study showed the possibility of applying optoelectronic pantography in TMD diagnostics and compares history, clinical and condylographic parameters in TMD patients with and without bruxism. Optoelectronic pantography enables us, by using relatively easy methods, to determine a more accurate diagnosis, highly important when choosing therapeutic methods and control of the aforementioned disorders. PMID:19860114

  5. Deficient cytokine control modulates temporomandibular joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Neveen; Catrina, Anca I; Alyamani, Ahmed O; Mustafa, Hamid; Alstergren, Per

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to investigate how endogenous cytokine control of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) influences temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in relation to the role of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six consecutive patients with TMJ RA were included. Temporomandibular joint pain intensity was assessed at rest, on maximum mouth opening, on chewing, and on palpation. Mandibular movement capacity and degree of anterior open bite (a clinical sign of structural destruction of TMJ tissues) were also assessed. Systemic inflammatory activity was assessed using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for rheumatoid arthritis. Samples of TMJ synovial fluid and blood were obtained and analyzed for TNF, its soluble receptor, soluble TNF receptor II (TNFsRII), and ACPA. A high concentration of TNF in relation to the concentration of TNFsRII in TMJ synovial fluid was associated with TMJ pain on posterior palpation on maximum mouth opening. The ACPA concentration correlated significantly to the TNF concentration, but not to the TNFsRII concentration, indicating that increased inflammatory activity is mainly caused by an insufficient increase in anti-inflammatory mediators. This study indicates that TMJ pain on palpation in patients with RA is related to a deficiency in local cytokine control that contributes to increased inflammatory activity, including sensitization to mechanical stimuli over the TMJ. PMID:26010823

  6. Effects of COX-2 inhibitor in temporomandibular joint acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schütz, T C B; Andersen, M L; Tufik, S

    2007-05-01

    Since it is recognized that cyclo-oxygenase-2 mediates nociception and the sleep-wake cycle as well, and that acute inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) results in sleep disturbances, we hypothesized that cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor would restore the sleep pattern in this inflammatory rat model. First, sleep was monitored after the injection of Freund's adjuvant (FA group) or saline (SHAM group) into the rats' temporomandibular joint. Second, etoricoxib was co-administered in these groups. The Freund's adjuvant group showed a reduction in sleep efficiency, in rapid eye movement (REM), and in non-REM sleep, and an increase in sleep and REM sleep latency when compared with the SHAM group, while etoricoxib substantially increased sleep quality in the Freund's adjuvant group. These parameters returned progressively to those found in the SHAM group. Etoricoxib improved the sleep parameters, suggesting the involvement of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme in acute inflammation of the TMJ, specifically in REM sleep. PMID:17452571

  7. Mood spectrum in patients with different painful temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Daniele; di Poggio, Adolfo Bandettini; Romagnoli, Mario; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Bosco, Mario

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate for difference in the prevalence of mood disorders between patients with different painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD). After a sample size necessary for the study was calculated, 60 patients with a painful TMD were selected and divided into the following groups: myofascial pain (n=20), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain (n=18), combined myofascial and TMJ pain (n=22). Two distinct comparison groups were selected: subjects with a nonpainful TMD (n=25) and TMD-free subjects (n=29). All participants filled out a self-report validated instrument (MOODS-SR) to evaluate psychopathological symptoms related to mood disturbances. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni's post hoc test for multiple comparisons was performed to investigate for significant differences among the groups. The three groups of patients with painful TMD scored significantly higher than comparison groups in all MOODS-SR domains investigating depression, but no difference was shown between subjects with myofascial pain and those with TMJ pain. No significant differences among the groups emerged for the presence of manic symptoms, indicating that depressive disorders associated with TMD are not an expression of a more complex manic depressive illness. The study concluded that the presence of depressive symptoms in TMD patients seems to be related to the presence of a painful condition and seems to be unrelated to the location of pain. Furthermore, depressive disturbances in painful TMD patients affect the whole spectrum of depressive psychopathology. PMID:15293779

  8. Pseudotumor in the temporomandibular joint: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroyuki; Kayamori, Kou; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Wake, Sou; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neoplastic disease in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition and is difficult to differentiate from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) based on symptoms and simple X-ray examinations. Potential differential diagnoses include synovial chondromatosis and pseudotumor, both of which are also relatively rare in the TMJ. Presentation of case We report a case of pseudotumor of the TMJ that was difficult to differentiate from synovial chondromatosis in a 71-year-old woman with a chief complaint of pain in the left TMJ. MRI of the right TMJ initially led to diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. Extirpation of the lesion was performed under general anesthesia. Histopathological findings of the resected specimen revealed inflammatory granulation tissue without cellular atypism. Discussion The pathological findings for the resected specimen were compatible with pseudotumor of the TMJ. These findings were not supportive of synovial chondromatosis or other tumor diseases. Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of careful examination of a mass lesion in the TMJ for differentiation from other TMJ-related diseases. PMID:26298241

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility Manifestation Based on Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Haghighat, Abbas; Mohammadi, Iman; Shadmehr, Elham; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint range of motion might affected by some factors like laxity and increase joint mobility. Generalized joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint hypermobility (TMJH) are reported as risk factors for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to survey the etiological factors of TMJH and its relations to habitual status. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 69 patients with TMJH were involved. After profiling personal information and medical history, the patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO) as follow: (Light) MMO of 50-55 mm, (moderate): MMO between 55 and 65 mm, (severe) MMO >65 mm. For subjective observations, patients were asked to fill the prepared questionnaire. The objective evaluations conducted by a specialist. Finally, all the data subjected Chi-Square test by using SPSS software version 22 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: TMJH was more common in women (74.2%). The light group had significant differences with other groups in the discomfort of TMJ and TMJ sound (P < 0.05). Furthermore, sever group manifested highest percentage of masticatory pains, significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It can be concluded that pain in TMJ would have a correlation with MMO. PMID:26464530

  10. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescent violin players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1996-08-01

    Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the frequency of radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of adolescent violin players (VP group) were investigated in a group of 31 music students and in their age- and sex-matched controls (C group). All subjects underwent a routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles. The VP group reported a higher frequency of the subjective symptoms: pain in the TMJ when chewing, a feeling of stiffness in the TMJ, and clenching of the teeth. Clinically, the VP group showed a greater range of maximal protrusion and of maximal laterotrusion to the right, and a greater frequency of deviation to the right on opening. They also showed more palpatory tenderness in the masticatory muscles and pain in the TMJ on maximal opening. The number of playing years and the number of weekly playing hours correlated with several signs and symptoms of TMDs. In terms of radiologic findings in the condyles of the TMJs there was no difference between the groups. It is concluded that intense violin playing may have a predisposing role in the etiology of TMDs in adolescence. PMID:8876740