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Sample records for complement factors induced

  1. Complement activation induced by rabbit rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R R; Brown, J C

    1980-01-01

    Rabbit rheumatoid factor produced in animals by hyperimmunized with group C streptococcal vaccine activated guinea pig complement. Anti-streptococcal serum was fractionated by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography into excluded (19S) and included (7S) material and examined for hemolytic activity in a sensitive homologous hemolytic assay system. In the presence of complement, both 19S and 7S antistreptococcal serum fractions induced lysis of bovine (ox) erythrocytes coated with mildly reduced and carboxymethylated rabbit anti-erythrocyte immunoglobulin G. That rabbit rheumatoid factor was responsible for the observed hemolytic activity was substantiated by hemolytic inhibition assays. Significant inhibition of hemolysis was effected when antistreptococcal serum fractions were incubated in the presence of human immunoglobulin G, rabbit immunoglobulin G, and Fc, whereas, no inhibition was detected when the same fractions were tested in the presence of rabbit Fab or F(ab')2 fragments. Deaggregation of inhibitor preparations revealed a preferential reactivity of rheumatoid factor for rabbit immunoglobulin G. In addition to the rheumatoid factor-dependent hemolytic activity observed in humoral preparations, immunoglobulin G-specific antibody-forming cells in spleen and peripheral blood lymphocyte isolates were enumerated by plaque-forming cell assay. PMID:7399707

  2. Virus-induced gene complementation reveals a transcription factor network in modulation of tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hang; Lai, Tongfei; Qin, Cheng; Shi, Nongnong; Wang, Huizhong; Jin, Mingfei; Zhong, Silin; Fan, Zaifeng; Liu, Yule; Wu, Zirong; Jackson, Stephen; Giovannoni, James J.; Rolin, Dominique; Gallusci, Philippe; Hong, Yiguo

    2012-01-01

    Plant virus technology, in particular virus-induced gene silencing, is a widely used reverse- and forward-genetics tool in plant functional genomics. However the potential of virus technology to express genes to induce phenotypes or to complement mutants in order to understand the function of plant genes is not well documented. Here we exploit Potato virus X as a tool for virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC). Using VIGC in tomato, we demonstrated that ectopic viral expression of LeMADS-RIN, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor (TF), resulted in functional complementation of the non-ripening rin mutant phenotype and caused fruits to ripen. Comparative gene expression analysis indicated that LeMADS-RIN up-regulated expression of the SBP-box (SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like) gene LeSPL-CNR, but down-regulated the expression of LeHB-1, an HD-Zip homeobox TF gene. Our data support the hypothesis that a transcriptional network may exist among key TFs in the modulation of fruit ripening in tomato. PMID:23150786

  3. Essential Role of Surface-Bound Complement Factor H in Controlling Immune Complex–Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cortes, Claudio; Pickering, Matthew C.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Arend, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Factor H (fH) is an endogenous negative regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) that binds polyanions as well as complement activation fragments C3b and C3d. The AP is both necessary and sufficient to develop collagen Ab–induced arthritis (CAIA) in mice; the mechanisms whereby normal control of the AP is overcome and injury develops are unknown. Although primarily a soluble circulating protein, fH can also bind to tissues in a manner dependent on the carboxyl-terminal domain containing short consensus repeats 19 and 20. We examined the role of fH in CAIA by blocking its binding to tissues through administration of a recombinant negative inhibitor containing short consensus repeats 19 and 20 (rfH19-20), which impairs fH function and amplifies surface AP activation in vitro. Administration of rfH19-20, but not control rfH3-5, significantly worsened clinical disease activity, histopathologic injury, and C3 deposition in the synovium and cartilage in wild-type and fH+/− mice. In vitro studies demonstrated that rfH19-20 increased complement activation on cartilage extracts and injured fibroblast-like synoviocytes, two major targets of complement deposition in the joint. We conclude that endogenous fH makes a significant contribution to inhibition of the AP in CAIA through binding to sites of immune complex formation and complement activation. PMID:23436934

  4. Small Molecule-Induced Complement Factor D (Adipsin) Promotes Lipid Accumulation and Adipocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Song, No-Joon; Kim, Suji; Jang, Byung-Hyun; Chang, Seo-Hyuk; Yun, Ui Jeong; Park, Ki-Moon; Waki, Hironori; Li, Dean Y; Tontonoz, Peter; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are differentiated by various transcriptional cascades integrated on the master regulator, Pparγ. To discover new genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, preadipocytes were treated with three newly identified pro-adipogenic small molecules and GW7845 (a Pparγ agonist) for 24 hours and transcriptional profiling was analyzed. Four genes, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparγ), human complement factor D homolog (Cfd), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 9 (Ccl9), and GIPC PDZ Domain Containing Family Member 2 (Gipc2) were induced by at least two different small molecules but not by GW7845. Cfd and Ccl9 expressions were specific to adipocytes and they were altered in obese mice. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA) mediated knockdown of Cfd in preadipocytes inhibited lipid accumulation and expression of adipocyte markers during adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of Cfd promoted adipocyte differentiation, increased C3a production, and led to induction of C3a receptor (C3aR) target gene expression. Similarly, treatments with C3a or C3aR agonist (C4494) also promoted adipogenesis. C3aR knockdown suppressed adipogenesis and impaired the pro-adipogenic effects of Cfd, further suggesting the necessity for C3aR signaling in Cfd-mediated pro-adipogenic axis. Together, these data show the action of Cfd in adipogenesis and underscore the application of small molecules to identify genes in adipocytes. PMID:27611793

  5. HIV-1 induces complement factor C3 synthesis in astrocytes and neurons by modulation of promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Cornelia; Hagleitner, Magdalena; Darlington, Gretchen; Mohsenipour, Iradj; Würzner, Reinhard; Höllmüller, Isolde; Stoiber, Heribert; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Dierich, Manfred P; Speth, Cornelia

    2004-02-01

    Virus-induced complement expression and activation in the brain is hypothesized to contribute to the process of neurodegeneration in AIDS-associated neurological disorders. Previous experiments have shown that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) upregulates the low basal production of complement factor C3 in astrocytes and neurons. Since inhibition of complement synthesis and activation in the brain may represent a putative therapeutic goal to prevent virus-induced damage, we analysed the mechanism of the HIV-induced modulation of C3 expression. Detailed studies using different C3 promoter constructs revealed that HIV activates the synthesis of C3 by stimulation of the promoter. This HIV-induced promoter activation could be measured both in different astrocytic cell lines and in neurons. Deletion constructs of the C3 promoter defined the IL-6/IL-1beta responsive element within the promoter region as a central element for the responsiveness of the C3 promoter towards the influence of HIV. A binding site for the transcription factor C/EBPdelta was identified as important regulatory domain within the IL-6/IL-1beta responsive element, since a point mutation which eliminates the binding capacity of C/EBPdelta to this site also abolishes the induction by HIV-1. Similarly, the viral proteins Nef and gp41 which had also been shown to stimulate the synthesis of C3, exert their effect via the IL-6/IL-1beta responsive element with binding of the transcription factor C/EBPdelta representing the critical step. Our experiments clearly define the mechanism for the induction of complement factors in the HIV-infected brain and reveal a decisive role of the regulator protein C/EBPdelta for the HIV-induced increase in C3 expression. PMID:14725791

  6. Complement fixation by rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Cooper, N R; Johnson, J S; Vaughan, J H

    1975-01-01

    The capacity for fixation and activation of hemolytic complement by polyclonal IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) isolated from sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and monoclonal IgM-RF isolated from the cryoprecipitates of patients with IgM-IgG mixed cryoglobulinemia was examined. RF mixed with aggregated, reduced, and alkylated human IgG (Agg-R/A-IgG) in the fluid phase failed to significantly reduce the level of total hemolytic complement, CH50, or of individual complement components, C1, C2, C3, and C5. However, sheep erythrocytes (SRC) coated with Agg-R/A-IgG or with reduced and alkylated rabbit IgG anti-SRC antibody were hemolyzed by complement in the presence of polyclonal IgM-RF. Human and guinea pig complement worked equally well. The degree of hemolysis was in direct proportion to the hemagglutination titer of the RF against the same coated cells. Monoclonal IgM-RF, normal human IgM, and purified Waldenström macroglobulins without antiglobulin activity were all inert. Hemolysis of coated SRC by RF and complement was inhibited by prior treatment of the complement source with chelating agents, hydrazine, cobra venom factor, specific antisera to C1q, CR, C5, C6, or C8, or by heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Purified radiolabeled C4, C3, and C8 included in the complement source were bound to hemolysed SRC in direct proportion to the degree of hemolysis. These data indicate that polyclonal IgM-RF fix and activate complement via the classic pathway. The system described for assessing complement fixation by isolated RF is readily adaptable to use with whole human serum. PMID:1078825

  7. Virus-induced gene complementation in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jinhua; Chen, Weiwei; Shen, Jiajia; Qin, Cheng; Lai, Tongfei; Zhang, Pengcheng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Chaoqun; Yang, Xin; Hong, Yiguo

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC), a plant virus technology based on Potato virus X for transient overexpression of endogenous genes complemented tomato mutants, resulting in non-ripening fruits to ripen. This efficient “gain-of-function” approach involves no stable transformation, and reveals a fruit-specific transcriptional network that may exist among key transcription factors in modulating tomato ripening. Thus, VIGC represents a novel and feasible strategy for gene functional analysis in plants. PMID:24305652

  8. Flicker-induced retinal vasodilatation is not dependent on complement factor H polymorphism in healthy young subjects

    PubMed Central

    Told, Reinhard; Palkovits, Stefan; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Napora, Katarzyna J; Werkmeister, René M; Haslacher, Helmuth; Frantal, Sophie; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The complement factor H (CFH) tyrosine 402 histidine (Y402H, rs1061170) variant is known to be significantly associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Whether this genetic variant may impact retinal blood flow regulation is largely unknown. This study investigated whether flicker-induced vasodilation, an indicator for the coupling between neural activity and blood flow, is altered in subjects carrying the rs1061170 risk allele. Methods One hundred healthy subjects (aged between 18 and 45 years) were included in this study. Retinal blood flow regulation was tested by assessing retinal vessel calibres in response to stimulation with diffuse flicker light. Retinal vascular flicker responses were determined with a Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (DVA). In addition, genotyping for rs1061170 was performed. Results Eighteen subjects were homozygous for the risk allele C, 50 were homozygous for the ancestral allele T, and 31 subjects were heterozygous (CT). One subject had to be excluded from data evaluation, as no genetic analysis could be performed due to technical difficulties. Baseline diameters of retinal arteries (p = 0.39) and veins (p = 0.64) were comparable between the three groups. Flicker-induced vasodilation in both retinal arteries (p = 0.38) and retinal veins (p = 0.62) was also comparable between the three studied groups. Conclusions Our data indicate that homozygous healthy young carriers of the C risk allele at rs1061170 do not show abnormal flicker-induced vasodilation in the retina. This suggests that the high-risk genetic variant of CFH polymorphism does not impact neuro-vascular coupling in healthy subjects. PMID:24863099

  9. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Baracho GV, Nudelman V, Isaac L. Molecular characterization of homozygous hereditary factor I deficiency. Clin Exp ... G, Sánchez-Corral P, López-Trascasa M. Molecular characterization of Complement Factor I deficiency in two Spanish ...

  10. The alternative complement component factor B regulates UV-induced oedema, systemic suppression of contact and delayed hypersensitivity, and mast cell infiltration into the skin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Hammond, Kirsten J L; Chan, Carling Y-Y; Rogers, Linda J; Beaugie, Clare; Rana, Sabita; Marsh-Wakefield, Felix; Thurman, Joshua M; Halliday, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in sunlight are the prime cause of skin cancer in humans with both the UVA and UVB wavebands making a contribution to photocarcinogenesis. UV has many different biological effects on the skin that contribute to carcinogenesis, including suppression of adaptive immunity, sunburn and altering the migration of mast cells into and away from irradiated skin. Many molecular mechanisms have been identified as contributing to skin responses to UV. Recently, using gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data, we identified the alternative complement pathway with a central role for factor B (fB) in UVA-induced immunosuppression. In the current study we used mice genetically deficient in fB (fB-/- mice) to study the functional role of the alternative complement pathway in skin responses to UV. We found that fB is required for not only UVA but also UVB-induced immunosuppression and solar-simulated UV induction of the oedemal component of sunburn. Factor B-/- mice had a larger number of resident skin mast cells than control mice, but unlike the controls did not respond to UV by increasing mast cell infiltration into the skin. This study provides evidence for a function role for fB in skin responses to UV radiation. Factor B regulates UVA and UVB induced immunosuppression, UV induced oedema and mast cell infiltration into the skin. The alternative complement pathway is therefore an important regulator of skin responses to UV. PMID:25645888

  11. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2015-05-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation. PMID:25802332

  12. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W.; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-β signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation. PMID:25802332

  13. SIGN-R1 and complement factors are involved in the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells in whole-body irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Yeon; Loh, SoHee; Cho, Eun-hee; Choi, Hyeong-Jwa; Na, Tae-Young; Nemeno, Judee Grace E.; Lee, Jeong Ik; Yoon, Taek Joon; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Jae-Seon; Kang, Young-Sun

    2015-08-07

    Although SIGN-R1-mediated complement activation pathway has been shown to enhance the systemic clearance of apoptotic cells, the role of SIGN-R1 in the clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells has not been characterized and was investigated in this study. Our data indicated that whole-body γ-irradiation of mice increased caspase-3{sup +} apoptotic lymphocyte numbers in secondary lymphoid organs. Following γ-irradiation, SIGN-R1 and complements (C4 and C3) were simultaneously increased only in the mice spleen tissue among the assessed tissues. In particular, C3 was exclusively activated in the spleen. The delayed clearance of apoptotic cells was markedly prevalent in the spleen and liver of SIGN-R1 KO mice, followed by a significant increase of CD11b{sup +} cells. These results indicate that SIGN-R1 and complement factors play an important role in the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic innate immune cells to maintain tissue homeostasis after γ-irradiation. - Highlights: • Splenic SIGN-R1{sup +} macrophages are activated after γ-irradiation. • C3 and C4 levels increased and C3 was activated in the spleen after γ-irradiation. • SIGN-R1 mediated the systemic clearance of radiation-induced apoptotic cells in spleen and liver.

  14. Complement factor H related proteins (CFHRs).

    PubMed

    Skerka, Christine; Chen, Qian; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T

    2013-12-15

    Factor H related proteins comprise a group of five plasma proteins: CFHR1, CFHR2, CFHR3, CFHR4 and CFHR5, and each member of this group binds to the central complement component C3b. Mutations, genetic deletions, duplications or rearrangements in the individual CFHR genes are associated with a number of diseases including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), C3 glomerulopathies (C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN), dense deposit disease (DDD) and CFHR5 nephropathy), IgA nephropathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although complement regulatory functions were attributed to most of the members of the CFHR protein family, the precise role of each CFHR protein in complement activation and the exact contribution to disease pathology is still unclear. Recent publications show that CFHR proteins form homo- as well as heterodimers. Genetic abnormalities within the CFHR gene locus can result in hybrid proteins with affected dimerization or recognition domains which cause defective functions. Here we summarize the recent data about CFHR genes and proteins in order to better understand the role of CFHR proteins in complement activation and in complement associated diseases. PMID:23830046

  15. The membrane attack complex of complement contributes to plasmin-induced synthesis of platelet-activating factor by endothelial cells and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lupia, Enrico; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Bergerone, Serena; Emanuelli, Giorgio; Camussi, Giovanni; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Thrombolytic agents, used to restore blood flow to ischaemic tissues, activate several enzymatic systems with pro-inflammatory effects, thus potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of ischaemia–reperfusion injury. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a phospholipid mediator of inflammation, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of this process. We previously showed that the infusion of streptokinase (SK) induces the intravascular release of PAF in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and that cultured human endothelial cells (EC) synthesized PAF in response to SK and plasmin (PLN). In the present study, we investigated the role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) of complement in the PLN-induced synthesis of PAF. In vivo, we showed a correlation between the levels of soluble terminal complement components (sC5b-9) and the concentrations of PAF detected in blood of patients with AMI infused with SK. In vitro both EC and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), incubated in the presence of PLN and normal human serum, showed an intense staining for the MAC neoepitope, while no staining was detected when they were incubated with PLN in the presence of heat-inactivated normal human serum. Moreover, the insertion of MAC on EC and PMN plasmamembrane elicited the synthesis of PAF. In conclusion, our results elucidate the mechanisms involved in PAF production during the activation of the fibrinolytic system, showing a role for complement products in this setting. The release of PAF may increase the inflammatory response, thus limiting the beneficial effects of thrombolytic therapy. Moreover, it may have a pathogenic role in other pathological conditions, such as transplant rejection, tumoral angiogenesis, and septic shock, where fibrinolysis is activated. PMID:12871223

  16. Anti-complement-factor H-associated glomerulopathies.

    PubMed

    Durey, Marie-Agnes Dragon; Sinha, Aditi; Togarsimalemath, Shambhuprasad Kotresh; Bagga, Arvind

    2016-09-01

    Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS), an important cause of acute kidney injury, is characterized by dysregulation of the complement pathway, frequent need for dialysis, and progression to end-stage renal disease. Autoantibodies against complement factor H (FH), the main plasma regulatory protein of the alternative pathway of the complement system, account for a considerable proportion of children with aHUS. The autoantibodies are usually associated with the occurrence of a homozygous deletion in the genes encoding the FH-related proteins FHR1 and FHR3. High levels of autoantibodies, noted at the onset of disease and during relapses, induce functional deficiency of FH, whereas their decline, in response to plasma exchanges and/or immunosuppressive therapy, is associated with disease remission. Management with plasma exchange and immunosuppression is remarkably effective in inducing and maintaining remission in aHUS associated with FH autoantibodies, whereas terminal complement blockade with eculizumab is considered the most effective therapy in other forms of aHUS. Anti-FH autoantibodies are also detected in a small proportion of patients with C3 glomerulopathies, which are characterized by chronic glomerular injury mediated by activation of the alternative complement pathway and predominant C3 deposits on renal histology. PMID:27452363

  17. Functional anatomy of complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2013-06-11

    Factor H (FH) is a soluble regulator of the proteolytic cascade at the core of the evolutionarily ancient vertebrate complement system. Although FH consists of a single chain of similar protein modules, it has a demanding job description. Its chief role is to prevent complement-mediated injury to healthy host cells and tissues. This entails recognition of molecular patterns on host surfaces combined with control of one of nature's most dangerous examples of a positive-feedback loop. In this way, FH modulates, where and when needed, an amplification process that otherwise exponentially escalates the production of the pro-inflammatory, pro-phagocytic, and pro-cytolytic cleavage products of complement proteins C3 and C5. Mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the FH gene and autoantibodies against FH predispose individuals to diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, dense-deposit disease, and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Moreover, deletions or variations of genes for FH-related proteins also influence the risk of disease. Numerous pathogens hijack FH and use it for self-defense. As reviewed herein, a molecular understanding of FH function is emerging. While its functional oligomeric status remains uncertain, progress has been achieved in characterizing its three-dimensional architecture and, to a lesser extent, its intermodular flexibility. Models are proposed, based on the reconciliation of older data with a wealth of recent evidence, in which a latent circulating form of FH is activated by its principal target, C3b tethered to a self-surface. Such models suggest hypotheses linking sequence variations to pathophysiology, but improved, more quantitative, functional assays and rigorous data analysis are required to test these ideas. PMID:23701234

  18. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the suspected disease are done first. C3 and C4 are the complement components measured most often. A ... normal levels of the complement proteins C3 and C4 . Complement activity varies throughout the body. For example, ...

  19. Identification and characterization of complement factor H in Branchiostoma belcheri.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Zhu, Jiu; Yin, Denghua; Chen, Liming; Jin, Ping; Ma, Fei

    2014-12-10

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an essential regulator of the complement system and plays very important roles in animal innate immunity. Although the complement system of amphioxus has been extensively studied, the expression in amphioxus and evolution of CFH gene remain unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized an amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) CFH gene (designated as AmphiCFH). Our results showed that the full-length cDNA of AmphiCFH gene consists of 1295 bp nucleotides containing an 855 bp open reading frame (ORF) that was predicted to encode a 284 amino acid protein. The putative AmphiCFH protein possessed the characteristic of the CFH protein family, including typical CCP (complement control protein) domain. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the AmphiCFH was ubiquitously and differentially expressed in five investigated tissues (intestine, gills, notochord, muscles, and hepatic cecum). The expression level of the AmphiCFH gene was induced upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation, indicating that the AmphiCFH gene might be involved in innate immunity. In addition, phylogenetic analysis showed that the AmphiCFH gene was located between that of invertebrates and vertebrates, suggesting that the AmphiCFH gene is a member of the CFH gene family. In conclusion, our findings provided an insight into animal innate immunity and evolution of the CFH gene family. PMID:25281822

  20. Complement-activating ability of leucocytes from patients with complement factor I deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, H V; Rasmussen, J M; Leslie, R G

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that normal peripheral blood B cells are capable of activating complement via the alternative pathway (AP), that the activation is associated with complement receptor type 2 (CR2) expression, and that erythrocytes at normal blood levels partially inhibit the activation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether factor I (FI) deficiency, which leads to continued formation of the AP convertase (C3bBb) resulting in the consumption of factor B and C3 and large scale generation of C3b fragments, affects the phenotype and/or function of the patients' B cells. Using flow cytometry, peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) from two FI-deficient patients were investigated for expression of complement receptors and complement regulatory proteins, in vivo-deposited C3 fragments and in vitro complement-activating ability. CR1 levels on B cells were significantly lower in FI-deficient patients than in normal individuals, whereas CR2 levels were found to be reduced, although not to a significant extent. CR1 levels on monocytes and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) were found to be normal or slightly raised. All leucocyte subpopulations were found to be covered in vivo with C3b fragments. AP activation on B cells from FI-deficient patients in homologous serum was significantly reduced compared with that for normal individuals, whereas no in vitro activation was seen in autologous serum. In addition, the in vivo-bound C3b fragments were degraded to C3d,g when the patients' PBL were incubated in homologous serum containing EDTA. Finally, the patients, erythrocytes failed to exert any inhibition on AP activation in homologous serum. PMID:9301541

  1. Complement factor H–related hybrid protein deregulates complement in dense deposit disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Wiesener, Michael; Eberhardt, Hannes U.; Hartmann, Andrea; Uzonyi, Barbara; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Kerstin; Buettner, Maike; Goodship, Tim; Hugo, Christian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    The renal disorder C3 glomerulopathy with dense deposit disease (C3G-DDD) pattern results from complement dysfunction and primarily affects children and young adults. There is no effective treatment, and patients often progress to end-stage renal failure. A small fraction of C3G-DDD cases linked to factor H or C3 gene mutations as well as autoantibodies have been reported. Here, we examined an index family with 2 patients with C3G-DDD and identified a chromosomal deletion in the complement factor H–related (CFHR) gene cluster. This deletion resulted in expression of a hybrid CFHR2-CFHR5 plasma protein. The recombinant hybrid protein stabilized the C3 convertase and reduced factor H–mediated convertase decay. One patient was refractory to plasma replacement and exchange therapy, as evidenced by the hybrid protein quickly returning to pretreatment plasma levels. Subsequently, complement inhibitors were tested on serum from the patient for their ability to block activity of CFHR2-CFHR5. Soluble CR1 restored defective C3 convertase regulation; however, neither eculizumab nor tagged compstatin had any effect. Our findings provide insight into the importance of CFHR proteins for C3 convertase regulation and identify a genetic variation in the CFHR gene cluster that promotes C3G-DDD. Monitoring copy number and sequence variations in the CFHR gene cluster in C3G-DDD and kidney patients with C3G-DDD variations will help guide treatment strategies. PMID:24334459

  2. Von Willebrand factor regulates complement on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Noone, Damien G; Riedl, Magdalena; Pluthero, Fred G; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Lu, Lily; Quan, Yi; Balgobin, Steve; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Schneppenheim, Sonja; Budde, Ulrich; James, Paula; Atkinson, John P; Palaniyar, Nades; Kahr, Walter H A; Licht, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura have traditionally been considered separate entities. Defects in the regulation of the complement alternative pathway occur in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and defects in the cleavage of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-multimers arise in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. However, recent studies suggest that both entities are related as defects in the disease-causing pathways overlap or show functional interactions. Here we investigate the possible functional link of VWF-multimers and the complement system on endothelial cells. Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) were obtained from 3 healthy individuals and 2 patients with Type 3 von Willebrand disease lacking VWF. Cells were exposed to a standardized complement challenge via the combination of classical and alternative pathway activation and 50% normal human serum resulting in complement fixation to the endothelial surface. Under these conditions we found the expected release of VWF-multimers causing platelet adhesion onto BOECs from healthy individuals. Importantly, in BOECs derived from patients with von Willebrand disease complement C3c deposition and cytotoxicity were more pronounced than on BOECs derived from normal individuals. This is of particular importance as primary glomerular endothelial cells display a heterogeneous expression pattern of VWF with overall reduced VWF abundance. Thus, our results support a mechanistic link between VWF-multimers and the complement system. However, our findings also identify VWF as a new complement regulator on vascular endothelial cells and suggest that VWF has a protective effect on endothelial cells and complement-mediated injury. PMID:27236750

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells inhibit complement activation by secreting factor H.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhidan; Li, Qing; Bu, Hong; Lin, Feng

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent and broad immunosuppressive capabilities, and have shown promise in clinical trials treating many inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have found that MSCs inhibit dendritic cell, T-cell, and B-cell activities in the adaptive immunity; however, whether MSCs inhibit complement in the innate immunity, and if so, by which mechanism, have not been established. In this report, we found that MSCs constitutively secrete factor H, which potently inhibits complement activation. Depletion of factor H in the MSC-conditioned serum-free media abolishes their complement inhibitory activities. In addition, production of factor H by MSCs is augmented by inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in dose- and time-dependent manners, while IL-6 does not have a significant effect. Furthermore, the factor H production from MSCs is significantly suppressed by the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis inhibitor indomethacin and the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor 1-methyl-d-tryptophan (1-MT), both of which inhibitors are known to efficiently dampen MSCs immunosuppressive activity. These results indicate that MSCs inhibit complement activation by producing factor H, which could be another mechanism underlying MSCs broad immunosuppressive capabilities. PMID:20163251

  4. Complement-mediated adipocyte lysis by nephritic factor sera.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, P W; Würzner, R; Oliveria, D B; Lachmann, P J; Peters, D K

    1993-06-01

    Recent data indicate a previously unsuspected link between the complement system and adipocyte biology. Murine adipocytes produce key components of the alternative pathway of complement and are able to activate this pathway. This suggested to us an explanation for adipose tissue loss in partial lipodystrophy, a rare human condition usually associated with the immunoglobulin G(IgG) autoantibody nephritic factor (NeF) which leads to enhanced alternative pathway activation in vivo. We hypothesized that in the presence of NeF, there is dysregulated complement activation at the membrane of the adipocyte, leading to adipocyte lysis. Here we show that adipocytes explanted from rat epididymal fat pads are lysed by NeF-containing sera but not by control sera. A similar pattern is seen with IgG fractions of these sera. Adipocyte lysis in the presence of NeF is associated with the generation of fluid-phase terminal complement complexes, the level of which correlates closely with the level of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of cell lysis. Lysis is abolished by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, which chelates divalent cations and prevents complement activation, and reduced by an antibody to factor D, a key component of the alternative pathway. These data provide an explanation for the previously obscure link between NeF and fat cell damage. PMID:8496694

  5. LPS induces pulp progenitor cell recruitment via complement activation.

    PubMed

    Chmilewsky, F; Jeanneau, C; Laurent, P; About, I

    2015-01-01

    Complement system, a major component of the natural immunity, has been recently identified as an important mediator of the dentin-pulp regeneration process through STRO-1 pulp cell recruitment by the C5a active fragment. Moreover, it has been shown recently that under stimulation with lipoteichoic acid, a complex component of the Gram-positive bacteria cell wall, human pulp fibroblasts are able to synthesize all proteins required for complement activation. However, Gram-negative bacteria, which are also involved in tooth decay, are known as powerful activators of complement system and inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of Gram-negative bacteria-induced complement activation on the pulp progenitor cell recruitment using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of all Gram-negative bacteria. Our results show that incubating pulp fibroblasts with LPS induced membrane attack complex formation and C5a release in serum-free fibroblast cultures. The produced C5a binds to the pulp progenitor cells' membrane and induces their migration toward the LPS stimulation chamber, as revealed by the dynamic transwell migration assays. The inhibition of this migration by the C5aR-specific antagonist W54011 indicates that the pulp progenitor migration is mediated by the interaction between C5a and C5aR. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a direct interaction between the recruitment of progenitor pulp cells and the activation of complement system generated by pulp fibroblast stimulation with LPS. PMID:25359783

  6. Role of complement in porphyrin-induced photosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.W.; Gigli, I.

    1981-01-01

    Addition of porphyrins to sera of guinea pigs in vitro, followed by irradiation with 405 nm light, resulted in dose-dependent inhibitions of hemolytic activity of complement. With guinea pig as an animal model, we also found that systemically administered porphyrins, followed by irradiation with 405 nm light, resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of CH50 in vivo. The erythrocytes from porphyrin-treated guinea pigs showed an increased susceptibility to hemolysis induced by 405 nm irradiation in vitro. Clinical changes in these animals were limited to light-exposed areas and consisted of erythema, crusting, and delayed growth of hair. Histologically, dermal edema, dilation of blood vessels, and infiltration of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells were observed. Guinea pigs irradiated with ultraviolet-B developed erythema, but had no alteration of their complement profiles. It is suggested that complement products may play a specific role in the pathogenesis of the cutaneous lesions of some porphyrias.

  7. Complement factor H polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Albert O; Ritter, Robert; Abel, Kenneth J; Manning, Alisa; Panhuysen, Carolien; Farrer, Lindsay A

    2005-04-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, late-onset, and complex trait with multiple risk factors. Concentrating on a region harboring a locus for AMD on 1q25-31, the ARMD1 locus, we tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms for association with AMD in two independent case-control populations. Significant association (P = 4.95 x 10(-10)) was identified within the regulation of complement activation locus and was centered over a tyrosine-402 --> histidine-402 protein polymorphism in the gene encoding complement factor H. Possession of at least one histidine at amino acid position 402 increased the risk of AMD 2.7-fold and may account for 50% of the attributable risk of AMD. PMID:15761121

  8. Can apolipoproteins and complement factors be biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Manral, Pallavi; Sharma, Pratibha; Hariprasad, Gururao; Chandralekha; Tripathi, Manjari; Srinivasan, Alagiri

    2012-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in elderly persons. Quick diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease will allow treatments that may help slow its progression. The correlation between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) parameters and progression of Alzheimer's disease is higher than and independent of other risk factors. We have compared sixteen CSF samples of clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease patients with non demented subjects using proteomics approach. Apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein J, complement C4b, hemopexin and complement factor B were identified as differentially expressed proteins. Pathway analyses show that these proteins have interacting partners in Alzheimer's and apoptotic pathways. The possible roles of these proteins in relation to the disease are discussed. PMID:22631439

  9. A role for tumour necrosis factor-alpha, complement C5 and interleukin-6 in the initiation and development of the mycobacterial cord factor trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate induced granulomatous response.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Kerry J; Abbott, April N; Hwang, Shen-An; Indrigo, Jessica; Armitige, Lisa Y; Blackburn, Michael R; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2008-06-01

    Trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) is a glycolipid component of the mycobacterial cell wall that causes immune responses in mice similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection, including granuloma formation with production of proinflammatory cytokines. The precise roles of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, complement C5 and interleukin (IL)-6 in the molecular events that lead to the initiation and maintenance of the granulomatous response to TDM have not been fully elucidated. Macrophage proinflammatory responses from wild-type and complement-deficient mice after infection with MTB were assessed, and compared to responses from organisms in which surface TDM had been removed. Removal of TDM abolished proinflammatory responses, markedly so in the complement-deficient macrophages. Mice deficient in TNF-alpha, C5a and IL-6, along with wild-type C57BL/6 controls, were intravenously injected with TDM in a water-in-oil emulsion, and analysed for histological response and cytokine production in lungs. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice formed granulomas with increased production of IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), IL-12p40, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and IL-10 protein and mRNA. TNF-alpha-deficient mice failed to produce a histological response to TDM, with no increases in cytokine production following TDM administration. While C5a-deficient mice exhibited inflammation, they did not form structured granulomas and initially had decreased production of proinflammatory mediators. IL-6-deficient mice initiated granuloma formation, but failed to maintain the granulomas through day 7 and demonstrated decreased early production of proinflammatory mediators in comparison to wild-type mice. These data suggest that TNF-alpha is critical for initiation of the granulomatous response, C5a is necessary for formation of cohesive granulomas, and IL-6 plays a key role in the granuloma maintenance response to mycobacterial TDM. PMID:18524936

  10. Nephritic Factor of the Classical Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Halbwachs, L.; Leveillé, M.; Lesavre, Ph.; Wattel, S.; Leibowitch, J.

    1980-01-01

    A factor, functionally characterized by its capacity to stabilize the normally labile classical pathway C3-converting complex of the classical pathway of complement, has been isolated from the serum of one patient with a case of acute glomerulonephritis, subsequent to a cutaneous infection. The factor confers long-lived stabilization of classical pathway C3 convertase complexes formed both in the solid (sensitized sheep erythrocytes bearing activated C̄1̄ and the classical pathway C3 convertase) and fluid phase. The half-life of such stabilized C3-cleaving enzymes extended beyond several hours at 37°C. The stabilizing activity was associated with a protein fraction immunochemically identified as immunoglobulin (Ig)G, a sizeable population of which exhibited a gamma chain of 60,000 daltons. The IgG-associated stabilizing activity was found to bind to the classical pathway C3 convertase enzyme via a fragment bearing the antigen-binding site of the molecule [F(ab)2 and F(ab)]. Such binding was demonstrable for classical pathway and not for alternative pathway C3 convertase. Thus, the stabilizing factor behaves like an autoantibody to the C3-converting complex of the classical pathway of complement. The binding of the antibody to the enzyme affords protection of the latter against decay-degradation. By analogy with the nephritic factor of the alternative pathway situation where IgG autoantibodies specifically bind to alternative pathway C3 convertase enzymes and protect them from degradation, the functionally unusual IgG in our patient was designated as the nephritic factor of the classical pathway. Indirect evidence suggests that nephritic factor of the classical pathway-IgG might be of the IgG3 subclass. Images PMID:6902727

  11. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by antisense oligonucleotides targeting complement factor B improves lupus nephritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Tamar R; Hettrick, Lisa A; Johnson, Robert B; Hung, Gene; Peralta, Raechel; Watt, Andrew; Henry, Scott P; Adamson, Peter; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that manifests in widespread complement activation and deposition of complement fragments in the kidney. The complement pathway is believed to play a significant role in the pathogenesis and in the development of lupus nephritis. Complement factor B is an important activator of the alternative complement pathway and increasing evidence supports reducing factor B as a potential novel therapy to lupus nephritis. Here we investigated whether pharmacological reduction of factor B expression using antisense oligonucleotides could be an effective approach for the treatment of lupus nephritis. We identified potent and well tolerated factor B antisense oligonucleotides that resulted in significant reductions in hepatic and plasma factor B levels when administered to normal mice. To test the effects of factor B antisense oligonucleotides on lupus nephritis, we used two different mouse models, NZB/W F1 and MRL/lpr mice, that exhibit lupus nephritis like renal pathology. Antisense oligonucleotides mediated reductions in circulating factor B levels were associated with significant improvements in renal pathology, reduced glomerular C3 deposition and proteinuria, and improved survival. These data support the strategy of using factor B antisense oligonucleotides for treatment of lupus nephritis in humans. PMID:26307001

  12. Complement activating factor(s) of Trypanosoma lewisi: some physiochemical characteristics of the active components.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, K; Sheppard, J; Tizard, I; Holmes, W

    1978-01-01

    Of the complement activating factors present in Trypanosoma lewisi, the major component, a carbohydrate containing substance was further investigated. This component was found to have a lag time of complete activation of 2 CH50 units of bovine complement of approximately 15 minutes while 1% trypsin (a known activator of complement, used as a control system) was capable of instant consumption of a similar quantity of complement. In addition, the complement activating factor of trypanosomes was observed to be stable at 100 degrees C for 15 minutes and over a pH range of 3.0 to 11.0. Thin layer chromatography studies suggested that at least part of the active component contained lipid, perhaps indicating that it may be glycolipid in nature. PMID:25701

  13. Complement Factor H Polymorphism in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Robert J.; Zeiss, Caroline; Chew, Emily Y.; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Sackler, Richard S.; Haynes, Chad; Henning, Alice K.; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Mane, Shrikant M.; Mayne, Susan T.; Bracken, Michael B.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Ott, Jurg; Barnstable, Colin; Hoh., Josephine

    2006-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in the elderly. We report a genome-wide screen of 96 cases and 50 controls for polymorphisms associated with AMD. Among 116,204 single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped, an intronic and common variant in the complement factor H gene (CFH) is strongly associated with AMD (nominal P value <10−7). In individuals homozygous for the risk allele, the likelihood of AMD is increased by a factor of 7.4 (95% confidence interval 2.9 to 19). Resequencing revealed a polymorphism in linkage disequilibrium with the risk allele representing a tyrosine-histidine change at amino acid 402. This polymorphism is in a region of CFH that binds heparin and C-reactive protein. The CFH gene is located on chromosome 1 in a region repeatedly linked to AMD in family-based studies. PMID:15761122

  14. CTRP6 is an endogenous complement regulator that can effectively treat induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Masanori A.; Kakuta, Shigeru; Inoue, Asuka; Umeda, Naoto; Yonezawa, Tomo; Maruhashi, Takumi; Tateishi, Koichiro; Ishigame, Harumichi; Yabe, Rikio; Ikeda, Satoshi; Seno, Akimasa; Chi, Hsi-Hua; Hashiguchi, Yuriko; Kurata, Riho; Tada, Takuya; Kubo, Sachiko; Sato, Nozomi; Liu, Yang; Hattori, Masahira; Saijo, Shinobu; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Sumida, Takayuki; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is important for the host defence against infection as well as for the development of inflammatory diseases. Here we show that C1q/TNF-related protein 6 (CTRP6; gene symbol C1qtnf6) expression is elevated in mouse rheumatoid arthritis (RA) models. C1qtnf6−/− mice are highly susceptible to induced arthritis due to enhanced complement activation, whereas C1qtnf6-transgenic mice are refractory. The Arthus reaction and the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are also enhanced in C1qtnf6−/− mice and C1qtnf6−/− embryos are semi-lethal. We find that CTRP6 specifically suppresses the alternative pathway of the complement system by competing with factor B for C3(H2O) binding. Furthermore, treatment of arthritis-induced mice with intra-articular injection of recombinant human CTRP6 cures the arthritis. CTRP6 is expressed in human synoviocytes, and CTRP6 levels are increased in RA patients. These results indicate that CTRP6 is an endogenous complement regulator and could be used for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26404464

  15. Regulation of complement-dependent cytotoxicity by TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Goswami, M T; Reka, A K; Kurapati, H; Kaza, V; Chen, J; Standiford, T J; Keshamouni, V G

    2016-04-14

    The process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in addition to being an initiating event for tumor metastasis, is implicated in conferring several clinically relevant properties to disseminating cancer cells. These include stem cell-like properties, resistance to targeted therapies and ability to evade immune surveillance. Enrichment analysis of gene expression changes during transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced EMT in lung cancer cells identified complement cascade as one of the significantly enriched pathway. Further analysis of the genes in the complement pathway revealed an increase in the expression of complement inhibitors and a decrease in the expression of proteins essential for complement activity. In this study, we tested whether EMT confers resistance to complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in lung cancer cells and promotes tumor progression. CD59 is a potent inhibitor of membrane attack complex that mediates complement-dependent cell lysis. We observed a significant increase in the CD59 expression on the surface of cells after TGF-β-induced EMT. Furthermore, CD59 knockdown restored susceptibility of cells undergoing EMT to cetuximab-mediated CDC. TGF-β-induced CD59 expression during EMT is dependent on Smad3 but not on Smad2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that Smad3 directly binds to the CD59 promoter. Stable knockdown of CD59 in A549 cells inhibited experimental metastasis. These results demonstrate that TGF-β-induced EMT and CD59 expression confers an immune-evasive mechanism to disseminating tumor cells facilitating tumor progression. Together, our data demonstrates that CD59 inhibition may serve as an adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of antibody-mediated therapies, as well as to inhibit metastasis in lung cancer. PMID:26148233

  16. Bisretinoid-mediated Complement Activation on Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Complement Factor H Haplotype*

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Roxana A.; Hu, Jane; Jiang, Zhichun; Bok, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common central blinding disease of the elderly. Homozygosity for a sequence variant causing Y402H and I62V substitutions in the gene for complement factor H (CFH) is strongly associated with risk of AMD. CFH, secreted by many cell types, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is a regulatory protein that inhibits complement activation. Recessive Stargardt maculopathy is another central blinding disease caused by mutations in the gene for ABCA4, a transporter in photoreceptor outer segments (OS) that clears retinaldehyde and prevents formation of toxic bisretinoids. Photoreceptors daily shed their distal OS, which are phagocytosed by the RPE cells. Here, we investigated the relationship between the CFH haplotype of human RPE (hRPE) cells, exposure to OS containing bisretinoids, and complement activation. We show that hRPE cells of the AMD-predisposing CFH haplotype (HH402/VV62) are attacked by complement following exposure to bisretinoid-containing Abca4−/− OS. This activation was dependent on factor B, indicating involvement of the alternative pathway. In contrast, hRPE cells of the AMD-protective CFH haplotype (YY402/II62) showed no complement activation following exposure to either Abca4−/− or wild-type OS. The AMD-protective YY402/II62 hRPE cells were more resistant to the membrane attack complex, whereas HH402/VV62 hRPE cells showed significant membrane attack complex deposition following ingestion of Abca4−/− OS. These results suggest that bisretinoid accumulation in hRPE cells stimulates activation and dysregulation of complement. Cells with an intact complement negative regulatory system are protected from complement attack, whereas cells with reduced CFH synthesis because of the Y402H and I62V substitutions are vulnerable to disease. PMID:24550392

  17. Complement Evasion Mediated by Enhancement of Captured Factor H: Implications for Protection of Self-Surfaces from Complement.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Andrew P; Makou, Elisavet; Chen, Zhuo A; Kerr, Heather; Richards, Anna; Rappsilber, Juri; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-11-15

    In an attempt to evade annihilation by the vertebrate complement system, many microbes capture factor H (FH), the key soluble complement-regulating protein in human plasma. However, FH is normally an active complement suppressor exclusively on self-surfaces and this selective action of FH is pivotal to self versus non-self discrimination by the complement system. We investigated whether the bacterially captured FH becomes functionally enhanced and, if so, how this is achieved at a structural level. We found, using site-directed and truncation mutagenesis, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cross-linking and mass spectrometry, that the N-terminal domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae protein PspC (PspCN) not only binds FH extraordinarily tightly but also holds it in a previously uncharacterized conformation. Functional enhancement arises from exposure of a C-terminal cryptic second binding site in FH for C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the pivotal complement component, C3. This conformational change of FH doubles its affinity for C3b and increases 5-fold its ability to accelerate decay of the binary enzyme (C3bBb) responsible for converting C3 to C3b in an amplification loop. Despite not sharing critical FH-binding residues, PspCNs from D39 and Tigr4 S. pneumoniae exhibit similar FH-anchoring and enhancing properties. We propose that these bacterial proteins mimic molecular markers of self-surfaces, providing a compelling hypothesis for how FH prevents complement-mediated injury to host tissue while lacking efficacy on virtually all other surfaces. In hemolysis assays with 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide-treated erythrocytes that recapitulate paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, PspCN enhanced protection of cells by FH, suggesting a new paradigm for therapeutic complement suppression. PMID:26459349

  18. Complement Evasion Mediated by Enhancement of Captured Factor H: Implications for Protection of Self-Surfaces from Complement

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew P.; Makou, Elisavet; Chen, Zhuo A.; Kerr, Heather; Richards, Anna; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to evade annihilation by the vertebrate complement system, many microbes capture factor H (FH), the key soluble complement-regulating protein in human plasma. However, FH is normally an active complement suppressor exclusively on self-surfaces and this selective action of FH is pivotal to self versus non-self discrimination by the complement system. We investigated whether the bacterially captured FH becomes functionally enhanced and, if so, how this is achieved at a structural level. We found, using site-directed and truncation mutagenesis, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cross-linking and mass spectrometry, that the N-terminal domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae protein PspC (PspCN) not only binds FH extraordinarily tightly but also holds it in a previously uncharacterized conformation. Functional enhancement arises from exposure of a C-terminal cryptic second binding site in FH for C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the pivotal complement component, C3. This conformational change of FH doubles its affinity for C3b and increases 5-fold its ability to accelerate decay of the binary enzyme (C3bBb) responsible for converting C3 to C3b in an amplification loop. Despite not sharing critical FH-binding residues, PspCNs from D39 and Tigr4 S. pneumoniae exhibit similar FH-anchoring and enhancing properties. We propose that these bacterial proteins mimic molecular markers of self-surfaces, providing a compelling hypothesis for how FH prevents complement-mediated injury to host tissue while lacking efficacy on virtually all other surfaces. In hemolysis assays with 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide–treated erythrocytes that recapitulate paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, PspCN enhanced protection of cells by FH, suggesting a new paradigm for therapeutic complement suppression. PMID:26459349

  19. Enhancement of complement-mediated lysis by a peptide derived from SCR 13 of complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, H; Ammann, C; Spruth, M; Müllauer, B; Eberhart, A; Harris, C L; Huber, C G; Longhi, R; Falkensammer, B; Würzner, R; Dierich, M P

    2001-05-01

    Complement factor H (fH) is an important regulator of complement activation. It contributes to protection of cells against homologous complement attack. In this study we tested the effect of fH-depletion of normal human serum (NHS) on lysis of antibody-coated sheep and human erythrocytes (EshA and EhuA). In the absence of fH, lysis of sensitised Esh and Ehu was clearly increased. Addition of fH to fH-depleted serum re-established protection of cells against complement similar to that seen with NHS. A fH-derived peptide (pepAred), covering the N-terminal half of SCR 13 in fH, was able to enhance complement-mediated lysis of EhuA significantly. However, the oxidised form of this peptide (pepAox) had no effect. Biotinylated pepAred, but not pepAox, was able to directly bind to cells. Additionally, pepAred competed with direct fH-cell interaction which was observable only after treatment of purified fH with mercaptoethanol. Only pepAred increased the amount of C3 fragments and reduced levels of fH detectable on cells as shown by FACS analysis and radio-immuno assay. Furthermore, fH and factor I (fI)-mediated cleavage of agarose bound C3b into iC3b was decreased in the presence of pepAred. These data indicate that a fH-derived peptide can enhance complement-mediated lysis. We will continue to investigate whether the use of a fH peptide can be exploited for therapeutical purposes. PMID:11402501

  20. The Role of Complement in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Heparan Sulphate, a ZIP Code for Complement Factor H?

    PubMed Central

    Langford-Smith, Alex; Keenan, Tiarnan D.L.; Clark, Simon J.; Bishop, Paul N.; Day, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed nations and has been associated with complement dysregulation in the central retina. The Y402H polymorphism in the complement regulatory protein factor H (CFH) can confer a >5-fold increased risk of developing AMD and is present in approximately 30% of people of European descent. CFH, in conjunction with other factors, regulates complement activation in host tissues, and the Y402H polymorphism has been found to alter the protein's specificity for heparan sulphate (HS) – a complex polysaccharide found ubiquitously in mammals. HS, which is present on the cell surface and also in the extracellular matrix, exhibits huge structural diversity due to variations in the level/pattern of sulphation, where particular structures may act as ‘ZIP codes’ for different tissue/cellular locations. Recent work has demonstrated that CFH contains two HS-binding domains that each recognize specific HS ZIP codes, allowing differential recognition of Bruch's membrane (in the eye) or the glomerular basement membrane (in the kidney). Importantly, the Y402H polymorphism impairs the binding of CFH to the HS in Bruch's membrane, which could result in increased complement activation and chronic local inflammation (in 402H individuals) and thereby contribute to AMD pathology. PMID:24335201

  1. Complement Factor H-Related 5-Hybrid Proteins Anchor Properdin and Activate Complement at Self-Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Manzke, Melanie; Hartmann, Andrea; Büttner, Maike; Amann, Kerstin; Pauly, Diana; Wiesener, Michael; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F

    2016-05-01

    C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) is a severe kidney disease for which no specific therapy exists. The causes of C3G are heterogeneous, and defective complement regulation is often linked to C3G pathogenesis. Copy number variations in the complement factor H-related (CFHR) gene cluster on chromosome 1q32 and CFHR5 mutant proteins associate with this disease. Here, we identified CFHR5 as a pattern recognition protein that binds to damaged human endothelial cell surfaces and to properdin, the human complement activator. We found the two N-terminal short consensus repeat domains of CFHR5 contact properdin and mediate dimer formation. These properdin-binding segments are duplicated in two mutant CFHR5 proteins, CFHR2-CFHR5Hyb from German patients with C3G and CFHR5Dup from Cypriot patients with C3G. Each of these mutated proteins assembled into large multimeric complexes and, compared to CFHR5, bound damaged human cell surfaces and properdin with greater intensity and exacerbated local complement activation. This enhanced surface binding and properdin recruitment was further evidenced in the mesangia of a transplanted and explanted kidney from a German patient with a CFHR2-CFHR5Hyb protein. Enhanced properdin staining correlated with local complement activation with C3b and C5b-9 deposition on the mesangial cell surface in vitro This gain of function in complement activation for two disease-associated CFHR5 mutants describes a new disease mechanism of C3G, which is relevant for defining appropriate treatment options for this disorder. PMID:26432903

  2. Anti-GD(2) with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Linda S; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C; Ming Yu, Hui; Yu, Alice L

    2010-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD(2) ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human-mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC were measured using europium-TDA assay. In vivo, allodynia was evaluated by measuring thresholds to von Frey filaments applied to the hindpaws after injection of either ch14.18 or hu14.18K332 into wild type rats or rats with deficient complement factor 6. Other rats were pretreated with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist and tested following ch14.18 injection. The mutation reduces the antibody's ability to activate complement, while maintaining its ADCC capabilities. Injection of hu14.18K322 (1 or 3mg/kg) produced faster resolving allodynia than that engendered by ch14.18 (1mg/kg). Injection of ch14.18 (1mg/kg) into rats with C6 complement deficiency further reduced antibody-induced allodynia, while pre-treatment with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist completely abolished ch14.18-induced allodynia. These findings showed that mutant hu14.18 K322 elicited less allodynia than ch14.18 and that ch14.18-elicited allodynia is due to activation of the complement cascade: in part, to formation of membrane attack complex, but more importantly to release of complement factor C5a. Development of immunotherapeutic agents with decreased complement-dependent lysis while maintaining cellular cytotoxicity may offer treatment options with reduced adverse side effects, thereby allowing dose escalation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:20171010

  3. The role of complement in biomaterial-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Lambris, John D

    2007-01-01

    Biomaterials are regularly used in various types of artificial tissues and organs, such as oxygenators, plasmapheresis equipment, hemodialysers, catheters, prostheses, stents, vascular grafts, miniature pumps, sensors and heart aids. Although progress has been made regarding bioincompatibility, many materials and procedures are associated with side effects, in particular bioincompatibility-induced inflammation, infections and subsequent loss of function. After cardiopulmonary bypass, coagulopathies can occur and lead to cognitive disturbances, stroke and extended hospitalization. Hemodialysis is associated with anaphylatoid reactions that cause whole-body inflammation and may contribute to accelerated arteriosclerosis. Stents cause restenosis and, in severe cases, thrombotic reactions. This situation indicates that there is still a need to try to understand the mechanisms involved in these incompatibility reactions in order to be able to improve the biomaterials and to develop treatments that attenuate the reactions and thereby reduce patients' discomfort, treatment time and cost. This overview deals with the role of complement in the incompatibility reactions that occur when biomaterials come in contact with blood and other body fluids. PMID:16905192

  4. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  5. C5a anaphylatoxin as a product of complement activation up-regulates the complement inhibitory factor H in rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Schlaf, Gerald; Nitzki, Frauke; Heine, Ines; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Schieferdecker, Henrike L; Götze, Otto

    2004-11-01

    The 155-kDa complement regulator factor H (FH) is the predominant soluble regulatory protein of the complement system. It acts as a cofactor for the factor I-mediated conversion of the component C3b to iC3b, competes with factor B for a binding site on C3b and C3(H2O) and promotes the dissociation of the C3bBb complex. The primary site of synthesis is the liver, i.e. FH-specific mRNA and protein were identified in both hepatocytes (HC) and Kupffer cells (KC). Previous studies in rat primary HC and KC had shown that the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma influences the balance between activation and inhibition of the complement system through up-regulation of the inhibitory FH. In this study we show that C5a, as a product of complement activation, stimulates the expression of FH-specific mRNA and protein in KC and thus induces a negative feedback. Quantitative-competitive RT-PCR showed an approximate threefold C5a-induced up-regulation of FH. ELISA analyses revealed a corresponding increase in FH protein in the supernatants of KC. The up-regulation of FH was completely inhibited by the C5a-blocking monoclonal antibody 6-9F. Furthermore, an involvement of LPS and IFN-gamma was excluded, which strongly indicates a direct effect of C5a on the expression of FH in KC. PMID:15376195

  6. M. leprae components induce nerve damage by complement activation: identification of lipoarabinomannan as the dominant complement activator.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Das, Pranab K; Fluiter, Kees; Rosa, Patricia S; Vreijling, Jeroen; Troost, Dirk; Morgan, B Paul; Baas, Frank; Ramaglia, Valeria

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral nerve damage is the hallmark of leprosy pathology but its etiology is unclear. We previously identified the membrane attack complex (MAC) of the complement system as a key determinant of post-traumatic nerve damage and demonstrated that its inhibition is neuroprotective. Here, we determined the contribution of the MAC to nerve damage caused by Mycobacterium leprae and its components in mouse. Furthermore, we studied the association between MAC and the key M. leprae component lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in nerve biopsies of leprosy patients. Intraneural injections of M. leprae sonicate induced MAC deposition and pathological changes in the mouse nerve, whereas MAC inhibition preserved myelin and axons. Complement activation occurred mainly via the lectin pathway and the principal activator was LAM. In leprosy nerves, the extent of LAM and MAC immunoreactivity was robust and significantly higher in multibacillary compared to paucibacillary donors (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), with a highly significant association between LAM and MAC in the diseased samples (r = 0.9601, p = 0.0001). Further, MAC co-localized with LAM on axons, pointing to a role for this M. leprae antigen in complement activation and nerve damage in leprosy. Our findings demonstrate that MAC contributes to nerve damage in a model of M. leprae-induced nerve injury and its inhibition is neuroprotective. In addition, our data identified LAM as the key pathogen associated molecule that activates complement and causes nerve damage. Taken together our data imply an important role of complement in nerve damage in leprosy and may inform the development of novel therapeutics for patients. PMID:25772973

  7. Loxoprofen sodium induces the production of complement C5a in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Kodani, Yoshiko; Hashiguchi, Akihiko; Haida, Michiko; Nakamura, Masataka

    2016-04-01

    Basophil activation test (BAT) is an in vitro allergy test that is useful to identify allergens that cause IgE-dependent allergies. The test has been used to detect not only food allergies and allergies caused by environmental factors but also to detect drug hypersensitivity, which has been known to include IgE-independent reactions. In our preliminary studies in which BAT was applied to detect hypersensitivity of loxoprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), conventional BAT with incubation for 30min did not show basophil activation by means of increased CD203c expression. In this study, we extended the incubation time to 24h on the basis of the hypothesis that loxoprofen indirectly activates basophils. Basophils from healthy control donors as well as allergic patients showed up-regulation of CD203c after incubation with loxoprofen for 24h. Activation was induced using loxoprofen-treated serum. Proteomic and pharmacologic analyses revealed that serum incubation with loxoprofen generated an active complement component C5a, which induced CD203c expression via binding to the C5a receptor on basophils. Because C3a production was also detected after incubation for 24h, loxoprofen is likely to stimulate the complement classical pathway. Our findings suggest that the complement activation is involved in drug hypersensitivity and the suppression of this activation may contribute to the elimination of false positive of BAT for drug allergies. PMID:26854577

  8. A Familial C3GN Secondary to Defective C3 Regulation by Complement Receptor 1 and Complement Factor H.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Sophie; Roumenina, Lubka T; Bruneau, Sarah; Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Rybkine, Tania; Schramm, Elizabeth C; Java, Anuja; Atkinson, John P; Aldigier, Jean Claude; Bridoux, Frank; Touchard, Guy; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2016-06-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently described form of CKD. C3GN is a subtype of C3 glomerulopathy characterized by predominant C3 deposits in the glomeruli and is commonly the result of acquired or genetic abnormalities in the alternative pathway (AP) of the complement system. We identified and characterized the first mutation of the C3 gene (p. I734T) in two related individuals diagnosed with C3GN. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy studies showed C3 deposits in the subendothelial space, associated with unusual deposits located near the complement receptor 1 (CR1)-expressing podocytes. In vitro, this C3 mutation exhibited decreased binding to CR1, resulting in less CR1-dependent cleavage of C3b by factor 1. Both patients had normal plasma C3 levels, and the mutant C3 interacted with factor B comparably to wild-type (WT) C3 to form a C3 convertase. Binding of mutant C3 to factor H was normal, but mutant C3 was less efficiently cleaved by factor I in the presence of factor H, leading to enhanced C3 fragment deposition on glomerular cells. In conclusion, our results reveal that a CR1 functional deficiency is a mechanism of intraglomerular AP dysregulation and could influence the localization of the glomerular C3 deposits. PMID:26471127

  9. Regulation of age-related macular degeneration-like pathology by complement factor H

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Christopher B.; Kelly, Una; Saban, Daniel R.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a major susceptibility gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, its impact on AMD pathobiology is unresolved. Here, the role of CFH in the development of AMD pathology in vivo was interrogated by analyzing aged Cfh+/− and Cfh−/− mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-enriched diet. Strikingly, decreased levels of CFH led to increased sub-retinal pigmented epithelium (sub-RPE) deposit formation, specifically basal laminar deposits, following high-fat diet. Mechanistically, our data show that deposits are due to CFH competition for lipoprotein binding sites in Bruch’s membrane. Interestingly and despite sub-RPE deposit formation occurring in both Cfh+/− and Cfh−/− mice, RPE damage accompanied by loss of vision occurred only in old Cfh+/− mice. We demonstrate that such pathology is a function of excess complement activation in Cfh+/− mice versus complement deficiency in Cfh−/− animals. Due to the CFH-dependent increase in sub-RPE deposit height, we interrogated the potential of CFH as a previously unidentified regulator of Bruch’s membrane lipoprotein binding and show, using human Bruch’s membrane explants, that CFH removes endogenous human lipoproteins in aged donors. Thus, advanced age, high-fat diet, and decreased CFH induce sub-RPE deposit formation leading to complement activation, which contributes to RPE damage and visual function impairment. This new understanding of the complicated interactions of CFH in AMD-like pathology provides an improved foundation for the development of targeted therapies for AMD. PMID:25991857

  10. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Lambris, John D; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  11. Susceptibility to advanced age-related macular degeneration and alleles of complement factor H, complement factor B, complement component 2, complement component 3, and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 genes in a Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Gabriela; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Pompa-Mera, Ericka N.; Graue-Wiechers, Federico; Bekker-Méndez, Carolina; Ayala-Ramirez, Raul; Quezada, Carlos; Rodríguez-Loaiza, Jose L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)–high risk alleles of the complement factor H (CFH), complement factor B (CFB), complement component 2 (C2), complement component 3 (C3), and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) genes in a Mexican population for the first time. Methods Genotyping was performed for the Y402H variant of CFH, for the L9H, R32Q, and K565E variants of CFB, the E318D variant of C2, the A69S variant of ARMS2, and the R102G variant of C3 in 159 Mexican mestizo patients at advanced stages of AMD, i.e., CARMS (Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging System) grade 4 or 5. The frequency of these variants was also investigated in a group of 152 control subjects without AMD. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood leukocytes, and genotyping was performed using PCR followed by direct sequencing. Allele-specific restriction enzyme digestion was used to detect the R102G polymorphism in C3. Results There were significant differences in the allelic distribution between the two groups for CFH Y402H (p=1×10−5), ARMS A69S (p=4×10−7), and CFB R32Q (p=0.01). The odds ratios (95% confidence interval) obtained for the risk alleles of these three variants were 3.8 (2.4–5.9), 3.04 (2.2–4.3), and 2.5 (1.1–5.7), respectively. Haplotype analysis including the two most significantly associated alleles (CFH Y402H and ARMS A69S) indicated that the C-T combination conferred an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 6.9 (3.2–14.8). The exposed attributable risk for this particular haplotype was 85.5%. Conclusions This is the first case-control investigation of AMD–high risk alleles in a Latino population. Our results support that CFH, ARMS2, and CFB AMD-risk alleles are consistently associated with the disease, even in ethnic groups with a complex admixture of ancestral populations such as Mexican mestizos. PMID:23112567

  12. Variants in Complement Factor H and Complement Factor H-Related Protein Genes, CFHR3 and CFHR1, Affect Complement Activation in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Zhai, Ya-Ling; Wang, Feng-Mei; Hou, Ping; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Xu, Da-Min; Shi, Su-Fang; Liu, Li-Jun; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Novak, Jan; Gharavi, Ali G; Zhang, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Complement activation is common in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and associated with disease severity. Our recent genome-wide association study of IgAN identified susceptibility loci on 1q32 containing the complement regulatory protein-encoding genes CFH and CFHR1-5, with rs6677604 in CFH as the top single-nucleotide polymorphism and CFHR3-1 deletion (CFHR3-1∆) as the top signal for copy number variation. In this study, to explore the clinical effects of variation in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 on IgAN susceptibility and progression, we enrolled two populations. Group 1 included 1178 subjects with IgAN and available genome-wide association study data. Group 2 included 365 subjects with IgAN and available clinical follow-up data. In group 1, rs6677604 was associated with mesangial C3 deposition by genotype-phenotype correlation analysis. In group 2, we detected a linkage between the rs6677604-A allele and CFHR3-1∆ and found that the rs6677604-A allele was associated with higher serum levels of CFH and lower levels of the complement activation split product C3a. Furthermore, CFH levels were positively associated with circulating C3 levels and negatively associated with mesangial C3 deposition. Moreover, serum levels of the pathogenic galactose-deficient glycoform of IgA1 were also associated with the degree of mesangial C3 deposition in patients with IgAN. Our findings suggest that genetic variants in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 affect complement activation and thereby, predispose patients to develop IgAN. PMID:25205734

  13. Identification of human complement factor H as a chemotactic protein for monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nabil, K; Rihn, B; Jaurand, M C; Vignaud, J M; Ripoche, J; Martinet, Y; Martinet, N

    1997-01-01

    We used chromatographic separation to purify to homogeneity a monomeric monocyte chemotactic protein of 150 kDa contained in mesothelioma pleural effusions. It was identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and immunoblotting as complement factor H, an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Specific antibodies against factor H inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity of the purified protein, which was most active at 10 nM. Factor H is a restrictive factor of alternative complement pathway activation. The new chemotactic function assigned to factor H in recruiting monocytes to the mesothelioma site might contribute to malignant cell phagocytosis via the iC3b/complement receptor type 3 pathway. These functions link the humoral and cellular immune systems. PMID:9291108

  14. Clumping Factor A Interaction with Complement Factor I Increases C3b Cleavage on the Bacterial Surface of Staphylococcus aureus and Decreases Complement-Mediated Phagocytosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Pamela S.; Echague, Charlene G.; Sholl, Amber M.; Watkins, Justin A.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Foster, Timothy J.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2010-01-01

    The human complement system is important in the immunological control of Staphylococcus aureus infection. We showed previously that S. aureus surface protein clumping factor A (ClfA), when expressed in recombinant form, bound complement control protein factor I and increased factor I cleavage of C3b to iC3b. In the present study, we show that, compared to the results for the wild type, when isogenic ClfA-deficient S. aureus mutants were incubated in serum, they bound less factor I, generated less iC3b on the bacterial surface, and bound fewer C3 fragments. It has been shown previously that two amino acids in ClfA (P336 and Y338) are essential for fibrinogen binding. However, S. aureus expressing ClfA(P336A Y338S) was less virulent than ClfA-deficient strains in animal models. This suggested that ClfA contributed to S. aureus virulence by a mechanism different than fibrinogen binding. In the present study, we showed that S. aureus expressing ClfA(P336A Y338S) was more susceptible to complement-mediated phagocytosis than a ClfA-null mutant or the wild type. Unlike ClfA, ClfA(P336A Y338S) did not enhance factor I cleavage of C3b to iC3b and inhibited the cofactor function of factor H. Fibrinogen enhanced factor I binding to ClfA and the S. aureus surface. Twenty clinical S. aureus strains all expressed ClfA and bound factor I. High levels of factor I binding by clinical strains correlated with poor phagocytosis. In summary, our results suggest that the interaction of ClfA with factor I contributes to S. aureus virulence by a complement-mediated mechanism. PMID:20100856

  15. Methods for quantitative detection of antibody-induced complement activation on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal(1). Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis(1-4). However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  16. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  17. Effects of two types of cobra venom factor on porcine complement activation and pulmonary artery pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, A K; Parker, C J; Wilcox, L

    1989-01-01

    Autologous porcine plasma that has been incubated with cuprophan haemodialysis membranes causes pulmonary hypertension and peripheral leucopenia following reinfusion into swine. These effects appear to be mediated by biologically active fragments of C3 and C5 that are generated as a consequence of ex vivo activation of complement. Putatively, C5a induces the leucopenia; however, the specific contributions of products of C3 and C5 activation to the pulmonary vasoconstriction have not been elucidated. In the present study, the effects of in vivo infusion of two different types of cobra venom factor (CVF) on peripheral leucocyte count and pulmonary artery pressure in the swine are reported. The CVF from Naja n. naja (CVF(TN)) was shown to activate both porcine C3 and C5, whereas the CVF from Naja h. haje (CVF(NH)) activated only C3. Both types of CVF produced pulmonary hypertension. Significant peripheral leucopenia, however, was observed only with CVF(TN). These results suggest that activation products of C3 contribute to the pulmonary hypertension but not to the peripheral leucopenia observed during haemodialysis using dialysis membranes that activate complement. PMID:12412765

  18. Complement-induced regulatory T cells suppress T-cell responses but allow for dendritic-cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Barchet, Winfried; Price, Jeffrey D.; Cella, Marina; Colonna, Marco; MacMillan, Sandra K.; Cobb, J. Perren; Thompson, Paul A.; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Atkinson, John P.; Kemper, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent activation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and complement regulator CD46 on human CD4+ T lymphocytes induces Tr1-like regulatory T cells that suppress through IL-10 secretion bystander T-cell proliferation. Here we show that, despite their IL-10 production, CD46-induced T-regulatory T cells (Tregs) do not suppress the activation/maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). DC maturation by complement/CD46-induced Tregs is mediated through simultaneous secretion of GM-CSF and soluble CD40L, factors favoring DC differentiation and reversing inhibitory effects of IL-10. Thus, CD46-induced Tregs produce a distinct cytokine profile that inhibits T-cell responses but leaves DC activation unimpaired. Such “DC-sparing” Tregs could be desirable at host/environment interfaces such as the gastrointestinal tract where their specific cytokine profile provides a mechanism that ensures unresponsiveness to commensal bacteria while maintaining reactivity to invading pathogens. PMID:16239430

  19. In vitro inactivation of complement by a serum factor present in Junin-virus infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, M T; de Bracco, M M

    1980-01-01

    A serum factor(s) of guinea-pigs infected with Junin virus, the etiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever, is endowed with a potent anticomplementary activity. It is resistant to heat (56 degrees, 30 min) and elutes from a Sephadex G-200 column between albumin and haemoglobin. It is ineffective in the presence of EDTA or EGTA and does not sediment at 82,000 g. It has no direct effect on C4 unless functional Cl is present. However, it induces Cl activation that consumes C4 haemolytic activity in normal human and guinea-pig sera. The evidence presented in this report demonstrates that the complement activation observed in experimental Argentine haemorrhagic fever is at least in part due to a direct effect of this serum factor on the classical complement pathway. PMID:6247264

  20. Localization of intrinsic factor and complement fixing intrinsic factor–intrinsic factor antibody complex in parietal cell of man

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Elizabeth; Glass, G. B. J.

    1971-01-01

    In an attempt to localize intrinsic factor in the human parietal cell, and to study its intracellular union with the intrinsic factor antibody and complement, intrinsic factor antibody was separated from coexisting parietal cell antibody in pernicious anaemia sera by gel filtration. Intrinsic factor antibody of both `binding' and `blocking' type was also produced in rabbits by immunization with semi-purified human intrinsic factor–[57Co]B12 complex. Intrinsic factor antibody obtained from both sources produced fluorescence in the human parietal cells in the indirect Coons' test in the presence of fluoresceinated anti-human IgG. The fluorescence was localized peripherally, at the cell membrane. When instead of the fluoresceinated anti-human IgG a fluoresceinated anti-human complement (C) serum and normal complement containing serum were used, intrinsic factor antibody from both sources produced fluorescence of the entire parietal cell cytoplasm of the human mucosa. Thus, intrinsic factor was localized at highest concentration at the membrane of the parietal cell in man, the intrinsic factor antibody–intrinsic factor complex was demonstrated within the human parietal cell, and evidence was obtained that this antigen–antibody complex fixes complement (C). The possible role of the intrinsic factor–intrinsic factor antibody–complement complex in the development of gastric atrophy in pernicious anaemia has been considered. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4995933

  1. The Plasmodium falciparum blood stages acquire factor H family proteins to evade destruction by human complement.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Thiago F A; Flammersfeld, Ansgar; Ngwa, Che J; Kiesow, Meike; Fischer, Rainer; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Pradel, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    The acquisition of regulatory proteins is a means of blood-borne pathogens to avoid destruction by the human complement. We recently showed that the gametes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum bind factor H (FH) from the blood meal of the mosquito vector to assure successful sexual reproduction, which takes places in the mosquito midgut. While these findings provided a first glimpse of a complex mechanism used by Plasmodium to control the host immune attack, it is hitherto not known, how the pathogenic blood stages of the malaria parasite evade destruction by the human complement. We now show that the human complement system represents a severe threat for the replicating blood stages, particularly for the reinvading merozoites, with complement factor C3b accumulating on the surfaces of the intraerythrocytic schizonts as well as of free merozoites. C3b accumulation initiates terminal complement complex formation, in consequence resulting in blood stage lysis. To inactivate C3b, the parasites bind FH as well as related proteins FHL-1 and CFHR-1 to their surface, and FH binding is trypsin-resistant. Schizonts acquire FH via two contact sites, which involve CCP modules 5 and 20. Blockage of FH-mediated protection via anti-FH antibodies results in significantly impaired blood stage replication, pointing to the plasmodial complement evasion machinery as a promising malaria vaccine target. PMID:26457721

  2. A De Novo Deletion in the Regulators of Complement Activation Cluster Producing a Hybrid Complement Factor H/Complement Factor H-Related 3 Gene in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rachel C; Araujo, Geisilaine S R; Wong, Edwin K S; Anderson, Holly E; Awan, Atif; Dorman, Anthony M; Waldron, Mary; Wilson, Valerie; Brocklebank, Vicky; Strain, Lisa; Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L; Marchbank, Kevin J; Goodship, Timothy H J; Kavanagh, David

    2016-06-01

    The regulators of complement activation cluster at chromosome 1q32 contains the complement factor H (CFH) and five complement factor H-related (CFHR) genes. This area of the genome arose from several large genomic duplications, and these low-copy repeats can cause genome instability in this region. Genomic disorders affecting these genes have been described in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, arising commonly through nonallelic homologous recombination. We describe a novel CFH/CFHR3 hybrid gene secondary to a de novo 6.3-kb deletion that arose through microhomology-mediated end joining rather than nonallelic homologous recombination. We confirmed a transcript from this hybrid gene and showed a secreted protein product that lacks the recognition domain of factor H and exhibits impaired cell surface complement regulation. The fact that the formation of this hybrid gene arose as a de novo event suggests that this cluster is a dynamic area of the genome in which additional genomic disorders may arise. PMID:26490391

  3. Complement factor H in its alternative identity as adrenomedullin-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Sim, Robert B; Ferluga, Janez; Al-Rashidi, Hanan; Abbow, Hussein; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Kishore, Uday

    2015-11-01

    Complement factor H has been extensively studied since its discovery 50 years ago, and its role in the complement system is quite well established. It has another role, however, as a binding protein for the regulatory peptide adrenomedullin. Part of this role appears to be protection of adrenomedullin from proteolytic degradation. The binding interaction is unusual and merits further investigation. Adrenomedullin has potential therapeutic uses in diseases affecting the vasculature, and factor H has been administered with adrenomedullin in some animal models of disease. PMID:26597206

  4. Structure-activity relationships for substrate-based inhibitors of human complement factor B.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Lim, Junxian; Halili, Maria A; Le, Giang T; Madala, Praveen K; Abbenante, Giovanni; Fairlie, David P

    2009-10-01

    Human complement is a cascading network of plasma proteins important in immune defense, cooperatively effecting recognition, opsonization, destruction, and removal of pathogens and infected/damaged cells. Overstimulated or unregulated complement activation can result in immunoinflammatory diseases. Key serine proteases in this cascade are difficult to study due to their multiprotein composition, short lifetimes, formation on membranes, or serum circulation as inactive zymogens. Factor B is inactive at pH 7, but a catalytically active serine protease under alkaline conditions, enabling structure-activity relationship studies for 63 substrate-based peptide inhibitors with 4-7 residues and a C-terminal aldehyde. A potent factor B inhibitor was hexpeptide Ac-RLTbaLAR-H (IC(50) 250 nM, pH 9.5), which at pH 7 also blocked formation of membrane attack complex via the "alternative pathway" of complement activation and inhibited human complement mediated lysis of rabbit erythrocytes. Inhibitors of factor B may be valuable probes and drug leads for complement mediated immunity and disease. PMID:19743866

  5. An extended mini-complement factor H molecule ameliorates experimental C3 glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Eva-Maria; Barbour, Thomas D; Pappworth, Isabel Y; Wong, Edwin K S; Palmer, Jeremy M; Sheerin, Neil S; Pickering, Matthew C; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal regulation of the complement alternative pathway is associated with C3 glomerulopathy. Complement factor H is the main plasma regulator of the alternative pathway and consists of 20 short consensus repeat (SCR) domains. Although recombinant full-length factor H represents a logical treatment for C3 glomerulopathy, its production has proved challenging. We and others have designed recombinant mini-factor H proteins in which ‘non-essential' SCR domains have been removed. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo effects of a mini-complement factor H protein, FH1–5^18–20, using the unique factor H–deficient (Cfh−/−) mouse model of C3 glomerulopathy. FH1–5^18–20 is comprised of the key complement regulatory domains (SCRs 1–5) linked to the surface recognition domains (SCRs 18–20). Intraperitoneal injection of FH1–5^18–20 in Cfh−/− mice reduced abnormal glomerular C3 deposition, similar to full-length factor H. Systemic effects on plasma alternative pathway control were comparatively modest, in association with a short half-life. Thus, FH1–5^18–20 is a potential therapeutic agent for C3 glomerulopathy and other renal conditions with alternative pathway-mediated tissue injury. PMID:26221753

  6. Complement Factor C4d Is a Common Denominator in Thrombotic Microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Chua, Jamie S; Baelde, Hans J; Zandbergen, Malu; Wilhelmus, Suzanne; van Es, Leendert A; de Fijter, Johan W; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Cohen, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Complement activation has a major role in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), a disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical conditions. Promising results of recent trials with terminal complement-inhibiting drugs call for biomarkers identifying patients who might benefit from this treatment. The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and localization of complement factor C4d in kidneys of patients with TMA. The secondary aims were to determine which complement pathways lead to C4d deposition and to determine whether complement activation results in deposition of the terminal complement complex. We examined 42 renal sections with histologically confirmed TMA obtained from a heterogeneous patient group. Deposits of C4d, mannose-binding lectin, C1q, IgM, and C5b-9 were scored in the glomeruli, peritubular capillaries, and arterioles. Notably, C4d deposits were present in 88.1% of TMA cases, and the various clinical conditions had distinct staining patterns within the various compartments of the renal vasculature. Classical pathway activation was observed in 90.5% of TMA cases. C5b-9 deposits were present in 78.6% of TMA cases and in 39.6% of controls (n=53), but the staining pattern differed between cases and controls. In conclusion, C4d is a common finding in TMA, regardless of the underlying clinical condition. Moreover, C5b-9 was present in >75% of the TMA samples, suggesting that terminal complement inhibitors may have a beneficial effect in these patients. C4d and C5b-9 should be investigated as possible diagnostic biomarkers in the clinical work-up of patients suspected of having complement-mediated TMA. PMID:25573909

  7. Regulation of complement factor H (CFH) by multiple miRNAs in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, Walter J; Alexandrov, Peter N

    2012-08-01

    Human brain cells rely on a specific subset of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) to shape their gene expression patterns, and this is mediated through microRNA effects on messenger RNA (mRNA) speciation and complexity. In recent studies (a) in short post-mortem interval Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissues versus age-matched controls, and (b) in pro-inflammatory cytokine- and Aβ42 peptide-stressed human neuronal-glial (HNG) cells in primary culture, we have identified several brain-abundant miRNA species found to be significantly up-regulated, including miR-125b and miR-146a. Both of these nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-activated, 22 nucleotide small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) target the mRNA of the key, innate-immune- and inflammation-related regulatory protein, complement factor-H (CFH; chr 1q32), resulting in significant decreases in CFH expression (p < 0.01, ANOVA). Our results further indicate that HNG cells respond to IL-1β + Aβ42-peptide-induced stress by significant NF-κB-modulated up-regulation of miRNA-125b- and miRNA-146a. The complex interactive signaling of NF-κB, miR-125b, miR-146a, and perhaps other miRNAs, further illustrate interplay between inducible transcription factors and multiple pro-inflammatory sncRNAs that regulate CFH expression. The novel concept of miRNA actions involving mRNA target convergence and divergence are proposed and discussed. The combinatorial use of NF-кB inhibitors with anti-miRNAs (AMs; antagomirs) may have potential against CFH-driven pathogenic signaling in neurodegenerative disease, and may redirect our therapeutic perspectives to novel treatment strategies that have not yet been considered. PMID:22302353

  8. Cleavage of Complement C3b to iC3b on the Surface of Staphylococcus aureus Is Mediated by Serum Complement Factor I

    PubMed Central

    Cunnion, K. M.; Hair, P. S.; Buescher, E. S.

    2004-01-01

    Complement-mediated opsonization of Staphylococcus aureus bearing the dominant capsule serotypes, serotypes 5 and 8, remains incompletely understood. We have previously shown that complement plays a vital role in the efficient phagocytosis of a serotype 5 S. aureus strain and that the opsonic fragments of the central complement protein C3, C3b and iC3b, were present on the bacterial surface after incubation in human serum. In the present studies, C3b and iC3b were found on several serotype 5 and 8 S. aureus strains after incubation in human serum. Using purified classical activation pathway complement proteins and the Western blot assay, we showed that when C3b was generated on the S. aureus surface no iC3b fragments were found, suggesting that other serum proteins may be required for cleaving C3b to iC3b. When C3b-coated S. aureus was incubated with serum factor I, a complement regulatory protein, iC3b was generated. Purified factor H, a serum protein cofactor for factor I, did not enhance factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b. These findings suggest that C3b cleavage to iC3b on S. aureus is mediated by serum factor I and does not require factor H. PMID:15102797

  9. Further structural insights into the binding of complement factor H by complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 1 (CspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Joseph J. E.; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter; Zipfel, Peter F.; Lea, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi has evolved many mechanisms of evading the different immune systems across its range of reservoir hosts, including the capture and presentation of host complement regulators factor H and factor H-like protein-1 (FHL-1). Acquisition is mediated by a family of complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), of which the atomic structure of CspA (BbCRASP-1) is known and shows the formation of a homodimeric species which is required for binding. Mutagenesis studies have mapped a putative factor H binding site to a cleft between the two subunits. Presented here is a new atomic structure of CspA which shows a degree of flexibility between the subunits which may be critical for factor H scavenging by increasing access to the binding interface and allows the possibility that the assembly can clamp around the bound complement regulators. PMID:23722839

  10. Nerve Growth Factor Secretion From Pulp Fibroblasts is Modulated by Complement C5a Receptor and Implied in Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chmilewsky, Fanny; Ayaz, Warda; Appiah, James; About, Imad; Chung, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury. Using ELISA and AXIS co-culture systems, we demonstrate that C5aR is critically implicated in the modulation of NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts, which is negatively regulated by C5aR activation, has a role in the control of the neurite outgrowth length in our axon regeneration analysis. Our data provide a scientific step forward that can guide development of future therapeutic tools for innovative and incipient interventions targeting the dentin-pulp regeneration process by linking the neurite outgrowth to human pulp fibroblast through complement system activation. PMID:27539194

  11. Nerve Growth Factor Secretion From Pulp Fibroblasts is Modulated by Complement C5a Receptor and Implied in Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chmilewsky, Fanny; Ayaz, Warda; Appiah, James; About, Imad; Chung, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury. Using ELISA and AXIS co-culture systems, we demonstrate that C5aR is critically implicated in the modulation of NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts, which is negatively regulated by C5aR activation, has a role in the control of the neurite outgrowth length in our axon regeneration analysis. Our data provide a scientific step forward that can guide development of future therapeutic tools for innovative and incipient interventions targeting the dentin-pulp regeneration process by linking the neurite outgrowth to human pulp fibroblast through complement system activation. PMID:27539194

  12. Alternative Complement Pathway Deficiency Ameliorates Chronic Smoke-Induced Functional and Morphological Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Casey, Sarah; Williamson, Tucker; Ferrell, W. Drew; Atkinson, Carl; Jones, Bryan W.; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a complex disease involving genetic variants and environmental insults, is among the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Genetic and histologic evidence implicate the complement system in AMD pathogenesis; and smoking is the major environmental risk factor associated with increased disease risk. Although previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure (CE) causes retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defects in mice, and smoking leads to complement activation in patients, it is unknown whether complement activation is causative in the development of CE pathology; and if so, which complement pathway is required. Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or clean, filtered air for 6 months. The effects of CE were analyzed in wildtype (WT) mice or mice without a functional complement alternative pathway (AP; CFB−/−) using molecular, histological, electrophysiological, and behavioral outcomes. Results CE in WT mice exhibited a significant reduction in function of both rods and cones as determined by electroretinography and contrast sensitivity measurements, concomitant with a thinning of the nuclear layers as measured by SD-OCT imaging and histology. Gene expression analyses suggested that alterations in both photoreceptors and RPE/choroid might contribute to the observed loss of function, and visualization of complement C3d deposition implies the RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) complex as the target of AP activity. RPE/BrM alterations include an increase in mitochondrial size concomitant with an apical shift in mitochondrial distribution within the RPE and a thickening of BrM. CFB−/− mice were protected from developing these CE-mediated alterations. Conclusions Taken together, these findings provide clear evidence that ocular pathology generated in CE mice is dependent on complement activation and requires the AP. Identifying animal models with RPE/BrM damage and verifying which

  13. Regulatory Components of the Alternative Complement Pathway in Endothelial Cell Cytoplasm, Factor H and Factor I, Are Not Packaged in Weibel-Palade Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Nancy A.; Sartain, Sarah E.; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF —- but not factor H. PMID:25803806

  14. Regulation of Complement Dependent Cytotoxicity by TGF-β-induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Moloy T.; Reka, Ajaya Kumar; Kurapati, Himabindu; Kaza, Viritha; Chen, Jun; Standiford, Theodore J; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.

    2015-01-01

    The process of Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in addition to being an initiating event for tumor metastasis, is implicated in conferring several clinically relevant properties to disseminating cancer cells. These include stem cell like properties, resistance to targeted therapies and ability to evade immune surveillance. Enrichment analysis of gene expression changes during TGF-β induced EMT in lung cancer cells identified complement cascade as one of the significantly enriched pathway. Further analysis of the genes in the complement pathway revealed an increase in the expression of complement inhibitors and a decrease in the expression of proteins essential for complement activity. In this study, we tested whether EMT confers resistance to complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in lung cancer cells and promotes tumor progression. CD59 is a potent inhibitor of membrane attack complex that mediates complement-dependent cell lysis. We observed a significant increase in the CD59 expression on the surface of cells after TGF-β-induced EMT. Furthermore, CD59 knock down restored susceptibility of cells undergoing EMT to Cetuximab-mediated CDC. TGF-β-induced CD59 expression during EMT is dependent on Smad3 but not Smad2. ChIP analysis confirmed that Smad3 directly binds to the CD59 promoter. Stable knock-down of CD59 in A549 cells inhibited experimental metastasis. These results demonstrate that TGF-β-induced EMT and CD59 expression confers an immune evasive mechanism to disseminating tumor cells facilitating tumor progression. Together, our data demonstrates that CD59 inhibition may serve as an adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of antibody-mediated therapies, as well as to inhibit metastasis in lung cancer. PMID:26148233

  15. Antibodies That Efficiently Form Hexamers upon Antigen Binding Can Induce Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity under Complement-Limiting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Erika M; Lindorfer, Margaret A; van der Horst, Hilma; Oostindie, Simone; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Zent, Clive S; Burack, Richard; Parren, Paul W H I; Taylor, Ronald P

    2016-09-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that IgG Abs can organize into ordered hexamers after binding their cognate Ags expressed on cell surfaces. This process is dependent on Fc:Fc interactions, which promote C1q binding, the first step in classical pathway complement activation. We went on to engineer point mutations that stimulated IgG hexamer formation and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The hexamer formation-enhanced (HexaBody) CD20 and CD38 mAbs support faster, more robust CDC than their wild-type counterparts. To further investigate the CDC potential of these mAbs, we used flow cytometry, high-resolution digital imaging, and four-color confocal microscopy to examine their activity against B cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in sera depleted of single complement components. We also examined the CDC activity of alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) and mAb W6/32 (anti-HLA), which bind at high density to cells and promote substantial complement activation. Although we observed little CDC for mAb-opsonized cells reacted with sera depleted of early complement components, we were surprised to discover that the Hexabody mAbs, as well as ALM and W6/32, were all quite effective at promoting CDC in sera depleted of individual complement components C6 to C9. However, neutralization studies conducted with an anti-C9 mAb verified that C9 is required for CDC activity against cell lines. These highly effective complement-activating mAbs efficiently focus activated complement components on the cell, including C3b and C9, and promote CDC with a very low threshold of MAC binding, thus providing additional insight into their enhanced efficacy in promoting CDC. PMID:27474078

  16. Antibodies That Efficiently Form Hexamers upon Antigen Binding Can Induce Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity under Complement-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Erika M.; Lindorfer, Margaret A.; van der Horst, Hilma; Oostindie, Simone; Beurskens, Frank J.; Schuurman, Janine; Zent, Clive S.; Burack, Richard; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that IgG Abs can organize into ordered hexamers after binding their cognate Ags expressed on cell surfaces. This process is dependent on Fc:Fc interactions, which promote C1q binding, the first step in classical pathway complement activation. We went on to engineer point mutations that stimulated IgG hexamer formation and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The hexamer formation–enhanced (HexaBody) CD20 and CD38 mAbs support faster, more robust CDC than their wild-type counterparts. To further investigate the CDC potential of these mAbs, we used flow cytometry, high-resolution digital imaging, and four-color confocal microscopy to examine their activity against B cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in sera depleted of single complement components. We also examined the CDC activity of alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) and mAb W6/32 (anti-HLA), which bind at high density to cells and promote substantial complement activation. Although we observed little CDC for mAb-opsonized cells reacted with sera depleted of early complement components, we were surprised to discover that the Hexabody mAbs, as well as ALM and W6/32, were all quite effective at promoting CDC in sera depleted of individual complement components C6 to C9. However, neutralization studies conducted with an anti-C9 mAb verified that C9 is required for CDC activity against cell lines. These highly effective complement-activating mAbs efficiently focus activated complement components on the cell, including C3b and C9, and promote CDC with a very low threshold of MAC binding, thus providing additional insight into their enhanced efficacy in promoting CDC. PMID:27474078

  17. Complement Factor H Serum Levels Determine Resistance to Pneumococcal Invasive Disease.

    PubMed

    van der Maten, Erika; Westra, Dineke; van Selm, Saskia; Langereis, Jeroen D; Bootsma, Hester J; van Opzeeland, Fred J H; de Groot, Ronald; Ruseva, Marieta M; Pickering, Matthew C; van den Heuvel, Lambert P W J; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; de Jonge, Marien I; van der Flier, Michiel

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of life-threatening infections. Complement activation plays a vital role in opsonophagocytic killing of pneumococci in blood. Initial complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways is amplified through the alternative pathway amplification loop. Alternative pathway activity is inhibited by complement factor H (FH). Our study demonstrates the functional consequences of the variability in human serum FH levels on host defense. Using an in vivo mouse model combined with human in vitro assays, we show that the level of serum FH correlates with the efficacy of opsonophagocytic killing of pneumococci. In summary, we found that FH levels determine a delicate balance of alternative pathway activity, thus affecting the resistance to invasive pneumococcal disease. Our results suggest that variation in FH expression levels, naturally occurring in the human population, plays a thus far unrecognized role in the resistance to invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:26802141

  18. Aged complement factor H knockout mice kept in a clean barriered environment have reduced retinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Hoh Kam, Jaimie; Morgan, James E; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the largest cause of visual loss in those over 60 years in the West and is a condition increasing in prevalence. Many diseases result from genetic/environmental interactions and 50% of AMD cases have an association with polymorphisms of the complement system including complement factor H. Here we explore interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental conditions in triggering retinal pathology in two groups of aged complement factor H knock out (Cfh(-/-)) mice. Mice were maintained over 9 months in either a conventional open environment or a barriered pathogen free environment. Open environment Cfh(-/-) mice had significant increases in subretinal macrophage numbers, inflammatory and stress responses and reduced photoreceptor numbers over mice kept in a pathogen free environment. Hence, environmental factors can drive retinal disease in these mice when linked to complement deficits impairing immune function. Both groups of mice had similar levels of retinal amyloid beta accumulation. Consequently there is no direct link between this and inflammation in Cfh(-/-) mice. PMID:27397653

  19. The role of complement, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 in a reversed passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Donigi-Gale, D.; Shoupe, T. S.; Edwards, R.; Williams, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying oedema formation induced in a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction and, for comparison, in response to zymosan in rabbit skin were investigated. 2. Oedema formation at skin sites was quantified by the accumulation of intravenously-injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin. 3. Recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), administered locally in rabbit skin, suppressed oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by zymosan. 4. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, WEB 2086 and PF10040 administered locally, inhibited oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by PAF but not by zymosan. 5. A locally administered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist, LY-255283, inhibited oedema formation induced by LTB4 but did not inhibit oedema responses to PAF, zymosan or the RPA reaction. 6. The results demonstrate a role for complement in oedema formation in both the RPA reaction and in response to zymosan. An important contribution by PAF is indicated in the RPA reaction but not in response to zymosan whereas no evidence was obtained to suggest a role for LTB4 in either inflammatory response. PMID:1330163

  20. Efficacy of plasma therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with complement factor H mutations.

    PubMed

    Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Wagner, Eric; Phan, Véronique; Clermont, Marie-José; Merouani, Aïcha; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Goodship, Timothy H J; Robitaille, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) frequently results in end-stage renal failure and can be lethal. Several studies have established an association between quantitative or qualitative abnormalities in complement factor H and aHUS. Although plasma infusion and exchange are often advocated, guidelines have yet to be established. Long-term outcome for patients under treatment is still unknown. We describe a patient who, at 7 months of age, presented with aHUS associated with combined de novo complement factor H mutations (S1191L and V1197A) on the same allele. Laboratory investigations showed normal levels of complements C4, C3 and factor H. Plasma exchanges and large-dose infusion therapy resulted in a resolution of hemolysis and recovery of renal function. Three recurrences were successfully treated by intensification of the plasma infusion treatment to intervals of 2 or 3 days. This patient showed good response to large doses of plasma infusions and her condition remained stable for 30 months with weekly plasma infusions (30 ml/kg). Long-term tolerance and efficacy of such intensive plasma therapy are still unknown. Reported secondary failure of plasma therapy in factor H deficiency warrants the search for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:18425537

  1. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, C.S.; Duarte, C.G.; Azzolini, A.E.C.S.; Assis-Pandochi, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP) activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4) levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg). Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01). In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32%) were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production. PMID:22370704

  2. A partial cDNA clone of trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF), a developmentally regulated complement inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi, has genetic and functional similarities to the human complement inhibitor DAF.

    PubMed Central

    Tambourgi, D V; Kipnis, T L; da Silva, W D; Joiner, K A; Sher, A; Heath, S; Hall, B F; Ogden, G B

    1993-01-01

    Resistance to complement-mediated lysis in Trypanosoma cruzi is due to the expression of complement-regulatory factors by the virulent developmental forms of this protozoan parasite. An 87- to 93-kDa molecule, which we have termed T-DAF (trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor), is present on the surface of the parasite and inhibits complement activation in a manner functionally similar to the mammalian complement regulatory component, decay-accelerating factor. In this report, we characterized monospecific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies which were obtained from mice and rabbits immunized with fast protein liquid chromatography-purified T-DAF. These polyclonal antibodies were shown to inhibit T-DAF activity and were capable of inducing lysis of the parasites. Both the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were used to screen a cDNA expression library prepared from T. cruzi trypomastigote mRNA. From this library, we obtained a partial lambda gt11 cDNA clone which showed genetic and functional similarity to the human C3 convertase inhibitor DAF (A. Nicholson-Weller, J. Burge, D. T. Fearon, P. F. Weller, and K. F. Austen, J. Immunol. 129:184-189, 1982). Images PMID:7689538

  3. Effect of complement depletion by cobra venom factor on fowlpox virus infection in chickens and chicken embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Yoshikawa, Y; Kai, C; Yamanouchi, K; Taniguchi, H; Komine, K; Ishijima, Y; Okada, H

    1986-01-01

    The course of infection with an attenuated strain of fowlpox virus (FPV), which is known to induce antibody-independent activation of complement via the alternative pathway, was investigated in 1- to 3-day-old chickens and 14-day-old chicken embryos by treatment with cobra venom factor (CVF). CVF was found to inhibit complement activity transiently via the alternative pathway but not via the classical pathway. In chickens treated with CVF, virus growth in the skin was enhanced, and pock lesions tended to disseminate, leading to fatal infection in some birds. Histologically, an acute inflammation at an early stage of infection (within 3 days) was inhibited, and virus content in the pock lesion was increased. In chicken embryos with immature immune capacities, CVF treatment caused changes in pock morphology from clear pocks to diffuse ones, an increase in virus content in the pock, and inhibition of cell infiltration. Thus, FPV infection was aggravated in both CVF-treated chickens and chicken embryos. These results are discussed in relation to roles of complement in the elimination of virus at an early stage of FPV infection. Images PMID:3003397

  4. Expression and Subcellular Targeting of Human Complement Factor C5a in Nicotiana species

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Henrik; Mischofsky, Heike; Koslowski, Roswitha; Meyer, Udo; Broer, Inge; Huckauf, Jana

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated transgenic tobacco plants as an alternative to Escherichia coli for the production of recombinant human complement factor 5a (C5a). C5a has not been expressed in plants before and is highly unstable in vivo in its native form, so it was necessary to establish the most suitable subcellular targeting strategy. We used the strong and constitutive CaMV 35S promoter to drive transgene expression and compared three different subcellular compartments. The yields of C5a in the T0 transgenic plants were low in terms of the proportion of total soluble protein (TSP) when targeted to the apoplast (0.0002% TSP) or endoplasmic reticulum (0.0003% TSP) but was one order of magnitude higher when targeted to the vacuole (0.001% TSP). The yields could be increased by conventional breeding (up to 0.014% TSP in the T2 generation). C5a accumulated to the same level in seeds and leaves when targeted to the apoplast but was up to 1.7-fold more abundant in the seeds when targeted to the ER or vacuole, although this difference was less striking in the better-performing lines. When yields were calculated as an amount per gram fresh weight of transgenic plant tissue, the vacuole targeting strategy was clearly more efficient in seeds, reaching 35.8 µg C5a per gram of fresh seed weight compared to 10.62 µg C5a per gram fresh weight of leaves. Transient expression of C5aER and C5aVac in N. benthamiana, using MagnICON vectors, reached up to 0.2% and 0.7% of TSP, respectively, but was accompanied by cytotoxic effects and induced leaf senescence. Western blot of the plant extracts revealed a band matching the corresponding glycosylated native protein and the bioassay demonstrated that recombinant C5a was biologically active. PMID:23285250

  5. Complement factor H modulates the activation of human neutrophil granulocytes and the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Kárpáti, Éva; Józsi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Factor H (FH) is a major inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement activation in plasma and on certain host surfaces. In addition to being a complement regulator, FH can bind to various cells via specific receptors, including binding to neutrophil granulocytes through complement receptor type 3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18), and modulate their function. The cellular roles of FH are, however, poorly understood. Because neutrophils are important innate immune cells in inflammatory processes and the host defense against pathogens, we aimed at studying the effects of FH on various neutrophil functions, including the generation of extracellular traps. FH co-localized with CD11b on the surface of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals, and cell-bound FH retained its cofactor activity and enhanced C3b degradation. Soluble FH supported neutrophil migration and immobilized FH induced cell spreading. In addition, immobilized but not soluble FH enhanced IL-8 release from neutrophils. FH alone did not trigger the cells to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), but NET formation induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus fungal β-glucan were inhibited by immobilized, but not by soluble, FH. Moreover, in parallel with NET formation, immobilized FH also inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus β-glucan. Altogether, these data indicate that FH has multiple regulatory roles on neutrophil functions. While it can support the recruitment of neutrophils, FH may also exert anti-inflammatory effects and influence local inflammatory and antimicrobial reactions, and reduce tissue damage by modulating NET formation. PMID:26938503

  6. Cysteine Proteinase from Streptococcus pyogenes Enables Evasion of Innate Immunity via Degradation of Complement Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Ogawa, Taiji; Terao, Yutaka; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Ikebe, Kazunori; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that causes invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the function of a major cysteine protease from S. pyogenes that affects the amount of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) and other complement factors and aimed to elucidate the mechanism involved in occurrence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from the aspect of the complement system. First, we revealed that culture supernatant of a given S. pyogenes strain and recombinant SpeB degraded the C1-INH. Then, we determined the N-terminal sequence of the C1-INH fragment degraded by recombinant SpeB. Interestingly, the region containing one of the identified cleavage sites is not present in patients with C1-INH deficiency. Scanning electron microscopy of the speB mutant incubated in human serum showed the abnormal superficial architecture and irregular oval structure. Furthermore, unlike the wild-type strain, that mutant strain showed lower survival capacity than normal as compared with heat-inactivated serum, whereas it had a significantly higher survival rate in serum without the C1-INH than in normal serum. Also, SpeB degraded multiple complement factors and the membrane attack complex. Flow cytometric analyses revealed deposition of C9, one of the components of membrane the attack complex, in greater amounts on the surface of the speB mutant, whereas lower amounts of C9 were bound to the wild-type strain surface. These results suggest that SpeB can interrupt the human complement system via degrading the C1-INH, thus enabling S. pyogenes to evade eradication in a hostile environment. PMID:23589297

  7. Complement factor I from flatfish half-smooth tongue (Cynoglossus semilaevis) exhibited anti-microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinsong; Li, Xihong; Chen, Yadong; Lu, Yang; Yu, Mengjun; Chen, Xuejie; Zhang, Wenting; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Luming; Chen, Songlin; Sha, Zhenxia

    2015-11-01

    Complement factor I (Cfi) is a soluble serine protease which plays a crucial role in the modulation of complement cascades. In the presence of substrate modulating cofactors (such as complement factor H, C4bp, CR1, etc), Cfi cleaves and inactivates C3b and C4b, thereby controlling the complement-mediated processes. In this study, we sequenced and characterized Cfi gene from Cynoglossus Semilaevis (designated as CsCfi) for the first time. The full-length cDNA of CsCfi was 2230 bp in length, including a 98 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 164 bp 3'-UTR and a 1968 bp open reading frame (ORF). It encoded a polypeptide of 656 amino acids, with a molecular mass of 72.28 kDa and an isoelectric point of 7.71. A signal peptide was defined at N-terminus, resulting in a 626-residue mature protein. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that Cfi proteins were well conserved with the typical modular architecture and identical active sites throughout the vertebrates, which suggested the conserved function of Cfi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsCfi and the homologous Cfi sequences from teleosts clustered into a clade, separating from another clade from the cartilaginous fish and other vertebrates. Tissue expression profile analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that CsCfi mRNA constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, with the predominant expression in liver and the lowest in stomach. Temporal expression levels of CsCfi after challenging with Vibrio anguillarum showed different expression patterns in intestine, spleen, skin, blood, head kidney and liver. The recombinant CsCfi (rCsCfi) protein showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shewanella putrefaciens. The research revealed that CsCfi plays an important role in C. Semilaevis immunity. PMID:26148855

  8. A complement-microglial axis drives synapse loss during virus-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Vasek, Michael J; Garber, Charise; Dorsey, Denise; Durrant, Douglas M; Bollman, Bryan; Soung, Allison; Yu, Jinsheng; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Frouin, Arnaud; Wilton, Daniel K; Funk, Kristen; DeMasters, Bette K; Jiang, Xiaoping; Bowen, James R; Mennerick, Steven; Robinson, John K; Garbow, Joel R; Tyler, Kenneth L; Suthar, Mehul S; Schmidt, Robert E; Stevens, Beth; Klein, Robyn S

    2016-06-23

    Over 50% of patients who survive neuroinvasive infection with West Nile virus (WNV) exhibit chronic cognitive sequelae. Although thousands of cases of WNV-mediated memory dysfunction accrue annually, the mechanisms responsible for these impairments are unknown. The classical complement cascade, a key component of innate immune pathogen defence, mediates synaptic pruning by microglia during early postnatal development. Here we show that viral infection of adult hippocampal neurons induces complement-mediated elimination of presynaptic terminals in a murine WNV neuroinvasive disease model. Inoculation of WNV-NS5-E218A, a WNV with a mutant NS5(E218A) protein leads to survival rates and cognitive dysfunction that mirror human WNV neuroinvasive disease. WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice (recovery defined as survival after acute infection) display impaired spatial learning and persistence of phagocytic microglia without loss of hippocampal neurons or volume. Hippocampi from WNV-NS5-E218A-recovered mice with poor spatial learning show increased expression of genes that drive synaptic remodelling by microglia via complement. C1QA was upregulated and localized to microglia, infected neurons and presynaptic terminals during WNV neuroinvasive disease. Murine and human WNV neuroinvasive disease post-mortem samples exhibit loss of hippocampal CA3 presynaptic terminals, and murine studies revealed microglial engulfment of presynaptic terminals during acute infection and after recovery. Mice with fewer microglia (Il34(-/-) mice with a deficiency in IL-34 production) or deficiency in complement C3 or C3a receptor were protected from WNV-induced synaptic terminal loss. Our study provides a new murine model of WNV-induced spatial memory impairment, and identifies a potential mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment in patients recovering from WNV neuroinvasive disease. PMID:27337340

  9. Chromosomal rearrangement-A rare cause of complement factor I associated atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Patrick J; Wilson, Valerie; Cox, Thomas E; Sharma, Seema D; Smith-Jackson, Kate; Strain, Lisa; Lappin, David; McHale, Teresa; Kavanagh, David; Goodship, Timothy H J

    2016-10-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements affecting the genes encoding complement factor H and the factor H related proteins have been described in aHUS patients. To date such disorders have not been described in other aHUS associated genes. We describe here a heterozygous 875,324bp deletion encompassing the gene (CFI) encoding complement factor I and ten other genes. The index case presented with aHUS and did not recover renal function. No abnormalities were detected on Sanger sequencing of CFI but a low factor I level led to a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay being undertaken. This showed a complete heterozygous deletion of CFI. The extent of the deletion and the breakpoint was defined. In the Newcastle aHUS cohort we have identified and report here 32 different CFI variants in 56 patients but to date this is the only deletion that we have identified. This finding although rare does suggest that screening for chromosomal rearrangements affecting CFI should be undertaken in all aHUS patients particularly if the factor I level is unexplainably low. PMID:27268256

  10. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab')2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  11. Complement factor D homolog involved in the alternative complement pathway of rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus): Molecular and functional characterization and immune responsive mRNA expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Godahewa, G I; Perera, N C N; Bathige, S D N K; Nam, Bo-Hye; Noh, Jae Koo; Lee, Jehee

    2016-08-01

    The complement system serves conventional role in the innate defense against common invading pathogens. Complement factor D (CfD) is vital to alternative complement pathway activation in cleaving complement factor B. This catalytic reaction forms the alternative C3 convertase that is crucial for complement-mediated pathogenesis. In this study, rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) CfD (OfCfD) was characterized and OfCfD mRNA expression was investigated. OfCfD encodes 277 amino acids (aa) for a 30-kDa polypeptide. A domain analysis of the deduced OfCfD aa sequence showed a single serine protease trypsin superfamily domain, a serine active region, three active sites, and three substrate-binding sites. Pairwise sequence comparisons indicated that OfCfD has the highest identity (84.5%) with Oreochromis niloticus CfD. The phylogenetic tree revealed a common ancestral origin of CfD members, with fish CfD distinct from other vertebrate orthologs. The structural arrangement of the OfCfD gene (2451 bp) contained five exons interrupted by four introns. A spatial transcriptional analysis indicated that OfCfD transcripts constitutively expressed in all of the examined rock bream tissues, and that they were highest in the spleen and liver. In addition, OfCfD transcripts were immunologically upregulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (12 h p.i.), Streptococcus iniae (12 h p.i.), rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) (6-12 h p.i.), and poly I:C (6 h p.i.) in spleen tissue. OfCfD is a trypsin protease and its recombinant protein showed strong protease activity similar to that of trypsin, indicating its catalytic function in the alternative pathway. Together, our findings suggest that OfCfD might be involved in immune responses in rock bream. PMID:27311435

  12. COMPLEMENT C5 REGULATES THE EXPRESSION OF INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR BINDING PROTEINS IN CHRONIC EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

    PubMed Central

    Cudrici, Cornelia; Ito, Takahiro; Zafranskaia, Ekaterina; Weerth, Susanna; Rus, Violeta; Chen, Hegang; Niculescu, Florin; Soloviova, Katerina; Tegla, Cosmin; Gherman, Adrian; Raine, Cedric S.; Shin, Moon L.; Rus, Horea

    2008-01-01

    Complement activation plays a central role in autoimmune demyelination. To explore the possible effects of C5 on post-inflammatory tissue repair, we investigated the transcriptional profile induced by C5 in chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) using oligonucleotide arrays. We used C5-deficient (C5-d) and C5-sufficient (C5-s) mice to compare the gene expression profile and we found that 390 genes were differentially regulated in C5-s mice as compared to C5-d mice during chronic EAE. Among them, a group of genes belonging to the family of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 were found most significantly differentially regulated by C5. The dysregulation of these genes suggests that these proteins might be responsible for the gliosis and lack of remyelination seen in C5-d mice with chronic EAE. PMID:18692252

  13. Complement-derived leukotactic factors in inflammatory synovial fluids of humans

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Peter A.; Zvaifler, Nathan J.

    1971-01-01

    A large per cent of rheumatoid synovial fluids contain chemotactic activity for rabbit granulocytes (neutrophilic). The chemotactic activity is, in large part, related to the fifth (C5) and sixth (C6) components of human complement; a combination of physical-chemical techniques indicates the activity to be attributable to C567 and C5a, a cleavage product of C5. Many rheumatoid synovial fluids contain a C5-cleaving enzyme which, on the basis of substrate specificity and susceptibility to inhibitors, is very similar to an enzyme extractable from lysosomal granules of human and rabbit granulocytes. Inflammatory nonrheumatoid synovial fluids contain chemotactic activity that is related to cleavage products (C3a) of the third component of human complement (C3). Also found in these fluids is a C3-cleaving enzyme capable of producing C3a. Of the other synovial fluids examined, lupus fluids were remarkable by their total lack of chemotactic activity. These findings record for the first time the presence of complement-derived chemotactic factors in pathological human fluids. Images PMID:5545123

  14. Mutations of Complement Factor I and Potential Mechanisms of Neuroinflammation in Acute Hemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Lori; Gandhi, Chhavi; Mueller, James L.; Putnam, Christopher D.; Shayan, Katayoon; Giclas, Patricia C.; Peterson, Karin S.; Aceves, Seema S.; Sheets, Robert M.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Newbury, Robert O.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Bastian, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Acute Hemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis (AHLE) is a rare demyelinating disorder of acute onset, rapid deterioration and significant morbidity and mortality. Most often described as a post-infectious complication of an upper respiratory illness, its precise pathophysiology remains unclear. We describe two pediatric patients with AHLE with partial complement factor I (FI) deficiency whose successful treatment included the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, anakinra, implicating a role for FI and IL-1 in this disorder. Methods Extensive clinical workup of two patients presenting with AHLE revealed complement abnormalities, specifically related to the alternative pathway and its regulator, FI. Aggressive management with steroids, immunoglobulin, and anakinra ultimately led to improvement of clinical status and near return to neurologic baseline in both patients. Genetic sequencing of the FI coding regions of the patients and their families was performed. In vitro protein expression studies and immunohistochemistry of fixed brain tissue was used to investigate pathogenic mechanisms. Results Two novel mutations in FI were identified in our patients, which result in failure to secrete FI. Immunohistochemical evaluation of brain tissue demonstrated positive staining for C3, membrane attack complex (MAC) and IL-1. Conclusions We propose AHLE is an unreported, rare phenotype for partial FI deficiency. The upregulation of C3, MAC and IL-1 with subsequent demyelination support a pathologic role for complement activation in AHLE, and suggest anakinra as an important adjunctive therapy in this disease. PMID:22926405

  15. Resolvin D1 Alleviates the Lung Ischemia Reperfusion Injury via Complement, Immunoglobulin, TLR4, and Inflammatory Factors in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qifeng; Wu, Ji; Lin, Zhiyong; Hua, Qingwang; Zhang, Weixi; Ye, Leping; Wu, Guowei; Du, Jie; Xia, Jie; Chu, Maoping; Hu, Xingti

    2016-08-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI) is still an unsolved medical issue, which negatively affects the prognosis of many lung diseases. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of RvD1 on LIRI and the potential mechanisms involved. The results revealed that the levels of complement, immunoglobulin, cytokines, sICAM-1, MPO, MDA, CINC-1, MCP-1, ANXA-1, TLR4, NF-κBp65, apoptosis index, and pulmonary permeability index were increased, whereas the levels of SOD, GSH-PX activity, and oxygenation index were decreased in rats with LIRI. Except for ANXA-1, these responses induced by LIRI were significantly inhibited by RvD1 treatment. In addition, LIRI-induced structure damages of lung tissues were also alleviated by RvD1 as shown by H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy. The results suggest that RvD1 may play an important role in protection of LIRI via inhibition of complement, immunoglobulin, and neutrophil activation; down-regulation of TLR4/NF-κB; and the expression of a variety of inflammatory factors. PMID:27145782

  16. Insights into complement convertase formation based on the structure of the factor B-cobra venom factor complex

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Bert J C; Gomes, Lucio; Koning, Roman I; Svergun, Dmitri I; Koster, Abraham J; Fritzinger, David C; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Gros, Piet

    2009-01-01

    Immune protection by the complement system critically depends on assembly of C3 convertases on the surface of pathogens and altered host cells. These short-lived protease complexes are formed through pro-convertases, which for the alternative pathway consist of the complement component C3b and the pro-enzyme factor B (FB). Here, we present the crystal structure at 2.2-Å resolution, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) data of the pro-convertase formed by human FB and cobra venom factor (CVF), a potent homologue of C3b that generates more stable convertases. FB is loaded onto CVF through its pro-peptide Ba segment by specific contacts, which explain the specificity for the homologous C3b over the native C3 and inactive products iC3b and C3c. The protease segment Bb binds the carboxy terminus of CVF through the metal-ion dependent adhesion site of the Von Willebrand factor A-type domain. A possible dynamic equilibrium between a ‘loading' and ‘activation' state of the pro-convertase may explain the observed difference between the crystal structure of CVFB and the EM structure of C3bB. These insights into formation of convertases provide a basis for further development of complement therapeutics. PMID:19574954

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a complement-depleting factor from king cobra, Ophiophagus hannah.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Sun, Qian-Yun; Jin, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2012-09-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF) is an anti-complement factor existing in cobra venom. CVF proteins have been purified from the venoms of Naja haje, Naja siamensis, Naja atra, Naja kaouthia, Naja naja, Naja melanoleuca and Austrelaps superbus, but only three full-length cDNA sequences of CVF are available. In the present work, a cobra venom factor termed OVF was purified from the crude venom of Ophiophagus hannah by successive gel filtration, ion-exchange and heparin affinity chromatography steps. The purified OVF was homogenous on the SDS-PAGE gel with an apparent molecular weight of 140 kDa under non-reducing conditions. Under reducing conditions, OVF was divided into three bands with apparent molecular weight of 72 kDa (α chain), 45 kDa (β chain) and 32 kDa (γ chain), respectively. OVF consumed complement components with anti-complement activity of 154 units per mg. By using Reverse transcription-PCR and 5'-RACE assay, the open reading frame of OVF was obtained. MALDI-TOF and protein sequencing assays confirmed the cloned cDNA coding for OVF protein. The cDNA sequence of OVF is conservative when aligned with that of other CVFs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed OVF is closer to CVF from N. kaouthia than to AVF-1 and AVF-2 from A. superbus. Our results demonstrated that OVF has its unique features as following: 1) The N-terminal amino acid sequence of OVF γ chain is different from that of other known CVFs, suggesting that the OVF γ chain might be further processed; 2) Unlike N. kaouthia CVF and A. superbus AVF-1, which have potential N-linked glycosylation sites located in both α and β chain, OVF only has N-linked glycosylation site in its α chain as revealed by Schiff's reagent staining and protein sequence analysis; 3) In addition to the 27 well conserved cysteine residues in all known CVFs, OVF have an additional cysteine residue in its γ chain. Understanding the importance of above mentioned specific characteristics might provide useful information on structure

  18. A method of purifying intact complement factor H from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Mei; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a method of purifying intact complement factor H (CFH) from human plasma. CFH was isolated from human plasma by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, following three sequential chromatographic columns, which consisted of l-lysine Sepharose column, Resource Q column and Sephacryl S-300 High Resolution HiPrep 16/60 column. All the above steps were performed at 4°C by Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) AKTA Purifier 10 with Frac-900. Identification of the purified CFH was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The following functions of the purified CFH were further analyzed compared with the commercial CFH in vitro: (1) binding ability with C3b; (2) binding ability with mCRP; (3) the protecting function of the hemolysis of sheep red blood cells; (4) the cofactor role for complement factor I-mediated proteolytic inactivation of C3b. Homogeneous CFH was purified from the plasma fraction through the above four steps. The purity and the functions of the purified CFH were comparable to the commercial CFH. The yield of CFH was 26±3% in our study. Compared with previous methods, our method was high yield with high purity. We established a stable and feasible system for purifying intact CFH, which could be used in the lab and clinical investigations. PMID:23906520

  19. Interaction of Human Complement Factor H Variants Tyr402 and His402 with Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Aldacilene Souza; Valencia, Mónica Marcela Castiblanco; Cianciarullo, Aurora Marques; Vasconcellos, Sílvio Arruda; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by pathogenic bacteria from the genus Leptospira. The disease represents a serious public health problem in underdeveloped tropical countries. Leptospires infect hosts through small abrasions in the skin or mucous membranes and they rapidly disseminate to target organs. The capacity of some pathogenic leptospiral strains to acquire the negative complement regulators factor H (FH) and C4b binding protein correlates with their ability to survive in human serum. In this study we assessed the functional consequences of the age macular degeneration-associated polymorphism FH His402 or FH Tyr402 on FH–Leptospira interactions. In binding assays using sub-saturating amounts of FH, the FH Tyr402 variant interacted with all the strains tested more strongly than the FH His402 variant. At higher concentrations, differences tended to disappear. We then compared cofactor activities displayed by FH His402 and FH Tyr402 bound to the surface of L. interrogans. Both variants exhibit similar activity as cofactors for Factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b, thus indicating that they do not differ in their capacity to regulate the complement cascade. PMID:22566834

  20. Maternal Haploids Are Preferentially Induced by CENH3-tailswap Transgenic Complementation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Kelliher, Timothy; Starr, Dakota; Wang, Wenling; McCuiston, Jamie; Zhong, Heng; Nuccio, Michael L.; Martin, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Doubled haploid plants are invaluable breeding tools but many crop species are recalcitrant to available haploid induction techniques. To test if haploid inducer lines can be engineered into crops, CENH3−∕− and CENH3:RNAi lines were complemented by AcGREEN-tailswap-CENH3 or AcGREEN-CENH3 transgenes. Haploid induction rates were determined following testcrosses to wild-type plants after independently controlling for inducer parent sex and transgene zygosity. CENH3 fusion proteins were localized to centromeres and did not cause vegetative defects or male sterility. CENH3:RNAi lines did not demonstrate consistent knockdown and rarely produced haploids. In contrast, many of the complemented CENH3−∕− lines produced haploids at low frequencies. The rate of gynogenic haploid induction reached a maximum of 3.6% in several hemizygous individuals when backcrossed as males. These results demonstrate that CENH3-tailswap transgenes can be used to engineer in vivo haploid induction systems into maize plants. PMID:27066050

  1. Maternal Haploids Are Preferentially Induced by CENH3-tailswap Transgenic Complementation in Maize.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, Timothy; Starr, Dakota; Wang, Wenling; McCuiston, Jamie; Zhong, Heng; Nuccio, Michael L; Martin, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Doubled haploid plants are invaluable breeding tools but many crop species are recalcitrant to available haploid induction techniques. To test if haploid inducer lines can be engineered into crops, CENH3 (-∕-) and CENH3:RNAi lines were complemented by AcGREEN-tailswap-CENH3 or AcGREEN-CENH3 transgenes. Haploid induction rates were determined following testcrosses to wild-type plants after independently controlling for inducer parent sex and transgene zygosity. CENH3 fusion proteins were localized to centromeres and did not cause vegetative defects or male sterility. CENH3:RNAi lines did not demonstrate consistent knockdown and rarely produced haploids. In contrast, many of the complemented CENH3 (-∕-) lines produced haploids at low frequencies. The rate of gynogenic haploid induction reached a maximum of 3.6% in several hemizygous individuals when backcrossed as males. These results demonstrate that CENH3-tailswap transgenes can be used to engineer in vivo haploid induction systems into maize plants. PMID:27066050

  2. Painting factor H onto mesenchymal stem cells protects the cells from complement- and neutrophil-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Qiu, Wen; Zhang, Lingjun; Fung, John; Lin, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undergoing intensive testing in clinical trials as a promising new therapy for many inflammatory diseases and for regenerative medicine, but further optimization of current MSC-based therapies is required. In this study, we found that in addition to direct complement-mediated attack through the assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs) that we and others have recently reported, of the released complement activation products, C5a, but not C3a, activates neutrophils in the blood to further damage MSCs through oxidative burst. In addition, we have developed a simple method for painting factor H, a native complement inhibitor, onto MSCs to locally inhibit complement activation on MSCs. MSCs painted with factor H are protected from both MAC- and neutrophil-mediated attack and are significantly more effective in inhibiting antigen-specific T cell responses than the mock-painted MSCs both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27343468

  3. Familial C3 glomerulonephritis associated with mutations in the gene for complement factor B.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hideaki; Konomoto, Takao; Tanaka, Etsuko; Hisano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Nunoi, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    We report the first case of familial C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) associated with mutations in the gene for complement factor B (CFB). A 12-year-old girl was diagnosed with biopsy-proven C3GN. Her mother had a history of treatment for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and her brother had hypocomplementemia without urinary abnormalities. DNA analysis revealed heterozygosity for CFB p.S367R in the patient, mother and brother. Evaluation of the structure-function relationship supports that this mutation has gain-of-function effects in CFB. The present case suggests that CFB has an important role in the etiology of C3GN and provides a new insight into anticomplement therapy approaches. PMID:25758434

  4. Sickness: From the focus on cytokines, prostaglandins, and complement factors to the perspectives of neurons.

    PubMed

    Poon, David Chun-Hei; Ho, Yuen-Shan; Chiu, Kin; Wong, Hoi-Lam; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2015-10-01

    Systemic inflammation leads to a variety of physiological (e.g. fever) and behavioral (e.g. anorexia, immobility, social withdrawal, depressed mood, disturbed sleep) responses that are collectively known as sickness. While these phenomena have been studied for the past few decades, the neurobiological mechanisms by which sickness occurs remain unclear. In this review, we first revisit how the body senses and responds to infections and injuries by eliciting systemic inflammation. Next, we focus on how peripheral inflammatory molecules such as cytokines, prostaglandins, and activated complement factors communicate with the brain to trigger neuroinflammation and sickness. Since depression also involves inflammation, we further elaborate on the interrelationship between sickness and depression. Finally, we discuss how immune activation can modulate neurons in the brain, and suggest future perspectives to help unravel how changes in neuronal functions relate to sickness responses. PMID:26363665

  5. Intranasal peptide-induced tolerance and linked suppression: consequences of complement deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Ling, Guang Sheng; Baudino, Lucie; Szajna, Marta; Manivannan, Kiruthika; Zhao, Jade Chen; Midgley, Robert; Chai, Jian-Guo; Simpson, Elizabeth; Botto, Marina; Scott, Diane

    2015-01-01

    A role for complement, particularly the classical pathway, in the regulation of immune responses is well documented. Deficiencies in C1q or C4 predispose to autoimmunity, while deficiency in C3 affects the suppression of contact sensitization and generation of oral tolerance. Complement components including C3 have been shown to be required for both B-cell and T-cell priming. The mechanisms whereby complement can mediate these diverse regulatory effects are poorly understood. Our previous work, using the mouse minor histocompatibility (HY) model of skin graft rejection, showed that both C1q and C3 were required for the induction of tolerance following intranasal peptide administration. By comparing tolerance induction in wild-type C57BL/6 and C1q-, C3-, C4- and C5-deficient C57BL/6 female mice, we show here that the classical pathway components including C3 are required for tolerance induction, whereas C5 plays no role. C3-deficient mice failed to generate a functional regulatory T (Treg) -dendritic cell (DC) tolerogenic loop required for tolerance induction. This was related to the inability of C3-deficient DC to up-regulate the arginine-consuming enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos-2), in the presence of antigen-specific Treg cells and peptide, leading to reduced Treg cell generation. Our findings demonstrate that the classical pathway and C3 play a critical role in the peptide-mediated induction of tolerance to HY by modulating DC function. PMID:25039245

  6. Intranasal peptide-induced tolerance and linked suppression: consequences of complement deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Ling, Guang Sheng; Baudino, Lucie; Szajna, Marta; Manivannan, Kiruthika; Zhao, Jade Chen; Midgley, Robert; Chai, Jian-Guo; Simpson, Elizabeth; Botto, Marina; Scott, Diane

    2015-01-01

    A role for complement, particularly the classical pathway, in the regulation of immune responses is well documented. Deficiencies in C1q or C4 predispose to autoimmunity, while deficiency in C3 affects the suppression of contact sensitization and generation of oral tolerance. Complement components including C3 have been shown to be required for both B-cell and T-cell priming. The mechanisms whereby complement can mediate these diverse regulatory effects are poorly understood. Our previous work, using the mouse minor histocompatibility (HY) model of skin graft rejection, showed that both C1q and C3 were required for the induction of tolerance following intranasal peptide administration. By comparing tolerance induction in wild-type C57BL/6 and C1q-, C3-, C4- and C5-deficient C57BL/6 female mice, we show here that the classical pathway components including C3 are required for tolerance induction, whereas C5 plays no role. C3-deficient mice failed to generate a functional regulatory T (Treg) –dendritic cell (DC) tolerogenic loop required for tolerance induction. This was related to the inability of C3-deficient DC to up-regulate the arginine-consuming enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos-2), in the presence of antigen-specific Treg cells and peptide, leading to reduced Treg cell generation. Our findings demonstrate that the classical pathway and C3 play a critical role in the peptide-mediated induction of tolerance to HY by modulating DC function. PMID:25039245

  7. Alterations of Choroidal Blood Flow Regulation in Young Healthy Subjects with Complement Factor H Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Told, Reinhard; Palkovits, Stefan; Haslacher, Helmuth; Frantal, Sophie; Schmidl, Doreen; Boltz, Agnes; Lasta, Michael; Kaya, Semira; Werkmeister, René M.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    A common polymorphism in the complement factor H gene (rs1061170, Y402H) is associated with a high risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the present study we hypothesized that healthy young subjects homozygous for the high-risk haplotype (CC) show abnormal choroidal blood flow (ChBF) regulation decades before potentially developing the disease. A total of 100 healthy young subjects were included in the present study, of which 4 subjects were excluded due to problems with genotyping or blood flow measurements. ChBF was measured continuously using laser Doppler flowmetry while the subjects performed isometric exercise (squatting) for 6 minutes. The increase in ChBF was less pronounced than the response in ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), indicating for some degree of choroidal blood flow regulation. Eighteen subjects were homozygous for C, 47 subjects were homozygous for T and 31 subjects were heterozygous (CT). The increase in OPP during isometric exercise was not different between groups. By contrast the increase in ChBF was more pronounced in subjects homozygous for the high risk C allele (p = 0.041). This was also evident from the pressure/flow relationship, where the increase in ChBF in homozygous C carriers started at lower OPPs as compared to the other groups. Our data indicate that the regulation of ChBF is abnormal in rs1061170 CC carriers. So far this polymorphism has been linked to age related macular degeneration (AMD) mainly via inflammatory pathways associated with the complement system dysfunction. Our results indicate that it could also be related to vascular factors that have been implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:23596508

  8. Alterations of choroidal blood flow regulation in young healthy subjects with complement factor H polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Told, Reinhard; Palkovits, Stefan; Haslacher, Helmuth; Frantal, Sophie; Schmidl, Doreen; Boltz, Agnes; Lasta, Michael; Kaya, Semira; Werkmeister, René M; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    A common polymorphism in the complement factor H gene (rs1061170, Y402H) is associated with a high risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the present study we hypothesized that healthy young subjects homozygous for the high-risk haplotype (CC) show abnormal choroidal blood flow (ChBF) regulation decades before potentially developing the disease. A total of 100 healthy young subjects were included in the present study, of which 4 subjects were excluded due to problems with genotyping or blood flow measurements. ChBF was measured continuously using laser Doppler flowmetry while the subjects performed isometric exercise (squatting) for 6 minutes. The increase in ChBF was less pronounced than the response in ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), indicating for some degree of choroidal blood flow regulation. Eighteen subjects were homozygous for C, 47 subjects were homozygous for T and 31 subjects were heterozygous (CT). The increase in OPP during isometric exercise was not different between groups. By contrast the increase in ChBF was more pronounced in subjects homozygous for the high risk C allele (p = 0.041). This was also evident from the pressure/flow relationship, where the increase in ChBF in homozygous C carriers started at lower OPPs as compared to the other groups. Our data indicate that the regulation of ChBF is abnormal in rs1061170 CC carriers. So far this polymorphism has been linked to age related macular degeneration (AMD) mainly via inflammatory pathways associated with the complement system dysfunction. Our results indicate that it could also be related to vascular factors that have been implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:23596508

  9. Production and functional activity of a recombinant von Willebrand factor-A domain from human complement factor B.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S C; Hinshelwood, J; Perkins, S J; Sim, R B

    1999-01-01

    Factor B is a five-domain 90 kDa serine protease proenzyme which is part of the human serum complement system. It binds to other complement proteins C3b and properdin, and is activated by the protease factor D. The fourth domain of factor B is homologous to the type A domain of von Willebrand Factor (vWF-A). A full-length human factor B cDNA clone was used to amplify the region encoding the vWF-A domain (amino acids 229-444 of factor B). A fusion protein expression system was then used to generate it in high yield in Escherichia coli, where thrombin cleavage was used to separate the vWF-A domain from its fusion protein partner. A second vWF-A domain with improved stability and solubility was created using a Cys(267)-->Ser mutation and a four-residue C-terminal extension of the first vWF-A domain. The recombinant domains were investigated by analytical gel filtration, sucrose density centrifugation and analytical ultracentrifugation, in order to show that both domains were monomeric and possessed compact structures that were consistent with known vWF-A crystal structures. This expression system and its characterization permitted the first investigation of the function of the isolated vWF-A domain. It was able to inhibit substantially the binding of (125)I-labelled factor B to immobilized C3b. This demonstrated both the presence of a C3b binding site in this portion of factor B and a ligand-binding property of the vWF-A domain. The site at which factor D cleaves factor B is close to the N-terminus of both recombinant vWF-A domains. Factor D was shown to cleave the vWF-A domain in the presence or absence of C3b, whereas the cleavage of intact factor B under the same conditions occurs only in the presence of C3b. PMID:10477273

  10. Allotyping human complement factor B in Asian Indian type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Kaur, G; Tandon, N; Mehra, N K

    2008-12-01

    Human complement factor B (BF) is an essential component of the alternate complement pathway and therefore important in innate immune and autoimmune responses. The BF gene is located in the central region of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and is known to encode more than 30 protein variants that can be resolved by isoelectric focusing and gel electrophoresis. There are three BF alleles - BF*S, BF*FB and BF*FA - that differ in codon 7 at nucleotide positions 94 and 95. These alleles have CGG, TGG or CAG triplets at their codon 7, respectively, that code for Arg, Trp or Gln residues. We have developed a novel polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers-based allotyping assay that can identify nucleotide substitutions in codon 7 in all the three BF alleles. The assay was validated by sequencing and amplified fragment length polymorphism. Using this SSP assay, we report the BF alleles located on the multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3 haplotypes that are unique in the Indian population and are associated with autoimmunity. The common type 1 diabetes (T1D)-favoring Caucasian haplotype HLA-A1-B8-DR3 (ancestral haplotype AH8.1) carries BF*S. However, in the North Indian T1D patients, the most common haplotype is HLA-A26-B8-DR3 (AH8.2) and this carried BF*FB. Because of its association with AH8.2, the BF*FB was overrepresented in the patients (51.03%) compared with healthy controls (32.7%, OR = 2.148, 95% CI = 1.34-3.44, P = 0.002). Similar studies on allotyping BF alleles in different haplotypes in various populations could have important implications in understanding mechanisms of MHC haplotypic diversifications and disease associations and designing future therapeutic approaches. PMID:19000152

  11. Alkylglycerols reduce serum complement and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Parri, A; Fitó, Montserrat; Torres, C F; Muñoz-Aguayo, D; Schröder, H; Cano, J F; Vázquez, L; Reglero, G; Covas, María-Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Alkylglycerols (AKGs), isolated or present in shark liver oil have anti-inflammatory properties. Complement 3 (C3) and 4 (C4) participate in lipid metabolism and in obesity, contributing to the metabolic syndrome and to the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity. In a randomized, controlled, crossover study, 26 non-diabetes obese individuals were assigned two preparations with low (LAC, 10 mg AKGs) and high (HAC, 20 mg AKGs) AKG content. Intervention periods were of 3 weeks preceded by 2-week washout periods in which shark liver oil was avoided. Cholesterol, C3, C4, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in a linear trend (P < 0.01) from baseline (control) to LAC and HAC. Values after HAC were significantly lower (P < 0.05) versus both baseline and after LAC. No adverse effects were observed or reported. Data from this pilot study open a promising field for the study of the beneficial effects of AKGs on cardiovascular risk factors in obese individuals. PMID:27188987

  12. Association of Genetic Variants in Complement Factor H and Factor H-Related Genes with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Wu, Hui; Khosravi, Melanie; Cui, Huijuan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Williams, Adrienne H.; Comeau, Mary E.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Marion, Miranda C.; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Jacob, Chaim O.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Moser, Kathy L.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Petri, Michelle A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Vilá, Luis M.; Reveille, John D.; James, Judith A.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Freedman, Barry I.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Merrill, Joan T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Stevens, Anne M.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Park, Ji Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Boackle, Susan A.; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Cantor, Rita M.; Yu, Chack-Yung; Shen, Nan; Tsao, Betty P.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH) and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5) within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA), which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, Pmeta = 6.6×10−8, OR = 1.18) and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, Pmeta = 2.9×10−7, OR = 1.17) rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS). Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ∼146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ), a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (Pmeta = 3.2×10−7, OR = 1.47) conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (Pmeta = 3.5×10−4, OR = 1.14). These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of complement

  13. Association of genetic variants in complement factor H and factor H-related genes with systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Wu, Hui; Khosravi, Melanie; Cui, Huijuan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Langefeld, Carl D; Williams, Adrienne H; Comeau, Mary E; Ziegler, Julie T; Marion, Miranda C; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Harley, John B; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Jacob, Chaim O; Vyse, Timothy J; Niewold, Timothy B; Gaffney, Patrick M; Moser, Kathy L; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcon, Graciela S; Petri, Michelle A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Vilá, Luis M; Reveille, John D; James, Judith A; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Freedman, Barry I; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Merrill, Joan T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Scofield, R Hal; Stevens, Anne M; Guthridge, Joel M; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Park, Ji Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Boackle, Susan A; Grossman, Jennifer M; Hahn, Bevra H; Goodship, Timothy H J; Cantor, Rita M; Yu, Chack-Yung; Shen, Nan; Tsao, Betty P

    2011-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH) and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5) within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA), which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, P(meta) = 6.6×10(-8), OR = 1.18) and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, P(meta) = 2.9×10(-7), OR = 1.17) rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS). Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ~146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ), a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (P(meta) = 3.2×10(-7), OR = 1.47) conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (P(meta) = 3.5×10(-4), OR = 1.14). These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of

  14. Development of a Sterne-Based Complement Fixation Test to Monitor the Humoral Response Induced by Anthrax Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Adone, Rosanna; Sali, Michela; Francia, Massimiliano; Iatarola, Michela; Donatiello, Adelia; Fasanella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis spore-forming bacterium. Since it is primarily a disease of animals, the control in animals, and humans depend on the prevention in livestock, principally cattle, sheep, and goats. Most veterinary vaccines utilize the toxigenic, uncapsulated (pXO1+/pXO2-) B. anthracis strain 34F2 which affords protection through the production of neutralizing antibodies directed to the toxin components Protective Antigen (PA), Lethal Factor (LF), and Edema Factor (EF). The titration of specific antibodies in sera of vaccinated animals is crucial to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccination and to obtain epidemiological information for an effective anthrax surveillance. In this study, we developed a Sterne-based Complement Fixation Test (CFT) to detect specific antibodies induced in animals vaccinated with Sterne 34F2. We assessed its efficacy in laboratory animals and under field conditions by monitoring the humoral response induced by vaccination in cattle. The results indicated that the Sterne-based CFT is able to correctly identify vaccinated animals. It proved to be a very sensitive and specific test. Moreover, the Sterne-based CFT offers many benefits with regard to costs, standardization and reproducibility of the assay procedure. PMID:26858700

  15. Development of a Sterne-Based Complement Fixation Test to Monitor the Humoral Response Induced by Anthrax Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Adone, Rosanna; Sali, Michela; Francia, Massimiliano; Iatarola, Michela; Donatiello, Adelia; Fasanella, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis spore-forming bacterium. Since it is primarily a disease of animals, the control in animals, and humans depend on the prevention in livestock, principally cattle, sheep, and goats. Most veterinary vaccines utilize the toxigenic, uncapsulated (pXO1+/pXO2–) B. anthracis strain 34F2 which affords protection through the production of neutralizing antibodies directed to the toxin components Protective Antigen (PA), Lethal Factor (LF), and Edema Factor (EF). The titration of specific antibodies in sera of vaccinated animals is crucial to evaluate the efficacy of the vaccination and to obtain epidemiological information for an effective anthrax surveillance. In this study, we developed a Sterne-based Complement Fixation Test (CFT) to detect specific antibodies induced in animals vaccinated with Sterne 34F2. We assessed its efficacy in laboratory animals and under field conditions by monitoring the humoral response induced by vaccination in cattle. The results indicated that the Sterne-based CFT is able to correctly identify vaccinated animals. It proved to be a very sensitive and specific test. Moreover, the Sterne-based CFT offers many benefits with regard to costs, standardization and reproducibility of the assay procedure. PMID:26858700

  16. Distinct roles for the complement regulators factor H and Crry in protection of the kidney from injury.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Jennifer; Renner, Brandon; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Panzer, Sarah; Hannan, Jonathan P; Ljubanovic, Danica; Ruseva, Marieta M; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Antonioli, Alexandra H; Pickering, Matthew C; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the complement regulatory proteins are associated with several different diseases. Although these mutations cause dysregulated alternative pathway activation throughout the body, the kidneys are the most common site of injury. The susceptibility of the kidney to alternative pathway-mediated injury may be due to limited expression of complement regulatory proteins on several tissue surfaces within the kidney. To examine the roles of the complement regulatory proteins factor H and Crry in protecting distinct renal surfaces from alternative pathway mediated injury, we generated mice with targeted deletions of the genes for both proteins. Surprisingly, mice with combined genetic deletions of factor H and Crry developed significantly milder renal injury than mice deficient in only factor H. Deficiency of both factor H and Crry was associated with C3 deposition at multiple locations within the kidney, but glomerular C3 deposition was lower than that in factor H alone deficient mice. Thus, factor H and Crry are critical for regulating complement activation at distinct anatomic sites within the kidney. However, widespread activation of the alternative pathway reduces injury by depleting the pool of C3 available at any 1 location. PMID:27165610

  17. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    PubMed Central

    Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. Methods 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak’s multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). Results In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. Conclusions In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent. PMID:27437704

  18. Effect of sex chromosome complement on sodium appetite and Fos-immunoreactivity induced by sodium depletion.

    PubMed

    Dadam, Florencia M; Caeiro, Ximena E; Cisternas, Carla D; Macchione, Ana F; Cambiasso, María J; Vivas, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies indicate a sex chromosome complement (SCC) effect on the angiotensin II-sexually dimorphic hypertensive and bradycardic baroreflex responses. We sought to evaluate whether SCC may differentially modulate sexually dimorphic-induced sodium appetite and specific brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the rennin angiotensin system. For this purpose, we used the "four core genotype" mouse model, in which the effect of gonadal sex and SCC is dissociated, allowing comparisons of sexually dimorphic traits between XX and XY females as well as in XX and XY males. Gonadectomized mice were sodium depleted by furosemide (50 mg/kg) and low-sodium diet treatment; control groups were administered with vehicle and maintained on normal sodium diet. Twenty-one hours later, the mice were divided into two groups: one group was submitted to the water-2% NaCl choice intake test, while the other group was perfused and their brains subjected to the Fos-immunoreactivity (FOS-ir) procedure. Sodium depletion, regardless of SCC (XX or XY), induced a significantly lower sodium and water intake in females than in males, confirming the existence in mice of sexual dimorphism in sodium appetite and the organizational involvement of gonadal steroids. Moreover, our results demonstrate a SCC effect on induced brain FOS-ir, showing increased brain activity in XX-SCC mice at the paraventricular nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, and lateral parabrachial nucleus, as well as an XX-SCC augmented effect on sodium depletion-induced brain activity at two circumventricular organs, the subfornical organ and area postrema, nuclei closely involved in fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:24259464

  19. Does binding of complement factor H to the meningococcal vaccine antigen, factor H binding protein, decrease protective serum antibody responses?

    PubMed

    Granoff, Dan M; Ram, Sanjay; Beernink, Peter T

    2013-08-01

    Factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a principal antigen in a multicomponent meningococcal vaccine recently licensed in Europe for prevention of serogroup B diseases. The protein recruits the complement downregulator, factor H (fH), to the bacterial surface, which enables the organism to resist complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Binding is specific for human fH. In preclinical studies, mice and rabbits immunized with fHbp vaccines developed serum bactericidal antibody responses, which in humans predict protection against developing meningococcal disease. These studies, however, were in animals whose fH did not bind to the vaccine antigen. Here we review the immunogenicity of fHbp vaccines in human fH transgenic mice. The data suggest that animals with high serum human fH concentrations have impaired protective antibody responses. Further, mutant fHbp vaccines with single amino acid substitutions that decrease fH binding are superior immunogens, possibly by unmasking epitopes in the fH binding site that are important for eliciting serum bactericidal antibody responses. Humans immunized with fHbp vaccines develop serum bactericidal antibody, but achieving broad coverage in infants required incorporation of additional antigens, including outer membrane vesicles, which increased rates of fever and local reactions at the injection site. The experimental results in transgenic mice predict that fHbp immunogenicity can be improved in humans by using mutant fHbp vaccines with decreased fH binding. These results have important public health implications for developing improved fHbp vaccines for control of serogroup B meningococcal disease and for development of vaccines against other microbes that bind host molecules. PMID:23740919

  20. Complement Factor B Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome—Disease-Relevant or Benign?

    PubMed Central

    Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Vergoz, Laura; Rybkine, Tania; Ngo, Stephanie; Bettoni, Serena; Pashov, Anastas; Cayla, Mathieu; Tabarin, Fanny; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hue, Christophe; Smith, Richard J.; Noris, Marina; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Donadelli, Roberta; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic ultrarare renal disease associated with overactivation of the alternative pathway of complement. Four gain-of-function mutations that form a hyperactive or deregulated C3 convertase have been identified in Factor B (FB) ligand binding sites. Here, we studied the functional consequences of 10 FB genetic changes recently identified from different aHUS cohorts. Using several tests for alternative C3 and C5 convertase formation and regulation, we identified two gain-of-function and potentially disease-relevant mutations that formed either an overactive convertase (M433I) or a convertase resistant to decay by FH (K298Q). One mutation (R178Q) produced a partially cleaved protein with no ligand binding or functional activity. Seven genetic changes led to near-normal or only slightly reduced ligand binding and functional activity compared with the most common polymorphism at position 7, R7. Notably, none of the algorithms used to predict the disease relevance of FB mutations agreed completely with the experimental data, suggesting that in silico approaches should be undertaken with caution. These data, combined with previously published results, suggest that 9 of 15 FB genetic changes identified in patients with aHUS are unrelated to disease pathogenesis. This study highlights that functional assessment of identified nucleotide changes in FB is mandatory to confirm disease association. PMID:24652797

  1. Complement Factor H and Simian Virus 40 bind the GM1 ganglioside in distinct conformations.

    PubMed

    Blaum, Bärbel S; Frank, Martin; Walker, Ross C; Neu, Ursula; Stehle, Thilo

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian cell surfaces are decorated with a variety of glycan chains that orchestrate development and defense and are exploited by pathogens for cellular attachment and entry. While glycosidic linkages are, in principle, flexible, the conformational space that a given glycan can sample is subject to spatial and electrostatic restrictions imposed by its overall chemical structure. Here, we show how the glycan moiety of the GM1 ganglioside, a branched, monosialylated pentasaccharide that serves as a ligand for various proteins, undergoes differential conformational selection in its interactions with different lectins. Using STD NMR and X-ray crystallography, we found that the innate immune regulator complement Factor H (FH) binds a previously not reported GM1 conformation that is not compatible with the GM1-binding sites of other structurally characterized GM1-binding lectins such as the Simian Virus 40 (SV40) capsid. Molecular dynamics simulations of the free glycan in explicit solvent on the 10 μs timescale reveal that the FH-bound conformation nevertheless corresponds to a minimum in the Gibbs free energy plot. In contrast to the GM1 conformation recognized by SV40, the FH-bound GM1 conformation is associated with poor NOE restraints, explaining how it escaped(1)H-(1)H NOE-restrained modeling in the past and highlighting the necessity for ensemble representations of glycan structures. PMID:26715202

  2. Ultrastructural lesions induced in vitro in guinea-pig spermatozoa by a specific autoantibody (anti-T) and complement.

    PubMed Central

    Le Bouteiller, P; Toullet, F; Voisin, G A

    1975-01-01

    A quantitative ultrastructural study has been carried out on the lesions that are induced in vitro in guinea-pig spermatozoa by the action of auto-antispermatozoa antibodies and complement. The responsibility of three-independent autoantigen-autoantibody systems (S, P and T) has been explored. The only anti-T antibody known to fix complement and to be spermotoxic (T is a membrane-linked autoantigen), caused significant and important lesions, the immunologically specific origin of which was demonstrated. These lesions began a few seconds after complement had been added. The cytoplasmic membrane is first involved, then the acrosomal membranes, and then the acrosomal contents are lysed. The remarkable rapidity of action of complement on the antibody-sensitized target is emphasized. A typical dose-effect curve is obtained with dilutions of anti-T immune sera. Non-C1-fixing anti-S as well as C1-fixing anti-P antibodies (P has been shown to be intra-acrosomal) do not provoke any significant lesions, even in the presence fo complement, as compared to normal and various controls. However, anti-P serum, when added to non-damaging dilutions of anti-T in the presence of complement, was able to provoke significant lesions in the acrosomes. The bearing of these findings on the mechanisms of in vivo lesions is discussed. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1132887

  3. Ensemble refinement shows conformational flexibility in crystal structures of human complement factor D

    SciTech Connect

    Forneris, Federico; Burnley, B. Tom; Gros, Piet

    2014-03-01

    Ensemble-refinement analysis of native and mutant factor D (FD) crystal structures indicates a dynamical transition in FD from a self-inhibited inactive conformation to a substrate-bound active conformation that is reminiscent of the allostery in thrombin. Comparison with previously observed dynamics in thrombin using NMR data supports the crystallographic ensembles. Human factor D (FD) is a self-inhibited thrombin-like serine proteinase that is critical for amplification of the complement immune response. FD is activated by its substrate through interactions outside the active site. The substrate-binding, or ‘exosite’, region displays a well defined and rigid conformation in FD. In contrast, remarkable flexibility is observed in thrombin and related proteinases, in which Na{sup +} and ligand binding is implied in allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity through protein dynamics. Here, ensemble refinement (ER) of FD and thrombin crystal structures is used to evaluate structure and dynamics simultaneously. A comparison with previously published NMR data for thrombin supports the ER analysis. The R202A FD variant has enhanced activity towards artificial peptides and simultaneously displays active and inactive conformations of the active site. ER revealed pronounced disorder in the exosite loops for this FD variant, reminiscent of thrombin in the absence of the stabilizing Na{sup +} ion. These data indicate that FD exhibits conformational dynamics like thrombin, but unlike in thrombin a mechanism has evolved in FD that locks the unbound native state into an ordered inactive conformation via the self-inhibitory loop. Thus, ensemble refinement of X-ray crystal structures may represent an approach alternative to spectroscopy to explore protein dynamics in atomic detail.

  4. Complement factor H gene polymorphisms and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haas, P; Steindl, K; Schmid-Kubista, KE; Aggermann, T; Krugluger, W; Hageman, GS; Binder, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association of the complement factor H gene (CFH) Y402H polymorphism and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the Austrian population (Caucasoid descent), and to determine whether there is an association between exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae—responsible for up to 20% of community-acquired pneumoniae—and the AMD-associated CFH risk polymorphism. Methods Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in 75 unrelated AMD patients and compared with 75 healthy, age-matched control subjects. C. pneumoniae serum IgG was tested by ELISA (R&D) in both groups. The association between the CFH Y402H genetic polymorphism and the disease was examined by χ2-test and logistic regression. Results CFH Y402H genotype frequencies differed significantly between AMD patients and healthy controls (1277 TT, 22.7%; 1277 TC, 53.3%; and 1277 CC, 22.7% in the AMD group; 1277 TT, 48.0%; 1277 TC, 38.7%; and 1277 CC, 13.3% in the control group) showing a P-value <0.005 (OR:2.920/3.811). No association was found between a positive C. pneumoniae titre and AMD (P = 0.192), nor was any association found between C. pneumoniae and the CFH Y402H polymorphism. Conclusions Our data confirm that the CFH Y402H polymorphism is a risk factor for AMD in the Austrian population with a higher frequency of the Y402 polymorphism in AMD patients. No association between preceding C. pneumoniae infection and diagnosed AMD was found. PMID:19169230

  5. Impaired Immunogenicity of Meningococcal Neisserial Surface Protein A in Human Complement Factor H Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Eduardo; Pajon, Rolando; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-01-01

    Neisserial surface protein A (NspA) is a highly conserved outer membrane protein previously investigated as a meningococcal vaccine candidate. Despite eliciting serum bactericidal activity in mice, a recombinant NspA vaccine failed to elicit serum bactericidal antibodies in a phase 1 clinical trial in humans. The discordant results may be explained by the recent discovery that NspA is a human-specific ligand of the complement inhibitor factor H (FH). Therefore, in humans but not mice, NspA would be expected to form a complex with FH, which could impair human anti-NspA protective antibody responses. To investigate this question, we immunized human FH transgenic BALB/c mice with three doses of recombinant NspA expressed in Escherichia coli microvesicles, with each dose being separated by 3 weeks. Three of 12 (25%) transgenic mice and 13 of 14 wild-type mice responded with bactericidal titers of ≥1:10 in postimmunization sera (P = 0.0008, Fisher's exact test). In contrast, human FH transgenic and wild-type mice immunized with a control meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine had similar serum bactericidal antibody responses directed at PorA, which is not known to bind human FH, and a mutant factor H binding protein (FHbp) antigen with a >50-fold lower level of FH binding than wild-type FHbp antigen binding.Thus, human FH can impair anti-NspA serum bactericidal antibody responses, which may explain the poor immunogenicity of the NspA vaccine previously tested in humans. A mutant NspA vaccine engineered to have decreased binding to human FH may increase protective antibody responses in humans. PMID:26597984

  6. Expression, purification, cocrystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of sucrose octasulfate/human complement regulator factor H SCRs 6–8

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, Beverly E.; Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Clark, Simon J.; Tarelli, Edward; Sim, Robert B.; Day, Antony J.; Lea, Susan M.

    2007-06-01

    The crystallization of human complement regulator FH-678{sub 402H} with a glycosaminoglycan analogue is described. Human plasma protein complement factor H (FH) is an inhibitor of the spontaneously activated alternative complement pathway. An allotypic variant of FH, 402His, has been associated with age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Crystals of FH domains 6–8 (FH678) containing 402His have been grown in the presence of a polyanionic sucrose octasulfate ligand (an analogue of the natural glycosaminoglycan ligands of FH) using both native and selenomethionine-derivatized protein. Native data sets diffracting to 2.3 Å and SeMet data sets of up to 2.8 Å resolution have been collected. An anomalous difference Patterson map reveals self- and cross-peaks from two incorporated Se atoms. The corresponding selenium substructure has been solved.

  7. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus. PMID:26787717

  8. Bacillus anthracis Spore Surface Protein BclA Mediates Complement Factor H Binding to Spores and Promotes Spore Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunfang; Martinez-Moczygemba, Margarita; Herold, Jennifer; Botto, Marina; Wetsel, Rick A.; Xu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, are known to persist in the host lungs for prolonged periods of time, however the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that BclA, a major surface protein of B. anthracis spores, mediated direct binding of complement factor H (CFH) to spores. The surface bound CFH retained its regulatory cofactor activity resulting in C3 degradation and inhibition of downstream complement activation. By comparing results from wild type C57BL/6 mice and complement deficient mice, we further showed that BclA significantly contributed to spore persistence in the mouse lungs and dampened antibody responses to spores in a complement C3-dependent manner. In addition, prior exposure to BclA deletion spores (ΔbclA) provided significant protection against lethal challenges by B. anthracis, whereas the isogenic parent spores did not, indicating that BclA may also impair protective immunity. These results describe for the first time an immune inhibition mechanism of B. anthracis mediated by BclA and CFH that promotes spore persistence in vivo. The findings also suggested an important role of complement in persistent infections and thus have broad implications. PMID:27304426

  9. Bacillus anthracis Spore Surface Protein BclA Mediates Complement Factor H Binding to Spores and Promotes Spore Persistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyu; Jenkins, Sarah A; Gu, Chunfang; Shree, Ankita; Martinez-Moczygemba, Margarita; Herold, Jennifer; Botto, Marina; Wetsel, Rick A; Xu, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Spores of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, are known to persist in the host lungs for prolonged periods of time, however the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that BclA, a major surface protein of B. anthracis spores, mediated direct binding of complement factor H (CFH) to spores. The surface bound CFH retained its regulatory cofactor activity resulting in C3 degradation and inhibition of downstream complement activation. By comparing results from wild type C57BL/6 mice and complement deficient mice, we further showed that BclA significantly contributed to spore persistence in the mouse lungs and dampened antibody responses to spores in a complement C3-dependent manner. In addition, prior exposure to BclA deletion spores (ΔbclA) provided significant protection against lethal challenges by B. anthracis, whereas the isogenic parent spores did not, indicating that BclA may also impair protective immunity. These results describe for the first time an immune inhibition mechanism of B. anthracis mediated by BclA and CFH that promotes spore persistence in vivo. The findings also suggested an important role of complement in persistent infections and thus have broad implications. PMID:27304426

  10. Sex differences in body fluid homeostasis: Sex chromosome complement influences on bradycardic baroreflex response and sodium depletion induced neural activity.

    PubMed

    Vivas, L; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E

    2015-12-01

    Clinical and basic findings indicate that angiotensin II (ANG II) differentially modulates hydroelectrolyte and cardiovascular responses in male and female. But are only the activational and organizational hormonal effects to blame for such differences? Males and females not only differ in their sex (males are born with testes and females with ovaries) but also carry different sex chromosome complements and are thus influenced throughout life by different genomes. In this review, we discuss our recent studies in order to evaluate whether sex chromosome complement is in part responsible for gender differences previously observed in ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response and sodium depletion-induced sodium appetite and neural activity. To test the hypothesis that XX or XY contributes to the dimorphic ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response, we used the four core genotype mouse model, in which the effects of gonadal sex (testes or ovaries) and sex chromosome complement (XX or XY) are dissociated. The results indicate that ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex sexual dimorphic response may be ascribed to differences in sex chromosomes, indicating an XX-sex chromosome complement facilitatory bradycardic-baroreflex control of heart rate. Furthermore, we evaluated whether genetic differences within the sex chromosome complement may differentially modulate the known sexually dimorphic sodium appetite as well as basal or induced brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system by furosemide and low-sodium treatment. Our studies demonstrate an organizational hormonal effect on sexually dimorphic induced sodium intake in mice, while at the brain level (subfornical organ and area postrema) we showed a sex chromosome complement effect in sodium-depleted mice, suggesting a sex chromosome gene participation in the modulation of neural pathways underlying regulatory response to renin-angiotensin stimulation. PMID:26260434

  11. Rare Complement Factor H Variant Associated With Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the Amish

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joshua D.; CookeBailey, Jessica N.; D'Aoust, Laura; Cade, William; Ayala-Haedo, Juan; Fuzzell, Denise; Laux, Renee; Adams, Larry D.; Reinhart-Mercer, Lori; Caywood, Laura; Whitehead-Gay, Patrice; Agarwal, Anita; Wang, Gaofeng; Scott, William K.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness among the adult population in the developed world. To further the understanding of this disease, we have studied the genetically isolated Amish population of Ohio and Indiana. Methods. Cumulative genetic risk scores were calculated using the 19 known allelic associations. Exome sequencing was performed in three members of a small Amish family with AMD who lacked the common risk alleles in complement factor H (CFH) and ARMS2/HTRA1. Follow-up genotyping and association analysis was performed in a cohort of 973 Amish individuals, including 95 with self-reported AMD. Results. The cumulative genetic risk score analysis generated a mean genetic risk score of 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10, 1.13) in the Amish controls and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.22) in the Amish cases. This mean difference in genetic risk scores is statistically significant (P = 0.0042). Exome sequencing identified a rare variant (P503A) in CFH. Association analysis in the remainder of the Amish sample revealed that the P503A variant is significantly associated with AMD (P = 9.27 × 10−13). Variant P503A was absent when evaluated in a cohort of 791 elderly non-Amish controls, and 1456 non-Amish cases. Conclusions. Data from the cumulative genetic risk score analysis suggests that the variants reported by the AMDGene consortium account for a smaller genetic burden of disease in the Amish compared with the non-Amish Caucasian population. Using exome sequencing data, we identified a novel missense mutation that is shared among a densely affected nuclear Amish family and located in a gene that has been previously implicated in AMD risk. PMID:24906858

  12. Complement factor H gene associations with end-stage kidney disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Jason A.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Lea, Janice P.; Okusa, Mark D.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Bowden, Donald W.; Freedman, Barry I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in the complement factor H gene (CFH) region associate with renal-limited mesangial proliferative forms of glomerulonephritis including IgA nephropathy (IgAN), dense deposit disease (DDD) and C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN). Lack of kidney biopsies could lead to under diagnosis of CFH-associated end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in African Americans (AAs), with incorrect attribution to other causes. A prior genome-wide association study in AAs with non-diabetic ESKD implicated an intronic CFH single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Methods Thirteen CFH SNPs (8 exonic, 2 synonymous, 2 3′UTR, and the previously associated intronic variant rs379489) were tested for association with common forms of non-diabetic and type 2 diabetes-associated (T2D) ESKD in 3770 AAs (1705 with non-diabetic ESKD, 1305 with T2D-ESKD, 760 controls). Most cases lacked kidney biopsies; those with known IgAN, DDD or C3GN were excluded. Results Adjusting for age, gender, ancestry and apolipoprotein L1 gene risk variants, single SNP analyses detected 6 CFH SNPs (5 exonic and the intronic variant) as significantly associated with non-diabetic ESKD (P = 0.002–0.01), three of these SNPs were also associated with T2D-ESKD. Weighted CFH locus-wide Sequence Kernel Association Testing (SKAT) in non-diabetic ESKD (P = 0.00053) and T2D-ESKD (P = 0.047) confirmed significant evidence of association. Conclusions CFH was associated with commonly reported etiologies of ESKD in the AA population. These results suggest that a subset of cases with ESKD clinically ascribed to the effects of hypertension or glomerulosclerosis actually have CFH-related forms of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis. Genetic testing may prove useful to identify the causes of renal-limited kidney disease in patients with ESKD who lack renal biopsies. PMID:24586071

  13. Complement factor H interferes with Mycobacterium bovis BCG entry into macrophages and modulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Carroll, Maria V; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an accomplished intracellular pathogen, particularly within the macrophage and this is of the utmost importance in the host-pathogen stand-off observed in the granuloma during latent tuberculosis. Contact with innate immune molecules is one of the primary interactions that can occur with the pathogen M. tuberculosis once inhaled. Complement proteins may play a role in facilitating M. tuberculosis interactions with macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that factor H, a complement regulatory protein that down-regulates complement alternative pathway activation, binds directly to the model organism M. bovis BCG. Binding of factor H reaches saturation at 5-10μg of factor H/ml, well below the plasma level. C4 binding protein (C4BP) competed with factor H for binding to mycobacteria. Factor H was also found to inhibit uptake of M. bovis BCG by THP-1 macrophage cells in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time qPCR analysis showed stark differential responses of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the early stages of phagocytosis, as evident from elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and a concomitant decrease in IL-10, TGF-β and IL-12 levels, when THP-1:BCG interaction took place in the presence of factor H. Our results suggest that factor H can interfere with mycobacterial entry into macrophages and modulate inflammatory cytokine responses, particularly during the initial stages of infection, thus affecting the extracellular survival of the pathogen. Our results offer novel insights into complement activation-independent functions of factor H during the host-pathogen interaction in tuberculosis. PMID:27262511

  14. Visualizing K48 Ubiquitination during Presynaptic Formation By Ubiquitination-Induced Fluorescence Complementation (UiFC)

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Pedro, Joana R.; Costa, Rui O.; Almeida, Ramiro D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, signaling through ubiquitin has been shown to be of great importance for normal brain development. Indeed, fluctuations in ubiquitin levels and spontaneous mutations in (de)ubiquitination enzymes greatly perturb synapse formation and neuronal transmission. In the brain, expression of lysine (K) 48-linked ubiquitin chains is higher at a developmental stage coincident with synaptogenesis. Nevertheless, no studies have so far delved into the involvement of this type of polyubiquitin chains in synapse formation. We have recently proposed a role for polyubiquitinated conjugates as triggering signals for presynaptic assembly. Herein, we aimed at characterizing the axonal distribution of K48 polyubiquitin and its dynamics throughout the course of presynaptic formation. To accomplish so, we used an ubiquitination-induced fluorescence complementation (UiFC) strategy for the visualization of K48 polyubiquitin in live hippocampal neurons. We first validated its use in neurons by analyzing changing levels of polyubiquitin. UiFC signal is diffusely distributed with distinct aggregates in somas, dendrites and axons, which perfectly colocalize with staining for a K48-specific antibody. Axonal UiFC aggregates are relatively stable and new aggregates are formed as an axon grows. Approximately 65% of UiFC aggregates colocalize with synaptic vesicle clusters and they preferentially appear in the axonal domains of axo-somatodendritic synapses when compared to isolated axons. We then evaluated axonal accumulation of K48 ubiquitinated signals in bead-induced synapses. We observed rapid accumulation of UiFC signal and endogenous K48 ubiquitin at the sites of newly formed presynapses. Lastly, we show by means of a microfluidic platform, for the isolation of axons, that presynaptic clustering on beads is dependent on E1-mediated ubiquitination at the axonal level. Altogether, these results indicate that enrichment of K48 polyubiquitin at the site of nascent presynaptic

  15. The relationship between complement factor C3, APOE ε4, amyloid and tau in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Luke W; Desikan, Rahul S; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is becoming increasingly recognized as an important contributor to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. As a part of the innate immune system, the complement cascade enhances the body's ability to destroy and remove pathogens and has recently been shown to influence Alzheimer's associated amyloid and tau pathology. However, little is known in humans about the effects of the complement system and genetic modifiers of AD risk like the ε4 allele of apolioprotein E (APOE ε4) on AD pathobiology. We evaluated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein levels from 267 individuals clinically diagnosed as cognitively normal, mild cognitive impairment, and AD. Using linear models, we assessed the relationship between APOE ε4 genotype, CSF Complement 3 (C3), CSF amyloid-β (amyloid) and CSF hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau). We found a significant interaction between APOE ε4 and CSF C3 on both CSF amyloid and CSF ptau. We also found that CSF C3 is only associated with CSF ptau after accounting for CSF amyloid. Our results support a conceptual model of the AD pathogenic cascade where a synergistic relationship between the complement cascade (C3) and APOE ε4 results in elevated Alzheimer's neurodegeneration and in turn, amyloid further regulates the effect of the complement cascade on downstream tau pathology. PMID:27357286

  16. Genetic variations in complement factors in patients with congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinping; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A; Shirotani-Ikejima, Hiroko; Eura, Yuka; Hirai, Hidenori; Honda, Shigenori; Kokame, Koichi; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri; von Krogh, Anne-Sophie; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Lämmle, Bernhard; Miyata, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The congenital form of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is caused by genetic mutations in ADAMTS13. Some, but not all, congenital TTP patients manifest renal insufficiency in addition to microangiopathic hemolysis and thrombocytopenia. We included 32 congenital TTP patients in the present study, which was designed to assess whether congenital TTP patients with renal insufficiency have predisposing mutations in complement regulatory genes, as found in many patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). In 13 patients with severe renal insufficiency, six candidate complement or complement regulatory genes were sequenced and 11 missense mutations were identified. One of these missense mutations, C3:p.K155Q mutation, is a rare mutation located in the macroglobulin-like 2 domain of C3, where other mutations predisposing for aHUS cluster. Several of the common missense mutations identified in our study have been reported to increase disease-risk for aHUS, but were not more common in patients with as compared to those without renal insufficiency. Taken together, our results show that the majority of the congenital TTP patients with renal insufficiency studied do not carry rare genetic mutations in complement or complement regulatory genes. PMID:26830967

  17. Discrimination between activators and nonactivators of the alternative pathway of complement: Regulation via a sialic acid/polyanion binding site on factor H

    SciTech Connect

    Meri, S.; Pangburn, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The alternative complement pathway is capable of discriminating human cells and tissues from a wide variety of potential pathogens. It has been recently demonstrated that attachment of complement component C3b to activator-derived molecules restricts inactivation of C3b by factors H and I in a manner similar to activator surfaces. It is now shown that restriction is reversed by certain soluble polyanions that mimic the effects of sialic acid and glycosaminoglycans on human cells and tissues. Fluid-phase polyanions enhanced binding of factor H to C3b attached to activating particles, indicating that the effect resulted from increased affinity between C3b and factor H. The enhancement was specific for activator-bound C3b since no enhancement was observed on nonactivating particles. While several polyanions could cause this effect, some polyanions could not, indicating specificity. The active polyanions also inhibited lysis of cells via the alternative pathway. The binding site for sialic acid appears to reside on factor H, since factor H bound to heparin-agarose and to sialic acid-bearing fetuinagarose, whereas C3b bound to neither under the same conditions. These observation suggest that occupation of a specific site on factor H by polyanions induces an increase in the C3b-H affinity, resulting in discrimination of host cells and tissues from alternative pathway-activating foreign cells.

  18. Nitrite Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Released by Antimicrobial Agents and Complement Induces Interleukin-8 Production in Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sar, Borann; Oishi, Kazunori; Wada, Akihiro; Hirayama, Toshiya; Matsushima, Kouji; Nagatake, Tsuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    We have recently reported that nitrite reductase, a bifunctional enzyme located in the periplasmic space of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, could induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) generation in a variety of respiratory cells, including bronchial epithelial cells (K. Oishi et al. Infect. Immun. 65:2648–2655, 1997). In this report, we examined the mode of nitrite reductase (PNR) release from a serum-sensitive strain of live P. aeruginosa cells during in vitro treatment with four different antimicrobial agents or human complement. Bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa by antimicrobial agents induced PNR release and mediated IL-8 production in human bronchial epithelial (BET-1A) cells. Among these agents, imipenem demonstrated rapid killing of P. aeruginosa as well as rapid release of PNR and resulted in the highest IL-8 production. Complement-mediated killing of P. aeruginosa was also associated with PNR release and enhanced IL-8 production. The immunoprecipitates of the aliquots of bacterial culture containing imipenem or complement with anti-PNR immunoglobulin G (IgG) induced a twofold-higher IL-8 production than did the immunoprecipitates of the aliquots of bacterial culture with a control IgG. These pieces of evidence confirmed that PNR released in the aliquots of bacterial culture was responsible for IL-8 production in the BET-1A cells. Furthermore, the culture supernatants of the BET-1A cells stimulated with aliquots of bacterial culture containing antimicrobial agents or complement similarly mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. These data support the possibility that a potent inducer of IL-8, PNR, could be released from P. aeruginosa after exposure to antimicrobial agents or complement and contributes to neutrophil migration in the airways during bronchopulmonary infections with P. aeruginosa. PMID:10103183

  19. Quiescent complement in nonhuman primates during E coli Shiga toxin-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin C; Mayer, Chad L; Leibowitz, Caitlin S; Stearns-Kurosawa, D J; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

    2013-08-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) produce ribosome-inactivating Shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2) responsible for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Some patients show complement activation during EHEC infection, raising the possibility of therapeutic targeting of complement for relief. Our juvenile nonhuman primate (Papio baboons) models of endotoxin-free Stx challenge exhibit full spectrum HUS, including thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and AKI with glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy. There were no significant increases in soluble terminal complement complex (C5b-9) levels after challenge with lethal Stx1 (n = 6) or Stx2 (n = 5) in plasma samples from T0 to euthanasia at 49.5 to 128 hours post-challenge. d-dimer and cell injury markers (HMGB1, histones) confirmed coagulopathy and cell injury. Thus, complement activation is not required for the development of thrombotic microangiopathy and HUS induced by EHEC Shiga toxins in these preclinical models, and benefits or risks of complement inhibition should be studied further for this infection. PMID:23733336

  20. Factor H–Related Protein 5 Interacts with Pentraxin 3 and the Extracellular Matrix and Modulates Complement Activation

    PubMed Central

    Csincsi, Ádám I.; Kopp, Anne; Zöldi, Miklós; Bánlaki, Zsófia; Uzonyi, Barbara; Hebecker, Mario; Caesar, Joseph J. E.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Daigo, Kenji; Hamakubo, Takao; Lea, Susan M.; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The physiological roles of the factor H (FH)-related proteins are controversial and poorly understood. Based on genetic studies, FH-related protein 5 (CFHR5) is implicated in glomerular diseases, such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, dense deposit disease, and CFHR5 nephropathy. CFHR5 was also identified in glomerular immune deposits at the protein level. For CFHR5, weak complement regulatory activity and competition for C3b binding with the plasma complement inhibitor FH have been reported, but its function remains elusive. In this study, we identify pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as a novel ligand of CFHR5. Binding of native CFHR5 to PTX3 was detected in human plasma and the interaction was characterized using recombinant proteins. The binding of PTX3 to CFHR5 is of ∼2-fold higher affinity compared with that of FH. CFHR5 dose-dependently inhibited FH binding to PTX3 and also to the monomeric, denatured form of the short pentraxin C–reactive protein. Binding of PTX3 to CFHR5 resulted in increased C1q binding. Additionally, CFHR5 bound to extracellular matrix in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and competed with FH for binding. Altogether, CFHR5 reduced FH binding and its cofactor activity on pentraxins and the extracellular matrix, while at the same time allowed for enhanced C1q binding. Furthermore, CFHR5 allowed formation of the alternative pathway C3 convertase and supported complement activation. Thus, CFHR5 may locally enhance complement activation via interference with the complement-inhibiting function of FH, by enhancement of C1q binding, and by activating complement, thereby contributing to glomerular disease. PMID:25855355

  1. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  2. Elevated IgG and decreased complement component C3 and factor B in B-thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, D; Yadav, M

    1981-07-01

    Serum immunoglobulins, complements C3 and C4 and factor B were assayed in the sera of children with B-thalassaemia major, siblings and matched controls in an attempt to resolve the controversy surrounding the conflicting results reported in the literature. Significantly elevated IgG and decreased C3 and factor B levels were observed in thalassaemic patients who also had a high incidence of HBS hepatitis and other infections. The controversial results probably reflect differences in the incidence of infection, and the presence of circulating immune complexes due to blood transfusions, in the various communities. The alterations in immunoglobulin and complement levels represent a secondary rather than a primary immune disorder. PMID:6914868

  3. Splenic RNA and MicroRNA Mimics Promote Complement Factor B Production and Alternative Pathway Activation via Innate Immune Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lin; Feng, Yan; Xu, Ganqiong; Jian, Wenling; Chao, Wei

    2016-03-15

    Complement factor B (cfB) is an essential component of the alternative pathway (AP) and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of polymicrobial sepsis. However, the mechanism leading to cfB production and AP activation during sepsis remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that plasma cell-free RNA was significantly increased following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), an animal model of polymicrobial sepsis, and was closely associated with sepsis severity. Quantitative RT-PCR and microRNA (miRNA) array analysis revealed an increase in bacterial RNA and multiple host miRNAs (miR-145, miR-146a, miR-122, miR-210) in the blood following CLP. Treatment with tissue RNA or synthetic miRNA mimics (miR-145, miR-146a, miR-122, miR-34a) induced a marked increase in cfB production in cardiomyocytes or macrophages. The newly synthesized cfB released into medium was biologically active because it participated in AP activation initiated by cobra venom factor. Genetic deletion of TLR7 or MyD88, but not TLR3, and inhibition of the MAPKs (JNK and p38) or NF-κB abolished miR-146a-induced cfB production. In vivo, CLP led to a significant increase in splenic cfB expression that correlated with the plasma RNA or miRNA levels. Peritoneal injection of RNA or miR-146a led to an increase in cfB expression in the peritoneal space that was attenuated in MyD88-knockout or TLR7-knockout mice, respectively. These findings demonstrate that host cellular RNA and specific miRNAs are released into the circulation during polymicrobial sepsis and may function as extracellular mediators capable of promoting cfB production and AP activation through specific TLR7 and MyD88 signaling. PMID:26889043

  4. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3−/−), complement factor B (fB−/−), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR−/−) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3−/− mice than in WT controls, whereas fB−/− mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3−/− sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB−/− sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus. PMID:26787717

  5. Tubulointerstitial injury induced in rats by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits function of a membrane inhibitor of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, A; Nishikawa, K; Yuzawa, Y; Okada, H; Okada, N; Morgan, B P; Piddlesden, S J; Nadai, M; Hasegawa, T; Matsuo, S

    1995-01-01

    The kidney widely expresses membrane-associated complement regulatory proteins (membrane inhibitors of complement). The aim of this work was to evaluate the roles of these molecules in rat kidneys in vivo. To suppress functions of rat membrane inhibitors of complement, two mAbs, 512 and 6D1, were used. 5I2 and 6D1 inhibit functions of membrane inhibitors of complement at C3 level (rat Crry/p65) and C8/9 level (rat CD59), respectively. F(ab')2 fragment of 5I2 or 6D1 was perfused in the left kidneys, and perfusate was discarded from the renal vein. After perfusion, the left kidneys were connected to systemic circulation. In rats perfused with 5I2, mouse IgG was found in glomeruli, peritubular capillaries, vascular bundles, and tubules 15 min after recirculation. Binding of C3 and C5b-9 was evident in these areas. 1 d after perfusion with 5I2, cast formation, dilatation of tubular lumen, and tubular cell degeneration were observed. At day 4 through day 7, significant mononuclear cell infiltration and proximal tubule damage were observed. These changes were completely prevented by complement depletion. Rats perfused with 6D1 showed the binding of mouse IgG in the similar areas as 5I2, but C3 or C5b-9 deposition was not observed. Rats perfused with 6D1 or vehicle only did not show any pathology in the left kidneys. These results suggest that rat Crry/p65 plays protective roles against spontaneously occurring indiscriminate attack to tubulointerstitial tissues by autologous complement and that rat Crry/p65 is one of the important factors to maintain normal integrity of the kidney in rats. Images PMID:7593622

  6. Levan-induced glomerulitis in rabbits: a possible role for direct complement activation in situ.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, H.; Alkalay, A.; Ben-Bassat, M.; Hazaz, B.; Joshua, H.

    1985-01-01

    Since high-molecular-weight levan is known to reduce capillary permeability to large molecules, an experiment was designed to investigate whether this agent may attenuate the glomerulonephritis associated with acute serum sickness in rabbits. The study, in fact, demonstrated an enhancing effect of levan, which caused increased glomerular proliferative changes and leucocyte infiltration and, possibly, increased IgG deposition in this experimental model. In addition, rabbits injected only with levan also demonstrated mild glomerulitis and C3 deposition. In one of four rabbits examined, this was accompanied by a marked fall in the serum level of total haemolysing complement. Levan was demonstrated to cause activation of complement when incubated with normal rabbit serum in vitro. We believe that these findings are best explained on the basis of complement activation in situ by levan in the glomeruli, probably via the alternative pathway, with the resulting inflammatory response. In the case of BSA-injected rabbits, this response is believed to be additive to that of the classical immune complex-mediated complement activation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3986130

  7. CspA-Mediated Binding of Human Factor H Inhibits Complement Deposition and Confers Serum Resistance in Borrelia burgdorferi▿

    PubMed Central

    Kenedy, Melisha R.; Vuppala, Santosh R.; Siegel, Corinna; Kraiczy, Peter; Akins, Darrin R.

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi has developed efficient mechanisms for evading the innate immune response during mammalian infection and has been shown to be resistant to the complement-mediated bactericidal activity of human serum. It is well recognized that B. burgdorferi expresses multiple lipoproteins on its surface that bind the human complement inhibitors factor H and factor H-like protein 1 (FH/FHL-1). The binding of FH/FHL-1 on the surface of B. burgdorferi is thought to enhance its ability to evade serum-mediated killing during the acute phase of infection. One of the key B. burgdorferi FH/FHL-1 binding proteins identified thus far was designated CspA. While it is known that CspA binds FH/FHL-1, it is unclear how the interaction between CspA and FH/FHL-1 specifically enhances serum resistance. To better understand how CspA mediates serum resistance in B. burgdorferi, we inactivated cspA in a virulent strain of B. burgdorferi. An affinity ligand blot immunoassay and indirect immunofluorescence revealed that the CspA mutant does not efficiently bind human FH to its surface. Consistent with the lack of FH binding, the CspA mutant was also highly sensitive to killing by human serum. Additionally, the deposition of complement components C3, C6, and C5b-9 was enhanced on the surface of the CspA mutant compared to that of the wild-type strain. The combined data lead us to conclude that the CspA-mediated binding of human FH confers serum resistance by directly inhibiting complement deposition on the surface of B. burgdorferi. PMID:19451251

  8. Comparative Analysis of Novel Complement-Targeted Inhibitors, MiniFH, and the Natural Regulators Factor H and Factor H-like Protein 1 Reveal Functional Determinants of Complement Regulation.

    PubMed

    Harder, Markus J; Anliker, Markus; Höchsmann, Britta; Simmet, Thomas; Huber-Lang, Markus; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Barlow, Paul N; Schmidt, Christoph Q

    2016-01-15

    The serum proteins factor H (FH), consisting of 20 complement control protein modules (CCPs), and its splice product FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1; consisting of CCPs 1-7) are major regulators of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement activation. The engineered version of FH, miniFH, contains only the N- and C-terminal portions of FH linked by an optimized peptide and shows ∼ 10-fold higher ex vivo potency. We explored the hypothesis that regulatory potency is enhanced by unmasking of a ligand-binding site in the C-terminal CCPs 19-20 that is cryptic in full-length native FH. Therefore, we produced an FH variant lacking the central domains 10-15 (FHΔ10-15). To explore how avidity affects regulatory strength, we generated a duplicated version of miniFH, termed midiFH. We compared activities of FHΔ10-15 and midiFH to miniFH, FH, and FHL-1. Relative to FH, FHΔ10-15 exhibited an altered binding profile toward C3 activation products and a 5-fold-enhanced complement regulation on a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patient's erythrocytes. Contrary to dogma, FHL-1 and FH exhibited equal regulatory activity, suggesting that the role of FHL-1 in AP regulation has been underestimated. Unexpectedly, a substantially increased avidity for complement opsonins, as seen in midiFH, did not potentiate the inhibitory potential on host cells. In conclusion, comparisons of engineered and native FH-based regulators have identified features that determine high AP regulatory activity on host cells. Unrestricted availability of FH CCPs 19-20 and an optimal spatial orientation between the N- and C-terminal FH regions are key. PMID:26643478

  9. ATYPICAL HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME AND GENETIC ABERRATIONS IN THE COMPLEMENT FACTOR H RELATED 5 GENE

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Dineke; Vernon, Katherine A.; Volokhina, Elena B.; Pickering, Matthew C.; van de Kar, Nicole C.A.J.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.

    2012-01-01

    Atypical HUS (aHUS) is a severe renal disorder that is associated with mutations in the genes encoding proteins of the complement alternative pathway. Previously, we identified pathogenic variations in genes encoding complement regulators (CFH, CFI, and MCP) in our aHUS cohort. In this study, we screened for mutations in the alternative pathway regulator CFHR5 in 65 aHUS patients by means of PCR on genomic DNA and sequence analysis. Potential pathogenicity of genetic alterations was determined by published data on CFHR5 variants, evolutionary conservation, and in silico mutation prediction programs. Detection of serum CFHR5 was performed by western blot analysis and ELISA. A potentially pathogenic sequence variation was found in CFHR5 in three patients (4.6%). All variations were located in SCRs that might be involved in binding to C3b, heparin, or CRP. The identified CFHR5 mutations require functional studies to determine their relevance to aHUS, but they might be candidates for an altered genetic profile predisposing to the disease. PMID:22622361

  10. Binding of human factor H to outer membrane protein P5 of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae contributes to complement resistance

    PubMed Central

    Langereis, Jeroen D.; de Jonge, Marien I.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic pathogen of the human upper respiratory tract and is often found to cause inflammatory diseases that include sinusitis, otitis media and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To persist in the inflammatory milieu during infection, non-typeable H. influenzae must resist the antimicrobial activity of the human complement system. Here, we used Tn-seq to identify genes important for resistance to complement-mediated killing. This screen identified outer membrane protein P5 in evasion of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Outer membrane protein P5 was shown to bind human complement regulatory protein factor H directly, thereby, preventing complement factor C3 deposition on the surface of the bacterium. Furthermore, we show that amino acid variation within surface-exposed regions within outer membrane P5 affected the level of factor H binding between individual strains. PMID:25091181

  11. Elevated serum complement factors 3 and 4 are strong inflammatory markers of the metabolic syndrome development: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenfang; Tang, Qin; Wen, Jing; Tang, Yan; Huang, DaMin; Huang, Yuzhen; Xie, Jinling; Luo, Yawen; Liang, Min; Wu, Chunlei; Lu, Zheng; Tan, Aihua; Gao, Yong; Wang, Qiuyan; Jiang, Yonghua; Yao, Ziting; Lin, Xinggu; Zhang, Haiying; Mo, Zengnan; Yang, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    An epidemiological design, consisting of cross-sectional (n = 2376) and cohort (n = 976) studies, was adopted to investigate the association between complement factors 3 (C3) and 4, and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) development. In the cross-sectional study, the C3 and C4 concentrations in the MetS group were higher than those in the non-MetS group (all P < 0.001), and the levels of immune globulin M (IgM), IgA, IgE, and IgG exhibited no significant differences between MetS and non-MetS (all P > 0.050). After multi-factor adjustment, the odds ratios (ORs) in the highest quartile of C3 and C4 concentrations were 7.047 (4.664, 10.648) and 1.961 (1.349, 2.849), respectively, both Ptrend < 0.050. After a 4 years follow-up, total 166 subjects were diagnosed with MetS, and the complement baseline levels from 2009 were used to predict the MetS risk in 2013. In the adjusted model, the relative risks (RRs) in the highest quartile of C3 and C4 levels were 4.779 (2.854, 8.003) and 2.590 (1.567, 4.280), respectively, both Ptrend < 0.001. Activation of complement factors may be an important part of inflammatory processes, and our results indicated that the elevated C3 and C4 levels were independent risk factors for MetS development. PMID:26726922

  12. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins. PMID:26517887

  13. Sustained Systemic Glucocerebrosidase Inhibition Induces Brain α-Synuclein Aggregation, Microglia and Complement C1q Activation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Emily M.; Smith, Gaynor A.; Park, Eric; Cao, Hongmei; Graham, Anne-Renee; Brown, Eilish; McLean, Jesse R.; Hayes, Melissa A.; Beagan, Jonathan; Izen, Sarah C.; Perez-Torres, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Loss-of-function mutations in GBA1, which cause the autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, Gaucher disease (GD), are also a key genetic risk factor for the α-synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies. GBA1 encodes for the lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase and reductions in this enzyme result in the accumulation of the glycolipid substrates glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine. Deficits in autophagy and lysosomal degradation pathways likely contribute to the pathological accumulation of α-synuclein in PD. In this report we used conduritol-β-epoxide (CBE), a potent selective irreversible competitive inhibitor of glucocerebrosidase, to model reduced glucocerebrosidase activity in vivo, and tested whether sustained glucocerebrosidase inhibition in mice could induce neuropathological abnormalities including α-synucleinopathy, and neurodegeneration. Results: Our data demonstrate that daily systemic CBE treatment over 28 days caused accumulation of insoluble α-synuclein aggregates in the substantia nigra, and altered levels of proteins involved in the autophagy lysosomal system. These neuropathological changes were paralleled by widespread neuroinflammation, upregulation of complement C1q, abnormalities in synaptic, axonal transport and cytoskeletal proteins, and neurodegeneration. Innovation: A reduction in brain GCase activity has been linked to sporadic PD and normal aging, and may contribute to the susceptibility of vulnerable neurons to degeneration. This report demonstrates that systemic reduction of GCase activity using chemical inhibition, leads to neuropathological changes in the brain reminiscent of α-synucleinopathy. Conclusions: These data reveal a link between reduced glucocerebrosidase and the development of α-synucleinopathy and pathophysiological abnormalities in mice, and support the development of GCase therapeutics to reduce α-synucleinopathy in PD and related disorders

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides and Complement in Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Induced Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a clinical condition in the neonate, resulting from oxygen deprivation around the time of birth. HIE affects 1–5/1000 live births worldwide and is associated with the development of neurological deficits, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. Even though the brain is considered as an immune-privileged site, it has innate and adaptive immune response and can produce complement (C) components and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Dysregulation of cerebral expression of AMPs and C can exacerbate or ameliorate the inflammatory response within the brain. Brain ischemia triggers a prolonged inflammatory response affecting the progression of injury and secondary energy failure and involves both innate and adaptive immune systems, including immune-competent and non-competent cells. Following injury to the central nervous system (CNS), including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI), resident microglia, and astroglia are the main cells providing immune defense to the brain in a stimulus-dependent manner. They can express and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and therefore trigger prolonged inflammation, resulting in neurodegeneration. Microglial cells express and release a wide range of inflammation-associated molecules including several components of the complement system. Complement activation following neonatal HI injury has been reported to contribute to neurodegeneration. Astrocytes can significantly affect the immune response of the CNS under pathological conditions through production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory AMPs. Astrocytes express β-defensins, which can chemoattract and promote maturation of dendritic cells (DC), and can also limit inflammation by controlling the viability of these same DC. This review will focus on the balance of complement components and AMPs within the CNS following neonatal HI injury and the effect of that balance on the subsequent brain damage

  15. Targeted organ generation using Mixl1-inducible mouse pluripotent stem cells in blastocyst complementation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-15

    Generation of functional organs from patients' own cells is one of the ultimate goals of regenerative medicine. As a novel approach to creation of organs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), we employed blastocyst complementation in organogenesis-disabled animals and successfully generated PSC-derived pancreas and kidneys. Blastocyst complementation, which exploits the capacity of PSCs to participate in forming chimeras, does not, however, exclude contribution of PSCs to the development of tissues-including neural cells or germ cells-other than those specifically targeted by disabling of organogenesis. This fact provokes ethical controversy if human PSCs are to be used. In this study, we demonstrated that forced expression of Mix-like protein 1 (encoded by Mixl1) can be used to guide contribution of mouse embryonic stem cells to endodermal organs after blastocyst injection. We then succeeded in applying this method to generate functional pancreas in pancreatogenesis-disabled Pdx1 knockout mice using a newly developed tetraploid-based organ-complementation method. These findings hold promise for targeted organ generation from patients' own PSCs in livestock animals. PMID:25192056

  16. Drugs that inhibit complement.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Höchsmann, Britta

    2012-02-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune system. Complement plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of many disorders. Despite the pivotal role of the complement system, an approved targeted inhibitor of a complement factor became available only recently. Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits complement factor C5. It is a targeted, disease modifying, treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). It was approved be the US FDA and the European Commission in 2007. In this review we will update the experience with eculizumab in PNH and discuss potential use of eculizumab in other disorders (e.g. cold agglutinin disease; atypical HUS) and new approaches to complement inhibition with drugs other than eculizumab. PMID:22169380

  17. The Structure of the Cell-Wall Protease from Streptococci that Inactivates the Human Complement Factor 5A

    SciTech Connect

    Brown,C.; Gu, Z.; Matsuka, Y.; Olmsted, S.; Cleary, P.; Ohlendorf, D.; Earhart, C.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a 949-residue fragment of complement factor 5a peptidase (SCP) was determined to 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The molecule is made of five distinct domains in an elongated head-stalk structure. The structure suggests that activity of SCP can be modulated through binding of integrins to 2 RGD sequences. This structure is the first of an enzyme that is covalently attached to the cell wall of a Gram-positive bacteria. SCP is also the first functional protease containing a protease-associated domain to have its structure elucidated.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein SdrE Binds Complement Regulator Factor H as an Immune Evasion Tactic

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Echague, Charlene G.; Hair, Pamela S.; Ward, Michael D.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Foster, Timothy J.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2012-01-01

    Similar to other highly successful invasive bacterial pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus recruits the complement regulatory protein factor H (fH) to its surface to inhibit the alternative pathway of complement. Here, we report the identification of the surface-associated protein SdrE as a fH-binding protein using purified fH overlay of S. aureus fractionated cell wall proteins and fH cross-linking to S. aureus followed by mass spectrometry. Studies using recombinant SdrE revealed that rSdrE bound significant fH whether from serum or as a purified form, in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rSdrE-bound fH exhibited cofactor functionality for factor I (fI)-mediated cleavage of C3b to iC3b which correlated positively with increasing amounts of fH. Expression of SdrE on the surface of the surrogate bacterium Lactococcus lactis enhanced recruitment of fH which resulted in increased iC3b generation. Moreover, surface expression of SdrE led to a reduction in C3-fragment deposition, less C5a generation, and reduced killing by polymorphonuclear cells. Thus, we report the first identification of a S. aureus protein associated with the staphylococcal surface that binds factor H as an immune evasion mechanism. PMID:22675461

  19. Interleukin-22 Regulates the Complement System to Promote Resistance against Pathobionts after Pathogen-Induced Intestinal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Yada, Shoko; Zhen Liu, Meng; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Do, Nhu; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    Pathobionts play a critical role in disease development, but the immune mechanisms against pathobionts remain poorly understood. In this study we have reported a critical role for interleukin-22 (IL-22) in systemic protection against bacterial pathobionts that translocate into the circulation after infection with the pathogen Clostridium difficile. Infection with C. difficile induced IL-22, and infected Il22−/− mice harbored high numbers of pathobionts in extraintestinal organs despite comparable pathogen load and intestinal damage in mutant and wild-type mice. Pathobionts exhibited increased resistant against complement-mediated phagocytosis, and their intravenous administration resulted in high animal mortality. Selective removal of translocated commensals rescued Il22−/− mice and IL-22 administration enhanced the elimination of pathobionts. Mechanistically, IL-22 augmented bacterial phagocytosis by increasing the expression and bacterial binding of complement C3. Our study demonstrates an unexpected role for IL-22 in controlling the elimination of pathobionts that enter the systemic circulation through the regulation of the complement system. PMID:25367575

  20. TNT003, an inhibitor of the serine protease C1s, prevents complement activation induced by cold agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ju; Rose, Eileen L; Singh, Andrew; Hussain, Sami; Stagliano, Nancy E; Parry, Graham C; Panicker, Sandip

    2014-06-26

    Activation of the classical pathway (CP) of complement is often associated with autoimmune disorders in which disease pathology is linked to the presence of an autoantibody. One such disorder is cold agglutinin disease (CAD), an autoimmune hemolytic anemia in which autoantibodies (cold agglutinins) bind to red blood cells (RBCs) at low temperatures. Anemia occurs as a result of autoantibody-mediated CP activation on the surface of the erythrocyte, leading to the deposition of complement opsonins that drive extravascular hemolysis in the liver. Here we test the effects of TNT003, a mouse monoclonal antibody targeting the CP-specific serine protease C1s, on CP activity induced by cold agglutinins on human RBCs. We collected 40 individual CAD patient samples and showed that TNT003 prevented cold agglutinin-mediated deposition of complement opsonins that promote phagocytosis of RBCs. Furthermore, we show that by preventing CP activation, TNT003 also prevents cold agglutinin-driven generation of anaphylatoxins. Finally, we provide evidence that CP activity in CAD patients terminates prior to activation of the terminal cascade, supporting the hypothesis that the primary route of RBC destruction in these patients occurs via extravascular hemolysis. Our results support the development of a CP inhibitor for the treatment of CAD. PMID:24695853

  1. Complement Factor H-Related Protein 3 Serum Levels Are Low Compared to Factor H and Mainly Determined by Gene Copy Number Variation in CFHR3

    PubMed Central

    Pouw, Richard B.; Brouwer, Mieke C.; Geissler, Judy; van Herpen, Laurens V.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Wuillemin, Walter A.; Wouters, Diana; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2016-01-01

    The major human complement regulator in blood, complement factor H (FH), has several closely related proteins, called FH-related (FHR) proteins. As all FHRs lack relevant complement regulatory activity, their physiological role is not well understood. FHR protein 3 (FHR-3) has been suggested to compete with FH for binding to Neisseria meningitidis, thereby affecting complement-mediated clearance. Clearly, the in vivo outcome of such competition greatly depends on the FH and FHR-3 concentrations. While FH levels have been established, accurate FHR-3 levels were never unequivocally reported to date. Moreover, CFHR3 gene copy numbers commonly vary, which may impact the FHR-3 concentration. Hence, we generated five anti-FHR-3 mAbs to specifically measure FHR-3 in human healthy donors of which we determined the gene copy number variation at the CFH/CFHR locus. Finally, we examined the acute-phase response characteristics of FHR-3 in a small sepsis cohort. We determined FHR-3 levels to have a mean of 19 nM and that under normal conditions the copy number of CFHR3 correlates to a very large extent with the FHR-3 serum levels. On average, FHR-3 was 132-fold lower compared to the FH concentration in the same serum samples and FHR-3 did not behave as a major acute phase response protein. PMID:27007437

  2. Complement Factor H-Related Protein 3 Serum Levels Are Low Compared to Factor H and Mainly Determined by Gene Copy Number Variation in CFHR3.

    PubMed

    Pouw, Richard B; Brouwer, Mieke C; Geissler, Judy; van Herpen, Laurens V; Zeerleder, Sacha S; Wuillemin, Walter A; Wouters, Diana; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-01-01

    The major human complement regulator in blood, complement factor H (FH), has several closely related proteins, called FH-related (FHR) proteins. As all FHRs lack relevant complement regulatory activity, their physiological role is not well understood. FHR protein 3 (FHR-3) has been suggested to compete with FH for binding to Neisseria meningitidis, thereby affecting complement-mediated clearance. Clearly, the in vivo outcome of such competition greatly depends on the FH and FHR-3 concentrations. While FH levels have been established, accurate FHR-3 levels were never unequivocally reported to date. Moreover, CFHR3 gene copy numbers commonly vary, which may impact the FHR-3 concentration. Hence, we generated five anti-FHR-3 mAbs to specifically measure FHR-3 in human healthy donors of which we determined the gene copy number variation at the CFH/CFHR locus. Finally, we examined the acute-phase response characteristics of FHR-3 in a small sepsis cohort. We determined FHR-3 levels to have a mean of 19 nM and that under normal conditions the copy number of CFHR3 correlates to a very large extent with the FHR-3 serum levels. On average, FHR-3 was 132-fold lower compared to the FH concentration in the same serum samples and FHR-3 did not behave as a major acute phase response protein. PMID:27007437

  3. Recurrent infections in partial complement factor I deficiency: evaluation of three generations of a Brazilian family

    PubMed Central

    Grumach, A S; Leitão, M F; Arruk, V G; Kirschfink, M; Condino-Neto, A

    2006-01-01

    We report here on the evaluation of a factor I-deficient Brazilian family (three generations, 39 members) with strong consanguinity. The complete factor I-deficient patients (n = 3) presented recurrent respiratory infections, skin infections and meningitis; one of them died after sepsis. They presented an impaired total haemolytic activity (CH50), low C3, low factor H and undetectable C3dg/C3d. Partial factor I deficiency was detected in 16 family members (normal low cut-off value was 25 µg/ml). Respiratory infections were the most common clinical occurrence among partial factor I-deficient relatives. Two of them were submitted to nephrectomy following recurrent urinary tract infections. An additional two heterozygous relatives presented with arthritis and rheumatic fever. Apparently, patients with partial factor I deficiency are also at higher risk for recurrent infections. Vaccination against capsulated bacteria and the eventual use of prophylactic antibiotics should be considered individually in this patient group. PMID:16412054

  4. Complement Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... helpful? Also known as: C1; C1q; C2; C3; C4; CH50; CH100 (among others) Formal name: Complement Activity; ... whether the system is functioning normally. C3 and C4 are the most frequently measured complement proteins. Total ...

  5. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC's regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9(-/-)) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9(-/-). We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9(-/-), which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9(-/-). Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  6. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  7. Tissue expression of human complement inhibitor, decay-accelerating factor, in transgenic pigs. A potential approach for preventing xenograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Cary, N R; Langford, G A; Tucker, A W; Wallwork, J; White, D J

    1995-05-15

    Since complement-mediated hyperacute rejection of xenografts prevents the use of pigs as organ donors to man, the development of transgenic animals expressing species-specific complement inhibitors could provide a strategy for overcoming hyperacute rejection. The complement inhibitor, human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF), prevents the assembly of C3 and C5 convertases. In this article, the first histologic analysis of hDAF expression in pig tissues, specifically expression in endothelial cells of pigs transgenic for hDAF, is described. Twenty-seven transgenic pigs were categorized into 4 groups based on the expression patterns in endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, and squamous epithelial cells of skin biopsy specimens. Skin biopsy specimens permitted evaluation of the pigs without the need to kill them or to perform invasive procedures. Sixteen cases demonstrated endothelial cell staining. Complete necropsy evaluation, available in 14 of the 27 pigs, correlated with the skin biopsy specimen expression of hDAF. The immunoperoxidase data matched identically with the presence of the mRNA transcript in 25 of the 26 cases where RNA data were available. Also, the staining patterns of 6 transgenic pig founders and their 9 offspring (total of 9 founder-offspring pairs) correlated. Since transgenes are variably expressed in different cell types and since tissue lysates represent a melange of cell types, histologic evaluation for protein expression in tissues from transgenic animals will be critical if they are to be bred to become clinical organ donors. In addition to endothelial expression of hDAF, its expression on vascular smooth muscle cells may be important in preventing tissue damage when breaks in the endothelium occur. PMID:7539168

  8. The Complement Inhibitor Factor H Generates an Anti-Inflammatory and Tolerogenic State in Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivar, Rut; Luque, Ana; Cárdenas-Brito, Sonia; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Blom, Anna M; Borràs, Francesc E; Rodriguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Zipfel, Peter F; Aran, Josep M

    2016-05-15

    The activation of the complement system is a key initiating step in the protective innate immune-inflammatory response against injury, although it may also cause harm if left unchecked. The structurally related soluble complement inhibitors C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and factor H (FH) exert a tight regulation of the classical/lectin and alternative pathways of complement activation, respectively, attenuating the activity of the C3/C5 convertases and, consequently, avoiding serious damage to host tissues. We recently reported that the acute-phase C4BP isoform C4BP lacking the β-chain plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the adaptive immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that FH acts in the early stages of monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and is able to promote a distinctive tolerogenic and anti-inflammatory profile on monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) challenged by a proinflammatory stimulus. Accordingly, FH-treated and LPS-matured MoDCs are characterized by altered cytoarchitecture, resembling immature MoDCs, lower expression of the maturation marker CD83 and the costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86, decreased production of key proinflammatory Th1-cytokines (IL-12, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-8), and preferential production of immunomodulatory mediators (IL-10 and TGF-β). Moreover, FH-treated MoDCs show low Ag uptake and, when challenged with LPS, display reduced CCR7 expression and chemotactic migration, impaired CD4(+) T cell alloproliferation, inhibition of IFN-γ secretion by the allostimulated T cells, and, conversely, induction of CD4(+)CD127(low/negative)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. Thus, this novel noncanonical role of FH as an immunological brake able to directly affect the function of MoDCs in an inflammatory environment may exhibit therapeutic potential in hypersensitivity, transplantation, and autoimmunity. PMID:27076676

  9. Solution Structure of CCP Modules 10–12 Illuminates Functional Architecture of the Complement Regulator, Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Makou, Elisavet; Mertens, Haydyn D.T.; Maciejewski, Mateusz; Soares, Dinesh C.; Matis, Ilias; Schmidt, Christoph Q.; Herbert, Andrew P.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Barlow, Paul N.

    2012-01-01

    The 155-kDa plasma glycoprotein factor H (FH), which consists of 20 complement control protein (CCP) modules, protects self-tissue but not foreign organisms from damage by the complement cascade. Protection is achieved by selective engagement of FH, via CCPs 1–4, CCPs 6–8 and CCPs 19–20, with polyanion-rich host surfaces that bear covalently attached, activation-specific, fragments of complement component C3. The role of intervening CCPs 9–18 in this process is obscured by lack of structural knowledge. We have concatenated new high-resolution solution structures of overlapping recombinant CCP pairs, 10–11 and 11–12, to form a three-dimensional structure of CCPs 10–12 and validated it by small-angle X-ray scattering of the recombinant triple‐module fragment. Superimposing CCP 12 of this 10–12 structure with CCP 12 from the previously solved CCP 12–13 structure yielded an S-shaped structure for CCPs 10–13 in which modules are tilted by 80–110° with respect to immediate neighbors, but the bend between CCPs 10 and 11 is counter to the arc traced by CCPs 11–13. Including this four-CCP structure in interpretation of scattering data for the longer recombinant segments, CCPs 10–15 and 8–15, implied flexible attachment of CCPs 8 and 9 to CCP 10 but compact and intimate arrangements of CCP 14 with CCPs 12, 13 and 15. Taken together with difficulties in recombinant production of module pairs 13–14 and 14–15, the aberrant structure of CCP 13 and the variability of 13–14 linker sequences among orthologues, a structural dependency of CCP 14 on its neighbors is suggested; this has implications for the FH mechanism. PMID:23017427

  10. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay.

    PubMed

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop-loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop-loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  11. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay

    PubMed Central

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop–loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro. The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop–loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  12. The C-terminal tail of polycystin-1 regulates complement factor B expression by signal transducer and activator of transcription 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Chen, Meihan; Jing, Ying; Gu, Junhui; Mei, Shuqin; Yao, Qing; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Ming; Sun, Lijun; Wang, Wutao; Hu, Huimin; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Mei, Changlin

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of the overactivated alternative complement pathway in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) retards disease progression in animal models; however, it remains unknown how complement factor B (CFB) is upregulated in ADPKD. Here, we showed that the overexpression of CFB in cystic kidneys is associated with increased JAK2/STAT1 activity and enhanced expression of the polycystin-1 C-terminal tail (PC1-CTT). Overexpression or blockage of STAT1 increased or decreased CFB expression and CFB promoter activity. Moreover, overexpression of PC1-CTT induced JAK2/STAT1 activation and CFB upregulation in renal tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, PC1-CTT overexpression increased human CFB promoter activity, whereas dominant negative STAT1 plasmids or mutation of putative STAT1 responsive elements decreased PC1-CTT-induced CFB promoter activity. The effect of CFB on macrophage differentiation was tested on a mouse macrophage cell line. Bioactive CFB dose dependently promoted macrophage M2 phenotype conversion. In addition, conditioned media from renal epithelial cells promoted macrophage M2 phenotype conversion which was blocked by STAT1 inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Conditioned media from PC1-CTT-transfected renal epithelial cells further promoted macrophage M2 phenotype conversion, which was suppressed by fludarabine or a CFB antibody. In addition, we show that NF-κB acts downstream of PC1-CTT and may partly mediate PC1-CTT-induced CFB expression. In conclusion, our study reveals possible mechanisms of CFB upregulation in ADPKD and a novel role of PC1-CTT in ADPKD-associated inflammation. Furthermore, our study suggests that targeting STAT1 may be a new strategy to prevent inflammation in the kidney of patients with ADPKD. PMID:26984954

  13. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32), whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32) complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), angiotensin II (Ang II), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)). Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors. PMID:27043537

  14. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32), whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32) complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), angiotensin II (Ang II), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)). Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors. PMID:27043537

  15. Successful liver-kidney transplantation in two children with aHUS caused by a mutation in complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, H; Peltonen, S; Koskinen, A; Puntila, J; Isoniemi, H; Holmberg, C; Pinomäki, A; Armstrong, E; Koivusalo, A; Tukiainen, E; Mäkisalo, H; Saland, J; Remuzzi, G; de Cordoba, S; Lassila, R; Meri, S; Jokiranta, T S

    2008-01-01

    A 12-month-old boy and his 16-year-old aunt became acutely ill 6 months apart and were diagnosed to have atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Genetic analysis revealed heterozygous R1215Q mutation in complement factor H (CFH) in both patients. The same mutation was found in five healthy adult relatives indicating incomplete penetrance of the disease. The patients developed terminal renal failure and experienced reversible neurological symptoms in spite of plasma exchange (PE) therapy. In both cases, liver-kidney transplantation was successfully performed 6 months after the onset of the disease. To minimize complement activation and prevent thrombotic microangiopathy or overt thrombotic events due to the malfunctioning CFH, extensive PE with fresh frozen plasma was performed pre- and perioperatively and anticoagulation was started a few hours after the operation. No circulatory complications appeared and all four grafts started to function immediately. Also, no recurrence or other major clinical setbacks have appeared during the postoperative follow-up (15 and 9 months) and the grafts show excellent function. While more experience is needed, it seems that liver-kidney transplantation combined with pre- and perioperative PE is a rational option in the management of patients with aHUS caused by CFH mutation. PMID:17973958

  16. Heterogeneity in rhesus macaque complement factor H binding to meningococcal factor H binding protein (FHbp) informs selection of primates to assess immunogenicity of FHbp-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Beernink, Peter T; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Stefek, Heather; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2014-11-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes disease only in humans. An important mechanism underlying this host specificity is the ability of the organism to resist complement by recruiting the complement downregulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface. In previous studies, binding of FH to one of the major meningococcal FH ligands, factor H binding protein (FHbp), was reported to be specific for human FH. Here we report that sera from 23 of 73 rhesus macaques (32%) tested had high FH binding to FHbp. Similar to human FH, binding of macaque FH to the meningococcal cell surface inhibited the complement alternative pathway by decreasing deposition of C3b. FH contains 20 domains (or short consensus repeats), with domains 6 and 7 being responsible for binding of human FH to FHbp. DNA sequence analyses of FH domains 6 and 7 from macaques with high or low FH binding showed a polymorphism at residue 352 in domain 6, with Tyr being associated with high binding and His with low binding. A recombinant macaque FH 6,7/Fc fragment with Tyr352 showed higher binding to FHbp than the corresponding fragment with His352. In previous studies in human FH transgenic mice, binding of FH to FHbp vaccines decreased protective antibody responses, and mutant FHbp vaccines with decreased FH binding elicited serum antibodies with greater protective activity. Thus, macaques with high FH binding to FHbp represent an attractive nonhuman primate model to investigate further the effects of FH binding on the immunogenicity of FHbp vaccines. PMID:25185576

  17. Heterogeneity in Rhesus Macaque Complement Factor H Binding to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein (FHbp) Informs Selection of Primates To Assess Immunogenicity of FHbp-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Beernink, Peter T.; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Stefek, Heather; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes disease only in humans. An important mechanism underlying this host specificity is the ability of the organism to resist complement by recruiting the complement downregulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface. In previous studies, binding of FH to one of the major meningococcal FH ligands, factor H binding protein (FHbp), was reported to be specific for human FH. Here we report that sera from 23 of 73 rhesus macaques (32%) tested had high FH binding to FHbp. Similar to human FH, binding of macaque FH to the meningococcal cell surface inhibited the complement alternative pathway by decreasing deposition of C3b. FH contains 20 domains (or short consensus repeats), with domains 6 and 7 being responsible for binding of human FH to FHbp. DNA sequence analyses of FH domains 6 and 7 from macaques with high or low FH binding showed a polymorphism at residue 352 in domain 6, with Tyr being associated with high binding and His with low binding. A recombinant macaque FH 6,7/Fc fragment with Tyr352 showed higher binding to FHbp than the corresponding fragment with His352. In previous studies in human FH transgenic mice, binding of FH to FHbp vaccines decreased protective antibody responses, and mutant FHbp vaccines with decreased FH binding elicited serum antibodies with greater protective activity. Thus, macaques with high FH binding to FHbp represent an attractive nonhuman primate model to investigate further the effects of FH binding on the immunogenicity of FHbp vaccines. PMID:25185576

  18. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction. PMID:11414360

  19. Prostacyclin biosynthesis and reduced 5-HT uptake after complement-induced endothelial injury in the dog isolated lung.

    PubMed Central

    Bult, H.; Heiremans, J. J.; Herman, A. G.; Malcorps, C. M.; Peeters, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    1. Pulmonary prostacyclin (PGI2) biosynthesis was evaluated in relation to endothelial integrity before and after complement activation in isolated plasma-perfused lung lobes of the dog. 2. The plasma was activated with zymosan (ZAP, n = 4), yeast cells (YAP, n = 4) or yeast with 3 microM indomethacin (Indo + YAP, n = 3). Immunoreactive 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (i-6-oxo-PGF1 alpha) and thromboxane B2 (iTXB2) were measured to monitor PGI2 and TXA2 biosynthesis. 3. The kinetic parameters Km and Vmax of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake were calculated on the basis of multiple indicator diffusion data to evaluate endothelial integrity. 4. YAP and ZAP induced a biphasic increase of the arterial perfusion pressure. The immediate pressure peak was partly mediated by TXA2 and the TXB2 was subsequently cleared by the lung. 5. The apparent Vmax of 5-HT uptake remained constant throughout the experiment. Thus, complement activation did not affect the number of endothelial 5-HT carrier sites available to the perfusate. 6. The apparent Km of 5-HT uptake was enhanced in 9 lungs exposed to activated plasma complement for 20 min. This decreased affinity for 5-HT probably reflects endothelial injury. It was transient as the apparent Km had returned to the baseline value after 60 min. 7. PGI2 clearance and biosynthesis were virtually absent in the control period. PGI2 formation increased drastically after infusion of ZAP or YAP and was proportional to the endothelial injury expressed as elevated Km or pulmonary oedema. Thus, PGI2 biosynthesis might be a marker of severe endothelial distress. PMID:3291998

  20. Complement factor H polymorphism rs1061170 and the effect of cigarette smoking on the risk of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ezzeldin, Nada; Darwish, Amira; El-Bastawissy, Ahmed; Shalaby, Alaa Eldin

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study Complement factor H (CFH) has been known to inhibit the complement pathway and to contribute to tumour growth by suppressing the anti-tumour cell mediated response in cell lines from several malignancies. We examined the association of Try402His single nucleotide polymorphism in CFH gene with lung cancer and the interaction with cigarette smoking. Material and methods This case-control study included 80 primary lung cancer patients and 106 control subjects who were genotyped for Try402His (rs1061170) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Results Variant genotypes (Tyr/His and His/His) were overpresented among patients compared to controls (p = 0.03, OR = 2.510, 95% CI: 1.068–5.899), and the frequency of variant H allele was significantly overexpressed in cases compared to controls (p = 0.021). Tyr/His genotype was identified in 100% of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients vs. 34.5% of non-SCLC (NSCLC), while 20.7% of NSCLC patients were homozygous for the variant allele (His/His) (p = 0.001). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed a 2.5 times greater estimated risk for NSCLC than for SCLC among variant allele carriers, and a 7.3-fold increased risk of lung cancer among variant allele smoking carriers vs. 1.3-fold increased risk among wild allele smoking carriers. Moreover, the stage of cancer positively correlated with smoking and pack-years in allele H carriers, and the correlation was stronger among those who were homozygous for it (His/His) than those who were heterozygous (Tyr/His). Conclusions CFH 402H variant is a smoking-related risk factor for lung cancer, particularly the NSCLC. PMID:26843839

  1. Importance of Inhibition of Binding of Complement Factor H for Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses to Meningococcal Factor H-binding Protein Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Granoff, Dan M.; Beernink, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Factor H (fH) binding protein (fHbp) is part of vaccines developed for prevention of meningococcal serogroup B disease. More than 610 fHbp amino acid sequence variants have been identified, which can be classified into 2 subfamilies. The extent of cross-protection within a subfamily has been difficult to assess because of strain variation in fHbp expression. Methods. Using isogenic mutant strains, we compared cross-protective serum antibody responses of mice immunized with 7 divergent fHbp variants in subfamily B, including identification numbers (ID) 1 and 55, which were chosen for vaccine development. Results and Conclusions. In the presence of the human complement downregulator fH, the ability of the anti-fHbp antibodies to deposit sufficient complement C3b on the bacterial surface to elicit bactericidal activity required inhibition of binding of fH by the anti-fHbp antibodies. With less bound fH, the bacteria became more susceptible to complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Among the different fHbp sequence variants, those more central in a phylogenic network than ID 1 or 55 elicited anti-fHbp antibodies with broader inhibition of fH binding and broader bactericidal activity. Thus, the more central variants show promise of extending protection to strains with divergent fHbp sequences that are covered poorly by fHbp variants in clinical development. PMID:23715659

  2. Factor H binding as a complement evasion mechanism for an anaerobic pathogen, Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Nathalie; Carlson, Petteri; Kentala, Erna; Mattila, Petri S; Kuusela, Pentti; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna

    2008-12-15

    Fusobacterium necrophorum subspecies funduliforme is an obligate anaerobic Gram-negative rod causing invasive infections such as the life-threatening Lemierre's syndrome (sore throat, septicemia, jugular vein thrombosis, and disseminated infection). The aim of our study was to understand if and how F. necrophorum avoids C activation. We studied 12 F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strains isolated from patients with sepsis. All strains were resistant to serum killing after a 1-h incubation in 20% serum. The bacteria bound, at different levels, the C inhibitor factor H (fH). Binding was ionic and specific in nature and occurred via sites on both the N terminus and the C terminus of fH. Bound fH remained functionally active as a cofactor for factor I in the cleavage of C3b. Interestingly, patients with the most severe symptoms carried strains with the strongest ability to bind fH. An increased C3b deposition and membrane attack complex formation on the surface of a weakly fH-binding strain was observed and its survival in serum at 3.5 h was impaired. This strain had not caused a typical Lemierre's syndrome. These data, and the fact that fH-binding correlated with the severity of disease, suggest that the binding of fH contributes to virulence and survival of F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme in the human host. Our data show, for the first time, that an anaerobic bacterium is able to bind the C inhibitor fH to evade C attack. PMID:19050282

  3. Complement amplification revisited.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Hans U; Jelezarova, Emiliana

    2006-01-01

    Complement amplification in blood takes place not only on activating surfaces, but in plasma as well, where it is maintained primarily by C3b2-IgG complexes. Regular products of C3 activation in serum, these complexes are inherently very efficient precursors of the alternative pathway C3 convertase. Moreover, they can bind properdin bivalently, thus creating preferred sites for convertase formation. C3b2-IgG complexes have a half-life that is substantially longer than that of free C3b, since both C3b molecules are partially protected from inactivation by factor H and I. These complexes are preferentially generated on certain naturally occurring and induced antibodies that exhibit a paratope-independent affinity for C3/C3b. Such antibodies are known to stimulate alternative complement pathway activation. We have assembled the evidence for the generation and the functional potency of the C3b2-IgG complexes, which have been studied during the last two decades. We illustrate their roles in immune complex solubilization, phagocytosis, immune response, and their ability to initiate devastating effects in ischemia/reperfusion and in aggravating inflammation. PMID:16023211

  4. Complement system and immunological mediators: Their involvements in the induced inflammatory process by Androctonus australis hector venom and its toxic components.

    PubMed

    Bekkari, Nadjia; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Androctonus australis hector scorpion venom is well known by its high toxicity, it induces massive release of neurotransmitters that lead to pathophysiological disorders in cardiovascular, neuro-hormonal and immune systems. Previous studies have shown the relationship between the severity of scorpion envenoming and immune system activation. This study was assessed to investigate the involvement of complement system and inflammatory mediators after sublethal injection of Aah venom, its toxic fraction (FtoxG50) and its main toxins (AahI and AahII) into NMRI mice. The Activation complement system by the venom is also compared to that induced of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Obtained results showed that seric complement system (CS) is activated by the venom and by its toxic components; this activation is more pronounced into liver tissue when toxic components (FtoxG50, AahI or AahII) are used. Increase of cytokine levels (IL1β, TNFα and ICAM) into hepatic tissue induced by AahI or AahII neurotoxins is correlated with tissue alterations. Aprotinin, a non specific inhibitor of complement system seems to be able to reduce CS consumption and to restore partially the induced tissue damage by venom. The mechanisms by which toxic fraction or LPS induced the activation of complement system seem to be different. Sensitivity of hepatic tissue is more pronounced after FtoxG50 injection; however lung tissue is more sensible to LPS than FoxG50. PMID:25921955

  5. Complement factors alter the amount of PrP(Sc) in primary-cultured mouse cortical neurons associated with increased membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Rie; Tanaka, Misaki; Suzuki, Akio; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2016-09-01

    We examined the effects of complement factors on primary-cultured neurons infected with prions. The amount of protease K (PK)-resistant abnormal form of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) reached a maximum level at 12 and 16 days post exposure (dpe) in 22L- and Chandler-infected neurons, respectively. In Chandler-infected neurons, the reaction of complement factors C1q, C3 and C9 significantly increased membrane permeability. This was followed by a decrease of PK-resistant PrP(Sc) at 16 and 20dpe. In contrast, in 22L-infected neurons, the effects of complement factors were observed at 12 and 16dpe, but not at 20dpe. Membrane permeability also increased in 22L-infected neurons by reaction of complement factor C3, but interestingly, the amount of PK-resistant PrP(Sc) initially decreased, and then increased. These results suggest that the reactivity of complement factors in prion-infected neurons depends on the amount of PrP(Sc) and the prion strain. PMID:27236741

  6. Meningococcal factor H-binding protein vaccines with decreased binding to human complement factor H have enhanced immunogenicity in human factor H transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Raffaella; Granoff, Dan M; Beernink, Peter T

    2013-11-01

    Factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is a component of a meningococcal vaccine recently licensed in Europe for prevention of serogroup B disease, and a second vaccine in clinical development. The protein specifically binds human factor H (fH), which down-regulates complement activation and enhances resistance to bactericidal activity. There are conflicting data from studies in human fH transgenic mice on whether binding of human fH to fHbp vaccines decreases immunogenicity, and whether mutant fHbp vaccines with decreased fH binding have enhanced immunogenicity. fHbp can be classified into two sub-families based on sequence divergence and immunologic cross-reactivity. Previous studies of mutant fHbp vaccines with low fH binding were from sub-family B, which account for approximately 60% of serogroup B case isolates. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of two mutant sub-family A fHbp vaccines containing single substitutions, T221A or D211A, which resulted in 15- or 30-fold lower affinity for human fH, respectively, than the corresponding control wild-type fHbp vaccine. In transgenic mice with high serum concentrations of human fH, both mutant vaccines elicited significantly higher IgG titers and higher serum bactericidal antibody responses than the control fHbp vaccine that bound human fH. Thus, mutations introduced into a sub-family A fHbp antigen to decrease fH binding can increase protective antibody responses in human fH transgenic mice. Collectively the data suggest that mutant fHbp antigens with decreased fH binding will result in superior vaccines in humans. PMID:24035433

  7. New Insights into Disease-Specific Absence of Complement Factor H Related Protein C in Mouse Models of Spontaneous Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Banda, Nirmal K.

    2014-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) protein is an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement (AP) both in the fluid phase and on the surface of host cells. Mouse and human complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins also belong to the fH family of plasma glycoproteins. The main goal of the current study was to compare the presence of mRNA for two mCFHR proteins in spontaneously developing autoimmune diseases in mice such as dense deposit disease (DDD), diabetes mellitus (DM), basal laminar deposits (BLD), collagen antibody-induced arthrits (CAIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report for the first time that the CFHR-C mRNA was universally absent in the liver from three strains of lupus-prone mice and in a diabetic-prone mouse strain. The mRNA levels (pg/ng) for CFH and CFHR-B in MRL-lpr/lpr, at 9 wks and 23 wks were 707.2 ± 44.4, 54.5 ± 5.75 and 729 ± 252.9, 74.04 ± 22.76 respectively. The mRNA levels for CFH and CFHR-B in NZB/NZW mice, at 9 wks and 54 wks were 579.9 ± 23.8, 58.8 ± 1.41 and 890.3 ± 135.2, 63.30 ± 9.2 respectively. CFHR-C protein was absent in the circulation of MRL-lpr/lpr and NZB/NZW mice before and after the development of lupus. Similarly, mRNA and protein for CFHR-C was universally absent in liver and other organs and in the circulation of NOD mice before and after the development of DM. In contrast, the mRNAs for CFH, CFHR-B and CFHR-C were universally present in the liver from mice with and without DDD, BLD and CAIA. The levels of mRNA for CFHR-B in mice with and without BLD were ~4 times higher than the mice with lupus. The complete absence of mRNA for CFHR-C in lupus and diabetic-prone strains indicates that polymorphic variation within the mouse CFHR family exists and raises the possibility that such variation contributes to lupus and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:25033230

  8. New insights into disease-specific absence of complement factor H related protein C in mouse models of spontaneous autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Banda, Nirmal K

    2014-11-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) protein is an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement (AP) both in the fluid phase and on the surface of host cells. Mouse and human complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins also belong to the fH family of plasma glycoproteins. The main goal of the current study was to compare the presence of mRNA for two mCFHR proteins in spontaneously developing autoimmune diseases in mice such as dense deposit disease (DDD), diabetes mellitus (DM), basal laminar deposits (BLD), collagen antibody-induced arthrits (CAIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report for the first time that the CFHR-C mRNA was universally absent in the liver from three strains of lupus-prone mice and in a diabetic-prone mouse strain. The mRNA levels (pg/ng) for CFH and CFHR-B in MRL-lpr/lpr, at 9 wks and 23 wks were 707.2±44.4, 54.5±5.75 and 729±252.9, 74.04±22.76, respectively. The mRNA levels for CFH and CFHR-B in NZB/NZW mice, at 9 wks and 54 wks were 579.9±23.8, 58.8±1.41 and 890.3±135.2, 63.30±9.2, respectively. CFHR-C protein was absent in the circulation of MRL-lpr/lpr and NZB/NZW mice before and after the development of lupus. Similarly, mRNA and protein for CFHR-C was universally absent in liver and other organs and in the circulation of NOD mice before and after the development of DM. In contrast, the mRNAs for CFH, CFHR-B and CFHR-C were universally present in the liver from mice with and without DDD, BLD and CAIA. The levels of mRNA for CFHR-B in mice with and without BLD were ∼4 times higher than the mice with lupus. The complete absence of mRNA for CFHR-C in lupus and diabetic-prone strains indicates that polymorphic variation within the mouse CFHR family exists and raises the possibility that such variation contributes to lupus and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:25033230

  9. Complement factor H allotype 402H is associated with increased C3b opsonization and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Karita; Jarva, Hanna; Siljander, Tuula; Tewodros, Wezenet; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2008-11-01

    The main virulence factor of group A streptococcus (GAS), M protein, binds plasma complement regulators factor H (FH) and FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1) leading to decreased opsonization. The M protein binding site on FH is within domain 7 in which also the age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-associated polymorphism Y402H is located. We studied if FH allotypes 402H and 402Y have different binding affinities to GAS. Plasma-derived FH allotype 402H and its recombinant fragment FH5-7(402H) showed decreased binding to several GAS strains. Growth of GAS in human blood taken from FH(402H) homozygous individuals was decreased when compared with blood taken from FH(402Y) homozygous individuals. The effect of the allotype 402H can be explained by combining the previous M protein mutagenesis data and the recently published crystal structure of FH6-8. In conclusion the data indicate that the AMD-associated allotype 402H leads to diminished binding of FH to GAS and increased opsonophagocytosis of the bacteria in blood. These results suggest that the homozygous presence of the allele 402H could be associated with decreased risk for severe GAS infections offering an explanation for the high frequency of the allele despite its association with visual impairment. PMID:18627465

  10. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  11. A hybrid hydrologically complemented warning model for shallow landslides induced by extreme rainfall in Korean Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Pradhan, Ananta Man; Kang, Hyo-Sub; Kim, Yun-Tae

    2016-04-01

    This study uses a physically based approach to evaluate the factor of safety of the hillslope for different hydrological conditions, in Mt Umyeon, south of Seoul. The hydrological conditions were determined using intensity and duration of whole Korea of known landslide inventory data. Quantile regression statistical method was used to ascertain different probability warning levels on the basis of rainfall thresholds. Physically based models are easily interpreted and have high predictive capabilities but rely on spatially explicit and accurate parameterization, which is commonly not possible. Statistical probabilistic methods can include other causative factors which influence the slope stability such as forest, soil and geology, but rely on good landslide inventories of the site. In this study a hybrid approach has described that combines the physically-based landslide susceptibility for different hydrological conditions. A presence-only based maximum entropy model was used to hybrid and analyze relation of landslide with conditioning factors. About 80% of the landslides were listed among the unstable sites identified in the proposed model, thereby presenting its effectiveness and accuracy in determining unstable areas and areas that require evacuation. These cumulative rainfall thresholds provide a valuable reference to guide disaster prevention authorities in the issuance of warning levels with the ability to reduce losses and save lives.

  12. Molecular cloning of the b subunit of mouse coagulation factor XIII and assignment of the gene to chromosome 1: Close evolutionary relationship to complement factor H

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mayumi; Nonaka, Masaru; Natsuume-Sakai, Shunnosuke ); Matsuda, Yoichi ); Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Moriwaki, Kazuo )

    1993-03-01

    The b subunit of human coagulation factor XIII (FXIII-b) is composed of 10 short consensus repeats (SCRs) characteristic of the regulatory proteins of complement activation system. A full-length cDNA clone of mouse FXIII-b was isolated and the entire sequence was determined. The predicted amino acid sequence showed 77.5% homology with human FXIII-b, although mouse FXIII-b contained seven extra amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminal. The strong reactivity of the translation product of this clone with rabbit anti-human FXIII-b antiserum confirmed that it encodes a mouse counterpart of the human FXIII-b. By in situ hybridization and mapping studies using 66 interspecific backcross mice, the mouse FXIII-b gene (designated F13b) was shown to be located on distal chromosome 1 closely linked to Cfh, extending a conserved linkage group between human and mouse chromosome 1. In addition, a significant structural similarity between FXIII-b and complement factor H is described. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of complement Factor H on anti-FHbp serum bactericidal antibody responses of infant rhesus macaques boosted with a licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-12-16

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FH(high)), and six with FH(low) baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FH(high) phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (p<0.02). In macaques with the FH(high) baseline phenotype, the respective anti-FHbp C4b deposition and bactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FH(high), the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. PMID:26562320

  14. Susceptibility to Invasive Meningococcal Disease: Polymorphism of Complement System Genes and Neisseria meningitidis Factor H Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Declan T.; Bourke, Thomas W.; Fairley, Derek J.; Borrow, Raymond; Shields, Michael D.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Hughes, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis can cause severe infection in humans. Polymorphism of Complement Factor H (CFH) is associated with altered risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). We aimed to find whether polymorphism of other complement genes altered risk and whether variation of N. meningitidis factor H binding protein (fHBP) affected the risk association. Methods We undertook a case-control study with 309 European cases and 5,200 1958 Birth Cohort and National Blood Service cohort controls. We used additive model logistic regression, accepting P<0.05 as significant after correction for multiple testing. The effects of fHBP subfamily on the age at infection and severity of disease was tested using the independent samples median test and Student’s T test. The effect of CFH polymorphism on the N. meningitidis fHBP subfamily was investigated by logistic regression and Chi squared test. Results Rs12085435 A in C8B was associated with odds ratio (OR) of IMD (0.35 [95% CI 0.19–0.67]; P = 0.03 after correction). A CFH haplotype tagged by rs3753396 G was associated with IMD (OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.42–0.76], P = 1.6x10−4). There was no bacterial load (CtrA cycle threshold) difference associated with carriage of this haplotype. Host CFH haplotype and meningococcal fHBP subfamily were not associated. Individuals infected with meningococci expressing subfamily A fHBP were younger than those with subfamily B fHBP meningococci (median 1 vs 2 years; P = 0.025). Discussion The protective CFH haplotype alters odds of IMD without affecting bacterial load for affected heterozygotes. CFH haplotype did not affect the likelihood of infecting meningococci having either fHBP subfamily. The association between C8B rs12085435 and IMD requires independent replication. The CFH association is of interest because it is independent of known functional polymorphisms in CFH. As fHBP-containing vaccines are now in use, relationships between CFH polymorphism and vaccine effectiveness and

  15. 1,25(OH)2D3 and cAMP synergistically induce complement 5a receptor messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Biskobing, D; Titus, L; Thornton, D L; Catherwood, B D; Nanes, M S

    1996-02-01

    Complement 5a receptor (C5aR) mediates both acute and chronic participation of monocytes in the immune response. In the human U937 monoblast, C5aR is maximally expressed 4 days after treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 (or cycloheximide) and prostaglandin E2 combined. The authors asked whether these agents altered expression of C5aR messenger RNA (mRNA). Unstimulated U937 cells expressed neither C5aR mRNA nor C5a binding. Complement 5aR mRNA rose 3 hours after prostaglandin E2 application and fell to basal levels by 12 hours. This early rise in C5aR mRNA did not cause an acute rise in C5a binding, which gradually increased between 1 and 4 days. Neither 1,25(OH)2D3 nor cycloheximide induced expression of C5aR mRNA in the absence of prostaglandin E2 but did enhance prostaglandin E2-stimulated C5aR mRNA expression and C5a binding. The authors observed a late increase in C5aR mRNA at day 3 in treated cells. Inhibition of this late rise in mRNA with 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside attenuated C5a binding by 65%, indicating its importance in the generation of C5a binding sites. The expression of functional C5aR is, therefore, a complex process involving regulation at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. PMID:8615377

  16. Attenuation of Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Bacteremia by Human Mini-Antibodies Targeting the Complement Inhibitory Protein Efb.

    PubMed

    Georgoutsou-Spyridonos, Maria; Ricklin, Daniel; Pratsinis, Haris; Perivolioti, Eustathia; Pirmettis, Ioannis; Garcia, Brandon L; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Foukas, Periklis G; Lambris, John D; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Sfyroera, Georgia

    2015-10-15

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause a broad range of potentially fatal inflammatory complications (e.g., sepsis and endocarditis). Its emerging antibiotic resistance and formidable immune evasion arsenal have emphasized the need for more effective antimicrobial approaches. Complement is an innate immune sensor that rapidly responds to bacterial infection eliciting C3-mediated opsonophagocytic and immunomodulatory responses. Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) is a key immune evasion protein of S. aureus that intercepts complement at the level of C3. To date, Efb has not been explored as a target for mAb-based antimicrobial therapeutics. In this study, we have isolated donor-derived anti-Efb IgGs that attenuate S. aureus survival through enhanced neutrophil killing. A phage library screen yielded mini-Abs that selectively inhibit the interaction of Efb with C3 partly by disrupting contacts essential for complex formation. Surface plasmon resonance-based kinetic analysis enabled the selection of mini-Abs with favorable Efb-binding profiles as therapeutic leads. Mini-Ab-mediated blockade of Efb attenuated S. aureus survival in a whole blood model of bacteremia. This neutralizing effect was associated with enhanced neutrophil-mediated killing of S. aureus, increased C5a release, and modulation of IL-6 secretion. Finally, these mini-Abs afforded protection from S. aureus-induced bacteremia in a murine renal abscess model, attenuating bacterial inflammation in kidneys. Overall, these findings are anticipated to pave the way toward novel Ab-based therapeutics for S. aureus-related diseases. PMID:26342032

  17. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Kakuta, Yoichi; Miyagawa, Shuji; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Kato, Taigo; Abe, Toyofumi; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Maeda, Akira; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Mizuno, Masashi; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR) is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs) in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts. Methods We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP) by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course. Results qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry), was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate. Conclusions We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR. PMID:26928779

  18. RXFP1 is Targeted by Complement C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Factor 8 in Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Glogowska, Aleksandra; Burg, Maxwell; Wong, G. William; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The relaxin-like RXFP1 ligand–receptor system has important functions in tumor growth and tissue invasion. Recently, we have identified the secreted protein, CTRP8, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) family, as a novel ligand of the relaxin receptor, RXFP1, with functions in brain cancer. Here, we review the role of CTRP members in cancers cells with particular emphasis on CTRP8 in glioblastoma. PMID:26322020

  19. RXFP1 is Targeted by Complement C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Factor 8 in Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Glogowska, Aleksandra; Burg, Maxwell; Wong, G William; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The relaxin-like RXFP1 ligand-receptor system has important functions in tumor growth and tissue invasion. Recently, we have identified the secreted protein, CTRP8, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) family, as a novel ligand of the relaxin receptor, RXFP1, with functions in brain cancer. Here, we review the role of CTRP members in cancers cells with particular emphasis on CTRP8 in glioblastoma. PMID:26322020

  20. Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell research trends: complementation and diversification of the field.

    PubMed

    Kobold, Sabine; Guhr, Anke; Kurtz, Andreas; Löser, Peter

    2015-05-12

    Research in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is rapidly developing and there are expectations that this research may obviate the need to use human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), the ethics of which has been a subject of controversy for more than 15 years. In this study, we investigated approximately 3,400 original research papers that reported an experimental use of these types of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and were published from 2008 to 2013. We found that research into both cell types was conducted independently and further expanded, accompanied by a growing intersection of both research fields. Moreover, an in-depth analysis of papers that reported the use of both cell types indicates that hESCs are still being used as a "gold standard," but in a declining proportion of publications. Instead, the expanding research field is diversifying and hESC and hiPSC lines are increasingly being used in more independent research and application areas. PMID:25866160

  1. Binding of Complement Factor H to PorB3 and NspA Enhances Resistance of Neisseria meningitidis to Anti-Factor H Binding Protein Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Giuntini, Serena; Pajon, Rolando; Ram, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Among 25 serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis clinical isolates, we identified four (16%) with high factor H binding protein (FHbp) expression that were resistant to complement-mediated bactericidal activity of sera from mice immunized with recombinant FHbp vaccines. Two of the four isolates had evidence of human FH-dependent complement downregulation independent of FHbp. Since alternative complement pathway recruitment is critical for anti-FHbp bactericidal activity, we hypothesized that in these two isolates binding of FH to ligands other than FHbp contributes to anti-FHbp bactericidal resistance. Knocking out NspA, a known meningococcal FH ligand, converted both resistant isolates to anti-FHbp susceptible isolates. The addition of a nonbactericidal anti-NspA monoclonal antibody to the bactericidal reaction also increased anti-FHbp bactericidal activity. To identify a role for FH ligands other than NspA or FHbp in resistance, we created double NspA/FHbp knockout mutants. Mutants from both resistant isolates bound 10-fold more recombinant human FH domains 6 and 7 fused to Fc than double knockout mutants prepared from two sensitive meningococcal isolates. In light of recent studies showing functional FH-PorB2 interactions, we hypothesized that PorB3 from the resistant isolates recruited FH. Allelic exchange of porB3 from a resistant isolate to a sensitive isolate increased resistance of the sensitive isolate to anti-FHbp bactericidal activity (and vice versa). Thus, some PorB3 variants functionally bind human FH, which in the presence of NspA enhances anti-FHbp resistance. Combining anti-NspA antibodies with anti-FHbp antibodies can overcome resistance. Meningococcal vaccines that target both NspA and FHbp are likely to confer greater protection than either antigen alone. PMID:25644002

  2. Binding of complement factor H to PorB3 and NspA enhances resistance of Neisseria meningitidis to anti-factor H binding protein bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Giuntini, Serena; Pajon, Rolando; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-04-01

    Among 25 serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis clinical isolates, we identified four (16%) with high factor H binding protein (FHbp) expression that were resistant to complement-mediated bactericidal activity of sera from mice immunized with recombinant FHbp vaccines. Two of the four isolates had evidence of human FH-dependent complement downregulation independent of FHbp. Since alternative complement pathway recruitment is critical for anti-FHbp bactericidal activity, we hypothesized that in these two isolates binding of FH to ligands other than FHbp contributes to anti-FHbp bactericidal resistance. Knocking out NspA, a known meningococcal FH ligand, converted both resistant isolates to anti-FHbp susceptible isolates. The addition of a nonbactericidal anti-NspA monoclonal antibody to the bactericidal reaction also increased anti-FHbp bactericidal activity. To identify a role for FH ligands other than NspA or FHbp in resistance, we created double NspA/FHbp knockout mutants. Mutants from both resistant isolates bound 10-fold more recombinant human FH domains 6 and 7 fused to Fc than double knockout mutants prepared from two sensitive meningococcal isolates. In light of recent studies showing functional FH-PorB2 interactions, we hypothesized that PorB3 from the resistant isolates recruited FH. Allelic exchange of porB3 from a resistant isolate to a sensitive isolate increased resistance of the sensitive isolate to anti-FHbp bactericidal activity (and vice versa). Thus, some PorB3 variants functionally bind human FH, which in the presence of NspA enhances anti-FHbp resistance. Combining anti-NspA antibodies with anti-FHbp antibodies can overcome resistance. Meningococcal vaccines that target both NspA and FHbp are likely to confer greater protection than either antigen alone. PMID:25644002

  3. Complement factor B polymorphism (rs641153) and susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration: evidence from published studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Mao-Nian

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine whether single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs641153 is associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we performed a systematic meta-analysis of 15 eligible studies. SNP in the complement factor B (CFB) gene is considered to have significant association with AMD susceptibility, but there is great discrepancy in these results. METHODS The eligible studies were identified by searching the databases of PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association. All data were analyzed using Stata software. RESULTS The association between rs641153 and AMD risk was statistically significant under the homozygous model (AA vs GG:OR=0.26, 95%CI=0.15-0.45, Ph=0.973, I2=0.0%, fixed effects), dominant model (AA+GA vs GG:OR=0.49, 95%CI=0.40-0.59, Ph=0.004, I2=56.4%, random effects) and recessive model (AA vs GA+GG:OR=0.30, 95%CI=0.17-0.51, Ph=0.983, I2=0.0%, fixed effects). The same results were also observed in the stratified analyses by ethnicity, source of control and sample size. CONCLUSION Our meta-analysis suggests that rs641153 in the CFB gene may play a protective role in AMD susceptibility, the late AMD in particular, both in Caucasians and in Asians. PMID:24392338

  4. A novel nuclear localization signal in the auxiliary domain of apobec-1 complementation factor regulates nucleocytoplasmic import and shuttling.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Valerie; Kennedy, Susan; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2003-10-17

    C to U editing of the nuclear apolipoprotein B (apoB) transcript is mediated by a core enzyme containing a catalytic deaminase, apobec-1, and an RNA binding subunit, apobec-1 complementation factor (ACF). ACF expression is predominantly nuclear, including mutant proteins with deletions of a putative nuclear localization signal. We have now identified a novel 41-residue motif (ANS) in the auxiliary domain of ACF that functions as an authentic nuclear localization signal. ANS-green fluorescence protein and ANS-beta-galactosidase chimeras were both expressed exclusively in the nucleus, whereas wild-type chimeras or an ACF deletion mutant lacking the ANS were cytoplasmic. Nuclear accumulation of ACF is transcription-dependent, temperature-sensitive, and reversible, features reminiscent of a shuttling protein. ACF relocates to the cytoplasm after actinomycin D treatment, an effect blocked by the CRM1 inhibitor leptomycin B. Heterokaryon assays confirmed directly that ACF shuttles in vivo. ACF binds to the protein carrier, transportin 2 in vivo, and colocalizes to the nucleus as determined by confocal microscopy. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that transportin 2 binds directly to the ANS motif. These data suggest that directed nuclear localization and compartmentalization of the core complex of the apoB RNA editing enzyme is regulated through a dominant targeting sequence (ANS) contained within ACF. PMID:12896982

  5. MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-factor D activator in resting blood: the lectin and the alternative complement pathways are fundamentally linked

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Szakács, Dávid; Oroszlán, Gábor; Kortvely, Elod; Kiss, Bence; Boros, Eszter; Szász, Róbert; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    MASP-3 was discovered 15 years ago as the third mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease of the complement lectin pathway. Lacking any verified substrate its role remained ambiguous. MASP-3 was shown to compete with a key lectin pathway enzyme MASP-2 for MBL binding, and was therefore considered to be a negative complement regulator. Later, knock-out mice experiments suggested that MASP-1 and/or MASP-3 play important roles in complement pro-factor D (pro-FD) maturation. However, studies on a MASP-1/MASP-3-deficient human patient produced contradicting results. In normal resting blood unperturbed by ongoing coagulation or complement activation, factor D is present predominantly in its active form, suggesting that resting blood contains at least one pro-FD activating proteinase that is not a direct initiator of coagulation or complement activation. We have recently showed that all three MASPs can activate pro-FD in vitro. In resting blood, however, using our previously evolved MASP-1 and MASP-2 inhibitors we proved that neither MASP-1 nor MASP-2 activates pro-FD. Other plasma proteinases, particularly MASP-3, remained candidates for that function. For this study we evolved a specific MASP-3 inhibitor and unambiguously proved that activated MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-FD activator in resting blood, which demonstrates a fundamental link between the lectin and alternative pathways. PMID:27535802

  6. MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-factor D activator in resting blood: the lectin and the alternative complement pathways are fundamentally linked.

    PubMed

    Dobó, József; Szakács, Dávid; Oroszlán, Gábor; Kortvely, Elod; Kiss, Bence; Boros, Eszter; Szász, Róbert; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    MASP-3 was discovered 15 years ago as the third mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease of the complement lectin pathway. Lacking any verified substrate its role remained ambiguous. MASP-3 was shown to compete with a key lectin pathway enzyme MASP-2 for MBL binding, and was therefore considered to be a negative complement regulator. Later, knock-out mice experiments suggested that MASP-1 and/or MASP-3 play important roles in complement pro-factor D (pro-FD) maturation. However, studies on a MASP-1/MASP-3-deficient human patient produced contradicting results. In normal resting blood unperturbed by ongoing coagulation or complement activation, factor D is present predominantly in its active form, suggesting that resting blood contains at least one pro-FD activating proteinase that is not a direct initiator of coagulation or complement activation. We have recently showed that all three MASPs can activate pro-FD in vitro. In resting blood, however, using our previously evolved MASP-1 and MASP-2 inhibitors we proved that neither MASP-1 nor MASP-2 activates pro-FD. Other plasma proteinases, particularly MASP-3, remained candidates for that function. For this study we evolved a specific MASP-3 inhibitor and unambiguously proved that activated MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-FD activator in resting blood, which demonstrates a fundamental link between the lectin and alternative pathways. PMID:27535802

  7. Complement factor H genetic variant and age-related macular degeneration: effect size, modifiers and relationship to disease subtype

    PubMed Central

    Sofat, Reecha; Casas, Juan P; Webster, Andrew R; Bird, Alan C; Mann, Samantha S; Yates, John RW; Moore, Anthony T; Sepp, Tiina; Cipriani, Valentina; Bunce, Catey; Khan, Jane C; Shahid, Humma; Swaroop, Anand; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Branham, Kari E H; Zareparsi, Sepideh; Bergen, Arthur A; Klaver, Caroline CW; Baas, Dominique C; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Yuhong; Gibbs, Daniel; Weber, Bernhard H F; Keilhauer, Claudia N; Fritsche, Lars G; Lotery, Andrew; Cree, Angela J; Griffiths, Helen L; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Chen, Li L; Jenkins, Sharon A; Peto, Tunde; Lathrop, Mark; Leveillard, Thierry; Gorin, Michael B; Weeks, Daniel E; Ortube, Maria Carolina; Ferrell, Robert E; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Conley, Yvette P; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan H; Soubrane, Gisele; Topouzis, Fotis; Vioque, Jesus; Tomazzoli, Laura; Young, Ian; Whittaker, John; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Smeeth, Liam; Fletcher, Astrid; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2012-01-01

    Background Variation in the complement factor H gene (CFH) is associated with risk of late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Previous studies have been case–control studies in populations of European ancestry with little differentiation in AMD subtype, and insufficient power to confirm or refute effect modification by smoking. Methods To precisely quantify the association of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1061170, ‘Y402H’) with risk of AMD among studies with differing study designs, participant ancestry and AMD grade and to investigate effect modification by smoking, we report two unpublished genetic association studies (n = 2759) combined with data from 24 published studies (26 studies, 26 494 individuals, including 14 174 cases of AMD) of European ancestry, 10 of which provided individual-level data used to test gene–smoking interaction; and 16 published studies from non-European ancestry. Results In individuals of European ancestry, there was a significant association between Y402H and late-AMD with a per-allele odds ratio (OR) of 2.27 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.10–2.45; P = 1.1 x 10−161]. There was no evidence of effect modification by smoking (P = 0.75). The frequency of Y402H varied by ancestral origin and the association with AMD in non-Europeans was less clear, limited by paucity of studies. Conclusion The Y402H variant confers a 2-fold higher risk of late-AMD per copy in individuals of European descent. This was stable to stratification by study design and AMD classification and not modified by smoking. The lack of association in non-Europeans requires further verification. These findings are of direct relevance for disease prediction. New research is needed to ascertain if differences in circulating levels, expression or activity of factor H protein explain the genetic association. PMID:22253316

  8. Immunologically induced, complement-dependent up-regulation of the prion protein in the mouse spleen: follicular dendritic cells versus capsule and trabeculae.

    PubMed

    Lötscher, Marius; Recher, Mike; Hunziker, Lukas; Klein, Michael A

    2003-06-15

    The expression of the prion protein (PrP) in the follicular dendritic cell network of germinal centers in the spleen is critical for the splenic propagation of the causative agent of prion diseases. However, a physiological role of the prion protein in the periphery remains elusive. To investigate the role and function of PrP expression in the lymphoid system we treated naive mice i.v. with preformed immune complexes or vesicular stomatitis virus. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis of the spleen revealed that 8 days after immunization, immune complexes and vesicular stomatitis virus had both induced a strong increase of PrP expression in the follicular dendritic cell network. Remarkably, this up-regulation did not occur in mice that lack an early factor of the complement cascade, C1q, a component which has been shown previously to facilitate early prion pathogenesis. In addition to the variable PrP level in the germinal centers, we detected steady and abundant PrP expression in the splenic capsule and trabeculae, which are structural elements that have not been associated before with PrP localization. The abundant trabeculo-capsular PrP expression was also evident in spleens of Rag-1-deficient mice, which have been shown before to be incapable of prion expansion. We conclude that trabeculocapsular PrP is not sufficient for splenic prion propagation. Furthermore, our observations may provide important clues for a physiological function of the prion protein and allow a new view on the role of complement and PrP in peripheral prion pathogenesis. PMID:12794132

  9. Human carcinomas variably express the complement inhibitory proteins CD46 (membrane cofactor protein), CD55 (decay-accelerating factor), and CD59 (protectin).

    PubMed Central

    Niehans, G. A.; Cherwitz, D. L.; Staley, N. A.; Knapp, D. J.; Dalmasso, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    Normal human tissues express membrane-associated complement inhibitory proteins that protect these tissues from damage by autologous complement. To determine whether neoplasms also express these proteins, we examined the distribution of the complement inhibitors decay-accelerating factor (DAF), CD59 (protectin), and membrane cofactor protein in frozen samples of human breast, colon, kidney, and lung carcinomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, using immunohistochemistry. All samples were also studied for deposition of C3 fragments and activated C5b-9. Differences between normal tissues and the corresponding neoplasms were often observed, with loss or gain of expression of one or more inhibitors. Ductal carcinomas of the breast showed the most variation in phenotype; some tumors expressed only one inhibitor while others expressed different combinations of two or three inhibitors. Colon carcinomas, by contrast, stained intensely for all inhibitors. Renal cell carcinomas had weak to moderate expression of one to three inhibitors, generally DAF and CD59, whereas non-small cell carcinomas of the lung usually expressed CD59 and membrane cofactor protein with variable DAF immunoreactivity. The two small cell carcinomas of the lung showed little or no staining for any inhibitor. Activated C5b-9 deposition was seen adjacent to tumor nests in a minority of carcinomas and showed no correlation with complement inhibitor expression. C3 fragment deposition was minimal. Our results demonstrate that most carcinomas, with the exception of small cell carcinomas of the lung, do express one or more complement inhibitors at a level likely to inhibit complement-mediated cellular damage. Unexpectedly, large quantities of DAF and CD59 were often observed in tumor stroma, with only limited deposition in normal connective tissue. This suggests that carcinomas may supplement the activity of membrane-associated complement inhibitors by release of soluble forms of DAF and CD59 into the

  10. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy to Complement Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission in the Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safiq, Alexandrea; Ali, Salina; Nadarski, Benjamin; Smith, Jeremy; Yoskowitz, Josh; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael; Union College Team

    2013-10-01

    There is an active research program in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory on proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of atmospheric aerosols. PIXE is a powerful tool for the study of airborne pollution because it provides information on a broad range of elements simultaneously, has low detection limits, is nondestructive, does not require large samples, and the analysis can be performed in a short amount of time. However, PIXE provides only elemental information. We are investigating the use of Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) to complement PIXE analysis of aerosol samples by providing chemical information. In MRS, laser light is inelastically scattered from a sample and the vibrational spectrum of the scattered light is used to identify molecules and their functional groups. We are focusing on aerosol samples collected in the Adirondack Mountains that have considerable concentrations of sulfur that may contribute to acid rain. The MRS spectra collected on aerosol samples are being compared with a library of standards to try to determine the molecular structures in which the sulfur is bound. We will describe the analysis and present preliminary results. Union College Undergraduate Research Program.

  11. Methylation-induced G2/M arrest requires a full complement of the mismatch repair protein hMLH1

    PubMed Central

    Cejka, Petr; Stojic, Lovorka; Mojas, Nina; Russell, Anna Marie; Heinimann, Karl; Cannavó, Elda; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Marra, Giancarlo; Jiricny, Josef

    2003-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) gene hMLH1 is mutated in ∼50% of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancers and transcriptionally silenced in ∼25% of sporadic tumours of the right colon. Cells lacking hMLH1 display microsatellite instability and resistance to killing by methylating agents. In an attempt to study the phenotypic effects of hMLH1 downregulation in greater detail, we designed an isogenic system, in which hMLH1 expression is regulated by doxycycline. We now report that human embryonic kidney 293T cells expressing high amounts of hMLH1 were MMR-proficient and arrested at the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint following treatment with the DNA methylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), while cells not expressing hMLH1 displayed a MMR defect and failed to arrest upon MNNG treatment. Interestingly, MMR proficiency was restored even at low hMLH1 concentrations, while checkpoint activation required a full complement of hMLH1. In the MMR-proficient cells, activation of the MNNG-induced G2/M checkpoint was accompanied by phosphorylation of p53, but the cell death pathway was p53 independent, as the latter polypeptide is functionally inactivated in these cells by SV40 large T antigen. PMID:12727890

  12. The human complement regulatory factor-H-like protein 1, which represents a truncated form of factor H, displays cell-attachment activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hellwage, J; Kühn, S; Zipfel, P F

    1997-01-01

    Complement factor H (FH) and factor-H-like protein 1 (FHL-1) are human plasma proteins with regulatory functions in the alternative pathway of complement activation. FH and FHL-1 are organized in repetitive elements termed short consensus repeats (SCRs) and the seven SCRs of FHL-1 are identical with the N-terminal domain of the 20 SCRs of FH. The fourth SCR of both proteins (SCR 4) includes the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), a motif that is responsible for the major adhesive activity of matrix proteins like fibronectin. A synthetic hexapeptide with the sequence ERGDAV derived from the RGD domain of FH/FHL-1 interferes with cell attachment to a fibronectin matrix. Although the identical motif is present in both FH and FHL-1, only FHL-1 acts as a matrix for cell spreading and attachment, thus the two proteins differ in function. The adhesive activity of FHL-1 is localized to the RGD-containing SCR 4 by the use of recombinant fragments. All three analysed anchorage-dependent cell lines (CCl64, C32 and MRC-5) adhere to an FHL-1 matrix. The use of synthetic peptides in competition assays, on either FHL-1-derived or fibronectin matrices, shows that the cellular receptors binding to the FH/FHL-1-derived RGD motif are related to or identical with integrin receptors which interact with fibronectin. The identification of a functional adhesive domain in the FH/FHL-1 sequence demonstrates, at least for FHL-1, a role in cell attachment and adhesion. PMID:9291099

  13. Genetically engineered fusion of MAP-1 and factor H domains 1-5 generates a potent dual upstream inhibitor of both the lectin and alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Nordmaj, Mie Anemone; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Hein, Estrid; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of the complement cascade has emerged as an option for treatment of a range of diseases. Mannose-binding lectin/ficolin/collectin-associated protein (MAP-1) is a pattern recognition molecule (PRM)-associated inhibitor of the lectin pathway. The central regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) is complement factor H (FH). Our aim was to design a dual upstream inhibitor of both human lectin and APs by fusing MAP-1 with a part of FH. There were 2 different recombinant chimeric proteins comprising full-length human MAP-1 and the first 5 N-terminal domains of human FH designed. The FH domains were orientated either in the N- or C-terminal part of MAP-1. The complement inhibition potential in human serum was assessed. Both chimeric constructs displayed the characteristics of the native molecules and bound to the PRMs with an EC50 of ∼ 2 nM. However, when added to serum diluted 1:4 in a solid-phase functional assay, only the first 5 N-terminal domains of complement FH fused to the C-terminal part of full-length MAP-1 chimeric construct were able to combine inhibition of lectin and AP activation with an half maximal inhibitory concentration of ∼ 100 and 20 nM, respectively. No effect was seen on the classical pathway. Fusion of MAP-1 with FH domains represents a novel therapeutic approach for selective targeting upstream and central complement activation at sites of inflammation. PMID:26260032

  14. Complement, complement activation and anaphylatoxins in human ovarian follicular fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Perricone, R; de Carolis, C; Moretti, C; Santuari, E; de Sanctis, G; Fontana, L

    1990-01-01

    Functionally active complement was sought and detected in human follicular fluids obtained during the pre-ovulatory period. All the functional complement activities tested, including total haemolytic complement, classical pathway activity and alternative pathway activity were present in nine fluids from four different donors with values within the normal serum range. The immunochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of complement factors from C1 to C9, of B and of C1 INH, H, I. Complement anaphylatoxins were found employing RIA techniques in amounts significantly higher than in human plasma, thus demonstrating that follicular fluid complement, at least during the pre-ovulatory period, is partially activated. A possible role for urokinase-like substances in such an activation was indicated by further in vitro experiments. The presence of active complement in follicular fluid can be relevant for the function of the enzymatic multi-factorial mechanism of ovulation. PMID:2242616

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor C complements the ability of positron emission tomography to predict nodal disease in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Farhood; Madtes, David K.; Wood, Douglas E.; Flum, David R.; Zadworny, Megan E.; Waworuntu, Rachel; Hwang, Billanna; Mulligan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) C and D are biologically rational markers of nodal disease that could improve the accuracy of lung cancer staging. We hypothesized that these biomarkers would improve the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) to predict nodal disease among patients with suspected or confirmed non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A cross-sectional study (2010–2013) was performed of patients prospectively enrolled in a lung nodule biorepository, staged by computed tomography (CT) and PET, and who underwent pathologic nodal evaluation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure biomarker levels in plasma from blood drawn before anesthesia. Likelihood ratio testing was used to compare the following logistic regression prediction models: ModelPET, ModelPET/VEGF-C, ModelPET/VEGF-D, and ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D. To account for 5 planned pairwise comparisons, P values<.01 were considered significant. Results Among 62 patients (median age, 67 years; 48% men; 87% white; and 84% NSCLC), 58% had fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in hilar and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. The prevalence of pathologically confirmed lymph node metastases was 40%. Comparisons of prediction models revealed the following: ModelPET/VEGF-C versus ModelPET (P = .0069), ModelPET/VEGF-D versus ModelPET (P = .1886), ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET (P = .0146), ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET/VEGF-C (P = .2818), and ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET/VEGF-D (P = .0095). In ModelPET/VEGF-C, higher VEGF-C levels were associated with an increased risk of nodal disease (odds ratio, 2.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.26–6.90). Conclusions Plasma levels of VEGF-C complemented the ability of PET to predict nodal disease among patients with suspected or confirmed NSCLC. VEGF-D did not improve prediction. PMID:26320776

  16. Complement factor H Val62Ile variant and risk of age-related macular degeneration: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Dongqing; Yang, Qin; Liu, Xiaoyi; Yuan, Donglan; Yuan, Songtao; Xie, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the precise association of complement factor H (CFH) Val62Ile polymorphism with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) susceptibility. Methods We performed a meta-analysis using databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science to find relevant studies. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using fixed-effect and random-effects models. The inconsistency index (I2) was used to assess heterogeneity. Funnel plots and Egger’s test were used to evaluate publication bias. Sensitivity analysis was also performed. Results Fourteen studies including 4,438 patients with AMD and 6,099 controls based on the search criteria were involved in the meta-analysis. In overall populations, the pooled OR1 for genotype GA+GG versus homozygous genotype AA was 2.28 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.48–3.52), the OR2 of heterozygous genotype GA versus AA was 1.58 (95% CI: 1.13–2.19), the OR3 of homozygous genotype GG versus AA was 2.90 (95% CI: 1.95–4.30), and the OR4 of allele G versus A was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.43–2.21). In Asian populations, our results provided substantial evidence that the Val62Ile variant was significantly associated with AMD (OR4=1.85, 95% CI: 1.63–2.09). However, in Caucasian populations, no significant association of Val62Ile with AMD was established in all circumstances. Conclusions Our analysis provides substantial evidence that the Val62Ile variant is significantly associated with AMD in Asian populations. However, our results have demonstrated no link between the Val62Ile polymorphism and AMD in Caucasian populations. PMID:23441108

  17. Eradication of Helicobacter spp. by Using Medicated Diet in Mice Deficient in Functional Natural Killer Cells and Complement Factor D

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Martino-Cardona, Maria; Beck, Sarah E; Brayton, Cory; Watson, Julie

    2010-01-01

    A commercial 4-drug diet has shown promise in eradicating Helicobacter spp. from rodents; however, its effectiveness in immunocompromised mice is unknown. This study evaluated the efficacy of this treatment in eradicating Helicobacter spp. from mice deficient in functional natural killer cells (Cd1−/−) or complement factor D (Df −/−). Cd1−/− mice naturally infected with H. hepaticus with or without H. rodentium were fed either control or medicated diet for 8 wk followed by 4 wk on control diet. Fecal samples were PCR-evaluated for Helicobacter spp. before mice began treatment and then every 2 wk thereafter for 12 wk. The same experimental design was repeated for eighteen 9- to 21-wk-old Df −/− mice naturally infected with H. bilis with or without H. rodentium. All Df −/− mice and 8- to 21-wk-old Cd1−/− mice ceased shedding Helicobacter spp. after 2 wk of treatment and remained negative throughout the study. In contrast, the Cd1−/− mice that were 24 wk or older shed Helicobacter spp. for the first 8 wk but tested negative at 10 and 12 wk. All treated animals had enlarged ceca and gained less weight than control untreated mice, and 6 of 7 treated Cd1−/− male mice developed mild portal fibrosis. These findings show that within 2 wk of treatment, the 4-drug diet eradicated H. hepaticus and H. rodentium from young Cd1−/− mice and H. bilis and H. rodentium from Df −/− mice, but eradication of established infections in Cd1−/− mice required 8 wk of treatment. PMID:20587159

  18. Identification of three physically and functionally distinct binding sites for C3b in human complement factor H by deletion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A K; Pangburn, M K

    1996-01-01

    Human complement factor H controls spontaneous activation of complement in plasma and appears to play a role in distinguishing host cells from activators of the alternative pathway of complement. In both mice and humans, the protein is composed of 20 homologous short consensus repeat (SCR) domains. The size of the protein suggests that portions of the structure outside the known C3b binding site (SCR 1-4) possess a significant biological role. We have expressed the full-length cDNA of factor H in the baculovirus system and have shown the recombinant protein to be fully active. Mutants of this full-length protein have now been prepared, purified, and examined for cofactor activity and binding to C3b and heparin. The results demonstrate (i) that factor H has at least three sites that bind C3b, (ii) that one of these sites is located in SCR domains 1-4, as has been shown by others, (iii) that a second site exists in the domain 6-10 region, (iv) that a third site resides in the SCR 16-20 region, and (v) that two heparin binding sites exist in factor H, one near SCR 13 and another in the SCR 6-10 region. Functional assays demonstrated that only the first C3b site located in SCR 1-4 expresses factor I cofactor activity. Mutant proteins lacking any one of the three C3b binding sites exhibited 6- to 8-fold reductions in affinity for C3b on sheep erythrocytes, indicating that all three sites contribute to the control of complement activation on erythrocytes. The identification of multiple functionally distinct sites on factor H clarifies many of the heretofore unexplainable behaviors of this protein, including the heterogeneous binding of factor H to surface-bound C3b, the effects of trypsin cleavage, and the differential control of complement activation on activators and nonactivators of the alternative pathway of complement. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855297

  19. Complement Factor H Expressed by Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Can Suppress Neovascularization of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: An in vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Huang, Qing; Tang, Min; Zhang, Junjun; Fan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is one of the most important soluble complement regulatory proteins and is closely associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of irreversible central vision loss in the elderly population in developed countries. Our study searches to investigate whether CFH expression is changed in oxidative damaged retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and the role of CFH in the in vitro neovascularization. First, it was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining that CFH was expressed by ARPE-19 cells. CFH mRNA and protein in oxidative (H2O2) damaged ARPE-19 cells were both reduced, as determined by Real-time PCR and Western blotting analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed that ARPE-19 cells treated with H2O2 caused an increase in C3a content, which indicates complement activation. Then, wound assays were performed to show that CFH expression suppression promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) migration. Thereafter, ARPE-19 cells were transfected with CFH-specific siRNA and CFH knockdown was confirmed with the aid of Real-time PCR, immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. The ELISA results showed that specific CFH knockdown in ARPE-19 cells activated the complement system. Finally, in vitro matrigel tube formation assay was performed to determine whether change of CFH expression in RPE would affect tube formation by HUVECs. More tubes were formed by HUVECs co-cultured with ARPE-19 cells transfected with CFH specific-siRNA when compared with controls. Our results suggested that RPE cells might be the local CFH source, and RPE cell injuries (such as oxidative stress) may cause CFH expression suppression, which in turn may lead to complement activation and promotion of tube formation by HUVECs. This finding is of importance in elucidating the role of complement in the pathogenesis of ocular neovascularization including choroidal neovascularization. PMID:26091360

  20. Measles virus-induced down-regulation of CD46 is associated with enhanced sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis of infected cells.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, J J; Dunster, L M; Nanan, R; Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schneider-Schaulies, S; ter Meulen, V

    1995-04-01

    CD46, the major component of the measles virus (MV) receptor complex and a member of the regulators of complement activity (RCA) gene cluster, is down-regulated in MV-infected cells. We investigated whether the reduction of surface CD46 correlates with enhanced sensitivity of lymphoid and monocytic cells to lysis by activated complement. On human U937 cells, acutely or persistently infected with MV-Edmonston (ED) vaccine strain, infection-dependent down-regulation of CD46 confers sensitivity to activated complement, regardless of the pathway of activation and the specificity of the activating antibodies. Interestingly, down-regulation of CD46 alone is sufficient to confer susceptibility of cells to complement lysis despite the continued surface expression of other RCA proteins such as CD35 and CD55. In primary cultures, both peripheral blood lymphocytes and macrophages are efficiently lysed in the presence of complement activated via the alternative pathway after MV infection. In contrast to the MV-ED infection, infection of cells with the lymphotropic MV wild-type strain WTF does not down-regulate CD46. Cells infected with MV-WTF do not exhibit enhanced susceptibility to complement lysis. These data suggest that MV strains similar to WTF that do not down-regulate CD46 may have an enhanced potential for replication and dissemination within the human host, whereas complement-mediated elimination of cells infected with CD46-down-regulating strains of MV, such as ED, may limit the spread of MV infection, and could thus represent an attenuating factor for MV. PMID:7737301

  1. Complement factor B is the downstream effector of TLRs and plays an important role in a mouse model of severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lin; Feng, Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Chan; Cai, Jiayan; Gong, Yu; Wang, Larry; Thurman, Joshua M; Wu, Xiaobo; Atkinson, John P; Chao, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Severe sepsis involves massive activation of the innate immune system and leads to high mortality. Previous studies have demonstrated that various types of TLRs mediate a systemic inflammatory response and contribute to organ injury and mortality in animal models of severe sepsis. However, the downstream mechanisms responsible for TLR-mediated septic injury are poorly understood. In this article, we show that activation of TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4 markedly enhanced complement factor B (cfB) synthesis and release by macrophages and cardiac cells. Polymicrobial sepsis, created by cecal ligation and puncture in a mouse model, augmented cfB levels in the serum, peritoneal cavity, and major organs including the kidney and heart. Cecal ligation and puncture also led to the alternative pathway activation, C3 fragment deposition in the kidney and heart, and cfB-dependent C3dg elevation. Bacteria isolated from septic mice activated the serum alternative pathway via a factor D-dependent manner. MyD88 deletion attenuated cfB/C3 upregulation as well as cleavage induced by polymicrobial infection. Importantly, during sepsis, absence of cfB conferred a protective effect with improved survival and cardiac function and markedly attenuated acute kidney injury. cfB deletion also led to increased neutrophil migratory function during the early phase of sepsis, decreased local and systemic bacterial load, attenuated cytokine production, and reduced neutrophil reactive oxygen species production. Together, our data indicate that cfB acts as a downstream effector of TLR signaling and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of severe bacterial sepsis. PMID:24154627

  2. Complement Factor B is the Downstream Effector of Toll-Like Receptors and Plays an Important Role in a Mouse Model of Severe Sepsis¶

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lin; Feng, Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Chan; Cai, Jiayan; Gong, Yu; Wang, Larry; Thurman, Joshua M.; Wu, Xiaobo; Atkinson, John P.; Chao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Severe sepsis involves massive activation of the innate immune system and leads to high mortality. Previous studies have demonstrated that various types of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate a systemic inflammatory response and contribute to organ injury and mortality in animal models of severe sepsis. However, the downstream mechanisms responsible for TLR-mediated septic injury are poorly understood. Here, we show that activation of TLR2, TLR3 and TLR4 markedly enhanced complement factor B (cfB) synthesis and release by macrophages and cardiac cells. Polymicrobial sepsis, created by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in a mouse model, augmented cfB levels in the serum, peritoneal cavity and major organs including the kidney and heart. CLP also led to the alternative pathway (AP) activation, C3 fragment deposition in the kidney and heart, and cfB-dependent C3dg elevation. Bacteria isolated from septic mice activated the serum AP via a factor D-dependent manner. MyD88 deletion attenuated cfB/C3 up-regulation as well as cleavage induced by polymicrobial infection. Importantly, during sepsis, absence of cfB conferred a protective effect with improved survival and cardiac function, and markedly attenuated acute kidney injury. cfB deletion also led to increased neutrophil migratory function during the early phase of sepsis, decreased local and systemic bacterial load, attenuated cytokine production and reduced neutrophil reactive oxygen species production. Together, our data indicate that cfB acts as a downstream effector of TLR signaling and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of severe bacterial sepsis. PMID:24154627

  3. Chronic Low Level Complement Activation within the Eye Is Controlled by Intraocular Complement Regulatory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kaplan, Henry J.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To explore the role of the complement system and complement regulatory proteins in an immune-privileged organ, the eye. Methods Eyes of normal Lewis rats were analyzed for the expression of complement regulatory proteins, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay-acceleration factor (DAF), membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (MIRL, CD59), and cell surface regulator of complement (Crry), using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Zymosan, a known activator of the alternative pathway of complement system was injected into the anterior chamber of the eye of Lewis rats. Animals were also injected intracamerally with 5 μl (25 μg) of neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) against rat Crry (5I2) or CD59 (6D1) in an attempt to develop antibody induced anterior uveitis; control animals received 5 μl of sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), OX-18 (25 μg), G-16-510E3 (25 μg), or MOPC-21 (25 μg). The role of complement system in antibody-induced uveitis was explored by intraperitoneal injection of 35 U cobra venom factor (CVF), 24 hours before antibody injection. Immunohistochemical staining and sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with Western blot analysis were used to detect the presence of membrane attack complex (MAC) and C3 activation products, respectively, in normal and antibody-injected rat eyes. Results Complement activation product MAC was present in the normal rat eye, and intraocular injection of zymosan induced severe anterior uveitis. The complement regulatory proteins, MCP, DAF, CD59, and Crry, were identified in the normal rat eye. Soluble forms of Crry and CD59 were also detected in normal rat aqueous humor. Severe anterior uveitis developed in Lewis rats injected with a neutralizing mAb against Crry, with increased formation of C3 split products. Systemic complement depletion by CVF prevented the induction of anterior uveitis by anti

  4. The Borrelia hermsii Factor H Binding Protein FhbA Is Not Required for Infectivity in Mice or for Resistance to Human Complement In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Lindy M.; Miller, Daniel P.; Mallory, Katherine L.; Tegels, Brittney K.; Earnhart, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    The primary causative agent of tick-borne relapsing fever in North America is Borrelia hermsii. It has been hypothesized that B. hermsii evades complement-mediated destruction by binding factor H (FH), a host-derived negative regulator of complement. In vitro, B. hermsii produces a single FH binding protein designated FhbA (FH binding protein A). The properties and ligand binding activity of FhbA suggest that it plays multiple roles in pathogenesis. It binds plasminogen and has been identified as a significant target of a B1b B cell-mediated IgM response in mice. FhbA has also been explored as a potential diagnostic antigen for B. hermsii infection in humans. The ability to test the hypothesis that FhbA is a critical virulence factor in vivo has been hampered by the lack of well-developed systems for the genetic manipulation of the relapsing fever spirochetes. In this report, we have successfully generated a B. hermsii fhbA deletion mutant (the B. hermsii YORΔfhbA strain) through allelic exchange mutagenesis. Deletion of fhbA abolished FH binding by the YORΔfhbA strain and eliminated cleavage of C3b on the cell surface. However, the YORΔfhbA strain remained infectious in mice and retained resistance to killing in vitro by human complement. Collectively, these results indicate that B. hermsii employs an FhbA/FH-independent mechanism of complement evasion that allows for resistance to killing by human complement and persistence in mice. PMID:24866803

  5. The outer membrane protease PgtE of Salmonella enterica interferes with the alternative complement pathway by cleaving factors B and H.

    PubMed

    Riva, Rauna; Korhonen, Timo K; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The virulence factor PgtE is an outer membrane protease (omptin) of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella enterica that causes diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to severe enteric fever. It is surface exposed in bacteria that have a short-chain, i.e., rough LPS, as observed e.g., in bacteria residing inside macrophages or just emerging from them. We investigated whether PgtE cleaves the complement factors B (B) and H (H), key proteins controlling formation and inactivation of the complement protein C3b and thereby the activity of the complement system. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium or omptin-expressing recombinant E. coli bacteria were incubated with purified human complement proteins or recombinant H fragments. PgtE cleaved both B and H, whereas its close homolog Pla of Yersinia pestis cleaved only H. H was cleaved at both N- and C-termini, while the central region resisted proteolysis. Because of multiple effects of PgtE on complement components (cleavage of C3, C3b, B, and H) we assessed its effect on the opsonophagocytosis of Salmonella. In human serum, C3 cleavage was dependent on proteolytically active PgtE. Human neutrophils interacted less with serum-opsonized FITC-stained S. enterica 14028R than with the isogenic ΔpgtE strain, as analyzed by flow cytometry. In conclusion, cleavage of B and H by PgtE, together with C3 cleavage, affects the C3-mediated recognition of S. enterica by human neutrophils, thus thwarting the immune protection against Salmonella. PMID:25705210

  6. The outer membrane protease PgtE of Salmonella enterica interferes with the alternative complement pathway by cleaving factors B and H

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Rauna; Korhonen, Timo K.; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The virulence factor PgtE is an outer membrane protease (omptin) of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella enterica that causes diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to severe enteric fever. It is surface exposed in bacteria that have a short-chain, i.e., rough LPS, as observed e.g., in bacteria residing inside macrophages or just emerging from them. We investigated whether PgtE cleaves the complement factors B (B) and H (H), key proteins controlling formation and inactivation of the complement protein C3b and thereby the activity of the complement system. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium or omptin-expressing recombinant E. coli bacteria were incubated with purified human complement proteins or recombinant H fragments. PgtE cleaved both B and H, whereas its close homolog Pla of Yersinia pestis cleaved only H. H was cleaved at both N- and C-termini, while the central region resisted proteolysis. Because of multiple effects of PgtE on complement components (cleavage of C3, C3b, B, and H) we assessed its effect on the opsonophagocytosis of Salmonella. In human serum, C3 cleavage was dependent on proteolytically active PgtE. Human neutrophils interacted less with serum-opsonized FITC-stained S. enterica 14028R than with the isogenic ΔpgtE strain, as analyzed by flow cytometry. In conclusion, cleavage of B and H by PgtE, together with C3 cleavage, affects the C3-mediated recognition of S. enterica by human neutrophils, thus thwarting the immune protection against Salmonella. PMID:25705210

  7. Vaccine-Induced Human Antibodies to PspA Augment Complement C3 Deposition on Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Martina M.; Bartlett, William; Briles, David E.; Hicks, Bryony; Jurkuvenas, Audra; Lau, Peggy; Ren, Bing; Millar, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein (PspA) is a virulence factor expressed by all clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae. PspAs are variable in structure and have been grouped into clades and cross-reacting families based on sequence similarities and immunologic cross-reactivity. At least 98 percent of PspAs are found in PspA families 1 or 2. PspA has been shown to interfere with complement deposition on pneumococci, thus reducing opsonization and clearance of bacteria by the host immune system. Prior studies using pooled human sera have shown that PspA interferes with C3 deposition on a single strain of S. pneumoniae, WU2, and that mouse antibody to PspA can enhance the deposition of C3 on WU2. The present studies have demonstrated that these previous findings are representative of most normal human sera and each of 7 different strains of S. pneumoniae. It was observed that PspAs of PspA families 1 and 2 could inhibit C3 deposition in the presence of immunoglobulin present in all but 3 of 22 normal human sera. These studies have also demonstrated that rabbit and human antibody to PspA can enhance the deposition of C3 on pneumococci expressing either family 1 or 2 PspAs and either capsular types 2, 3, or 11. A vaccine candidate that can elicit immunity that neutralizes or compensates for S. pneumoniae’s ability to thwart host immunity would be of value. PMID:18006268

  8. Examining coagulation-complement crosstalk: complement activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H

    2016-05-01

    The coagulation and complement systems are ancestrally related enzymatic cascades of the blood. Although their primary purposes have diverged over the past few hundred million years, they remain inextricably connected. Both complement and coagulation systems limit infection by pathogens through innate immune mechanisms. Recently, it has been shown that hyperactive complement (in particular, elevated C5a/C5b-9) is involved in the pathogenesis (including thrombosis) of diseases such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and bacteremia. Although these diseases together account for many thrombosis cases, there are many more where complement activation is not considered a causative factor leading to thrombosis. To better understand what role complement may play in the pathogenesis of thrombosis a better understanding of the mechanisms that cause over-active complement in thrombotic disease is required. PMID:27207425

  9. Differential expression of complement proteins and regulatory decay accelerating factor in relation to differentiation of cultured human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Bernet-Camard, M F; Coconnier, M H; Hudault, S; Servin, A L

    1996-01-01

    Self protection of host cells against inadvertent injury resulting from attack by autologous complement proteins is well reported for vascular epithelium. In intestinal epithelium, the expression of C complement proteins and regulatory proteins remains currently poorly reported. This study looked at the distribution of C complement proteins and regulatory decay accelerating factor (DAF) in four cultured human intestinal cell lines of embryogenic or colon cancer origins. C3 and C4 proteins and DAF were widely present in human colon adenocarcinoma T84, HT-29 glc-/+ cells compared with human embryonic INT407 cells. In contrast, no expression of C5, C5b-9, and CR1 was seen for any of the cell lines. Taking advantage of the Caco-2 cells, which spontaneously differentiate in culture, it was seen that the C3, C4, and DAF were present in undifferentiated cells and that their expression increased as a function of the cell differentiation. These results, taken together with other reports on the presence of C complement proteins and DAF in the intestinal cells infer that the expression of regulatory C complement proteins develops in parallel with the expression of C proteins to protect these cells against the potential injury resulting from the activation of these local C proteins. Moreover, the finding that the pathogenic C1845 Escherichia coli binds to the membrane bound DAF in the cultured human intestinal cells synthetising locally C proteins and regulatory C proteins supports the hypothesis that E coli could promote inflammatory disorders by blocking local regulatory protein function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8801206

  10. Involvement of Antilipoarabinomannan Antibodies in Classical Complement Activation in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hetland, Geir; Wiker, Harald G.; Høgåsen, Kolbjørn; Hamasur, Beston; Svenson, Stefan B.; Harboe, Morten

    1998-01-01

    We examined alternative and classical complement activation induced by whole bacilli of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis products. After exposure to BCG, there were higher levels of the terminal complement complex in sera from Indian tuberculosis patients than in sera from healthy controls. The addition of BCG with or without EGTA to these sera indicated that approximately 70 to 85% of the total levels of the terminal complement complex was formed by classical activation. Sera from Indian tuberculosis patients contained more antibody to lipoarabinomannan (LAM) than sera from healthy Indians. Levels of anti-LAM immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2), but not anti-LAM IgM, correlated positively with classical activation induced by BCG in the sera. By flow cytometry, deposition of C3 and terminal complement complex on bacilli incubated with normal human serum was demonstrated. The anticomplement staining was significantly reduced in the presence of EGTA and EDTA. Flow cytometry also revealed the binding of complement to BCG incubated with rabbit anti-LAM and then with factor B-depleted serum. This indicates that classical activation plays a major role in complement activation induced by mycobacteria and that anti-LAM IgG on the bacilli can mediate this response. Classical complement activation may be important for the extent of phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis by mononuclear phagocytes, which may influence the course after infection. PMID:9521145

  11. Expression of Human Complement Factor H Prevents Age-Related Macular Degeneration–Like Retina Damage and Kidney Abnormalities in Aged Cfh Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B.; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G.; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh−/−) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh−/− mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub–retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  12. Identification of factor H-like protein 1 as the predominant complement regulator in Bruch’s membrane: implications for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Simon J.; Schmidt, Christoph Q.; White, Anne M.; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Morgan, B. Paul; Bishop, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    The tight regulation of innate immunity on extracellular matrix (ECM) is a vital part of immune homeostasis throughout the human body and disruption to this regulation in the eye is thought to contribute directly to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The plasma complement regulator factor H (FH) is believed to be the main regulator that protects ECM against damaging complement activation. However, here we demonstrate that a truncated form of FH, called factor-H like protein 1 (FHL-1), is the main regulatory protein in the layer of ECM under human retina, called Bruch’s membrane. Bruch’s membrane is a major site of AMD disease pathogenesis and where drusen, the hallmark lesions of AMD, form. We show that FHL-1 can passively diffuse through Bruch’s membrane, whereas the full sized, glycosylated, FH cannot. FHL-1 is largely bound to Bruch’s membrane through interactions with heparan sulfate and we show that the common Y402H polymorphism in the CFH gene, associated with an increased risk of AMD, reduces the binding of FHL-1 to this heparan sulfate. We also show that FHL-1 is retained in drusen while FH coats the periphery of the lesions, perhaps inhibiting their clearance. Our results identify a novel mechanism of complement regulation in the human eye, which highlights potential new avenues for therapeutic strategies. PMID:25305316

  13. Environmental Factors Inducing Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, N

    2012-01-01

    Background An explosion of research has been done in discovering how human health is affected by environmental factors. I will discuss the impacts of environmental cancer causing factors and how they continue to cause multiple disruptions in cellular networking. Some risk factors may not cause cancer. Other factors initiate consecutive genetic mutations that would eventually alter the normal pathway of cellular proliferations and differentiation. Genetic mutations in four groups of genes; (Oncogenes, Tumor suppressor genes, Apoptosis genes and DNA repairing genes) play a vital role in altering the normal cell division. In recent years, molecular genetics have greatly increased our understanding of the basic mechanisms in cancer development and utilizing these molecular techniques for cancer screening, diagnosis, prognosis and therapies. Inhibition of carcinogenic exposures wherever possible should be the goal of cancer prevention programs to reduce exposures from all environmental carcinogens. PMID:23304670

  14. Inflammation-inducing Factors of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which causes mycoplasmal pneumonia in human, mainly causes pneumonia in children, although it occasionally causes disease in infants and geriatrics. Some pathogenic factors produced by M. pneumoniae, such as hydrogen peroxide and Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin have been well studied. However, these factors alone cannot explain this predilection. The low incidence rate of mycoplasmal pneumonia in infants and geriatrics implies that the strong inflammatory responses induced by M. pneumoniae coordinate with the pathogenic factors to induce pneumonia. However, M. pneumoniae lacks a cell wall and does not possess an inflammation-inducing endotoxin, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In M. pneumoniae, lipoproteins were identified as an inflammation-inducing factor. Lipoproteins induce inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2. Because Mycoplasma species lack a cell wall and lipoproteins anchored in the membrane are exposed, lipoproteins and TLR2 have been thought to be important for the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae. However, recent reports suggest that M. pneumoniae also induces inflammatory responses also in a TLR2-independent manner. TLR4 and autophagy are involved in this TLR2-independent inflammation. In addition, the CARDS toxin or M. pneumoniae cytadherence induces inflammatory responses through an intracellular receptor protein complex called the inflammasome. In this review, the inflammation-inducing factors of M. pneumoniae are summarized. PMID:27065977

  15. Complement C5a induces PD-L1 expression and acts in synergy with LPS through Erk1/2 and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    An, Ling-Ling; Gorman, Jacob V; Stephens, Geoffrey; Swerdlow, Bonnie; Warrener, Paul; Bonnell, Jessica; Mustelin, Tomas; Fung, Michael; Kolbeck, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Severe bacterial infection results in both uncontrolled inflammation and immune suppression in septic patients. Although there is ample evidence that complement activation provokes overwhelming pro-inflammatory responses, whether or not it plays a role in immune suppression in this case is unclear. Here, we identify that complement C5a directly participates in negative regulation of immune responses to bacteria-induced inflammation in an ex vivo model of human whole blood. Challenge of whole blood with heat-killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces PD-L1 expression on monocytes and the production of IL-10 and TGF-β, which we show to be inhibited by C5a blockade. The induction of PD-L1 expression by C5a is via C5aR1but not C5aR2. Furthermore, C5a synergises with P. aeruginosa LPS in both PD-L1 expression and the production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Mechanistically, C5a contributes to the synergy in PD-L1 expression by specifically activating Erk1/2 and JNK signaling pathways. Our study reveals a new role for C5a in directly promoting immunosuppressive responses. Therefore, aberrant production of complement C5a during bacterial infection could have broader effect on compromising host defense including the induction of immune suppression. PMID:27624143

  16. C1q acts in the tumour microenvironment as a cancer-promoting factor independently of complement activation

    PubMed Central

    Bulla, Roberta; Tripodo, Claudio; Rami, Damiano; Ling, Guang Sheng; Agostinis, Chiara; Guarnotta, Carla; Zorzet, Sonia; Durigutto, Paolo; Botto, Marina; Tedesco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Complement C1q is the activator of the classical pathway. However, it is now recognized that C1q can exert functions unrelated to complement activation. Here we show that C1q, but not C4, is expressed in the stroma and vascular endothelium of several human malignant tumours. Compared with wild-type (WT) or C3- or C5-deficient mice, C1q-deficient (C1qa−/−) mice bearing a syngeneic B16 melanoma exhibit a slower tumour growth and prolonged survival. This effect is not attributable to differences in the tumour-infiltrating immune cells. Tumours developing in WT mice display early deposition of C1q, higher vascular density and an increase in the number of lung metastases compared with C1qa−/− mice. Bone marrow (BM) chimeras between C1qa−/− and WT mice identify non-BM-derived cells as the main local source of C1q that can promote cancer cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. Together these findings support a role for locally synthesized C1q in promoting tumour growth. PMID:26831747

  17. Microbe-specific C3b deposition in the horseshoe crab complement system in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg(2+)-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg(2+)-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca(2+)-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca(2+)-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner. PMID:22611464

  18. Microbe-Specific C3b Deposition in the Horseshoe Crab Complement System in a C2/Factor B-Dependent or -Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg2+-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg2+-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca2+-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca2+-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner. PMID:22611464

  19. [The significance of low levels of total proteins, albumins, globulins and complement factors in ascitic fluid and the development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Ljubicić, N; Bilić, A; Babić, Z; Roić, D; Banić, M

    1992-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is one of the most common complications of ascitic fluid in patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of total protein, albumin, globulin and complement ascitic fluid concentrations in development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with liver cirrhosis. In patients with liver cirrhosis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (n = 8) the ascitic fluid total protein, albumin and globulin concentrations were significantly lower than in patients with sterile ascites (n = 11) (p < 0.01). The ascitic fluid complement C3 and C4 concentrations were significantly lower in patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis than in patients with sterile ascites (9.1 +/- 3.1 mg/dL to 22.9 +/- 17.4 mg/dL, p < 0.01; 3.8 +/- 5.9 mg/dL to 8.2 +/- 5.9 mg/dL, p < 0.01, respectively). The ascites total protein, albumin, globulin and complement concentrations in cirrhotic patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis were significantly lower than in patients with sterile ascites demonstrating the importance of those factors in ascitic fluid defense against secondary bacterial infection. PMID:1343119

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fan; Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew M.

    2012-01-01

    Naïve T cells activated by antigen-presenting cells (APC) can be differentiated into at least four major types of T-helper (TH) cells: TH1, TH2, TH17 and inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) based on their unique cytokine production profiles and characteristic functions.1 TH1 produce interferon-γ (IFNγ) and are important for protective immune responses to intracellular viral, bacterial and parasitic infection. TH2 cells produce interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-23 and are critical for controlling extracellular parasites such as helminthes. TH17 cells are responsible for expelling extracellular bacteria and fungi through secretion of IL-17a, IL-17f and IL-22.2 These cells however are perhaps better known for their propensity to drive autoimmune responses. Tregs including naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTreg) play important roles in the suppressive control of both innate and adaptive immunity in vivo.3,4 PMID:22754770

  1. The disease-protective complement factor H allotypic variant Ile62 shows increased binding affinity for C3b and enhanced cofactor activity

    PubMed Central

    Tortajada, Agustín; Montes, Tamara; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Morgan, B. Paul; Harris, Claire L.; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mutations and polymorphisms in the gene encoding factor H (CFH) have been associated with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome, dense deposit disease and age-related macular degeneration. The disease-predisposing CFH variants show a differential association with pathology that has been very useful to unravel critical events in the pathogenesis of one or other disease. In contrast, the fH-Ile62 polymorphism confers strong protection to all three diseases. Using ELISA-based methods and surface plasmon resonance analyses we show here that the protective fH-Ile62 variant binds more efficiently to C3b than fH-Val62 and competes better with factor B in proconvertase formation. Functional analyses demonstrate an increased cofactor activity for fH-Ile62 in the factor I-mediated cleavage of fluid phase and surface-bound C3b; however, the two fH variants show no differences in decay accelerating activity. From these data we conclude that the protective effect of the fH-Ile62 variant is due to its better capacity to bind C3b, inhibit proconvertase formation and catalyse inactivation of fluid-phase and surface-bound C3b. This demonstration of the functional consequences of the fH-Ile62 polymorphism provides relevant insights into the complement regulatory activities of fH that will be useful in disease prediction and future development of effective therapeutics for disorders caused by complement dysregulation. PMID:19549636

  2. Complement Factor 3 Could Be an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with HBV Related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng-lin; Zhang, Ting; Ye, Yi-nong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Xie, Chan; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2016-01-01

    The complement is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple liver disorders. However, its role in patients with HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) remains unclear. Serum levels of the third and fourth complement components (C3, C4) and complement function (CH50) were examined in this prospective, observational study. Associations between their expression and disease activity were analyzed. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves. Predictors of clinical outcome were determined by Cox regression analysis. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients compared to controls. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were negatively correlated with Tbil levels but positively associated with PTA levels. C3 levels were negatively associated with MELD-Na. C3 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients who died compared to patients who survived. In a median hospital stay of 39 days, mortality occurred in 41 patients with a progressive increase based on C3 grade (P = 0.008). The actuarial probability of developing mortality was significantly higher in patients with low C3 grade compared to those with high C3 grade (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that C3 levels were an independent predictor of mortality. Complement played a pathogenic role in HBV-ACLF patients and C3 was an independent predictor of mortality. PMID:27144164

  3. Upregulation of MicroRNA-146a by Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Contributes to Hepatitis Development by Downregulating Complement Factor H

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Feng; Dai, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Shi-Hui; Zeng, Yang; Zhao, Guang-Yu; Kou, Zhi-Hua; Guo, Yan; Yu, Hong; Du, Lan-Ying; Jiang, Shi-Bo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatic injuries in hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients are caused by immune responses of the host. In our previous study, microRNA-146a (miR-146a), an innate immunity-related miRNA, and complement factor H (CFH), an important negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, were differentially expressed in HBV-expressing and HBV-free hepatocytes. Here, the roles of these factors in HBV-related liver inflammation were analyzed in detail. The expression levels of miR-146a and CFH in HBV-expressing hepatocytes were assessed via analyses of hepatocyte cell lines, transgenic mice, adenovirus-infected mice, and HBV-positive human liver samples. The expression level of miR-146a was upregulated in HBV-expressing Huh-7 hepatocytes, HBV-expressing mice, and patients with HBV infection. Further results demonstrated that the HBV X protein (HBx) was responsible for its effects on miR-146a expression through NF-κB-mediated enhancement of miR-146a promoter activity. HBV/HBx also downregulated the expression of CFH mRNA in hepatocyte cell lines and the livers of humans and transgenic mice. Furthermore, overexpression and inhibition of miR-146a in Huh-7 cells downregulated and upregulated CFH mRNA levels, respectively. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-146a downregulated CFH mRNA expression in hepatocytes via 3′-untranslated-region (UTR) pairing. The overall effect of this process in vivo is to promote liver inflammation. These results demonstrate that the HBx–miR-146a–CFH–complement activation regulation pathway might play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of chronic HBV infection. These findings have important implications for understanding the immunopathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B and developing effective therapeutic interventions. PMID:25805734

  4. The Complement System in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mayilyan, Karine R.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Sim, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    summary Several lines of evidence suggest that immunological factors contribute to schizophrenia. Since 1989, the role of complement, a major effector of innate immunity and an adjuvant of adaptive immunity, has been explored in schizophrenia. Increased activity of C1, C3, C4 complement components in schizophrenia has been reported by two or more groups. Two studies on different subject cohorts showed increased MBL-MASP-2 activity in patients versus controls. More then one report indicated a significant high frequency of FB*F allotype and low prevalence of the FS phenotype of complement factor B in schizophrenia. From the data reported, it is likely that the disorder is accompanied by alterations of the complement classical and lectin pathways, which undergo dynamic changes, depending on the illness course and the state of neuro-immune crosstalk. Recent findings, implicating complement in neurogenesis, synapse remodeling and pruning during brain development, suggest a reexamination of the potential role of complement in neurodevelopmental processes contributing to schizophrenia susceptibility. It is plausible that the multicomponent complement system has more than one dimensional association with schizophrenia susceptibility, pathopsychology and illness course, understanding of which will bring a new perspective for possible immunomodulation and immunocorrection of the disease. PMID:18560619

  5. C-reactive protein and complement factor H in aged human eyes and eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Bhutto, Imran A; Baba, Takayuki; Merges, Carol; Juriasinghani, Vikash; McLeod, D Scott; Lutty, Gerard A

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that inflammation and immune-mediated processes (complement activation) play an important role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. A genetic variation in the complement factor H (CFH) gene and plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a systemic marker of subclinical inflammation, have been consistently shown to be associated with an increased risk for AMD. In the present study, we examined the immunolocalization of CRP and CFH in aged control human donor eyes (n=10; mean age 79 yrs) and eyes with AMD (n=18; mean age 83 yrs). Methods Alkaline phosphatase immunohistochemistry was performed using polyclonal antibodies against CRP and CFH on cryopreserved tissue sections from disc/macular blocks. Three independent masked observers scored the reaction product (0-8). Results In aged control eyes, the retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch’s membrane/choriocapillaris (RPE/BrM/CC) complex including intercapillary septa (ICS) had the most prominent immunostaining for CRP and CFH. CRP was significantly higher than controls in BrM/CC/ICS and choroidal stroma in early and wet AMD eyes (p<0.05). In contrast, CFH was significantly lower in BrM/CC/ICS complex of AMD choroids than in controls (p<0.05). Interestingly, CRP and CFH were significantly reduced in BrM/CC/ICS complex in atrophic area of macula in geographic atrophy (GA)(p<0.05). Drusen and basal laminar deposits were intensely positive for CRP and CFH. Conclusion These immunohistochemical findings show that changes in distribution and relative levels of CRP and CFH were evident in early and late AMD eyes. This suggests that high levels of CRP and insufficient CFH at the retina/choroid interface may lead to uncontrolled complement activation with associated cell and tissue damage. This study supports the hypothesis that inflammation and immune-mediated mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:21633121

  6. Drug-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in caspase-8-complemented neuroblastoma cells proceeds via activation of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways and caspase-dependent cleavage of XIAP, Bcl-xL and RIP.

    PubMed

    Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick; Bourloud, Katia Balmas; Auderset, Katya; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Gross, Nicole

    2004-07-15

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood neoplasm which heterogeneous behavior can be explained by differential regulation of apoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces rapid apoptosis in most tumor cells and thus represents a promising anticancer agent. We have reported silencing of caspase-8 expression in highly malignant NB cells as a possible mechanism of resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To explore the particular contribution of caspase-8 in such resistance, retroviral-mediated stable caspase-8 expression was induced in the IGR-N91 cells. As a result, sensitivity to TRAIL was fully restored in the caspase-8-complemented cells. TRAIL-induced cell death could be further enhanced by cotreatment of IGR-N91-C8 and SH-EP cells with cycloheximide or subtoxic concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs in a caspase-dependent manner. Sensitization to TRAIL involved enhanced death receptor DR5 expression, activation of Bid and the complete caspases cascade. Interestingly, combined treatments also enhanced the cleavage-mediated inactivation of antiapoptotic molecules, XIAP, Bcl-x(L) and RIP. Our results show that restoration of active caspase-8 expression in a caspase-8-deficient NB cell line is necessary and sufficient to fully restore TRAIL sensitivity. Moreover, the synergistic effect of drugs and TRAIL results from activation of the caspase cascade via a mitochondrial pathway-mediated amplification loop and from the inactivation of apoptosis inhibitors. PMID:15094781

  7. Kinetics of acute inflammation induced by Escherichia coli in rabbits. II. The effect of hyperimmunization, complement depletion, and depletion of leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kopaniak, M. M.; Movat, H. Z.

    1983-01-01

    The inflammatory response to Escherichia coli was quantitated in the skin of normal rabbits and the kinetics established as described previously. Hyperemia, measured with radiolabeled microspheres; vascular permeability, estimated with 125 I-albumin; and leukocyte infiltration, quantitated with 51Cr-labeled autologous leukocytes, reached maximal values 3 hours after the injection of bacteria and subsided almost completely by 6 hours. Hemorrhage, measured with homologous 59Fe-erythrocytes, continued to increase between 1 and 6 hours after injection and then reached plateau levels. The lesions were studied up to 8 hours, since in the previous study no changes were observed beyond that time. In the study described in this paper, the host mediation systems were manipulated in various groups of rabbits in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the inflammatory reaction. One group of animals was hyperimmunized with the E coli organisms, another was partially depleted of hemolytic complement with cobra venom factor, and yet another was rendered leukopenic with nitrogen mustard. In hyperimmunized animals hyperemia in the dermal lesions induced by the microorganisms was significantly more intense than in normal rabbits. Vascular permeability increase occurred earlier in hyperimmunized rabbits and at 1 hour was significantly greater than in normals. Decomplemented rabbits had significantly less vascular permeability than normal animals, whereas in leukopenic rabbits no increase in vascular permeability could be elicited. Leukocyte accumulation was increased over the normal animals in the lesions of hyperimmunized rabbits. Hemorrhage was significantly decreased in leukopenic rabbits. Histologic examination of the lesions revealed that whereas in normal animals the infiltrating neutrophils ingested most of the bacteria and formed definite abscesses by 6-8 hours, these abscesses were absent in leukopenic animals, and free-lying bacteria were

  8. Factors Affecting Thermally Induced Furan Formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furan, a potential carcinogen, can be induced by heat from sugars and fatty acids. However, factors that contribute to its formation in foods are unclear. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of pH, presence of phosphate, heating time and heating temperature on furan forma...

  9. Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4b binding protein to group A streptococcal strains isolated from tonsillar tissue and blood.

    PubMed

    Suvilehto, Jari; Jarva, Hanna; Seppänen, Mikko; Siljander, Tuula; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2008-06-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is the most common pathogen causing bacterial pharyngitis. We isolated streptococcal strains from tonsils removed from patients with tonsillar disease (n=202) and studied their ability to bind the complement regulators factor H (FH) and C4b binding protein (C4BP) using 125 I-labeled proteins. Blood isolates of GAS (n=10) were obtained from patients with bacteraemia. Streptococci were isolated from 21% of the tonsillitis patients. The emm and T types of the GAS strains were determined. Of the 26 GAS strains studied, only six could bind FH and/or C4BP above the threshold levels. The fraction of the offered radioactive protein bound ranged between 6-12% for FH and 19-56% for C4BP. The clinical course of the tonsillar disease was not related to the binding of FH or C4BP by GAS. The binding strains were mostly of the T4M4 or T28M28 type. From the invasive strains (n=10), three bound FH (binding level: 8-11%) and two C4BP (36-39%). The binding correlated only partially to M-protein (emm) type suggesting that the binding was not exclusively due to M-protein. The results indicate that complement regulator binding by GAS is only partially related to pathogenicity and not a universal property of all group A streptococci. PMID:18538613

  10. The chromosomal order of genes controlling the major histocompatibility complex, properdin factor B, and deficiency of the second component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Raum, D; Glass, D; Carpenter, C B; Alper, C A; Schur, P H

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of the genes coding for HLA to those coding for properdin Factor B allotypes and for deficiency of the second component of complement (C2) was studied in families of patients with connective tissue disorders. Patients were selected because they were heterozygous or homozygous for C2 deficiency. 12 families with 15 matings informative for C2 deficiency were found. Of 57 informative meioses, two crossovers were noted between the C2 deficiency gene and the HLA-B gene, with a recombinant fraction of 0.035. A lod score of 13 was calculated for linkage between C2 deficiency and HLA-B at a maximum likelihood value of the recombinant fraction of 0.04. 18 families with 21 informative matings for both properdin Factor B allotype and HLA-B were found. Of 72 informative meioses, three recombinants were found, giving a recombinant fraction of 0.042. A lod score of 16 between HLA-B and Factor B allotypes was calculated at a maximum likelihood value of the recombinant fraction of 0.04. A crossover was shown to have occurred between genes for Factor B and HLA-D, in which HLA-D segregared with HLA-A and B. These studies suggest that the genes for Factor B and C2 deficiency are located outside those for HLA, that the order of genese is HLA-A, -B, -D, Factor B allotype, C2 deficiency, that the genes coding for C2 deficiency and Factor B allotypes are approximately 3--5 centimorgans from the HLA-A and HLA-B loci, and that the apparent lack of recombinants between the Factor B gene and C2 deficiency gene suggests that these two genes lie in close proximity to one another. PMID:993342