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Sample records for complement lectin pathway

  1. Mitochondria and the Lectin Pathway of Complement*

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Christel R.; Jensen, Lisbeth; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Holm, Ida E.; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens C.; Degn, Søren E.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of our cells, are remnants of a eubacterial endosymbiont. Notwithstanding the evolutionary time that has passed since the initial endosymbiotic event, mitochondria have retained many hallmarks of their eubacterial origin. Recent studies have indicated that during perturbations of normal homeostasis, such as following acute trauma leading to massive necrosis and release of mitochondria, the immune system might mistake symbiont for enemy and initiate an inappropriate immune response. The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading microbial pathogens, and as such is the primary suspect in the recognition of mitochondria-derived danger-associated molecular patterns and initiation of an aberrant response. Conversely, innate immune mechanisms are also central to noninflammatory clearance of innocuous agents. Here we investigated the role of a central humoral component of innate immunity, the lectin pathway of complement, in recognition of mitochondria in vitro and in vivo. We found that the soluble pattern recognition molecules, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), L-ficolin, and M-ficolin, were able to recognize mitochondria. Furthermore, MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) was able to activate the lectin pathway and deposit C4 onto mitochondria, suggesting that these molecules are involved either in homeostatic clearance of mitochondria or in induction of untoward inflammatory reactions. We found that following mitochondrial challenge, C3 was consumed in vivo in the absence of overt inflammation, indicating a potential role of complement in noninflammatory clearance of mitochondria. Thus, we report here the first indication of involvement of the lectin pathway in mitochondrial immune handling. PMID:23378531

  2. Role of the lectin complement pathway in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-10-01

    In the last 15 years two major advances in the role of complement in the kidney transplant have come about. The first is that ischaemia reperfusion injury and its profound effect on transplant outcome is dependent on the terminal product of complement activation, C5b-9. The second key observation relates to the function of the small biologically active fragments C3a and C5a released by complement activation in increasing antigen presentation and priming the T cell response that results in transplant rejection. In both cases local synthesis of C3 principally by the renal tubule cells plays an essential role that overshadows the role of the circulating pool of C3 generated largely by hepatocyte synthesis. More recent efforts have investigated the molecules expressed by renal tissue that can trigger complement activation. These have revealed a prominent effect of collectin-11 (CL-11), a soluble C-type lectin that is expressed in renal tissue and aligns with its major ligand L-fucose at sites of complement activation following ischaemic stress. Biochemical studies have shown that interaction between CL-11 and L-fucose results in complement activation by the lectin complement pathway, precisely targeting the innate immune response to the ischaemic tubule surface. Therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammatory and immune stimulation in ischaemic kidney have so far targeted C3 or its activation products and several are in clinical trials. The finding that lectin-fucose interaction is an important trigger of lectin pathway complement activation within the donor organ opens up further therapeutic targets where intervention could protect the donor kidney against complement. PMID:27286717

  3. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  4. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Simone L; Pike, Robert N; Mika, Angela; Blom, Anna M; Hofmann, Andreas; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Kemp, Dave; Fischer, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss) thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL) and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs) and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics. PMID:24854034

  5. Structural insights into the initiating complex of the lectin pathway of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Troels R; Le, Le T M; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Sander, Bjoern; Golas, Monika M; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Andersen, Gregers R; Thiel, Steffen

    2015-02-01

    The proteolytic cascade of the complement system is initiated when pattern-recognition molecules (PRMs) bind to ligands, resulting in the activation of associated proteases. In the lectin pathway of complement, the complex of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1) initiates the pathway by activating a second protease, MASP-2. Here we present a structural study of a PRM/MASP complex and derive the overall architecture of the 450 kDa MBL/MASP-1 complex using small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy. The serine protease (SP) domains from the zymogen MASP-1 dimer protrude from the cone-like MBL tetramer and are separated by at least 20 nm. This suggests that intracomplex activation within a single MASP-1 dimer is unlikely and instead supports intercomplex activation, whereby the MASP SP domains are accessible to nearby PRM-bound MASPs. This activation mechanism differs fundamentally from the intracomplex initiation models previously proposed for both the lectin and the classical pathway. PMID:25579818

  6. Classical and lectin complement pathway activity in polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; Cats, Elisabeth A; Vlam, Lotte; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan; Herpers, Bjorn; de Jong, Ben A W; Rijkers, Ger; van Strijp, Jos; Notermans, Nicolette C; van den Berg, Leonard H; van der Pol, W-Ludo

    2016-01-15

    Polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy (IgM-PNP) is a slowly progressive, sensorimotor neuropathy. It is assumed that complement activation contributes to IgM-PNP pathogenesis. We investigated whether innate differences in complement activity of the classical and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways are associated with IgM-PNP or its severity. We measured complement activity using ELISA and determined MBL serumc oncentrations and MBL gene polymorphisms in 83 patients and 83 healthy controls. We did not observe differences between IgM-PNP patients and healthy controls nor associations with different disease severities. Differences in innate complement activity are not likely to explain susceptibility to or severity of IgM-PNP. PMID:26711574

  7. Structural Basis for the Function of Complement Component C4 within the Classical and Lectin Pathways of Complement.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Kidmose, Rune T; Petersen, Steen V; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Prohászka, Zoltan; Andersen, Gregers R

    2015-06-01

    Complement component C4 is a central protein in the classical and lectin pathways within the complement system. During activation of complement, its major fragment C4b becomes covalently attached to the surface of pathogens and altered self-tissue, where it acts as an opsonin marking the surface for removal. Moreover, C4b provides a platform for assembly of the proteolytically active convertases that mediate downstream complement activation by cleavage of C3 and C5. In this article, we present the crystal and solution structures of the 195-kDa C4b. Our results provide the molecular details of the rearrangement accompanying C4 cleavage and suggest intramolecular flexibility of C4b. The conformations of C4b and its paralogue C3b are shown to be remarkably conserved, suggesting that the convertases from the classical and alternative pathways are likely to share their overall architecture and mode of substrate recognition. We propose an overall molecular model for the classical pathway C5 convertase in complex with C5, suggesting that C3b increases the affinity for the substrate by inducing conformational changes in C4b rather than a direct interaction with C5. C4b-specific features revealed by our structural studies are probably involved in the assembly of the classical pathway C3/C5 convertases and C4b binding to regulators. PMID:25911760

  8. Mannose-binding Lectin Mediated Complement Pathway in Autoimmune Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Mehrdad; Dabirzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Dastravan, Nastaran; Etemadifar, Masoud; Ghadimi, Keyvan; Saadatpour, Zahra; Rezaei, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with variable phenotypic presentations, while Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is the prototypic acute inflammatory disorder that affects the peripheral nervous system. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a T cell dependent and antibody mediated autoimmune disease. Although it has been shown that complement plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of MS, GBS, and MG, the role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) as a biomarker of immunopathogensis of these diseases and also its association with the severity of them have been poorly investigated. Therefore, in this study we aimed to measure plasma levels of MBL in patients with MS, GBS, and MG. In a case-control study, plasma was obtained from healthy controls (n=100) and also patients with MS (n=120), GBS (n=30), and MG (n=30). Plasma level measurement of MBL was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mean serum level of MBL was significantly different between groups of patients and healthy controls (p<0.001). We also found a positive correlation between plasma levels of MBL and severity scores of MS, MG, and GBS patients including: expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (r=+0.60 and p=<0.001), quantitative myasthenia gravis score (QMGS) (r=+0.56 and p=0.01), and GBS disability scale (GDS) (r=+0.37 and p=0.04). Taken together, our findings suggest that complement activation mediated by MBL contributes to the pathogenesis and also severity of MS, MG, and GBS. However, because the lectin pathway can be involved in several phases of the immune response, further evidence will be required to elucidate the underlying mechanism. PMID:27424141

  9. Cholesterol Crystals Activate the Lectin Complement Pathway via Ficolin-2 and Mannose-Binding Lectin: Implications for the Progression of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pilely, Katrine; Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette; Gal, Peter; Pál, Gábor; Halvorsen, Bente; Holm, Sverre; Aukrust, Pål; Bakke, Siril Skaret; Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Nervik, Ingunn; Niyonzima, Nathalie; Bartels, Emil D; Stahl, Gregory L; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Espevik, Terje; Garred, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Cholesterol crystals (CC) play an essential role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. CC activate the classical and the alternative complement pathways, but the role of the lectin pathway is unknown. We hypothesized that the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) from the lectin pathway bind CC and function as an upstream innate inflammatory signal in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We investigated the binding of the PRMs mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3, the associated serine proteases, and complement activation products to CC in vitro using recombinant proteins, specific inhibitors, as well as deficient and normal sera. Additionally, we examined the deposition of ficolin-2 and MBL in human carotid plaques by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the lectin pathway was activated on CC by binding of ficolin-2 and MBL in vitro, resulting in activation and deposition of complement activation products. MBL bound to CC in a calcium-dependent manner whereas ficolin-2 binding was calcium-independent. No binding was observed for ficolin-1 or ficolin-3. MBL and ficolin-2 were present in human carotid plaques, and binding of MBL to CC was confirmed in vivo by immunohistochemistry, showing localization of MBL around CC clefts. Moreover, we demonstrated that IgM, but not IgG, bound to CC in vitro and that C1q binding was facilitated by IgM. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that PRMs from the lectin pathway recognize CC and provides evidence for an important role for this pathway in the inflammatory response induced by CC in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. PMID:27183610

  10. Salivary agglutinin is the major component in human saliva that modulates the lectin pathway of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Gunput, Sabrina Tg; Wouters, Diana; Nazmi, Kamran; Cukkemane, Nivedita; Brouwer, Mieke; Veerman, Enno Ci; Ligtenberg, Antoon Jm

    2016-05-01

    Saliva interacts with blood after mucosal damage or leakage of gingival crevicular fluid. Surface-adsorbed salivary agglutinin (SAG) activates the lectin pathway (LP) of the complement system via mannose-binding lectin, while SAG in solution inhibits complement activation. In the present study we investigated if, next to SAG, whole and glandular saliva itself and other salivary glycoproteins activate or inhibit the LP. Complement activation was measured by detecting C4 deposition on microtiter plates coated with saliva or purified proteins. Complement inhibition was measured after incubating serum with saliva or proteins in microtiter plates coated with mannan, an LP activator. Adsorbed whole, sublingual and submandibular saliva showed LP-dependent complement activation. Blood group secretors, but not non-secretors, activated the LP. Saliva of both secretors and non-secretors inhibited C4 deposition on mannan. After depletion of SAG, saliva no longer inhibited the LP. Other salivary proteins, including amylase, MUC5B and histatin 2, did not activate or inhibit the LP. Surface-adsorbed whole saliva and glandular saliva samples activate the LP of complement, depending on the presence of SAG and the secretor status of the donor. In solution, saliva inhibits the LP, depending on the presence of SAG, but independent of the secretor status. PMID:27048414

  11. Human L-ficolin, a Recognition Molecule of the Lectin Activation Pathway of Complement, Activates Complement by Binding to Pneumolysin, the Major Toxin of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Youssif M.; Kenawy, Hany I.; Muhammad, Adnan; Sim, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune response, providing a critical line of defense against different pathogens including S. pneumoniae. Complement is activated via three distinct pathways: the classical (CP), the alternative (AP) and the lectin pathway (LP). The role of Pneumolysin (PLY), a bacterial toxin released by S. pneumoniae, in triggering complement activation has been studied in vitro. Our results demonstrate that in both human and mouse sera complement was activated via the CP, initiated by direct binding of even non-specific IgM and IgG3 to PLY. Absence of CP activity in C1q−/− mouse serum completely abolished any C3 deposition. However, C1q depleted human serum strongly opsonized PLY through abundant deposition of C3 activation products, indicating that the LP may have a vital role in activating the human complement system on PLY. We identified that human L-ficolin is the critical LP recognition molecule that drives LP activation on PLY, while all of the murine LP recognition components fail to bind and activate complement on PLY. This work elucidates the detailed interactions between PLY and complement and shows for the first time a specific role of the LP in PLY-mediated complement activation in human serum. PMID:24349316

  12. Mouse Ficolin B Has an Ability to Form Complexes with Mannose-Binding Lectin-Associated Serine Proteases and Activate Complement through the Lectin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Yuichi; Iwaki, Daisuke; Ishida, Yumi; Takahashi, Minoru; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo

    2012-01-01

    Ficolins are thought to be pathogen-associated-molecular-pattern-(PAMP-) recognition molecules that function to support innate immunity. Like mannose-binding lectins (MBLs), most mammalian ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), leading to complement activation via the lectin pathway. However, the ability of murine ficolin B, a homologue of human M-ficolin, to perform this function is still controversial. The results of the present study show that ficolin B in mouse bone marrow is an oligomeric protein. Ficolin B, pulled down using GlcNAc-agarose, contained very low, but detectable, amounts of MASP-2 and small MBL-associated protein (sMAP) and showed detectable C4-deposition activity on immobilized N-acetylglucosamine. These biochemical features of ficolin B were confirmed using recombinant mouse ficolin B produced in CHO cells. Taken together, these results suggest that like other mammalian homologues, murine ficolin B has an ability to exert its function via the lectin pathway. PMID:22523468

  13. Critical Role and Therapeutic Control of the Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation in an Abortion-Prone Mouse Mating.

    PubMed

    Petitbarat, Marie; Durigutto, Paolo; Macor, Paolo; Bulla, Roberta; Palmioli, Alessandro; Bernardi, Anna; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Ledee, Nathalie; Chaouat, Gerard; Tedesco, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    The abortion-prone mating combination CBA/J × DBA/2 has been recognized as a model of preeclampsia, and complement activation has been implicated in the high rate of pregnancy loss observed in CBA/J mice. We have analyzed the implantation sites collected from DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice for the deposition of the complement recognition molecules using CBA/J mated with BALB/c mice as a control group. MBL-A was observed in the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2 combination in the absence of MBL-C and was undetectable in BALB/c-mated CBA/J mice. Conversely, C1q was present in both mating combinations. Searching for other complement components localized at the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2, we found C4 and C3, but we failed to reveal C1r. These data suggest that complement is activated through the lectin pathway and proceeds to completion of the activation sequence as revealed by C9 deposition. MBL-A was detected as early as 3.5 d of pregnancy, and MBL-A deficiency prevented pregnancy loss in the abortion-prone mating combination. The contribution of the terminal complex to miscarriage was supported by the finding that pregnancy failure was largely inhibited by the administration of neutralizing Ab to C5. Treatment of DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice with Polyman2 that binds to MBL-A with high affinity proved to be highly effective in controlling the activation of the lectin pathway and in preventing fetal loss. PMID:26561549

  14. Genetically engineered fusion of MAP-1 and factor H domains 1-5 generates a potent dual upstream inhibitor of both the lectin and alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Nordmaj, Mie Anemone; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Hein, Estrid; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of the complement cascade has emerged as an option for treatment of a range of diseases. Mannose-binding lectin/ficolin/collectin-associated protein (MAP-1) is a pattern recognition molecule (PRM)-associated inhibitor of the lectin pathway. The central regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) is complement factor H (FH). Our aim was to design a dual upstream inhibitor of both human lectin and APs by fusing MAP-1 with a part of FH. There were 2 different recombinant chimeric proteins comprising full-length human MAP-1 and the first 5 N-terminal domains of human FH designed. The FH domains were orientated either in the N- or C-terminal part of MAP-1. The complement inhibition potential in human serum was assessed. Both chimeric constructs displayed the characteristics of the native molecules and bound to the PRMs with an EC50 of ∼ 2 nM. However, when added to serum diluted 1:4 in a solid-phase functional assay, only the first 5 N-terminal domains of complement FH fused to the C-terminal part of full-length MAP-1 chimeric construct were able to combine inhibition of lectin and AP activation with an half maximal inhibitory concentration of ∼ 100 and 20 nM, respectively. No effect was seen on the classical pathway. Fusion of MAP-1 with FH domains represents a novel therapeutic approach for selective targeting upstream and central complement activation at sites of inflammation. PMID:26260032

  15. MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-factor D activator in resting blood: the lectin and the alternative complement pathways are fundamentally linked

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Szakács, Dávid; Oroszlán, Gábor; Kortvely, Elod; Kiss, Bence; Boros, Eszter; Szász, Róbert; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    MASP-3 was discovered 15 years ago as the third mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease of the complement lectin pathway. Lacking any verified substrate its role remained ambiguous. MASP-3 was shown to compete with a key lectin pathway enzyme MASP-2 for MBL binding, and was therefore considered to be a negative complement regulator. Later, knock-out mice experiments suggested that MASP-1 and/or MASP-3 play important roles in complement pro-factor D (pro-FD) maturation. However, studies on a MASP-1/MASP-3-deficient human patient produced contradicting results. In normal resting blood unperturbed by ongoing coagulation or complement activation, factor D is present predominantly in its active form, suggesting that resting blood contains at least one pro-FD activating proteinase that is not a direct initiator of coagulation or complement activation. We have recently showed that all three MASPs can activate pro-FD in vitro. In resting blood, however, using our previously evolved MASP-1 and MASP-2 inhibitors we proved that neither MASP-1 nor MASP-2 activates pro-FD. Other plasma proteinases, particularly MASP-3, remained candidates for that function. For this study we evolved a specific MASP-3 inhibitor and unambiguously proved that activated MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-FD activator in resting blood, which demonstrates a fundamental link between the lectin and alternative pathways. PMID:27535802

  16. MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-factor D activator in resting blood: the lectin and the alternative complement pathways are fundamentally linked.

    PubMed

    Dobó, József; Szakács, Dávid; Oroszlán, Gábor; Kortvely, Elod; Kiss, Bence; Boros, Eszter; Szász, Róbert; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    MASP-3 was discovered 15 years ago as the third mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease of the complement lectin pathway. Lacking any verified substrate its role remained ambiguous. MASP-3 was shown to compete with a key lectin pathway enzyme MASP-2 for MBL binding, and was therefore considered to be a negative complement regulator. Later, knock-out mice experiments suggested that MASP-1 and/or MASP-3 play important roles in complement pro-factor D (pro-FD) maturation. However, studies on a MASP-1/MASP-3-deficient human patient produced contradicting results. In normal resting blood unperturbed by ongoing coagulation or complement activation, factor D is present predominantly in its active form, suggesting that resting blood contains at least one pro-FD activating proteinase that is not a direct initiator of coagulation or complement activation. We have recently showed that all three MASPs can activate pro-FD in vitro. In resting blood, however, using our previously evolved MASP-1 and MASP-2 inhibitors we proved that neither MASP-1 nor MASP-2 activates pro-FD. Other plasma proteinases, particularly MASP-3, remained candidates for that function. For this study we evolved a specific MASP-3 inhibitor and unambiguously proved that activated MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-FD activator in resting blood, which demonstrates a fundamental link between the lectin and alternative pathways. PMID:27535802

  17. Simultaneous Complement Response via Lectin Pathway in Retina and Optic Nerve in an Experimental Autoimmune Glaucoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Reinehr, Sabrina; Reinhard, Jacqueline; Gandej, Marcel; Kuehn, Sandra; Noristani, Rozina; Faissner, Andreas; Burkhard Dick, H.; Joachim, Stephanie C.

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease and especially mechanisms occurring independently from an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are still unknown. Likely, the immune system contributes to the glaucoma pathogenesis. Previously, IgG antibody depositions and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss were found in an IOP-independent autoimmune glaucoma model. Therefore, we investigated the possible participation of the complement system in this model. Here, rats were immunized with bovine optic nerve homogenate antigen (ONA), while controls (Co) received sodium chloride (n = 5–6/group). After 14 days, RGC density was quantified on flatmounts. No changes in the number of RGCs could be observed at this point in time. Longitudinal optic nerve sections were stained against the myelin basic protein (MBP). We could note few signs of degeneration processes. In order to detect distinct complement components, retinas and optic nerves were labeled with complement markers at 3, 7, 14, and 28 days and analyzed. Significantly more C3 and MAC depositions were found in retinas and optic nerves of the ONA group. These were already present at day 7, before RGC loss and demyelination occurred. Additionally, an upregulation of C3 protein was noted via Western Blot at this time. After 14 days, quantitative real-time PCR revealed significantly more C3 mRNA in the ONA retinas. An upregulation of the lectin pathway-associated mannose-serine-protease-2 (MASP2) was observed in the retinas as well as in the optic nerves of the ONA group after 7 days. Significantly more MASP2 in retinas could also be observed via Western Blot analyses at this point in time. No effect was noted in regard to C1q. Therefore, we assume that the immunization led to an activation of the complement system via the lectin pathway in retinas and optic nerves at an early stage in this glaucoma model. This activation seems to be an early response, which then triggers degeneration. These findings can help to develop novel

  18. Studies of the binding of ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 from the complement lectin pathway to Leptospira biflexa, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Valencia, Mónica Marcela Castiblanco; Elias, Waldir P; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Garred, Peter; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    Ficolins recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns and activate the lectin pathway of complement system. However, our knowledge regarding pathogen recognition of human ficolins is still limited. We therefore set out to explore and investigate the possible interactions of the two main serum ficolins, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 with different Gram-negative bacteria. We used recombinant ficolin molecules and normal human serum, which were detected with anti-ficolin monoclonal antibodies. In addition we investigated the capacity of these pathogens to activate the lectin pathway of complement system. We show for the first time that human ficolin-2 recognizes the nonpathogenic spirochete Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc, but not the pathogenic Leptospira interrogans serovar Kennewicki strain Fromm. Additionally, human ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 recognize pathogenic Pasteurella pneumotropica, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) serotype O111ab:H2 and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) serogroup O71 but not four enterohemorrhagic E. coli, three EPEC, three EAEC and two nonpathogenic E. coli strains (DH5α and HB101). The lectin pathway was activated by Pasteurella pneumotropica, EPEC O111ab:H2 and EAEC O71 after incubation with C1q depleted human serum. In conclusion, this study provide novel insight in the binding and complement activating capacity of the lectin pathway initiation molecules ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 towards relevant Gram-negative pathogens of pathophysiological relevance. PMID:26074063

  19. Inhibition of the classical and lectin pathway of the complement system by recombinant LAIR-2.

    PubMed

    Olde Nordkamp, Marloes J M; Boross, Peter; Yildiz, Cafer; Jansen, J H Marco; Leusen, Jeanette H W; Wouters, Diana; Urbanus, Rolf T; Hack, C Erik; Meyaard, Linde

    2014-01-01

    Activation of complement may cause severe tissue damage in antibody-mediated allograft rejection and other antibody-mediated clinical conditions; therefore, novel potent complement inhibitors are needed. Previously, we described binding of the inhibitory receptor LAIR-1 and its soluble family member LAIR-2 to collagen. Here, we investigated binding of LAIR-1 and LAIR-2 to the complement proteins C1q and MBL, which both have collagen-like domains, and evaluated the effect of this binding on complement function. We demonstrate specific binding of recombinant LAIR proteins to both C1q and MBL. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that LAIR-2-Fc protein bound C1q and MBL with the highest affinity compared to LAIR-2-HIS. We, therefore, hypothesized that LAIR-2-Fc is a potent complement inhibitor. Indeed, LAIR-2-Fc inhibited C4 fixation to IgG or mannan, reduced activation of C4 by aggregated IgG in plasma and inhibited iC3b deposition on cells. Finally, LAIR-2-Fc inhibited complement-mediated lysis of cells sensitized with anti-HLA antibodies in an ex vivo model for antibody-mediated transplant rejection. Thus, LAIR-2-Fc is an effective novel complement inhibitor for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated allograft rejection and antibody-mediated clinical conditions. PMID:24192271

  20. The Group B Streptococcus–Secreted Protein CIP Interacts with C4, Preventing C3b Deposition via the Lectin and Classical Complement Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Rosini, Roberto; Buccato, Scilla

    2016-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal invasive disease. GBS bacteria are surrounded by a thick capsular polysaccharide that is a potent inhibitor of complement deposition via the alternative pathway. Several of its surface molecules can however activate the classical and lectin complement pathways, rendering this species still vulnerable to phagocytic killing. In this study we have identified a novel secreted protein named complement interfering protein (CIP) that downregulates complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway. The CIP protein showed high affinity toward C4b and inhibited its interaction with C2, presumably preventing the formation of the C4bC2a convertase. Addition of recombinant CIP to GBS cip-negative bacteria resulted in decreased deposition of C3b on their surface and in diminished phagocytic killing in a whole-blood assay. Our data reveal a novel strategy exploited by GBS to counteract innate immunity and could be valuable for the development of anti-infective agents against this important pathogen. PMID:26608922

  1. The Group B Streptococcus-Secreted Protein CIP Interacts with C4, Preventing C3b Deposition via the Lectin and Classical Complement Pathways.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Rosini, Roberto; Buccato, Scilla; Speziale, Pietro; Margarit, Immaculada

    2016-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal invasive disease. GBS bacteria are surrounded by a thick capsular polysaccharide that is a potent inhibitor of complement deposition via the alternative pathway. Several of its surface molecules can however activate the classical and lectin complement pathways, rendering this species still vulnerable to phagocytic killing. In this study we have identified a novel secreted protein named complement interfering protein (CIP) that downregulates complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway. The CIP protein showed high affinity toward C4b and inhibited its interaction with C2, presumably preventing the formation of the C4bC2a convertase. Addition of recombinant CIP to GBS cip-negative bacteria resulted in decreased deposition of C3b on their surface and in diminished phagocytic killing in a whole-blood assay. Our data reveal a novel strategy exploited by GBS to counteract innate immunity and could be valuable for the development of anti-infective agents against this important pathogen. PMID:26608922

  2. Complement Activation by Giardia duodenalis Parasites through the Lectin Pathway Contributes to Mast Cell Responses and Parasite Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Erqiu; Tako, Ernest A; Singer, Steven M

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Giardia duodenalis is one of the most common causes of diarrheal disease in the world. While numerous studies have identified important contributions of adaptive immune responses to parasite control, much less work has examined innate immunity and its connections to the adaptive response during this infection. We explored the role of complement in immunity to Giardia using mice deficient in mannose-binding lectin (Mbl2) or complement factor 3a receptor (C3aR). Both strains exhibited delayed clearance of parasites and a reduced ability to recruit mast cells in the intestinal submucosa. C3aR-deficient mice had normal production of antiparasite IgA, butex vivo T cell recall responses were impaired. These data suggest that complement is a key factor in the innate recognition of Giardia and that recruitment of mast cells and activation of T cell immunity through C3a are important for parasite control. PMID:26831470

  3. Activation of the lectin pathway of complement by cardiopulmonary bypass contributes to the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Pągowska-Klimek, I; Świerzko, A S; Michalski, M; Głowacka, E; Szala-Poździej, A; Sokołowska, A; Moll, M; Krajewski, W R; Romak, J; Cedzyński, M

    2016-05-01

    The systemic inflammatory response is a challenge in the management of paediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Although multi-factorial, a contribution by the lectin pathway of complement activation has been postulated. We therefore investigated the changes in serum levels of mannose binding lectin (MBL) and activities of MBL-MBL-associated serine protease (MASP)-1 and MBL-MASP-2 complexes immediately before and during surgery, throughout the first postoperative day and at discharge from the hospital. These changes were analysed in relation to postoperative complications. Blood samples were obtained from 185 children with congenital heart disease undergoing surgical correction with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass: preoperatively (MBL-1), 15 min after initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (MBL-E), 30 min (MBL-2), 4 h (MBL-3), 12 h (MBL-4) and 24 h (MBL-5) post-CPB and at discharge from hospital (MBL-K). Alterations in serum MBL levels were calculated as a ratio of its serum level at subsequent time-points (MBL-2, -3, -4, -5) to the preoperative (MBL-1) value. Decreases in MBL and MBL-MASP complexes were observed in all samples, correlating with a decrease in C4 and increase in C4a, confirming activation of the lectin pathway. Changes in MBL levels between children with an uncomplicated postoperative course and those suffering from infection or low cardiac output syndrome did not differ significantly, but significant differences were observed between the SIRS and non-SIRS groups. Paediatric cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass activates the complement system via the lectin pathway and the latter contributes to the development of the post-bypass systemic inflammatory response. PMID:26703090

  4. Oxidative stress sensitizes retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells to complement-mediated injury in a natural antibody-, lectin pathway-, and phospholipid epitope-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Kusumam; Kulik, Liudmila; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Thiel, Steffen; Thielens, Nicole M; Holers, V Michael; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-05-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the alternative complement pathway (AP) is thought to be associated with age-related macular degeneration. Previously, we have shown that in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) monolayers, oxidative stress reduced complement inhibition on the cell surface, resulting in sublytic complement activation and loss of transepithelial resistance (TER), but the potential ligand and pathway involved are unknown. ARPE-19 cells were grown as monolayers on transwell plates, and sublytic complement activation was induced with H2O2 and normal human serum. TER deteriorated rapidly in H2O2-exposed monolayers upon adding normal human serum. Although the effect required AP activation, AP was not sufficient, because elimination of MASP, but not C1q, prevented TER reduction. Reconstitution experiments to unravel essential components of the lectin pathway (LP) showed that both ficolin and mannan-binding lectin can activate the LP through natural IgM antibodies (IgM-C2) that recognize phospholipid cell surface modifications on oxidatively stressed RPE cells. The same epitopes were found on human primary embryonic RPE monolayers. Likewise, mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization, an injury that involves LP activation, could be increased in antibody-deficient rag1(-/-) mice using the phospholipid-specific IgM-C2. In summary, using a combination of depletion and reconstitution strategies, we have shown that the LP is required to initiate the complement cascade following natural antibody recognition of neoepitopes, which is then further amplified by the AP. LP activation is triggered by IgM bound to phospholipids. Taken together, we have defined novel mechanisms of complement activation in oxidatively stressed RPE, linking molecular events involved in age-related macular degeneration, including the presence of natural antibodies and neoepitopes. PMID:23493397

  5. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits selectively deplete the pattern recognition molecule ficolin-2 of the lectin complement pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hein, E; Munthe-Fog, L; Thiara, A S; Fiane, A E; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    2015-02-01

    The complement system can be activated via the lectin pathway by the recognition molecules mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and the ficolins. Ficolin-2 exhibits binding against a broad range of ligands, including biomaterials in vitro, and low ficolin-2 levels are associated with increased risk of infections. Thus, we investigated the biocompatibility of the recognition molecules of the lectin pathway in two different types of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. Bloods were drawn at five time-points before, during and postoperatively from 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Patients were randomized into two groups using different coatings of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, Phisio® (phosphorylcholine polymer coating) and Bioline® (albumin-heparin coating). Concentrations of MBL, ficolin-1, -2 and -3 and soluble C3a and terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma samples were measured. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was evaluated with C4, C3 and TCC as output. There was no significant difference between the two circuit materials regarding MBL, ficolin-1 and -3. In the Bioline® group the ficolin-2 levels decreased significantly after initiation of surgery (P < 0.0001) and remained reduced throughout the sampling period. This was not seen for Phisio®-coated circuits. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was reduced significantly in both groups after start of operation (P < 0.0001), whereas soluble C3a and TCC in the samples were increased (P < 0.0001). Ficolin-2 was depleted from plasma during cardiac surgery when using heparin-coated bypass circuits and did not reach baseline level 24 h postoperation. These findings may have implications for the postoperative susceptibility to infections in patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation procedures. PMID:25174443

  6. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits selectively deplete the pattern recognition molecule ficolin-2 of the lectin complement pathway in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hein, E; Munthe-Fog, L; Thiara, A S; Fiane, A E; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    2015-01-01

    The complement system can be activated via the lectin pathway by the recognition molecules mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and the ficolins. Ficolin-2 exhibits binding against a broad range of ligands, including biomaterials in vitro, and low ficolin-2 levels are associated with increased risk of infections. Thus, we investigated the biocompatibility of the recognition molecules of the lectin pathway in two different types of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. Bloods were drawn at five time-points before, during and postoperatively from 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Patients were randomized into two groups using different coatings of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, Phisio® (phosphorylcholine polymer coating) and Bioline® (albumin-heparin coating). Concentrations of MBL, ficolin-1, −2 and −3 and soluble C3a and terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma samples were measured. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was evaluated with C4, C3 and TCC as output. There was no significant difference between the two circuit materials regarding MBL, ficolin-1 and −3. In the Bioline® group the ficolin-2 levels decreased significantly after initiation of surgery (P < 0·0001) and remained reduced throughout the sampling period. This was not seen for Phisio®-coated circuits. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was reduced significantly in both groups after start of operation (P < 0·0001), whereas soluble C3a and TCC in the samples were increased (P < 0·0001). Ficolin-2 was depleted from plasma during cardiac surgery when using heparin-coated bypass circuits and did not reach baseline level 24 h postoperation. These findings may have implications for the postoperative susceptibility to infections in patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation procedures. PMID:25174443

  7. Stringent Regulation of Complement Lectin Pathway C3/C5 Convertase By C4b-Binding Protein (C4bp)

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Nenoo; Rajagopalan, Rema; Salvi, Veena P.

    2009-01-01

    The complement lectin pathway, an essential component of the innate immune system, is geared for rapid recognition of infections as each C4b deposited via this pathway is capable of forming a C3/C5 convertase. In the present study, role of C4b-binding protein (C4BP) in regulating the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase assembled on zymosan and sheep erythrocytes coated with mannan (EMan) was examined. While the C4BP concentration for inhibiting 50% (IC50) formation of surface-bound C3 convertase on the two surfaces was similar to that obtained for the soluble C3 convertase (1.05 nM), ∼3- and 41-fold more was required to inhibit assembly of the C5 convertase on zymosan (2.81 nM) and EMan (42.66 nM). No difference in binding interactions between C4BP and surface-bound C4b alone or in complex with C3b was observed. Increasing the C4b density on zymosan (14,000-431,000 C4b/Zym) increased the number of C4b bound per C4BP from 2.87 to 8.23 indicating that at high C4b density all seven α-chains of C4BP are engaged in C4b-binding. In contrast, the number of C4b bound per C4BP remained constant (3.79 ± 0.60) when the C4b density on EMan was increased. The data also show that C4BP regulates assembly and decay of the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase more stringently than the classical pathway C3/C5 convertase because of a ∼7 to 13-fold greater affinity for C4b deposited via the lectin pathway than the classical pathway. C4BP thus regulates efficiently the four times greater potential of the lectin pathway than the classical pathway in generating the C3/C5 convertase and hence production of pro-inflammatory products, which are required to fight infections but occasionally cause pathological inflammatory reactions. PMID:19660812

  8. H-ficolin binds Aspergillus fumigatus leading to activation of the lectin complement pathway and modulation of lung epithelial immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bidula, Stefan; Sexton, Darren W; Yates, Matthew; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Shah, Anand; Wallis, Russell; Reed, Anna; Armstrong-James, Darius; Schelenz, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that typically infects the lungs of immunocompromised patients leading to a high mortality. H-Ficolin, an innate immune opsonin, is produced by type II alveolar epithelial cells and could participate in lung defences against infections. Here, we used the human type II alveolar epithelial cell line, A549, to determine the involvement of H-ficolin in fungal defence. Additionally, we investigated the presence of H-ficolin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from transplant patients during pneumonia. H-Ficolin exhibited demonstrable binding to A. fumigatus conidia via l-fucose, d-mannose and N-acetylglucosamine residues in a calcium- and pH-dependent manner. Moreover, recognition led to lectin complement pathway activation and enhanced fungal association with A549 cells. Following recognition, H-ficolin opsonization manifested an increase in interleukin-8 production from A549 cells, which involved activation of the intracellular signalling pathways mitogen-activated protein kinase MAPK kinase 1/2, p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Finally, H-ficolin concentrations were significantly higher in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with lung infections compared with control subjects (n = 16; P = 0·00726). Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis further highlighted the potential of H-ficolin as a diagnostic marker for lung infection (area under the curve = 0·77; P < 0·0001). Hence, H-ficolin participates in A. fumigatus defence through the activation of the lectin complement pathway, enhanced fungus-host interactions and modulated immune responses. PMID:26133042

  9. Essential Role for the Lectin Pathway in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis Revealed Through Use of Adenovirus Programming Complement Inhibitor MAp44 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Nirmal K.; Mehta, Gaurav; Kjaer, Troels R.; Takahashi, Minoru; Schaack, Jerome; Morrison, Thomas E.; Thiel, Steffen; Arend, William P.; Holers, V. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies using mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and complement C4 deficient mice have suggested that the lectin pathway (LP) is not required for the development of inflammatory arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. MBL, ficolins and collectin-11 are key LP pattern recognition molecules that associate with three serine proteases, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3, and also with two MBL-associated proteins designated sMAP and MAp44. Recent studies have shown that MAp44, an alternatively spliced product of the MASP-1/3 gene, is a competitive inhibitor of the binding of the recognition molecules to all three MASPs. In these studies we examined the effect of treatment of mice with adenovirus (Ad) programmed to express human MAp44 (AdhMAp44) on the development of CAIA. AdhMAp44 and Ad programming Green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) expression were injected intraperitoneally in C57BL/6 wild-type mice prior to the induction of CAIA. AdhMAp44 significantly reduced the clinical disease activity score (CDA) by 81% compared to mice injected with AdGFP. Similarly, histopathologic injury scores for inflammation, pannus, cartilage and bone damage, as well as C3 deposition in the cartilage and synovium, were significantly reduced by AdhMAp44 pretreatment. Mice treated with AdmMAp44, programming expression of mouse MAp44, also showed significantly decreased CDA and histopathologic injury scores. Additionally, administration of AdhMAp44 significantly diminished the severity of Ross River Virus-induced arthritis, a LP-dependent model. Our study provides conclusive evidence that an intact complement LP is essential to initiate CAIA, and that MAp44 may be an appropriate treatment for inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25070856

  10. Quantitative characterization of the activation steps of mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases (MASPs) points to the central role of MASP-1 in the initiation of the complement lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Megyeri, Márton; Harmat, Veronika; Major, Balázs; Végh, Ádám; Balczer, Júlia; Héja, Dávid; Szilágyi, Katalin; Datz, Dániel; Pál, Gábor; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Dobó, József

    2013-03-29

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases, MASP-1 and MASP-2, have been thought to autoactivate when MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes bind to pathogens triggering the complement lectin pathway. Autoactivation of MASPs occurs in two steps: 1) zymogen autoactivation, when one proenzyme cleaves another proenzyme molecule of the same protease, and 2) autocatalytic activation, when the activated protease cleaves its own zymogen. Using recombinant catalytic fragments, we demonstrated that a stable proenzyme MASP-1 variant (R448Q) cleaved the inactive, catalytic site Ser-to-Ala variant (S646A). The autoactivation steps of MASP-1 were separately quantified using these mutants and the wild type enzyme. Analogous mutants were made for MASP-2, and rate constants of the autoactivation steps as well as the possible cross-activation steps between MASP-1 and MASP-2 were determined. Based on the rate constants, a kinetic model of lectin pathway activation was outlined. The zymogen autoactivation rate of MASP-1 is ∼3000-fold higher, and the autocatalytic activation of MASP-1 is about 140-fold faster than those of MASP-2. Moreover, both activated and proenzyme MASP-1 can effectively cleave proenzyme MASP-2. MASP-3, which does not autoactivate, is also cleaved by MASP-1 quite efficiently. The structure of the catalytic region of proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q was solved at 2.5 Å. Proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q readily cleaves synthetic substrates, and it is inhibited by a specific canonical inhibitor developed against active MASP-1, indicating that zymogen MASP-1 fluctuates between an inactive and an active-like conformation. The determined structure provides a feasible explanation for this phenomenon. In summary, autoactivation of MASP-1 is crucial for the activation of MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes, and in the proenzymic phase zymogen MASP-1 controls the process. PMID:23386610

  11. Quantitative Characterization of the Activation Steps of Mannan-binding Lectin (MBL)-associated Serine Proteases (MASPs) Points to the Central Role of MASP-1 in the Initiation of the Complement Lectin Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Megyeri, Márton; Harmat, Veronika; Major, Balázs; Végh, Ádám; Balczer, Júlia; Héja, Dávid; Szilágyi, Katalin; Datz, Dániel; Pál, Gábor; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Dobó, József

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases, MASP-1 and MASP-2, have been thought to autoactivate when MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes bind to pathogens triggering the complement lectin pathway. Autoactivation of MASPs occurs in two steps: 1) zymogen autoactivation, when one proenzyme cleaves another proenzyme molecule of the same protease, and 2) autocatalytic activation, when the activated protease cleaves its own zymogen. Using recombinant catalytic fragments, we demonstrated that a stable proenzyme MASP-1 variant (R448Q) cleaved the inactive, catalytic site Ser-to-Ala variant (S646A). The autoactivation steps of MASP-1 were separately quantified using these mutants and the wild type enzyme. Analogous mutants were made for MASP-2, and rate constants of the autoactivation steps as well as the possible cross-activation steps between MASP-1 and MASP-2 were determined. Based on the rate constants, a kinetic model of lectin pathway activation was outlined. The zymogen autoactivation rate of MASP-1 is ∼3000-fold higher, and the autocatalytic activation of MASP-1 is about 140-fold faster than those of MASP-2. Moreover, both activated and proenzyme MASP-1 can effectively cleave proenzyme MASP-2. MASP-3, which does not autoactivate, is also cleaved by MASP-1 quite efficiently. The structure of the catalytic region of proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q was solved at 2.5 Å. Proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q readily cleaves synthetic substrates, and it is inhibited by a specific canonical inhibitor developed against active MASP-1, indicating that zymogen MASP-1 fluctuates between an inactive and an active-like conformation. The determined structure provides a feasible explanation for this phenomenon. In summary, autoactivation of MASP-1 is crucial for the activation of MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes, and in the proenzymic phase zymogen MASP-1 controls the process. PMID:23386610

  12. A novel peptide inhibitor of classical and lectin complement activation including ABO incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, Clifford T.; Pallera, Haree K.; Sharp, Julia A.; Woltmann, Jon L.; Qian, Shizhi; Hair, Pamela S.; van der Pol, Pieter; van Kooten, Cees; Thielens, Nicole M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2012-01-01

    Previous experiments from our laboratories have identified peptides derived from the human astrovirus coat protein (CP) that bind C1q and mannose binding lectin (MBL) inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the function of these coat protein peptides (CPPs) in an in vitro model of complement-mediated disease (ABO incompatibility), preliminarily assess their in vivo complement suppression profile and develop more highly potent derivatives of these molecules. E23A, a 30 amino acid CPP derivative previously demonstrated to inhibit classical pathway activation was able to dose-dependently inhibit lysis of AB erythrocytes treated with mismatched human O serum. Additionally, when injected into rats, E23A inhibited the animals’ serum from lysing antibody-sensitized erythrocytes, providing preliminary in vivo functional evidence that this CPP can cross the species barrier to inhibit serum complement activity in rodents. A rational drug design approach was implemented to identify more potent CPP derivatives, resulting in the identification and characterization of a 15 residue peptide (Polar Assortant (PA)), which demonstrated both superior inhibition of classical complement pathway activation and robust binding to C1q collagen-like tails. PA also inhibited ABO incompatibility in vitro and demonstrated in vivo complement suppression up to 24 hours post-injection. CPP’s ability to inhibit ABO incompatibility in vitro, proof of concept in vivo inhibitory activity in rats and the development of the highly potent PA derivative set the stage for preclinical testing of this molecule in small animal models of complement-mediated disease. PMID:22906481

  13. Novel Evasion Mechanisms of the Classical Complement Pathway.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zwarthoff, Seline A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2016-09-15

    Complement is a network of soluble and cell surface-associated proteins that gives rise to a self-amplifying, yet tightly regulated system with fundamental roles in immune surveillance and clearance. Complement becomes activated on the surface of nonself cells by one of three initiating mechanisms known as the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. Evasion of complement function is a hallmark of invasive pathogens and hematophagous organisms. Although many complement-inhibition strategies hinge on hijacking activities of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, an increasing number of uniquely evolved evasion molecules have been discovered over the past decade. In this review, we focus on several recent investigations that revealed mechanistically distinct inhibitors of the classical pathway. Because the classical pathway is an important and specific mediator of various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, in-depth knowledge of novel evasion mechanisms could direct future development of therapeutic anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:27591336

  14. IgG4 anti-phospholipase A2 receptor might activate lectin and alternative complement pathway meanwhile in idiopathic membranous nephropathy: an inspiration from a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chao; Jin, Liping; He, Fagui; Li, Changchun; Gao, Qingman; Chen, Guanglei; He, Zhijun; Song, Minghui; Zhou, Zhuliang; Shan, Fujun; Qi, Ka; Ma, Lu

    2016-08-01

    The deposition of IgG4 of antibodies against phospholipase A2 receptor (anti-PLA2R) is predominating in the kidneys of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, while its predictive value has not been determined. It was a retrospective study, and 438 patients were included. Serum samples of two time points [before intervention (baseline) and after 1.5-year treatment (endpoint)] were detected for total and IgG4 anti-PLA2R. IgG4 <0.26 RU/mL or total <20 RU/mL was considered as seronegativity. Bi-positivity/bi-negativity was defined when patients'antibodies were found positive or negative both at the baseline and endpoint. Completed remission (CR) was a major clinical outcome. A series of complement ingredients (MASP-1/2, MBL, C3a, C5a, Factor B, Ba, Bb and C5b-9) were measured in the patients of bi-positivity and bi-negativity: (1) meta-analysis based on six papers conducted seropositivity of anti-PLA2R was a useful predictor for achieving CR, but there was a high heterogeneity; (2) there was significant correlation between the baseline and decrease in IgG4 subclass and the achievement of CR; (3) bi-negativity of IgG4 has a high accuracy of predicting CR compared with total antibodies; (4) in patients of bi-positivity, those achieving CR showed lower MASP-1/2, MBL, C3a, C5a, FB, Ba and Bb than patients failing to achieve CR; (5) the titers of endpoint and decrease in Ba and Bb were associated with improvement of 24 h-UP in those of bi-positivity; and (6) the decrease in Ba was a significant factor for achieving CR in those of bi-positivity. Continuous IgG4 negativity was a useful tool to predict the achievement of CR; however, in patients of continuous IgG4 positivity, those with lower activation of lectin and alternative pathways would still more probably achieve CR. PMID:26837241

  15. Oligomerization of Mannan-binding Lectin Dictates Binding Properties and Complement Activation.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, T R; Jensen, L; Hansen, A; Dani, R; Jensenius, J C; Dobó, J; Gál, P; Thiel, S

    2016-07-01

    The complement system is a part of the innate immune system and is involved in recognition and clearance of pathogens and altered-self structures. The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) with collagen-like regions bind to foreign or altered self-surfaces. Associated with the collagen-like stems of these PRMs are three mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases (MASPs) and two MBL-associated proteins (MAps). The most studied of the PRMs, MBL, is present in serum mainly as trimeric and tetrameric oligomers of the structural subunit. We hypothesized that oligomerization of MBL may influence both the potential to bind to micro organisms and the interaction with the MASPs and MAps, thus influencing the ability to initiate complement activation. When testing binding at 37 °C, we found higher binding of tetrameric MBL to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than trimeric and dimeric MBL. In serum, we found that tetrameric MBL was the main oligomeric form present in complexes with the MASPs and MAp44. Such preference was confirmed using purified forms of recombinant MBL (rMBL) oligomers, where tetrameric rMBL interacted stronger with all of the MASPs and MAp44, compared to trimeric MBL. As a direct consequence of the weaker interaction with the MASPs, we found that trimeric rMBL was inferior to tetrameric rMBL in activating the complement system. Our data suggest that the oligomeric state of MBL is crucial both for the binding properties and the effector function of MBL. PMID:27104295

  16. Increased Autoreactivity of the Complement-Activating Molecule Mannan-Binding Lectin in a Type 1 Diabetes Model

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Ruseva, Marieta Milkova; Malik, Talat Habib; Hoffmann-Petersen, Ingeborg Torp; Pickering, Matthew Caleb; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure despite intensive treatment of modifiable risk factors. Identification of new drug targets is therefore of paramount importance. The complement system is emerging as a potential new target. The lectin pathway of the complement system, initiated by the carbohydrate-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL), is linked to poor kidney prognosis in diabetes. We hypothesized that MBL activates complement upon binding within the diabetic glomerulus. Methods. We investigated this by comparing complement deposition and activation in kidneys from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and healthy control mice. Results. After 20 weeks of diabetes, glomerular deposition of MBL was significantly increased. Diabetic animals had 2.0-fold higher (95% CI 1.6–2.5) immunofluorescence intensity from anti-MBL antibodies compared with controls (P < 0.001). Diabetes and control groups did not differ in glomerular immunofluorescence intensity obtained by antibodies against complement factors C4, C3, and C9. However, the circulating complement activation product C3a was increased in diabetes as compared to control mice (P = 0.04). Conclusion. 20 weeks of diabetes increased MBL autoreactivity in the kidney and circulating C3a concentration. Together with previous findings, these results indicate direct effects of MBL within the kidney in diabetes. PMID:26977416

  17. Increased Autoreactivity of the Complement-Activating Molecule Mannan-Binding Lectin in a Type 1 Diabetes Model.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Ruseva, Marieta Milkova; Malik, Talat Habib; Hoffmann-Petersen, Ingeborg Torp; Pickering, Matthew Caleb; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure despite intensive treatment of modifiable risk factors. Identification of new drug targets is therefore of paramount importance. The complement system is emerging as a potential new target. The lectin pathway of the complement system, initiated by the carbohydrate-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL), is linked to poor kidney prognosis in diabetes. We hypothesized that MBL activates complement upon binding within the diabetic glomerulus. Methods. We investigated this by comparing complement deposition and activation in kidneys from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and healthy control mice. Results. After 20 weeks of diabetes, glomerular deposition of MBL was significantly increased. Diabetic animals had 2.0-fold higher (95% CI 1.6-2.5) immunofluorescence intensity from anti-MBL antibodies compared with controls (P < 0.001). Diabetes and control groups did not differ in glomerular immunofluorescence intensity obtained by antibodies against complement factors C4, C3, and C9. However, the circulating complement activation product C3a was increased in diabetes as compared to control mice (P = 0.04). Conclusion. 20 weeks of diabetes increased MBL autoreactivity in the kidney and circulating C3a concentration. Together with previous findings, these results indicate direct effects of MBL within the kidney in diabetes. PMID:26977416

  18. Lectin Complement Protein Collectin 11 (CL-K1) and Susceptibility to Urinary Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Justin S.; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Kremsner, Peter G.; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Urinary Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease endemic in many sub Saharan -African countries. Collectin Kidney 1 (CL-K1, encoded by COLEC11 on chromosome 2p25.3), a member of the vertebrate C-type lectin super family, has recently been identified as pattern-recognition molecule (PRR) of the lectin complement pathway. CL-K1 is preferentially expressed in the kidneys, but also in other organs and it is considered to play a role in host defense to some infectious agents. Schistosome teguments are fucosylated and CL-K1 has, through its collagen-like domain, a high binding affinity to fucose. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized a Nigerian study group consisting of 167 Schistosoma haematobium infected individuals and 186 matched healthy subjects, and investigated the contribution of CL-K1 deficiency and of COLEC11 polymorphisms to infection phenotype. Higher CL-K1 serum levels were associated with decreased risk of schistosome infection (Pcorr = 0.0004). CL-K1 serum levels were differentially distributed between the COLEC11 genotypes and haplotypes observed. The non-synonymous variant p.R216H was associated with the occurrence of schistosomiasis (OR = 0.44, 95%CI = 0.22–0.72, Pcorr = 0.0004). The reconstructed COLEC11*TCCA haplotypes were associated with higher CL-K1 serum levels (P = 0.002) and with decreased schistosomiasis (OR = 0.38, 95%CI = 0.23–0.63, Pcorr = 0.0001). Conclusions In agreement with findings from our earlier published study, our findings support the observation that CL-K1 and their functional variants may be host factors associated with protection in schistosomiasis and may be a useful marker for further investigations. PMID:25807310

  19. Heterocomplexes of Mannose-binding Lectin and the Pentraxins PTX3 or Serum Amyloid P Component Trigger Cross-activation of the Complement System*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying Jie; Doni, Andrea; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Honoré, Christian; Arendrup, Maiken; Mantovani, Alberto; Garred, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3), serum amyloid P component (SAP), and C-reactive protein belong to the pentraxin family of pattern recognition molecules involved in tissue homeostasis and innate immunity. They interact with C1q from the classical complement pathway. Whether this also occurs via the analogous mannose-binding lectin (MBL) from the lectin complement pathway is unknown. Thus, we investigated the possible interaction between MBL and the pentraxins. We report that MBL bound PTX3 and SAP partly via its collagen-like domain but not C-reactive protein. MBL-PTX3 complex formation resulted in recruitment of C1q, but this was not seen for the MBL-SAP complex. However, both MBL-PTX3 and MBL-SAP complexes enhanced C4 and C3 deposition and opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Interaction between MBL and PTX3 led to communication between the lectin and classical complement pathways via recruitment of C1q, whereas SAP-enhanced complement activation occurs via a hitherto unknown mechanism. Taken together, MBL-pentraxin heterocomplexes trigger cross-activation of the complement system. PMID:21106539

  20. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  1. A novel IgM-H-ficolin complement pathway to attack allogenic cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiaoying; Liu, Chaoxu; Azadzoi, Kazem; Li, Cuiling; Lu, Fan; Xiang, An; Sun, Jianbin; Guo, Yanhai; Zhao, Qingchuan; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    The pentameric serum IgMs are critical to immune defense and surveillance through cytotoxicity against microbes and nascent cancer cells. Ficolins, a group of oligomeric lectins with an overall structure similar to C1q and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) participate in microbe infection and apoptotic cell clearance by activating the complement lectin pathway or a primitive opsonophagocytosis. It remains unknown whether serum IgMs interplay with ficolins in cancer immunosurveillance. Here we report a natural cancer killing of different types of cancer cells by sera from a healthy human population mediated by a novel IgM-H-ficolin complement activation pathway. We demonstrate for the first time that H-ficolin bound to a subset of IgMs in positive human sera and IgM-H-ficolin deposited on cancer cells to activate complement attack in cancer cells. Our data suggest that the IgM-H-ficolin -mediated complement activation pathway may be another defensive strategy for human cancer immunosurveillance. PMID:25592840

  2. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Viviana P; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K; Abdeladhim, Maha; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases. PMID:26758086

  3. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Viviana P.; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K.; Abdeladhim, Maha; Ferreira Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A.; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Horácio Pereira, Marcos; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Gontijo, Nelder F.; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host’s skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases. PMID:26758086

  4. Association Study of Mannose-Binding Lectin Levels and Genetic Variants in Lectin Pathway Proteins with Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Dean, Melinda M.; Baird, Paul N.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Daniell, Mark; Guymer, Robyn H.; Eisen, Damon P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the complement system is thought to be activated by chronic oxidative damage with genetic variants identified in the alternative pathway as susceptibility factors. However, the involvement of the lectin pathway of complement, a key mediator of oxidative damage, is controversial. This study investigated whether mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels and genetic variants in lectin pathway proteins, are associated with the predisposition to and severity of AMD. Methods MBL levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBL2 and the ficolin-2 (FCN2) gene were determined in 109 patients with AMD and 109 age- and sex-matched controls. Results MBL expression levels were equally distributed in both cases (early and late AMD) and controls (p>0.05). However, there was a trend towards higher median MBL levels in cases with late AMD compared to cases with early AMD (1.0 vs. 0.4 μg/ml, p = 0.09) and MBL deficiency (<0.5 μg/ml) was encountered less frequently in the late AMD group (35% vs 56%, p = 0.03). FCN2 and MBL2 allele frequencies were similarly distributed in early and late AMD cases compared with controls (p>0.05 for all analyses) as were MBL2 genotypes. Similarly, there was no significant difference in allele frequencies in any SNPs in either the MBL2 or FCN2 gene in cases with early vs. late AMD. Conclusions SNPs of lectin pathway proteins investigated in this study were not associated with AMD or AMD severity. However, MBL levels deserve further study in a larger cohort of early vs. late AMD patients to elucidate any real effect on AMD severity. PMID:26207622

  5. A Metalloproteinase Mirolysin of Tannerella forsythia Inhibits All Pathways of the Complement System.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Mizgalska, Danuta; Bielecka, Ewa; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Riesbeck, Kristian; Garred, Peter; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2015-09-01

    Recent reports focusing on virulence factors of periodontal pathogens implicated proteinases as major determinants of remarkable pathogenicity of these species, with special emphasis on their capacity to modulate complement activity. In particular, bacteria-mediated cleavage of C5 and subsequent release of C5a seems to be an important phenomenon in the manipulation of the local inflammatory response in periodontitis. In this study, we present mirolysin, a novel metalloproteinase secreted by Tannerella forsythia, a well-recognized pathogen strongly associated with periodontitis. Mirolysin exhibited a strong effect on all complement pathways. It inhibited the classical and lectin complement pathways due to efficient degradation of mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, ficolin-3, and C4, whereas inhibition of the alternative pathway was caused by degradation of C5. This specificity toward complement largely resembled the activity of a previously characterized metalloproteinase of T. forsythia, karilysin. Interestingly, mirolysin released the biologically active C5a peptide in human plasma and induced migration of neutrophils. Importantly, we demonstrated that combination of mirolysin with karilysin, as well as a cysteine proteinase of another periodontal pathogen, Prevotella intermedia, resulted in a strong synergistic effect on complement. Furthermore, mutant strains of T. forsythia, devoid of either mirolysin or karilysin, showed diminished survival in human serum, providing further evidence for the synergistic inactivation of complement by these metalloproteinases. Taken together, our findings on interactions of mirolysin with complement significantly add to the understanding of immune evasion strategies of T. forsythia and expand the knowledge on molecular mechanisms driving pathogenic events in the infected periodontium. PMID:26209620

  6. Potent inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by a novel C1q-binding peptide derived from the human astrovirus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Gronemus, Jenny Q; Hair, Pamela S; Crawford, Katrina B; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2010-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratories has demonstrated that purified, recombinant human astrovirus coat protein (HAstV CP) binds C1q and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. Analysis of the 787 amino acid CP molecule revealed that residues 79-139 share limited sequence homology with human neutrophil defensin-1 (HNP-1), a molecule previously demonstrated to bind C1q and MBL, inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. A 30 amino acid peptide derived from this region of the CP molecule competitively inhibited the binding of wild-type CP to C1q. The parent peptide and various derivatives were subsequently assayed for C1q binding, inhibition of C1 and C4 activation as well as suppression of complement activation in hemolytic assays. The parent peptide and several derivatives inhibited complement activation in these functional assays to varying degrees. One peptide derivative in particular (E23A) displayed superior inhibition of complement activation in multiple assays of classical complement pathway activation. Further analysis revealed homology to a plant defensin allowing development of a proposed structural model for E23A. Based upon these findings, we hypothesize that further rationale optimization of E23A may result in a promising therapeutic inhibitor for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in which dysregulated activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:20728940

  7. Association of Low Ficolin-Lectin Pathway Parameters with Cardiac Syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Z; Csuka, D; Vargova, K; Leé, S; Varga, L; Garred, P; Préda, I; Zsámboki, E T; Prohászka, Z; Kiss, R G

    2016-09-01

    In patients with typical angina pectoris, inducible myocardial ischaemia and macroscopically normal coronaries (cardiac syndrome X (CSX)), a significantly elevated plasma level of terminal complement complex (TCC), the common end product of complement activation, has been observed without accompanying activation of the classical or the alternative pathways. Therefore, our aim was to clarify the role of the ficolin-lectin pathway in CSX. Eighteen patients with CSX, 37 stable angina patients with significant coronary stenosis (CHD) and 54 healthy volunteers (HC) were enrolled. Serum levels of ficolin-2 and ficolin-3, ficolin-3/MASP-2 complex and ficolin-3-mediated TCC deposition (FCN3-TCC) were determined. Plasma level of TCC was significantly higher in the CSX than in the HC or CHD group (5.45 versus 1.30 versus 2.04 AU/ml, P < 0.001). Serum levels of ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 were significantly lower in the CSX compared to the HC or CHD group (3.60 versus 5.80 or 5.20 μg/ml, P < 0.05; 17.80 versus 24.10 or 26.80 μg/ml, P < 0.05). The ficolin-3/MASP-2 complex was significantly lower in the CSX group compared to the HC group (92.90 versus 144.90 AU/ml, P = 0.006). FCN3-TCC deposition was significantly lower in the CSX group compared to the HC and CHD groups (67.8% versus 143.3% or 159.7%, P < 0.05). In the CSX group, a significant correlation was found between TCC and FCN3-TCC level (r = 0.507, P = 0.032) and between ficolin-3/MASP-2 complex level and FCN3-TCC deposition (r = 0.651, P = 0.003). In conclusion, in patients with typical angina and myocardial ischaemia despite macroscopically normal coronary arteries, low levels of several lectin pathway parameters were observed, indicating complement activation and consumption. Complement activation through the ficolin-lectin pathway might play a role in the complex pathomechanism of CSX. PMID:27312152

  8. Glycoepitopes of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid Govern Complement-mediated Opsonophagocytosis via Human Serum Antibody and Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Jung, Dong-Jun; An, Jang-Hyun; Fuchs, Katharina; Jeon, Yu-Jin; Kim, Na-Hyang; Li, Xuehua; Tateishi, Koichiro; Park, Ji Ae; Xia, Guoqing; Matsushita, Misao; Takahashi, Kazue; Park, Hee-Ju; Peschel, Andreas; Lee, Bok Luel

    2013-01-01

    Serum antibodies and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) are important host defense factors for host adaptive and innate immunity, respectively. Antibodies and MBL also initiate the classical and lectin complement pathways, respectively, leading to opsonophagocytosis. We have shown previously that Staphylococcus aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA), a cell wall glycopolymer consisting of ribitol phosphate substituted with α- or β-O-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and d-alanine, is recognized by MBL and serum anti-WTA IgG. However, the exact antigenic determinants to which anti-WTA antibodies or MBL bind have not been determined. To answer this question, several S. aureus mutants, such as α-GlcNAc glycosyltransferase-deficient S. aureus ΔtarM, β-GlcNAc glycosyltransferase-deficient ΔtarS, and ΔtarMS double mutant cells, were prepared from a laboratory and a community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain. Here, we describe the unexpected finding that β-GlcNAc WTA-deficient ΔtarS mutant cells (which have intact α-GlcNAc) escape from anti-WTA antibody-mediated opsonophagocytosis, whereas α-GlcNAc WTA-deficient ΔtarM mutant cells (which have intact β-GlcNAc) are efficiently engulfed by human leukocytes via anti-WTA IgG. Likewise, MBL binding in S. aureus cells was lost in the ΔtarMS double mutant but not in either single mutant. When we determined the serum concentrations of the anti-α- or anti-β-GlcNAc-specific WTA IgGs, anti-β-GlcNAc WTA-IgG was dominant in pooled human IgG fractions and in the intact sera of healthy adults and infants. These data demonstrate the importance of the WTA sugar conformation for human innate and adaptive immunity against S. aureus infection. PMID:24045948

  9. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Deficiencies of Early Components of the Complement Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Catarina Lunz; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the innate and acquired immune response against pathogens. It consists of more than 30 proteins found in soluble form or attached to cell membranes. Most complement proteins circulate in inactive forms and can be sequentially activated by the classical, alternative, or lectin pathways. Biological functions, such as opsonization, removal of apoptotic cells, adjuvant function, activation of B lymphocytes, degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and solubilization and clearance of immune complex and cell lysis, are dependent on complement activation. Although the activation of the complement system is important to avoid infections, it also can contribute to the inflammatory response triggered by immune complex deposition in tissues in autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, the deficiency of early complement proteins from the classical pathway (CP) is strongly associated with development of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) – mainly C1q deficiency (93%) and C4 deficiency (75%). The aim of this review is to focus on the deficiencies of early components of the CP (C1q, C1r, C1s, C4, and C2) proteins in SLE patients. PMID:26941740

  10. Inhibition of the classical pathway of the complement system by saliva of Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Franco, Paula F; Silva, Naylene C S; Fazito do Vale, Vladimir; Abreu, Jéssica F; Santos, Vânia C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Pereira, Marcos H; Sant'Anna, Mauricio R V; Gomes, Alessandra P S; Araujo, Ricardo N

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the complement system during and after haematophagy is of utmost importance for tick success in feeding and tick development. The role of such inhibition is to minimise damage to the intestinal epithelium as well as avoiding inflammation and opsonisation of salivary molecules at the bite site. Despite its importance, the salivary anti-complement activity has been characterised only in species belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex which saliva is able to inhibit the alternative and lectin pathways. Little is known about this activity in other species of the Ixodidae family. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe the inhibition of the classical pathway of the complement system by the saliva of Amblyomma cajennense at different stages of the haematophagy. The A. cajennense saliva and salivary gland extract (SGE) were able to inhibit the complement classical pathway through haemolytic assays with higher activity observed when saliva was used. The anti-complement activity is present in the salivary glands of starving females and also in females throughout the whole feeding process, with significant higher activity soon after tick detachment. The SGE activity from both females fed on mice or horses had no significant correlation (p > 0.05) with tick body weight. The pH found in the intestinal lumen of A. cajennense was 8.04 ± 0.08 and haemolytic assays performed at pH 8.0 showed activation of the classical pathway similarly to what occurs at pH 7.4. Consequently, inhibition could be necessary to protect the tick enterocytes. Indeed, the inhibition observed by SGE was higher in pH 8.0 in comparison to pH 7.4 reinforcing the role of saliva in protecting the intestinal cells. Further studies should be carried out in order to identify the inhibitor molecule and characterise its inhibition mechanism. PMID:26948715

  11. Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide activates the classical complement pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Schultz, D R; Arnold, P I; Johnson, W

    1992-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium capable of entering and growing in alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Complement and complement receptors are important in the uptake of L. pneumophila by human mononuclear phagocytes. The surface molecules of L. pneumophila that activate the complement system are unknown. To identify these factors, we investigated the effects of L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the classical and alternative complement pathways of normal human serum by functional hemolytic assays. Although incubation of LPS in normal human serum at 37 degrees C resulted in the activation of both pathways, complement activation proceeded primarily through the classical pathway. Activation of the classical pathway by LPS was dependent on natural antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class that were present in various quantities in sera from different normal individuals but were absent in an immunoglobulin-deficient serum obtained from an agammaglobulinemic patient. Additional studies using sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS suggested that the antibodies recognized antigenic sites in the carbohydrate portion of LPS. The ability of LPS to interact with the complement system suggests a role for LPS in the uptake of L. pneumophila by mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:1612744

  12. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System.

    PubMed

    Zewde, Nehemiah; Gorham, Ronald D; Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection. PMID

  13. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection. PMID

  14. An Inhibitor of the Alternative Pathway of Complement in Saliva of New World Anopheline Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Sousa, Antonio F; Queiroz, Daniel C; Vale, Vladimir F; Ribeiro, José M C; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Gontijo, Nelder F; Andersen, John F

    2016-07-15

    The complement system present in circulating blood is an effective mechanism of host defense, responsible for the killing of pathogens and the production of potent anaphylatoxins. Inhibitors of the complement system have been described in the saliva of hematophagous arthropods that are involved in the protection of digestive tissues against complement system-mediated damage. In this study, we describe albicin, a novel inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement from the salivary glands of the malaria vector, Anopheles albimanus The inhibitor was purified from salivary gland homogenates by reverse-phase HPLC and identified by mass spectrometry as a small (13.4-kDa) protein related to the gSG7 protein of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi Recombinant albicin was produced in Escherichia coli and found to potently inhibit lysis of rabbit erythrocytes in assays of the alternative pathway while having no inhibitory effect on the classical or lectin pathways. Albicin also inhibited the deposition of complement components on agarose-coated plates, although it could not remove previously bound components. Antisera produced against recombinant albicin recognized both the native and recombinant inhibitors and also blocked their activities in in vitro assays. Using surface plasmon resonance and enzymatic assays, we found that albicin binds and stabilizes the C3-convertase complex (C3bBb) formed on a properdin surface and inhibits the convertase activity of a reconstituted C3bBb complex in solution. The data indicate that albicin specifically recognizes the activated form of the complex, allowing more efficient inhibition by an inhibitor whose quantity is limited. PMID:27307559

  15. Peptide inhibitor of complement c1, a novel suppressor of classical pathway activation: mechanistic studies and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julia A; Whitley, Pamela H; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2014-01-01

    The classical pathway of complement plays multiple physiological roles including modulating immunological effectors initiated by adaptive immune responses and an essential homeostatic role in the clearance of damaged self-antigens. However, dysregulated classical pathway activation is associated with antibody-initiated, inflammatory diseases processes like cold agglutinin disease, acute intravascular hemolytic transfusion reaction (AIHTR), and acute/hyperacute transplantation rejection. To date, only one putative classical pathway inhibitor, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), is currently commercially available and its only approved indication is for replacement treatment in hereditary angioedema, which is predominantly a kinin pathway disease. Given the variety of disease conditions in which the classical pathway is implicated, development of therapeutics that specifically inhibits complement initiation represents a major unmet medical need. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement. In vitro studies have demonstrated that these peptide inhibitors of complement C1 (PIC1) bind to the collagen-like region of the initiator molecule of the classical pathway, C1q. PIC1 binding to C1q blocks activation of the associated serine proteases (C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s) and subsequent downstream complement activation. Rational design optimization of PIC1 has resulted in the generation of a highly potent derivative of 15 amino acids. PIC1 inhibits classical pathway mediated complement activation in ABO incompatibility in vitro and inhibiting classical pathway activation in vivo in rats. This review will focus on the pre-clinical development of PIC1 and discuss its potential as a therapeutic in antibody-mediated classical pathway disease, specifically AIHTR. PMID:25202312

  16. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1, a Novel Suppressor of Classical Pathway Activation: Mechanistic Studies and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Whitley, Pamela H.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2014-01-01

    The classical pathway of complement plays multiple physiological roles including modulating immunological effectors initiated by adaptive immune responses and an essential homeostatic role in the clearance of damaged self-antigens. However, dysregulated classical pathway activation is associated with antibody-initiated, inflammatory diseases processes like cold agglutinin disease, acute intravascular hemolytic transfusion reaction (AIHTR), and acute/hyperacute transplantation rejection. To date, only one putative classical pathway inhibitor, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), is currently commercially available and its only approved indication is for replacement treatment in hereditary angioedema, which is predominantly a kinin pathway disease. Given the variety of disease conditions in which the classical pathway is implicated, development of therapeutics that specifically inhibits complement initiation represents a major unmet medical need. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement. In vitro studies have demonstrated that these peptide inhibitors of complement C1 (PIC1) bind to the collagen-like region of the initiator molecule of the classical pathway, C1q. PIC1 binding to C1q blocks activation of the associated serine proteases (C1s–C1r–C1r–C1s) and subsequent downstream complement activation. Rational design optimization of PIC1 has resulted in the generation of a highly potent derivative of 15 amino acids. PIC1 inhibits classical pathway mediated complement activation in ABO incompatibility in vitro and inhibiting classical pathway activation in vivo in rats. This review will focus on the pre-clinical development of PIC1 and discuss its potential as a therapeutic in antibody-mediated classical pathway disease, specifically AIHTR. PMID:25202312

  17. Monospecific inhibitors show that both mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1) and -2 Are essential for lectin pathway activation and reveal structural plasticity of MASP-2.

    PubMed

    Héja, Dávid; Harmat, Veronika; Fodor, Krisztián; Wilmanns, Matthias; Dobó, József; Kékesi, Katalin A; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2012-06-01

    The lectin pathway is an antibody-independent activation route of the complement system. It provides immediate defense against pathogens and altered self-cells, but it also causes severe tissue damage after stroke, heart attack, and other ischemia reperfusion injuries. The pathway is triggered by target binding of pattern recognition molecules leading to the activation of zymogen mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases (MASPs). MASP-2 is considered as the autonomous pathway-activator, while MASP-1 is considered as an auxiliary component. We evolved a pair of monospecific MASP inhibitors. In accordance with the key role of MASP-2, the MASP-2 inhibitor completely blocks the lectin pathway activation. Importantly, the MASP-1 inhibitor does the same, demonstrating that MASP-1 is not an auxiliary but an essential pathway component. We report the first Michaelis-like complex structures of MASP-1 and MASP-2 formed with substrate-like inhibitors. The 1.28 Å resolution MASP-2 structure reveals significant plasticity of the protease, suggesting that either an induced fit or a conformational selection mechanism should contribute to the extreme specificity of the enzyme. PMID:22511776

  18. Monospecific Inhibitors Show That Both Mannan-binding Lectin-associated Serine Protease-1 (MASP-1) and -2 Are Essential for Lectin Pathway Activation and Reveal Structural Plasticity of MASP-2*

    PubMed Central

    Héja, Dávid; Harmat, Veronika; Fodor, Krisztián; Wilmanns, Matthias; Dobó, József; Kékesi, Katalin A.; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    The lectin pathway is an antibody-independent activation route of the complement system. It provides immediate defense against pathogens and altered self-cells, but it also causes severe tissue damage after stroke, heart attack, and other ischemia reperfusion injuries. The pathway is triggered by target binding of pattern recognition molecules leading to the activation of zymogen mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases (MASPs). MASP-2 is considered as the autonomous pathway-activator, while MASP-1 is considered as an auxiliary component. We evolved a pair of monospecific MASP inhibitors. In accordance with the key role of MASP-2, the MASP-2 inhibitor completely blocks the lectin pathway activation. Importantly, the MASP-1 inhibitor does the same, demonstrating that MASP-1 is not an auxiliary but an essential pathway component. We report the first Michaelis-like complex structures of MASP-1 and MASP-2 formed with substrate-like inhibitors. The 1.28 Å resolution MASP-2 structure reveals significant plasticity of the protease, suggesting that either an induced fit or a conformational selection mechanism should contribute to the extreme specificity of the enzyme. PMID:22511776

  19. Nephritic Factor of the Classical Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Halbwachs, L.; Leveillé, M.; Lesavre, Ph.; Wattel, S.; Leibowitch, J.

    1980-01-01

    A factor, functionally characterized by its capacity to stabilize the normally labile classical pathway C3-converting complex of the classical pathway of complement, has been isolated from the serum of one patient with a case of acute glomerulonephritis, subsequent to a cutaneous infection. The factor confers long-lived stabilization of classical pathway C3 convertase complexes formed both in the solid (sensitized sheep erythrocytes bearing activated C̄1̄ and the classical pathway C3 convertase) and fluid phase. The half-life of such stabilized C3-cleaving enzymes extended beyond several hours at 37°C. The stabilizing activity was associated with a protein fraction immunochemically identified as immunoglobulin (Ig)G, a sizeable population of which exhibited a gamma chain of 60,000 daltons. The IgG-associated stabilizing activity was found to bind to the classical pathway C3 convertase enzyme via a fragment bearing the antigen-binding site of the molecule [F(ab)2 and F(ab)]. Such binding was demonstrable for classical pathway and not for alternative pathway C3 convertase. Thus, the stabilizing factor behaves like an autoantibody to the C3-converting complex of the classical pathway of complement. The binding of the antibody to the enzyme affords protection of the latter against decay-degradation. By analogy with the nephritic factor of the alternative pathway situation where IgG autoantibodies specifically bind to alternative pathway C3 convertase enzymes and protect them from degradation, the functionally unusual IgG in our patient was designated as the nephritic factor of the classical pathway. Indirect evidence suggests that nephritic factor of the classical pathway-IgG might be of the IgG3 subclass. Images PMID:6902727

  20. Absence of functional alternative complement pathway alleviates lupus cerebritis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jessy J; Jacob, Alexander; Vezina, Paul; Sekine, Hideharu; Gilkeson, Gary S; Quigg, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    The complement inhibitor, Crry, which blocks both the classical and alternative pathways, alleviates CNS disease in the lupus model, MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6lpr (MRL/lpr) mice. To understand the role of the alternative pathway, we studied mice deficient in a key alternative pathway protein, complement factor B (fB). Immune deposits (IgG and C3) were reduced in the brains of MRL/lpr fB-deficient (fB-/-MRL/lpr) compared to fB-sufficient (MRL/lpr) mice, indicating reduced complement activation. Reduced neutrophil infiltration (22% of MRL/lpr mice) and apoptosis (caspase-3 activity was reduced to 33% of MRL/lpr mice) in these mice indicates that the absence of the alternative pathway was neuroprotective. Furthermore, expression of phospho (p)-Akt (0.16+/-0.02 vs. 0.35+/-0.13, p<0.03) was increased, while expression of p-PTEN (0.40+/-0.06 vs. 0.11+/-0.07, p<0.05) was decreased in fB-/-MRL/lpr mice compared to their MRL/lpr counterparts. The expression of fibronectin, laminin and collagen IV was significantly decreased in fB-/-MRL/lpr mice compared to MRL/lpr mice, indicating that in the lupus setting, tissue integrity was maintained in the absence of the alternative pathway. Absence of fB reduced behavioral alterations in MRL/lpr mice. Our results suggest that in lupus, the alternative pathway may be the key mechanism through which complement activation occurs in brain, and therefore it might serve as a therapeutic target for lupus cerebritis. PMID:17523212

  1. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and Its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway-specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan K; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-08-01

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4, formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here, we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by small angle x-ray scattering analysis. We analyzed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The small angle x-ray scattering-derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared with that established for the alternative pathway proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar to the crystal structure of the alternative pathway C3 convertase C3bBb, which is in accordance with their identical functions in cleaving the complement proteins C3 and C5. PMID:27252379

  2. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  3. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the suspected disease are done first. C3 and C4 are the complement components measured most often. A ... normal levels of the complement proteins C3 and C4 . Complement activity varies throughout the body. For example, ...

  4. Mannose binding lectin plays a crucial role in innate immunity against yeast by enhanced complement activation and enhanced uptake of polymorphonuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    van Asbeck, Eveline C; Hoepelman, Andy IM; Scharringa, Jelle; Herpers, Bjorn L; Verhoef, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background Mannose binding lectin (MBL) is an important host defence protein against opportunistic fungal pathogens. This carbohydrate-binding protein, an opsonin and lectin pathway activator, binds through multiple lectin domains to the repeating sugar arrays displayed on the surface of a wide range of clinically relevant microbial species. We investigated the contribution of MBL to antifungal innate immunity towards C. parapsilosis in vitro. Results High avidity binding was observed between MBL and C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. Addition of MBL to MBL deficient serum increased the deposition of C4 and C3b and enhanced the uptake of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and acapsular C. neoformans by polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs). Compared to other microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Cryptococcus neoformans, C. parapsilosis and Candida albicans were potent activators of the lectin pathway. Conclusion Our results suggest that MBL plays a crucial role in the innate immunity against infections caused by yeast by increasing uptake by PMN. PMID:19094203

  5. Alternative Pathway Dysregulation and the Conundrum of Complement Activation by IgG4 Immune Complexes in Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), a major cause of nephrotic syndrome, is a non-inflammatory immune kidney disease mediated by IgG antibodies that form glomerular subepithelial immune complexes. In primary MN, autoantibodies target proteins expressed on the podocyte surface, often phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1). Pathology is driven by complement activation, leading to podocyte injury and proteinuria. This article overviews the mechanisms of complement activation and regulation in MN, addressing the paradox that anti-PLA2R1 and other antibodies causing primary MN are predominantly (but not exclusively) IgG4, an IgG subclass that does not fix complement. Besides immune complexes, alterations of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in MN may lead to impaired regulation of the alternative pathway (AP). The AP amplifies complement activation on surfaces insufficiently protected by complement regulatory proteins. Whereas podocytes are protected by cell-bound regulators, the GBM must recruit plasma factor H, which inhibits the AP on host surfaces carrying certain polyanions, such as heparan sulfate (HS) chains. Because HS chains present in the normal GBM are lost in MN, we posit that the local complement regulation by factor H may be impaired as a result. Thus, the loss of GBM HS in MN creates a micro-environment that promotes local amplification of complement activation, which in turn may be initiated via the classical or lectin pathways by subsets of IgG in immune complexes. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of complement activation and dysregulation in MN is important for designing more effective therapies. PMID:27199983

  6. Alternative Pathway Dysregulation and the Conundrum of Complement Activation by IgG4 Immune Complexes in Membranous Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), a major cause of nephrotic syndrome, is a non-inflammatory immune kidney disease mediated by IgG antibodies that form glomerular subepithelial immune complexes. In primary MN, autoantibodies target proteins expressed on the podocyte surface, often phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1). Pathology is driven by complement activation, leading to podocyte injury and proteinuria. This article overviews the mechanisms of complement activation and regulation in MN, addressing the paradox that anti-PLA2R1 and other antibodies causing primary MN are predominantly (but not exclusively) IgG4, an IgG subclass that does not fix complement. Besides immune complexes, alterations of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in MN may lead to impaired regulation of the alternative pathway (AP). The AP amplifies complement activation on surfaces insufficiently protected by complement regulatory proteins. Whereas podocytes are protected by cell-bound regulators, the GBM must recruit plasma factor H, which inhibits the AP on host surfaces carrying certain polyanions, such as heparan sulfate (HS) chains. Because HS chains present in the normal GBM are lost in MN, we posit that the local complement regulation by factor H may be impaired as a result. Thus, the loss of GBM HS in MN creates a micro-environment that promotes local amplification of complement activation, which in turn may be initiated via the classical or lectin pathways by subsets of IgG in immune complexes. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of complement activation and dysregulation in MN is important for designing more effective therapies. PMID:27199983

  7. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  8. An amphioxus gC1q protein binds human IgG and initiates the classical pathway: Implications for a C1q-mediated complement system in the basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Li, Mengyang; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-12-01

    The origin of the classical complement pathway remains open during chordate evolution. A C1q-like member, BjC1q, was identified in the basal chordate amphioxus. It is predominantly expressed in the hepatic caecum, hindgut, and notochord, and is significantly upregulated following challenge with bacteria or lipoteichoic acid and LPS. Recombinant BjC1q and its globular head domain specifically interact with lipoteichoic acid and LPS, but BjC1q displays little lectin activity. Moreover, rBjC1q can assemble to form the high molecular weight oligomers necessary for binding to proteases C1r/C1s and for complement activation, and binds human C1r/C1s/mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 as well as amphioxus serine proteases involved in the cleavage of C4/C2, and C3 activation. Importantly, rBjC1q binds with human IgG as well as an amphioxus Ig domain containing protein, resulting in the activation of the classical complement pathway. This is the first report showing that a C1q-like protein in invertebrates is able to initiate classical pathway, raising the possibility that amphioxus possesses a C1q-mediated complement system. It also suggests a new scenario for the emergence of the classical complement pathway, in contrast to the proposal that the lectin pathway evolved into the classical pathway. PMID:25174509

  9. Identification of Novel Pathways in Plant Lectin-Induced Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Sun, Rong; Yu, Tian; Liu, Rong; Cheng, Li-Jia; Bao, Jin-Ku; Zou, Liang; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Plant lectins have been investigated to elucidate their complicated mechanisms due to their remarkable anticancer activities. Although plant lectins seems promising as a potential anticancer agent for further preclinical and clinical uses, further research is still urgently needed and should include more focus on molecular mechanisms. Herein, a Naïve Bayesian model was developed to predict the protein-protein interaction (PPI), and thus construct the global human PPI network. Moreover, multiple sources of biological data, such as smallest shared biological process (SSBP), domain-domain interaction (DDI), gene co-expression profiles and cross-species interolog mapping were integrated to build the core apoptotic PPI network. In addition, we further modified it into a plant lectin-induced apoptotic cell death context. Then, we identified 22 apoptotic hub proteins in mesothelioma cells according to their different microarray expressions. Subsequently, we used combinational methods to predict microRNAs (miRNAs) which could negatively regulate the abovementioned hub proteins. Together, we demonstrated the ability of our Naïve Bayesian model-based network for identifying novel plant lectin-treated cancer cell apoptotic pathways. These findings may provide new clues concerning plant lectins as potential apoptotic inducers for cancer drug discovery. PMID:26867193

  10. Characterization of mannose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity capable of activating the lectin pathway of the complement system. A MBL gene was isolated from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The deduced protein contains a canonical collagen-like domain, a carbohydrate recognition d...

  11. AMD and the alternative complement pathway: genetics and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Perciliz L; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular neurodegenerative disorder and is the leading cause of legal blindness in Western societies, with a prevalence of up to 8 % over the age of 60, which continues to increase with age. AMD is characterized by the progressive breakdown of the macula (the central region of the retina), resulting in the loss of central vision including visual acuity. While its molecular etiology remains unclear, advances in genetics and genomics have illuminated the genetic architecture of the disease and have generated attractive pathomechanistic hypotheses. Here, we review the genetic architecture of AMD, considering the contribution of both common and rare alleles to susceptibility, and we explore the possible mechanistic links between photoreceptor degeneration and the alternative complement pathway, a cascade that has emerged as the most potent genetic driver of this disorder. PMID:27329102

  12. Complement Alternative Pathway Activation in Human Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Filip M.; Verdam, Froukje J.; de Jonge, Charlotte; Boonen, Bas; Driessen, Ann; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Bouvy, Nicole D.; Greve, Jan Willem M.; Buurman, Wim A.; Rensen, Sander S.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system plays a major role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recently we reported complement activation in human NASH. However, it remained unclear whether the alternative pathway of complement, which amplifies C3 activation and which is frequently associated with pathological complement activation leading to disease, was involved. Here, alternative pathway components were investigated in liver biopsies of obese subjects with healthy livers (n = 10) or with NASH (n = 12) using quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. Properdin accumulated in areas where neutrophils surrounded steatotic hepatocytes, and colocalized with the C3 activation product C3c. C3 activation status as expressed by the C3c/native C3 ratio was 2.6-fold higher (p<0.01) in subjects with NASH despite reduced native C3 concentrations (0.94±0.12 vs. 0.57±0.09; p<0.01). Hepatic properdin levels positively correlated with levels of C3c (rs = 0.69; p<0.05) and C3c/C3 activation ratio (rs = 0.59; p<0.05). C3c, C3 activation status (C3c/C3 ratio) and properdin levels increased with higher lobular inflammation scores as determined according to the Kleiner classification (C3c: p<0.01, C3c/C3 ratio: p<0.05, properdin: p<0.05). Hepatic mRNA expression of factor B and factor D did not differ between subjects with healthy livers and subjects with NASH (factor B: 1.00±0.19 vs. 0.71±0.07, p = 0.26; factor D: 1.00±0.21 vs. 0.66±0.14, p = 0.29;). Hepatic mRNA and protein levels of Decay Accelerating Factor tended to be increased in subjects with NASH (mRNA: 1.00±0.14 vs. 2.37±0.72; p = 0.22; protein: 0.51±0.11 vs. 1.97±0.67; p = 0.28). In contrast, factor H mRNA was downregulated in patients with NASH (1.00±0.09 vs. 0.71±0.06; p<0.05) and a similar trend was observed with hepatic protein levels (1.12±0.16 vs. 0.78±0.07; p = 0.08). Collectively, these data suggest a role for alternative pathway

  13. Coding and non-coding polymorphisms in the lectin pathway activator L-ficolin gene in 188 Dutch blood bank donors.

    PubMed

    Herpers, Bjorn Lars; Immink, Marie-Monique; de Jong, Ben A W; van Velzen-Blad, Heleen; de Jongh, Bartelt M; van Hannen, Erik J

    2006-03-01

    Human L-ficolin (FCN) is a serum lectin characterized by a collagen-like and a fibrinogen-like domain that can activate the lectin pathway of complement. Structural and functional similarities to mannose-binding lectin (MBL) suggest a role for L-ficolin in innate immunity. Structural polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene lead to functional deficiency of MBL. Polymorphisms in the FCN2 gene have not been studied previously. We developed 10 denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) assays to screen a total of 188 Dutch Caucasians for polymorphisms in FCN2. Total gene screening in this large cohort revealed 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Interestingly, two conserved coding SNPs were found in exon 8, leading to amino acid substitutions within the fibrinogen-like domain. Fibrinogen-like domains are highly conserved among several proteins in many species. As this domain is responsible for binding of L-ficolin, these newly found coding polymorphisms could alter the affinity of the protein for its substrates and possibly alter the ability of L-ficolin to recognize invading microorganisms. PMID:16076493

  14. Antibody-independent activation of the classical pathway of complement by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Martin, H; McConnell, I; Gorick, B; Hughes-Jones, N C

    1987-03-01

    A purified preparation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to activate the classical complement pathway by direct interaction with the first component of complement, C1, without the intervention of antibody. No evidence was found for activation of the alternative pathway. Following classical pathway activation the specific affinity of EBV for B cells can be presumed to be lost since the virus will become opsonized for clearance by phagocytic cells bearing complement receptors, CR1 and CR3. This activation is further evidence that complement plays a role in defence mechanisms independently of antibody activity. PMID:3038440

  15. Volvariella volvacea lectin activates mouse T lymphocytes by a calcium dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Sze, S C W; Ho, J C K; Liu, W K

    2004-08-15

    The immunomodulatory lectin, Volvariella volvacea lectin (VVL), isolated from the edible mushroom, Volvariella volvacea, has been shown to stimulate the expression of Th1 cytokines and the proliferative activity of mouse splenocytes (She et al. [1998]: Biochem Biophys Res Comm 247:106-111). In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these activities, we conducted a kinetic analysis of the early and late activation markers in mouse T lymphocytes: (1) flow cytometric analysis of calcium influx, (2) induction of activation molecules (CD25 and CD69), (3) expression and DNA-binding activity of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), NFkappaB, and activation protein-1 (AP-1), (4) translational production of cytokines (interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma)), and (5) cell proliferation by expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and tritiated thymidine incorporation. All results showed that VVL induced a rapid expression of CD69, CD25, NFAT, IL-2, and PCNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner, leading to lymphocyte proliferation. These effects brought about by VVL were more potent than those stimulated by equimolar concentrations of mitogenic lectin, concanavalin A (Con A). Cell activation and proliferation were mediated through a calcium-dependent pathway as demonstrated by a VVL-induced increase of intracellular calcium influx, and a proliferation inhibition by the Ca-dependent phosphatase calcineurin blocker-cyclosporin A (CsA). Taken all data together, VVL is a lectin which activates lymphocyte through successive calcium influx, nuclear localization of NFAT transcription factor, induction of activation markers, CD25 and CD69, intracellular cytokine production, and cell proliferation. PMID:15258902

  16. The alternative pathway of complement and the thrombotic microangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Chia Wei; Riedl, Magdalena; Licht, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) are disorders defined by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, non-immune thrombocytopenia and have multi-organ involvement including the kidneys, brain, gastrointestinal, respiratory tract and skin. Emerging evidence points to the central role of complement dysregulation in leading to microvascular endothelial injury which is crucial for the development of TMAs. This key insight has led to the development of complement-targeted therapy. Eculizumab is an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody, which has revolutionized the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Several other anti-complement therapeutic agents are currently in development, offering a potential armamentarium of therapies available to treat complement-mediated TMAs. The development of sensitive, reliable and easy to perform assays to monitor complement activity and therapeutic efficacy will be key to devising an individualized treatment regime with the potential of safely weaning or discontinuing treatment in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:27160864

  17. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by antisense oligonucleotides targeting complement factor B improves lupus nephritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Tamar R; Hettrick, Lisa A; Johnson, Robert B; Hung, Gene; Peralta, Raechel; Watt, Andrew; Henry, Scott P; Adamson, Peter; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that manifests in widespread complement activation and deposition of complement fragments in the kidney. The complement pathway is believed to play a significant role in the pathogenesis and in the development of lupus nephritis. Complement factor B is an important activator of the alternative complement pathway and increasing evidence supports reducing factor B as a potential novel therapy to lupus nephritis. Here we investigated whether pharmacological reduction of factor B expression using antisense oligonucleotides could be an effective approach for the treatment of lupus nephritis. We identified potent and well tolerated factor B antisense oligonucleotides that resulted in significant reductions in hepatic and plasma factor B levels when administered to normal mice. To test the effects of factor B antisense oligonucleotides on lupus nephritis, we used two different mouse models, NZB/W F1 and MRL/lpr mice, that exhibit lupus nephritis like renal pathology. Antisense oligonucleotides mediated reductions in circulating factor B levels were associated with significant improvements in renal pathology, reduced glomerular C3 deposition and proteinuria, and improved survival. These data support the strategy of using factor B antisense oligonucleotides for treatment of lupus nephritis in humans. PMID:26307001

  18. Blockade of Alternative Complement Pathway in Dense Deposit Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sacquépée, Mathieu; Fila, Marc; Peuchmaur, Michel; Perrier-Cornet, Emilia; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Deschênes, Georges

    2014-01-01

    A patient aged 17 with dense deposit disease associated with complement activation, circulating C3 Nef, and Factor H mutation presented with nephrotic syndrome and hypertension. Steroid therapy, plasma exchange, and rituximab failed to improve proteinuria and hypertension despite a normalization of the circulating sC5b9 complex. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against C5, was used to block the terminal product of the complement cascade. The dose was adapted to achieve a CH50 below 10%, but proteinuria and blood pressure were not improved after 3 months of treatment. PMID:24672732

  19. Blockade of alternative complement pathway in dense deposit disease.

    PubMed

    Berthe-Aucejo, Aurore; Sacquépée, Mathieu; Fila, Marc; Peuchmaur, Michel; Perrier-Cornet, Emilia; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Deschênes, Georges

    2014-01-01

    A patient aged 17 with dense deposit disease associated with complement activation, circulating C3 Nef, and Factor H mutation presented with nephrotic syndrome and hypertension. Steroid therapy, plasma exchange, and rituximab failed to improve proteinuria and hypertension despite a normalization of the circulating sC5b9 complex. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against C5, was used to block the terminal product of the complement cascade. The dose was adapted to achieve a CH50 below 10%, but proteinuria and blood pressure were not improved after 3 months of treatment. PMID:24672732

  20. Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate inhibits the complement classical pathway by potentiating C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Rajabi, Mohsen; Chen, Trina; Karnaukhova, Elena; Kozlowski, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) has become the subject of multidisciplinary investigation as a non-traditional contaminant in the heparin therapeutic preparations that were linked to severe adverse events. In this study, it was found that OSCS inhibited complement fixation on bacteria and bacterial lysis mediated by the complement classical pathway. The inhibition of complement by OSCS is not due to interference with antibody/antigen interaction or due to consumption of C3 associated with FXII-dependent contact system activation. However, OSCS complement inhibition is dependent on C1 inhibitor (C1inh) since the depletion of C1inh from either normal or FXII-deficient complement plasma prevents OSCS inhibition of complement activity. Surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed that immobilized C1inhibitor bound greater than 5-fold more C1s in the presence of OSCS than in presence of heparin. Although heparin can also inhibit complement, OSCS and OSCS contaminated heparin are more potent inhibitors of complement. Furthermore, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG), an anti-inflammatory veterinary medicine with a similar structure to OSCS, also inhibited complement in the plasma of dogs and farm animals. This study provides a new insight that in addition to the FXII-dependent activation of contact system, oversulfated and polysulfated chondroitin-sulfate can inhibit complement activity by potentiating the classical complement pathway regulator C1inh. This effect on C1inh may play a role in inhibiting inflammation as well as impacting bacterial clearance. PMID:23077587

  1. Synthesis of classical pathway complement components by chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, K; North, J; Saunders, D; Schwaeble, W; Jeziorska, M; Woolley, D E; Whaley, K

    1996-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical studies, C1q, C1s, C4 and C2 were detected in chondrocytes in normal human articular cartilage and macroscopically normal articular cartilage from the inferior surfaces of hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis. Using reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNA for C1q, C1s, C4 and C2 was also detected in RNA extracted from articular cartilage. C1r, C3, C1-inhibitor, C4-binding protein and factor I were not detected by either technique. Articular chondrocytes cultured in vitro synthesized C1r, C1s, C4, C2, C3 and C1-inhibitor but not C1q, C4-binding protein or factor I, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Northern blot analysis. Thus cultured articular chondrocytes have a complement profile that is similar to that of cultured human fibroblasts rather than that of articular chondrocytes in vivo. Complement synthesis in cultured chondrocytes was modulated by the cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), showing that cytokines can probably regulate complement synthesis in intact cartilage. The possible roles of local synthesis of complement components by chondrocytes in matrix turnover and the regulation chondrocyte function are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8881771

  2. Deficient activity of the alternative pathway of complement in beta thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Corry, J M; Marshall, W C; Guthrie, L A; Peerless, A G; Johnston, R B

    1981-06-01

    Patients with thalassemia major suffer frequent and serious infections, especially after splenectomy. To explore the basis for this susceptibility, we examined activity of the complement system in sera from 24 patients. All sera had normal or increased activity of the classic complement pathway. However, six of the 24 (three with and three without splenectomy) had abnormal alternative pathway function, and mean alternative pathway activity was significantly decreased in both splenectomized and nonsplenectomized patients. Mean concentrations of C3, factor B, properdin, and immunoglobulins were normal. Defective alternative pathway function, especially in conjunction with asplenia, could contribute to the propensity to infection that exists in thalassemia. PMID:6908998

  3. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway preserves photoreceptors after retinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Sweigard, J. Harry; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Smith, Kaylee E.; Kim, Leo A.; Paschalis, Eleftherios I.; Okonuki, Yoko; Castillejos, Alexandra; Kataoka, Keiko; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Yanai, Ryoji; Husain, Deeba; Lambris, John D.; Vavvas, Demetrios; Miller, Joan W.; Connor, Kip M.

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of photoreceptors is a primary cause of vision loss worldwide, making the underlying mechanisms surrounding photoreceptor cell death critical to developing new treatment strategies. Retinal detachment, characterized by the separation of photoreceptors from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium, is a sight-threatening event that can happen in a number of retinal diseases. The detached photoreceptors undergo apoptosis and programmed necrosis. Given that photoreceptors are nondividing cells, their loss leads to irreversible visual impairment even after successful retinal reattachment surgery. To better understand the underlying disease mechanisms, we analyzed innate immune system regulators in the vitreous of human patients with retinal detachment and correlated the results with findings in a mouse model of retinal detachment. We identified the alternative complement pathway as promoting early photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Photoreceptors down-regulate membrane-bound inhibitors of complement, allowing for selective targeting by the alternative complement pathway. When photoreceptors in the detached retina were removed from the primary source of oxygen and nutrients (choroidal vascular bed), the retina became hypoxic, leading to an up-regulation of complement factor B, a key mediator of the alternative pathway. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway in knockout mice or through pharmacological means ameliorated photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Our current study begins to outline the mechanism by which the alternative complement pathway facilitates photoreceptor cell death in the damaged retina. PMID:26203084

  4. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway preserves photoreceptors after retinal injury.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Smith, Kaylee E; Kim, Leo A; Paschalis, Eleftherios I; Okonuki, Yoko; Castillejos, Alexandra; Kataoka, Keiko; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Yanai, Ryoji; Husain, Deeba; Lambris, John D; Vavvas, Demetrios; Miller, Joan W; Connor, Kip M

    2015-07-22

    Degeneration of photoreceptors is a primary cause of vision loss worldwide, making the underlying mechanisms surrounding photoreceptor cell death critical to developing new treatment strategies. Retinal detachment, characterized by the separation of photoreceptors from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium, is a sight-threatening event that can happen in a number of retinal diseases. The detached photoreceptors undergo apoptosis and programmed necrosis. Given that photoreceptors are nondividing cells, their loss leads to irreversible visual impairment even after successful retinal reattachment surgery. To better understand the underlying disease mechanisms, we analyzed innate immune system regulators in the vitreous of human patients with retinal detachment and correlated the results with findings in a mouse model of retinal detachment. We identified the alternative complement pathway as promoting early photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Photoreceptors down-regulate membrane-bound inhibitors of complement, allowing for selective targeting by the alternative complement pathway. When photoreceptors in the detached retina were removed from the primary source of oxygen and nutrients (choroidal vascular bed), the retina became hypoxic, leading to an up-regulation of complement factor B, a key mediator of the alternative pathway. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway in knockout mice or through pharmacological means ameliorated photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Our current study begins to outline the mechanism by which the alternative complement pathway facilitates photoreceptor cell death in the damaged retina. PMID:26203084

  5. Clinical hypothermia temperatures increase complement activation and cell destruction via the classical pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is a treatment modality that is increasingly used to improve clinical neurological outcomes for ischemia-reperfusion injury-mediated diseases. Antibody-initiated classical complement pathway activation has been shown to contribute to ischemia-reperfusion injury in multiple disease processes. However, how therapeutic hypothermia affects complement activation is unknown. Our goal was to measure the independent effect of temperature on complement activation, and more specifically, examine the relationship between clinical hypothermia temperatures (31–33°C), and complement activation. Methods Antibody-sensitized erythrocytes were used to assay complement activation at temperatures ranging from 0-41°C. Individual complement pathway components were assayed by ELISA, Western blot, and quantitative dot blot. Peptide Inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) was used to specifically inhibit activation of C1. Results Antibody-initiated complement activation resulting in eukaryotic cell lysis was increased by 2-fold at 31°C compared with 37°C. Antibody-initiated complement activation in human serum increased as temperature decreased from 37°C until dramatically decreasing at 13°C. Quantitation of individual complement components showed significantly increased activation of C4, C3, and C5 at clinical hypothermia temperatures. In contrast, C1s activation by heat-aggregated IgG decreased at therapeutic hypothermia temperatures consistent with decreased enzymatic activity at lower temperatures. However, C1q binding to antibody-coated erythrocytes increased at lower temperatures, suggesting that increased classical complement pathway activation is mediated by increased C1 binding at therapeutic hypothermia temperatures. PIC1 inhibited hypothermia-enhanced complement-mediated cell lysis at 31°C by up to 60% (P = 0.001) in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions In summary, therapeutic hypothermia temperatures increased antibody

  6. Targeting Complement Pathways During Cold Ischemia and Reperfusion Prevents Delayed Graft Function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z X; Qi, S; Lasaro, M A; Bouchard, K; Dow, C; Moore, K; Wu, Z; Barama, A; Xu, J; Johnson, K; Marozsan, A J; Wang, Y

    2016-09-01

    The complement system plays a critical role in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI)-mediated delayed graft function (DGF). To better understand the roles of complement activation pathways in IRI in kidney transplantation, donor kidneys were treated ex vivo with terminal complement pathway (TP) inhibitor, anti-rat C5 mAb 18A10, or complement alternative pathway (AP) inhibitor TT30 for 28 h at 4°C pretransplantation in a syngeneic kidney transplantation rat model. All 18A10- and 67% of TT30-pretreated grafts, but only 16.7% of isotype control-pretreated grafts, survived beyond day 21 (p < 0.01). Inhibitor treatment in the final 45 min of 28-h cold ischemia (CI) similarly improved graft survival. Systemic posttransplant treatment with 18A10 resulted in 60% increased graft survival beyond day 21 (p < 0.01), while no TT30-treated rat survived > 6 days. Our results demonstrate that AP plays a prominent role during CI and that blocking either the AP or, more effectively the TP prevents ischemic injury and subsequent DGF. Multiple complement pathways may be activated and contribute to reperfusion injury; blocking the TP, but not the AP, posttransplant is effective in preventing reperfusion injury and increasing graft survival. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using complement inhibitors for prevention of DGF in humans. PMID:27003920

  7. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J; Julian, Bruce A; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Novak, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome-wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H-related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1-containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  8. Alternative Complement Pathway Deficiency Ameliorates Chronic Smoke-Induced Functional and Morphological Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Casey, Sarah; Williamson, Tucker; Ferrell, W. Drew; Atkinson, Carl; Jones, Bryan W.; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a complex disease involving genetic variants and environmental insults, is among the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Genetic and histologic evidence implicate the complement system in AMD pathogenesis; and smoking is the major environmental risk factor associated with increased disease risk. Although previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure (CE) causes retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defects in mice, and smoking leads to complement activation in patients, it is unknown whether complement activation is causative in the development of CE pathology; and if so, which complement pathway is required. Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or clean, filtered air for 6 months. The effects of CE were analyzed in wildtype (WT) mice or mice without a functional complement alternative pathway (AP; CFB−/−) using molecular, histological, electrophysiological, and behavioral outcomes. Results CE in WT mice exhibited a significant reduction in function of both rods and cones as determined by electroretinography and contrast sensitivity measurements, concomitant with a thinning of the nuclear layers as measured by SD-OCT imaging and histology. Gene expression analyses suggested that alterations in both photoreceptors and RPE/choroid might contribute to the observed loss of function, and visualization of complement C3d deposition implies the RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) complex as the target of AP activity. RPE/BrM alterations include an increase in mitochondrial size concomitant with an apical shift in mitochondrial distribution within the RPE and a thickening of BrM. CFB−/− mice were protected from developing these CE-mediated alterations. Conclusions Taken together, these findings provide clear evidence that ocular pathology generated in CE mice is dependent on complement activation and requires the AP. Identifying animal models with RPE/BrM damage and verifying which

  9. Chemotaxigenesis and activation of the alternative complement pathway by encapsulated and non-encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Laxalt, K A; Kozel, T R

    1979-01-01

    In the presence of serum, whole cells of encapsulated and non-encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans generated a chemotactic response by neutrophils. Heat inactivation of serum ablated all chemotactic activity. Cryptococcal polysaccharide was not chemotaxigenic. Assays for alternative complement pathway activation such as depletion of alternative complement pathway factor B or electrophoretic conversion of factor B closely paralleled chemotaxis assays. Cells of encapsulated and non-encapsulated C. neoformans activated the alternative complement pathway, whereas cryptococcal polysaccharide was inactive. Failure of the capsular material to activate the alternative pathway was not due to serotype specificity because polysaccharide of several serotypes failed to achieve activation. The results suggest that chemotaxigenesis and alternative complement pathway activation are functions of the yeast cell wall. The results support our proposal that the cryptococcal capsul does not prevent potential opsonins from reaching binding and activation sites at the yeast cell wall or the release of biologically active soluble cleavage products into the surrounding medium; however, cell wall-bound cleavage products remain bound to the cell wall beneath the capsule. Therefore, they are unable to participate as opsonins in phagocytosis. PMID:397927

  10. Activation of the alternative complement pathway in canine normal serum by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, A.A.C.; Petroni, T.F.; Fedatto, P.F.; Bianchini, R.R.; Venancio, E.J.; Itano, E.N.; Ono, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a human granulomatous disease. Recently the first case of natural disease in dogs was reported. The complement system is an important effector component of humoral immunity against infectious agents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the activation of the dog alternative complement pathway by P. brasiliensis. Initially, the ability of erythrocytes of guinea pig, rabbit, sheep, chicken and swine to activate the dog alternative pathway was evaluated. The guinea pig erythrocytes showed the greatest capacity to activate dog alternative pathway. The alternative (AH50) hemolytic activity was evaluated in 27 serum samples from healthy dogs and the mean values were 87.2 AH50/ml. No significant differences were observed in relation to sex and age. The alternative pathway activation by P. brasiliensis was higher in serum samples from adult dogs when compared to puppies and aged dogs (p ≤ 0.05). This is the first report of dog alternative complement pathway activation by P. brasiliensis and suggests that it may play a protective role in canine paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24031350

  11. Activation of the alternative complement pathway in canine normal serum by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, A A C; Petroni, T F; Fedatto, P F; Bianchini, R R; Venancio, E J; Itano, E N; Ono, M A

    2009-04-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a human granulomatous disease. Recently the first case of natural disease in dogs was reported. The complement system is an important effector component of humoral immunity against infectious agents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the activation of the dog alternative complement pathway by P. brasiliensis. Initially, the ability of erythrocytes of guinea pig, rabbit, sheep, chicken and swine to activate the dog alternative pathway was evaluated. The guinea pig erythrocytes showed the greatest capacity to activate dog alternative pathway. The alternative (AH50) hemolytic activity was evaluated in 27 serum samples from healthy dogs and the mean values were 87.2 AH50/ml. No significant differences were observed in relation to sex and age. The alternative pathway activation by P. brasiliensis was higher in serum samples from adult dogs when compared to puppies and aged dogs (p ≤ 0.05). This is the first report of dog alternative complement pathway activation by P. brasiliensis and suggests that it may play a protective role in canine paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24031350

  12. Complement activation pathways: a bridge between innate and adaptive immune responses in asthma.

    PubMed

    Wills-Karp, Marsha

    2007-07-01

    Although it is widely accepted that allergic asthma is driven by T helper type 2 (Th2)-polarized immune responses to innocuous environmental allergens, the mechanisms driving these aberrant immune responses remain elusive. Recent recognition of the importance of innate immune pathways in regulating adaptive immune responses have fueled investigation into the role of innate immune pathways in the pathogenesis of asthma. The phylogenetically ancient innate immune system, the complement system, is no exception. The emerging paradigm is that C3a production at the airway surface serves as a common pathway for the induction of Th2-mediated inflammatory responses to a variety of environmental triggers of asthma (i.e., allergens, pollutants, viral infections, cigarette smoke). In contrast, C5a plays a dual immunoregulatory role by protecting against the initial development of a Th2-polarized adaptive immune response via its ability to induce tolerogenic dendritic cell subsets. On the other hand, C5a drives type 2-mediated inflammatory responses once inflammation ensues. Thus, alterations in the balance of generation of the various components of the complement pathway either due to environmental exposure changes or genetic alterations in genes of the complement cascade may underlie the recent rise in asthma prevalence in westernized countries. PMID:17607007

  13. Differential ability to resist to complement lysis and invade host cells mediated by MBL in R4 and 860 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Evans-Osses, Ingrid; Mojoli, Andres; Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; da Costa, Denise Endo; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; de Messias-Reason, Iara; Ramirez, Marcel Ivan

    2014-03-18

    To produce an infection Trypanosoma cruzi must evade lysis by the complement system. During early stages of infection, the lectin pathway plays an important role in host defense and can be activated by binding of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) to carbohydrates on the surface of pathogens. We hypothesized that MBL has a dual role during parasite-host cell interaction as lectin complement pathway activator and as binding molecule to invade the host cell. We used two polarized strains of T. cruzi, R4 (susceptible) and 860 (resistant) strains, to investigate the role of MBL in complement-mediated lysis. Interestingly R4, but not 860 metacyclic strain, markedly increases the invasion of host cells, suggesting that MBL drives the invasion process while the parasite deactivates the Lectin complement pathway. PMID:24560788

  14. Complement Pathway is Frequently Altered in Endometriosis and Endometriosis-Associated Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Swati; Huang, Xin; Elishaev, Esther; Budiu, Raluca A.; Zhang, Lixin; Kim, SungHwan; Donnellan, Nicole; Mantia-Smaldone, Gina; Ma, Tianzhou; Tseng, George; Lee, Ted; Mansuria, Suketu; Edwards, Robert; Vlad, Anda M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms of immune dysregulation associated with advanced tumors are relatively well understood. Much less is known about the role of immune effectors against cancer precursor lesions. Endometrioid and clear cell ovarian tumors partly derive from endometriosis, a commonly diagnosed chronic inflammatory disease. We performed here a comprehensive immune gene expression analysis of pelvic inflammation in endometriosis and endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer (EAOC). Experimental design RNA was extracted from 120 paraffin tissue blocks comprising of normal endometrium (n=32), benign endometriosis (n=30), atypical endometriosis (n=15) and EAOC (n=43). Serous tumors (n=15) were included as non-endometriosis associated controls. The immune microenvironment was profiled using Nanostring and the nCounter® GX Human Immunology Kit, comprising probes for a total of 511 immune genes. Results One third of the endometriosis patients revealed a tumor-like inflammation profile, suggesting that cancer–like immune signatures may develop earlier, in patients classified as clinically benign. Gene expression analyses revealed the complement pathway as most prominently involved in both endometriosis and EAOC. Complement proteins are abundantly present in epithelial cells in both benign and malignant lesions. Mechanistic studies in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells from mice with conditional (Cre-loxP) mutations show intrinsic production of complement in epithelia and demonstrate an early link between Kras- and Pten-driven pathways and complement upregulation. Downregulation of complement in these cells interferes with cell proliferation. Conclusions These findings reveal new characteristics of inflammation in precursor lesions and point to previously unknown roles of complement in endometriosis and EAOC. PMID:25294912

  15. Alternative Pathway of Complement in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Marians, Russell; Emlen, Woodruff; Wood, Susan; Smith, Christopher; Akana, Hillary; Holers, V. Michael; Lesser, Martin; Kline, Myriam; Hoffman, Cathy; Christen, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is a common cause of acute kidney injury in children. Mutations in alternative pathway (AP) complement regulatory proteins have been identified in severe cases of thrombotic microangiopathy, but the role of the AP in D+HUS has not been studied. Therefore, we determined whether plasma levels of markers of activation of the AP are increased in D+HUS and are biomarkers of the severity of renal injury that predict the need for dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Patients were randomly selected from among participants in the HUS-SYNSORB Pk trial. Plasma samples were collected on days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after enrollment and day 28 after discharge from the hospital. Levels of two complement pathway products, Bb and SC5b-9, were determined by ELISA. Results: Seventeen children (6 boys and 11 girls; age, 5.4 ± 3.5 yr) were studied. Eight (47%) required dialysis support, and two had serious extrarenal events. On the day of enrollment, plasma levels of Bb and SC5b-9 were significantly increased in all patients compared with healthy controls (P < 0.01). The elevated concentrations normalized by day 28 after discharge. Circulating levels of complement pathway fragments did not correlate with severity of renal injury or occurrence of complications. Conclusions: Patients with acute-onset D+HUS manifest activation of the AP of complement that is temporally related to the onset of disease and that resolves within 1 mo. Therapies to inhibit the AP of complement may be useful in attenuating the severity of renal injury and extrarenal complications. PMID:19820137

  16. A single-CRD C-type lectin from oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates immune recognition and pathogen elimination with a potential role in the activation of complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Huan; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-06-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs), serving as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins that participate in nonself-recognition and pathogen elimination. In the present study, a single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) CTL was identified from oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated as CgCLec-2). There was only one CRD within the deduced amino acid sequence of CgCLec-2 consisting of 129 amino acid residues. A conserved EPN (Glu246-Pro247-Asn248) motif was found in Ca(2+)-binding site 2 of CgCLec-2. The CgCLec-2 mRNA could be detected in all the examined tissues at different expression levels in oysters. The mRNA expression of CgCLec-2 in hemocytes was up-regulated significantly at 6 h post Vibrio splendidus challenge. The recombinant CgCLec-2 (rCgCLec-2) could bind various Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs), including lipopolysaccharide, mannan and peptidoglycan, and displayed strong binding abilities to Vibrio anguillarum, V. splendidus and Yarrowiali polytica and week binding ability to Staphylococcus aureus. It could also enhance the phagocytic activity of oyster hemocytes to V. splendidus and exhibited growth suppression activity against gram-positive bacteria S. aureus but no effect on gram-negative bacteria V. splendidus. Furthermore, the interaction between rCgCLec-2 and rCgMASPL-1 was confirmed by GST Pull down. The results suggested that CgCLec-2 served as not only a PRR in immune recognition but also a regulatory factor in pathogen elimination, and played a potential role in the activation of complement system. PMID:25800112

  17. The Levels of the Lectin Pathway Serine Protease MASP-1 and Its Complex Formation with C1 Inhibitor Are Linked to the Severity of Hereditary Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Cecilie Bo; Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette; Hansen, Karin Møller; Koch, Claus; Skjødt, Karsten; Garred, Peter; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2015-10-15

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is known to form complexes with the lectin complement pathway serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2. Deficiency of C1-INH is associated with hereditary angioedema (HAE), an autosomal inherited disease characterized by swelling attacks caused by elevated levels of bradykinin. MASP-1 was shown to cleave high m.w. kininogen into bradykinin; therefore, we hypothesized that MASP-1 levels and the quantity of MASP-1/C1-INH complexes might be associated with different paraclinical and clinical outcomes of HAE. We measured MASP-1 serum concentrations and endogenous MASP-1/C1-INH complex levels in 128 HAE patients and 100 controls. Relatively high levels of pre-existing MASP-1/C1-INH complexes were observed in normal serum, and we found that both the serum levels of MASP-1 and the complex formation between MASP-1 and C1-INH were significantly reduced in HAE patients compared with matched controls (p < 0.0001). The level of MASP-1 and MASP-1/C1-INH complexes in HE patients correlated with the level of C1-INH (p = 0.0009 and p = 0.0047, respectively), the level of C4 (p = 0.0084 and p < 0.0001, respectively), and the number of attacks in the year of blood sampling (p = 0.0075 and p = 0.0058, respectively). In conclusion, we show that MASP-1/C1-INH complexes circulate in normal human blood. The levels of MASP-1 and MASP-1/C1-INH complexes are reduced in HAE patients compared with controls. Both MASP-1 and MASP-1/C1-INH complexes are related to the degree of complement C4 consumption, as well as the severity of disease. These results suggest that MASP-1 may exert a previously unrecognized role in the pathophysiology of HAE. PMID:26371246

  18. C1-bypass complement-activation pathway in patients with chronic urticaria and angio-oedema.

    PubMed

    Ballow, M; Ward, G W; Gershwin, M E; Day, N K

    1975-08-01

    During the routine screening of 152 patients with urticaria or angio-oedema for hypocomplementaemia, 4 patients were found to have low serum levels of the third component of complement (C). These patients were noteworthy and differed from previous reports of patients with urticaria-like skin lesions and hypocomplementaemia because of the absence of immune-complex disease. In addition to the low C3, 2 of these patients were unique on the basis of low serum levels of haemolytic C1, C1q, C1s, and properdin factor B, but normal concentrations of C4 and C2. These C abnormalities may reflect a new clinical entity, and these cases form the first description in man of the C1-bypass complement-activation pathway. PMID:49798

  19. Complement activity is associated with disease severity in multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vlam, Lotte; Cats, Elisabeth A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Jansen, Marc D.; Piepers, Sanne; Veldink, Jan Herman; Franssen, Hessel; Stork, Abraham C.J.; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan H.M.; Herpers, Bjorn L.; van Strijp, Jos A.; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high innate activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement is associated with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and whether levels of innate complement activity or the potential of anti-GM1 antibodies to activate the complement system correlate with disease severity. Methods: We performed a case-control study including 79 patients with MMN and 79 matched healthy controls. Muscle weakness was documented with Medical Research Council scale sum score and axonal loss with nerve conduction studies. Activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement was assessed by ELISA. We also determined serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) concentrations and polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) and quantified complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies by ELISA. Results: Activity of the classical and lectin pathways, MBL2 genotypes, and serum MBL concentrations did not differ between patients and controls. Complement activation by anti-GM1 IgM antibodies was exclusively mediated through the classical pathway and correlated with antibody titers (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that both high innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and high complement-activating capacity of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were significantly associated with more severe muscle weakness and axonal loss. Conclusion: High innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and efficient complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies are determinants of disease severity in patients with MMN. These findings underline the importance of anti-GM1 antibody–mediated complement activation in the pathogenesis and clinical course of MMN. PMID:26161430

  20. Identification of peptidic inhibitors of the alternative complement pathway based on Staphylococcus aureus SCIN proteins.

    PubMed

    Summers, Brady J; Garcia, Brandon L; Woehl, Jordan L; Ramyar, Kasra X; Yao, Xiaolan; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2015-10-01

    The complement system plays a central role in a number of human inflammatory diseases, and there is a significant need for development of complement-directed therapies. The discovery of an arsenal of anti-complement proteins secreted by the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus brought with it the potential for harnessing the powerful inhibitory properties of these molecules. One such family of inhibitors, the SCINs, interact with a functional "hot-spot" on the surface of C3b. SCINs not only stabilize an inactive form of the alternative pathway (AP) C3 convertase (C3bBb), but also overlap the C3b binding site of complement factors B and H. Here we determined that a conserved Arg residue in SCINs is critical for function of full-length SCIN proteins. Despite this, we also found SCIN-specific differences in the contributions of other residues found at the C3b contact site, which suggested that a more diverse repertoire of residues might be able to recognize this region of C3b. To investigate this possibility, we conducted a phage display screen aimed at identifying SCIN-competitive 12-mer peptides. In total, seven unique sequences were identified and all exhibited direct C3b binding. A subset of these specifically inhibited the AP in assays of complement function. The mechanism of AP inhibition by these peptides was probed through surface plasmon resonance approaches, which revealed that six of the seven peptides disrupted C3bBb formation by interfering with factor B/C3b binding. To our knowledge this study has identified the first small molecules that retain inhibitory properties of larger staphylococcal immune evasion proteins. PMID:26052070

  1. Activation of the classical and alternative pathways of complement by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and Treponema vincentii.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T J

    1987-09-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro studies have indicated that complement plays an important role in the syphilitic immune responses. Few quantitative data are available concerning activation of the classical pathway by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and no information is available on treponemal activation of the alternative pathway. Activation of both pathways was compared by using T. pallidum subsp. pallidum and the nonpathogen T. vincentii. With rabbit and human sources of complement, both organisms rapidly activated the classical pathway, as shown by hemolysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes and by the generation of soluble C4a. With human sources of complement, both organisms also activated the alternative pathway, as shown by hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes and by the generation of soluble C3a in the presence of magnesium ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). During incubation, organisms remained actively mobile and did not lyse, indicating that activation was a function of complement reactivity with the intact outer treponemal surface. In addition, freshly harvested T. pallidum subsp. pallidum immediately activated both pathways of complement; preincubation of organisms did not enhance complement reactivity. T. vincentii was a more potent activator of this pathway. T. pallidum subsp. pallidum contained almost four times as much surface sialic acid as T. vincentii did. When sialic acid was enzymatically removed from T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, enhanced activation of the alternative pathway was detected. It is proposed that T. pallidum subsp. pallidum retards complement-mediated damage by the alternative pathway through surface-associated sialic acid. This may be an important virulence determinant that enables these organisms to readily disseminate through the bloodstream to infect other tissues. PMID:3305362

  2. Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 Inhibits the Classical Pathway by Blocking Activation of the C1 Complement Complex.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zhi, Hui; Wager, Beau; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens that traffic in blood, lymphatics, or interstitial fluids must adopt strategies to evade innate immune defenses, notably the complement system. Through recruitment of host regulators of complement to their surface, many pathogens are able to escape complement-mediated attack. The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces a number of surface proteins that bind to factor H related molecules, which function as the dominant negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement. Relatively less is known about how B. burgdorferi evades the classical pathway of complement despite the observation that some sensu lato strains are sensitive to classical pathway activation. Here we report that the borrelial lipoprotein BBK32 potently and specifically inhibits the classical pathway by binding with high affinity to the initiating C1 complex of complement. In addition, B. burgdorferi cells that produce BBK32 on their surface bind to both C1 and C1r and a serum sensitive derivative of B. burgdorferi is protected from killing via the classical pathway in a BBK32-dependent manner. Subsequent biochemical and biophysical approaches localized the anti-complement activity of BBK32 to its globular C-terminal domain. Mechanistic studies reveal that BBK32 acts by entrapping C1 in its zymogen form by binding and inhibiting the C1 subcomponent, C1r, which serves as the initiating serine protease of the classical pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of a spirochetal protein acting as a direct inhibitor of the classical pathway and is the only example of a biomolecule capable of specifically and noncovalently inhibiting C1/C1r. By identifying a unique mode of complement evasion this study greatly enhances our understanding of how pathogens subvert and potentially manipulate host innate immune systems. PMID:26808924

  3. Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 Inhibits the Classical Pathway by Blocking Activation of the C1 Complement Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Beau; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens that traffic in blood, lymphatics, or interstitial fluids must adopt strategies to evade innate immune defenses, notably the complement system. Through recruitment of host regulators of complement to their surface, many pathogens are able to escape complement-mediated attack. The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces a number of surface proteins that bind to factor H related molecules, which function as the dominant negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement. Relatively less is known about how B. burgdorferi evades the classical pathway of complement despite the observation that some sensu lato strains are sensitive to classical pathway activation. Here we report that the borrelial lipoprotein BBK32 potently and specifically inhibits the classical pathway by binding with high affinity to the initiating C1 complex of complement. In addition, B. burgdorferi cells that produce BBK32 on their surface bind to both C1 and C1r and a serum sensitive derivative of B. burgdorferi is protected from killing via the classical pathway in a BBK32-dependent manner. Subsequent biochemical and biophysical approaches localized the anti-complement activity of BBK32 to its globular C-terminal domain. Mechanistic studies reveal that BBK32 acts by entrapping C1 in its zymogen form by binding and inhibiting the C1 subcomponent, C1r, which serves as the initiating serine protease of the classical pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of a spirochetal protein acting as a direct inhibitor of the classical pathway and is the only example of a biomolecule capable of specifically and noncovalently inhibiting C1/C1r. By identifying a unique mode of complement evasion this study greatly enhances our understanding of how pathogens subvert and potentially manipulate host innate immune systems. PMID:26808924

  4. The alternative complement pathway is longitudinally associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The CODAM study.

    PubMed

    Hertle, Elisabeth; Arts, Ilja C W; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Feskens, Edith J M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J

    2016-01-01

    The alternative pathway of complement activation is highly reactive and can be activated spontaneously in the vasculature. Activation may contribute to vascular damage and development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We aimed to investigate functional components of the alternative pathway in cardiovascular risk. We studied 573 individuals who were followed-up for seven years. At baseline, we measured the enhancer properdin; the rate-limiting protease factor D (FD); and a marker of systemic activation, Bb. Using generalised estimating equations, we investigated their longitudinal associations with cardiovascular events (CVE, N=89), CVD (N=159), low-grade inflammation (LGI), endothelial dysfunction (ED) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Furthermore, we investigated associations with incident CVE (N=39) and CVD (N=73) in 342 participants free of CVD at baseline. CVE included myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac angioplasty and/or cardiac bypass. CVD additionally included ischaemia on an electrocardiogram and/or ankle-brachial index < 0.9. In adjusted analyses, properdin was positively associated with CVE (per 1SD, longitudinal OR=1.36 [1.07; 1.74], OR for incident CVE=1.53 [1.06; 2.20]), but not with CVD. Properdin was also positively associated with ED (β=0.13 [95%CI 0.06; 0.20]), but not with LGI or cIMT. FD and Bb were positively associated with LGI (per 1SD, FD: β=0.21 [0.12; 0.29], Bb: β=0.14 [0.07; 0.21]), and ED (FD: β=0.20 [0.11; 0.29], Bb: β=0.10 [0.03; 0.18]), but not with cIMT, CVE or CVD. Taken together, this suggests that the alternative complement pathway contributes to processes of vascular damage, and that in particular a high potential to enhance alternative pathway activation may promote unfavourable cardiovascular outcomes in humans. PMID:26446431

  5. Genetic Investigation of Complement Pathway Genes in Type 2 Diabetic Retinopathy: An Inflammatory Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming Ming; Wang, Jun; Ren, Hong; Sun, Yun Duan; Fan, Jiao Jie; Teng, Yan; Li, Yan Bo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has complex multifactorial pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the association of complement pathway genes with susceptibility to DR. Eight haplotype-tagging SNPs of SERPING1 and C5 were genotyped in 570 subjects with type 2 diabetes: 295 DR patients (138 nonproliferative DR [NPDR] and 157 proliferative DR [PDR]) and 275 diabetic controls. Among the six C5 SNPs, a marginal association was first detected between rs17611 and total DR patients (P = 0.009, OR = 0.53 for recessive model). In stratification analysis, a significant decrease in the frequencies of G allele and GG homozygosity for rs17611 was observed in PDR patients compared with diabetic controls (Pcorr = 0.032, OR = 0.65 and Pcorr = 0.016, OR = 0.37, resp.); it was linked with a disease progression. A haplotype AA defined by the major alleles of rs17611 and rs1548782 was significantly predisposed to PDR with increased risk of 1.54 (Pcorr = 0.023). Regarding other variants in C5 and SERPING1, none of the tagging SNPs had a significant association with DR and its subgroups (all P > 0.05). Our study revealed an association between DR and C5 polymorphisms with clinical significance, whereas SERPING1 is not a major genetic component of DR. Our data suggest a link of complement pathway with DR pathogenesis. PMID:26989329

  6. Inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by meningococcal capsular polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sarika; Vasudhev, Shreekant; DeOliveira, Rosane; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Almost all invasive Neisseria meningitidis isolates express capsular polysaccharide. Antibody (Ab) is required for complement-dependent killing of meningococci. While alternative pathway evasion has received considerable attention, little is known about classical pathway (CP) inhibition by meningococci and forms the basis of this study. We engineered capsulated and unencapsulated isogenic mutant strains of groups A, B, C, W and Y meningococci to express similar amounts of the same factor H-binding protein (fHbp; a key component of group B meningococcal vaccines) molecule. Despite similar anti-fHbp mAb binding, significantly less C4b was deposited on all five encapsulated mutants compared to their unencapsulated counterparts (P<0.01), when purified C1 and C4 were used to deposit C4b. Reduced C4b deposition was the result of capsule-mediated inhibition of C1q engagement by Ab. C4b deposition correlated linearly with C1q engagement by anti-fHbp. While B, C, W and Y capsules limited CP-mediated killing by anti-fHbp, the unencapsulated group A mutant paradoxically was more resistant than its encapsulated counterpart. Strains varied considerably in their susceptibility to anti-fHbp and complement despite similar Ab binding, which may have implications for the activity of fHbp-based vaccines. Capsule also limited C4b deposition by anti-porin A mAbs. Capsule expression decreased binding of an anti-LOS IgM mAb (~1.2 to 2-fold reduction in fluorescence). Akin to observations with IgG, capsule also decreased IgM-mediated C4b deposition when IgM binding to the mutant strain pairs was normalized. In conclusion, we show that capsular polysaccharide, a critical meningococcal virulence factor, inhibits the CP of complement. PMID:25015832

  7. Inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by meningococcal capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sarika; Vasudhev, Shreekant; DeOliveira, Rosane B; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-08-15

    Almost all invasive Neisseria meningitidis isolates express capsular polysaccharide. Ab is required for complement-dependent killing of meningococci. Although alternative pathway evasion has received considerable attention, little is known about classical pathway (CP) inhibition by meningococci, which forms the basis of this study. We engineered capsulated and unencapsulated isogenic mutant strains of groups A, B, C, W, and Y meningococci to express similar amounts of the same factor H-binding protein (fHbp; a key component of group B meningococcal vaccines) molecule. Despite similar anti-fHbp mAb binding, significantly less C4b was deposited on all five encapsulated mutants compared with their unencapsulated counterparts (p < 0.01) when purified C1 and C4 were used to deposit C4b. Reduced C4b deposition was the result of capsule-mediated inhibition of C1q engagement by Ab. C4b deposition correlated linearly with C1q engagement by anti-fHbp. Whereas B, C, W, and Y capsules limited CP-mediated killing by anti-fHbp, the unencapsulated group A mutant paradoxically was more resistant than its encapsulated counterpart. Strains varied considerably in their susceptibility to anti-fHbp and complement despite similar Ab binding, which may have implications for the activity of fHbp-based vaccines. Capsule also limited C4b deposition by anti-porin A mAbs. Capsule expression decreased binding of an anti-lipooligosaccharide IgM mAb (∼ 1.2- to 2-fold reduction in fluorescence). Akin to observations with IgG, capsule also decreased IgM-mediated C4b deposition when IgM binding to the mutant strain pairs was normalized. In conclusion, we show that capsular polysaccharide, a critical meningococcal virulence factor, inhibits the CP of complement. PMID:25015832

  8. The Complement System in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mayilyan, Karine R.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Sim, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    summary Several lines of evidence suggest that immunological factors contribute to schizophrenia. Since 1989, the role of complement, a major effector of innate immunity and an adjuvant of adaptive immunity, has been explored in schizophrenia. Increased activity of C1, C3, C4 complement components in schizophrenia has been reported by two or more groups. Two studies on different subject cohorts showed increased MBL-MASP-2 activity in patients versus controls. More then one report indicated a significant high frequency of FB*F allotype and low prevalence of the FS phenotype of complement factor B in schizophrenia. From the data reported, it is likely that the disorder is accompanied by alterations of the complement classical and lectin pathways, which undergo dynamic changes, depending on the illness course and the state of neuro-immune crosstalk. Recent findings, implicating complement in neurogenesis, synapse remodeling and pruning during brain development, suggest a reexamination of the potential role of complement in neurodevelopmental processes contributing to schizophrenia susceptibility. It is plausible that the multicomponent complement system has more than one dimensional association with schizophrenia susceptibility, pathopsychology and illness course, understanding of which will bring a new perspective for possible immunomodulation and immunocorrection of the disease. PMID:18560619

  9. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  10. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G; Douda, David N; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H A; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b-9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their "AP tool kit" to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  11. Complement factor D homolog involved in the alternative complement pathway of rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus): Molecular and functional characterization and immune responsive mRNA expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Godahewa, G I; Perera, N C N; Bathige, S D N K; Nam, Bo-Hye; Noh, Jae Koo; Lee, Jehee

    2016-08-01

    The complement system serves conventional role in the innate defense against common invading pathogens. Complement factor D (CfD) is vital to alternative complement pathway activation in cleaving complement factor B. This catalytic reaction forms the alternative C3 convertase that is crucial for complement-mediated pathogenesis. In this study, rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) CfD (OfCfD) was characterized and OfCfD mRNA expression was investigated. OfCfD encodes 277 amino acids (aa) for a 30-kDa polypeptide. A domain analysis of the deduced OfCfD aa sequence showed a single serine protease trypsin superfamily domain, a serine active region, three active sites, and three substrate-binding sites. Pairwise sequence comparisons indicated that OfCfD has the highest identity (84.5%) with Oreochromis niloticus CfD. The phylogenetic tree revealed a common ancestral origin of CfD members, with fish CfD distinct from other vertebrate orthologs. The structural arrangement of the OfCfD gene (2451 bp) contained five exons interrupted by four introns. A spatial transcriptional analysis indicated that OfCfD transcripts constitutively expressed in all of the examined rock bream tissues, and that they were highest in the spleen and liver. In addition, OfCfD transcripts were immunologically upregulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (12 h p.i.), Streptococcus iniae (12 h p.i.), rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) (6-12 h p.i.), and poly I:C (6 h p.i.) in spleen tissue. OfCfD is a trypsin protease and its recombinant protein showed strong protease activity similar to that of trypsin, indicating its catalytic function in the alternative pathway. Together, our findings suggest that OfCfD might be involved in immune responses in rock bream. PMID:27311435

  12. MytiLec, a Mussel R-Type Lectin, Interacts with Surface Glycan Gb3 on Burkitt’s Lymphoma Cells to Trigger Apoptosis through Multiple Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Sugawara, Shigeki; Fujii, Yuki; Koide, Yasuhiro; Terada, Daiki; Iimura, Naoya; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Keisuke G.; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Kanaly, Robert A.; Uchiyama, Hideho; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujita, Hideaki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    MytiLec; a novel lectin isolated from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis); shows strong binding affinity to globotriose (Gb3: Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc). MytiLec revealed β-trefoil folding as also found in the ricin B-subunit type (R-type) lectin family, although the amino acid sequences were quite different. Classification of R-type lectin family members therefore needs to be based on conformation as well as on primary structure. MytiLec specifically killed Burkitt's lymphoma Ramos cells, which express Gb3. Fluorescein-labeling assay revealed that MytiLec was incorporated inside the cells. MytiLec treatment of Ramos cells resulted in activation of both classical MAPK/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-ERK) and stress-activated (p38 kinase and JNK) Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. In the cells, MytiLec treatment triggered expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (a ligand of death receptor-dependent apoptosis) and activation of mitochondria-controlling caspase-9 (initiator caspase) and caspase-3 (activator caspase). Experiments using the specific MEK inhibitor U0126 showed that MytiLec-induced phosphorylation of the MEK-ERK pathway up-regulated expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, leading to cell cycle arrest and TNF-α production. Activation of caspase-3 by MytiLec appeared to be regulated by multiple different pathways. Our findings, taken together, indicate that the novel R-type lectin MytiLec initiates programmed cell death of Burkitt’s lymphoma cells through multiple pathways (MAPK cascade, death receptor signaling; caspase activation) based on interaction of the lectin with Gb3-containing glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains on the cell surface. PMID:26694420

  13. MytiLec, a Mussel R-Type Lectin, Interacts with Surface Glycan Gb3 on Burkitt's Lymphoma Cells to Trigger Apoptosis through Multiple Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Sugawara, Shigeki; Fujii, Yuki; Koide, Yasuhiro; Terada, Daiki; Iimura, Naoya; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Keisuke G; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Kanaly, Robert A; Uchiyama, Hideho; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujita, Hideaki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-01

    MytiLec; a novel lectin isolated from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis); shows strong binding affinity to globotriose (Gb3: Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc). MytiLec revealed β-trefoil folding as also found in the ricin B-subunit type (R-type) lectin family, although the amino acid sequences were quite different. Classification of R-type lectin family members therefore needs to be based on conformation as well as on primary structure. MytiLec specifically killed Burkitt's lymphoma Ramos cells, which express Gb3. Fluorescein-labeling assay revealed that MytiLec was incorporated inside the cells. MytiLec treatment of Ramos cells resulted in activation of both classical MAPK/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-ERK) and stress-activated (p38 kinase and JNK) Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. In the cells, MytiLec treatment triggered expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (a ligand of death receptor-dependent apoptosis) and activation of mitochondria-controlling caspase-9 (initiator caspase) and caspase-3 (activator caspase). Experiments using the specific MEK inhibitor U0126 showed that MytiLec-induced phosphorylation of the MEK-ERK pathway up-regulated expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, leading to cell cycle arrest and TNF-α production. Activation of caspase-3 by MytiLec appeared to be regulated by multiple different pathways. Our findings, taken together, indicate that the novel R-type lectin MytiLec initiates programmed cell death of Burkitt's lymphoma cells through multiple pathways (MAPK cascade, death receptor signaling; caspase activation) based on interaction of the lectin with Gb3-containing glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains on the cell surface. PMID:26694420

  14. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Pallera, Haree K.; Kumar, Parvathi S.; Mauriello, Clifford T.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Phelps, Cody A.; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M.; Pascal, Stephen M.; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  15. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julia A; Hair, Pamela S; Pallera, Haree K; Kumar, Parvathi S; Mauriello, Clifford T; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Phelps, Cody A; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M; Pascal, Stephen M; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M; Lattanzio, Frank A; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  16. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  17. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, C.S.; Duarte, C.G.; Azzolini, A.E.C.S.; Assis-Pandochi, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP) activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4) levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg). Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01). In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32%) were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production. PMID:22370704

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Uses Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase (Lpd) to Bind to the Human Terminal Pathway Regulators Vitronectin and Clusterin to Inhibit Terminal Pathway Complement Attack

    PubMed Central

    Hallström, Teresia; Uhde, Melanie; Singh, Birendra; Skerka, Christine; Riesbeck, Kristian; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa controls host innate immune and complement attack. Here we identify Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), a 57 kDa moonlighting protein, as the first P. aeruginosa protein that binds the two human terminal pathway inhibitors vitronectin and clusterin. Both human regulators when bound to the bacterium inhibited effector function of the terminal complement, blocked C5b-9 deposition and protected the bacterium from complement damage. P. aeruginosa when challenged with complement active human serum depleted from vitronectin was severely damaged and bacterial survival was reduced by over 50%. Similarly, when in human serum clusterin was blocked by a mAb, bacterial survival was reduced by 44%. Thus, demonstrating that Pseudomonas benefits from attachment of each human regulator and controls complement attack. The Lpd binding site in vitronectin was localized to the C-terminal region, i.e. to residues 354–363. Thus, Lpd of P. aeruginosa is a surface exposed moonlighting protein that binds two human terminal pathway inhibitors, vitronectin and clusterin and each human inhibitor when attached protected the bacterial pathogen from the action of the terminal complement pathway. Our results showed insights into the important function of Lpd as a complement regulator binding protein that might play an important role in virulence of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26368530

  19. Reduced neuronal cell death after experimental brain injury in mice lacking a functional alternative pathway of complement activation

    PubMed Central

    Leinhase, Iris; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M; Harhausen, Denise; Schmidt, Oliver I; Pietzcker, Malte; Taha, Mohy E; Rittirsch, Daniel; Huber-Lang, Markus; Smith, Wade R; Ward, Peter A; Stahel, Philip F

    2006-01-01

    Background Neuroprotective strategies for prevention of the neuropathological sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have largely failed in translation to clinical treatment. Thus, there is a substantial need for further understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways which lead to secondary neuronal cell death in the injured brain. The intracerebral activation of the complement cascade was shown to mediate inflammation and tissue destruction after TBI. However, the exact pathways of complement activation involved in the induction of posttraumatic neurodegeneration have not yet been assessed. In the present study, we investigated the role of the alternative complement activation pathway in contributing to neuronal cell death, based on a standardized TBI model in mice with targeted deletion of the factor B gene (fB-/-), a "key" component required for activation of the alternative complement pathway. Results After experimental TBI in wild-type (fB+/+) mice, there was a massive time-dependent systemic complement activation, as determined by enhanced C5a serum levels for up to 7 days. In contrast, the extent of systemic complement activation was significantly attenuated in fB-/- mice (P < 0.05,fB-/- vs. fB+/+; t = 4 h, 24 h, and 7 days after TBI). TUNEL histochemistry experiments revealed that posttraumatic neuronal cell death was clearly reduced for up to 7 days in the injured brain hemispheres of fB-/- mice, compared to fB+/+ littermates. Furthermore, a strong upregulation of the anti-apoptotic mediator Bcl-2 and downregulation of the pro-apoptotic Fas receptor was detected in brain homogenates of head-injured fB-/- vs. fB+/+ mice by Western blot analysis. Conclusion The alternative pathway of complement activation appears to play a more crucial role in the pathophysiology of TBI than previously appreciated. This notion is based on the findings of (a) the significant attenuation of overall complement activation in head-injured fB-/- mice, as determined by a

  20. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn's disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn's disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn's disease phenotype in 69 Crohn's disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin-mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn's disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn's disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants. PMID:27404661

  1. The Alternative Pathway of Complement and the Evolving Clinical-Pathophysiological Spectrum of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berger, Bruce E

    2016-08-01

    Complement-mediated atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) comprises approximately 90% of cases of aHUS, and results from dysregulation of endothelial-anchored complement activation with resultant endothelial damage. The discovery of biomarker ADAMTS13 has enabled a more accurate diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and an appreciation of overlapping clinical features of TTP and aHUS. Given our present understanding of the pathogenic pathways involved in aHUS, it is unlikely that a specific test will be developed. Rather the use of biomarker data, complement functional analyses, genomic analyses and clinical presentation will be required to diagnose aHUS. This approach would serve to clarify whether a thrombotic microangiopathy present in a complement-amplifying condition arises from the unmasking of a genetically driven aHUS versus a time-limited complement storm-mediated aHUS due to direct endothelial damage in which no genetic predisposition is present. Although both scenarios result in the phenotypic expression of aHUS and involve the alternate pathway of complement activation, long-term management would differ. PMID:27524217

  2. Activation of the alternative complement pathway by natural antibody to glycolipids in guinea-pig serum.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, N; Yasuda, T; Tsumita, T; Okada, H

    1983-01-01

    Liposomes containing paragloboside (PG) on their membrane were readily lysed by C4-deficient guinea-pig serum (C4D-GPS) through activation of the alternative complement pathway (ACP). Therefore we examined the reactivity of several types of guinea-pig serum (GPS) on PG-liposomes and determined that all GPS except that from specific pathogen-free (SPF) Hartley guinea-pigs had lytic capacity in Mg-EGTA-GVB (gelatin veronal-buffered saline containing Mg++ and ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetraacetate). This lytic capacity of GPS corresponded with the amount of natural antibody to PG in those sera. Although GPS of SPF guinea-pigs (SPF-GPS) could not lyse PG-liposomes in Mg-EGTA-GVB, it could lyse the liposomes when heated C4D-GPS or Hartley GPS was added. Natural antibody to PG in the heated sera was regarded to have sensitized PG-liposomes to lysis by SPF-GPS via ACP activation. Since the antibody to PG-liposomes was removed by lacto-N-nor-hexaosylceramide which has the same chemical structure in the terminal oligosaccharide, the antibody to PG in GPS was suggested to have a specificity to the terminal structure of oligosaccharide shared by lacto-N-nor-hexaosylceramide. Furthermore, the IgM fraction, which had been prepared by gel filtration of heated C4D-GPS on a Sephadex G200 column, could also sensitize PG-liposomes to lytic reaction of SPF-GPS in Mg-EGTA-GVB. This sensitizing capacity of heated C4D-GPS was suppressed by absorption of the serum or its IgM fraction with anti-guinea-pig mu-chain antibody coupled to Sepharose. Therefore, it was concluded that the lysis of PG-liposomes by GPS in Mg-EGTA-GVB was a result of ACP activation mediated by natural antibodies to PG of the IgM type which are present in usual GPS. This conclusion indicated that natural antibodies of the IgM type might play a role with ACP in host defence, especially in C4-deficient guinea-pigs where the classical complement pathway is impaired. PMID:6193057

  3. Musca domestica larva lectin induces apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells through a Ca(2+)/JNK-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Ling; Xia, Yan; Nie, Jian-Zeng; Zhou, Minghui; Zhang, Rong-Ping; Niu, Li-Li; Hou, Li-Hua; Cao, Xiao-Hong

    2013-06-01

    Although Musca domestica larvae lectin (MLL) is able to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and to induce cancer cell apoptosis, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for these processes remain elusive. In the current study, the signaling network underlying the MLL-induced apoptosis of human hepatoma BEL-7402 cell was investigated. Our data found out that MLL causes a sustained increase of the intracellular Ca(2+) and this process was prevented by the intracellular calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, suggesting the involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) in MLL-induced cell apoptosis. MLL also causes the production of reactive oxygen species and elevates the phosphorylation status of JNK, processes associated with the increased cytoplasmic Ca(2+). The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening study showed that MLL treatment of BEL-7402 cells results in the opening of MPTP and a reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In such condition, cytochrome-c was detected to be released from mitochondria to cytoplasm through the MPTP. This eventually activates caspase-3 and thus results in apoptosis of the tested BEL-7402 cells. According to a comprehensive review of all the evidence, it is concluded that MLL induces apoptosis of BEL-7402 cells through a Ca(2+)/JNK-mediated MPTP pathway. PMID:23247835

  4. Kidney injury accelerates cystogenesis via pathways modulated by heme oxygenase and complement.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juling; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Schoeb, Trenton R; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Cui, Xiangqin; Mrug, Sylvie; Yoder, Bradley K; Johnson, Martin R; Szalai, Alexander J; Mrug, Michal

    2012-07-01

    AKI accelerates cystogenesis. Because cystogenic mutations induce strong transcriptional responses similar to those seen after AKI, these responses may accelerate the progression of cystic renal disease. Here, we modulated the severity of the AKI-like response in Cys1(cpk/cpk) mice, a model that mimics autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Specifically, we induced or inhibited activity of the renoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO) and determined the effects on renal cystogenesis. We found that induction of HO attenuated both renal injury and the rate of cystogenesis, whereas inhibition of HO promoted cystogenesis. HO activity mediated the response of NFκB, which is a hallmark transcriptional feature common to both cystogenesis and AKI. Among the HO-modulated effects we measured, expression of complement component 3 (C3) strongly correlated with cystogenesis, a functionally relevant association as suggested by Cys1(cpk/cpk) mice with genetically induced C3 deficiency. Because both C3 deficiency and HO induction reduce cyst number and cyst areas, these two factors define an injury-stimulated cystogenic pathway that may provide therapeutic targets to slow the formation of new renal cysts and the growth of existing cysts. PMID:22518005

  5. Complement Blockade with a C1 Esterase Inhibitor in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Uknis, Marc; Yuan, Xuan; Mukhina, Galina L; Varela, Juan; Saye, JoAnne; Pu, Jeffrey; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, clonal, hematopoietic stem cell disorder that manifests with a complement-mediated hemolytic anemia, bone marrow failure and a propensity for thrombosis. These patients experience both intra- and extravascular hemolysis in the context of underlying complement activation. Currently eculizumab effectively blocks the intravascular hemolysis PNH. There remains an unmet clinical need for a complement inhibitor with activity early in the complement cascade to block complement at the classical and alternative pathways. C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) is an endogenous human plasma protein that has broad inhibitory activity in the complement pathway through inhibition of the classical pathway by binding C1r and C1s and inhibits the mannose-binding lectin-associated serine proteases in the lectin pathway. In this study, we show that commercially available plasma derived C1INH prevents lysis induced by the alternative complement pathway, of PNH erythrocytes in human serum. Importantly, C1INH was able to block the accumulation of C3 degradation products on CD55 deficient erythrocytes from PNH patient on eculizumab therapy. This could suggest a role for inhibition of earlier phases of the complement cascade than that currently inhibited by eculizumab for incomplete or non-responders to that therapy. PMID:25034232

  6. Targeting of mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 confers protection from myocardial and gastrointestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Lynch, Nicholas J.; Clark, James E.; Marber, Michael; Samani, Nilesh J.; Ali, Youssif Mohammed; Dudler, Thomas; Parent, Brian; Lhotta, Karl; Wallis, Russell; Farrar, Conrad A.; Sacks, Steven; Lee, Haekyung; Zhang, Ming; Iwaki, Daisuke; Takahashi, Minoru; Fujita, Teizo; Tedford, Clark E.; Stover, Cordula M.

    2011-01-01

    Complement research experienced a renaissance with the discovery of a third activation route, the lectin pathway. We developed a unique model of total lectin pathway deficiency, a mouse strain lacking mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2), and analyzed the role of MASP-2 in two models of postischemic reperfusion injury (IRI). In a model of transient myocardial IRI, MASP-2–deficient mice had significantly smaller infarct volumes than their wild-type littermates. Mice deficient in the downstream complement component C4 were not protected, suggesting the existence of a previously undescribed lectin pathway-dependent C4-bypass. Lectin pathway-mediated activation of C3 in the absence of C4 was demonstrated in vitro and shown to require MASP-2, C2, and MASP-1/3. MASP-2 deficiency also protects mice from gastrointestinal IRI, as do mAb-based inhibitors of MASP-2. The therapeutic effects of MASP-2 inhibition in this experimental model suggest the utility of anti–MASP-2 antibody therapy in reperfusion injury and other lectin pathway-mediated disorders. PMID:21502512

  7. The alternative complement pathway aids in vascular regression during the early stages of a murine model of proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Clifford; Smith, Kaylee E; Castillejos, Alexandra; Diaz-Aguilar, Daniel; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Connor, Kip M

    2016-03-01

    Proliferative retinopathic diseases often progress in 2 phases: initial regression of retinal vasculature (phase 1) followed by subsequent neovascularization (NV) (phase 2). The immune system has been shown to aid in vascular pruning in such retinopathies; however, little is known about the role of the alternative complement pathway in the initial vascular regression phase. Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), we observed that alternative complement pathway-deficient mice (Fb(-/-)) exhibited a mild decrease in vascular loss at postnatal day (P)8 compared with age- and strain-matched controls (P = 0.035). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the retinal blood vessels. Expression of the complement inhibitors Cd55 and Cd59 was significantly decreased in blood vessels isolated from hyperoxic retinas compared with those from normoxic control mice. Vegf expression was measured at P8 and found to be significantly lower in OIR mice than in normoxic control mice (P = 0.0048). Further examination of specific Vegf isoform expression revealed a significant decrease in Vegf120 (P = 0.00032) and Vegf188 (P = 0.0092). In conjunction with the major modulating effects of Vegf during early retinal vascular development, our data suggest a modest involvement of the alternative complement pathway in targeting vessels for regression in the initial vaso-obliteration stage of OIR. PMID:26631482

  8. Lysis of horse red blood cells mediated by antibody-independent activation of the alternative pathway of chicken complement.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Yoshikawa, Y; Kai, C; Yamanouchi, K; Okada, H

    1984-01-01

    Horse red blood cells (HRBC) were found to be lysed when incubated with fresh normal chicken serum (NCS). By comparison of the properties of the lysis of HRBC with those of the complement-dependent lysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) sensitized with haemolytic antibody via the classical pathway, the following differences were observed between the two haemolytic phenomena. (i) The lysis of HRBC was independent on antibody in contrast to the antibody dependence of the lysis of sensitized SRBC. (ii) The lysis of HRBC was dependent on Mg but not on Ca ion, whereas the lysis of sensitized SRBC required both Mg and Ca ions. (iii) Treatment of NCS with carrageenan that acts as an inactivator of the first component of complement (C1) inhibited the lysis of sensitized SRBC but not the lysis of HRBC. (iv) C1 was consumed in the lysis of sensitized SRBC but not in the lysis of HRBC. (v) Cobra venom factor (CVF), C3 inactivator via the alternative complement pathway, inhibited the lysis of HRBC but not the lysis of sensitized SRBC. (vi) Minimal reaction times for the lysis of HRBC and for the lysis of sensitized SRBC were 90 and 60 min, respectively. These findings indicate that the lysis of HRBC was caused by the antibody-independent activation of complement via the alternative pathway. PMID:6430791

  9. The indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase pathway controls complement-dependent enhancement of chemo-radiation therapy against murine glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an enzyme with immune-suppressive properties that is commonly exploited by tumors to evade immune destruction. Anti-tumor T cell responses can be initiated in solid tumors, but are immediately suppressed by compensatory upregulation of immunological checkpoints, including IDO. In addition to these known effects on the adaptive immune system, we previously showed widespread, T cell-dependent complement deposition during allogeneic fetal rejection upon maternal treatment with IDO-blockade. We hypothesized that IDO protects glioblastoma from the full effects of chemo-radiation therapy by preventing vascular activation and complement-dependent tumor destruction. Methods To test this hypothesis, we utilized a syngeneic orthotopic glioblastoma model in which GL261 glioblastoma tumor cells were stereotactically implanted into the right frontal lobes of syngeneic mice. These mice were treated with IDO-blocking drugs in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Results Pharmacologic inhibition of IDO synergized with chemo-radiation therapy to prolong survival in mice bearing intracranial glioblastoma tumors. We now show that pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of IDO allowed chemo-radiation to trigger widespread complement deposition at sites of tumor growth. Chemotherapy treatment alone resulted in collections of perivascular leukocytes within tumors, but no complement deposition. Adding IDO-blockade led to upregulation of VCAM-1 on vascular endothelium within the tumor microenvironment, and further adding radiation in the presence of IDO-blockade led to widespread deposition of complement. Mice genetically deficient in complement component C3 lost all of the synergistic effects of IDO-blockade on chemo-radiation-induced survival. Conclusions Together these findings identify a novel mechanistic link between IDO and complement, and implicate complement as a major downstream effector mechanism for the beneficial

  10. Down-Regulation of Complement Receptors on the Surface of Host Monocyte Even as In Vitro Complement Pathway Blocking Interferes in Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Cintia Ferreira; Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Marins-Dos-Santos, Alessandro; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; de Souza, Luiz José; Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria

    2014-01-01

    In dengue virus (DENV) infection, complement system (CS) activation appears to have protective and pathogenic effects. In severe dengue fever (DF), the levels of DENV non-structural-1 protein and of the products of complement activation, including C3a, C5a and SC5b-9, are higher before vascular leakage occurs, supporting the hypothesis that complement activation contributes to unfavourable outcomes. The clinical manifestations of DF range from asymptomatic to severe and even fatal. Here, we aimed to characterise CS by their receptors or activation product, in vivo in DF patients and in vitro by DENV-2 stimulation on monocytes. In comparison with healthy controls, DF patients showed lower expression of CR3 (CD11b), CR4 (CD11c) and, CD59 on monocytes. The DF patients who were high producers of SC5b-9 were also those that showed more pronounced bleeding or vascular leakage. Those findings encouraged us to investigate the role of CS in vitro, using monocytes isolated from healthy subjects. Prior blocking with CR3 alone (CD11b) or CR3 (CD11b/CD18) reduced viral infection, as quantified by the levels of intracellular viral antigen expression and soluble DENV non-structural viral protein. However, we found that CR3 alone (CD11b) or CR3 (CD11b/CD18) blocking did not influence major histocompatibility complex presentation neither active caspase-1 on monocytes, thus probably ruling out inflammasome-related mechanisms. Although it did impair the secretion of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon alpha. Our data provide strategies of blocking CR3 (CD11b) pathways could have implications for the treatment of viral infection by antiviral-related mechanisms. PMID:25061945

  11. Molecules Great and Small: The Complement System.

    PubMed

    Mathern, Douglas R; Heeger, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    The complement cascade, traditionally considered an effector arm of innate immunity required for host defense against pathogens, is now recognized as a crucial pathogenic mediator of various kidney diseases. Complement components produced by the liver and circulating in the plasma undergo activation through the classical and/or mannose-binding lectin pathways to mediate anti-HLA antibody-initiated kidney transplant rejection and autoantibody-initiated GN, the latter including membranous glomerulopathy, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and lupus nephritis. Inherited and/or acquired abnormalities of complement regulators, which requisitely limit restraint on alternative pathway complement activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of the C3 nephropathies and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Increasing evidence links complement produced by endothelial cells and/or tubular cells to the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and progressive kidney fibrosis. Data emerging since the mid-2000s additionally show that immune cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, produce alternative pathway complement components during cognate interactions. The subsequent local complement activation yields production of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, which bind to their respective receptors (C3aR and C5aR) on both partners to augment effector T-cell proliferation and survival, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T-cell induction and function. This immune cell-derived complement enhances pathogenic alloreactive T-cell immunity that results in transplant rejection and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other T cell-mediated kidney diseases. C5a/C5aR ligations on neutrophils have additionally been shown to contribute to vascular inflammation in models of ANCA-mediated renal vasculitis. New translational immunology efforts along with the development of pharmacologic agents that block human complement components and receptors now permit

  12. Molecular mechanism of anticancer effect of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in HT29 cells involves differential expression of genes associated with multiple signaling pathways: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Barkeer, Srikanth; Guha, Nilanjan; Hothpet, Vishwanathreddy; Saligrama Adavigowda, Deepak; Hegde, Prajna; Padmanaban, Arunkumar; Yu, Lu-Gang; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2015-12-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) is a lectin isolated from fungus S. rolfsii and has high binding specificity toward the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich carbohydrate antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAc-α-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF), which is expressed in more than 90% of human cancers. Our previous studies have shown that binding of SRL to human colon, breast and ovarian cancer cells induces cell apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo. This study investigated the SRL-mediated cell signaling in human colon cancer HT29 cells by mRNA and miRNA microarrays. It was found that SRL treatment results in altered expression of several hundred molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-JUN-associated, apoptosis-associated and cell cycle and DNA replication-associated signaling molecules. Pathway analysis using GeneSpring 12.6.1 revealed that SRL treatment induces changes of MAPK and c-JUN-associated signaling pathways as early as 2 h while changes of cell cycle, DNA replication and apoptosis pathways were significantly affected only after 24 h. A significant change of cell miRNA expression was also observed after 12 h treatment of the cells with SRL. These changes were further validated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. This study thus suggests that the presence of SRL affects multiple signaling pathways in cancer cells with early effects on cell proliferation pathways associated with MAPK and c-JUN, followed by miRNA-associated cell activity and apoptosis. This provides insight information into the molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of this fungal lectin. PMID:26347523

  13. The alternative complement pathway control protein H binds to immune complexes and serves their detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nydegger, U.E.; Corvetta, A.; Spaeth, P.J.; Spycher, M.

    1983-01-01

    During solubilization of immune complexes C3b becomes fixed to the immunoglobulin part and serves as a receptor for the alternative complement pathway control protein H. The H-C3b immune complex interaction can be made detectable using 4% polyethyleneglycol to separate free from bound /sup 125/I-H. Tetanus toxoid (Te)/anti-Te complexes kept soluble with fresh serum and containing 125 IU of specific antibody bound 18% of /sup 125/I-H; when fresh serum was chelated with 10 mM EDTA, /sup 125/I-H binding was only 5%. On sucrose density gradients, the H-binding material sedimented in the range of 12 to 30 S. In 36 serum samples from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and in 12 serum samples from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), /sup 125/I-H binding was significantly elevated to 9.5 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- 1 SD) and 13.3 +/- 5.6%, respectively, while /sup 125/I-H binding by 36 normal human sera was 4 +/- 2%. RA samples (17/36, 47%) and SLE samples (9/12, 75%) had H-binding values increased by more than 2 SD above the normal mean. The serum samples were also assessed for conglutinin- and C1q-binding activities; a significant correlation between H and C1q binding was observed (P less than 0.001); there was no correlation between H and conglutinin binding. Although binding to immune complexes through its interaction with C3b, H clearly detects a population of complexes other than conglutinin, thus expanding the possibilities of further characterizing pathological complexes.

  14. Linkage Specificity and Role of Properdin in Activation of the Alternative Complement Pathway by Fungal Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sarika; Specht, Charles A.; Huang, Haibin; Ostroff, Gary R.; Ram, Sanjay; Rice, Peter A.; Levitz, Stuart M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal cell walls are predominantly composed of glucans, mannans, and chitin. Recognition of these glycans by the innate immune system is a critical component of host defenses against the mycoses. Complement, an important arm of innate immunity, plays a significant role in fungal pathogenesis, especially the alternative pathway (AP). Here we determine that the glycan monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkages affect AP activation and C3 deposition. Furthermore, properdin, a positive regulator of the AP, contributes to these functions. AP activation by glycan particles that varied in composition and linkage was measured by C3a generation in serum treated with 10 mM EGTA and 10 mM Mg2+ (Mg-EGTA-treated serum) (AP specific; properdin functional) or Mg-EGTA-treated serum that lacked functional properdin. Particles that contained either β1→3 or β1→6 glucans or both generated large and similar amounts of C3a when the AP was intact. Blocking properdin function resulted in 5- to 10-fold-less C3a production by particulate β1→3 glucans. However, particulate β1→6 glucans generated C3a via the AP only in the presence of intact properdin. Interestingly, zymosan and glucan-mannan particles (GMP), which contain both β-glucans and mannans, also required properdin to generate C3a. The β1→4 glycans chitin and chitosan minimally activated C3 even when properdin was functional. Finally, properdin binding to glucan particles (GP) and zymosan in serum required active C3. Properdin colocalized with bound C3, suggesting that in the presence of serum, properdin bound indirectly to glycans through C3 convertases. These findings provide a better understanding of how properdin facilitates AP activation by fungi through interaction with the cell wall components. PMID:21878570

  15. Alternative and classical complement pathway activity in sera from colostrum-fed and colostrum-deprived neonatal pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, H W; Gilmore, R J

    1980-01-01

    Haemolytic assays were used to compare alternative and classical complement (C) pathway activities in sera obtained from neonatal pigs reared on porcine colostrum, bovine colostrum or an immunoglobulin-free synthetic diet. Dramatic increases in immunoglobulin concentrations were noted in the colostrum-fed animals during the first day of life, but there was not a concurrent, marked increase in either classical or alternative C pathway activity. Whether fed on homologous or heterologous colostrum, neonatal pigs had a similar gradual increase in alternative and classical C pathway activity in the post-natal period. If direct passive absorption of C components occurs in newborn pigs, it has only a minor influence on functional levels of alternative and classical C pathway activity in their sera. In pigs fed homologous and heterologous colostrum there was, respectively, an 83% and 80% increase in classical pathway activity, but only a 13% and 12% increase in alternative pathway activity during the first 3 days of life. Pigs fed the immunoglobulin-free synthetic diet had a 37% increase in classical C and a 24% increase in alternative C pathway activity. Part of the increase in classical C pathway activity in the post-natal period may be caused by a stimulating factor in colostrum. Most if not all of the increase in alternative C pathway activity and some of the increase in classical C pathway activity is most likely caused by normal humoral homeostatic mechanisms in the neonatal pig. PMID:7429550

  16. The alternative complement pathway aids in vascular regression during the early stages of a murine model of proliferative retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Clifford; Smith, Kaylee E.; Castillejos, Alexandra; Diaz-Aguilar, Daniel; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Connor, Kip M.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathic diseases often progress in 2 phases: initial regression of retinal vasculature (phase 1) followed by subsequent neovascularization (NV) (phase 2). The immune system has been shown to aid in vascular pruning in such retinopathies; however, little is known about the role of the alternative complement pathway in the initial vascular regression phase. Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), we observed that alternative complement pathway–deficient mice (Fb−/−) exhibited a mild decrease in vascular loss at postnatal day (P)8 compared with age- and strain-matched controls (P = 0.035). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the retinal blood vessels. Expression of the complement inhibitors Cd55 and Cd59 was significantly decreased in blood vessels isolated from hyperoxic retinas compared with those from normoxic control mice. Vegf expression was measured at P8 and found to be significantly lower in OIR mice than in normoxic control mice (P = 0.0048). Further examination of specific Vegf isoform expression revealed a significant decrease in Vegf120 (P = 0.00032) and Vegf188 (P = 0.0092). In conjunction with the major modulating effects of Vegf during early retinal vascular development, our data suggest a modest involvement of the alternative complement pathway in targeting vessels for regression in the initial vaso-obliteration stage of OIR.—Kim, C., Smith, K. E., Castillejos, A., Diaz-Aguilar, D., Saint-Geniez, M., Connor, K. M. The alternative complement pathway aids in vascular regression during the early stages of a murine model of proliferative retinopathy. PMID:26631482

  17. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn’s disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn’s disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn’s disease phenotype in 69 Crohn’s disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin–mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn’s disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn’s disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn’s disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants. PMID:27404661

  18. Phylogenetic aspects of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Zarkadis, I K; Mastellos, D; Lambris, J D

    2001-01-01

    During evolution two general systems of immunity have emerged: innate or, natural immunity and adaptive (acquired), or specific immunity. The innate system is phylogenetically older and is found in some form in all multicellular organisms, whereas the adaptive system appeared about 450 million years ago and is found in all vertebrates except jawless fish. The complement system in higher vertebrates plays an important role as an effector of both the innate and the acquired immune response, and also participates in various immunoregulatory processes. In lower vertebrates complement is activated by the alternative and lectin pathways and is primarily involved in the opsonization of foreign material. The Agnatha (the most primitive vertebrate species) possess the alternative and lectin pathways while cartilaginous fish are the first species in which the classical pathway appears following the emergence of immunoglobulins. The rest of the poikilothermic species, ranging from teleosts to reptilians, appear to contain a well-developed complement system resembling that of the homeothermic vertebrates. It seems that most of the complement components have appeared after the duplication of primordial genes encoding C3/C4/C5, fB/C2, C1s/C1r/MASP-1/MASP-2, and C6/C7/C8/C9 molecules, in a process that led to the formation of distinct activation pathways. However, unlike homeotherms, several species of poikilotherms (e.g. trout) have recently been shown to possess multiple forms of complement components (C3, factor B) that are structurally and functionally more diverse than those of higher vertebrates. We hypothesize that this remarkable diversity has allowed these animals to expand their innate capacity for immune recognition and response. Recent studies have also indicated the possible presence of complement receptors in protochordates and lower vertebrates. In conclusion, there is considerable evidence suggesting that the complement system is present in the entire lineage of

  19. Biocompatibility and pathways of initial complement pathway activation with Phisio- and PMEA-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits during open-heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Thiara, A S; Mollnes, T E; Videm, V; Andersen, V Y; Svennevig, K; Kolset, S O; Fiane, A E

    2011-03-01

    A randomized open-heart surgery study comprising 30 patients was undertaken to compare the biocompatibility of Phisio-(phosphorylcholine) and PMEA-(poly-2-methoxyethyl acrylate) coated cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuits and to assess the initial complement pathway activation during open-heart surgery. Blood samples were obtained at five time points, from the start of surgery to 24 hours postoperatively. The following analyses were performed: haemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase, leukocyte and platelet counts, myeloperoxidase and neutrophil-activating peptide-2, thrombin-anti-thrombin complexes, syndecan-1 and the complement activation products C1rs-C1-inhibitor complexes, C4bc, C3bc, C3bBbP and the terminal complement complex (TCC). No significant inter-group difference was found in any parameters, except for the concentration of TCC which was moderately lower in the PMEA group at termination of CPB. Complement activation during open-heart surgery was mainly mediated through the alternative pathway. In conclusion, PMEA- and Phisio-coated circuits displayed similar biocompatibility with respect to inflammatory and haemostatic responses during and after open-heart surgery. PMID:21177724

  20. C1q binding and activation of the complement classical pathway by Klebsiella pneumoniae outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Albertí, S; Marqués, G; Camprubí, S; Merino, S; Tomás, J M; Vivanco, F; Benedí, V J

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae serum-sensitive strains in nonimmune serum by the complement classical pathway have been studied. The bacterial cell surface components that bind C1q more efficiently were identified as two major outer membrane proteins, presumably the porins of this bacterial species. These two outer membrane proteins were isolated from a representative serum-sensitive strain. We have demonstrated that in their purified form, they bind C1q and activate the classical pathway in an antibody-independent manner, with the subsequent consumption of C4 and reduction of the serum total hemolytic activity. Activation of the classical pathway has been observed in human nonimmune serum and agammaglobulinemic serum (both depleted in factor D). Binding of C1q to other components of the bacterial outer membrane, in particular the rough lipopolysaccharide, could not be demonstrated. Activation of the classical pathway by this lipopolysaccharide was also much less efficient than activation by the two outer membrane proteins. The antibody-independent binding of C1q to serum-sensitive strains was independent of the presence of capsular polysaccharide, while strains possessing lipopolysaccharide O antigen bind less C1q and are resistant to complement-mediated killing. Images PMID:8432605

  1. A recombinant two-module form of human properdin is an inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway.

    PubMed

    Kouser, Lubna; Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Singhal, Dipti; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Urban, Britta C; Khan, Haseeb A; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-05-01

    Properdin upregulates the alternative complement pathway by binding and stabilising the C3 convertase complex (C3bBb). Properdin is a soluble glycoprotein and its flexible rod-like 53kDa monomers form cyclic polymers (dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers). The properdin monomer consists of seven thrombospondin type I repeats (TSR 0-6), which are similar and homologous to domains found in circumsporozoite and thrombospondin-related anonymous proteins of Plasmodium species, ETP100 of Eimeria tenella, various complement components C6-C9, and thrombospondin I and II. Using deletion constructs, TSR4 and TSR5 of human properdin were implicated in C3b binding and stabilising C3 convertase. However, individually expressed TSR4 or TSR5 failed to bind properdin ligands. Here, we have expressed and characterized biologically active TSR4 and TSR5 together (TSR4+5) in tandem in Escherichia coli, fused to maltose-binding protein. MBP-TSR4+5 bind solid-phase C3b, sulfatides and glycosaminoglycans. In addition, functionally active recombinant TSR4+5 modules inhibit the alternative pathway of complement. PMID:27060503

  2. PpsA-mediated alternative pathway to complement RNase E essentiality in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masaru; Honda, Naoko; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Cohen, Stanley N; Kato, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli cells require RNase E, encoded by the essential gene rne, to propagate. The growth properties on different carbon sources of E. coli cells undergoing suppression of RNase E production suggested that reduction in RNase E is associated with decreased expression of phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase (PpsA), which converts pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate during gluconeogenesis. Western blotting and genetic complementation confirmed the role of RNase E in PpsA expression. Adventitious ppsA overexpression from a multicopy plasmid was sufficient to restore colony formation of ∆rne E. coli on minimal media containing glycerol or succinate as the sole carbon source. Complementation of ∆rne by ppsA overproduction was observed during growth on solid media but was only partial, and bacteria showed slowed cell division and grew as filamentous chains. We found that restoration of colony-forming ability by ppsA complementation occurred independent of the presence of endogenous RNase G or second-site suppressors of RNase E essentiality. Our investigations demonstrate the role of phosphoryl transfer catalyzable by PpsA as a determinant of RNase E essentiality in E. coli. PMID:26883538

  3. Rapid Engineering of the Geldanamycin Biosynthesis Pathway by Red/ET Recombination and Gene Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Vetcher, Leandro; Tian, Zong-Qiang; McDaniel, Robert; Rascher, Andreas; Revill, W. Peter; Hutchinson, C. Richard; Hu, Zhihao

    2005-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of antibiotic producers, such as Streptomyces species, is a rational approach to improve the properties of biologically active molecules. However, this can be a slow and sometimes problematic process. Red/ET recombination in an Escherichia coli host has permitted rapid and more versatile engineering of geldanamycin biosynthetic genes in a complementation plasmid, which can then be readily transferred into the Streptomyces host from which the corresponding wild type gene(s) has been removed. With this rapid Red/ET recombination and gene complementation approach, efficient gene disruptions and gene replacements in the geldanamycin biosynthetic gene cluster have been successfully achieved. As an example, we describe here the creation of a ketoreductase 6 null mutation in an E. coli high-copy-number plasmid carrying gdmA2A3 from Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL3602 and the subsequent complementation of a gdmA2A3 deletion host with this plasmid to generate a novel geldanamycin analog. PMID:15812008

  4. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity.

    PubMed

    Khoa, D V A; Wimmers, K

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future. PMID:26194222

  5. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khoa, D. V. A.; Wimmers, K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future. PMID:26194222

  6. TNF Regulates Essential Alternative Complement Pathway Components and Impairs Activation of Protein C in Human Glomerular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sartain, Sarah E; Turner, Nancy A; Moake, Joel L

    2016-01-15

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy with severe renal injury secondary to an overactive alternative complement pathway (AP). aHUS episodes are often initiated or recur during inflammation. We investigated gene expression of the surface complement regulatory proteins (CD55, CD59, CD46, and CD141 [thrombomodulin]) and AP components in human glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs) and in HUVECs, a frequently used investigational model of endothelial cells. Surface complement regulatory proteins were also quantified by flow cytometry. All experiments were done with and without exposure to IL-1β or TNF. Without cytokine stimulation, we found that GMVECs had greater AP activation than did HUVECs. With TNF stimulation, THBD gene expression and corresponding CD141 surface presence in HUVECs and GMVECs were reduced, and gene expression of complement components C3 (C3) and factor B (CFB) was increased. Consequently, AP activation, measured by Ba production, was increased, and conversion of protein C (PC) to activated PC by CD141-bound thrombin was decreased, in GMVECs and HUVECs exposed to TNF. IL-1β had similar, albeit lesser, effects on HUVEC gene expression, and it only slightly affected GMVEC gene expression. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of the expression/display of AP components and surface regulatory proteins in GMVECs with and without cytokine stimulation. In aHUS patients with an underlying overactive AP, additional stimulation of the AP and inhibition of activated PC-mediated anticoagulation in GMVECs by the inflammatory cytokine TNF are likely to provoke episodes of renal failure. PMID:26673143

  7. Complement System Part I – Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Church, Sarah Elizabeth; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here, we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical, and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins, and the membrane-attack-complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure–function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly, we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors. PMID:26082779

  8. C1q, the recognition subcomponent of the classical pathway of complement, drives microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Färber, Katrin; Cheung, Giselle; Mitchell, Daniel; Wallis, Russell; Weihe, Eberhard; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2009-02-15

    Microglia, central nervous system (CNS) resident phagocytic cells, persistently police the integrity of CNS tissue and respond to any kind of damage or pathophysiological changes. These cells sense and rapidly respond to danger and inflammatory signals by changing their cell morphology; by release of cytokines, chemokines, or nitric oxide; and by changing their MHC expression profile. We have shown previously that microglial biosynthesis of the complement subcomponent C1q may serve as a reliable marker of microglial activation ranging from undetectable levels of C1q biosynthesis in resting microglia to abundant C1q expression in activated, nonramified microglia. In this study, we demonstrate that cultured microglial cells respond to extrinsic C1q with a marked intracellular Ca(2+) increase. A shift toward proinflammatory microglial activation is indicated by the release of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and nitric oxide and the oxidative burst in rat primary microglial cells, an activation and differentiation process similar to the proinflammatory response of microglia to exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Our findings indicate 1) that extrinsic plasma C1q is involved in the initiation of microglial activation in the course of CNS diseases with blood-brain barrier impairment and 2) that C1q synthesized and released by activated microglia is likely to contribute in an autocrine/paracrine way to maintain and balance microglial activation in the diseased CNS tissue. PMID:18831010

  9. Classical complement activation and acquired immune response pathways are not essential for retinal degeneration in the rd1 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, Bärbel; Demos, Christina; Frigg, Rico; Grimm, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Misregulation of the innate immune response and other immune-related processes have been suggested to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a number of different neurodegenerative diseases, including age related macular degeneration. In an animal model for photoreceptor degeneration, several genes of the innate and acquired immune system were found to be differentially regulated in the retina during the degenerative process. In addition to this differential regulation of individual genes, we found that in the rd1 retina a significantly higher number of genes involved in immune-related responses were expressed at any given time during the degenerative period. The peak of immune-related gene expression was at postnatal day 14, coinciding with the peak of photoreceptor apoptosis in the rd1 mouse. We directly tested the potential involvement of acquired and innate immune responses in initiation and progression of photoreceptor degeneration by analyzing double mutant animals. Retinal morphology and photoreceptor apoptosis of rd1 mice on a SCID genetic background (no mature T- and B-cells) or in combination with a RAG-1 (no functional B- and T-cells) or a C1qα (no functional classical complement activation pathway) knockout was followed during the degenerative process using light microscopy or TUNEL staining, respectively. Although complement factor C1qα was highly up-regulated in the rd1 retina concomitantly with the degenerative process, lack of this protein did not protect the rd1 retina. Similarly, retinal degeneration and photoreceptor apoptosis appeared to proceed normally in the rd1 mouse lacking functional B- and T-cells. Our results suggest that both, the classical complement system of innate immunity and a functional acquired immune response are not essential for the degenerative process in the rd1 mouse retina. PMID:17069800

  10. Shiga Toxin Promotes Podocyte Injury in Experimental Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome via Activation of the Alternative Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Monica; Buelli, Simona; Pezzotta, Anna; Corna, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Conti, Debora; Thurman, Joshua M.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli is the offending agent of postdiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disorder of glomerular ischemic damage and widespread microvascular thrombosis. We previously documented that Stx induces glomerular complement activation, generating C3a responsible for microvascular thrombosis in experimental HUS. Here, we show that the presence of C3 deposits on podocytes is associated with podocyte damage and loss in HUS mice generated by the coinjection of Stx2 and LPS. Because podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is mediated by integrins, the relevance of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signals in podocyte dysfunction was evaluated. Podocyte expression of ILK increased after the injection of Stx2/LPS and preceded the upregulation of Snail and downregulation of nephrin and α-actinin-4. Factor B deficiency or pretreatment with an inhibitory antibody to factor B protected mice against Stx2/LPS-induced podocyte dysregulation. Similarly, pretreatment with a C3a receptor antagonist limited podocyte loss and changes in ILK, Snail, and α-actinin-4 expression. In cultured podocytes, treatment with C3a reduced α-actinin-4 expression and promoted ILK-dependent nuclear expression of Snail and cell motility. These results suggest that Stx-induced activation of the alternative pathway of complement and generation of C3a promotes ILK signaling, leading to podocyte dysfunction and loss in Stx-HUS. PMID:24578132

  11. Visual Pathway Study Using in vivo DTI Tractography to Complement Classical Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wentao; Rigolo, Laura; O’Donnell, Lauren J.; Norton, Isaiah; Shriver, Sargent; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the individual course of the optic radiations (OR) is important to avoid post-operative visual deficits. Cadaveric studies of the visual pathways are limited because it has not been possible to accurately separate the OR from neighboring tracts and results may not apply to individual patients. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies may be able to demonstrate the relationships between the OR and neighboring fibers in vivo in individual subjects. Objective To use DTI tractography to study the OR and Meyer’s loop (ML) anatomy in vivo. Methods Ten healthy subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion imaging at 3T. Using a fiducial-based DTI tractography tool (Slicer 3.3), seeds were placed near the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) to reconstruct individual visual pathways and neighboring tracts. Projections of the optic radiations onto 3D brain models were shown individually in order to quantify relationships to key landmarks. Results Two patterns of visual pathways were found. The OR ran more commonly deep in the whole superior and middle temporal gyri and superior temporal sulcus. The OR was closely surrounded in all cases by an inferior longitudinal fascicle and a parieto/occipito/temporo-pontine fascicle. The mean left and right distances between the tip of the OR and temporal pole were 39.8± 3.8mm and 40.6±5.7 mm, respectively. Conclusion DTI tractography provides a practical complementary method to study the OR and ML anatomy in vivo, and with reference to individual 3D brain anatomy. PMID:21808220

  12. Viral Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: A Novel Tool to Study Intracellular Vesicular Trafficking Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Aaron L.; Pawlak, Emily N.; Cavanagh, P. Craig; Van Nynatten, Logan; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.

    2015-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) accessory protein Nef interacts with a multitude of cellular proteins, manipulating the host membrane trafficking machinery to evade immune surveillance. Nef interactions have been analyzed using various in vitro assays, co-immunoprecipitation studies, and more recently mass spectrometry. However, these methods do not evaluate Nef interactions in the context of viral infection nor do they define the sub-cellular location of these interactions. In this report, we describe a novel bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) lentiviral expression tool, termed viral BiFC, to study Nef interactions with host cellular proteins in the context of viral infection. Using the F2A cleavage site from the foot and mouth disease virus we generated a viral BiFC expression vector capable of concurrent expression of Nef and host cellular proteins; PACS-1, MHC-I and SNX18. Our studies confirmed the interaction between Nef and PACS-1, a host membrane trafficking protein involved in Nef-mediated immune evasion, and demonstrated co-localization of this complex with LAMP-1 positive endolysosomal vesicles. Furthermore, we utilized viral BiFC to localize the Nef/MHC-I interaction to an AP-1 positive endosomal compartment. Finally, viral BiFC was observed between Nef and the membrane trafficking regulator SNX18. This novel demonstration of an association between Nef and SNX18 was localized to AP-1 positive vesicles. In summary, viral BiFC is a unique tool designed to analyze the interaction between Nef and host cellular proteins by mapping the sub-cellular locations of their interactions during viral infection. PMID:25915798

  13. Regulation of C3 Activation by the Alternative Complement Pathway in the Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer A E; Stampoulis, Dimitris; Gunter, Chloe E; Greenwood, John; Adamson, Peter; Moss, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the retinas of mice carrying hemizygous and null double deletions of Cfb-/- and Cfh-/-, and to compare these with the single knockouts of Cfb, Cfh and Cfd. Retinas were isolated from wild type (WT), Cfb-/-/Cfh-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh+/-, Cfh-/-/Cfb+/-, Cfb-/-, Cfh-/- Cfd-/-, and Cfd+/- mice. Complement proteins were evaluated by western blotting, ELISA and immunocytochemistry, and retinal morphology was assessed using toluidine blue stained semi-thin sections. WT mice showed staining for C3 and its breakdown products in the retinal vasculature and the basal surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Cfb-/- mice exhibited a similar C3 staining pattern to WT in the retinal vessels but a decrease in C3 and its breakdown products at the basal surface of the RPE. Deletion of both Cfb and Cfh restored C3 to levels similar to those observed in WT mice, however this reversal of phenotype was not observed in Cfh-/-/Cfb+/- or Cfb-/-/Cfh+/- mice. Loss of CFD caused an increase in C3 and a decrease in C3 breakdown products along the basal surface of the RPE. Overall the retinal morphology and retinal vasculature did not appear different across the various genotypes. We observed that C3 accumulates at the basal RPE in Cfb-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh+/-, Cfd-/- and WT mice, but is absent in Cfh-/- and Cfh-/-/Cfb+/- mice, consistent with its consumption in the serum of mice lacking CFH when CFB is present. C3 breakdown products along the surface of the RPE were either decreased or absent when CFB, CFH or CFD was deleted or partially deleted. PMID:27564415

  14. Regulation of C3 Activation by the Alternative Complement Pathway in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jennifer A. E.; Stampoulis, Dimitris; Gunter, Chloe E.; Greenwood, John; Adamson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the retinas of mice carrying hemizygous and null double deletions of Cfb-/- and Cfh-/-, and to compare these with the single knockouts of Cfb, Cfh and Cfd. Retinas were isolated from wild type (WT), Cfb-/-/Cfh-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh+/-, Cfh-/-/Cfb+/-, Cfb-/-, Cfh-/- Cfd-/-, and Cfd+/- mice. Complement proteins were evaluated by western blotting, ELISA and immunocytochemistry, and retinal morphology was assessed using toluidine blue stained semi-thin sections. WT mice showed staining for C3 and its breakdown products in the retinal vasculature and the basal surface of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Cfb-/- mice exhibited a similar C3 staining pattern to WT in the retinal vessels but a decrease in C3 and its breakdown products at the basal surface of the RPE. Deletion of both Cfb and Cfh restored C3 to levels similar to those observed in WT mice, however this reversal of phenotype was not observed in Cfh-/-/Cfb+/- or Cfb-/-/Cfh+/- mice. Loss of CFD caused an increase in C3 and a decrease in C3 breakdown products along the basal surface of the RPE. Overall the retinal morphology and retinal vasculature did not appear different across the various genotypes. We observed that C3 accumulates at the basal RPE in Cfb-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh-/-, Cfb-/-/Cfh+/-, Cfd-/- and WT mice, but is absent in Cfh-/- and Cfh-/-/Cfb+/- mice, consistent with its consumption in the serum of mice lacking CFH when CFB is present. C3 breakdown products along the surface of the RPE were either decreased or absent when CFB, CFH or CFD was deleted or partially deleted. PMID:27564415

  15. A Low-Abundance Biofilm Species Orchestrates Inflammatory Periodontal Disease through the Commensal Microbiota and the Complement Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Liang, Shuang; Payne, Mark A.; Hashim, Ahmed; Jotwani, Ravi; Eskan, Mehmet A.; McIntosh, Megan L.; Alsam, Asil; Kirkwood, Keith L.; Lambris, John D.; Darveau, Richard P.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Porphyromonas gingivalis is a low-abundance oral anaerobic bacterium implicated in periodontitis, a polymicrobial inflammatory disease, and the associated systemic conditions. However, the mechanism by which P. gingivalis contributes to inflammation and disease has remained elusive. Here we show that P. gingivalis, at very low colonization levels, triggers changes to the amount and composition of the oral commensal microbiota leading to inflammatory periodontal bone loss. The commensal microbiota and the complement pathway were both required for P. gingivalis-induced bone loss as germ-free mice or conventionally raised C3a and C5a receptor deficient mice did not develop bone loss after inoculation with P. gingivalis. These findings demonstrate that a single, low-abundance species can disrupt host-microbial homeostasis to cause inflammatory disease. The identification and targeting of similar low-abundance pathogens with community-wide impact may be important for treating inflammatory diseases of polymicrobial etiology. PMID:22036469

  16. Complement Factor H Serum Levels Determine Resistance to Pneumococcal Invasive Disease.

    PubMed

    van der Maten, Erika; Westra, Dineke; van Selm, Saskia; Langereis, Jeroen D; Bootsma, Hester J; van Opzeeland, Fred J H; de Groot, Ronald; Ruseva, Marieta M; Pickering, Matthew C; van den Heuvel, Lambert P W J; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; de Jonge, Marien I; van der Flier, Michiel

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of life-threatening infections. Complement activation plays a vital role in opsonophagocytic killing of pneumococci in blood. Initial complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways is amplified through the alternative pathway amplification loop. Alternative pathway activity is inhibited by complement factor H (FH). Our study demonstrates the functional consequences of the variability in human serum FH levels on host defense. Using an in vivo mouse model combined with human in vitro assays, we show that the level of serum FH correlates with the efficacy of opsonophagocytic killing of pneumococci. In summary, we found that FH levels determine a delicate balance of alternative pathway activity, thus affecting the resistance to invasive pneumococcal disease. Our results suggest that variation in FH expression levels, naturally occurring in the human population, plays a thus far unrecognized role in the resistance to invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:26802141

  17. Rapid Assays for Lectin Toxicity and Binding Changes that Reflect Altered Glycosylation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans, with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, and also missing those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also give rise to spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes

  18. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    PubMed

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  19. ON VASCULAR STENOSIS, RESTENOSIS AND MANNOSE BINDING LECTIN.

    PubMed

    Kahlow, Barbara Stadler; Nery, Rodrigo Araldi; Skare, Thelma L; Ribas, Carmen Australia Paredes Marcondes; Ramos, Gabriela Piovezani; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski

    2016-03-01

    Mannose binding lectin is a lectin instrumental in the innate immunity. It recognizes carbohydrate patterns found on the surface of a large number of pathogenic micro-organisms, activating the complement system. However, this protein seems to increase the tissue damage after ischemia. In this paper is reviewed some aspects of harmful role of the mannose binding lectin in ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27120743

  20. ON VASCULAR STENOSIS, RESTENOSIS AND MANNOSE BINDING LECTIN

    PubMed Central

    KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; SKARE, Thelma L; RIBAS, Carmen Australia Paredes Marcondes; RAMOS, Gabriela Piovezani; PETISCO, Roberta Dombroski

    2016-01-01

    Mannose binding lectin is a lectin instrumental in the innate immunity. It recognizes carbohydrate patterns found on the surface of a large number of pathogenic micro-organisms, activating the complement system. However, this protein seems to increase the tissue damage after ischemia. In this paper is reviewed some aspects of harmful role of the mannose binding lectin in ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27120743

  1. Cartilage specific collagen activates macrophages and the alternative pathway of complement: evidence for an immunopathogenic concept of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hanauske-Abel, H M; Pontz, B F; Schorlemmer, H U

    1982-01-01

    We studied the effect of human interstitial collagen types I, II, and III on serum-free cultured mouse macrophages and on the complement classical and alternative pathways in human and guinea-pig serum. Type II collagen produced a dose-dependent consumption and conversion of C3 and factor B both in the homologous and in the heterologous system. This effect on the alternative pathway was reproduced in genetically C4-deficient guinea-pig serum and could be triggered by native, triple helical type II molecules, by their component alpha chains, and the CNBr peptide mixture. Addition of type II collagen to the mouse macrophage cultures induced not only a dose- and time-dependent secretion of lysosomal enzymes, but also the generation of a supernatant factor cytotoxic for mouse mastocytoma P 815 cells. Collagen of types I and III were conspicuously less active or inactive in all assays. The studies demonstrate properties of the collagen specific for cartilage which, on a molecular level, suggest its direct, local participation in the production and perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:7073345

  2. Functional Complementation Analysis (FCA): A Laboratory Exercise Designed and Implemented to Supplement the Teaching of Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hudson, André O; Harkness, Taylor C M; Savka, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Functional complementation assay (FCA) is an in vivo assay that is widely used to elucidate the function/role of genes/enzymes. This technique is very common in biochemistry, genetics and many other disciplines. A comprehensive overview of the technique to supplement the teaching of biochemical pathways pertaining to amino acids, peptidoglycan and the bacterial stringent response is reported in this manuscript. Two cDNAs from the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana that are involved in the metabolism of lysine (L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (dapL) and tyrosine aminotransferase (tyrB) involved in the metabolism of tyrosine and phenylalanine are highlighted. In addition, the bacterial peptidoglycan anabolic pathway is highlighted through the analysis of the UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamate-meso-2,6-diaminopimelate ligase (murE) gene from the bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum involved in the cross-linking of peptidoglycan. The bacterial stringent response is also reported through the analysis of the rsh (relA/spoT homolog) bifunctional gene responsible for a hyper-mucoid phenotype in the bacterium Novosphingobium sp. Four examples of FCA are presented. The video will focus on three of them, namely lysine, peptidoglycan and the stringent response. PMID:27403640

  3. Complement modulatory activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids isolated from Isopyrum thalictroides--I. Influence on classical pathway in human serum.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, N; Nikolova, P; Hristova, M; Philipov, S; Istatkova, R

    1999-05-01

    Eleven bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BBI) were isolated from the plant Isopyrum thalictroides (L.). Treatment of normal human serum (NHS) with BBI resulted in a diminution of the haemolytic activity of the classical pathway (CP). The mode of action of the main alkaloids isopyruthaline (It1), fangchinoline (It2) and isotalictrine (It3) on CP activation was investigated in vitro. The inhibition was time- and temperature-related and for Itl and It3 depended on the concentration of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions. It was established that the substances reduced C1 haemolytic activity. It2 and It3 enhanced the complement consumption caused by heat aggregated human IgG (HAGG). The BBI prevented the formation of C3 convertase of the classical pathway. The loss of haemolytic activity was partially restored by the addition of C142 reagent (zymosan-treated guinea pig serum) to alkaloids-treated NHS. The addition of the late components C3-9 (EDTA-treated rat sera) recovered to some extent the haemolytic activity of It1-treated NHS, but not of It2- and It3-treated NHS. PMID:10408629

  4. Ulex europaeus agglutinin II (UEA-II) is a novel, potent inhibitor of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Lekowski, R; Collard, C D; Reenstra, W R; Stahl, G L

    2001-02-01

    Complement is an important mediator of vascular injury following oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that complement activation following endothelial oxidative stress is mediated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and activation of the lectin complement pathway. Here, we investigated whether nine plant lectins which have a binding profile similar to that of MBL competitively inhibit MBL deposition and subsequent complement activation following human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) oxidative stress. HUVEC oxidative stress (1% O(2), 24 hr) significantly increased Ulex europaeus agglutinin II (UEA-II) binding by 72 +/- 9% compared to normoxic cells. UEA-II inhibited MBL binding to HUVEC in a concentration-dependent manner following oxidative stress. Further, MBL inhibited UEA-II binding to HUVEC in a concentration-dependent manner following oxidative stress, suggesting a common ligand. UEA-II (< or = 100 micromol/L) did not attenuate the hemolytic activity, nor did it inhibit C3a des Arg formation from alternative or classical complement pathway-specific hemolytic assays. C3 deposition (measured by ELISA) following HUVEC oxidative stress was inhibited by UEA-II in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) = 10 pmol/L). UEA-II inhibited C3 and MBL co-localization (confocal microscopy) in a concentration-dependent manner on HUVEC following oxidative stress (IC(50) approximately 1 pmol/L). Finally, UEA-II significantly inhibited complement-dependent neutrophil chemotaxis, but failed to inhibit fMLP-mediated chemotaxis, following endothelial oxidative stress. These data demonstrate that UEA-II is a novel, potent inhibitor of human MBL deposition and complement activation following human endothelial oxidative stress. PMID:11266613

  5. Mitogenic activity of edible mushroom lectins.

    PubMed

    Ho, J C K; Sze, S C W; Shen, W Z; Liu, W K

    2004-03-17

    A special group of lectins were isolated from three popular Asian edible mushrooms: Volvariella volvacea, Pleurotus flabellatus and Hericium erinacium, and their mitogenic activities towards mouse T cells were compared to the extensively investigated Agaricus bisporus lectin (ABL) and the Jack bean lectin, Concanavalin A (Con A). Among the four mushroom lectins tested, V. volvacea lectin (VVL) exhibited strong mitogenic activity as demonstrated by 3H-thymidine incorporation, which was at least 10-fold more effective than that of Con A, and the other mushroom lectins did not exhibit any proliferative activity. Treatment with VVL and ABL resulted in activation of the protein tyrosine kinase, p56lck, and expression of early activation markers, CD69 and CD25, but only VVL induced intracellular calcium influx while ABL triggered cell death. The calcium influx was sensitive to calcium channel antagonists such as nifedipine and verapamil. The P. flabellatus lectin (PFL) and H. erinacium lectin (HEL) did not stimulate p56lck expression and cell proliferation. Neither of these lectins interfered with Con A-mediated lymphocyte proliferation, which further indicated that both PFL and HEL were non-mitogenic. Taken all results together, VVL induced mitogenesis through T cell receptors and the subsequent calcium signaling pathway. PMID:15026140

  6. A targeted inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway reduces RPE injury and angiogenesis in models of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, Bärbel; Long, Qin; Coughlin, Beth; Renner, Brandon; Huang, Yuxiang; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Ferreira, Viviana P; Pangburn, Michael K; Gilkeson, Gary S; Thurman, Joshua M; Tomlinson, Stephen; Holers, V Michael

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variations in complement factor H (fH), an inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway (CAP), and oxidative stress are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Recently, novel complement therapeutics have been created with the capacity to be "targeted" to sites of complement activation. One example is our recombinant form of fH, CR2-fH, which consists of the N-terminus of mouse fH that contains the CAP-inhibitory domain, linked to a complement receptor 2 (CR2) targeting fragment that binds complement activation products. CR2-fH was investigated in vivo in the mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and in vitro in oxidatively stressed RPE cell monolayers. RPE deterioration and CNV development were found to require CAP activation, and specific CAP inhibition by CR2-fH reduced the loss of RPE integrity and angiogenesis in CNV. In both the in vivo and in vitro paradigm of RPE damage, a model requiring molecular events known to be involved in AMD, complement-dependent VEGF production, was confirmed. These data may open new avenues for AMD treatment strategies. PMID:20711712

  7. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix. PMID:27141819

  8. Antimicrobial functions of EsLecH, a C-type lectin, via JNK pathway in the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, You-Ting; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Shi-Chuang; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Qun

    2016-08-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are pattern recognition proteins that play significant roles in the innate immune system by identifying and eliminating pathogens. Here, we have reported a CTL (EsLecH) from the Chinese mitten crab that can bind to microorganisms and regulate antimicrobial peptide (AMP) expression via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. EsLecH was found to have an N-terminal signal peptide and a single carbohydrate recognition domain. The EsLecH transcript was detected abundantly in various tissues, and it was significantly upregulated in hemocytes after challenging with lipopolysaccharides and bacteria. Recombinant (r)EsLecH could bind to microorganisms, but at different levels. Ca(2+) significantly increased rEsLecH binding affinity to microorganisms. Furthermore, growth inhibition by rEsLecH increased with increasing rEsLecH levels. Knockdown of EsLecH was accompanied by a significant reduction in AMP expression and JNK phosphorylation; AMP expression was reduced with JNK silencing and can not rescued by rEsLecH when absence of JNK. These results indicate that EsLecH could regulate AMPs via JNK signaling. PMID:27068761

  9. CR2 is the primary acceptor site for C3 during alternative pathway activation of complement on human peripheral B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Marquart, H V; Svehag, S E; Leslie, R G

    1994-07-01

    Human cells infected with certain viruses acquire the ability to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement. Complement receptor 2 on EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines has been reported to act as the covalent binding site for C3b during AP activation. Using flow cytometry, we investigated the ability of normal human peripheral blood leukocytes to activate the AP in homologous serum. Deposition of C3 fragments was determined as a measurement of complement activation on each of the subpopulations of the blood cells. Incubating human peripheral blood leukocytes with homologous or autologous serum resulted in C3 deposition on B cells and, to a lesser extent, on monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Complement activation in the presence of Mg2+ ions and EGTA revealed major involvement of the AP in the case of B cells, and to a lesser extent for other leukocyte populations examined. Preincubation of the leukocytes with polyclonal anti-complement receptor 2 Ab markedly decreased the C3 fragment deposition, as a result of in vitro AP activation, on B cells, indicating that on normal human B cells this receptor may be involved in AP activation. Freshly isolated, normal human B cells also bear low but significant amounts of C3d,g fragments on their membranes, indicating that this AP activation also occurs in vivo. AP activation was partially decreased in the presence of autologous erythrocytes (RBC) suggesting that complement regulatory proteins on RBC play a role in limiting the AP activation in vivo. PMID:7515925

  10. SALSA: A Regulator of the Early Steps of Complement Activation on Mucosal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Martin Parnov; Meri, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Complement is present mainly in blood. However, following mechanical damage or inflammation, serous exudates enter the mucosal surfaces. Here, the complement proteins interact with other endogenous molecules to keep microbes from entering the parenteral tissues. One of the mucosal proteins known to interact with the early complement components of both the classical and the lectin pathway is the salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA). SALSA is also known as deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 and gp340. It is found both attached to the epithelium and secreted into the surrounding fluids of most mucosal surfaces. SALSA has been shown to bind directly to C1q, mannose-binding lectin, and the ficolins. Through these interactions SALSA regulates activation of the complement system. In addition, SALSA interacts with surfactant proteins A and D, secretory IgA, and lactoferrin. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are examples of diseases, where complement activation in mucosal tissues may occur. This review describes the latest advances in our understanding of how the early complement components interact with the SALSA molecule. Furthermore, we discuss how these interactions may affect disease propagation on mucosal surfaces in immunological and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27014265

  11. Genetically-Defined Deficiency of Mannose-Binding Lectin Is Associated with Protection after Experimental Stroke in Mice and Outcome in Human Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Alvaro; Planas, Anna M.; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Jensenius, Jens C.; Torres, Ferran; Lozano, Francisco; Chamorro, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Background The complement system is a major effector of innate immunity that has been involved in stroke brain damage. Complement activation occurs through the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. The latter is initiated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Here we investigated whether the lectin pathway contributes to stroke outcome in mice and humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in MBL-null mice induced smaller infarctions, better functional outcome, and diminished C3 deposition and neutrophil infiltration than in wild-type mice. Accordingly, reconstitution of MBL-null mice with recombinant human MBL (rhMBL) enhanced brain damage. In order to investigate the clinical relevance of these experimental observations, a study of MBL2 and MASP-2 gene polymorphism rendering the lectin pathway dysfunctional was performed in 135 stroke patients. In logistic regression adjusted for age, gender and initial stroke severity, unfavourable outcome at 3 months was associated with MBL-sufficient genotype (OR 10.85, p = 0.008) and circulating MBL levels (OR 1.29, p = 0.04). Individuals carrying MBL-low genotypes (17.8%) had lower C3, C4, and CRP levels, and the proinflammatory cytokine profile was attenuated versus MBL-sufficient genotypes. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, genetically defined MBL-deficiency is associated with a better outcome after acute stroke in mice and humans. PMID:20140243

  12. Antibody-independent activation of the classical pathway of human serum complement by lipid A is restricted to re-chemotype lipopolysaccharide and purified lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Vukajlovich, S W

    1986-01-01

    Incubation of most bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with normal human sera at 37 degrees C activates the serum complement system, resulting in decreased levels of hemolytic complement. A panel of R-chemotype LPS preparations isolated from Salmonella minnesota rough mutant strains, as well as smooth wild-type LPS from S. minnesota, Escherichia coli O55-B5, Serratia marcescens, and Yersinia enterolitica, were used to examine the effect of LPS polysaccharide chain length on LPS lipid (lipid A)-dependent activation of the classical pathway of complement (CPC). To examine specific lipid A-dependent activation of the CPC, sera deficient in alternative pathway of complement activity were prepared by the removal of factor D. Absorption of normal human sera with formalinized rabbit erythrocytes was found to remove natural antibodies, factors capable of forming LPS complexes which activate the CPC, or both. By using such factor D-depleted formalinized rabbit erythrocyte-absorbed normal human sera, only isolated lipid A and Re-chemotype LPS (R595 LPS) were found to activate the CPC. Thus, the presence of the additional monosaccharide L-glycero-D-mannoheptose in the Rd2 LPS oligosaccharide chain compared with the L-glycero-D-mannoheptose-deficient Re-chemotype LPS structure is sufficient to block lipid A-dependent activation of the CPC by LPS. PMID:3744547

  13. Splenic RNA and MicroRNA Mimics Promote Complement Factor B Production and Alternative Pathway Activation via Innate Immune Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lin; Feng, Yan; Xu, Ganqiong; Jian, Wenling; Chao, Wei

    2016-03-15

    Complement factor B (cfB) is an essential component of the alternative pathway (AP) and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of polymicrobial sepsis. However, the mechanism leading to cfB production and AP activation during sepsis remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that plasma cell-free RNA was significantly increased following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), an animal model of polymicrobial sepsis, and was closely associated with sepsis severity. Quantitative RT-PCR and microRNA (miRNA) array analysis revealed an increase in bacterial RNA and multiple host miRNAs (miR-145, miR-146a, miR-122, miR-210) in the blood following CLP. Treatment with tissue RNA or synthetic miRNA mimics (miR-145, miR-146a, miR-122, miR-34a) induced a marked increase in cfB production in cardiomyocytes or macrophages. The newly synthesized cfB released into medium was biologically active because it participated in AP activation initiated by cobra venom factor. Genetic deletion of TLR7 or MyD88, but not TLR3, and inhibition of the MAPKs (JNK and p38) or NF-κB abolished miR-146a-induced cfB production. In vivo, CLP led to a significant increase in splenic cfB expression that correlated with the plasma RNA or miRNA levels. Peritoneal injection of RNA or miR-146a led to an increase in cfB expression in the peritoneal space that was attenuated in MyD88-knockout or TLR7-knockout mice, respectively. These findings demonstrate that host cellular RNA and specific miRNAs are released into the circulation during polymicrobial sepsis and may function as extracellular mediators capable of promoting cfB production and AP activation through specific TLR7 and MyD88 signaling. PMID:26889043

  14. Infections of People with Complement Deficiencies and Patients Who Have Undergone Splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Sanjay; Lewis, Lisa A.; Rice, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The complement system comprises several fluid-phase and membrane-associated proteins. Under physiological conditions, activation of the fluid-phase components of complement is maintained under tight control and complement activation occurs primarily on surfaces recognized as “nonself” in an attempt to minimize damage to bystander host cells. Membrane complement components act to limit complement activation on host cells or to facilitate uptake of antigens or microbes “tagged” with complement fragments. While this review focuses on the role of complement in infectious diseases, work over the past couple of decades has defined several important functions of complement distinct from that of combating infections. Activation of complement in the fluid phase can occur through the classical, lectin, or alternative pathway. Deficiencies of components of the classical pathway lead to the development of autoimmune disorders and predispose individuals to recurrent respiratory infections and infections caused by encapsulated organisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. While no individual with complete mannan-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency has been identified, low MBL levels have been linked to predisposition to, or severity of, several diseases. It appears that MBL may play an important role in children, who have a relatively immature adaptive immune response. C3 is the point at which all complement pathways converge, and complete deficiency of C3 invariably leads to severe infections, including those caused by meningococci and pneumococci. Deficiencies of the alternative and terminal complement pathways result in an almost exclusive predisposition to invasive meningococcal disease. The spleen plays an important role in antigen processing and the production of antibodies. Splenic macrophages are critical in clearing opsonized encapsulated bacteria (such as pneumococci, meningococci, and Escherichia coli

  15. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  16. The complement system of elasmobranches revealed by liver transcriptome analysis of a hammerhead shark, Sphyrna zygaena.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Reo; Matsushita, Misao; Nonaka, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Comprehensive studies of the complement genes in basal vertebrates have revealed that cyclostomes have apparently primitive complement systems whereas bony fish have well-developed complement systems comparable to those of mammals. Here we have performed liver transcriptome analysis of a hammerhead shark, Sphyrna zygaeana, to elucidate the early history of vertebrate complement evolution. Identified genes were; one C1qB, one C1r, one C1s, one MASP-1/-3, one MASP-2, two factor B/C2, one C3, three C4, one C5, one C6, one C7, one C8A, three C8B, one C8G, one C9, two factor I and one S protein. No MBL, ficolin, C1qA or C1qC were found. These results indicate that the lectin, classical, alternative and lytic pathways were established in the common ancestor of jawed vertebrates. In addition to the absence of MBL and ficolin, the MASP transcripts lacked the serine protease domain, suggesting that the lectin pathway was lost in the hammerhead shark lineage. PMID:26987526

  17. A C-type lectin receptor pathway is responsible for the pathogenesis of acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dejima, Takashi; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamada, Hisakata; Takeuchi, Ario; Hara, Hiromitsu; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2013-12-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis often arises after cyclophosphamide (CYP) administration. As yet, however, the mechanism involved in its pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, it was found that the Fc receptor γ chain (FcRγ)- caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9)-dependent pathway rather than the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of acute CYP-induced cystitis in mice. Rapid and transient production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β was detected in the bladder at 4 hr, preceding IL-23 and IL-17A production and an influx of neutrophils, which reached a peak at 24 hr after injection. As assessed by weight, edema and neutrophil infiltration, cystitis was significantly attenuated in CARD9 knockout (KO) and FcRγKO mice, this attenuation being accompanied by impaired production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A. The major source of IL-17A is the vesical γδ T cell population: IL-17AKO, CδKO and Tyk2KO mice showed little IL-17A production and reduced neutrophil infiltration in the bladder after CYP injection. These results suggest that FcRγ-CARD9-dependent production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 and the subsequent activation of IL-17A-producing γδ T cells are at least partly involved in the pathogenesis of acute CYP-induced cystitis in mice. PMID:24102807

  18. Complement and Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system functions as an immune surveillance system that rapidly responds to infection. Activation of the complement system by specific recognition pathways triggers a protease cascade, generating cleavage products that function to eliminate pathogens, regulate inflammatory responses, and shape adaptive immune responses. However, when dysregulated, these powerful functions can become destructive and the complement system has been implicated as a pathogenic effector in numerous diseases, including infectious diseases. This review highlights recent discoveries that have identified critical roles for the complement system in the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:21292294

  19. Laboratory tests for disorders of complement and complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Shih, Angela R; Murali, Mandakolathur R

    2015-12-01

    The complement pathway is a cascade of proteases that is involved in immune surveillance and innate immunity, as well as adaptive immunity. Dysfunction of the complement cascade may be mediated by aberrations in the pathways of activation, complement regulatory proteins, or complement deficiencies, and has been linked to a number of hematologic disorders, including paroxysmal noctural hemoglobinuria (PNH), hereditary angioedema (HAE), and atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS). Here, current laboratory tests for disorders of the complement pathway are reviewed, and their utility and limitations in hematologic disorders and systemic diseases are discussed. Current therapeutic advances targeting the complement pathway in treatment of complement-mediated hematologic disorders are also reviewed. PMID:26437749

  20. Targeting mechanisms at sites of complement activation for imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Holers, V Michael

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in many acute injury states as well as chronic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Localized complement activation and alternative pathway-mediated amplification on diverse target surfaces promote local recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells and elaboration of other mediators. Despite a general understanding of the architecture of the system, though, many of the mechanisms that underlie site-specific complement activation and amplification in vivo are incompletely understood. In addition, there is no capability yet to measure the level of local tissue site-specific complement activation in patients without performing biopsies to detect products using immunohistochemical techniques. Herein is reviewed emerging evidence obtained through clinical research studies of human rheumatoid arthritis along with translational studies of its disease models which demonstrate that several parallel mechanisms are involved in site-specific amplification of activation of the complement system in vivo. Among these processes are de-regulation of the alternative pathway, effector pathway-catalyzed amplification of proximal complement activation, recognition of injury-associated ligands by components of the lectin pathway, and engagement of pathogenic natural antibodies that recognize a limited set of injury-associated neoepitopes. Studies suggest that each of these inter-related processes can play key roles in amplification of complement-dependent injury on self-tissues in vivo. These findings, in addition to development of an imaging strategy described herein designed to quantitatively measure local complement C3 fixation, have relevance to therapeutic and diagnostic strategies targeting the complement system. PMID:25979851

  1. Discrimination between activators and nonactivators of the alternative pathway of complement: Regulation via a sialic acid/polyanion binding site on factor H

    SciTech Connect

    Meri, S.; Pangburn, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The alternative complement pathway is capable of discriminating human cells and tissues from a wide variety of potential pathogens. It has been recently demonstrated that attachment of complement component C3b to activator-derived molecules restricts inactivation of C3b by factors H and I in a manner similar to activator surfaces. It is now shown that restriction is reversed by certain soluble polyanions that mimic the effects of sialic acid and glycosaminoglycans on human cells and tissues. Fluid-phase polyanions enhanced binding of factor H to C3b attached to activating particles, indicating that the effect resulted from increased affinity between C3b and factor H. The enhancement was specific for activator-bound C3b since no enhancement was observed on nonactivating particles. While several polyanions could cause this effect, some polyanions could not, indicating specificity. The active polyanions also inhibited lysis of cells via the alternative pathway. The binding site for sialic acid appears to reside on factor H, since factor H bound to heparin-agarose and to sialic acid-bearing fetuinagarose, whereas C3b bound to neither under the same conditions. These observation suggest that occupation of a specific site on factor H by polyanions induces an increase in the C3b-H affinity, resulting in discrimination of host cells and tissues from alternative pathway-activating foreign cells.

  2. Regulatory Components of the Alternative Complement Pathway in Endothelial Cell Cytoplasm, Factor H and Factor I, Are Not Packaged in Weibel-Palade Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Nancy A.; Sartain, Sarah E.; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF —- but not factor H. PMID:25803806

  3. Complement C5a induces PD-L1 expression and acts in synergy with LPS through Erk1/2 and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    An, Ling-Ling; Gorman, Jacob V; Stephens, Geoffrey; Swerdlow, Bonnie; Warrener, Paul; Bonnell, Jessica; Mustelin, Tomas; Fung, Michael; Kolbeck, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Severe bacterial infection results in both uncontrolled inflammation and immune suppression in septic patients. Although there is ample evidence that complement activation provokes overwhelming pro-inflammatory responses, whether or not it plays a role in immune suppression in this case is unclear. Here, we identify that complement C5a directly participates in negative regulation of immune responses to bacteria-induced inflammation in an ex vivo model of human whole blood. Challenge of whole blood with heat-killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces PD-L1 expression on monocytes and the production of IL-10 and TGF-β, which we show to be inhibited by C5a blockade. The induction of PD-L1 expression by C5a is via C5aR1but not C5aR2. Furthermore, C5a synergises with P. aeruginosa LPS in both PD-L1 expression and the production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Mechanistically, C5a contributes to the synergy in PD-L1 expression by specifically activating Erk1/2 and JNK signaling pathways. Our study reveals a new role for C5a in directly promoting immunosuppressive responses. Therefore, aberrant production of complement C5a during bacterial infection could have broader effect on compromising host defense including the induction of immune suppression. PMID:27624143

  4. Modulation of glycan detection on specific glycoproteins by lectin multimerization

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zheng; Partyka, Katie; McDonald, Mitchell; Brouhard, Elizabeth; Hincapie, Marina; Brand, Randall E.; Hancock, William S.; Haab, Brian B.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods for studying glycans could spur significant advances in the understanding and application of glycobiology. The use of affinity reagents such as lectins and glycan-binding antibodies is a valuable complement to methods involving mass spectrometry and chromatography. Many lectins, however, are not useful as analytic tools due to low affinity in vitro. As an approach to increasing lectin avidity to targeted glycans, we tested the use of lectin multimerization. Several biotinylated lectins were linked together through streptavidin interactions. The binding of certain lectins for purified glycoproteins and glycoproteins captured directly out of biological solutions was increased using multimerization, resulting in the detection of lower concentrations of glycoprotein than possible using monomeric detection. The analysis of glycoproteins in plasma samples showed that the level of binding enhancement through multimerization was not equivalent across patient samples. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) reactive glycans on fibronectin and thrombospondin-5 were preferentially bound by multimers in pancreatic cancer patient samples relative to control samples, suggesting a cancer-associated change in glycan density that could be detected only through lectin multimerization. This strategy could lead to the more sensitive and informative detection of glycans in biological samples and a broader spectrum of lectins that are useful as analytical reagents. PMID:23286506

  5. Modulation of glycan detection on specific glycoproteins by lectin multimerization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Partyka, Katie; McDonald, Mitchell; Brouhard, Elizabeth; Hincapie, Marina; Brand, Randall E; Hancock, William S; Haab, Brian B

    2013-02-01

    Improved methods for studying glycans could spur significant advances in the understanding and application of glycobiology. The use of affinity reagents such as lectins and glycan-binding antibodies is a valuable complement to methods involving mass spectrometry and chromatography. Many lectins, however, are not useful as analytic tools due to low affinity in vitro. As an approach to increasing lectin avidity to targeted glycans, we tested the use of lectin multimerization. Several biotinylated lectins were linked together through streptavidin interactions. The binding of certain lectins for purified glycoproteins and glycoproteins captured directly out of biological solutions was increased using multimerization, resulting in the detection of lower concentrations of glycoprotein than possible using monomeric detection. The analysis of glycoproteins in plasma samples showed that the level of binding enhancement through multimerization was not equivalent across patient samples. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) reactive glycans on fibronectin and thrombospondin-5 were preferentially bound by multimers in pancreatic cancer patient samples relative to control samples, suggesting a cancer-associated change in glycan density that could be detected only through lectin multimerization. This strategy could lead to the more sensitive and informative detection of glycans in biological samples and a broader spectrum of lectins that are useful as analytical reagents. PMID:23286506

  6. MASP-1, a promiscuous complement protease: structure of its catalytic region reveals the basis of its broad specificity.

    PubMed

    Dobó, József; Harmat, Veronika; Beinrohr, László; Sebestyén, Edina; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter

    2009-07-15

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease (MASP)-1 is an abundant component of the lectin pathway of complement. The related enzyme, MASP-2 is capable of activating the complement cascade alone. Though the concentration of MASP-1 far exceeds that of MASP-2, only a supporting role of MASP-1 has been identified regarding lectin pathway activation. Several non-complement substrates, like fibrinogen and factor XIII, have also been reported. MASP-1 belongs to the C1r/C1s/MASP family of modular serine proteases; however, its serine protease domain is evolutionary different. We have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic region of active MASP-1 and refined it to 2.55 A resolution. Unusual features of the structure are an internal salt bridge (similar to one in factor D) between the S1 Asp189 and Arg224, and a very long 60-loop. The functional and evolutionary differences between MASP-1 and the other members of the C1r/C1s/MASP family are reflected in the crystal structure. Structural comparison of the protease domains revealed that the substrate binding groove of MASP-1 is wide and resembles that of trypsin rather than early complement proteases explaining its relaxed specificity. Also, MASP-1's multifunctional behavior as both a complement and a coagulation enzyme is in accordance with our observation that antithrombin in the presence of heparin is a more potent inhibitor of MASP-1 than C1 inhibitor. Overall, MASP-1 behaves as a promiscuous protease. The structure shows that its substrate binding groove is accessible; however, its reactivity could be modulated by an unusually large 60-loop and an internal salt bridge involving the S1 Asp. PMID:19564340

  7. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26582375

  8. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26637747

  9. Mannan binding lectin attenuates double-stranded RNA-mediated TLR3 activation and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhi; Zhou, Jia; Ma, Di; Lu, Xiao; Ming, Siqi; Shan, Guiqiu; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Hou, Jinlin; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2014-03-18

    Mannan binding lectin (MBL) functions as a pattern recognition molecule (PRM) which is able to initiate complement activation. Here, we characterize a previously unrecognized attribute of MBL as a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein capable of modifying Toll like receptor 3 (TLR3) activation. MBL interacts with poly(I:C) and suppresses poly(I:C)-induced activation of TLR3 pathways and subsequent cytokine production. In addition, MBL binds to TLR3 directly. Surprisingly, disrupting the interaction between MBL and complement receptor 1 (CR1) or restraining the traffic of MBL to phagosome reversed the MBL limited TLR3 activation. We demonstrate the importance of MBL guided ligands intracellular localization, emphasizing the significance of understanding the dynamics of TLR agonists complexed with MBL or other PRMs inside the cell in immune defense. PMID:24530528

  10. New insight into the effects of heparinoids on complement inhibition by C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Poppelaars, F; Damman, J; de Vrij, E L; Burgerhof, J G M; Saye, J; Daha, M R; Leuvenink, H G; Uknis, M E; Seelen, M A J

    2016-06-01

    Complement activation is of major importance in numerous pathological conditions. Therefore, targeted complement inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy. C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) controls activation of the classical pathway (CP) and the lectin pathway (LP). However, conflicting data exist on inhibition of the alternative pathway (AP) by C1-INH. The inhibitory capacity of C1-INH for the CP is potentiated by heparin and other glycosaminoglycans, but no data exist for the LP and AP. The current study investigates the effects of C1-INH in the presence or absence of different clinically used heparinoids on the CP, LP and AP. Furthermore, the combined effects of heparinoids and C1-INH on coagulation were investigated. C1-INH, heparinoids or combinations were analysed in a dose-dependent fashion in the presence of pooled serum. Functional complement activities were measured simultaneously using the Wielisa(®) -kit. The activated partial thrombin time was determined using an automated coagulation analyser. The results showed that all three complement pathways were inhibited significantly by C1-INH or heparinoids. Next to their individual effects on complement activation, heparinoids also enhanced the inhibitory capacity of C1-INH significantly on the CP and LP. For the AP, significant potentiation of C1-INH by heparinoids was found; however, this was restricted to certain concentration ranges. At low concentrations the effect on blood coagulation by combining heparinoids with C1-INH was minimal. In conclusion, our study shows significant potentiating effects of heparinoids on the inhibition of all complement pathways by C1-INH. Therefore, their combined use is a promising and a potentially cost-effective treatment option for complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26874675

  11. Direct evidence that decreased serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in sickle cell disease is related to antibody deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Lobel, J S

    1987-01-01

    Two approaches were used to demonstrate that reduction in serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in children with sickle cell disease is related to a deficiency of antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. First, opsonization of S. pneumoniae mediated by the alternative pathway in patients' sera was restored to normal by addition of the purified IgG or IgM fraction of goat antiserum to capsular polysaccharide of the homologous serotype. Secondly, IgG antibody titers to capsular polysaccharide in patients' sera correlated significantly with alternative pathway-mediated opsonization; the correlation between titers of IgM anticapsular antibodies and opsonization approached statistical significance. The sum of the IgG and IgM anticapsular antibody titers correlated most significantly with opsonization. Our results suggest that reduction in alternative pathway-mediated opsonization in sera from children with sickle cell disease is related to low levels of both IgG and IgM anticapsular antibodies. Images PMID:3805275

  12. Direct evidence that decreased serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in sickle cell disease is related to antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bjornson, A B; Lobel, J S

    1987-02-01

    Two approaches were used to demonstrate that reduction in serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in children with sickle cell disease is related to a deficiency of antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. First, opsonization of S. pneumoniae mediated by the alternative pathway in patients' sera was restored to normal by addition of the purified IgG or IgM fraction of goat antiserum to capsular polysaccharide of the homologous serotype. Secondly, IgG antibody titers to capsular polysaccharide in patients' sera correlated significantly with alternative pathway-mediated opsonization; the correlation between titers of IgM anticapsular antibodies and opsonization approached statistical significance. The sum of the IgG and IgM anticapsular antibody titers correlated most significantly with opsonization. Our results suggest that reduction in alternative pathway-mediated opsonization in sera from children with sickle cell disease is related to low levels of both IgG and IgM anticapsular antibodies. PMID:3805275

  13. Role of mannose-binding lectin in intestinal homeostasis and fungal elimination.

    PubMed

    Choteau, L; Parny, M; François, N; Bertin, B; Fumery, M; Dubuquoy, L; Takahashi, K; Colombel, J-F; Jouault, T; Poulain, D; Sendid, B; Jawhara, S

    2016-05-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a soluble lectin of the innate immune system that is produced by the liver and secreted into the circulation where it activates the lectin complement pathway, enhances phagocytosis of microorganisms by leukocytes, and modulates inflammation. MBL can recognize patterns on the surface of different pathogens, including Candida albicans. Our aims were to investigate whether MBL is expressed in the gut epithelium and to examine its effect on the modulation of intestinal inflammation and C. albicans elimination. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, MBL transcripts were highly expressed in different parts of the mouse gut. MBL expression was also detected by immunoblotting and immunolocalization in response to C. albicans colonization of the gut; the highest expression of MBL was detected in the stomach. Blocking MBL by administering mannans to mice increased C. albicans colonization. MBL-deficient mice had a higher level of colonization than wild-type mice. Dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis promoted C. albicans dissemination to the kidneys and lungs of MBL-deficient mice. MBL-deficient mice exhibited elevated expression of interleukin (IL)-17, IL-23, dectin-1, and Toll-like receptor-4. This study shows that MBL expression is induced in the gut in response to C. albicans sensing and is required for intestinal homeostasis and host defense against C. albicans. PMID:26442658

  14. Complement Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... helpful? Also known as: C1; C1q; C2; C3; C4; CH50; CH100 (among others) Formal name: Complement Activity; ... whether the system is functioning normally. C3 and C4 are the most frequently measured complement proteins. Total ...

  15. Complement, complement activation and anaphylatoxins in human ovarian follicular fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Perricone, R; de Carolis, C; Moretti, C; Santuari, E; de Sanctis, G; Fontana, L

    1990-01-01

    Functionally active complement was sought and detected in human follicular fluids obtained during the pre-ovulatory period. All the functional complement activities tested, including total haemolytic complement, classical pathway activity and alternative pathway activity were present in nine fluids from four different donors with values within the normal serum range. The immunochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of complement factors from C1 to C9, of B and of C1 INH, H, I. Complement anaphylatoxins were found employing RIA techniques in amounts significantly higher than in human plasma, thus demonstrating that follicular fluid complement, at least during the pre-ovulatory period, is partially activated. A possible role for urokinase-like substances in such an activation was indicated by further in vitro experiments. The presence of active complement in follicular fluid can be relevant for the function of the enzymatic multi-factorial mechanism of ovulation. PMID:2242616

  16. Lectins of marine hydrobionts.

    PubMed

    Chernikov, O V; Molchanova, V I; Chikalovets, I V; Kondrashina, A S; Li, W; Lukyanov, P A

    2013-07-01

    Data from the literature and results of our research on lectins isolated from some kinds of marine hydrobionts such as clams, ascidians, sea worms, sponges, and algae are presented in this review. Results of comparative analysis of the basic physicochemical properties and biological activity of lectins isolated from various sources are discussed. PMID:24010839

  17. Accelerated Tumor Growth Mediated by Sub-lytic Levels of Antibody-Induced Complement Activation is Associated with Activation of the PI3K/AKT Survival Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaohong; Ragupathi, Govind; Panageas, Katherine; Hong, Feng; Livingston, Philip O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We addressed the possibility that low levels of tumor cell bound antibodies targeting gangliosides might accelerate tumor growth. Experimental Design To test this hypothesis, we treated mice with a range of mAb doses against GM2, GD2, GD3 and CD20 after challenge with tumors expressing these antigens and tested the activity of the same mAbs in-vitro. We also explored the mechanisms behind the complement-mediated tumor growth acceleration that we observed and an approach to overcome it. Results Serologically detectable levels of IgM-mAb against GM2 are able to delay or prevent tumor growth of high GM2-expressing cell lines both in-vitro and in a SCID mouse model, while very low levels of this mAb resulted in slight but consistent acceleration of tumor growth in both settings. Surprisingly, this is not restricted to IgM antibodies targeting GM2 but consistent against IgG-mAb targeting GD3 as well. These findings were mirrored by in-vitro studies with antibodies against these antigens as well as GD2 and CD20 (with Rituxan), and shown to be complement-dependent in all cases. Complement-mediated accelerated growth of cultured tumor cell lines initiated by low mAb levels was associated with activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway and significantly elevated levels of both p-AKT and p-PRAS40. This complement-mediated PI3K-activation and accelerated tumor growth in-vitro and in-vivo are eliminated by PI3K-inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and Wortmannin. These PI3K-inhibitors also significantly increased efficacy of high doses of these 4 mAbs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that manipulation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and its signaling network can significantly increase the potency of passively administered mAbs and vaccine-induced-antibodies targeting a variety of tumor-cell-surface-antigens. PMID:23833306

  18. Collectin liver 1 and collectin kidney 1 and other complement-associated pattern recognition molecules in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Troldborg, A; Thiel, S; Jensen, L; Hansen, S; Laska, M J; Deleuran, B; Jensenius, J C; Stengaard-Pedersen, K

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the involvement of collectin liver 1 (CL-L1) and collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1) and other pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) of the lectin pathway of the complement system in a cross-sectional cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Concentrations in plasma of CL-L1, CL-K1, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), M-ficolin, H-ficolin and L-ficolin were determined in 58 patients with SLE and 65 healthy controls using time-resolved immunoflourometric assays. The SLE patients' demographic, diagnostic, clinical and biochemical data and collection of plasma samples were performed prospectively during 4 months. CL-L1, CL-K1 and M-ficolin plasma concentrations were lower in SLE patients than healthy controls (P-values < 0.001, 0.033 and < 0.001, respectively). H-ficolin concentration was higher in SLE patients (P < 0.0001). CL-L1 and CL-K1 plasma concentrations in the individuals correlated in both patients and controls. Patients with low complement component 3 (C3) demonstrated a negative correlation between C3 and CL-L1 and CL-K1 (P = 0.022 and 0.031, respectively). Patients positive for anti-dsDNA antibodies had lower levels of MBL in plasma than patients negative for anti-dsDNA antibodies (P = 0.02). In a cross-sectional cohort of SLE patients, we found differences in the plasma concentrations of CL-L1, CL-K1, M-ficolin and H-ficolin compared to a group of healthy controls. Alterations in plasma concentrations of the PRMs of the lectin pathway in SLE patients and associations to key elements of the disease support the hypothesis that the lectin pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:26154564

  19. CD45-mediated signaling pathway is involved in Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL)-induced proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion in human PBMC

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Radha; Eligar, Sachin M.; Kumar, Natesh; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.; Swamy, Bale M.; Shastry, Padma

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL, a potent mitogenic and complex N-glycan specific lectin binds to CD45 on PBMC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL triggers CD45-mediated signaling involved in activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of CD45 PTPase signaling blocks RBL-induced ZAP70 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL-CD45 mediated signaling is crucial for RBL-induced immunodulatory activities. -- Abstract: We earlier reported the mitogenic and immunostimulatory activities of Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), purified from phytopathogenic fungus R. bataticola in human PBMC. The lectin demonstrates specificity towards glycoproteins containing complex N-glycans. Since CD45-protein tyrosine phosphatase that abundantly expresses N-glycans is important in T-cell signaling, the study aimed to investigate the involvement of CD45 in the immunomodulatory activities of RBL. Flowcytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that RBL exhibited binding to PBMC and colocalized with CD45. The binding was comparable in cells expressing different CD45 isoforms-RA, -RB and -RO. CD45 blocking antibody reduced the binding and proliferation of PBMC induced by RBL. CD45-PTPase inhibitor dephostatin inhibited RBL-induced proliferation, expression of CD25 and pZAP-70. RBL-induced secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines were significantly inhibited in presence of dephostatin. Also, dephostatin blocked phosphorylation of p38MAPK and STAT-5 that was crucial for the biological functions of RBL. The study demonstrates the involvement of CD45-mediated signaling in RBL-induced PBMC proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5.

  20. Collagen-binding Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecule (MSCRAMM) of Gram-positive Bacteria Inhibit Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mingsong; Ko, Ya-Ping; Liang, Xiaowen; Ross, Caná L.; Liu, Qing; Murray, Barbara E.; Höök, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Members of a family of collagen-binding microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) from Gram-positive bacteria are established virulence factors in several infectious diseases models. Here, we report that these adhesins also can bind C1q and act as inhibitors of the classical complement pathway. Molecular analyses of Cna from Staphylococcus aureus suggested that this prototype MSCRAMM bound to the collagenous domain of C1q and interfered with the interactions of C1r with C1q. As a result, C1r2C1s2 was displaced from C1q, and the C1 complex was deactivated. This novel function of the Cna-like MSCRAMMs represents a potential immune evasion strategy that could be used by numerous Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:23720782

  1. Murine Complement Interactions with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Their Consequences During Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Younger, John G.; Shankar-Sinha, Sunita; Mickiewicz, Marc; Brinkman, Adam S.; Valencia, Gabriel A.; Sarma, J. Vidya; Younkin, Ellen M.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Zetoune, Firas S.; Ward, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Complement is necessary for defense against lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice. We studied in vitro interactions between complement and P. aeruginosa and in vivo effects of complement depletion to better understand this relationship. In vitro, P. aeruginosa strain UI-18 was resistant to killing by mouse serum. However, C3 opsonized the organism (via the alternative and mannose binding lectin [MBL] pathways), and C5 convertase activity on the bacterial surface was demonstrated. In vivo, compared with normal mice, complement-deficient mice experienced higher mortality and failed to sterilize their bronchoalveolar space within 24 h of inoculation. These changes did not seem to be a result of decreased inflammation because complement-deficient mice had normal neutrophil recruitment, greater lung myeloperoxidase content, and, by 24 h, a 35-fold higher level of the CXC chemokine KC. Lung static pressure-volume curves were abnormal in infected animals but were significantly more so in complement deficient mice. These data indicate that although P. aeruginosa is resistant to serum killing, C3 opsonization and C5 convertase assembly occur on its surface. This interaction in vivo plays a central role in host survival beyond just recruitment and activation of phagocytes and may serve to limit the inflammatory response to and tissue injury resulting from bacterial infection. PMID:14500254

  2. Complement activation by ligand-driven juxtaposition of discrete pattern recognition complexes.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Kjaer, Troels R; Kidmose, Rune T; Jensen, Lisbeth; Hansen, Annette G; Tekin, Mustafa; Jensenius, Jens C; Andersen, Gregers R; Thiel, Steffen

    2014-09-16

    Defining mechanisms governing translation of molecular binding events into immune activation is central to understanding immune function. In the lectin pathway of complement, the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins complexed with the MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-2 cleave C4 and C2 to generate C3 convertase. MASP-1 was recently found to be the exclusive activator of MASP-2 under physiological conditions, yet the predominant oligomeric forms of MBL carry only a single MASP homodimer. This prompted us to investigate whether activation of MASP-2 by MASP-1 occurs through PRM-driven juxtaposition on ligand surfaces. We demonstrate that intercomplex activation occurs between discrete PRM/MASP complexes. PRM ligand binding does not directly escort the transition of MASP from zymogen to active enzyme in the PRM/MASP complex; rather, clustering of PRM/MASP complexes directly causes activation. Our results support a clustering-based mechanism of activation, fundamentally different from the conformational model suggested for the classical pathway of complement. PMID:25197071

  3. Complement activation by ligand-driven juxtaposition of discrete pattern recognition complexes

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Kjaer, Troels R.; Kidmose, Rune T.; Jensen, Lisbeth; Hansen, Annette G.; Tekin, Mustafa; Jensenius, Jens C.; Andersen, Gregers R.; Thiel, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Defining mechanisms governing translation of molecular binding events into immune activation is central to understanding immune function. In the lectin pathway of complement, the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins complexed with the MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-2 cleave C4 and C2 to generate C3 convertase. MASP-1 was recently found to be the exclusive activator of MASP-2 under physiological conditions, yet the predominant oligomeric forms of MBL carry only a single MASP homodimer. This prompted us to investigate whether activation of MASP-2 by MASP-1 occurs through PRM-driven juxtaposition on ligand surfaces. We demonstrate that intercomplex activation occurs between discrete PRM/MASP complexes. PRM ligand binding does not directly escort the transition of MASP from zymogen to active enzyme in the PRM/MASP complex; rather, clustering of PRM/MASP complexes directly causes activation. Our results support a clustering-based mechanism of activation, fundamentally different from the conformational model suggested for the classical pathway of complement. PMID:25197071

  4. Complement Factor C4d Is a Common Denominator in Thrombotic Microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Chua, Jamie S; Baelde, Hans J; Zandbergen, Malu; Wilhelmus, Suzanne; van Es, Leendert A; de Fijter, Johan W; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Cohen, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Complement activation has a major role in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), a disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical conditions. Promising results of recent trials with terminal complement-inhibiting drugs call for biomarkers identifying patients who might benefit from this treatment. The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and localization of complement factor C4d in kidneys of patients with TMA. The secondary aims were to determine which complement pathways lead to C4d deposition and to determine whether complement activation results in deposition of the terminal complement complex. We examined 42 renal sections with histologically confirmed TMA obtained from a heterogeneous patient group. Deposits of C4d, mannose-binding lectin, C1q, IgM, and C5b-9 were scored in the glomeruli, peritubular capillaries, and arterioles. Notably, C4d deposits were present in 88.1% of TMA cases, and the various clinical conditions had distinct staining patterns within the various compartments of the renal vasculature. Classical pathway activation was observed in 90.5% of TMA cases. C5b-9 deposits were present in 78.6% of TMA cases and in 39.6% of controls (n=53), but the staining pattern differed between cases and controls. In conclusion, C4d is a common finding in TMA, regardless of the underlying clinical condition. Moreover, C5b-9 was present in >75% of the TMA samples, suggesting that terminal complement inhibitors may have a beneficial effect in these patients. C4d and C5b-9 should be investigated as possible diagnostic biomarkers in the clinical work-up of patients suspected of having complement-mediated TMA. PMID:25573909

  5. Lectin and lectin-related proteins in lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.) seeds: biochemical and evolutionary studies.

    PubMed

    Sparvoli, F; Lanave, C; Santucci, A; Bollini, R; Lioi, L

    2001-03-01

    Lectin-related polypeptides are a class of defence proteins found in seeds of Phaseolus species. In Lima bean (P. lunatus), these proteins and their genes have been well characterized in the Andean morphotype, which represents one of the two gene pools of this species. To study the molecular evolution of the lectin family in Lima bean we characterized the polypeptides belonging to this multigene family and cloned the genes belonging to the Mesoamerican gene pool. The latter gene pool contains components similar to those of the Andean pool, namely: an amylase inhibitor-like (AIL), an arcelin-like (ARL) lectin and the less abundant Lima bean lectin (LBL). These proteins originate from an ancestor gene of the lectin type which duplicated to yield the lectin gene and the progenitor of ARL and AIL. In this species. ARL represents an evolutionary intermediate form that precedes AIL. Phylogenetic analysis supports an Andean origin for Lima bean. The molecular evolutionary studies were extended to the genes of common bean and demonstrated that true lectin genes and the ancestor of lectin-related genes are the result of a duplication event that occurred before speciation. Lima and common bean followed different evolutionary pathways and in the latter species a second duplication event occurred that gave rise, in Mesoamerican wild genotypes, to arcelin genes. PMID:11414617

  6. Inhibition of the alternative pathway of nonhuman infant complement by porin B2 contributes to virulence of Neisseria meningitidis in the infant rat model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lisa A; Vu, David M; Granoff, Dan M; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis utilizes capsular polysaccharide, lipooligosaccharide (LOS) sialic acid, factor H binding protein (fHbp), and neisserial surface protein A (NspA) to regulate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement. Using meningococcal mutants that lacked all four of the above-mentioned molecules (quadruple mutants), we recently identified a role for PorB2 in attenuating the human AP; inhibition was mediated by human fH, a key downregulatory protein of the AP. Previous studies showed that fH downregulation of the AP via fHbp or NspA is specific for human fH. Here, we report that PorB2-expressing quadruple mutants also regulate the AP of baby rabbit and infant rat complement. Blocking a human fH binding region on PorB2 of the quadruple mutant of strain 4243 with a chimeric protein that comprised human fH domains 6 and 7 fused to murine IgG Fc enhanced AP-mediated baby rabbit C3 deposition, which provided evidence for an fH-dependent mechanism of nonhuman AP regulation by PorB2. Using isogenic mutants of strain H44/76 that differed only in their PorB molecules, we confirmed a role for PorB2 in resistance to killing by infant rat serum. The PorB2-expressing strain also caused higher levels of bacteremia in infant rats than its isogenic PorB3-expressing counterpart, thus providing a molecular basis for increased survival of PorB2 isolates in this model. These studies link PorB2 expression with infection of infant rats, which could inform the choice of meningococcal strains for use in animal models, and reveals, for the first time, that PorB2-expressing strains of N. meningitidis regulate the AP of baby rabbits and rats. PMID:24686052

  7. Inhibition of the Alternative Pathway of Nonhuman Infant Complement by Porin B2 Contributes to Virulence of Neisseria meningitidis in the Infant Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Vu, David M.; Granoff, Dan M.; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis utilizes capsular polysaccharide, lipooligosaccharide (LOS) sialic acid, factor H binding protein (fHbp), and neisserial surface protein A (NspA) to regulate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement. Using meningococcal mutants that lacked all four of the above-mentioned molecules (quadruple mutants), we recently identified a role for PorB2 in attenuating the human AP; inhibition was mediated by human fH, a key downregulatory protein of the AP. Previous studies showed that fH downregulation of the AP via fHbp or NspA is specific for human fH. Here, we report that PorB2-expressing quadruple mutants also regulate the AP of baby rabbit and infant rat complement. Blocking a human fH binding region on PorB2 of the quadruple mutant of strain 4243 with a chimeric protein that comprised human fH domains 6 and 7 fused to murine IgG Fc enhanced AP-mediated baby rabbit C3 deposition, which provided evidence for an fH-dependent mechanism of nonhuman AP regulation by PorB2. Using isogenic mutants of strain H44/76 that differed only in their PorB molecules, we confirmed a role for PorB2 in resistance to killing by infant rat serum. The PorB2-expressing strain also caused higher levels of bacteremia in infant rats than its isogenic PorB3-expressing counterpart, thus providing a molecular basis for increased survival of PorB2 isolates in this model. These studies link PorB2 expression with infection of infant rats, which could inform the choice of meningococcal strains for use in animal models, and reveals, for the first time, that PorB2-expressing strains of N. meningitidis regulate the AP of baby rabbits and rats. PMID:24686052

  8. Degradation of Complement 3 by Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin B Inhibits Complement Activation and Neutrophil Opsonophagocytosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Tsao, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B), a cysteine protease, is an important virulence factor in group A streptococcus (GAS) infection. The inhibition of phagocytic activity by SPE B may help prevent bacteria from being ingested. In this study, we examined the mechanism SPE B uses to enable bacteria to resist opsonophagocytosis. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that SPE B-treated serum impaired the activation of the classical, the lectin, and the alternative complement pathways. In contrast, C192S, a SPE B mutant lacking protease activity, had no effect on complement activation. Further study showed that cleavage of serum C3 by SPE B, but not C192S, blocked zymosan-induced production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils as a result of decreased deposition of C3 fragments on the zymosan surface. Reconstitution of C3 into SPE B-treated serum unblocked zymosan-mediated neutrophil activation dose dependently. SPE B-treated, but not C192S-treated, serum also impaired opsonization of C3 fragments on the surface of GAS strain A20. Moreover, the amount of C3 fragments on the A20 cell surface, a SPE B-producing strain, was less than that on its isogenic mutant strain, SW507, after opsonization with normal serum. A20 opsonized with SPE B-treated serum was more resistant to neutrophil killing than A20 opsonized with normal serum, and SPE B-mediated resistance was C3 dependent. These results suggest a novel SPE B mechanism, one which degrades serum C3 and enables GAS to resist complement damage and opsonophagocytosis. PMID:18174338

  9. M. leprae components induce nerve damage by complement activation: identification of lipoarabinomannan as the dominant complement activator.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Das, Pranab K; Fluiter, Kees; Rosa, Patricia S; Vreijling, Jeroen; Troost, Dirk; Morgan, B Paul; Baas, Frank; Ramaglia, Valeria

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral nerve damage is the hallmark of leprosy pathology but its etiology is unclear. We previously identified the membrane attack complex (MAC) of the complement system as a key determinant of post-traumatic nerve damage and demonstrated that its inhibition is neuroprotective. Here, we determined the contribution of the MAC to nerve damage caused by Mycobacterium leprae and its components in mouse. Furthermore, we studied the association between MAC and the key M. leprae component lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in nerve biopsies of leprosy patients. Intraneural injections of M. leprae sonicate induced MAC deposition and pathological changes in the mouse nerve, whereas MAC inhibition preserved myelin and axons. Complement activation occurred mainly via the lectin pathway and the principal activator was LAM. In leprosy nerves, the extent of LAM and MAC immunoreactivity was robust and significantly higher in multibacillary compared to paucibacillary donors (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), with a highly significant association between LAM and MAC in the diseased samples (r = 0.9601, p = 0.0001). Further, MAC co-localized with LAM on axons, pointing to a role for this M. leprae antigen in complement activation and nerve damage in leprosy. Our findings demonstrate that MAC contributes to nerve damage in a model of M. leprae-induced nerve injury and its inhibition is neuroprotective. In addition, our data identified LAM as the key pathogen associated molecule that activates complement and causes nerve damage. Taken together our data imply an important role of complement in nerve damage in leprosy and may inform the development of novel therapeutics for patients. PMID:25772973

  10. Lectins: production and practical applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lectins are proteins found in a diversity of organisms. They possess the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes with known carbohydrate specificity since they have at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. This articles aims to review the production and practical applications of lectins. Lectins are isolated from their natural sources by chromatographic procedures or produced by recombinant DNA technology. The yields of animal lectins are usually low compared with the yields of plant lectins such as legume lectins. Lectins manifest a diversity of activities including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory, and anti-insect activities, which may find practical applications. A small number of lectins demonstrate antibacterial and anti-nematode activities. PMID:20890754

  11. Complement research in the 18th-21st centuries: Progress comes with new technology.

    PubMed

    Sim, R B; Schwaeble, W; Fujita, T

    2016-10-01

    The complement system has been studied for about 120 years. Progress in defining this large and complex system has been dependent on the research technologies available, but since the introduction of protein chromatography, electrophoresis, and antibody-based assay methods in the 1950s and 60s, and sequencing of proteins and DNA in the 70s and 80s, there has been very rapid accumulation of data. With more recent improvements in 3D structure determination (nmr and X-ray crystallography), the structures of most of the complement proteins have now been solved. Complement research since 1990 has been greatly stimulated by the discoveries of the multiple proteins in the lectin pathway, the strong association of Factor H, C3, Factor B allelic variants with adult macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, and the introduction of the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody as a therapy for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. Potential new roles for complement in tissue development and the search for novel therapeutics suggest a very active future for complement research. PMID:27371361

  12. Mild hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation in a swine model of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Zhao, Hong; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Ziren; Mei, Xue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has been implicated in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to determine whether mild hypothermia (HT) inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Sixteen minipigs resuscitated from 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation were randomized into two groups: HT group (n=8), treated with HT (33°C) for 12 hours; and normothermia group (n=8), treated similarly as HT group except for cooling. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 6, 12, and 24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The brain cortex was harvested 24 hours after ROSC. Complement and pro-inflammatory markers were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neurologic deficit scores were evaluated 24 hours after ROSC. C1q, Bb, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), C3b, C3a, C5a, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly increased under normothermia within 24 hours after ROSC. However, these increases were significantly reduced by HT. Hypothermia decreased brain C1q, MBL, C3b, and C5a contents 24 hours after ROSC. Hypothermic pigs had a better neurologic outcome than normothermic pigs. In conclusion, complement is activated through classic, alternative, and MBL pathways after ROSC. Hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation, which may provide an additional mechanism of cerebral protection. PMID:25757755

  13. Isolation of C4-binding protein from guinea pig plasma and demonstration of its function as a control protein of the classical complement pathway C3 convertase.

    PubMed

    Burge, J; Nicholson-Weller, A; Austen, K F

    1981-01-01

    A decay-accelerating factor of the classical complement pathway C3 convertase, C4b,2a, has been purified to homogeneity from guinea pig plasma by a 5-step procedure that includes 5% polyethyleneglycol-4000 (PEG-4000) precipitation, Sepharose 6B gel filtration, heparin-Sepharose chromatography, DE-52 anion exchange chromatography, and Sepharose-C4gp affinity chromatography. The protein elicited a monospecific antiserum in a rabbit and was found with the Mancini technique in both normal and C4-deficient guinea pig plasma at a concentration of 60 microgram/ml. The purified protein gave a single stained band of 550,000 m.w. on SDS-PAGE under nonreducing conditions and a single band of 72,000 m.w. with reduction and alkylation. On the basis of its m.w. and subunit structure, ability to bind to a C4 affinity column, and ability to regulate the classical C system by accelerating the decay of the classical C3 convertase this protein represents the guinea pig analog of the human C4-binding protein. PMID:6778916

  14. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar Calreticulin: Inhibition of Classical Complement Pathway and Differences in the Level of Expression in Amoebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ximénez, Cecilia; González, Enrique; Nieves, Miriam E.; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; García de León, Ma del Carmen; Morán, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Rojas, Liliana; Hernández, Eric G.; Partida, Oswaldo; Cerritos, René

    2014-01-01

    The role of calreticulin (CRT) in host-parasite interactions has recently become an important area of research. Information about the functions of calreticulin and its relevance to the physiology of Entamoeba parasites is limited. The present work demonstrates that CRT of both pathogenic E. histolytica and nonpathogenic E. dispar species specifically interacted with human C1q inhibiting the activation of the classical complement pathway. Using recombinant EhCRT protein, we demonstrate that CRT interaction site and human C1q is located at the N-terminal region of EhCRT. The immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy experiments show that CRT and human C1q colocalize in the cytoplasmic vesicles and near to the surface membrane of previously permeabilized trophozoites or are incubated with normal human serum which is known to destroy trophozoites. In the presence of peripheral mononuclear blood cells, the distribution of EhCRT and C1q is clearly over the surface membrane of trophozoites. Nevertheless, the level of expression of CRT in situ in lesions of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in the hamster model is different in both Entamoeba species; this molecule is expressed in higher levels in E. histolytica than in E. dispar. This result suggests that EhCRT may modulate some functions during the early moments of the host-parasite relationship. PMID:24860808

  15. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25569520

  16. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    PubMed

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interactions suggesting of their use in diverse areas of glycobiology. PMID:26945504

  17. Unbiased expression mapping identifies a link between the complement and cholinergic systems in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Rickard P F; Ström, Mikael; Heinig, Matthias; Al Nimer, Faiez; Aeinehband, Shahin; Berg, Alexander; Dominguez, Cecilia A; Vijayaraghavan, Swetha; Zhang, Xing-Mei; Harnesk, Karin; Zelano, Johan; Hübner, Norbert; Cullheim, Staffan; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Diez, Margarita; Piehl, Fredrik

    2014-02-01

    The complement system is activated in a wide spectrum of CNS diseases and is suggested to play a role in degenerative phenomena such as elimination of synaptic terminals. Still, little is known of mechanisms regulating complement activation in the CNS. Loss of synaptic terminals in the spinal cord after an experimental nerve injury is increased in the inbred DA strain compared with the PVG strain and is associated with expression of the upstream complement components C1q and C3, in the absence of membrane attack complex activation and neutrophil infiltration. To further dissect pathways regulating complement expression, we performed genome-wide expression profiling and linkage analysis in a large F2(DA × PVG) intercross, which identified quantitative trait loci regulating expression of C1qa, C1qb, C3, and C9. Unlike C1qa, C1qb, and C9, which all displayed distinct coregulation with different cis-regulated C-type lectins, C3 was regulated in a coexpression network immediately downstream of butyrylcholinesterase. Butyrylcholinesterase hydrolyses acetylcholine, which exerts immunoregulatory effects partly through TNF-α pathways. Accordingly, increased C3, but not C1q, expression was demonstrated in rat and mouse glia following TNF-α stimulation, which was abrogated in a dose-dependent manner by acetylcholine. These findings demonstrate new pathways regulating CNS complement expression using unbiased mapping in an experimental in vivo system. A direct link between cholinergic activity and complement activation is supported by in vitro experiments. The identification of distinct pathways subjected to regulation by naturally occurring genetic variability is of relevance for the understanding of disease mechanisms in neurologic conditions characterized by neuronal injury and complement activation. PMID:24353269

  18. Effect of the extract of the tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit on the complement system: studies in vitro and in hamsters submitted to a cholesterol-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Landi Librandi, Ana Paula; Chrysóstomo, Taís Nader; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Recchia, Carem Gledes Vargas; Uyemura, Sérgio Akira; de Assis-Pandochi, Ana Isabel

    2007-08-01

    This work evaluated a crude hydroalcoholic extract (ExT) from the pulp of the tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit as a source of compounds active on the complement system (CS) in vitro. ExT, previously characterized by other authors, had time and concentration dependent effects on the lytic activity of the CS. The activity of 0.8 mg/mL of the extract on the classical/lectin pathways (CP/LP) increased after 30 min of pre-incubation, while that of the alternative pathway (AP) decreased after 15 min at 1mg/mL. Since the CS is a mediator of inflammation, studies were also made in vivo, taking advantage of a model of hypercholesterolemia in hamsters to investigate the role of CS in the phase preceding the inflammatory process of atherosclerosis. Hamsters submitted to a diet rich in cholesterol showed increased lytic activity of the CP/LP and AP after 45 days. The activity levels of C2 and factor B components on respectively, classical/lectin and alternative pathways of the CS also increased. Early events cooperating to trigger the process of atherosclerotic lesions are not completely understood, and these alterations of complement may participate in these events. When treatment with a diet rich in cholesterol was associated to the furnishing of ExT, evaluation of complement components and complement lytic activity showed values similar to those of the controls, showing that treatment with ExT blocked the increase of complement activity caused by the cholesterol-rich diet. By itself, ExT had no effect on the complement system in vivo. ExT activity on the CS may be of interest for therapy and research purposes. PMID:17383788

  19. The Role of Complement in Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis and Immune Challenge in the Sea Anemone Aiptasia pallida.

    PubMed

    Poole, Angela Z; Kitchen, Sheila A; Weis, Virginia M

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an innate immune pathway that in vertebrates, is responsible for initial recognition and ultimately phagocytosis and destruction of microbes. Several complement molecules including C3, Factor B, and mannose binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASP) have been characterized in invertebrates and while most studies have focused on their conserved role in defense against pathogens, little is known about their role in managing beneficial microbes. The purpose of this study was to (1) characterize complement pathway genes in the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida, (2) investigate the evolution of complement genes in invertebrates, and (3) examine the potential dual role of complement genes Factor B and MASP in the onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge using qPCR based studies. The results demonstrate that A. pallida has multiple Factor B genes (Ap_Bf-1, Ap_Bf-2a, and Ap_Bf-2b) and one MASP gene (Ap_MASP). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the evolutionary history of complement genes is complex, and there have been many gene duplications or gene loss events, even within members of the same phylum. Gene expression analyses revealed a potential role for complement in both onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge. Specifically, Ap_Bf-1 and Ap_MASP are significantly upregulated in the light at the onset of symbiosis and in response to challenge with the pathogen Serratia marcescens suggesting that they play a role in the initial recognition of both beneficial and harmful microbes. Ap_Bf-2b in contrast, was generally downregulated during the onset and maintenance of symbiosis and in response to challenge with S. marcescens. Therefore, the exact role of Ap_Bf-2b in response to microbes remains unclear, but the results suggest that the presence of microbes leads to repressed expression. Together, these results indicate functional divergence between Ap_Bf-1

  20. The Role of Complement in Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis and Immune Challenge in the Sea Anemone Aiptasia pallida

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Angela Z.; Kitchen, Sheila A.; Weis, Virginia M.

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an innate immune pathway that in vertebrates, is responsible for initial recognition and ultimately phagocytosis and destruction of microbes. Several complement molecules including C3, Factor B, and mannose binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASP) have been characterized in invertebrates and while most studies have focused on their conserved role in defense against pathogens, little is known about their role in managing beneficial microbes. The purpose of this study was to (1) characterize complement pathway genes in the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida, (2) investigate the evolution of complement genes in invertebrates, and (3) examine the potential dual role of complement genes Factor B and MASP in the onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge using qPCR based studies. The results demonstrate that A. pallida has multiple Factor B genes (Ap_Bf-1, Ap_Bf-2a, and Ap_Bf-2b) and one MASP gene (Ap_MASP). Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the evolutionary history of complement genes is complex, and there have been many gene duplications or gene loss events, even within members of the same phylum. Gene expression analyses revealed a potential role for complement in both onset and maintenance of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and immune challenge. Specifically, Ap_Bf-1 and Ap_MASP are significantly upregulated in the light at the onset of symbiosis and in response to challenge with the pathogen Serratia marcescens suggesting that they play a role in the initial recognition of both beneficial and harmful microbes. Ap_Bf-2b in contrast, was generally downregulated during the onset and maintenance of symbiosis and in response to challenge with S. marcescens. Therefore, the exact role of Ap_Bf-2b in response to microbes remains unclear, but the results suggest that the presence of microbes leads to repressed expression. Together, these results indicate functional divergence between Ap_Bf-1

  1. Lectin-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection via soluble and transmembrane C-type lectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Brudner, Matthew; Karpel, Marshall; Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M Reza; Eisen, Damon P; Mungall, Bruce A; Kotton, Darrell N; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L; Ezekowitz, Alan B; Spear, Gregory T; Olinger, Gene G; Schmidt, Emmett V; Michelow, Ian C

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  2. Lectin-Dependent Enhancement of Ebola Virus Infection via Soluble and Transmembrane C-type Lectin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L. Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M. Reza; Eisen, Damon P.; Mungall, Bruce A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L.; Ezekowitz, Alan B.; Spear, Gregory T.; Olinger, Gene G.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Michelow, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  3. A Serine Protease Isolated from the Bristles of the Amazonic Caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, Is a Potent Complement System Activator

    PubMed Central

    Villas Boas, Isadora Maria; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called “Pararamose”, characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa’s bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system. Results The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly

  4. Microencapsulation of lectin anti-cancer agent and controlled release by alginate beads, biosafety approach.

    PubMed

    El-Aassar, M R; Hafez, Elsayed E; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered as one of the most aggressive cancer worldwide. In Egypt, the prevalence of HCC is increasing during last years. Recently, drug-loaded microparticles were used to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. This study is designed to evaluate the anticancer potentialities of lectins against HCC while hinting to its safety usage. The aim is also extended to encapsulate lectins in alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery purposes. The extracted lectins showed anti-proliferative effect against HCC with a percentage of 60.76% by using its nontoxic dose with an up-regulation of P53 gene expression. Concerning the handling of lectin alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery, the prepared lectin alginate beads were ∼100μm in diameter. The efficiency of the microcapsules was checked by scanning electron microscopy, the SEM showed the change on the alginate beads surface revealing the successful lectin encapsulation. The release of lectins from the microbeads depended on a variety of factors as the microbeads forming carriers and the amount-encapsulated lectins. The Pisum sativum extracted lectins may be considered as a promising agent in controlling HCC and this solid dosage form could be suitable for oral administration complemented with/or without the standard HCC drugs. PMID:24857870

  5. The collectins CL-L1, CL-K1 and CL-P1, and their roles in complement and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Soren W K; Ohtani, Katsuki; Roy, Nitai; Wakamiya, Nobutaka

    2016-10-01

    Both the complement system and collectins play important roles in our innate immune system. The collectins, which are characterized by their inclusion of a collagen-like region and a calcium-dependent carbohydrate recognition domain, are pattern recognition molecules and include the well characterized proteins mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the surfactant proteins SP-A/-D. Collectin liver 1 (CL-L1), collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1) and collectin placenta 1 (CL-P1) are the most recently discovered collectins. Although their function is still under investigation, accumulating information suggests that CL-L1, CL-K1 and CL-P1 play important roles in host defense by recognizing a variety of microorganisms and interacting with effector proteins, including complement components. The recent establishment of the existence of CL-K1 in the circulation in form of heteromeric complexes with CL-L1 (known as CL-LK) and its activation of the lectin pathway via MASPs, drew new attention in the complement biology, which was further strengthened by the observed interactions between CL-P1 and CRP-C1q-factor H or properdin. Deficiency of either CL-K1 or MASP-3 has been demonstrated in 3MC syndrome patients with developmental abnormalities, showing that lectin pathway components, regulation and/or activation are essential during the embryonic development; another feature that they most likely share CL-P1. Herein, we discuss the recent characteristics and roles of the collectins CL-L1, CL-K1 and CL-P1 in the complement system, in innate immunity and their possible association with disease development and pathogenesis. PMID:27377710

  6. Model-Driven Redox Pathway Manipulation for Improved Isobutanol Production in Bacillus subtilis Complemented with Experimental Validation and Metabolic Profiling Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Haishan; Li, Shanshan; Zhao, Sumin; Huang, Di; Xia, Menglei; Wen, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    To rationally guide the improvement of isobutanol production, metabolic network and metabolic profiling analysis were performed to provide global and profound insights into cell metabolism of isobutanol-producing Bacillus subtilis. The metabolic flux distribution of strains with different isobutanol production capacity (BSUL03, BSUL04 and BSUL05) drops a hint of the importance of NADPH on isobutanol biosynthesis. Therefore, the redox pathways were redesigned in this study. To increase NADPH concentration, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase was inactivated (BSUL06) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was overexpressed (BSUL07) successively. As expected, NADPH pool size in BSUL07 was 4.4-fold higher than that in parental strain BSUL05. However, cell growth, isobutanol yield and production were decreased by 46%, 22%, and 80%, respectively. Metabolic profiling analysis suggested that the severely imbalanced redox status might be the primary reason. To solve this problem, gene udhA of Escherichia coli encoding transhydrogenase was further overexpressed (BSUL08), which not only well balanced the cellular ratio of NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+, but also increased NADH and ATP concentration. In addition, a straightforward engineering approach for improving NADPH concentrations was employed in BSUL05 by overexpressing exogenous gene pntAB and obtained BSUL09. The performance for isobutanol production by BSUL09 was poorer than BSUL08 but better than other engineered strains. Furthermore, in fed-batch fermentation the isobutanol production and yield of BSUL08 increased by 11% and 19%, up to the value of 6.12 g/L and 0.37 C-mol isobutanol/C-mol glucose (63% of the theoretical value), respectively, compared with parental strain BSUL05. These results demonstrated that model-driven complemented with metabolic profiling analysis could serve as a useful approach in the strain improvement for higher bio-productivity in further application. PMID:24705866

  7. A New Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for In Vitro Screening of Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stravalaci, Matteo; De Blasio, Daiana; Orsini, Franca; Perego, Carlo; Palmioli, Alessandro; Goti, Giulio; Bernardi, Anna; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Gobbi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a circulating protein that acts as a soluble pattern recognition molecule of the innate immunity. It binds to carbohydrate patterns on the surface of pathogens or of altered self-cells, with activation of the lectin pathway of the complement system. Recent evidence indicates that MBL contributes to the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion injury and other conditions. Thus, MBL inhibitors offer promising therapeutic strategies, since they prevent the interaction of MBL with its target sugar arrays. We developed and characterized a novel assay based on surface plasmon resonance for in vitro screening of these compounds, which may be useful before the more expensive and time-consuming in vivo studies. The assay measures the inhibitor's ability to interfere with the binding of murine MBL-A or MBL-C, or of human recombinant MBL, to mannose residues immobilized on the sensor chip surface. We have applied the assay to measure the IC50 of synthetic glycodendrimers, two of them with neuroprotective properties in animal models of MBL-mediated injuries. PMID:26969323

  8. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Modifies Lysine Residues to Facilitate Oligomerization of Mannan-Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Risteli, Maija; Ruotsalainen, Heli; Bergmann, Ulrich; Venkatraman Girija, Umakhanth; Wallis, Russell; Myllylä, Raili

    2014-01-01

    Lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3) is a multifunctional protein with lysyl hydroxylase, galactosyltransferase and glucosyltransferase activities. The LH3 has been shown to modify the lysine residues both in collagens and also in some collagenous proteins. In this study we show for the first time that LH3 is essential for catalyzing formation of the glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysines of mannan-binding lectin (MBL), the first component of the lectin pathway of complement activation. Furthermore, loss of the terminal glucose units on the derivatized lysine residues in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the LH3 protein leads to defective disulphide bonding and oligomerization of rat MBL-A, with a decrease in the proportion of the larger functional MBL oligomers. The oligomerization could be completely restored with the full length LH3 or the amino-terminal fragment of LH3 that possesses the glycosyltransferase activities. Our results confirm that LH3 is the only enzyme capable of glucosylating the galactosylhydroxylysine residues in proteins with a collagenous domain. In mice lacking the lysyl hydroxylase activity of LH3, but with untouched galactosyltransferase and glucosyltransferase activities, reduced circulating MBL-A levels were observed. Oligomerization was normal, however and residual lysyl hydroxylation was compensated in part by other lysyl hydroxylase isoenzymes. Our data suggest that LH3 is commonly involved in biosynthesis of collagenous proteins and the glucosylation of galactosylhydroxylysines residues by LH3 is crucial for the formation of the functional high-molecular weight MBL oligomers. PMID:25419660

  9. Lectin from Abelmoschus esculentus reduces zymosan-induced temporomandibular joint inflammatory hypernociception in rats via heme oxygenase-1 pathway integrity and tnf-α and il-1β suppression.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Raul Sousa; do Val, Danielle Rocha; Fernandes, Maria Ester Frota; Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; de Lacerda, José Thalles Jocelino Gomes; SantiGadelha, Tatiane; de Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto; de Paulo Teixeira Pinto, Vicente; Cristino-Filho, Gerardo; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders show inflammatory components, heavily impacting on quality of life. Abelmoschus esculentus is largely cultivated in Northeastern Brazil for medicinal purposes, having it shown anti-inflammatory activity. We evaluated A. esculentus lectin (AEL) efficacy in reducing zymosan-induced temporomandibular joint inflammatory hypernociception in rats along with the mechanism of action through which it exerts anti-inflammatory activity. Animals were pre-treated with AEL (0.01, 0.1 or 1mg/kg) before zymosan (Zy) injection in the TMJ to determine anti-inflammatory activity. To analyse the possible effect of the hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and the nitric oxide (NO) pathways on AEL efficacy, animals were pre-treated with ZnPP-IX (3mg/kg), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, or aminoguanidine (30mg/kg), a selective iNOS inhibitor, before AEL administration. Von Frey test evaluated inflammatory hypernociception, synovial fluid collection was performed to determine leukocyte counting and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity 6h after Zy injection, and Evans Blue extravasation determined vascular permeability. TMJ tissue was collected for histopathological analysis (H&E) and immunohistochemistry (TNF-α, IL-1β, HO-1). In addition, TMJ tissue and trigeminal ganglion collection was performed for TNF-α and IL-1β dosage (ELISA). AEL increased inflammatory nociceptive threshold, reduced leukocyte influx along with MPO activity, leukocyte influx into the synovial membrane, and Evans Blue extravasation. It promoted HO-1 overexpression whilst decreased TNF-α and IL-1β expression in the TMJ tissue. AEL reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels in TMJ tissue and trigeminal ganglion. AEL effects, however, were not observed in the presence of ZnPP-IX. These findings suggest that AEL efficacy depends on TNF-α/IL-1β inhibition and HO-1 pathway integrity. PMID:27344040

  10. Specificity analysis of lectins and antibodies using remodeled glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Iskratsch, Thomas; Braun, Andreas; Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2009-03-15

    Due to their ability to bind specifically to certain carbohydrate sequences, lectins are a frequently used tool in cytology, histology, and glycan analysis but also offer new options for drug targeting and drug delivery systems. For these and other potential applications, it is necessary to be certain as to the carbohydrate structures interacting with the lectin. Therefore, we used glycoproteins remodeled with glycosyltransferases and glycosidases for testing specificities of lectins from Aleuria aurantia (AAL), Erythrina cristagalli (ECL), Griffonia simplicifolia (GSL I-B(4)), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Lens culinaris (LCA), Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA), peanut (Arachis hypogaeae) (PNA), Ricinus communis (RCA I), Sambucus nigra (SNA), Vicia villosa (VVA), and wheat germ (Triticum vulgaris) (WGA) as well as reactivities of anti-carbohydrate antibodies (anti-bee venom, anti-horseradish peroxidase [anti-HRP], and anti-Lewis(x)). After enzymatic remodeling, the resulting neoglycoforms display defined carbohydrate sequences and can be used, when spotted on nitrocellulose or in enzyme-linked lectinosorbent assays, to identify the sugar moieties bound by the lectins. Transferrin with its two biantennary complex N-glycans was used as scaffold for gaining diverse N-glycosidic structures, whereas fetuin was modified using glycosidases to test the specificities of lectins toward both N- and O-glycans. In addition, alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and Schistosoma mansoni egg extract were chosen as controls for lectin interactions with fucosylated glycans (Lewis(x) and core alpha1,3-fucose). Our data complement and expand the existing knowledge about the binding specificity of a range of commercially available lectins. PMID:19123999

  11. Antagonism of the complement component C4 by flavivirus nonstructural protein NS1

    PubMed Central

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Fuchs, Anja; Hauhart, Richard E.; Somnuke, Pawit; Youn, Soonjeon

    2010-01-01

    The complement system plays an essential protective role in the initial defense against many microorganisms. Flavivirus NS1 is a secreted nonstructural glycoprotein that accumulates in blood, is displayed on the surface of infected cells, and has been hypothesized to have immune evasion functions. Herein, we demonstrate that dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), and yellow fever virus (YFV) NS1 attenuate classical and lectin pathway activation by directly interacting with C4. Binding of NS1 to C4 reduced C4b deposition and C3 convertase (C4b2a) activity. Although NS1 bound C4b, it lacked intrinsic cofactor activity to degrade C4b, and did not block C3 convertase formation or accelerate decay of the C3 and C5 convertases. Instead, NS1 enhanced C4 cleavage by recruiting and activating the complement-specific protease C1s. By binding C1s and C4 in a complex, NS1 promotes efficient degradation of C4 to C4b. Through this mechanism, NS1 protects DENV from complement-dependent neutralization in solution. These studies define a novel immune evasion mechanism for restricting complement control of microbial infection. PMID:20308361

  12. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270074

  13. Complement activation and cytokine response by BioProtein, a bacterial single cell protein.

    PubMed

    Sikkeland, L I B; Thorgersen, E B; Haug, T; Mollnes, T E

    2007-04-01

    The bacterial single cell protein (BSCP), BioProtein, is dried bacterial mass derived from fermentation of the gram negative bacteria Methylococcus capsulatus, used for animal and fish feed. Workers in this industry suffer frequently from pulmonary and systemic symptoms which may be induced by an inflammatory reaction. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of BSCP on inflammation in vitro as evaluated by complement activation and cytokine production. Human serum was incubated with BSCP and complement activation products specific for all pathways were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Human whole blood anti-coagulated with lepirudin was incubated with BSCP and a panel of 27 biological mediators was measured using multiplex technology. BSCP induced a dose-dependent complement activation as revealed by a pronounced increase in alternative and terminal pathway activation (fivefold and 20-fold, respectively) at doses from 1 microg BSCP/ml serum and a similar, but less extensive (two- to fourfold) increase in activation of the lectin and classical pathways at doses from 100 and 1000 microg BSCP/ml serum, respectively. Similarly, BSCP induced a dose-dependent production of a number of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in human whole blood. At doses as low as 0 x 05-0 x 5 microg BSCP/ml blood a substantial increase was seen for tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1-beta, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, IL-4, IL-9, IL-17, IL-1Ra, granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thus, BSCP induced a substantial activation of all three initial complement pathways as well as a pronounced cytokine response in vitro, indicating a potent inflammatory property of this agent. PMID:17302729

  14. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  15. Glycan and lectin biosensors.

    PubMed

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Tkáč, Ján

    2016-06-30

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  16. Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibits the Motility of Pathogenic Salmonella by Affecting the Driving Forces of Motility and the Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Guo, Yijie; Ihara, Kohei; Tomioka, Rintaro; Masuda, Mizuki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key pattern recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system, an important component of innate immunity. MBL functions as an opsonin which enhances the sequential immune process such as phagocytosis. We here report an inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of pathogenic bacteria, which occurs by affecting the energy source required for motility and the signaling pathway of chemotaxis. When Salmonella cells were treated with a physiological concentration of MBL, their motile fraction and free-swimming speed decreased. Rotation assays of a single flagellum showed that the flagellar rotation rate was significantly reduced by the addition of MBL. Measurements of the intracellular pH and membrane potential revealed that MBL affected a driving force for the Salmonella flagellum, the electrochemical potential difference of protons. We also found that MBL treatment increased the reversal frequency of Salmonella flagellar rotation, which interfered with the relative positive chemotaxis toward an attractive substrate. We thus propose that the motility inhibition effect of MBL may be secondarily involved in the attack against pathogens, potentially facilitating the primary role of MBL in the complement system. PMID:27104738

  17. Characterization of the human submandibular/sublingual saliva glycoproteome using lectin affinity chromatography coupled to Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Lu, Bingwen; Liao, Lujian; Xu, Tao; Bedi, Gurrinder; Melvin, James E.; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth analysis of the salivary proteome is fundamental to understanding the functions of salivary proteins in the oral cavity and to reveal disease biomarkers involved in different pathophysiological conditions, with the ultimate goal of improving patient diagnosis and prognosis. Submandibular and sublingual glands contribute saliva rich in glycoproteins to the total saliva output, making them valuable sources for glycoproteomic analysis. Lectin-affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics was used to explore the submandibular/sublingual (SM/SL) saliva glycoproteome. A total of 262 N- and O-linked glycoproteins were identified by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Only 38 were previously described in SM and SL salivas from the human salivary N-linked glycoproteome, while 224 were unique. Further comparison analysis with SM/SL saliva of the human saliva proteome, revealed 125 glycoproteins not formerly reported in this secretion. KEGG pathway analyses demonstrated that many of these glycoproteins are involved in processes such as complement and coagulation cascades, cell communication, glycosphingolipid biosynthesis neo-lactoseries, O-glycan biosynthesis, glycan structures-biosynthesis 2, starch and sucrose metabolism, peptidoglycan biosynthesis or others pathways. In summary, lectin-affinity chromatography coupled to MudPIT mass spectrometry identified many novel glycoproteins in SM/SL saliva. These new additions to the salivary proteome may prove to be a critical step for providing reliable biomarkers in the diagnosis of a myriad of oral and systemic diseases. PMID:21936497

  18. The C-Type Lectin OCILRP2 Costimulates EL4 T Cell Activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guangchao; Ma, Yuanfang

    2014-01-01

    OCILRP2 is a typical Type-II transmembrane protein that is selectively expressed in activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and B cells and functions as a novel co-stimulator of T cell activation. However, the signaling pathways underlying OCILRP2 in T cell activation are still not completely understood. In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability and IL-2 production, inhibit Raf1, MAPK3, and MAPK8 activation, and impair NFAT and NF-κB transcriptional activities. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation results indicated that OCILRP2 could interact with the DAP12 protein, an adaptor containing an intracellular ITAM motif that can transduce signals to induce MAP kinase activation for T cell activation. Our data reveal that after binding with DAP12, OCILRP2 activates the Raf-MAP kinase pathways, resulting in T cell activation. PMID:25411776

  19. Serum levels, ontogeny and heritability of chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL).

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, S B; Hedemand, J E; Nielsen, O L; Thiel, S; Koch, C; Jensenius, J C

    1998-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum lectin found in mammals and recently also in birds. It is thought to play an important role in the innate immune defence through binding to surface carbohydrates on micro-organisms followed by complement activation via the MBL pathway. This results in opsonization or direct complement-mediated killing. To gain further knowledge about the physiology and function of the protein, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for chicken MBL and used this to investigate the level of MBL in different chicken strains during embryogenesis, early and adult life. The MBL concentrations in 308 chickens, representing 14 different strains, showed a non-Gaussian, unimodal distribution profile with a mean concentration of 5.8 micrograms/ml (range 0.4-37.8 micrograms/ml). No difference between the strains could be demonstrated and no chickens were found deficient in MBL. Ontogenetic studies showed that MBL is already detectable in embryos at a gestational age of 10 days (11 days before hatching). At hatching, the level is comparable to the level found in adult chickens. This level is fairly stable during the first weeks of life, but a deficiency state develops at 4 weeks of age, whereafter the level is normalized again at 5 weeks of age. Chickens with relatively low or high MBL levels were bred with cockerels having similar MBL levels and this resulted in F1 generations with significantly different MBL levels, suggesting that the protein level is genetically influenced. PMID:9767449

  20. Complement fixation by rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Cooper, N R; Johnson, J S; Vaughan, J H

    1975-01-01

    The capacity for fixation and activation of hemolytic complement by polyclonal IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) isolated from sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and monoclonal IgM-RF isolated from the cryoprecipitates of patients with IgM-IgG mixed cryoglobulinemia was examined. RF mixed with aggregated, reduced, and alkylated human IgG (Agg-R/A-IgG) in the fluid phase failed to significantly reduce the level of total hemolytic complement, CH50, or of individual complement components, C1, C2, C3, and C5. However, sheep erythrocytes (SRC) coated with Agg-R/A-IgG or with reduced and alkylated rabbit IgG anti-SRC antibody were hemolyzed by complement in the presence of polyclonal IgM-RF. Human and guinea pig complement worked equally well. The degree of hemolysis was in direct proportion to the hemagglutination titer of the RF against the same coated cells. Monoclonal IgM-RF, normal human IgM, and purified Waldenström macroglobulins without antiglobulin activity were all inert. Hemolysis of coated SRC by RF and complement was inhibited by prior treatment of the complement source with chelating agents, hydrazine, cobra venom factor, specific antisera to C1q, CR, C5, C6, or C8, or by heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Purified radiolabeled C4, C3, and C8 included in the complement source were bound to hemolysed SRC in direct proportion to the degree of hemolysis. These data indicate that polyclonal IgM-RF fix and activate complement via the classic pathway. The system described for assessing complement fixation by isolated RF is readily adaptable to use with whole human serum. PMID:1078825

  1. Characterization and expression analysis of a complement component gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Dong, Ying; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-12-01

    The complement system plays a crucial role in the innate immune system of animals. It can be activated by distinct yet overlapping classical, alternative and lectin pathways. In the alternative pathway, complement factor B (Bf) serves as the catalytic subunit of complement component 3 (C3) convertase, which plays the central role among three activation pathways. In this study, the Bf gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus), termed AjBf, was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of AjBf was 3231 bp in length barring the poly (A) tail. It contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2742 bp encoding 913 amino acids, a 105 bp 5'-UTR (5'-terminal untranslated region) and a 384 bp 3'-UTR. AjBf was a mosaic protein with six CCP (complement control protein) domains, a VWA (von Willebrand factor A) domain, and a serine protease domain. The deduced molecular weight of AjBf protein was 101 kDa. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expression level of AjBf in A. japonicus was obviously higher at larval stage than that at embryonic stage. Expression detection in different tissues showed that AjBf expressed higher in coelomocytes than in other four tissues. In addation, AjBf expression in different tissues was induced significantly after LPS or PolyI:C challenge. These results indicated that AjBf plays an important role in immune responses to pathogen infection.

  2. The outer membrane protease PgtE of Salmonella enterica interferes with the alternative complement pathway by cleaving factors B and H.

    PubMed

    Riva, Rauna; Korhonen, Timo K; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The virulence factor PgtE is an outer membrane protease (omptin) of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella enterica that causes diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to severe enteric fever. It is surface exposed in bacteria that have a short-chain, i.e., rough LPS, as observed e.g., in bacteria residing inside macrophages or just emerging from them. We investigated whether PgtE cleaves the complement factors B (B) and H (H), key proteins controlling formation and inactivation of the complement protein C3b and thereby the activity of the complement system. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium or omptin-expressing recombinant E. coli bacteria were incubated with purified human complement proteins or recombinant H fragments. PgtE cleaved both B and H, whereas its close homolog Pla of Yersinia pestis cleaved only H. H was cleaved at both N- and C-termini, while the central region resisted proteolysis. Because of multiple effects of PgtE on complement components (cleavage of C3, C3b, B, and H) we assessed its effect on the opsonophagocytosis of Salmonella. In human serum, C3 cleavage was dependent on proteolytically active PgtE. Human neutrophils interacted less with serum-opsonized FITC-stained S. enterica 14028R than with the isogenic ΔpgtE strain, as analyzed by flow cytometry. In conclusion, cleavage of B and H by PgtE, together with C3 cleavage, affects the C3-mediated recognition of S. enterica by human neutrophils, thus thwarting the immune protection against Salmonella. PMID:25705210

  3. The outer membrane protease PgtE of Salmonella enterica interferes with the alternative complement pathway by cleaving factors B and H

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Rauna; Korhonen, Timo K.; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The virulence factor PgtE is an outer membrane protease (omptin) of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella enterica that causes diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to severe enteric fever. It is surface exposed in bacteria that have a short-chain, i.e., rough LPS, as observed e.g., in bacteria residing inside macrophages or just emerging from them. We investigated whether PgtE cleaves the complement factors B (B) and H (H), key proteins controlling formation and inactivation of the complement protein C3b and thereby the activity of the complement system. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium or omptin-expressing recombinant E. coli bacteria were incubated with purified human complement proteins or recombinant H fragments. PgtE cleaved both B and H, whereas its close homolog Pla of Yersinia pestis cleaved only H. H was cleaved at both N- and C-termini, while the central region resisted proteolysis. Because of multiple effects of PgtE on complement components (cleavage of C3, C3b, B, and H) we assessed its effect on the opsonophagocytosis of Salmonella. In human serum, C3 cleavage was dependent on proteolytically active PgtE. Human neutrophils interacted less with serum-opsonized FITC-stained S. enterica 14028R than with the isogenic ΔpgtE strain, as analyzed by flow cytometry. In conclusion, cleavage of B and H by PgtE, together with C3 cleavage, affects the C3-mediated recognition of S. enterica by human neutrophils, thus thwarting the immune protection against Salmonella. PMID:25705210

  4. Complement amplification revisited.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Hans U; Jelezarova, Emiliana

    2006-01-01

    Complement amplification in blood takes place not only on activating surfaces, but in plasma as well, where it is maintained primarily by C3b2-IgG complexes. Regular products of C3 activation in serum, these complexes are inherently very efficient precursors of the alternative pathway C3 convertase. Moreover, they can bind properdin bivalently, thus creating preferred sites for convertase formation. C3b2-IgG complexes have a half-life that is substantially longer than that of free C3b, since both C3b molecules are partially protected from inactivation by factor H and I. These complexes are preferentially generated on certain naturally occurring and induced antibodies that exhibit a paratope-independent affinity for C3/C3b. Such antibodies are known to stimulate alternative complement pathway activation. We have assembled the evidence for the generation and the functional potency of the C3b2-IgG complexes, which have been studied during the last two decades. We illustrate their roles in immune complex solubilization, phagocytosis, immune response, and their ability to initiate devastating effects in ischemia/reperfusion and in aggravating inflammation. PMID:16023211

  5. The mechanisms of complement activation in normal bovine serum and normal horse serum against Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 strains with different outer membrane proteins content.

    PubMed

    Miętka, K; Brzostek, K; Guz-Regner, K; Bugla-Płoskońska, G

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a common zoonotic pathogen and facultative intracellular bacterium which can survive within blood cells. Cattle and horses are considered a reservoir of Y. enterocolitica which often causes several serious syndromes associated with yersiniosis such as abortions, premature births or infertility. The aim of our investigation was to determine the vitality of Y. enterocolitica O:9 strains (Ye9) in bovine and horse sera (NBS and NHrS) and explain the role of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in serum resistance of these bacteria. Our previous studies demonstrated moderate human serum (NHS) resistance of the wild type Ye9 strain, whereas mutants lacking YadA, Ail or OmpC remained sensitive to the bactericidal activity of NHS. The present study showed that the wild type of Ye9 strain was resistant to the bactericidal activity of both NHrS and NBS, while Ye9 mutants lacking the YadA, Ail and OmpC proteins were sensitive to NHrS and NBS as well as to NHS. The mechanisms of complement activation against Ye9 strains lacking Ail and YadA were distinguished, i.e. activation of the classical/lectin pathways decisive in the bactericidal mechanism of complement activation of NBS, parallel activation of the classical/lectin and alternative pathways of NHrS. In this research the mechanism of independent activation of the classical/lectin or the alternative pathway of NBS and NHrS against Ye9 lacking OmpC porin was also established. The results indicate that serum resistance of Ye9 is multifactorial, in which extracellular structures, i.e. outer membrane proteins (OMPs) such as Ail, OmpC or YadA, play the main role. PMID:27096793

  6. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1) catalytic region

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Harmat, Veronika; Sebestyén, Edina; Beinrohr, László; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter

    2008-01-01

    MASP-1, a multidomain serine protease, is a component of the lectin pathway of complement. Its precise function is unknown, although it seems to enhance the complement-activating capacity of MASP-2, a related enzyme. MASP-1 has also been implicated as playing a role in blood coagulation. It is mostly found associated with mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Early attempts to crystallize MASP-1 failed because of the inhomogeneity of the purified material. MASP-1 was shown by acidic nondenaturing PAGE to be composed of differently charged species, which are most likely to be the products of deamidation occurring during the refolding procedure. Sequential cation-exchange and anion-exchange chromatography resulted in a homogeneous material, which was successfully crystallized. The best crystal diffracted to 2.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.4, b = 70.4, c = 121.4 Å. The crystal structure of MASP-1 may help in understanding the function of this mysterious serine protease. PMID:18765903

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1) catalytic region.

    PubMed

    Dobó, József; Harmat, Veronika; Sebestyén, Edina; Beinrohr, László; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter

    2008-09-01

    MASP-1, a multidomain serine protease, is a component of the lectin pathway of complement. Its precise function is unknown, although it seems to enhance the complement-activating capacity of MASP-2, a related enzyme. MASP-1 has also been implicated as playing a role in blood coagulation. It is mostly found associated with mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Early attempts to crystallize MASP-1 failed because of the inhomogeneity of the purified material. MASP-1 was shown by acidic nondenaturing PAGE to be composed of differently charged species, which are most likely to be the products of deamidation occurring during the refolding procedure. Sequential cation-exchange and anion-exchange chromatography resulted in a homogeneous material, which was successfully crystallized. The best crystal diffracted to 2.55 A resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.4, b = 70.4, c = 121.4 A. The crystal structure of MASP-1 may help in understanding the function of this mysterious serine protease. PMID:18765903

  9. A novel L-type lectin was required for the multiplication of WSSV in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunjia; Wang, Yuqing; Zhao, Lingling; Qin, Zhendong; Yuan, Junfa; Qin, Qiwei; Lin, Li; Lan, Jiangfeng

    2016-08-01

    L-type lectins are involved in glycoproteins secretory pathways and are associated with many immune responses. There is growing evidence that L-type lectins are also involved in viral replication. In this study, a novel L-type lectin (named as PcL-lectin) was identified from red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clakii). Gene sequencing and phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the PcL-lectin was a kind of endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment-53 (ERGIC-53). The expression level of PcL-lectin was significantly down regulated in crayfish after challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Recombinant PcL-lectin protein facilitated the replication of WSSV in crayfish. In addition, WSSV replication was decreased when endogenous PcL-lectin was knocked down by RNA interference in crayfish. Furthermore, PcL-lectin may interact with VP24, an envelope protein of WSSV. Our results suggest that PcL-lectin may be required for the multiplication of WSSV, and will pave a new way for the developing of strategies against WSSV infection. PMID:27208793

  10. Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of sulfur amino acids in seed

  11. The novel complement inhibitor human CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) protein promotes factor I-mediated degradation of C4b and C3b and inhibits the membrane attack complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Esparza, Astrid; Kalchishkova, Nikolina; Kurbasic, Emila; Jiang, Wen G; Blom, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) is a transmembrane protein containing 15 consecutive complement control protein (CCP) domains, which are characteristic for complement inhibitors. We expressed a membrane-bound fragment of human CSMD1 composed of the 15 C-terminal CCP domains and demonstrated that it inhibits deposition of C3b by the classical pathway on the surface of Chinese hamster ovary cells by 70% at 6% serum and of C9 (component of membrane attack complex) by 90% at 1.25% serum. Furthermore, this fragment of CSMD1 served as a cofactor to factor I-mediated degradation of C3b. In all functional assays performed, well-characterized complement inhibitors were used as positive controls, whereas Coxsackie adenovirus receptor, a protein with no effect on complement, was a negative control. Moreover, attenuation of expression in human T47 breast cancer cells that express endogenous CSMD1 significantly increased C3b deposition on these cells by 45% at 8% serum compared with that for the controls. Furthermore, by expressing a soluble 17-21 CCP fragment of CSMD1, we found that CSMD1 inhibits complement by promoting factor I-mediated C4b/C3b degradation and inhibition of MAC assembly at the level of C7. Our results revealed a novel complement inhibitor for the classical and lectin pathways. PMID:23964079

  12. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  13. A true autoactivating enzyme. Structural insight into mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 activations.

    PubMed

    Gál, Péter; Harmat, Veronika; Kocsis, Andrea; Bián, Tünde; Barna, László; Ambrus, Géza; Végh, Barbara; Balczer, Júlia; Sim, Robert B; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Závodszky, Péter

    2005-09-30

    Few reports have described in detail a true autoactivation process, where no extrinsic cleavage factors are required to initiate the autoactivation of a zymogen. Herein, we provide structural and mechanistic insight into the autoactivation of a multidomain serine protease: mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2), the first enzymatic component in the lectin pathway of complement activation. We characterized the proenzyme form of a MASP-2 catalytic fragment encompassing its C-terminal three domains and solved its crystal structure at 2.4 A resolution. Surprisingly, zymogen MASP-2 is capable of cleaving its natural substrate C4, with an efficiency about 10% that of active MASP-2. Comparison of the zymogen and active structures of MASP-2 reveals that, in addition to the activation domain, other loops of the serine protease domain undergo significant conformational changes. This additional flexibility could play a key role in the transition of zymogen MASP-2 into a proteolytically active form. Based on the three-dimensional structures of proenzyme and active MASP-2 catalytic fragments, we present model for the active zymogen MASP-2 complex and propose a mechanism for the autoactivation process. PMID:16040602

  14. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  15. A review of fish lectins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Fai Cheung, Randy Chi; Wing Ng, Charlene Cheuk; Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Lectins have been reported from various tissues of a diversity of fish species including Japanese eel, conger eel, electric eel, bighead carp, gibel carp, grass carp, Arabian Gulf catfish, channel catfish, blue catfish, catfish, pike perch, perch, powan, zebrafish, toxic moray, cobia fish, steelhead trout, Japanese trout, Atlantic salmon, chinook salmon, olive rainbow smelt, rainbow smelt, white-spotted charr, tilapia, blue gourami, ayu, Potca fish, Spanish mackerel, gilt head bream, tench, roach, rudd, common skate, and sea lamprey. The tissues from which the lectins were isolated comprise gills, eggs, electric organ, stomach, intestine, and liver. Lectins have also been isolated from skin, mucus serum, and plasma. The lectins differ in molecular weight, number of subunits, glycosylation, sugar binding specificity and amino acid sequence. Their activities include antimicrobial, antitumor, immunoregulatory and a role in development. PMID:25929869

  16. Lectins in the investigation of receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtin, V. M.; Yamskov, Igor A.

    1991-08-01

    Problems of the purification and characterisation are considered for approximately 270 receptors (including cell surface and organelle enzymes), which are glycoconjugates (mainly glycoproteins) from animals, plants and microorganisms, using various lectins (mainly lectin sorbents). An analysis has been carried out of the stages of lectin affinity chromatography of receptors (choice of detergent, use of organic solvents, elution with carbohydrates, etc.). Examples are given of procedures for the purification of receptors, including the use of paired columns and combination chromatography on lectins. The possibility of separating sub-populations of receptors using lectins has been demonstrated. Examples are given of the use of lectins in the analysis of the oligosaccharide structure of receptors. Cases are recorded of the interaction of receptors with endogenous lectins and of receptor lectins with endogenous glycoconjugates. It has been shown that lectins, in combination with glycosidases and antibodies, may be useful in the investigation of receptors. The bibliography contains 406 references.

  17. Gender-specific modulation of immune system complement gene expression in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma following dietary exposure of BDE-47.

    PubMed

    Ye, Roy R; Lei, Elva N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Chan, Alice K Y; Bo, Jun; van de Merwe, Jason P; Fong, Amy C C; Yang, Michael M S; Lee, J S; Segner, Helmut E; Wong, Chris K C; Wu, Rudolf S S; Au, Doris W T

    2011-08-01

    BDE-47 is one of the most widely found congeners of PBDEs in marine environments. The potential immunomodulatory effects of BDE-47 on fish complement system were studied using the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma as a model fish. Three-month-old O. melastigma were subjected to short-term (5 days) and long-term (21 days) exposure to two concentrations of BDE-47 (low dose at 290 ± 172 ng/day; high dose at 580 ± 344 ng/day) via dietary uptake of BDE-47 encapsulated in Artemia nauplii. Body burdens of BDE-47 and other metabolic products were analyzed in the exposed and control fish. Only a small amount of debrominated product, BDE-28, was detected, while other metabolic products were all under detection limit. Transcriptional expression of six major complement system genes involved in complement activation: C1r/s (classical pathway), MBL-2 (lectin pathway), CFP (alternative pathway), F2 (coagulation pathway), C3 (the central component of complement system), and C9 (cell lysis) were quantified in the liver of marine medaka. Endogenous expression of all six complement system genes was found to be higher in males than in females (p < 0.05). Upon dietary exposure of marine medaka to BDE-47, expression of all six complement genes were downregulated in males at day 5 (or longer), whereas in females, MBl-2, CFP, and F2 mRNAs expression were upregulated, but C3 and C9 remained stable with exposure time and dose. A significant negative relationship was found between BDE-47 body burden and mRNA expression of C1r/s, CFP, and C3 in male fish (r = -0.8576 to -0.9447). The above findings on changes in complement gene expression patterns indicate the complement system may be compromised in male O. melastigma upon dietary exposure to BDE-47. Distinct gender difference in expression of six major complement system genes was evident in marine medaka under resting condition and dietary BDE-47 challenge. The immunomodulatory effects of BDE-47 on transcriptional

  18. Complement C5a-C5aR interaction enhances MAPK signaling pathway activities to mediate renal injury in trichloroethylene sensitized BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-xiang; Zha, Wan-sheng; Ye, Liang-ping; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hui; Shen, Tong; Wu, Chang-hao; Zhu, Qi-xing

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown complement activation as a possible mechanism for trichloroethylene (TCE) sensitization, leading to multi-organ damage including the kidneys. In particular, excessive deposition of C5 and C5b-9-the membrane attack complex, which can generate significant tissue damage, was observed in the kidney tissue after TCE sensitization. The present study tested the hypothesis that anaphylatoxin C5a binding to its receptor C5aR mediates renal injury in TCE-sensitized BALB/c mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized through skin challenge with TCE, with or without pretreatment by the C5aR antagonist W54011. Kidney histopathology and the renal functional test were performed to assess renal injury, and immunohistochemistry and fluorescent labeling were carried out to assess C5a and C5aR expressions. TCE sensitization up-regulated C5a and C5aR expressions in kidney tissue, generated inflammatory infiltration, renal tubule damage, glomerular hypercellularity and impaired renal function. Antagonist pretreatment blocked C5a binding to C5aR and attenuated TCE-induced tissue damage and renal dysfunction. TCE sensitization also caused the deposition of major pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the kidney tissue (P < 0.05); this was accompanied by increased expression of P-p38, P-ERK and P-JNK proteins (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with the C5aR antagonist attenuated the increase of expression of P-p38, P-ERK and P-JNK proteins (P < 0.05) and also consistently reduced the TCE sensitization-induced increase of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ (P < 0.05). These data identify C5a binding to C5aR, MAP kinase activation, and inflammatory cytokine release as a novel mechanism for complement-mediated renal injury by sensitization with TCE or other environmental chemicals. PMID:26095957

  19. Nutritional complementation of oxidative glucose metabolism in Escherichia coli via pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Adamowicz, M.; Conway, T.; Nickerson, K.W. )

    1991-07-01

    Two glucose-negative Escherichia coli mutants (ZSC113 and DF214) were unable to grow on glucose as the sole carbon source unless supplemented with pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). PQQ is the cofactor for the periplasmic enzyme glucose dehydrogenase, which converts glucose to gluconate. Aerobically, E. Coli ZSC113 grew on glucose plus PQQ with a generation time of 65 min, a generation time about the same as that for wild-type E. coli in a defined glucose-salts medium. Thus, for E. coli ZSC113 the Entner-Doudoroff pathway was fully able to replace the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. In the presence of 5% sodium dodecyl sulfate, PQQ no longer acted as a growth factor. Sodium dodecyl sulfate inhibited the formation of gluconate from glucose but not gluconate metabolism. Adaptation to PQQ-dependent growth exhibited long lag periods, except under low-phosphate conditions, in which the PhoE porin would be expressed. The authors suggest that E. coli has maintained the apoenzyme for glucose dehydrogenase and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway as adaptations to an aerobic, low-phosphate, and low-detergent aquatic environment.

  20. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  1. Antinutritional properties of plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José Tadeu A

    2004-09-15

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding (glyco)proteins which are ubiquitous in nature. In plants, they are distributed in various families and hence ingested daily in appreciable amounts by both humans and animals. One of the most nutritionally important features of plant lectins is their ability to survive digestion by the gastrointestinal tract of consumers. This allows the lectins to bind to membrane glycosyl groups of the cells lining the digestive tract. As a result of this interaction a series of harmful local and systemic reactions are triggered placing this class of molecules as antinutritive and/or toxic substances. Locally, they can affect the turnover and loss of gut epithelial cells, damage the luminal membranes of the epithelium, interfere with nutrient digestion and absorption, stimulate shifts in the bacterial flora and modulate the immune state of the digestive tract. Systemically, they can disrupt lipid, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, promote enlargement and/or atrophy of key internal organs and tissues and alter the hormonal and immunological status. At high intakes, lectins can seriously threaten the growth and health of consuming animals. They are also detrimental to numerous insect pests of crop plants although less is presently known about their insecticidal mechanisms of action. This current review surveys the recent knowledge on the antinutritional/toxic effects of plant lectins on higher animals and insects. PMID:15302522

  2. In vitro and in vivo downregulation of C3 by lipoteichoic acid isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum K8 suppressed cytokine-mediated complement system activation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Boram; Kim, Hye Rim; Kim, Hangeun; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-07-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) is one of the proteins associated with complement cascades. C3 plays an essential role in three different pathways-the alternative, classical and lectin pathways. It is well known that cytokines activate complement system and increase complement component C3 production. In the current study, we found that lipoteichoic acid isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum K8 (pLTA) inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-mediated C3 mRNA and protein expression in HaCaT cells. pLTA inhibited C3 expression through the inhibition of the phosphorylation of p65 and p38 in the TNF-α-treated cells, while the inhibition of STAT1/2 and JAK2 phosphorylation by pLTA contributed to the reduction of C3 in IFN-γ-treated cells. When mice were pre-injected with pLTA followed by re-injection of TNF-α, serum C3 level was decreased as compared to TNF-α-injected only. Further studies revealed that membrane attack complex (MAC) increased by TNF-α injection was lessened in pLTA-pre-injected mice. A bactericidal assay using mouse sera showed that MAC activity in pLTA-pre-injected mice was lower than in TNF-α only-injected mice. These results suggest that pLTA can suppress inflammatory cytokine-mediated complement activation through the inhibition of C3 synthesis. pLTA application has the potential to alleviate complement-mediated diseases caused by excessive inflammation. PMID:27231239

  3. Activation of mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases leads to generation of a fibrin clot

    PubMed Central

    Gulla, Krishana C; Gupta, Kshitij; Krarup, Anders; Gal, Peter; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Sim, Robert B; O’Connor, C David; Hajela, Krishnan

    2010-01-01

    The lectin pathway of complement is activated upon binding of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins (FCNs) to their targets. Upon recognition of targets, the MBL-and FCN-associated serine proteases (MASPs) are activated, allowing them to generate the C3 convertase C4b2a. Recent findings indicate that the MASPs also activate components of the coagulation system. We have previously shown that MASP-1 has thrombin-like activity whereby it cleaves and activates fibrinogen and factor XIII. MASP-2 has factor Xa-like activity and activates prothrombin through cleavage to form thrombin. We now report that purified L-FCN-MASPs complexes, bound from serum to N-acetylcysteine-Sepharose, or MBL-MASPs complexes, bound to mannan-agarose, generate clots when incubated with calcified plasma or purified fibrinogen and factor XIII. Plasmin digestion of the clot and analysis using anti-D-dimer antibodies revealed that the clot was made up of fibrin and was similar to that generated by thrombin in normal human plasma. Fibrinopeptides A and B (FPA and FPB, respectively) were released after fibrinogen cleavage by L-FCN-MASPs complexes captured on N-acetylcysteine-Sepharose. Studies of inhibition of fibrinopeptide release indicated that the dominant pathway for clotting catalysed by the MASPs is via MASP-2 and prothrombin activation, as hirudin, a thrombin inhibitor that does not inhibit MASP-1 and MASP-2, substantially inhibits fibrinopeptide release. In the light of their potent chemoattractant effects on neutrophil and fibroblast recruitment, the MASP-mediated release of FPA and FPB may play a role in early immune activation. Additionally, MASP-catalysed deposition and polymerization of fibrin on the surface of micro-organisms may be protective by limiting the dissemination of infection. PMID:20002787

  4. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD. PMID:26742632

  5. Drugs that inhibit complement.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Höchsmann, Britta

    2012-02-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune system. Complement plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of many disorders. Despite the pivotal role of the complement system, an approved targeted inhibitor of a complement factor became available only recently. Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits complement factor C5. It is a targeted, disease modifying, treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). It was approved be the US FDA and the European Commission in 2007. In this review we will update the experience with eculizumab in PNH and discuss potential use of eculizumab in other disorders (e.g. cold agglutinin disease; atypical HUS) and new approaches to complement inhibition with drugs other than eculizumab. PMID:22169380

  6. Complement sensitivity of Entamoeba histolytica and various nonpathogenic amoeba species.

    PubMed

    Förster, B; Ebert, F; Horstmann, R D

    1994-12-01

    Culture forms of the potentially pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica were compared to those of the nonpathogenic species of E. dispar, E. hartmanni, E. coli, Endolimax nana, and E. moshkovskii regarding the sensitivity to lysis by human complement activated through the alternative pathway. E. dispar was found unique in its complement resistance; all other nonpathogenic isolates resembled E. histolytica in that they were complement sensitive. Thus, a state of complement sensitivity is not a particular property of potentially pathogenic amoebae. PMID:7716404

  7. The Role of Mannose-Binding Lectin in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    De Pascale, Gennaro; Cutuli, Salvatore Lucio; Pennisi, Mariano Alberto; Antonelli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are a primary cause of death in patients in intensive care unit (ICU). Investigations upon genetic susceptibility profile to systemic complications during severe infections are a field of increasing scientific interest. Particularly when adaptive immune system is compromised or immature, innate immunity plays a key role in the immediate defense against invasive pathogens. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum protein that recognizes a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms and activates complement cascade via the antibody-independent pathway. More than 30% of humans harbor mutations in MBL gene (MBL2) resulting in reduced plasmatic levels and activity. Increased risk of infection acquisition has been largely documented in MBL-deficient patients, but the real impact of this form of innate immunosuppression upon clinical outcome is not clear. In critically ill patients higher incidence and worse prognosis of severe sepsis/septic shock appear to be associated with low-producers haplotypes. However an excess of MBL activation might be also harmful due to the possibility of an unbalanced proinflammatory response and an additional host injury. Strategies of replacement therapies in critically ill patients with severe infections are under investigation but still far to be applied in clinical practice. PMID:24223476

  8. C-reactive protein collaborates with plasma lectins to boost immune response against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ng, Patricia M L; Le Saux, Agnès; Lee, Chia M; Tan, Nguan S; Lu, Jinhua; Thiel, Steffen; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak L

    2007-07-25

    Although human C-reactive protein (CRP) becomes upregulated during septicemia, its role remains unclear, since purified CRP showed no binding to many common pathogens. Contrary to previous findings, we show that purified human CRP (hCRP) binds to Salmonella enterica, and that binding is enhanced in the presence of plasma factors. In the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, CRP is a major hemolymph protein. Incubation of hemolymph with a range of bacteria resulted in CRP binding to all the bacteria tested. Lipopolysaccharide-affinity chromatography of the hemolymph co-purified CRP, galactose-binding protein (GBP) and carcinolectin-5 (CL5). Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays suggested that these pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) form pathogen recognition complexes. We show the conservation of PRR crosstalk in humans, whereby hCRP interacts with ficolin (CL5 homologue). This interaction stabilizes CRP binding to bacteria and activates the lectin-mediated complement pathway. We propose that CRP does not act alone but collaborates with other plasma PRRs to form stable pathogen recognition complexes when targeting a wide range of bacteria for destruction. PMID:17581635

  9. Mannose-binding lectin and its associated proteases (MASPs) mediate coagulation and its deficiency is a risk factor in developing complications from infection, including disseminated intravascular coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazue; Chang, Wei-Chuan; Takahashi, Minoru; Pavlov, Vasile; Ishida, Yumi; La Bonte, Laura; Shi, Lei; Fujita, Teizo; Stahl, Gregory L.; Van Cott, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The first line of host defense is the innate immune system that includes coagulation factors and pattern recognition molecules, one of which is mannose-binding lectin (MBL). Previous studies have demonstrated that MBL deficiency increases susceptibility to infection. Several mechanisms are associated with increased susceptibility to infection, including reduced opsonophagocytic killing and reduced lectin complement pathway activation. In this study, we demonstrate that MBL and MBL-associated serine protease (MASP)-1/3 together mediate coagulation factor-like activities, including thrombin-like activity. MBL and/or MASP-1/3 deficient hosts demonstrate in vivo evidence that MBL and MASP-1/3 are involved with hemostasis following injury. Staphylococcus aureus infected MBL null mice developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which was associated with elevated blood IL-6 levels (but not TNF-α and multi-organ inflammatory responses). Infected MBL null mice also develop liver injury. These findings suggest that MBL deficiency may manifest into DIC and organ failure during infectious diseases. PMID:20399528

  10. Mannan binding lectin-associated serine protease 1 is induced by hepatitis C virus infection and activates human hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, A; Baloch, K; Brown, R J P; Wallis, R; Chen, L; Dexter, L; McClure, C P; Shakesheff, K; Thomson, B J

    2013-01-01

    Mannan binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease type 1 (MASP-1) has a central role in the lectin pathway of complement activation and is required for the formation of C3 convertase. The activity of MASP-1 in the peripheral blood has been identified previously as a highly significant predictor of the severity of liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but not in liver disease of other aetiologies. In this study we tested the hypotheses that expression of MASP-1 may promote disease progression in HCV disease by direct activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and may additionally be up-regulated by HCV. In order to do so, we utilized a model for the maintenance of primary human HSC in the quiescent state by culture on basement membrane substrate prior to stimulation. In comparison to controls, recombinant MASP-1 stimulated quiescent human HSCs to differentiate to the activated state as assessed by both morphology and up-regulation of HSC activation markers α-smooth muscle actin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1. Further, the expression of MASP-1 was up-regulated significantly by HCV infection in hepatocyte cell lines. These observations suggest a new role for MASP-1 and provide a possible mechanistic link between high levels of MASP-1 and the severity of disease in HCV infection. Taken together with previous clinical observations, our new findings suggest that the balance of MASP-1 activity may be proinflammatory and act to accelerate fibrosis progression in HCV liver disease. PMID:23841802

  11. Complement activation in discordant hepatic xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Tector, A J; Chen, X; Soderland, C; Tchervenkov, J I

    1998-11-01

    Little is known about hyperacute rejection in hepatic xenotransplantation. Information from clinical xenoperfusions suggests that the liver may be rejected by a mechanism less vigorous than either kidney or heart xenografts. We used the in vitro model of porcine hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (PHEC) incubated with either complement replete or deficient human serum to determine the relative roles of the classical and alternate pathways of complement in the immediate response to hepatic xenotransplantation. Our results suggest that either the classical or alternate pathways are capable of independently activating the complement cascade upon exposure to the porcine hepatic sinusoidal endothelium. Our results also imply that either pathway alone is capable of initiating similar degrees of injury as the entire cascade. PMID:9915253

  12. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction. PMID:11414360

  13. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  14. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  15. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  16. Drug-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in caspase-8-complemented neuroblastoma cells proceeds via activation of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways and caspase-dependent cleavage of XIAP, Bcl-xL and RIP.

    PubMed

    Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick; Bourloud, Katia Balmas; Auderset, Katya; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Gross, Nicole

    2004-07-15

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood neoplasm which heterogeneous behavior can be explained by differential regulation of apoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces rapid apoptosis in most tumor cells and thus represents a promising anticancer agent. We have reported silencing of caspase-8 expression in highly malignant NB cells as a possible mechanism of resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To explore the particular contribution of caspase-8 in such resistance, retroviral-mediated stable caspase-8 expression was induced in the IGR-N91 cells. As a result, sensitivity to TRAIL was fully restored in the caspase-8-complemented cells. TRAIL-induced cell death could be further enhanced by cotreatment of IGR-N91-C8 and SH-EP cells with cycloheximide or subtoxic concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs in a caspase-dependent manner. Sensitization to TRAIL involved enhanced death receptor DR5 expression, activation of Bid and the complete caspases cascade. Interestingly, combined treatments also enhanced the cleavage-mediated inactivation of antiapoptotic molecules, XIAP, Bcl-x(L) and RIP. Our results show that restoration of active caspase-8 expression in a caspase-8-deficient NB cell line is necessary and sufficient to fully restore TRAIL sensitivity. Moreover, the synergistic effect of drugs and TRAIL results from activation of the caspase cascade via a mitochondrial pathway-mediated amplification loop and from the inactivation of apoptosis inhibitors. PMID:15094781

  17. Broilers with low serum Mannose-binding Lectin show increased fecal shedding of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Lynge, Sofie L; Juul-Madsen, Helle R; Kjærup, Rikke B; Okimoto, Ron; Abrahamsen, Mitchell S; Maurischat, Sven; Sørensen, Poul; Dalgaard, Tina S

    2016-08-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key molecule in innate immunity. MBL binds to carbohydrates on the surface of pathogens, initiating the complement system via the lectin-dependent pathway or facilitates opsonophagocytosis. In vivo studies using inbred chicken lines differing in MBL serum concentration indicate that chicken MBL affects Salmonella resistance; further studies are imperative in conventional broiler chickens. In this study 104 conventional day-old chickens (offspring from a cross between Cobb 500 male and female parent breeders) were orally infected with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Montevideo. The chickens were divided into two groups based on polymorphisms in their MBL promoter region, designated L/L for low serum concentrations of MBL and L/H for medium serum concentrations of MBL. A semi-quantitative real-time PCR method for detection of Salmonella in cloacal swabs was used, the log10 CFU quantification was based on a standard curve from artificially spiked cloacal swab samples pre-incubated for 8 h with known concentrations of Salmonella ranging from 10(1) to 10(6) CFU/swabs, with an obtained amplification efficiency of 102% and a linear relationship between the log10 CFU and the threshold cycle Ct values of (R(2) = 0.99). The L/L chickens had significantly higher Log10 CFU/swab at week 5 post infection (pi) than the L/H chickens. A repetition of the study with 86 L/L and 18 L/H chickens, also gave significantly higher log10 CFU ± SEM in cloacal swabs, using the semi-quantitative real-time PCR method from L/L chickens than from the L/H chickens at week 5 pi. These results indicate that genetically determined basic levels of MBL may influence S. Montevideo susceptibility. PMID:26994208

  18. The consequence of low mannose-binding lectin plasma concentration in relation to susceptibility to Salmonella Infantis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Lynge, Sofie L; Dalgaard, Tina S; Norup, Liselotte R; Kjærup, Rikke M; Olsen, John E; Sørensen, Poul; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2015-01-15

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key protein in innate immunity. MBL binds to carbohydrates on the surface of pathogens, where it initiates complement activation via the lectin-dependent pathway or facilitates opsonophagocytosis. In vitro studies have shown that human MBL is able to bind to Salmonella, but knowledge in relation to chicken MBL and Salmonella is lacking. In order to study this relation day-old chickens from two selected lines L10H and L10L, differing in MBL serum concentration, were either orally infected with S. Infantis (S.123443) or kept as non-infected controls. The differences between healthy L10H and L10L chicken sublines were more profound than differences caused by the S. Infantis infection. The average daily body weight was higher for L10H than for L10L, regardless of infection, indicating beneficial effects of MBL selection on growth. Salmonella was detected in cloacal swabs and the number of Salmonella positive chickens during the experiment was significantly higher in L10L than L10H, indicating that MBL may affect the magnitude of Salmonella colonisation in day-old chickens. MBL expression was determined in ceca tissue by real-time RT-PCR. L10H chickens showed a significantly higher relative expression than L10L at days 1 and 41 pi, regardless of infection. Finally, flow cytometric analysis of whole blood from infected chickens showed that L10H had a significantly higher count of all assessed leucocyte subsets on day 5 pi, and also a higher count of monocytes on day 12 pi than L10L. No difference was observed between infected and non-infected L10L chicken. PMID:25487759

  19. Serum Mannose-Binding Lectin Concentration, but Not Genotype, Is Associated With Clostridium difficile Infection Recurrence: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Swale, Andrew; Miyajima, Fabio; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi; Roberts, Paul; Little, Margaret; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Beadsworth, Mike B. J.; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a key role in the activation of the lectin-complement pathway of innate immunity, and its deficiency has been linked with several acute infections. However, its role in predisposing to, or modulating disease severity in, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has not been investigated. Methods. We prospectively recruited 308 CDI case patients and 145 control patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). CDI outcome measures were disease severity, duration of symptoms, 30-day mortality, and 90-day recurrence. Serum concentrations of MBL were determined using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay transferred to an electrochemiluminescence–based platform. MBL2 polymorphisms were typed using a combination of pyrosequencing and TaqMan genotyping assays. Results. The frequency of the MBL2 genetic variants was similar to that reported in other white populations. MBL serum concentrations in CDI and AAD subjects were determined by MBL2 exonic variants B, C, and D and the haplotypes (LYPB, LYQC, and HYPD). There was no difference in either MBL concentrations or genotypes between cases and controls. MBL concentration, but not genotype, was a determinant of CDI recurrence (odds ratios, 3.18 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.40–7.24] and 2.61 [95% CI, 1.35–5.04] at the <50 ng/mL and <100 ng/mL cutoff points, respectively; P < .001). However, neither MBL concentration nor MBL2 genotype was linked with the other CDI outcomes. Conclusions. Serum MBL concentration did not differentiate between CDI cases and AAD controls, but among CDI cases, MBL concentration, but not genotype, was associated with CDI recurrence, indicating that MBL acts as a modulator of disease, rather than a predisposing factor. PMID:25170052

  20. CSF coccidioides complement fixation

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 61. Read More Complement Update Date 5/1/2015 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, ...

  1. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  2. The structure of C2b, a fragment of complement component C2 produced during C3 convertase formation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Vengadesan; Xu, Yuanyuan; Macon, Kevin; Volanakis, John E.; Narayana, Sthanam V. L.

    2009-03-01

    The crystal structure of C2b has been determined at 1.8 Å resolution, which reveals the arrangement of its three complement control protein (CCP) modules. A model for complement component C2 is presented and its conformational changes during the C3-convertase formation are also discussed. The second component of complement (C2) is a multi-domain serine protease that provides catalytic activity for the C3 and C5 convertases of the classical and lectin pathways of human complement. The formation of these convertases requires the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent binding of C2 to C4b and the subsequent cleavage of C2 by C1s or MASP2, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length C2 is not yet available, although the structure of its C-terminal catalytic segment C2a has been determined. The crystal structure of the N-terminal segment C2b of C2 determined to 1.8 Å resolution presented here reveals the arrangement of its three CCP domains. The domains are arranged differently compared with most other CCP-domain assemblies, but their arrangement is similar to that found in the Ba part of the full-length factor B structure. The crystal structures of C2a, C2b and full-length factor B are used to generate a model for C2 and a discussion of the domain association and possible interactions with C4b during formation of the C4b–C2 complex is presented. The results of this study also suggest that upon cleavage by C1s, C2a domains undergo conformational rotation while bound to C4b and the released C2b domains may remain folded together similar to as observed in the intact protein.

  3. Lectins in Castor Bean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Suzanne M.; Beevers, Harry

    1986-01-01

    The amounts of the two lectins (ricin and Ricinus communis agglutinin) in tissues of castor bean seedlings were followed during germination and early growth. For measurement, lectins in extracts were separately eluted from Sepharose columns; an antibody to the agglutinin was also used to detect the lectins by immunodiffusion. The endosperm of the dry seed contains 3.5 mg total lectin (5.6% of the total seed protein), which declines by 50% by day 4 and more rapidly thereafter as the tissue is completely consumed. The cotyledons of the dry seed also contain lectins but the amounts are less than 1% of those in the endosperm, and, as in the endosperm, they are constituents of the albumin fraction of the isolated protein bodies. No lectins were detected in the green cotyledons of 10-day seedlings that had been exposed to light from day 5. The embryonic axes of 2-day seedlings contained very small amounts of lectins but they were not detectable in the aerial parts of seedlings grown for 3 weeks or in cells from endosperm grown in tissue culture. The ability of proteinases and glycosidases (isolated from endosperm of 4-day seedlings) to hydrolyze the lectins was examined. No hydrolysis of the two lectins was observed, but the subunits, separated by reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol, were hydrolyzed slowly by a proteinase and some release of mannose was observed in the presence of the glycosidases. Ricin was converted to its subunits by cysteine and an enzyme in an endosperm extract accelerated chain separation by glutathione. Images Fig. 3 PMID:16664561

  4. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  5. Complement component 3 (C3)

    MedlinePlus

    C3 and C4 are the most commonly measured complement components. A complement test may be used to monitor people with an ... normal levels of the complement proteins C3 and C4 . Complement activity varies throughout the body. For example, ...

  6. Effect of chum salmon egg lectin on tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ryo; Yamamoto, Shintaro; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a chum salmon egg lectin (CSL3) on tight junction (TJ) of Caco-2 cell monolayers was investigated. The lectin opened TJ as indicated by the decrease of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) value and the increase of the permeation of lucifer yellow, which is transported via the TJ-mediated paracellular pathway. The effects of CSL3 were inhibited by the addition of 10 mM L-rhamnose or D-galactose which were specific sugars for CSL3. The lectin increased the intracellular Ca2+ of Caco-2 cell monolayers, that could be inhibited by the addition of L-rhamnose. The fluorescence immunostaining of β-actin in Caco-2 cell monolayers revealed that the cytoskeleton was changed by the CSL3 treatment, suggesting that CSL3 depolymerized β-actin to cause reversible TJ structural and functional disruption. Although Japanese jack bean lectin and wheat germ lectin showed similar effects in the decrease of the TER values and the increase of the intracellular Ca2+, they could not be inhibited by the same concentrations of simple sugars, such as D-glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. PMID:25951005

  7. Mannose-binding Lectin (MBL) as a susceptible host factor influencing Indian Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anshuman; Antony, Justin S; Gai, Prabhanjan; Sundaravadivel, Pandarisamy; Van, Tong Hoang; Jha, Aditya Nath; Singh, Lalji; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-12-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL), caused by Leishmania donovani is endemic in the Indian sub-continent. Mannose-binding Lectin (MBL) is a complement lectin protein that binds to the surface of Leishmania promastigotes and results in activation of the complement lectin cascade. We utilized samples of 218 VL patients and 215 healthy controls from an Indian population. MBL2 functional variants were genotyped and the circulating MBL serum levels were measured. MBL serum levels were elevated in patients compared to the healthy controls (adjusted P=0.007). The MBL2 promoter variants -78C/T and +4P/Q were significantly associated with relative protection to VL (-78C/T, OR=0.7, 95% CI=0.5-0.96, adjusted P=0.026 and +4P/Q, OR=0.66, 95% CI=0.48-0.9, adjusted P=0.012). MBL2*LYQA haplotypes occurred frequently among controls (OR=0.69, 95% CI=0.5-0.97, adjusted P=0.034). MBL recognizes Leishmania and plays a relative role in establishing L. donovani infection and subsequent disease progression. In conclusion, MBL2 functional variants were associated with VL. PMID:26297290

  8. A dual role for complement in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Köhl, Jörg; Wills-Karp, Marsha

    2007-06-01

    Complement is an ancient danger-sensor system of innate immunity, providing first-line defence against pathogens. Concordant with its pro-inflammatory properties, complement contributes to airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness and mucus production during the effector phase of allergic asthma. In contrast to these pro-allergic properties, complement can also protect from the development of the maladaptive Th2-biased immune response that drives airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in allergic asthma. As such, selective targeting of pro-allergic complement pathways appears an attractive therapeutic option in allergic asthma. PMID:17475559

  9. The Complement Inhibitor Factor H Generates an Anti-Inflammatory and Tolerogenic State in Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivar, Rut; Luque, Ana; Cárdenas-Brito, Sonia; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Blom, Anna M; Borràs, Francesc E; Rodriguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Zipfel, Peter F; Aran, Josep M

    2016-05-15

    The activation of the complement system is a key initiating step in the protective innate immune-inflammatory response against injury, although it may also cause harm if left unchecked. The structurally related soluble complement inhibitors C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and factor H (FH) exert a tight regulation of the classical/lectin and alternative pathways of complement activation, respectively, attenuating the activity of the C3/C5 convertases and, consequently, avoiding serious damage to host tissues. We recently reported that the acute-phase C4BP isoform C4BP lacking the β-chain plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the adaptive immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that FH acts in the early stages of monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and is able to promote a distinctive tolerogenic and anti-inflammatory profile on monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) challenged by a proinflammatory stimulus. Accordingly, FH-treated and LPS-matured MoDCs are characterized by altered cytoarchitecture, resembling immature MoDCs, lower expression of the maturation marker CD83 and the costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86, decreased production of key proinflammatory Th1-cytokines (IL-12, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-8), and preferential production of immunomodulatory mediators (IL-10 and TGF-β). Moreover, FH-treated MoDCs show low Ag uptake and, when challenged with LPS, display reduced CCR7 expression and chemotactic migration, impaired CD4(+) T cell alloproliferation, inhibition of IFN-γ secretion by the allostimulated T cells, and, conversely, induction of CD4(+)CD127(low/negative)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. Thus, this novel noncanonical role of FH as an immunological brake able to directly affect the function of MoDCs in an inflammatory environment may exhibit therapeutic potential in hypersensitivity, transplantation, and autoimmunity. PMID:27076676

  10. Complement-Mediated Regulation of Metabolism and Basic Cellular Processes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-08-16

    Complement is well appreciated as a critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and works by directly destroying them through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Newly identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription-factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings. PMID:27533012

  11. The role of complement in inflammation and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Barrington, R; Zhang, M; Fischer, M; Carroll, M C

    2001-04-01

    Major advances in our understanding of the immunobiology of complement were made within the past 5 years primarily due to the development of gene-targeting technology. New strains of mice bearing specific deficiencies in serum complement proteins or their receptors were developed using this approach. Characterization of these mice has provided new and exciting insights into the biology of the complement system. In this review, we discuss recent results on two important aspects of the complement system, i) host protection and inflammation, and ii) regulation of B lymphocytes of adaptive immunity. While these two roles appear distinct, they are linked. We discuss how natural antibody and classical pathway complement work together in host protection against bacterial infection on the one hand but, on the other, they co-operate to induce inflammation as observed in reperfusion injury. Significantly, the lymphocytes that produce natural antibody, the B-1 lymphocytes, are regulated in part by the complement system. PMID:11414363

  12. Complement inhibition: a promising concept for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively novel and deserves closer attention. In this paper, we will summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:23706991

  13. Sugared biomaterial binding lectins: achievements and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bojarová, P; Křen, V

    2016-07-19

    Lectins, a distinct group of glycan-binding proteins, play a prominent role in the immune system ranging from pathogen recognition and tuning of inflammation to cell adhesion or cellular signalling. The possibilities of their detailed study expanded along with the rapid development of biomaterials in the last decade. The immense knowledge of all aspects of glycan-lectin interactions both in vitro and in vivo may be efficiently used in bioimaging, targeted drug delivery, diagnostic and analytic biological methods. Practically applicable examples comprise photoluminescence and optical biosensors, ingenious three-dimensional carbohydrate microarrays for high-throughput screening, matrices for magnetic resonance imaging, targeted hyperthermal treatment of cancer tissues, selective inhibitors of bacterial toxins and pathogen-recognising lectin receptors, and many others. This review aims to present an up-to-date systematic overview of glycan-decorated biomaterials promising for interactions with lectins, especially those applicable in biology, biotechnology or medicine. The lectins of interest include galectin-1, -3 and -7 participating in tumour progression, bacterial lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IL), E. coli (Fim-H) and Clostridium botulinum (HA33) or DC-SIGN, receptors of macrophages and dendritic cells. The spectrum of lectin-binding biomaterials covered herein ranges from glycosylated organic structures, calixarene and fullerene cores over glycopeptides and glycoproteins, functionalised carbohydrate scaffolds of cyclodextrin or chitin to self-assembling glycopolymer clusters, gels, micelles and liposomes. Glyconanoparticles, glycan arrays, and other biomaterials with a solid core are described in detail, including inorganic matrices like hydroxyapatite or stainless steel for bioimplants. PMID:27075026

  14. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  15. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ran; Zhao, Xi; Wang, Zixia; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Limei; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host’s immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated. Methods and Findings The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy) to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs) elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration. Conclusion Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9. PMID:26720603

  16. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  17. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  18. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed. PMID:25001046

  19. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Blood Products § 864.9550 Lectins and protectins. (a) Identification. Lectins and protectins...

  20. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Blood Products § 864.9550 Lectins and protectins. (a) Identification. Lectins and protectins...

  1. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Blood Products § 864.9550 Lectins and protectins. (a) Identification. Lectins and protectins...

  2. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... and Blood Products § 864.9550 Lectins and protectins. (a) Identification. Lectins and protectins...

  3. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital. PMID:25941756

  4. Examining coagulation-complement crosstalk: complement activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H

    2016-05-01

    The coagulation and complement systems are ancestrally related enzymatic cascades of the blood. Although their primary purposes have diverged over the past few hundred million years, they remain inextricably connected. Both complement and coagulation systems limit infection by pathogens through innate immune mechanisms. Recently, it has been shown that hyperactive complement (in particular, elevated C5a/C5b-9) is involved in the pathogenesis (including thrombosis) of diseases such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and bacteremia. Although these diseases together account for many thrombosis cases, there are many more where complement activation is not considered a causative factor leading to thrombosis. To better understand what role complement may play in the pathogenesis of thrombosis a better understanding of the mechanisms that cause over-active complement in thrombotic disease is required. PMID:27207425

  5. Sensing of cell death by myeloid C-type lectin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, David; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Molecules associated with dead or dying cells can be detected by receptors on macrophages and dendritic cells. Signals from these receptors impact myeloid cell function and play a role in determining whether death is silent or proinflammatory, tolerogenic or immunogenic. Prominent among myeloid receptors detecting dead cells are C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Signals from these receptors variably induce endocytosis of cell corpses, corpse degradation, retrieval of dead cell-associated antigens and/or modulation of immune responses. The sensing of tissue damage by myeloid CLRs complements detection of pathogens in immunity and represents an ancient response aimed at restoring tissue homeostasis. PMID:23332826

  6. Chronic Low Level Complement Activation within the Eye Is Controlled by Intraocular Complement Regulatory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kaplan, Henry J.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To explore the role of the complement system and complement regulatory proteins in an immune-privileged organ, the eye. Methods Eyes of normal Lewis rats were analyzed for the expression of complement regulatory proteins, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay-acceleration factor (DAF), membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (MIRL, CD59), and cell surface regulator of complement (Crry), using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Zymosan, a known activator of the alternative pathway of complement system was injected into the anterior chamber of the eye of Lewis rats. Animals were also injected intracamerally with 5 μl (25 μg) of neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) against rat Crry (5I2) or CD59 (6D1) in an attempt to develop antibody induced anterior uveitis; control animals received 5 μl of sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), OX-18 (25 μg), G-16-510E3 (25 μg), or MOPC-21 (25 μg). The role of complement system in antibody-induced uveitis was explored by intraperitoneal injection of 35 U cobra venom factor (CVF), 24 hours before antibody injection. Immunohistochemical staining and sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with Western blot analysis were used to detect the presence of membrane attack complex (MAC) and C3 activation products, respectively, in normal and antibody-injected rat eyes. Results Complement activation product MAC was present in the normal rat eye, and intraocular injection of zymosan induced severe anterior uveitis. The complement regulatory proteins, MCP, DAF, CD59, and Crry, were identified in the normal rat eye. Soluble forms of Crry and CD59 were also detected in normal rat aqueous humor. Severe anterior uveitis developed in Lewis rats injected with a neutralizing mAb against Crry, with increased formation of C3 split products. Systemic complement depletion by CVF prevented the induction of anterior uveitis by anti

  7. Carbohydrate-lectin interactions assayed by SPR.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Eric; Lamerant-Fayel, Nathalie; Frison, Natacha; Monsigny, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance is a valuable tool to determine the affinity between glycoconjugates and sugar-binding proteins such as plant and animal lectins. The main interest of using such an approach is that neither the lectins - which are proteins - nor their ligands - natural compounds such as glycoproteins, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, or synthetic glycoconjugates such as glycoclusters or neoglycoproteins - require any tag. Because lectins bear several binding sites, they behave like immunoglobulin eliciting avidity phenomena. This peculiarity may lead to erroneous results if special conditions are not applied. We obtained best and reproducible results when the lectin was immobilized and its ligands were used as soluble analytes. With heterogeneous glycoconjugates such as neoglycoproteins (which are heterogeneous in terms of nature, number, and position of sugar residues) or a mixture of oligosaccharides, the data may be more accurately gathered by using the Sips approach, which has been used to determine mean binding constants of polyclonal antibodies. With small analytes such as oligosaccharides, we found it convenient to determine binding constants by using an inhibitory approach: a neoglycoprotein (M (r) = approximately 80,000) was allowed to bind to the immobilized lectin and small oligosaccharides were used as inhibitors. With larger glycoconjugates such as peptides substituted with glycoclusters, direct binding measurements gave accurate results. Because of the availability of low-cost simple sugars (mono- or disaccharides) it is very convenient to use large concentrations of such carbohydrates to clean the sensor chips instead of more drastic cleaning solutions such as acids or alkali, in such a way that the immobilized lectin is stable for many experiments. PMID:20217620

  8. Complement and HIV-I infection/ HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over fifteen years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose binding lectins (MBL) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. Also, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting to the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24639397

  9. Lectin glycoprofiling of recombinant therapeutic interleukin-7.

    PubMed

    Landemarre, Ludovic; Duverger, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Lectins array is a powerfull and complementary method of glycans analysis allowing fast identification of specific motifs on molecules or cells. This technology is of increased interest for the development of therapeutic recombinant glycoproteins and particularly relevant for a first study of lot-to-lot comparison, or detection of unwanted glycans. In this chapter, we describe a lectin array-type method specifically designed for the study of recombinant therapeutic interleukin-7 (rhIL-7). This specific method allows the analysis of the glycans motifs, the distribution of the glycoforms population, and the detection of potential immunogen glycans in rhIL-7 purified CHO-produced batches. PMID:23475723

  10. Complement-Coagulation Cross-Talk: A Potential Mediator of the Physiological Activation of Complement by Low pH

    PubMed Central

    Kenawy, Hany Ibrahim; Boral, Ismet; Bevington, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a major constituent of the innate immune system. It not only bridges innate and adaptive arms of the immune system but also links the immune system with the coagulation system. Current understanding of the role of complement has extended far beyond fighting of infections, and now encompasses maintenance of homeostasis, tissue regeneration, and pathophysiology of multiple diseases. It has been known for many years that complement activation is strongly pH sensitive, but only relatively recently has the physiological significance of this been appreciated. Most complement assays are carried out at the physiological pH 7.4. However, pH in some extracellular compartments, for example, renal tubular fluid in parts of the tubule, and extracellular fluid at inflammation loci, is sufficiently acidic to activate complement. The exact molecular mechanism of this activation is still unclear, but possible cross-talk between the contact system (intrinsic pathway) and complement may exist at low pH with subsequent complement activation. The current article reviews the published data on the effect of pH on the contact system and complement activity, the nature of the pH sensor molecules, and the clinical implications of these effects. Of particular interest is chronic kidney disease (CKD) accompanied by metabolic acidosis, in which therapeutic alkalinization of urine has been shown significantly to reduce tubular complement activation products, an effect, which may have important implications for slowing progression of CKD. PMID:25999953

  11. Effect of lectins on mouse peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, G; Porras, F; Fernández, L; Vázquez, L; Zenteno, E

    1994-11-01

    We studied the in vitro ability of lectin-treated murine peritoneal macrophages to attach and phagocytize particulate antigens. Glucose and mannose specific lectins such as Con-A and lentil lectin, as well as complex lactosamine residues specific lectins, such as Phaseolus vulgaris var. cacahuate and Phaseolus coccineus var. alubia, increased the macrophage phagocytic activity towards heterologous erythrocytes, whereas peanut agglutinin, a galactose-specific lectin, diminished the macrophage phagocytic activity. These results suggest that a galactose-N-acetyl-D galactosamine-containing structure could participate as negative modulator of the phagocytic activity. PMID:7851961

  12. Electrochemical lectin based biosensors as a label-free tool in glycomics

    PubMed Central

    Bertók, Tomáš; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Gemeiner, Peter; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Glycans and other saccharide moieties attached to proteins and lipids, or present on the surface of a cell, are actively involved in numerous physiological or pathological processes. Their structural flexibility (that is based on the formation of various kinds of linkages between saccharides) is making glycans superb “identity cards”. In fact, glycans can form more “words” or “codes” (i.e., unique sequences) from the same number of “letters” (building blocks) than DNA or proteins. Glycans are physicochemically similar and it is not a trivial task to identify their sequence, or - even more challenging - to link a given glycan to a particular physiological or pathological process. Lectins can recognise differences in glycan compositions even in their bound state and therefore are most useful tools in the task to decipher the “glycocode”. Thus, lectin-based biosensors working in a label-free mode can effectively complement the current weaponry of analytical tools in glycomics. This review gives an introduction into the area of glycomics and then focuses on the design, analytical performance, and practical utility of lectin-based electrochemical label-free biosensors for the detection of isolated glycoproteins or intact cells. PMID:27239071

  13. Complement System in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pankita H.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24901241

  14. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  15. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  16. Lectins from tropical sponges. Purification and characterization of lectins from genus Aplysina.

    PubMed

    Miarons, P B; Fresno, M

    2000-09-22

    Only a few animal phyla have been screened for the presence and distribution of lectins. Probably the most intensively studied group is the mollusk. In this investigation, 22 species from 12 families of tropical sponges collected in Los Roques National Park (Venezuela) were screened for the presence of lectins. Nine saline extracts exhibited strong hemagglutinating activity against pronase-treated hamster red blood cells; five of these reacted against rabbit red blood cells, four with trypsin-treated bovine red blood cells, and five with human red blood cells regardless of the blood group type. Extracts from the three species studied from genus Aplysina (archeri, lawnosa, and cauliformis) were highly reactive and panagglutinating against the panel of red blood cells tested. The lectins from A. archeri and A. lawnosa were purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on p-aminobenzyl-beta-1-thiogalactopyranoside-agarose, and gel filtration chromatography. Both lectins exhibited a native molecular mass of 63 kDa and by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions have an apparent molecular mass of 16 kDa, thus suggesting they occur as homotetramers. The purified lectins contain 3-4 mol of divalent cation per molecule, which are essential for their biological activity. Hapten inhibition of hemagglutination was carried out to define the sugar binding specificity of the purified A. archeri lectin. The results indicate a preference of the lectin for nonreducing beta-linked d-Gal residues being the best inhibitors of red blood cells binding methyl-beta-d-Gal and thiodigalactoside (Gal beta 1-4-thiogalactopyranoside). The behavior of several glycans on immobilized lectin affinity chromatography confirmed and extended the specificity data obtained by hapten inhibition. PMID:10852905

  17. Complement in disease: a defence system turning offensive.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2016-07-01

    Although the complement system is primarily perceived as a host defence system, a more versatile, yet potentially more harmful side of this innate immune pathway as an inflammatory mediator also exists. The activities that define the ability of the complement system to control microbial threats and eliminate cellular debris - such as sensing molecular danger patterns, generating immediate effectors, and extensively coordinating with other defence pathways - can quickly turn complement from a defence system to an aggressor that drives immune and inflammatory diseases. These host-offensive actions become more pronounced with age and are exacerbated by a variety of genetic factors and autoimmune responses. Complement can also be activated inappropriately, for example in response to biomaterials or transplants. A wealth of research over the past two decades has led to an increasingly finely tuned understanding of complement activation, identified tipping points between physiological and pathological behaviour, and revealed avenues for therapeutic intervention. This Review summarizes our current view of the key activating, regulatory, and effector mechanisms of the complement system, highlighting important crosstalk connections, and, with an emphasis on kidney disease and transplantation, discusses the involvement of complement in clinical conditions and promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:27211870

  18. [Atypical HUS caused by complement-related abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yoko; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2015-02-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by the triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. The term aHUS was historically used to distinguish this disorder from Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC)-HUS. Many aHUS cases (approximately 70%) are reportedly caused by uncontrolled complement activation due to genetic mutations in the alternative pathway, including complement factor H (CFH), complement factor I (CFI), membrane cofactor protein (MCP), thrombomodulin (THBD), complement component C3 (C3), and complement factor B (CFB). Mutations in the coagulation pathway, such as diacylglycerol kinase ε (DGKE) and plasminogen, are also reported to be causes of aHUS. In this review, we have focused on aHUS due to complement dysfunction. aHUS is suspected based on plasma ADAMTS13 activity of 10% or more, and being negative for STEC-HUS, in addition to the aforementioned triad. Complement genetic studies provide a more specific diagnosis of aHUS. Plasma therapy is the first-line treatment for patients with aHUS and should be initiated as soon as the diagnosis is suspected. Recently, eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against C5, was shown to be an effective treatment for aHUS. Therefore, early diagnosis and identification of the underlying pathogenic mechanism is important for improving the outcome of aHUS. PMID:25765799

  19. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed. PMID:25821171

  20. A mushroom lectin from ascomycete Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eui Cha; Kim, Ki Don; Bae, Chan Hyung; Kim, Ju Cheol; Kim, Dae Kyong; Kim, Ha Hyung

    2007-05-01

    A mushroom lectin has been purified from ascomycete Cordyceps militaris, which is one of the most popular mushrooms in eastern Asia used as a nutraceutical and in traditional Chinese medicine. This lectin, designated CML, exhibited hemagglutination activity in mouse and rat erythrocytes, but not in human ABO erythrocytes. SDS-PAGE of CML revealed a single band with a molecular mass of 31.0 kDa under both nonreducing and reducing conditions that was stained by silver nitrate, and a 31.4 kDa peak in a Superdex-200 HR gel-filtration column. The hemagglutination activity was inhibited by sialoglycoproteins, but not in by mono- or disaccharides, asialoglycoproteins, or de-O-acetylated glycoprotein. The activity was maximal at pH 6.0-9.1 and at temperatures below 50 degrees C. Circular dichroism spectrum analysis revealed that CML comprises 27% alpha-helix, 12% beta-sheets, 29% beta-turns, and 32% random coils. Its binding specificity and secondary structure are similar to those of a fungal lectin from Arthrobotrys oligospora. However, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of CML differs greatly from those of other lectins. CML exhibits mitogenic activity against mouse splenocytes. PMID:17306462

  1. Lectin genes in the Frankia alni genome.

    PubMed

    Pujic, Petar; Fournier, Pascale; Alloisio, Nicole; Hay, Anne-Emmanuelle; Maréchal, Joelle; Anchisi, Stéphanie; Normand, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Frankia alni strain ACN14a's genome was scanned for the presence of determinants involved in interactions with its host plant, Alnus spp. One such determinant type is lectin, proteins that bind specifically to sugar motifs. The genome of F. alni was found to contain 7 such lectin-coding genes, five of which were of the ricinB-type. The proteins coded by these genes contain either only the lectin domain, or also a heat shock protein or a serine-threonine kinase domain upstream. These lectins were found to have several homologs in Streptomyces spp., and a few in other bacterial genomes among which none in Frankia EAN1pec and CcI3 and two in strain EUN1f. One of these F. alni genes, FRAAL0616, was cloned in E. coli, fused with a reporter gene yielding a fusion protein that was found to bind to both root hairs and to bacterial hyphae. This protein was also found to modify the dynamics of nodule formation in A. glutinosa, resulting in a higher number of nodules per root. Its role could thus be to permit binding of microbial cells to root hairs and help symbiosis to occur under conditions of low Frankia cell counts such as in pioneer situations. PMID:22159868

  2. Anti-Gal binds to pili of Neisseria meningitidis: the immunoglobulin A isotype blocks complement-mediated killing.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, R M; Estabrook, M M; Zhou, P; Jarvis, G A; Griffiss, J M

    1995-12-01

    alpha 1,3-Galactosyl antibodies (anti-Gal) are ubiquitous natural human serum and secretory polyclonal antibodies that bind to terminal galactose-alpha 1,3-galactose (alpha-galactosyl) residues. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-Gal can block alternative complement pathway-mediated lysis of representative gram-negative enteric bacteria that bind it to lipopolysaccharide alpha-galactosyl structures, thereby promoting survival of such bacteria in the nonimmune host. We wanted to know whether anti-Gal also could bind to the lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of Neisseria meningitidis. To our surprise, we found that serum and secretory anti-Gal bound to pili but not to LOS of certain strains. This suggested the presence of an immunogenic pilus carbohydrate epitope. Mild periodate oxidation of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated outer membrane preparations from strains that bound anti-Gal followed by labeling of the neoaldehyde groups resulted in the labeling of bands that corresponded to pilin and LOS, confirming that pilin contains carbohydrate structures. A Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin that also binds terminal alpha 1,3-galactosyl residues also bound to pilin. Serum IgG, IgA, and IgM anti-Gal as well as colostral secretory IgA anti-Gal bound to pilin, as judged by immunoblotting, and to the pili of intact piliated organisms, as judged by immunoelectron microscopy. Total serum anti-Gal (IgG, IgA, and IgM) and purified serum IgA1 anti-Gal, but not its purified IgG isotype, blocked complement-mediated lysis of a piliated meningococcal strain that bound anti-Gal to its pili. Colostral anti-Gal secretory IgA blocked killing of the same strain. Thus, anti-Gal IgA may promote disease when it binds to the pili of N. meningitidis strains. PMID:7591153

  3. Complement-mediated adipocyte lysis by nephritic factor sera.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, P W; Würzner, R; Oliveria, D B; Lachmann, P J; Peters, D K

    1993-06-01

    Recent data indicate a previously unsuspected link between the complement system and adipocyte biology. Murine adipocytes produce key components of the alternative pathway of complement and are able to activate this pathway. This suggested to us an explanation for adipose tissue loss in partial lipodystrophy, a rare human condition usually associated with the immunoglobulin G(IgG) autoantibody nephritic factor (NeF) which leads to enhanced alternative pathway activation in vivo. We hypothesized that in the presence of NeF, there is dysregulated complement activation at the membrane of the adipocyte, leading to adipocyte lysis. Here we show that adipocytes explanted from rat epididymal fat pads are lysed by NeF-containing sera but not by control sera. A similar pattern is seen with IgG fractions of these sera. Adipocyte lysis in the presence of NeF is associated with the generation of fluid-phase terminal complement complexes, the level of which correlates closely with the level of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of cell lysis. Lysis is abolished by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, which chelates divalent cations and prevents complement activation, and reduced by an antibody to factor D, a key component of the alternative pathway. These data provide an explanation for the previously obscure link between NeF and fat cell damage. PMID:8496694

  4. Displacement phenomena in lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wonryeon

    2015-10-01

    The work described here examines displacement phenomena that play a role in lectin affinity chromatography and their potential to impact reproducibility. This was achieved using Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), a lectin widely used in monitoring cancer. Four small identical LEL columns were coupled in series to form a single affinity chromatography system with the last in the series connected to an absorbance detector. The serial affinity column set (SACS) was then loaded with human plasma proteins. At the completion of loading, the column set was disassembled, the four columns were eluted individually, the captured proteins were trypsin digested, the peptides were deglycosylated with PNGase F, and the parent proteins were identified through mass spectral analyses. Significantly different sets of glycoproteins were selected by each column, some proteins appearing to be exclusively bound to the first column while others were bound further along in the series. Clearly, sample displacement chromatography (SDC) occurs. Glycoproteins were bound at different places in the column train, identifying the presence of glycoforms with different affinity on a single glycoprotein. It is not possible to see these phenomena in the single column mode of chromatography. Moreover, low abundance proteins were enriched, which facilitates detection. The great advantage of this method is that it differentiates between glycoproteins on the basis of their binding affinity. Displacement phenomena are concluded to be a significant component of the separation mechanism in heavily loaded lectin affinity chromatography columns. This further suggests that care must be exercised in sample loading of lectin columns to prevent analyte displacement with nonretained proteins. PMID:26348026

  5. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katy A; O'Bryan, John P

    2011-01-01

    Defining the subcellular distribution of signaling complexes is imperative to understanding the output from that complex. Conventional methods such as immunoprecipitation do not provide information on the spatial localization of complexes. In contrast, BiFC monitors the interaction and subcellular compartmentalization of protein complexes. In this method, a fluororescent protein is split into amino- and carboxy-terminal non-fluorescent fragments which are then fused to two proteins of interest. Interaction of the proteins results in reconstitution of the fluorophore (Figure 1). A limitation of BiFC is that once the fragmented fluorophore is reconstituted the complex is irreversible. This limitation is advantageous in detecting transient or weak interactions, but precludes a kinetic analysis of complex dynamics. An additional caveat is that the reconstituted flourophore requires 30min to mature and fluoresce, again precluding the observation of real time interactions. BiFC is a specific example of the protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) which employs reporter proteins such as green fluorescent protein variants (BiFC), dihydrofolate reductase, b-lactamase, and luciferase to measure protein:protein interactions. Alternative methods to study protein:protein interactions in cells include fluorescence co-localization and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). For co-localization, two proteins are individually tagged either directly with a fluorophore or by indirect immunofluorescence. However, this approach leads to high background of non-interacting proteins making it difficult to interpret co-localization data. In addition, due to the limits of resolution of confocal microscopy, two proteins may appear co-localized without necessarily interacting. With BiFC, fluorescence is only observed when the two proteins of interest interact. FRET is another excellent method for studying protein:protein interactions, but can be technically challenging. FRET

  6. Von Willebrand factor regulates complement on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Noone, Damien G; Riedl, Magdalena; Pluthero, Fred G; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Lu, Lily; Quan, Yi; Balgobin, Steve; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Schneppenheim, Sonja; Budde, Ulrich; James, Paula; Atkinson, John P; Palaniyar, Nades; Kahr, Walter H A; Licht, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura have traditionally been considered separate entities. Defects in the regulation of the complement alternative pathway occur in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and defects in the cleavage of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-multimers arise in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. However, recent studies suggest that both entities are related as defects in the disease-causing pathways overlap or show functional interactions. Here we investigate the possible functional link of VWF-multimers and the complement system on endothelial cells. Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) were obtained from 3 healthy individuals and 2 patients with Type 3 von Willebrand disease lacking VWF. Cells were exposed to a standardized complement challenge via the combination of classical and alternative pathway activation and 50% normal human serum resulting in complement fixation to the endothelial surface. Under these conditions we found the expected release of VWF-multimers causing platelet adhesion onto BOECs from healthy individuals. Importantly, in BOECs derived from patients with von Willebrand disease complement C3c deposition and cytotoxicity were more pronounced than on BOECs derived from normal individuals. This is of particular importance as primary glomerular endothelial cells display a heterogeneous expression pattern of VWF with overall reduced VWF abundance. Thus, our results support a mechanistic link between VWF-multimers and the complement system. However, our findings also identify VWF as a new complement regulator on vascular endothelial cells and suggest that VWF has a protective effect on endothelial cells and complement-mediated injury. PMID:27236750

  7. Biological role of mannose binding lectin: From newborns to centenarians.

    PubMed

    Scorza, Manuela; Liguori, Renato; Elce, Ausilia; Salvatore, Francesco; Castaldo, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Mannose binding lectin (MBL) is a protein of innate immunity that activates the complement and promotes opsonophagocytosis. The deficiency of MBL due to several common gene polymorphisms significantly enhances the risk of severe infections, particularly in the neonatal age and in childhood. On the contrary, the role of the protein in carcinogenesis and atherogenesis is still debated: MBL has a relevant role against neoplastic cells, but some studies described a protective effect of low levels of MBL toward breast cancer and a longer survival of lung cancer patients with a reduced MBL activity. Similarly, some studies concluded on the protective role of low levels of MBL toward cardiovascular diseases while other focused on a higher risk of myocardial infarction in subjects with a deficient activity of the protein. More recently, a role of MBL in the clearance of senescent cells emerged, and a study in two large cohorts of centenarians demonstrated that a high biological activity of the protein enhances the risk of autoimmune diseases. This body of data strongly suggests that the optimal levels of MBL activity depend on the age and on the environmental context of each subject. PMID:25783214

  8. Bacteria under stress by complement and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Berends, Evelien T M; Kuipers, Annemarie; Ravesloot, Marietta M; Urbanus, Rolf T; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2014-11-01

    The complement and coagulation systems are two related protein cascades in plasma that serve important roles in host defense and hemostasis, respectively. Complement activation on bacteria supports cellular immune responses and leads to direct killing of bacteria via assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex (MAC). Recent studies have indicated that the coagulation system also contributes to mammalian innate defense since coagulation factors can entrap bacteria inside clots and generate small antibacterial peptides. In this review, we will provide detailed insights into the molecular interplay between these protein cascades and bacteria. We take a closer look at how these pathways are activated on bacterial surfaces and discuss the mechanisms by which they directly cause stress to bacterial cells. The poorly understood mechanism for bacterial killing by the MAC will be reevaluated in light of recent structural insights. Finally, we highlight the strategies used by pathogenic bacteria to modulate these protein networks. Overall, these insights will contribute to a better understanding of the host defense roles of complement and coagulation against bacteria. PMID:25065463

  9. Algal lectins as promising biomolecules for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Thakur, Shivani Rani; Bansal, Parveen

    2015-02-01

    Lectins are natural bioactive ubiquitous proteins or glycoproteins of non-immune response that bind reversibly to glycans of glycoproteins, glycolipids and polysaccharides possessing at least one non-catalytic domain causing agglutination. Some of them consist of several carbohydrate-binding domains which endow them with the properties of cell agglutination or precipitation of glycoconjugates. Lectins are rampant in nature from plants, animals and microorganisms. Among microorganisms, algae are the potent source of lectins with unique properties specifically from red algae. The demand of peculiar and neoteric biologically active substances has intensified the developments on isolation and biomedical applications of new algal lectins. Comprehensively, algal lectins are used in biomedical research for antiviral, antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor activities, etc. and in pharmaceutics for the fabrication of cost-effective protein expression systems and nutraceutics. In this review, an attempt has been made to collate the information on various biomedical applications of algal lectins. PMID:23855360

  10. Two Chitotriose-Specific Lectins Show Anti-Angiogenesis, Induces Caspase-9-Mediated Apoptosis and Early Arrest of Pancreatic Tumor Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruby; Nawale, Laxman; Sarkar, Dhiman; Suresh, C G

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative activity of two chito-specific agglutinins purified from Benincasa hispida (BhL) and Datura innoxia (DiL9) of different plant family origin was investigated on various cancer cell lines. Both lectins showed chitotriose specificity, by inhibiting lectin hemagglutinating activity. On further studies, it was revealed that these agglutinins caused remarkable concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic cancerous cells but not on the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells even at higher doses determined using MTT assay. The GI50 values were approximately 8.4 μg ml(-1) (0.247 μM) and 142 μg ml(-1) (14.8 μM) for BhL and DiL9, respectively, against PANC-1 cells. The growth inhibitory effect of these lectins on pancreatic cancer cells were shown to be a consequence of lectin cell surface binding and triggering G0/G1 arrest, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, sustained increase of the intracellular calcium release and the apoptotic signal is amplified by activation of caspases executing cell death. Interestingly, these lectins also showed anti-angiogenic activity by disrupting the endothelial tubulogenesis. Therefore, we report for the first time two chito-specific lectins specifically binding to tumor glycans; they can be considered to be a class of molecules with antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer cells mediated through caspase dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26795117

  11. Two Chitotriose-Specific Lectins Show Anti-Angiogenesis, Induces Caspase-9-Mediated Apoptosis and Early Arrest of Pancreatic Tumor Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Dhiman; Suresh, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative activity of two chito- specific agglutinins purified from Benincasa hispida (BhL) and Datura innoxia (DiL9) of different plant family origin was investigated on various cancer cell lines. Both lectins showed chitotriose specificity, by inhibiting lectin hemagglutinating activity. On further studies, it was revealed that these agglutinins caused remarkable concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic cancerous cells but not on the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells even at higher doses determined using MTT assay. The GI50 values were approximately 8.4 μg ml-1 (0.247 μM) and 142 μg ml-1(14.8 μM) for BhL and DiL9, respectively, against PANC-1 cells. The growth inhibitory effect of these lectins on pancreatic cancer cells were shown to be a consequence of lectin cell surface binding and triggering G0/G1 arrest, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, sustained increase of the intracellular calcium release and the apoptotic signal is amplified by activation of caspases executing cell death. Interestingly, these lectins also showed anti-angiogenic activity by disrupting the endothelial tubulogenesis. Therefore, we report for the first time two chito-specific lectins specifically binding to tumor glycans; they can be considered to be a class of molecules with antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer cells mediated through caspase dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26795117

  12. Anti-complement-factor H-associated glomerulopathies.

    PubMed

    Durey, Marie-Agnes Dragon; Sinha, Aditi; Togarsimalemath, Shambhuprasad Kotresh; Bagga, Arvind

    2016-09-01

    Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS), an important cause of acute kidney injury, is characterized by dysregulation of the complement pathway, frequent need for dialysis, and progression to end-stage renal disease. Autoantibodies against complement factor H (FH), the main plasma regulatory protein of the alternative pathway of the complement system, account for a considerable proportion of children with aHUS. The autoantibodies are usually associated with the occurrence of a homozygous deletion in the genes encoding the FH-related proteins FHR1 and FHR3. High levels of autoantibodies, noted at the onset of disease and during relapses, induce functional deficiency of FH, whereas their decline, in response to plasma exchanges and/or immunosuppressive therapy, is associated with disease remission. Management with plasma exchange and immunosuppression is remarkably effective in inducing and maintaining remission in aHUS associated with FH autoantibodies, whereas terminal complement blockade with eculizumab is considered the most effective therapy in other forms of aHUS. Anti-FH autoantibodies are also detected in a small proportion of patients with C3 glomerulopathies, which are characterized by chronic glomerular injury mediated by activation of the alternative complement pathway and predominant C3 deposits on renal histology. PMID:27452363

  13. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  14. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  15. Fine carbohydrate recognition of Euphorbia milii lectin.

    PubMed

    Irazoqui, Fernando J; Vozari-Hampe, Magdolna M; Lardone, Ricardo D; Villarreal, Marcos A; Sendra, Victor G; Montich, Guillermo G; Trindade, Vera M; Clausen, Henrik; Nores, Gustavo A

    2005-10-14

    Glycans are key structures involved in biological processes such as cell attachment, migration, and invasion. Information coded on cell-surface glycans is frequently deciphered by proteins, as lectins, that recognize specific carbohydrate topology. Here, we describe the fine carbohydrate specificity of Euphorbia milii lectin (EML). Competitive assays using various sugars showed that GalNAc was the strongest inhibitor, and that the hydroxyl axial position of C4 and acetamido on C2 of GalNAc are critical points of EML recognition. A hydrophobic locus adjacent to GalNAc is also an important region for EML binding. Direct binding assays of EML revealed a stereochemical requirement for a structure adjacent to terminal GalNAc, showing that GalNAc residue is a necessary but not sufficient condition for EML interaction. The capacity of EML to bind epithelial tumor cells makes it a potentially useful tool for study of some over-expressed GalNAc glycoconjugates. PMID:16122701

  16. Determinants of quaternary association in legume lectins

    PubMed Central

    Brinda, K.V.; Mitra, Nivedita; Surolia, Avadhesha; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the sequence of amino acids in proteins code for its tertiary structure. It is also known that there exists a relationship between sequence and the quaternary structure of proteins. The question addressed here is whether the nature of quaternary association can be predicted from the sequence, similar to the three-dimensional structure prediction from the sequence. The class of proteins called legume lectins is an interesting model system to investigate this problem, because they have very high sequence and tertiary structure homology, with diverse forms of quaternary association. Hence, we have used legume lectins as a probe in this paper to (1) gain novel insights about the relationship between sequence and quaternary structure; (2) identify the sequence motifs that are characteristic of a given type of quaternary association; and (3) predict the quaternary association from the sequence motif. PMID:15215518

  17. Complement involvement in periodontitis: molecular mechanisms and rational therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Maekawa, Tomoki; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a network of interacting fluid-phase and cell surface-associated molecules that trigger, amplify, and regulate immune and inflammatory signaling pathways. Dysregulation of this finely balanced network can destabilize host-microbe homeostasis and cause inflammatory tissue damage. Evidence from clinical and animal model-based studies suggests that complement is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. This review discusses molecular mechanisms of complement involvement in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiome and the resulting destructive inflammation, culminating in loss of periodontal bone support. These mechanistic studies have additionally identified potential therapeutic targets. In this regard, interventional studies in preclinical models have provided proof-of-concept for using complement inhibitors for the treatment of human periodontitis. PMID:26306443

  18. Complement - a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Hajishengallis, George; Yang, Kun; Lambris, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly a century after the significance of the human complement system was recognized we have come to realize that its versatile functions extend far beyond the elimination of microbes. Indeed, complement acts as a rapid and efficient immune surveillance system that has distinct effects on healthy and altered host cells and foreign intruders. By eliminating cellular debris and infectious microbes, orchestrating immune responses, and sending `danger' signals, complement contributes substantially to homeostasis, but it may also take action against healthy cells if not properly controlled. This review describes our updated view of the function, structure, and dynamics of the complement network, highlights its interconnection with immunity at large and with other endogenous pathways, and illustrates its dual role in homeostasis and disease. PMID:20720586

  19. Luciferase fragment complementation imaging in preclinical cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Madryn C.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    The luciferase fragment complementation assay (LFCA) enables molecular events to be non-invasively imaged in live cells in vitro and in vivo in a comparatively cheap and safe manner. It is a development of previous enzyme complementation assays in which reporter genes are split into two, individually enzymatically inactive, fragments that are able to complement one another upon interaction. This complementation can be used to externally visualize cellular activities. In recent years, the number of studies which have used LFCAs to probe questions relevant to cancer have increased, and this review summarizes the most significant and interesting of these. In particular, it focuses on work conducted on the epidermal growth factor, nuclear and chemokine receptor families, and intracellular signaling pathways, including IP3, cAMP, Akt, cMyc, NRF2 and Rho GTPases. LFCAs which have been developed to image DNA methylation and detect RNA transcripts are also discussed. PMID:25594026

  20. Expression of complement 3 and complement 5 in newt limb and lens regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuko; Madhavan, Mayur; Call, Mindy K; Santiago, William; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Lambris, John D; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2003-03-01

    Some urodele amphibians possess the capacity to regenerate their body parts, including the limbs and the lens of the eye. The molecular pathway(s) involved in urodele regeneration are largely unknown. We have previously suggested that complement may participate in limb regeneration in axolotls. To further define its role in the regenerative process, we have examined the pattern of distribution and spatiotemporal expression of two key components, C3 and C5, during limb and lens regeneration in the newt Notophthalmus viridescens. First, we have cloned newt cDNAs encoding C3 and C5 and have generated Abs specifically recognizing these molecules. Using these newt-specific probes, we have found by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis that these molecules are expressed during both limb and lens regeneration, but not in the normal limb and lens. The C3 and C5 proteins were expressed in a complementary fashion during limb regeneration, with C3 being expressed mainly in the blastema and C5 exclusively in the wound epithelium. Similarly, during the process of lens regeneration, C3 was detected in the iris and cornea, while C5 was present in the regenerating lens vesicle as well as the cornea. The distinct expression profile of complement proteins in regenerative tissues of the urodele lens and limb supports a nonimmunologic function of complement in tissue regeneration and constitutes the first systematic effort to dissect its involvement in regenerative processes of lower vertebrate species. PMID:12594255

  1. Concept, strategy and realization of lectin-based glycan profiling.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Lectins are a diverse group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Each lectin has its own specificity profile. It is believed that lectins exist in all living organisms that produce glycans. From a practical viewpoint, lectins have been used extensively in biochemical fields including proteomics due to their usefulness as detection and enrichment tools for specific glycans. Nevertheless, they have often been underestimated as probes, especially compared with antibodies, because of their low affinity and broad specificity. However, together with the concept of glycomics, such properties of lectins are now considered to be suitable for the task of 'profiling' in order to cover a wider range of ligands. Recently there has been rapid movement in the field of proteomics aimed at the investigation of glycan-related biomarkers. This is partly because of limitations of the present approach of simply following changes in protein-level expression, without paying sufficient attention to the fact and effects of glycosylation. The trend is reflected in the frequent use of lectins in the contexts of glycoprotein enrichment and glycan profiling. However, there are many aspects to be considered in using lectins, which differ considerably from antibodies. In this article, the author, as a developer of two unique methodologies, frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) and the lectin microarray, describes critical points concerning the use of lectins, together with the concept, strategy and means to achieve advances in these emerging glycan profiling technologies. PMID:18390573

  2. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  3. Tomato lectin histochemistry for microglial visualization.

    PubMed

    Villacampa, Nàdia; Almolda, Beatriz; González, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    The use of different lectins for the study of microglial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) is a valuable tool that has been extensively used in the last years for the selective staining of this glial cell population, not only in normal physiological conditions, but also in a wide range of pathological situations where the normal homeostasis of the parenchyma is disturbed. In this chapter we accurately describe the methodology for the selective labelling of microglial cells by using the tomato lectin (TL), a protein lectin obtained from Lycopersicum esculentum with specific affinity for poly-N-acetyl lactosamine sugar residues which are found on the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm of microglia. Here we describe how to perform this technique on vibratome, frozen, and paraffin sections for optical microscopy, as well as for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Using this methodology it is possible to visualize amoeboid microglia in the developing brain, ramified microglia in the adult, and activated/reactive microglia in the experimentally damaged brain. In addition, as TL also recognized sugar residues in endothelial cells, this technique is very useful for the study of the relationship established between microglia and the CNS vasculature. PMID:23813385

  4. Putative effects of mitogenic lectin therapy corroborated by alloactivation data.

    PubMed

    Wimer, B M

    1996-02-01

    A firm theoretical case for PHA and other plant mitogens as superior immunomodulators has previously been presented, but direct confirmatory evidences have been compromised by experimental studies involving excessive dosages of erythroagglutinating PHA that often compromised the circulation in smaller animals, while inadequate amounts were applied in humans because this mitogen's availability in nonagglutinating form was restricted. The resulting underestimation of efficacy has failed to inspire the production of industrial quantities of mitogens required for reliable clinical trials. As a means of circumventing this dilemma, past favorable results from the immuno-stimulating activities of allocativation have been extrapolated to forecast the effects to be anticipated from mitogenic modulation. Such an extrapolation would underrate the latter's impact, which would neither be confined to stimulation nor dependent on the uncertainties of engraftment. This review cites clear examples showing that all recognized immune system pathways have been stimulated by alloactivation except perhaps the ADCC, and an example of this pathway's activation has been shown to have occurred with PHA therapy itself. Of the mitogenic lectins currently available, PHA, Con A, and PWM have each shown rare instances of hypersensitization that hopefully might be eliminated by exclusion of contaminants with recombinant DNA methods of production. PMID:10851521

  5. Loa loa Microfilariae evade complement attack in vivo by acquiring regulatory proteins from host plasma.

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Karita; Meri, Taru; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2009-09-01

    Loa loa is a filarial nematode that infects humans. The adults live in subcutaneous tissues and produce microfilariae that live for several weeks in the blood circulation in order to be transmitted to another person via blood meals of a dipterian vector. As microfilariae live in continuous contact with plasma, it is obvious that they evade the complement system. We studied markers of complement activation and signs of complement regulation on Loa loa microfilariae in vivo. The microfilariae were isolated from anticoagulated blood samples of a Loa loa-infected Caucasian patient. C1q and some mannose-binding lectin but only a limited amount of C3b or C4b fragments and practically no C5 or C5b-9 were present on the microfilariae. The covalently microfilaria-bound C3 and C4 depositions were mainly inactive iC3b, C3c, and iC4b fragments indicating that microfilariae had regulated complement activation in vivo. Also, in vitro deposition of C3b onto the microfilariae upon serum exposure was limited. The patient-isolated microfilariae were found to carry the host complement regulators factor H and C4b-binding protein on the outermost layer, so called sheath. The microfilaria-bound factor H was functionally active. Binding of the complement regulators to the microfilariae was confirmed in vitro using (125)I-labeled factor H and C4b-binding protein. In conclusion, our study shows that Loa loa microfilariae block complement activation and acquire the host complement regulators factor H and C4b-binding protein in blood circulation. This is the first time that binding of complement regulators onto nonviral pathogens has been demonstrated to occur in humans in vivo. PMID:19528206

  6. Long Circulating Lectin Conjugated Paclitaxel Loaded Magnetic Nanoparticles: A New Theranostic Avenue for Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhalaxmi; Dilnawaz, Fahima; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Amongst all leukemias, Bcr-Abl positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) confers resistance to native drug due to multi drug resistance and also resistance to p53 and fas ligand pathways. In the present study, we have investigated the efficacy of microtubule stabilizing paclitaxel loaded magnetic nanoparticles (pac-MNPs) to ascertain its cytotoxic effect on Bcr-Abl positive K562 cells. For active targeted therapy, pac-MNPs were functionalized with lectin glycoprotein which resulted in higher cellular uptake and lower IC50 value suggesting the efficacy of targeted delivery of paclitaxel. Both pac-MNPs and lectin conjugated pac-MNPs have a prolonged circulation time in serum suggesting increased bioavailability and therapeutics index of paclitaxel in vivo. Further, the molecular mechanism pertaining to pac-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed by studying the involvement of different apoptotic pathway proteins by immunoblotting and quantitative PCR. Our study revealed simultaneous activation of JNK pathway leading to Bcr-Abl instability and the extrinsic apoptotic pathway after pac-MNPs treatment in two Bcr-Abl positive cell lines. In addition, the MRI data suggested the potential application of MNPs as imaging agent. Thus our in vitro and in vivo results strongly suggested the pac-MNPs as a future prospective theranostic tool for leukemia therapy. PMID:22110595

  7. Subcellular site of lectin synthesis in developing rice embryos

    PubMed Central

    Stinissen, Hetty M.; Peumans, Willy J.; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1984-01-01

    Embryos of developing rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Koshihikari) caryopses which actively synthesize lectin were labelled with [35S]cysteine for different times and newly synthesized rice lectin was isolated by affinity chromatography. Gel filtration of embryo extracts on Sepharose-4B indicated that a large portion of the labelled lectin was associated with the particulate fraction. Experiments with detergent indicated that this lectin was sequestered within organelles. When extracts of pulse-labelled embryos were fractionated on isopycnic sucrose gradients, this detergent-released lectin banded in the same density-region as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker enzyme NADH-cytochrome c reductase. Both radioactivity in rice lectin and the enzyme activity shifted towards a higher density in the presence of 2 mM Mg acetate, indicating that the labelled lectin was associated with the rough ER. The ER-bound lectin could be chased from this organelle when tissue was incubated in unlabelled cysteine following a 1 h pulse of labelled cysteine. Radioactivity chased out of the ER with a half-life of ˜4 h and accumulated in the soluble fraction. In the ER the lectin was present as a polypeptide with mol. wt. 23 000, while in the soluble fraction it occurred as polypeptides with mol. wt. 18 000, 10 000 and 8000. The rice lectin in the ER is capable of binding carbohydrates since it binds readily to the affinity gels. It is associated into dimers with an approximate mol. wt. of 46 000. The results show that newly synthesized rice lectin is transiently sequestered within the ER before further transport and processing take place. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:16453545

  8. Complement-activating ability of leucocytes from patients with complement factor I deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, H V; Rasmussen, J M; Leslie, R G

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that normal peripheral blood B cells are capable of activating complement via the alternative pathway (AP), that the activation is associated with complement receptor type 2 (CR2) expression, and that erythrocytes at normal blood levels partially inhibit the activation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether factor I (FI) deficiency, which leads to continued formation of the AP convertase (C3bBb) resulting in the consumption of factor B and C3 and large scale generation of C3b fragments, affects the phenotype and/or function of the patients' B cells. Using flow cytometry, peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) from two FI-deficient patients were investigated for expression of complement receptors and complement regulatory proteins, in vivo-deposited C3 fragments and in vitro complement-activating ability. CR1 levels on B cells were significantly lower in FI-deficient patients than in normal individuals, whereas CR2 levels were found to be reduced, although not to a significant extent. CR1 levels on monocytes and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) were found to be normal or slightly raised. All leucocyte subpopulations were found to be covered in vivo with C3b fragments. AP activation on B cells from FI-deficient patients in homologous serum was significantly reduced compared with that for normal individuals, whereas no in vitro activation was seen in autologous serum. In addition, the in vivo-bound C3b fragments were degraded to C3d,g when the patients' PBL were incubated in homologous serum containing EDTA. Finally, the patients, erythrocytes failed to exert any inhibition on AP activation in homologous serum. PMID:9301541

  9. Microvascular alterations and the role of complement in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Lahoria, Rajat; Selcen, Duygu; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pathological basis of perifascicular muscle fibre atrophy in dermatomyositis. These include ischaemia due to immune-mediated microvascular injury, enhanced expression of type 1 interferon-induced gene transcripts in perifascicular capillaries and muscle fibres, and occlusion of larger perimysial blood vessels. Microvascular complement deposition is a feature of dermatomyositis pathology but the trigger for complement activation, the predominant complement pathway involved, or its role in the pathogenesis of the disease, has not been clearly defined. In the first step of this study we examined the density of capillaries and transverse vessels and searched for occlusion or depletion of larger perimysial blood vessels in 10 patients with dermatomyositis. This revealed an invariable association of perifascicular atrophy with capillary and transverse vessel depletion. The capillary and transverse vessel densities in non-atrophic fibre regions were not significantly different from those in muscle specimens of 10 age-matched controls. Next, in the same 10, as well as in 40 additional dermatomyositis patients, we searched for vascular deposits of IgG, IgM, and the C5b-9 complement membrane attack complex. Thirty-one of 50 dermatomyositis specimens contained C5b-9 reactive endomysial microvessels but none of these or other vessels reacted for IgG. Ten of 50 specimens harboured IgM-positive capillaries but only a few of these reacted for C5b-9. Finally, we analysed and compared different pathways of complement activation in dermatomyositis, lupus nephritis, and necrotic muscle fibres in Duchenne dystrophy. In lupus nephritis, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with IgG, IgM, C1q, and C4d, consistent with immune complex dependent activation of the classical complement pathway. In both dermatomyositis and Duchenne dystrophy, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with C1q and C4d and rarely with IgM indicating activation of the classical

  10. Complement activation by Coccidioides immitis: in vitro and clinical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Galgiani, J N; Yam, P; Petz, L D; Williams, P L; Stevens, D A

    1980-01-01

    Mycelial- or spherule-phase derivatives of Coccidioides immitis caused a decrease in vitro of total hemolytic complement in serum from a nonsensitized person. Activation involved both classic and alternative pathways as shown by deprssion of hemolytic C4 and by generation of products of activation of components C3, C4, and factor B. In addition, functional complement activity or immunoreactive levels of complement components or both were measured in 23 patients with self-limited or disseminated coccidioidomycosis. Low total hemolytic complement was found in nine, usually during the early phase of primary illness, and was transient. Hemolytic C4 was low, and the effect of inulin to decrease complement levels was blunted, suggested both classic and alternative pathways may be deficient. However, associated depression of immunoreactive levels of components assayed (C3, C4, C5, factor B, and properdin) was not consistently found. This disparity raises the possibility of enhanced in vitro inactivation analogous to activation by immune complexes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6901703

  11. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C.; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  12. Glycan profiling of endometrial cancers using lectin microarray.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Sugiyama, Taro; Miyazawa, Masaki; Muramatsu, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kyoko; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Mikami, Mikio

    2012-10-01

    Cell surface glycans change during the process of malignant transformation. To characterize and distinguish endometrial cancer and endometrium, we performed glycan profiling using an emerging modern technology, lectin microarray analysis. The three cell lines, two from endometrial cancers [well-differentiated type (G1) and poorly differentiated type (G3)] and one from normal endometrium, were successfully categorized into three independent groups by 45 lectins. Furthermore, in cancer cells, a clear difference between G1 and G3 type was observed for the glycans recognized with six lectins, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), Sambucus sieboldiana agglutinin (SSA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Trichosanthes japonica agglutinin I (TJA-I), Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA), and Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPL). The lectin microarray analysis using G3 type tissues demonstrated that stage I and stage III or IV were distinguished depending on signal pattern of three lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), BPL, and ACA. In addition, the analysis of the glycans on the ovarian cancer cells showed that only anticancer drug-sensitive cell lines had almost no activities to specific three lectins. Glycan profiling by the lectin microarray may be used to assess the characteristics of tumors and potentially to predict the success of chemotherapy treatment. PMID:22957961

  13. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... antigens. These substances are used to detect blood group antigens for in vitro diagnostic purposes. (b...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Products Used In Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9550 Lectins and protectins. (a) Identification. Lectins and protectins...

  14. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-01

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest. PMID:26262628

  15. Assessment of lectin inactivation by heat and digestion.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Grant, G

    1998-01-01

    Proteins/glycoproteins from plants, particularly lectins, are more resistant to heat denaturation than animal proteins (1, 2). With legume seeds, whose lectin content is appreciable, this presents potentially serious problems in nutritional practice. Therefore, before they can be used safely, legume-based food/ feeds usually require thorough and expensive heat processing to inactivate antinutritive components. Indeed, dry or moist heating of seeds at 70°C for several h has little or no effect on their lectin activity (Fig. 1) and treatment at much higher temperatures is needed to inactivate the biological and antinutritional effects of legume lectins (1, 2). The safety aspect is even more serious with some monocot lectins, such as wheatgerm agglutinin or a number of oilseed lectins, such as peanut agglutinin and many others because they are extremely heat stable and normal cooking or other conventional heat treatments may fail to inactivate them (3) Thus, the best way to avoid potential harmful effects of these heat-resistant lectins is to limit their dietary intake to a minimum. Fig. 1. Loss of lectin activity during aqueous heat treatment of soybean at various temperatures. PMID:21374488

  16. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  17. Frutalin, a galactose-binding lectin, induces chemotaxis and rearrangement of actin cytoskeleton in human neutrophils: involvement of tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Brando-Lima, Aline C; Saldanha-Gama, Roberta F; Henriques, Maria das Graças M O; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Moreira, Renato A; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina

    2005-10-15

    Several lectin-like molecules have been shown as potent activators of leukocytes. Galactose-binding lectins are of special interest since they could interact with several endogenous molecules involved in the innate and specific immune responses. The effects of Frutalin (FTL), an alpha-D-galactose (Gal)-binding plant lectin, on the modulation of neutrophil (PMN) functions were investigated. FTL induced a dose-dependent PMN migration in mice pleural cavity. Moreover, FTL was also a potent direct chemotactic for human PMN, in vitro, and triggered oxidative burst in these cells. These effects were accompanied by a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton dynamic, activation of tyrosine kinase (TK) pathways, increase in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, and its subsequent association to phosphoinositide3-kinase (PI3K). All those effects were inhibited in the presence of Gal, suggesting specific carbohydrate recognition for FTL effects. The activations of TK and PI3K pathways are essential events for FTL-induced chemotaxis, since inhibitors of these pathways, genistein and LY294002, inhibited neutrophil migration in vitro. The data indicate that sugar-protein interactions between a soluble lectin and galacto-components on neutrophil surface trigger the TK pathway, inducing FAK and PI3K activation, interfering with cell motility and oxidative response. PMID:16183388

  18. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  19. Mitogenic effect of Parkia speciosa seed lectin on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Suvachittanont, W; Jaranchavanapet, P

    2000-12-01

    Mitogenic activity of a lectin, purified from Parkia speciosa seeds, on the isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from normal blood donors and patients with esophageal carcinoma was examined using [3H]thymidine incorporation. The lectin increases the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA of human lymphocytes. The activity of the lectin increased as its concentration was increased and then declined once the concentration passed an optimum point. The stimulant effect was also expressed using a proliferation index (PI): the ratio of [3H]thymidine incorporated into lymphocytes in the presence and absence of the lectin. The mitogenic activity of the lectin is comparable to those of the known T-cell mitogens, such as concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen. Only slightly less responsiveness was observed in the case of lymphocytes from esophageal cancer compared to lymphocytes from normal donors. PMID:11199124

  20. Use of amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to differentiate cervical dysplasia (CIN).

    PubMed

    Santaella-Verdejo, Arturo; Gallegos, Belem; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro; Zenteno, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    Alterations in O-glycosylation of proteins in cell surfaces can originate disorder in cellular function, as well as in cell transformation and tumoral differentiation. In this work, we investigate changes in O-glycosylation in cervical intraepithelial dysplasia (CIN) at different stages of differentiation (CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III) using lectins specific for O-glycosidically linked glycans. Twenty cases with CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III dysplasias each, and 20 normal cases were studied by lectin histochemistry and evaluated under optical microscopy. The lectins from Glycine max and Griffonia simplicifolia showed no differences in their recognition pattern among the different CIN stages and normal tissue. Dolichos Biflorus lectin recognized CIN I dysplasia. Lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus showed increased reactivity in the presence of CIN II dysplasia, compared with CIN I and CIN III. These results suggest that subtle modifications in the O-glycosylation pattern could be considered in diagnosis or prognosis of cervical precancerous stages. PMID:17516251

  1. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  2. Biotoxicity assays for fruiting body lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Garbani, Mattia; Lüthy, Peter; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a specific class of fungal lectins, commonly referred to as fruiting body lectins, play a role as effector molecules in the defense of fungi against predators and parasites. Hallmarks of these fungal lectins are their specific expression in reproductive structures, fruiting bodies, and/or sclerotia and their synthesis on free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Fruiting body lectins are released upon damage of the fungal cell and bind to specific carbohydrate structures of predators and parasites, which leads to deterrence, inhibition of growth, and development or even killing of these organisms. Here, we describe assays to assess the toxicity of such lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins toward three different model organisms: the insect Aedes aegypti, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. All three assays are based on heterologous expression of the examined proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and feeding of these recombinant bacteria to omnivorous and bacterivorous organisms. PMID:20816208

  3. Complement in age-related macular degeneration: a focus on function

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D T; Zipfel, P F; Hughes, A E

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an inflammatory disease, which causes visual impairment and blindness in older people. The proteins of the complement system are central to the development of this disease. Local and systemic inflammation in AMD are mediated by the deregulated action of the alternative pathway of the complement system. Variants in complement system genes alter an individual's risk of developing AMD. Recent studies have shown how some risk-associated genetic variants alter the function of the complement system. In this review, we describe the evolution of the complement system and bring together recent research to form a picture of how changes in complement system genes and proteins affect the function of the complement cascade, and how this affects the development of AMD. We discuss the application of this knowledge to prevention and possible future treatments of AMD. PMID:21394116

  4. Complement activation in the context of stem cells and tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstatter, Ingrid U; Khaldoyanidi, Sophia K; DiScipio, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    The complement pathway is best known for its role in immune surveillance and inflammation. However, its ability of opsonizing and removing not only pathogens, but also necrotic and apoptotic cells, is a phylogenetically ancient means of initiating tissue repair. The means and mechanisms of complement-mediated tissue repair are discussed in this review. There is increasing evidence that complement activation contributes to tissue repair at several levels. These range from the chemo-attraction of stem and progenitor cells to areas of complement activation, to increased survival of various cell types in the presence of split products of complement, and to the production of trophic factors by cells activated by the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. This repair aspect of complement biology has not found sufficient appreciation until recently. The following will examine this aspect of complement biology with an emphasis on the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. PMID:26435769

  5. cDNA cloning, characterization, and pharmacologic evaluation of anticancer activity of a lectin gene in Pinellia integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Liu, L L; Yang, Z J; Peng, Z S

    2016-01-01

    Plant lectins are proteins that possess at least one non-catalytic domain, which could reversibly bind to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. The important roles played by plant lectins in immune regulation, signaling pathways, and plant defense could be attributed to their specific binding activities with carbohydrates. In this study, a Pinellia integrifolia lectin gene, designated pia, was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame (ORF) of pia was constructed into the pET-28a vector, and a 33-kDa recombinant protein was induced in Escherichia coli BL21. The hemagglutination and anticancer properties of the purified recombinant protein were assayed in vitro. The results indicated that the full-length cDNA of pia was 1210 bp long, containing an 807-bp ORF encoding a 268-amino acid peptide. The putative P. integrifolia lectin protein (PIA) contained three mannose-binding sites. The agglutinating activity exhibited by PIA was inhibited by D-mannose. PIA was also shown to exert an anti-proliferative activity against nasopharyngeal carcinoma, human cervical carcinoma, and human breast cancer cell lines in vitro. These results could be applied to determine the function of PIA in the future. PMID:27525949

  6. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes. PMID:23176516

  7. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age. PMID:27237111

  8. Nutritional evaluation of lectin-free soybeans for poultry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, M W; Parsons, C M; Hymowitz, T

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the nutritional value of raw lectin-free soybeans in comparison with raw Kunitz trypsin inhibitor-free soybeans, raw conventional soybeans, and commercial heat processed soybean meal (SBM). Analyzed lectin values (milligrams per kilogram) were 7.2, 7.1, and < 0.00015 for the Kunitz-free, conventional, and lectin-free soybeans, respectively. Three experiments were conducted using New Hampshire x Columbian male chicks fed 23% CP dextrose-soybean diets from 8 to 17 d of age. Growth performance of chicks fed lectin-free soybeans was greater (P < 0.05) than that of chicks fed raw conventional soybeans in all three experiments. However, performance of chicks fed lectin-free soybeans was lower than that of chicks fed Kunitz-free soybeans or SBM. The SBM yielded weight gains and feed efficiencies that were much higher than those observed from any of the raw soybeans. True amino acid digestibility and TMEn of the lectin-free and conventional soybeans were determined using the precision-fed cecectomized rooster assay. Seven roosters were crop-intubated with 30 g of soybeans and excreta were collected for 48 h. Digestibility coefficients of most amino acids for lectin-free soybeans were 5 to 8 percentage units higher than those for conventional soybeans, but the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). Likewise, the TMEn for lectin-free soybeans was 11% higher than that for raw conventional soybeans (3.577 vs 3.227 kcal/g DM) but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that the nutritional value of raw lectin-free soybeans is greater than raw conventional soybeans but is less than raw Kunitz-free soybeans and SBM, suggesting that trypsin inhibitor is a greater antinutritional factor than lectins. PMID:10023754

  9. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  10. Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Green A.

    2006-01-01

    With the growth of standardized assessment benchmarks in both the public and private paradigms, testing performance matters to institutions more than ever. In an attempt to take as many hindering variables out of this process, such as test anxiety, socioeconomic influences, and latency in cognition, Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum seeks…

  11. Reincarnation of ancient links between coagulation and complement.

    PubMed

    Conway, E M

    2015-06-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have developed means to contain wounds by simultaneously limiting bleeding and eliminating pathogens and damaged host cells via the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. Disease emerges when there is unchecked activation of innate immune and/or coagulation responses. A key component of innate immunity is the complement system. Concurrent excess activation of coagulation and complement - two major blood-borne proteolytic pathways - is evident in numerous diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, venous thromboembolic disease, thrombotic microangiopathies, arthritis, cancer, and infectious diseases. Delineating the cross-talk between these two cascades will uncover novel therapeutic insights. PMID:26149013

  12. Exploring the Innate Immune System: Using Complement-Medicated Cell Lysis in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kevin G.

    2008-01-01

    The protein complement pathway comprises an important part of the innate immunity. The use of serum to demonstrate complement-mediated destruction across a series of bacterial dilutions allows an instructor to introduce a number of important biological concepts such as bacterial growth, activation cascades, and adaptive versus innate immunity.

  13. Network Analysis Reveals the Recognition Mechanism for Mannose-binding Lectins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Jian, Yiren; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    The specific carbohydrate binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) protein in plants makes it a very useful molecular tool for cancer cell detection and other applications. The biological states of most MBL proteins are dimeric. Using dynamics network analysis on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the model protein of MBL, we elucidate the short- and long-range driving forces behind the dimer formation. The results are further supported by sequence coevolution analysis. We propose a general framework for deciphering the recognition mechanism underlying protein-protein interactions that may have potential applications in signaling pathways.

  14. Carbohydrate recognition by the antiviral lectin cyanovirin-N.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yukiji K; Green, David F

    2012-12-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CVN) is a cyanobacterial lectin with potent antiviral activity and has been the focus of extensive preclinical investigation as a potential prophylactic for the prevention of the sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Here we present a detailed analysis of carbohydrate recognition by this important protein, using a combination of computational methods, including extensive molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) energetic analysis. The simulation results strongly suggest that the observed tendency of wild-type CVN to form domain-swapped dimers is the result of a previously unidentified cis-peptide bond present in the monomeric state. The energetic analysis additionally indicates that the highest-affinity ligand for CVN characterized to date (α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man) is recognized asymmetrically by the two binding sites. Finally, we are able to provide a detailed map of the role of all binding site functional groups (both backbone and side chain) to various aspects of molecular recognition: general affinity for cognate ligands, specificity for distinct oligosaccharide targets, and the asymmetric recognition of α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man. Taken as a whole, these results complement past experimental characterization (both structural and thermodynamic) to provide the most complete understanding of carbohydrate recognition by CVN to date. The results also provide strong support for the application of similar approaches to the understanding of other protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:23057413

  15. Hormonal regulation of mannan-binding lectin synthesis in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, C M; Hansen, T K; Steffensen, R; Jensenius, J C; Thiel, S

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the complement system via the plasma protein mannan-binding lectin (MBL) provides a first line of defence against infections. The plasma level of MBL is, in part, determined genetically, but may also be influenced by different hormones in vivo. Here we study the hormonal regulation of MBL synthesis from the human hepatocyte cell line HuH-7. Cells were exposed to medium with growth hormone (GH), hydrocortisone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, insulin, interleukin (IL)-6 or thyroid hormones (T3 or T4). After 3 days the concentration of MBL in the culture supernatants was determined and the amount of mRNA for MBL was measured, relative to mRNA for β2 microglobulin. GH, IL-6, T3 and T4 significantly increased MBL synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, while hydrocortisone, insulin and IGF-1 had no effect. T3 caused a fourfold increase at 1 nM of T3 (P < 0·001) and at 100 nM of T3 the production was increased more than eightfold. The effect of T4 was less potent, reaching an eightfold increase at 1 µM of T4 (P < 0·001). GH augmented the production of MBL threefold at a concentration of 100 ng/ml (P = 0·018) with no further effect up to 10 µg/ml, whereas IL-6 caused only a very weak increase in MBL production. MBL mRNA levels were stable during the first 24 h of T3 stimulation but increased significantly between 24 and 48 h. The results suggest that MBL synthesis in humans may be increased by thyroid hormone and GH, whereas it does not exhibit a classical IL-6-dependent response. PMID:16792688

  16. Antibodies That Efficiently Form Hexamers upon Antigen Binding Can Induce Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity under Complement-Limiting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Erika M; Lindorfer, Margaret A; van der Horst, Hilma; Oostindie, Simone; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Zent, Clive S; Burack, Richard; Parren, Paul W H I; Taylor, Ronald P

    2016-09-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that IgG Abs can organize into ordered hexamers after binding their cognate Ags expressed on cell surfaces. This process is dependent on Fc:Fc interactions, which promote C1q binding, the first step in classical pathway complement activation. We went on to engineer point mutations that stimulated IgG hexamer formation and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The hexamer formation-enhanced (HexaBody) CD20 and CD38 mAbs support faster, more robust CDC than their wild-type counterparts. To further investigate the CDC potential of these mAbs, we used flow cytometry, high-resolution digital imaging, and four-color confocal microscopy to examine their activity against B cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in sera depleted of single complement components. We also examined the CDC activity of alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) and mAb W6/32 (anti-HLA), which bind at high density to cells and promote substantial complement activation. Although we observed little CDC for mAb-opsonized cells reacted with sera depleted of early complement components, we were surprised to discover that the Hexabody mAbs, as well as ALM and W6/32, were all quite effective at promoting CDC in sera depleted of individual complement components C6 to C9. However, neutralization studies conducted with an anti-C9 mAb verified that C9 is required for CDC activity against cell lines. These highly effective complement-activating mAbs efficiently focus activated complement components on the cell, including C3b and C9, and promote CDC with a very low threshold of MAC binding, thus providing additional insight into their enhanced efficacy in promoting CDC. PMID:27474078

  17. Antibodies That Efficiently Form Hexamers upon Antigen Binding Can Induce Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity under Complement-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Erika M.; Lindorfer, Margaret A.; van der Horst, Hilma; Oostindie, Simone; Beurskens, Frank J.; Schuurman, Janine; Zent, Clive S.; Burack, Richard; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that IgG Abs can organize into ordered hexamers after binding their cognate Ags expressed on cell surfaces. This process is dependent on Fc:Fc interactions, which promote C1q binding, the first step in classical pathway complement activation. We went on to engineer point mutations that stimulated IgG hexamer formation and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The hexamer formation–enhanced (HexaBody) CD20 and CD38 mAbs support faster, more robust CDC than their wild-type counterparts. To further investigate the CDC potential of these mAbs, we used flow cytometry, high-resolution digital imaging, and four-color confocal microscopy to examine their activity against B cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in sera depleted of single complement components. We also examined the CDC activity of alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) and mAb W6/32 (anti-HLA), which bind at high density to cells and promote substantial complement activation. Although we observed little CDC for mAb-opsonized cells reacted with sera depleted of early complement components, we were surprised to discover that the Hexabody mAbs, as well as ALM and W6/32, were all quite effective at promoting CDC in sera depleted of individual complement components C6 to C9. However, neutralization studies conducted with an anti-C9 mAb verified that C9 is required for CDC activity against cell lines. These highly effective complement-activating mAbs efficiently focus activated complement components on the cell, including C3b and C9, and promote CDC with a very low threshold of MAC binding, thus providing additional insight into their enhanced efficacy in promoting CDC. PMID:27474078

  18. Bisretinoid-mediated Complement Activation on Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Complement Factor H Haplotype*

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Roxana A.; Hu, Jane; Jiang, Zhichun; Bok, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common central blinding disease of the elderly. Homozygosity for a sequence variant causing Y402H and I62V substitutions in the gene for complement factor H (CFH) is strongly associated with risk of AMD. CFH, secreted by many cell types, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is a regulatory protein that inhibits complement activation. Recessive Stargardt maculopathy is another central blinding disease caused by mutations in the gene for ABCA4, a transporter in photoreceptor outer segments (OS) that clears retinaldehyde and prevents formation of toxic bisretinoids. Photoreceptors daily shed their distal OS, which are phagocytosed by the RPE cells. Here, we investigated the relationship between the CFH haplotype of human RPE (hRPE) cells, exposure to OS containing bisretinoids, and complement activation. We show that hRPE cells of the AMD-predisposing CFH haplotype (HH402/VV62) are attacked by complement following exposure to bisretinoid-containing Abca4−/− OS. This activation was dependent on factor B, indicating involvement of the alternative pathway. In contrast, hRPE cells of the AMD-protective CFH haplotype (YY402/II62) showed no complement activation following exposure to either Abca4−/− or wild-type OS. The AMD-protective YY402/II62 hRPE cells were more resistant to the membrane attack complex, whereas HH402/VV62 hRPE cells showed significant membrane attack complex deposition following ingestion of Abca4−/− OS. These results suggest that bisretinoid accumulation in hRPE cells stimulates activation and dysregulation of complement. Cells with an intact complement negative regulatory system are protected from complement attack, whereas cells with reduced CFH synthesis because of the Y402H and I62V substitutions are vulnerable to disease. PMID:24550392

  19. Noncovalent PEGylation via Lectin-Glycopolymer Interactions.

    PubMed

    Antonik, Paweł M; Eissa, Ahmed M; Round, Adam R; Cameron, Neil R; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    PEGylation, the covalent modification of proteins with polyethylene glycol, is an abundantly used technique to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic proteins. The drawback with this methodology is that the covalently attached PEG can impede the biological activity (e.g., reduced receptor-binding capacity). Protein therapeutics with "disposable" PEG modifiers have potential advantages over the current technology. Here, we show that a protein-polymer "Medusa complex" is formed by the combination of a hexavalent lectin with a glycopolymer. Using NMR spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), size exclusion chromatography, and native gel electrophoresis it was demonstrated that the fucose-binding lectin RSL and a fucose-capped polyethylene glycol (Fuc-PEG) form a multimeric assembly. All of the experimental methods provided evidence of noncovalent PEGylation with a concomitant increase in molecular mass and hydrodynamic radius. The affinity of the protein-polymer complex was determined by ITC and competition experiments to be in the micromolar range, suggesting that such systems have potential biomedical applications. PMID:27403588

  20. MEMBRANE ATTACK BY COMPLEMENT: THE ASSEMBLY AND BIOLOGY OF TERMINAL COMPLEMENT COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Tegla, Cosmin A.; Cudrici, Cornelia; Patel, Snehal; Trippe, Richard; Rus, Violeta; Niculescu, Florin; Rus, Horea

    2013-01-01

    Complement system activation plays an important role in both innate and acquired immunity. Activation of complement and the subsequent formation of C5b-9 channels (the membrane attack complex) on cell membranes lead to cell death. However, when the number of channels assembled on the surface of nucleated cells is limited, sublytic C5b-9 can induce cell cycle progression by activating signal transduction pathways and transcription factors and inhibiting apoptosis. This induction by C5b-9 is dependent upon the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/FOXO1 and ERK1 pathways in a Gi protein-dependent manner. C5b-9 induces sequential activation of CDK4 and CDK2, enabling the G1/S-phase transition and cellular proliferation. In addition, it induces RGC-32, a novel gene that plays a role in cell cycle activation by interacting with Akt and the cyclin B1-CDC2 complex. C5b-9 also inhibits apoptosis by inducing the phosphorylation of Bad and blocking the activation of FLIP, caspase-8, and Bid cleavage. Thus, sublytic C5b-9 plays an important role in cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation, thereby contributing to the maintenance of cell and tissue homeostasis. PMID:21850539

  1. Potential immunomodulatory effects of plant lectins in Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Reis, Eliana A G; Athanazio, Daniel A; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; de Paulo Teixeira Pinto, Vicente; Carmo, Theomira M A; Reis, Alice; Trocolli, Graziela; Croda, Julio; Harn, Donald; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Reis, Mitermayer G

    2008-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding glycoproteins that can stimulate, in a non-antigen-specific fashion, lymphocytes, leading to proliferation and cytokine production. Some lectins are utilized as in vitro mitogenic lymphocyte stimulators and their use as immunomodulators against infectious diseases has been evaluated experimentally. In the experimental murine model, the immune response to schistosomiasis is Th1-like during the initial stage of infection, with a shift towards a Th2-like response after oviposition. We report the response of schistosomiasis patients' (n=37) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to stimulation by lectins, including newly isolated lectins from Brazilian flora, and by Schistosomamansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA). Cytokine production upon lectin stimulation ex vivo was assessed in PBMC supernatants, collected at 24 and 72 h, by sandwich ELISA to IL-5, IL-10, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In PBMC from infected patients all but one of the lectins induced a Th2-like cytokine response, characterized by elevated IL-5 production that was higher than that induced by SEA stimulation alone. Our results show that the Th2 environment present during schistosomiasis is not affected and that it may be further stimulated by the presence of lectins. PMID:18579103

  2. The insecticidal activity of recombinant garlic lectins towards aphids.

    PubMed

    Fitches, Elaine; Wiles, Duncan; Douglas, Angela E; Hinchliffe, Gareth; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-10-01

    The heterodimeric and homodimeric garlic lectins ASAI and ASAII were produced as recombinant proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The proteins were purified as functional dimeric lectins, but underwent post-translational proteolysis. Recombinant ASAII was a single homogenous polypeptide which had undergone C-terminal processing similar to that occurring in planta. The recombinant ASAI was glycosylated and subject to variable and heterogenous proteolysis. Both lectins showed insecticidal effects when fed to pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) in artificial diet, ASAII being more toxic than ASAI at the same concentration. Acute toxicity (mortality at < or =48 h exposure; similar timescale to starvation) was only apparent at the highest lectin concentrations tested (2.0 mg ml(-)1), but dose-dependent chronic toxicity (mortality at >3d exposure) was observed over the concentration range 0.125-2.0 mg ml(-1). The recombinant lectins caused mortality in both symbiotic and antibiotic-treated aphids, showing that toxicity is not dependent on the presence of the bacterial symbiont (Buchnera aphidicola), or on interaction with symbiont proteins, such as the previously identified lectin "receptor" symbionin. A pull-down assay coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting identified two abundant membrane-associated aphid gut proteins, alanyl aminopeptidase N and sucrase, as "receptors" for lectin binding. PMID:18707000

  3. Lectin reactivities as intermediate biomarkers in premalignant colorectal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Boland, C R; Martin, M A; Goldstein, I J

    1992-01-01

    Normal colonic epithelial cells undergo maturation as they traverse the crypt to the lumenal surface. The binding of lectins to goblet cell mucins and other glycoconjugates changes as the cells migrate and differentiate. Additional stepwise modifications in glycoconjugate expression occur in premalignant and malignant neoplasms that may be detected by lectin binding studies. The lectins Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA) have been developed as markers of differentiation in normal-appearing colonic epithelium. Using a quantitative biometric system to score tissues, reduced levels of lectin binding have been found in rectal tissue from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. The lectin Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA) binds to a cytoplasmic glycoconjugate expressed at the base of the colonic crypt and serves as a possible proliferation marker in the distal, but not proximal, colon. ACA binding increases in tandem with increased levels of proliferation (using BrdU incorporation) in neoplastic tissues. Binding by the peanut lectin (PNA) occurs late in the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence--in larger adenomas and in cancers--and serves as a marker of advancing neoplasia. Lectins identify the stepwise changes that occur during normal differentiation, proliferation and in advancing neoplasia. By selecting the appropriate probe, biomarkers may be developed for early, intermediate, and late events in colorectal cancer. PMID:1469891

  4. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  5. Cloning and characterization of root-specific barley lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, D.R.; Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Cereal lectins are a class of biochemically and antigenically related proteins localized in a tissue-specific manner in embryos and adult plants. To study the specificity of lectin expression, a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) embryo cDNa library was constructed and a clone (BLc3) for barley lectin was isolated. BLc3 is 972 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 212 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acid residues followed by a 186 amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide has 95% sequence identity to the antigenically indistinguishable wheat germ agglutinin isolectin-B (WGA-B) suggesting that BLc3 encodes barley lectin. Further evidence that BLc3 encodes barley lectin was obtained by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of BLc3 RNA transcripts and barley embryo poly(A{sup +}) RNA. In situ hybridizations with BLc3 showed that barley lectin gene expression is confined to the outermost cell layers of both embryonic and adult root tips. On Northern blots, BLc3 hybridizes to a 1.0 kilobyte mRNA in poly(A{sup +}) RNA from both embryos and root tips. We suggest, on the basis of immunoblot experiments, that barley lectin is synthesized as a glycosylated precursor and processed by removal of a portion of the carboxyl terminus including the single N-linked glycosylation site.

  6. CD44 Antibody Inhibition of Macrophage Phagocytosis Targets Fcγ Receptor- and Complement Receptor 3-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Amash, Alaa; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yawen; Bhakta, Varsha; Fairn, Gregory D; Hou, Ming; Peng, Jun; Sheffield, William P; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-04-15

    Targeting CD44, a major leukocyte adhesion molecule, using specific Abs has been shown beneficial in several models of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The mechanisms contributing to the anti-inflammatory effects of CD44 Abs, however, remain poorly understood. Phagocytosis is a key component of immune system function and can play a pivotal role in autoimmune states where CD44 Abs have shown to be effective. In this study, we show that the well-known anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab IM7 can inhibit murine macrophage phagocytosis of RBCs. We assessed three selected macrophage phagocytic receptor systems: Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), complement receptor 3 (CR3), and dectin-1. Treatment of macrophages with IM7 resulted in significant inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized RBCs. The inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis was at an early stage in the phagocytic process involving both inhibition of the binding of the target RBC to the macrophages and postbinding events. This CD44 Ab also inhibited CR3-mediated phagocytosis of C3bi-opsonized RBCs, but it did not affect the phagocytosis of zymosan particles, known to be mediated by the C-type lectin dectin-1. Other CD44 Abs known to have less broad anti-inflammatory activity, including KM114, KM81, and KM201, did not inhibit FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of RBCs. Taken together, these findings demonstrate selective inhibition of FcγR and CR3-mediated phagocytosis by IM7 and suggest that this broadly anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab inhibits these selected macrophage phagocytic pathways. The understanding of the immune-regulatory effects of CD44 Abs is important in the development and optimization of therapeutic strategies for the potential treatment of autoimmune conditions. PMID:26944929

  7. Purification, some properties of a D-galactose-binding leaf lectin from Erythrina indica and further characterization of seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Konozy, Emadeldin H E; Mulay, Ranjana; Faca, Vitor; Ward, Richard John; Greene, Lewis Joel; Roque-Barriera, Maria Cristina; Sabharwal, Sushma; Bhide, Shobhana V

    2002-10-01

    Lectin from a leaf of Erythrina indica was isolated by affinity chromatography on Lactamyl-Seralose 4B. Lectin gave a single band in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In SDS-gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions Erythrina indica leaf lectin (EiLL) split into two bands with subunit molecular weights of 30 and 33 kDa, whereas 58 kDa was obtained for the intact lectin by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. EiLL agglutinated all human RBC types, with a slight preference for the O blood group. Lectin was found to be a glycoprotein with a neutral sugar content of 9.5%. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin was directed towards D-galactose and its derivatives with pronounced preference for lactose. EiLL had pH optima at pH 7.0; above and below this pH lectin lost sugar-binding capability rapidly. Lectin showed broad temperature optima from 25 to 50 degrees C; however, at 55 degrees C EiLL lost more than 90% of its activity and at 60 degrees C it was totally inactivated. The pI of EiLL was found to be 7.6. The amino acid analysis of EiLL indicated that the lectin was rich in acidic as well as hydrophobic amino acids and totally lacked cysteine and methionine. The N-terminal amino acids were Val-Glu-Thr-IIe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Glu-Phe-Glu-Ala-Gly-Asn-Asp-X-Leu-Thr-Gln-Glu-Gly-Ala-Ala-Leu-. Chemical modification studies of both EiLL and Erythrina indica seed lectin (EiSL) with phenylglyoxal, DEP and DTNB revealed an absence of arginine, histidine and cysteine, respectively, in or near the ligand-binding site of both lectins. Modification of tyrosine with NAI led to partial inactivation of EiLL and EiSL; however, total inactivation was observed upon NBS-modification of two tryptophan residues in EiSL. Despite the apparent importance of these tryptophan residues for lectin activity they did not seem to have a direct role in binding haptenic sugar as D-galactose did not protect lectin from inactivation by NBS. PMID:12504284

  8. Effects of lectin ingestion on animal growth and internal organs.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A

    1998-01-01

    Lectins are essential and omnipresent plant constituents. As many foods are of plant origin, the daily ingestion of lectins by both humans and animals is appreciable. For example, in an ad hoc survey, 53 edible plants were shown to contain lectins and approx 30% of fresh and processed food regularly consumed by humans had significant hemagglutinating activity (1). The situation is potentially even more acute in animal nutrition because animal diet is less diverse than that of humans, and in most instances foodstuffs are not thoroughly heat-treated. This is particularly significant in the light of our finding a correlation between lectin activity and antinutritional effects (2). As in evolution, the mammalian gut has been regularly exposed to lectins, they must have played an important part in the development of the digestive system. Although based on experience, most overtly toxic plants have been eliminated from the diet, many plants with appreciable lectin content are still consumed because it has not been easy to relate growth retardation and antinutritional, mild allergic or other subclinical symptoms to the food consumed or a particular component of it. As some lectins are at least partially heat stable and most survive the passage through the gut in functionally and immunologically intact form, their interaction with the gut surface epithelium (3) can damage the gut at high dietary intakes and this may lead to digestive disorders/diseases in some instances. However, it is not generally appreciated that not all lectins are antinutrients and indeed some may have beneficial effects and be of potential value in nutritional practice. Accordingly, it is of considerable importance to establish whether a lectin has deleterious or potentially beneficial effects for mammals. Unfortunately at present there are no adequate in vitro methods to do this reliably and it is usually necessary to carry out in vivo animal feeding studies, despite their relatively cumbersome

  9. Molecular modeling of lectin-like protein from Acacia farnesiana reveals a possible anti-inflammatory mechanism in Carrageenan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β -strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction. PMID:24490151

  10. Molecular Modeling of Lectin-Like Protein from Acacia farnesiana Reveals a Possible Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism in Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β-strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction. PMID:24490151

  11. Complement Activation in Placental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Chloe R.; Tran, Vanessa; Kain, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Sixty percent of all pregnancies worldwide occur in malaria endemic regions. Pregnant women are at greater risk of malaria infection than their non-pregnant counterparts and have a higher risk of adverse birth outcomes including low birth weight resulting from intrauterine growth restriction and/or preterm birth. The complement system plays an essential role in placental and fetal development as well as the host innate immune response to malaria infection. Excessive or dysregulated complement activation has been associated with the pathobiology of severe malaria and with poor pregnancy outcomes, dependent and independent of infection. Here we review the role of complement in malaria and pregnancy and discuss its part in mediating altered placental angiogenesis, malaria-induced adverse birth outcomes, and disruptions to the in utero environment with possible consequences on fetal neurodevelopment. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms underlying adverse birth outcomes, and the impact of maternal malaria infection on fetal neurodevelopment, may lead to biomarkers to identify at-risk pregnancies and novel therapeutic interventions to prevent these complications. PMID:26733992

  12. A Lactose-Binding Lectin from the Marine Sponge Cinachyrella Apion (Cal) Induces Cell Death in Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luciana; Monteiro, Norberto; Serquiz, Raphael; Santos, Paula; Oliveira, Ruth; Oliveira, Adeliana; Rocha, Hugo; Morais, Ana Heloneida; Uchoa, Adriana; Santos, Elizeu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer represents a set of more than 100 diseases, including malignant tumors from different locations. Strategies inducing differentiation have had limited success in the treatment of established cancers. Marine sponges are a biological reservoir of bioactive molecules, especially lectins. Several animal and plant lectins were purified with antitumor activity, mitogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral, but there are few reports in the literature describing the mechanism of action of lectins purified from marine sponges to induce apoptosis in human tumor cells. In this work, a lectin purified from the marine sponge Cinachyrella apion (CaL) was evaluated with respect to its hemolytic, cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties, besides the ability to induce cell death in tumor cells. The antiproliferative activity of CaL was tested against HeLa, PC3 and 3T3 cell lines, with highest growth inhibition for HeLa, reducing cell growth at a dose dependent manner (0.5–10 µg/mL). Hemolytic activity and toxicity against peripheral blood cells were tested using the concentration of IC50 (10 µg/mL) for both trials and twice the IC50 for analysis in flow cytometry, indicating that CaL is not toxic to these cells. To assess the mechanism of cell death caused by CaL in HeLa cells, we performed flow cytometry and western blotting. Results showed that lectin probably induces cell death by apoptosis activation by pro-apoptotic protein Bax, promoting mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, cell cycle arrest in S phase and acting as both dependent and/or independent of caspases pathway. These results indicate the potential of CaL in studies of medicine for treating cancer. PMID:22690140

  13. In vivo biosynthetic studies of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J.M.; Etzler, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The in vivo biosynthesis of the Dolichos biflorus seed lectin was studied by pulse-chase labeling experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine. These studies demonstrate that each of the two mature lectin subunit types are derived by the processing of separate glycosylated precursors. The appearance of the precursor to subunit I before the precursor to subunit II supports the possibility raised by previous studies that both subunit types of this lectin may originate from a single gene product.

  14. Upregulation of Glycans Containing 3’ Fucose in a Subset of Pancreatic Cancers Uncovered Using Fusion-Tagged Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Birendra, KC; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H. Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F.; Mehta, Anand S.; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3’ linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2’ linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ~75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4’ linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3’ linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2’ linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3’ fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus glycans containing 3’ fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer. PMID:25938165

  15. Herbal complement inhibitors in the treatment of neuroinflammation: future strategy for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Amod P; Kellaway, Laurie A; Kotwal, Girish J

    2005-11-01

    The upregulated complement system plays a damaging role in disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). The classical and alternate pathways are two major pathways activated in neuroinflammatory disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, HIV-associated dementia, Parkinson's disease, and mad cow disease. Failure of currently available anti-inflammatory agents, especially cyclooxygenase inhibitors, in offering significant neuroprotection in large epidemiologic clinical trials of CNS disorders suggests an urgent need for the development of new neuroprotective agents. The positive preclinical outcomes in treating CNS disorders by complement regulatory molecules, such as vaccinia virus complement control protein, suggest the possibility of using complement-inhibitory molecules as neuroprotective agents. Several active ingredients of herbal origin are found to have complement-inhibitory activity. These herbal ingredients along with other anti-inflammatory roles might be useful in treating neuroinflammation associated with CNS disorders. Active ingredients of herbal origin with complement inhibitory ingredients are summarized and classified according to their chemical nature and specificity towards the major pathways activating the complement system. The structure activity relationship of some specific examples is also discussed in this report. This information might be helpful in formulating a natural panacea against complement-mediated neuroinflammation. PMID:16387706

  16. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  17. Complement profile and activation mechanisms by different LDL apheresis systems.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Hardersen, Randolf; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Enebakk, Terje; Christiansen, Dorte; Ludviksen, Judith Krey; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2012-07-01

    Extracorporeal removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by means of selective LDL apheresis is indicated in otherwise uncontrolled familial hypercholesterolemia. During blood-biomaterial interaction other constituents than the LDL particles are affected, including the complement system. We set up an ex vivo model in which human whole blood was passed through an LDL apheresis system with one of three different apheresis columns: whole blood adsorption, plasma adsorption and plasma filtration. The concentrations of complement activation products revealed distinctly different patterns of activation and adsorption by the different systems. Evaluated as the final common terminal complement complex (TCC) the whole blood system was inert, in contrast to the plasma systems, which generated substantial and equal amounts of TCC. Initial classical pathway activation was revealed equally for both plasma systems as increases in the C1rs-C1inh complex and C4d. Alternative pathway activation (Bb) was most pronounced for the plasma adsorption system. Although the anaphylatoxins (C3a and C5a) were equally generated by the two plasma separation systems, they were efficiently adsorbed to the plasma adsorption column before the "outlet", whereas they were left free in the plasma in the filtration system. Consequently, during blood-biomaterial interaction in LDL apheresis the complement system is modulated in different manners depending on the device composition. PMID:22373816

  18. Defective opsonisation and complement deficiency in serum from patients with fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed Central

    Wyke, R J; Rajkovic, I A; Eddleston, A L; Williams, R

    1980-01-01

    Serum from 23 of 26 patients with fulminant hepatic failure and grade IV encephalopathy had defective opsonisation of E. coli and yeast (S. cerevisiae). No toxic serum factors acting on the polymorphonuclear leucocytes or inactivators of the normal serum opsonisation factors were found. Complement deficiency was shown to be the most likely cause of the defect in opsonisation. The addition of a heat-labile fraction of normal serum at low concentration corrected the defect and factors of both the classical and the alternative pathways of complement were reduced to below 40% of the activity of the control serum. During the early stages of clinical recovery serum opsonisation and complement activity returned to normal with statistically significant correlations between tests of opsonisation and total haemolytic complement CH50, C3 and total alternative pathway activity. Defective serum opsonisation and complement deficiency represent major defects in the body's defences against infection. PMID:7000632

  19. Effects of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strain Background on Complement Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hyams, Catherine; Opel, Sophia; Hanage, William; Yuste, Jose; Bax, Katie; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Spratt, Brian G.; Brown, Jeremy S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Immunity to infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is dependent on complement. There are wide variations in sensitivity to complement between S. pneumoniae strains that could affect their ability to cause invasive infections. Although capsular serotype is one important factor causing differences in complement resistance between strains, there is also considerable other genetic variation between S. pneumoniae strains that may affect complement-mediated immunity. We have therefore investigated whether genetically distinct S. pneumoniae strains with the same capsular serotype vary in their sensitivity to complement mediated immunity. Methodology and Principal Findings C3b/iC3b deposition and neutrophil association were measured using flow cytometry assays for S. pneumoniae strains with different genetic backgrounds for each of eight capsular serotypes. For some capsular serotypes there was marked variation in C3b/iC3b deposition between different strains that was independent of capsule thickness and correlated closely to susceptibility to neutrophil association. C3b/iC3b deposition results also correlated weakly with the degree of IgG binding to each strain. However, the binding of C1q (the first component of the classical pathway) correlated more closely with C3b/iC3b deposition, and large differences remained in complement sensitivity between strains with the same capsular serotype in sera in which IgG had been cleaved with IdeS. Conclusions These data demonstrate that bacterial factors independent of the capsule and recognition by IgG have strong effects on the susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to complement, and could therefore potentially account for some of the differences in virulence between strains. PMID:22022358

  20. Function of Serum Complement in Drinking Water Arsenic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Laila N.; Zahid, M. Shamim Hasan; Nabi, A. H. M. Nurun; Hossain, Mahmud

    2012-01-01

    Serum complement function was evaluated in 125 affected subjects suffering from drinking water arsenic toxicity. Their mean duration of exposure was 7.4 ± 5.3 yrs, and the levels of arsenic in drinking water and urine samples were 216 ± 211 and 223 ± 302 μg/L, respectively. The mean bactericidal activity of complement from the arsenic patients was 92% and that in the unexposed controls was 99% (P < 0.01), but heat-inactivated serum showed slightly elevated activity than in controls. In patients, the mean complement C3 was 1.56 g/L, and C4 was 0.29 g/L compared to 1.68 g/L and 0.25 g/L, respectively, in the controls. The mean IgG in the arsenic patients was 24.3 g/L that was highly significantly elevated (P < 0.001). Arsenic patients showed a significant direct correlation between C3 and bactericidal activity (P = 0.014). Elevated levels of C4 indicated underutilization and possibly impaired activity of the classical complement pathway. We conclude reduced function of serum complement in drinking water arsenic toxicity. PMID:22545044

  1. Can apolipoproteins and complement factors be biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Manral, Pallavi; Sharma, Pratibha; Hariprasad, Gururao; Chandralekha; Tripathi, Manjari; Srinivasan, Alagiri

    2012-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in elderly persons. Quick diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease will allow treatments that may help slow its progression. The correlation between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) parameters and progression of Alzheimer's disease is higher than and independent of other risk factors. We have compared sixteen CSF samples of clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease patients with non demented subjects using proteomics approach. Apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein J, complement C4b, hemopexin and complement factor B were identified as differentially expressed proteins. Pathway analyses show that these proteins have interacting partners in Alzheimer's and apoptotic pathways. The possible roles of these proteins in relation to the disease are discussed. PMID:22631439

  2. Correlation between proinflammatory role of a lectin from Typhonium giganteum Engl. and macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yaozong; Yu, Hongli; Wu, Hao; Chen, Yeqing; Wang, Kuilong; Liu, Liping; Jin, Yangping; Zhang, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between proinflammatory effects of a lectin from Typhonium giganteum Engl. and macrophage. Methods: T. giganteum lectin (TGL) was extracted from the tuber of T. giganteum and purified, and was then identified by using SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry. The morphologic changes of macrophage after being stimulated by TGL were observed with scanning electron microscopy. The influences of such stimulation on neutrophil migration were evaluated by establishing an in vitro macrophage-neutrophil co-culture migration model. By establishing a rat peritoneal macrophage in vitro cultured model, the effects of TGL stimulation on inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-1β released by macrophage were analyzed. With p65 as the index, the expressions of the NF-κB signaling pathway in the cytoplasm and nucleus were detected before and after TGL stimulation respectively. Furthermore, we also investigated whether the inhibitor for NF-κB signaling pathway BAY11-7082 can block p65 nuclear translocation. Results: After being stimulated by TGL, macrophage had increased volume, number of pseudopodia and gradually cracked cell membrane, accompanied by evidently induced migration of neutrophils due to released inflammatory factors. As the concentration of TGL varied, NF-κB’s monomer p65 had different expression levels in the cytoplasm and nucleus, while BAY11-7082 can indeed block the nuclear translocation of p65. Conclusions: TGL-induced inflammation was closely related to macrophage mediation. PMID:26617695

  3. Bacterial Isolation by Lectin-Modified Microengines

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Susana; Orozco, Jahir; Kagan, Daniel; Guix, Maria; Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Claussen, Jonathan C.; Merkoçi, Arben; Wang, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    New template-based self-propelled gold/nickel/polyaniline/platinum (Au/Ni/PANI/Pt) microtubular engines, functionalized with the Concanavalin A (ConA) lectin bioreceptor, are shown to be extremely useful for the rapid, real-time isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria from fuel-enhanced environmental, food and clinical samples. These multifunctional microtube engines combine the selective capture of E. coli with the uptake of polymeric drug-carrier particles to provide an attractive motion-based theranostics strategy. Triggered release of the captured bacteria is demonstrated by movement through a low-pH glycine-based dissociation solution. The smaller size of the new polymer-metal microengines offers convenient, direct and label-free optical visualization of the captured bacteria and discrimination against non-target cells. PMID:22136558

  4. Molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from Clivia miniata.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-03-01

    Screening of a cDNA library constructed from total RNA isolated from young developing ovaries of Clivia miniata Regel with the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone resulted in the isolation of four different isolectin clones which clearly differ from each other in their nucleotide sequences and hence also in their deduced amino acid sequences. Apparently the lectin is translated from an mRNA of ca. 800 nucleotides encoding a precursor polypeptide of 163 amino acids. Northern blot analysis of total RNA isolated from different tissues of Clivia miniata has shown that the lectin is expressed in most plant tissues with very high lectin mRNA concentrations in the ovary and the seed endosperm. PMID:8193308

  5. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata.

    PubMed

    Work, Thierry M; Farah, Yael

    2014-03-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis. PMID:24518620

  6. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit. PMID:17590430

  7. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  8. Specific interaction of lectins with liposomes and monolayers bearing neoglycolipids.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Vincent; Costa, Maria de Lourdes; Boullanger, Paul; Baszkin, Adam; Rosilio, Véronique

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of three lectins (wheat germ, Ulex europaeus I, and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinins: WGA, UEA-I and LTA) with either N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or L-fucose neoglycolipids incorporated into phospholipid monolayers and liposome bilayers was studied at the air/water interface and in bulk solution. The results show that for both systems studied, synthesized neoglycolipids were capable of binding their specific lectin and that, in general, the binding of lectins increased with the increase in the molar fraction of the saccharide derivative incorporated in either the monolayers or bilayers. However, whereas for UEA-I, molecular recognition was enhanced by a strong hydrophobic interaction, for WGA and LTA successful recognition was predominantly related to the distance between neighboring sugar groups. The observed lengthy adsorption times of these lectins onto their specific ligands were attributed to interfacial conformational changes occurring in the proteins upon their adsorption at the interfaces. PMID:14499473

  9. Sweet complementarity: the functional pairing of glycans with lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H-J; Manning, J C; Kopitz, J; André, S; Kaltner, H

    2016-05-01

    Carbohydrates establish the third alphabet of life. As part of cellular glycoconjugates, the glycans generate a multitude of signals in a minimum of space. The presence of distinct glycotopes and the glycome diversity are mapped by sugar receptors (antibodies and lectins). Endogenous (tissue) lectins can read the sugar-encoded information and translate it into functional aspects of cell sociology. Illustrated by instructive examples, each glycan has its own ligand properties. Lectins with different folds can converge to target the same epitope, while intrafamily diversification enables functional cooperation and antagonism. The emerging evidence for the concept of a network calls for a detailed fingerprinting. Due to the high degree of plasticity and dynamics of the display of genes for lectins the validity of extrapolations between different organisms of the phylogenetic tree yet is inevitably limited. PMID:26956894

  10. Protozoa lectins and their role in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins of non-immune origin that agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc., and bind reversibly to carbohydrates present on the apposing cells. They have at least two carbohydrate binding sites and their binding can be inhibited by one or more carbohydrates. Owing to carbohydrate binding specificity of lectins, they mediate cell-cell interactions and play role in protozoan adhesion and host cell cytotoxicity, thus are central to the pathogenic property of the parasite. Several parasitic protozoa possess lectins which mediate parasite adherence to host cells based on their carbohydrate specificities. These interactions could be exploited for development of novel therapeutics, targeting the adherence and thus helpful in eradicating wide spread of protozoan diseases. The current review highlights the present state knowledge with regard to protozoal lectins with an emphasis on their haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, characteristics and also their role in pathogenesis notably as adhesion molecules, thereby aiding the pathogen in disease establishment. PMID:27268207

  11. Structure and Function of Mammalian Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kevin; Evers, David; Rice, Kevin G.

    Over the past three decades the field of glycobiology has expanded beyond a basic understanding of the structure and biosynthesis of glycoprotein, proteoglycans, and glycolipids toward a more detailed picture of how these molecules afford communication through binding to mammalian lectins. Although the number of different mammalian lectin domains appears to be finite and even much smaller than early estimates predicated based on the diversity of glycan structures, nature appears capable of using these in numerous combinations to fine tune specificity. The following provides an overview of the major classes of mammalian lectins and discusses their glycan binding specificity. The review provides a snapshot of the field of glycobiology that continues to grow providing an increasing number of examples of biological processes that rely upon glycan-lectin binding.

  12. Identification of human complement factor H as a chemotactic protein for monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nabil, K; Rihn, B; Jaurand, M C; Vignaud, J M; Ripoche, J; Martinet, Y; Martinet, N

    1997-01-01

    We used chromatographic separation to purify to homogeneity a monomeric monocyte chemotactic protein of 150 kDa contained in mesothelioma pleural effusions. It was identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and immunoblotting as complement factor H, an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Specific antibodies against factor H inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity of the purified protein, which was most active at 10 nM. Factor H is a restrictive factor of alternative complement pathway activation. The new chemotactic function assigned to factor H in recruiting monocytes to the mesothelioma site might contribute to malignant cell phagocytosis via the iC3b/complement receptor type 3 pathway. These functions link the humoral and cellular immune systems. PMID:9291108

  13. Complement fixation test to C. burnetii

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003520.htm Complement fixation test to C burnetii To use the sharing features on this ... JavaScript. The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetti ) is a blood test that checks for ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Although meningitis can be life-threatening, individuals with complement component ... leaves affected individuals prone to recurrent episodes of meningitis. Learn more about the genes associated with complement ...

  15. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  16. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  17. On the Functional Overlap between Complement and Anti-Microbial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jana; Hobkirk, James; Mohamed, Fatima; Browning, Michael J.; Stover, Cordula M.

    2015-01-01

    Intriguingly, activated complement and anti-microbial peptides share certain functionalities; lytic, phagocytic, and chemo-attractant activities and each may, in addition, exert cell instructive roles. Each has been shown to have distinct LPS detoxifying activity and may play a role in the development of endotoxin tolerance. In search of the origin of complement, a functional homolog of complement C3 involved in opsonization has been identified in horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs possess anti-microbial peptides able to bind to acyl chains or phosphate groups/saccharides of endotoxin, LPS. Complement activity as a whole is detectable in marine invertebrates. These are also a source of anti-microbial peptides with potential pharmaceutical applicability. Investigating the locality for the production of complement pathway proteins and their role in modulating cellular immune responses are emerging fields. The significance of local synthesis of complement components is becoming clearer from in vivo studies of parenchymatous disease involving specifically generated, complement-deficient mouse lines. Complement C3 is a central component of complement activation. Its provision by cells of the myeloid lineage varies. Their effector functions in turn are increased in the presence of anti-microbial peptides. This may point to a potentiating range of activities, which should serve the maintenance of health but may also cause disease. Because of the therapeutic implications, this review will consider closely studies dealing with complement activation and anti-microbial peptide activity in acute inflammation (e.g., dialysis-related peritonitis, appendicitis, and ischemia). PMID:25646095

  18. On the Functional Overlap between Complement and Anti-Microbial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Jana; Hobkirk, James; Mohamed, Fatima; Browning, Michael J; Stover, Cordula M

    2014-01-01

    Intriguingly, activated complement and anti-microbial peptides share certain functionalities; lytic, phagocytic, and chemo-attractant activities and each may, in addition, exert cell instructive roles. Each has been shown to have distinct LPS detoxifying activity and may play a role in the development of endotoxin tolerance. In search of the origin of complement, a functional homolog of complement C3 involved in opsonization has been identified in horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs possess anti-microbial peptides able to bind to acyl chains or phosphate groups/saccharides of endotoxin, LPS. Complement activity as a whole is detectable in marine invertebrates. These are also a source of anti-microbial peptides with potential pharmaceutical applicability. Investigating the locality for the production of complement pathway proteins and their role in modulating cellular immune responses are emerging fields. The significance of local synthesis of complement components is becoming clearer from in vivo studies of parenchymatous disease involving specifically generated, complement-deficient mouse lines. Complement C3 is a central component of complement activation. Its provision by cells of the myeloid lineage varies. Their effector functions in turn are increased in the presence of anti-microbial peptides. This may point to a potentiating range of activities, which should serve the maintenance of health but may also cause disease. Because of the therapeutic implications, this review will consider closely studies dealing with complement activation and anti-microbial peptide activity in acute inflammation (e.g., dialysis-related peritonitis, appendicitis, and ischemia). PMID:25646095

  19. Affinity entrapment of oligosaccharides and glycopeptides using free lectin solution.

    PubMed

    Yodoshi, Masahiro; Oyama, Takehiro; Masaki, Ken; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Hayakawa, Takao; Suzuki, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    Two procedures were proposed for the specific recovery of fluorescent derivatives of glycoprotein-derived oligosaccharides and tryptic glycopeptides using certain plant lectins. The first was based on the salting out of oligosaccharide-lectin conjugates with ammonium sulfate. Oligosaccharides specifically bound to lectins were recovered free from lectins using ethanol precipitation after dissolution in water. This method enabled group separation of 2-aminopyridine-labeled oligosaccharides derived from ovalbumin to galacto-oligosaccharides and agalacto-oligosaccharides by Ricinus communis agglutinin, and to high mannose- and hybrid-type oligosaccharides by wheat-germ agglutinin. Fractional precipitation based on differences in affinity for concanavalin A was accomplished by adding an appropriate concentration of methyl α-mannoside as an inhibitor. In the second method, tryptic digests of glycoproteins were mixed with a lectin solution, and the glycopeptide-lectin conjugates were specifically trapped on a centrifugal ultrafiltration membrane with cut-off of 10 kD. Trapped glycopeptides, as retentates, were passed through membranes by resuspension in diluted acid. This method is particularly useful for the enrichment of glycopeptides in protease digestion mixtures for glycosylation analyses by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:21478615

  20. Binding of various lectins during chondrogenesis in mouse limb buds.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, B

    1986-01-01

    The binding of six different FITC-labelled lectins to cells and matrix was investigated during chondrogenesis in mouse limb buds from day 10 to 13 of development. In undifferentiated mesenchyme, concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin bound very strongly, whereas at later stages binding was decreased in the peripheral mesenchyme, but very strong in blastemata and cartilage. Phaseolus vulgaris lectin showed the same properties, but the decrease in the peripheral mesenchyme was less pronounced. Fucose-specific lotus A lectin showed no binding at all. Ricinus communis lectin bound preferentially to the blastemata, and the galactose-specific peanut lectin exhibited binding exclusively to the blastemata. Electron microscopic investigations of the binding of peroxidase-labelled peanut lectin revealed reaction product in the matrix and at cellular membranes only at later stages. Early blastemal cell condensations were negative. In vitro experiments on chondrogenesis in high density cultures showed no pronounced influence of beta-D-galactosides on cell differentiation and matrix production. PMID:2422680

  1. Antifungal activity of lectins against yeast of vaginal secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruno Severo; Siqueira, Ana Beatriz Sotero; de Cássia Carvalho Maia, Rita; Giampaoli, Viviana; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; de Lima, Adriana Nunes; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-imune origin. This group of proteins is distributed widely in nature and they have been found in viruses, microorganisms, plants and animals. Lectins of plants have been isolated and characterized according to their chemical, physical-chemical, structural and biological properties. Among their biological activities, we can stress its fungicidal action. It has been previously described the effect of the lectins Dviol, DRL, ConBr and LSL obtained from the seeds of leguminous plants on the growth of yeasts isolated from vaginal secretions. In the present work the experiments were carried out in microtiter plates and the results interpreted by both methods: visual observations and a microplate reader at 530nm. The lectin concentrations varied from 0.5 to 256μg/mL, and the inoculum was established between 65-70% of trammitance. All yeast samples isolated from vaginal secretion were evaluated taxonomically, where were observed macroscopic and microscopic characteristics to each species. The LSL lectin did not demonstrate any antifungal activity to any isolate studied. The other lectins DRL, ConBr and DvioL, showed antifungal potential against yeast isolated from vaginal secretion. These findings offering offer a promising field of investigation to develop new therapeutic strategies against vaginal yeast infections, collaborating to improve women's health. PMID:24031889

  2. Assessment of Sauromatum guttatum lectin toxicity against Bactrocera cucurbitae.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Thakur, Kshema; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Kaur, Satwinder; Kaur, Amritpal; Singh, Jatinder

    2015-11-01

    Lectins are proteins that bind specifically to foreign glycans. Due to this binding property, these molecules have potential application as bioinsecticidal tools replacing conventional chemical insecticides. The present study involved purification of phytolectin from the tubers of Sauromatum guttatum by affinity chromatography on asialofetuin-linked silica matrix. The purity of the sample was checked by SDS-PAGE at pH 8.3. Purified lectin was incorporated in the artificial diet of a Dipteran model, Bactrocera cucurbitae at different concentrations (10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 µgml(-1)). The lectin significantly affected various developmental parameters that were studied. Percentage pupation and percentage emergence was reduced to 44 % and 7.9%, respectively, at 80 µgml(-1) concentration as compared to control (100%). LC50 of Sauromatum guttatum lectin was calculated to be 19.42 µgml(-1). Treatment of insect larvae with LC50 of Sauromatum guttatum lectin suppressed the activity of hydrolytic enzymes (esterases and acid phosphatases) and oxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase). Thus, with low LC50 and high mortality (approximately 92% at 80 µgml(-1)) of the insect larvae, Sauromatum guttatum lectin offers a possibility to engineer crop plants for improved and safer agriculture. PMID:26688959

  3. Papillomavirus DNA Complementation in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Recent phylogenic studies indicate that DNA recombination could have occurred in ancient papillomaviruses types. However, no experimental data is available to demonstrate this event because of the lack of human papillomavirus infection models. We have used the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)/rabbit model to study pathogenesis and immunogenicity of different mutant genomes in vivo. Although the domestic rabbit is not a natural host for CRPV infection, it is possible to initiate infection with naked CRPV DNA cloned into a plasmid and monitor papilloma outgrowth on these animals. Taking advantage of a large panel of mutants based on a CRPV strain (Hershey CRPV), we tested the hypothesis that two non-viable mutant genomes could induce papillomas by either recombination or complementation. We found that co-infection with a dysfunctional mutant with an E2 transactivation domain mutation and another mutant with an E7 ATG knock out generated papillomas in rabbits. DNA extracted from these papillomas contained genotypes from both parental genomes. Three additional pairs of dysfunctional mutants also showed similar results. Individual wild type genes were also shown to rescue the function of corresponding dysfunctional mutants. Therefore, we suggest that complementation occurred between these two non-viable mutant PV genomes in vivo. PMID:19379784

  4. A lectin from Sesbania aculeata (Dhaincha) roots and its possible function.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Saroha, A; Das, H R

    2009-03-01

    A lectin was isolated from the roots of Sesbania aculeata. This is a glucose specific lectin having 39 kDa subunit molecular weight. The expression of this lectin was found to be developmentally regulated and observed to be the highest in the second week. The lectin was purified by affinity chromatography using Sephadex G-50 and found to have 28% homology with Arabidopsis thaliana lectin-like protein (accession No. CAA62665). The lectin binds with lipopolysaccharide isolated from different rhizobial strains indicating the plants interaction with multiple rhizobial species. PMID:19364328

  5. Weak protein-protein interactions in lectins: the crystal structure of a vegetative lectin from the legume Dolichos biflorus.

    PubMed

    Buts, L; Dao-Thi, M H; Loris, R; Wyns, L; Etzler, M; Hamelryck, T

    2001-05-25

    The legume lectins are widely used as a model system for studying protein-carbohydrate and protein-protein interactions. They exhibit a fascinating quaternary structure variation, which becomes important when they interact with multivalent glycoconjugates, for instance those on cell surfaces. Recently, it has become clear that certain lectins form weakly associated oligomers. This phenomenon may play a role in the regulation of receptor crosslinking and subsequent signal transduction. The crystal structure of DB58, a dimeric lectin from the legume Dolichos biflorus reveals a separate dimer of a previously unobserved type, in addition to a tetramer consisting of two such dimers. This tetramer resembles that formed by DBL, the seed lectin from the same plant. A single amino acid substitution in DB58 affects the conformation and flexibility of a loop in the canonical dimer interface. This disrupts the formation of a stable DBL-like tetramer in solution, but does not prohibit its formation in suitable conditions, which greatly increases the possibilities for the cross-linking of multivalent ligands. The non-canonical DB58 dimer has a buried symmetrical alpha helix, which can be present in the crystal in either of two antiparallel orientations. Two existing structures and datasets for lectins with similar quaternary structures were reconsidered. A central alpha helix could be observed in the soybean lectin, but not in the leucoagglutinating lectin from Phaseolus vulgaris. The relative position and orientation of the carbohydrate-binding sites in the DB58 dimer may affect its ability to crosslink mulitivalent ligands, compared to the other legume lectin dimers. PMID:11491289

  6. Complement receptors and the shaping of the natural antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Holers, V Michael

    2005-03-01

    Complement and complement receptors have been known for several decades to play important roles in immune effector mechanisms related to pathogen elimination and tissue inflammation. In addition, studies over the last 10 years have clearly demonstrated a key role for the complement C3d activation fragment receptor designated CR2 (complement receptor type 2) in the switched-isotype, high-affinity and memory humoral immune responses to T-dependent foreign antigens. More recent studies have extended those observations to include a key role for CR2 and C3d in the humoral immune response to T-independent foreign antigens. Conversely, as these studies have proceeded, a parallel series of analyses have linked defects in expression or function of complement C4 and other classical pathway activation pathway proteins, as well as CR2 and the closely related CR1, to the loss of self tolerance to nuclear antigens such as double-stranded DNA and chromatin in systemic lupus erythematosus. With regard to the topic of this issue, it is now becoming increasingly clear that CR2 also plays a major role in the development of the natural antibody repertoire. Specifically, in the absence of this receptor natural IgM and IgG develop in the naïve animal that demonstrate clearly altered recognition patterns for specific natural antibody targets. This repertoire change is important physiologically in at least one setting because these CR2-dependent natural antibodies are necessary for the recognition of ischemic self tissues. In addition, it is possible that certain of the phenotypes manifest by CR2-deficient mice may be strongly influenced not only by effects on later stages of B cell activation and maturation, as commonly thought, but also by alterations in the pre-existing pool of natural antibodies that are influenced by this receptor. This review will examine the evidence that has accumulated over the last few years supporting these hypotheses. PMID:15614507

  7. Lectin histochemistry of normal and neoplastic peripheral nerve sheath. 2. Lectin binding patterns of schwannoma and neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Nakasu, S; Nioka, H; Handa, J

    1993-01-01

    Lectin binding patterns of 31 schwannomas and 6 neurofibromas were examined using 12 lectins, and the results were compared with those of normal peripheral nerves. Tumors obtained from 10 cases of neurofibromatosis and 4 recurrent schwannomas were included. Changes of glycoconjugates were observed in association with a neoplastic transformation of Schwann cells; Arachis hypogaea (PNA) staining after neuraminidase treatment seen in normal Schwann cells was reduced in schwannoma of Antoni type A, and bindings with Glycine max (SBA) and Helix pomatia (HPA) after sialic acid removal, which were not seen in normal Schwann cells, appeared in schwannoma cells. Intensities of staining of tumor cells with each lectin were higher in Antoni type B than those in Antoni type A. No differences in lectin binding patterns were observed between schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis or recurrent schwannomas and ordinary, primary schwannomas in patients without stigmata of neurofibromatosis. Lectin binding patterns of Schwann cells and perineurial cells in neurofibroma were almost similar to those in normal peripheral nerves with an exception of faint stain of Schwann cells with HPA after neuraminidase pretreatment. This result suggests differences in extent of differentiation between schwannoma cells and neoplastic Schwann cells in neurofibroma. Specific PNA binding to perineurial cells in neurofibroma indicates the significance of this lectin as a marker of these cells. PMID:8310811

  8. Lectin histochemistry of normal and neoplastic peripheral nerve sheath. 1. Lectin binding pattern of normal peripheral nerve in man.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Nakasu, S; Nioka, H; Handa, J

    1993-01-01

    The binding patterns of lectins to normal peripheral nerves were examined. Twelve biotinylated lectins were used in this study; Canavalia ensiformis (Con A), Pisum sativum (PSA), Lens culinaris (LCA), Ricinus communis 1 (RCA-1), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Glycine max (SBA), Sophora japonica (SJA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia 1 (BSL-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), succinylated WGA (s-WGA), Ulex europaeus 1 (UEA-1) and Helix pomatia (HPA). Cytoplasm of Schwann cells and perineurial cells was stained by Con A, PSA, LCA, s-WGA and WGA. PNA showed specific binding to perineurial cells, while after neuraminidase treatment stain with this lectin was demonstrated also in Schwann cells. Myelin sheaths were stained with fewer lectins. SBA and HPA with sialic acid removal rarely showed reactivity to the peripheral nerve structure in surgical specimens, in contrast to clear staining of Schwann cells, perineurial cells and myelin sheaths in autopsy specimens. The present study shows distinct lectin stainings of specific structures of the normal human peripheral nerves, and provides important basic information on the alterations of lectin binding patterns during pathological processes in the peripheral nerves. PMID:8310810

  9. Utilization of lectin-histochemistry in forensic neuropathology: lectin staining provides useful information for postmortem diagnosis in forensic neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Katsuji; Tanegashima, Akio; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Ushiyama, Ikuko; Ikemoto, Keiko; Yamasaki, Shigeru; Nishimura, Akiyoshi; Rand, Steven; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2003-09-01

    We have investigated the deposition of glycoconjugates in human brain tissue with or without brain disorders. In this review we describe the application of lectin-histochemistry techniques to forensic neuropathology. Lectin staining is able to reveal several kinds of carbohydrate-related depositions in addition to the conventional degenerative changes including senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and corpora amylacea. The senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles were clearly stained by Con A, PSA and GSI lectins, the corpora amylacea which is relevant to repeated brain hypoxia and mitochondrial damage was also easily detected by these and many other kinds of lectins. Amorphous spaces were detected around blood vessels and independently from blood vessels by lectin staining in the white matter from patients with brain disorders or severe edema. The white matter lesions were not considered relevant for forensic pathology, until a large group of cerebral white matter lesions were detected in the elderly with increasing frequency by modern neuro-imaging methods. The spherical deposits were newly detected by lectin staining in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation chiefly from patients with schizophrenia or cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:14568771

  10. The cytolytic C5b-9 complement complex: feedback inhibition of complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bhakdi, S; Maillet, F; Muhly, M; Kazatchkine, M D

    1988-01-01

    We describe a regulatory function of the terminal cytolytic C5b-9 complex [C5b-9(m)] of human complement. Purified C5b-9(m) complexes isolated from target membranes, whether in solution or bound to liposomes, inhibited lysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes by whole human serum in a dose-dependent manner. C9 was not required for the inhibitory function since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes isolated from membranes were also effective. No effect was found with the cytolytically inactive, fluid-phase SC5b-9 complex. However, tryptic modification of SC5b-9 conferred an inhibitory capacity to the complex, due probably to partial removal of the S protein. Experiments using purified components demonstrated that C5b-9(m) exerts a regulatory effect on the formation of the classical- and alternative-pathway C3 convertases and on the utilization of C5 by cell-bound C5 convertases. C5b-9(m) complexes were unable to inhibit the lysis of cells bearing C5b-7(m) by C8 and C9. Addition of C5b-9(m) to whole human serum abolished its bactericidal effect on the serum-sensitive Escherichia coli K-12 strain W 3110 and suppressed its hemolytic function on antibody-sensitized, autologous erythrocytes. Feedback inhibition by C5b-9(m) represents a biologically relevant mechanism through which complement may autoregulate its effector functions. Images PMID:3162317

  11. Permeability characteristics of complement-damaged membranes: evaluation of the membrane leak generated by the complement proteins C5b-9.

    PubMed

    Sims, P J

    1981-03-01

    Permeability characteristics of the membrane lesion generated by the terminal complement proteins are considered in light of recent observations that the measured diffusion of solute across complement-damaged membranes does not conform to the "doughnut hole" model of a discrete transmembrane pore formed by the inserted C5b-9 complex. By using the measured kinetics of steady-state tracer isotope diffusion of nonelectrolytes across resealed erythrocyte ghost membranes treated with C5b-9, a new transport model is developed. This model considers the apparent membrane lesion strictly in terms of the operational criteria of a functional conducting pathway for the observed diffusing solute, independent of a priori assumptions about the geometry or molecular properties of the membrane lesion. With this definition of the unit membrane lesion and the assumption that the exclusion size of the conducting pathway varies directly with the multiplicity of bound C5b-9 (as suggested by previous measurements under conditions of varying input of C5b-9), numerical estimates of te apparent permeability of the complement-damaged membrane to four diffusing nonelectrolytes are derived. These results suggest that the pathway for a particle diffusing across the complement lesion cannot be a pore and is functionally equivalent to an aqueous leak pathway, free of pore constraints. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of current molecular models for the mechanism of membrane damage by the complement proteins. PMID:6940192

  12. Coloidal gold, ferritin and peroxidase as markers for electron microscopic double labeling lectin techniques.

    PubMed

    Roth, J; Binder, M

    1978-03-01

    Three markers, colloidal gold, ferritin and peroxidase, were checked for usefulness in double labeling of lectin-binding sites. The amount of various lectins for the stabilization of good sols of a different particle size was evaluated. Several lectin-gold complexes were prepared for electron microscopic labeling purposes, and the optimal amount of various lectins needed for stabilization of gold solutions of a different particle size was determined. The following combinations were investigated for their usefulness in labeling two different lectin-binding sites: lectin-gold and lectin-gold (different particle size), lectin-gold and lectin-ferritin, as well as lectin-ferritin and lectin-peroxidase. Of these combinations the latter did not give satisfactory results for double labeling. In all single and double labeling techniques with the above mentioned markers the quantitative evaluation of the number of lectin-binding sites is not feasible, but these techniques will be of considerable value for the investigation of the dynamics of different lectin-binding sites on the cell surface. PMID:632554

  13. Differential Expression of Complement Markers in Normal and AMD Transmitochondrial Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Nashine, Sonali; Chwa, Marilyn; Kazemian, Mina; Thaker, Kunal; Lu, Stephanie; Nesburn, Anthony; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and abnormalities in the complement pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was designed to determine the effects of mtDNA from AMD subjects on the complement pathway. Methods Transmitochondrial cybrids were prepared by fusing platelets from AMD and age-matched Normal subjects with Rho0 (lacking mtDNA) human ARPE-19 cells. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were performed to examine gene and protein expression profiles, respectively, of complement markers in these cybrids. Bioenergetic profiles of Normal and AMD cybrids were examined using the Seahorse XF24 flux analyzer. Results Significant decreases in the gene and protein expression of complement inhibitors, along with significantly higher levels of complement activators, were found in AMD cybrids compared to Older-Normal cybrids. Seahorse flux data demonstrated that the bioenergetic profiles for Older-Normal and Older-AMD cybrid samples were similar to each other but were lower compared to Young-Normal cybrid samples. Conclusion In summary, since all cybrids had identical nuclei and differed only in mtDNA content, the observed changes in components of complement pathways can be attributed to mtDNA variations in the AMD subjects, suggesting that mitochondrial genome and retrograde signaling play critical roles in this disease. Furthermore, the similar bioenergetic profiles of AMD and Older-Normal cybrids indicate that the signaling between mitochondria and nuclei are probably not via a respiratory pathway. PMID:27486856

  14. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function. PMID:25534591

  15. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity. PMID:25451301

  16. Microbe-specific C3b deposition in the horseshoe crab complement system in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg(2+)-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg(2+)-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca(2+)-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca(2+)-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner. PMID:22611464

  17. Microbe-Specific C3b Deposition in the Horseshoe Crab Complement System in a C2/Factor B-Dependent or -Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Toyoki; Shibata, Toshio; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens in the mammalian complement system, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. To understand the molecular mechanism of C3b deposition on microbes, we characterized two types of C2/factor B homologs (designated TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2) identified from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Although the domain architectures of TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were identical to those of mammalian homologs, they contained five-repeated and seven-repeated complement control protein domains at their N-terminal regions, respectively. TtC2/Bf-1 and TtC2/Bf-2 were synthesized and glycosylated in hemocytes and secreted to hemolymph plasma, which existed in a complex with C3 (TtC3), and their activation by microbes was absolutely Mg2+-dependent. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TtC3b deposition was Mg2+-dependent on Gram-positive bacteria or fungi, but not on Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this analysis demonstrated that Ca2+-dependent lectins (C-reactive protein-1 and tachylectin-5A) were required for TtC3b deposition on Gram-positive bacteria, and that a Ca2+-independent lectin (Tachypleus plasma lectin-1) was definitely indispensable for TtC3b deposition on fungi. In contrast, a horseshoe crab lipopolysaccharide-sensitive protease factor C was necessary and sufficient to deposit TtC3b on Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that plasma lectins and factor C play key roles in microbe-specific TtC3b deposition in a C2/factor B-dependent or -independent manner. PMID:22611464

  18. Immature recent thymic emigrants are eliminated by complement1

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fan-Chi; Shapiro, Michael J.; Chen, Meibo W.; McWilliams, Douglas C.; Seaburg, Lauren M.; Tangen, Sarah N.; Shapiro, Virginia Smith

    2014-01-01

    Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) must undergo phenotypic and functional maturation to become long-lived mature naïve T cells. In CD4-cre NKAP conditional knockout mice, NKAP-deficient RTEs fail to complete T cell maturation. Here, we demonstrate that NKAP-deficient immature RTEs do not undergo apoptosis, but are eliminated by complement. C3, C4 and C1q are bound to NKAP-deficient peripheral T cells, demonstrating activation of the classical arm of the complement pathway. As thymocytes mature and exit to the periphery, they increase sialic acid incorporation into cell surface glycans. This is essential to peripheral lymphocyte survival, as stripping sialic acid with neuraminidase leads to the binding of natural IgM and complement fixation. NKAP-deficient T cells have a defect in sialylation on cell surface glycans, leading to IgM recruitment. We demonstrate that the defect in sialylation is due to aberrant α2,8-linked sialylation, and the expression of three genes (ST8sia1, ST8sia4 and ST8sia6) that mediate α2,8 sialylation are down regulated in NKAP-defcient RTEs. The maturation of peripheral NKAP-deficient T cells is partially rescued in a C3-deficient environment. Thus, sialylation during T cell maturation is critical to protect immature RTEs from complement in the periphery. PMID:25367120

  19. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  20. The Role of Complement in Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Corrales, Leticia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a central part of the immune system that has developed as a first defense against non-self cells. Neoplastic transformation is accompanied by an increased capacity of the malignant cells to activate complement. In fact, clinical data demonstrate complement activation in cancer patients. On the basis of the use of protective mechanisms by malignant cells, complement activation has traditionally been considered part of the body's immunosurveillance against cancer. Inhibitory mechanisms of complement activation allow cancer cells to escape from complement-mediated elimination and hamper the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody–based cancer immunotherapies. To overcome this limitation, many strategies have been developed with the goal of improving complement-mediated effector mechanisms. However, significant work in recent years has identified new and surprising roles for complement activation within the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports suggest that complement elements can promote tumor growth in the context of chronic inflammation. This chapter reviews the data describing the role of complement activation in cancer immunity, which offers insights that may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to control cancer. PMID:24272362

  1. The role of complement activation in atherogenesis: the first 40 years.

    PubMed

    Vlaicu, Sonia I; Tatomir, Alexandru; Rus, Violeta; Mekala, Armugam P; Mircea, Petru A; Niculescu, Florin; Rus, Horea

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenesis of atherosclerotic inflammation is a multi-step process defined by the interweaving of excess modified lipid particles, monocyte-macrophages populations, and innate immune and adaptive immunity effectors. A part of innate immunity, the complement system, is an important player in the induction and progression of atherosclerosis. The accumulation of either oxidized or enzymatically modified LDL-bound to C-reactive protein or not-prompts complement activation leading to the assembly of the terminal complement C5b-9 complex in the atherosclerotic lesion. The sublytic C5b-9 assembly leads to the activation and proliferation of smooth muscle and endothelial cells, accompanied by the release of various chemotactic, pro-adhesion, and procoagulant cytokines from these cells. Response gene to complement (RGC)-32, an essential effector of the terminal complement complex C5b-9, also affects atherogenesis, propelling vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, stimulating endothelial proliferation, and promoting vascular lesion formation. A substantial amount of experimental work has suggested a role for the complement system activation during atherosclerotic plaque formation, with the proximal classical complement pathway seemingly having a protective effect and terminal complement contributing to accelerated atherogenesis. All these data suggest that complement plays an important role in atherogenesis. PMID:26091721

  2. Regulation of complement and modulation of its activity in monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Saskia; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Boross, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is a powerful tool of the innate immune system to eradicate pathogens. Both in vitro and in vivo evidence indicates that therapeutic anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can activate the complement system by the classical pathway. However, the contribution of complement to the efficacy of mAbs is still debated, mainly due to the lack of convincing data in patients. A beneficial role for complement during mAb therapy is supported by the fact that cancer cells often upregulate complement-regulatory proteins (CRPs). Polymorphisms in various CRPs were previously associated with complement-mediated disorders. In this review the role of complement in anti-tumor mAb therapy will be discussed with special emphasis on strategies aiming at modifying complement activity. In the future, clinical efficacy of mAbs with enhanced effector functions together with comprehensive analysis of polymorphisms in CRPs in mAb-treated patients will further clarify the role of complement in mAb therapy. PMID:25517299

  3. Membrane protein Crry maintains homeostasis of the complement system1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaobo; Spitzer, Dirk; Mao, Dailing; Peng, Stanford L.; Molina, Hector; Atkinson, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Complement activation is tightly regulated to avoid excessive inflammatory and immune responses. Crry-/- is an embryonic lethal phenotype secondary to the maternal complement alternative pathway (AP) attacking a placenta deficient in this inhibitor. In this study, we demonstrate that Crry-/- mice could be rescued on a partial as well as on a complete factor B (fB)- or C3-deficient maternal background. The C3 and fB protein concentrations in Crry-/-C3+/- and Crry-/-fB+/- mice were substantially reduced for gene dosage secondary to enhanced AP turnover. Based on these observations, a breeding strategy featuring reduced maternal AP-activating capacity rescued the lethal phenotype. It led to a novel, stable line of Crry SKO mice carrying normal alleles for C3 and fB. Crry SKO mice also had accelerated C3 and fB turnover and therefore reduced AP-activating potential. These instructive results represent an example of a membrane regulatory protein being responsible for homeostasis of the complement system. They imply that there is constant turnover on cells of the AP pathway which functions as an immune surveillance system for pathogens and altered self. PMID:18684964

  4. Probing the cons and pros of lectin-induced immunomodulation: case studies for the mistletoe lectin and galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H J

    2001-07-01

    When imagining to monitor animal cells through a microscope with resolution at the molecular level, a salient attribute of their surfaces will be the abundance of glycan chains. They present galactosides at their termini widely extending like tentacles into the extracellular space. Their spatial accessibility and their potential for structural variability endow especially these glycan parts with capacity to act as docking points for molecular sensors (sugar receptors such as lectins). Binding and ligand clustering account for transmission of post-binding signals into the cell interior. The range of triggered activities has turned plant lectins into popular tools in cell biology and immunology. Potential for clinical application has been investigated rigorously only in recent years. As documented in vitro and in vivo for the galactoside-specific mistletoe lectin, its apparent immunomodulatory capacity reflected in upregulation of production of proinflammatory cytokines will not necessarily be clinically favorable but a double-edged sword. In fact, lectin application has been shown to stimulate tumor growth in cell lines, histocultures of human tumors and in two animal models using chemical carcinogenesis or tumor transplantation. When testing immunological effects of the endogenous lectin galectin-1, protection against disorders mediated by activated T cells came up for consideration. Elimination of these cells via CD7-dependent induction of apoptosis, and a shift to the Th2 response by the galectin, are factors to ameliorate disease states. This result encourages further efforts with other galectins. Functional redundancy, synergism, diversity or antagonism among galectins are being explored to understand the actual role of this class of endogenous lectins in inflammation. Regardless of the results of further preclinical testing for galectin-1, these two case studies break new ground in our understanding how glycans as ligands for lectins convey reactivity to

  5. Structure Predictions of Two Bauhinia variegata Lectins Reveal Patterns of C-Terminal Properties in Single Chain Legume Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Conceição, Fabricio R.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Pinto, Luciano da S.

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and –II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins. PMID:24260572

  6. Differential Use of the C-Type Lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN for Phlebovirus Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Léger, Psylvia; Tetard, Marilou; Youness, Berthe; Cordes, Nicole; Rouxel, Ronan N; Flamand, Marie; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2016-06-01

    Bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to humans and livestock globally. The receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely unidentified and poorly characterized. DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin highly expressed on dermal dendritic cells that has been found to act as an authentic entry receptor for many phleboviruses (Bunyaviridae), including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Toscana virus (TOSV) and Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). We found that these phleboviruses can exploit another C-type lectin, L-SIGN, for infection. L-SIGN shares 77% sequence homology with DC-SIGN and is expressed on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. L-SIGN is required for UUKV binding but not for virus internalization. An endocytosis-defective mutant of L-SIGN was still able to mediate virus uptake and infection, indicating that L-SIGN acts as an attachment receptor for phleboviruses rather than an endocytic receptor. Our results point out a fundamental difference in the use of the C-type lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN by UUKV to enter cells, although both proteins are closely related in terms of molecular structure and biological function. This study sheds new light on the molecular mechanisms by which phleboviruses target the liver and also highlights the added complexity in virus-receptor interactions beyond attachment. PMID:26990254

  7. Purification and some properties of a lectin from the fruit juice of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, D C

    1980-01-01

    In the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plant, the fruit juice was found to be the richest source of agglutinating activity. The lectin responsible could be inhibited by oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine, and this property was exploited to purify the lectin by affinity adsorption on trypsin-treated erythrocytes. The lectin is a glycoprotein that cross-reacts immunologically with the lectin from Datura stramonium (thorn-apple). PMID:7378052

  8. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches. PMID:25943580

  9. Identification of Lectins from Metastatic Cancer Cells through Magnetic Glyconanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kavunja, Herbert W.; Voss, Patricia G.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells can have characteristic carbohydrate binding properties. Previously, it was shown that a highly metastatic melanoma cell line B16F10 bound to galacto-side-functionalized nanoparticles much stronger than the corresponding less metastatic B16F1 cells. To better understand the carbohydrate binding properties of cancer cells, herein, we report the isolation and characterization of endogenous galactose binding proteins from B16F10 cells using magnetic glyconanoparticles. The galactose-coated magnetic glyconanoparticles could bind with lectins present in the cells and be isolated through magnet-mediated separation. Through Western blot and mass spectrometry, the arginine/serine rich splicing factor Sfrs1 was identified as a galactose-selective endogenous lectin, overexpressed in B16F10 cells, compared with B16F1 cells. In addition, galactin-3 was found in higher amounts in B16F10 cells. Finally, the glyconanoparticles exhibited a superior efficiency in lectin isolation, from both protein mixtures and live cells, than the corresponding more traditional microparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. Thus, the magnetic glyconanoparticles present a useful tool for discovery of endogenous lectins, as well as binding partners of lectins, without prior knowledge of protein identities. PMID:27110035

  10. Lectin histochemistry of palatine glands in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Zaki; Kitaura, Hideki; Honma, Shiho; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the binding pattern of lectins, soybean agglutinin (SBA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and succinylated WGA (sucWGA) in the developing rat palatine glands. In adult rats, heterogeneous lectin binding patterns were revealed between the anterior and posterior portions of palatine glands, as DBA, VVA, and WGA were bound more intensely and broadly in the posterior portion. SBA, PNA, and sucWGA showed far less reactivity in the anterior than in the posterior portion. At embryonic day 18 (E18), weak labeling was observed with UEA-I and WGA at the basal membrane of terminal buds, UEA-I and PNA labeled the epithelial cord, and there was no apparent binding for SBA, DBA, VVA, and sucWGA. At E20, after acinar lumenization, all lectins were detected at the acinar cell basal membranes. After birth, all lectins detectably labeled at the mucous cell apical membranes and progressively, with maturation, extended from the apical to basal portions of the cytoplasm. Apparent serous cells were observed around postnatal day 10 (PN10) and bound UEA-I. Lectins reached peak reactivity at PN21 and the binding patterns became identical to those of adults around PN28. PMID:24345684

  11. White kidney bean lectin exerts anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-04-01

    A 60-kDa glucosamine binding lectin, white kidney bean lectin (WKBL), was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. white kidney beans, by application of anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, and FPLC-size exclusion on Superdex 75. The anti-proliferative activity of WKBL on HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells was stronger than the activity on MCF7 cells and WRL68 cells (IC50 values for a 48-h treatment with WKBL on HONE1 cells: 18.8 μM; HepG2 cells: 19.7 μM; MCF7 cells: 26.9 μM; and WRL68 cells: >80 μM). The activity could be reduced by addition of glucosamine, which occupies the binding sites of WKBL, indicating that carbohydrate binding is crucial for the activity. Annexin V-FITC and PI staining, JC-1 staining and Hoechst 33342 staining revealed that apoptosis was induced on WKBL-treated HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells, but not as obviously on MCF7 cells. Cell cycle analysis also showed a slight cell cycle arrest on HONE1 cells after WKBL treatment. Western blotting suggested that WKBL induced apoptosis of HONE1 cells occurred through the extrinsic apoptosis pathway, with detection of increased level of active caspase 3, 8 and 9. PMID:26769089

  12. Characterization of the Grp94/OS-9 chaperone-lectin complex

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Paul M.; Shinsky, Stephen A.; Hong, Feng; Li, Zihai; Cosgrove, Michael S.; Gewirth, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Grp94 is a macromolecular chaperone belonging to the hsp90 family and is the most abundant glycoprotein in the endoplasmic reticulum of mammals. In addition to its essential role in protein folding, Grp94 was proposed to participate in the ER associated degradation (ERAD) quality control pathway by interacting with the lectin OS-9, a sensor for terminally misfolded proteins (TMPs). To understand how OS-9 interacts with ER chaperone proteins, we mapped its interaction with Grp94. Glycosylation of the full length Grp94 protein was essential for OS-9 binding, although deletion of the Grp94 N-terminal domain relieved this requirement suggesting that the effect was allosteric rather than direct. Although yeast OS-9 is composed of a well-established N-terminal MRH lectin domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain, we find that the C-terminal domain of OS-9 in higher eukaryotes contains ‘mammalian-specific insets’ that are specifically recognized by the middle and C-terminal domains of Grp94. Additionally, the Grp94 binding domain in OS-9 was found to be intrinsically disordered. The biochemical analysis of the interacting regions provides insight into the manner by which the two associate, and additionally hints at a plausible biological role for the Grp94/OS-9 complex. PMID:25193139

  13. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increa