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Sample records for complex antigens inhibition

  1. Inhibition of Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Processing by Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin Requires an Enzymatically Active A Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Matousek, Milita P.; Nedrud, John G.; Cieplak, Witold; Harding, Clifford V.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and cholera toxin (CT) were found to inhibit intracellular antigen processing. Processing was not inhibited by mutant LT with attenuated ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, CT B or LT B subunit, which enhanced presentation of preexisting cell surface peptide-class II major histocompatibility complex complexes. Inhibition of antigen processing correlated with A subunit ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PMID:9632629

  2. An Annular Lipid Belt Is Essential for Allosteric Coupling and Viral Inhibition of the Antigen Translocation Complex TAP (Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing)*

    PubMed Central

    Eggensperger, Sabine; Fisette, Olivier; Parcej, David; Schäfer, Lars V.; Tampé, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) constitutes a focal element in the adaptive immune response against infected or malignantly transformed cells. TAP shuttles proteasomal degradation products into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum for loading of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here, the heterodimeric TAP complex was purified and reconstituted in nanodiscs in defined stoichiometry. We demonstrate that a single heterodimeric core-TAP complex is active in peptide binding, which is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Notably, with increasing peptide length, the ATP turnover was gradually decreased, revealing that ATP hydrolysis is coupled to the movement of peptide through the ATP-binding cassette transporter. In addition, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show that the observed 22 lipids are sufficient to form an annular belt surrounding the TAP complex. This lipid belt is essential for high affinity inhibition by the herpesvirus immune evasin ICP47. In conclusion, nanodiscs are a powerful approach to study the important role of lipids as well as the function, interaction, and modulation of the antigen translocation machinery. PMID:25305015

  3. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Inhibits Fas Antigen-Mediated Gastric Mucosal Cell Apoptosis through Actin-Dependent Inhibition of Receptor Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Stoicov, Calin; Cai, Xun; Li, Hanchen; Klucevsek, Kristine; Carlson, Jane; Saffari, Reza; Houghton, JeanMarie

    2005-01-01

    Escape from normal apoptotic controls is thought to be essential for the development of cancer. During Helicobacter pylori infection, the leading cause of gastric cancer, activation of the Fas antigen (Fas Ag) apoptotic pathway is responsible for early atrophy and tissue loss. As disease progresses, metaplastic and dysplastic glands arise which express Fas Ag but are resistant to apoptosis and are believed to be the precursor cells for adenocarcinoma. In this report, we show that one mechanism of acquired Fas resistance is inhibition of receptor aggregation via a major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII)-mediated, actin-dependent mechanism. For these studies we used the well-described C57BL/6 mouse model of Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis infection. Under normal conditions, Fas Ag is expressed at low levels, and MHCII expression on gastric mucosal cells is negligible. With infection and inflammation, both receptors are upregulated, and 6.1% of gastric mucosal cells express MHCII in combination with Fas Ag. Using the rat gastric mucosal cell line RGM-1 transfected with murine Fas Ag and MHCIIαβ chains, we demonstrate that MHCII prevents Fas receptor aggregation and inhibits Fas-mediated signaling through its effects on the actin cytoskeleton. Depolymerization of actin with cytochalasin D allows receptors to aggregate and restores Fas sensitivity. These findings offer one mechanism by which gastric mucosal cells acquire Fas resistance. PMID:16177302

  4. Inhibition of Intracellular Transport of B Cell Antigen Receptor Complexes by Kaposi's Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus K1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bok-Soo; Alvarez, Xavier; Ishido, Satoshi; Lackner, Andrew A.; Jung, Jae U.

    2000-01-01

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is a large complex that consists of a disulfide-linked tetramer of two transmembrane heavy (μ) chains and two light (λ or κ) chains in association with a heterodimer of Igα and Igβ. Kaposi's sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a transforming protein called K1, which has structural and functional similarity to Igα and Igβ. We demonstrate that K1 downregulates the expression of BCR complexes on the surface. The NH2-terminal region of K1 specifically interacts with the μ chains of BCR complexes, and this interaction retains BCR complexes in the endoplasmic reticulum, preventing their intracellular transport to the cell surface. Thus, KSHV K1 resembles Igα and Igβ in its ability to induce signaling and to interact with μ chains of the BCR. However, unlike Igα and Igβ, which interact with μ chains to direct BCR complexes to the cell surface, K1 interacts with μ chains to block the intracellular transport of BCR complexes to the cell surface. These results demonstrate a unique feature of the K1 transforming protein, which may confer virus-infected cells with a long-term survival advantage. PMID:10880522

  5. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  6. Immunosuppressant deoxyspergualin inhibits antigen processing in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, P H; Tepper, M A; Faith, A; Higgins, J A; Lamb, J R; Geha, R S

    1994-11-01

    Deoxyspergualin (DSG) is a novel immunosuppressive agent recently shown to bind to the constitutive heat shock protein 70, which is involved in binding and intracellular transport of antigenic peptides. In this study, we show that DSG inhibits the proliferation of PBMCs to the Ags tetanus toxoid and diphtheria toxoid, but not to the mitogens PHA and PMA/ionomycin, nor to the superantigens toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and staphylococcal enterotoxin A. DSG's effect was specific for monocytes as preincubation of T cells with DSG did not inhibit their proliferation to monocytes pulsed with tetanus toxoid Ag for 16 h, whereas the presence of DSG during Ag pulsing of the monocytes inhibited their ability to stimulate T cell proliferation. DSG did not down-regulate the expression of MHC class II molecules by monocytes, and the inhibitory effect of DSG on T cell proliferation was not reversed by the addition of IL-2, nor by the addition of the costimulatory signals IL-1, IL-6, and anti-CD28. Studies with two human T cell clones, HA1.7 and PF5, specific, respectively, to peptides spanning amino acids 307-319 and 256-270 of influenza hemagglutinin, showed that DSG inhibited the proliferation of the clones to the native hemagglutinin molecule but minimally affected their proliferation to the peptides. These data suggest that DSG interferes with Ag processing and/or presentation. PMID:7930603

  7. Inhibition by chloroquine of the class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted presentation of endogenous antigens varies according to the cellular origin of the antigen-presenting cells, the nature of the T-cell epitope, and the responding T cell.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard-Platlet, S; Bertolino, P; Deng, H; Gerlier, D; Rabourdin-Combe, C

    1993-01-01

    Chloroquine treatment of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was explored as a tool to investigate the processing pathway for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted presentation of the endogenous secreted hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and transmembrane measles virus haemagglutinin (HA). A 72-hr pretreatment of the APC with 25 microM chloroquine blocked the presentation of the HEL(52-61) T-cell epitope generated from endogenous HEL to the I-Ak-restricted 3A9 T-cell hybridoma by MHC class II-transfected L cells expressing the invariant chain (Ii). The presentation of exogenously added HEL peptides was not affected. Under the same conditions, no inhibition of the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the I-Ed-restricted G28 high-avidity T-cell hybridoma, nor of HA when synthesized by L cells, was observed. When B-lymphoid APC were used, inhibition was observed in every case with a low number of B APC pretreated for 48 hr with chloroquine prior to the T-cell stimulation test. Moreover, addition of chloroquine to untreated B APC during the T-cell stimulation assay was sufficient to inhibit completely the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the B10.D24.42 low avidity T-cell hybridoma. Altogether these studies suggest that an apparent resistance of endogenous Ag presentation to chloroquine inhibition may not necessarily indicate the existence of a non-endosomal pathway but may be due to the nature of the T-cell epitope, to the use of 'non-professional' APC such as L cells, to the use of T cells of high avidity, and to high amounts of pre-existing MHC class II-peptide complexes expressed by the APC. We demonstrate here that, at least in conventional APC such as B cells, class II-restricted presentation of both endogenous secreted HEL and transmembrane HA involves an endosomal pathway. PMID:7508420

  8. T-antigen-DNA polymerase alpha complex implicated in simian virus 40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Smale, S T; Tjian, R

    1986-01-01

    We have combined in vitro DNA replication reactions and immunological techniques to analyze biochemical interactions between simian virus (SV40) large T antigen and components of the cellular replication apparatus. First, in vitro SV40 DNA replication was characterized with specific origin mutants. Next, monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that a specific domain of T antigen formed a complex with cellular DNA polymerase alpha. Several antibodies were identified that coprecipitated T antigen and DNA polymerase alpha, while others were found to selectively prevent this interaction and concomitantly inhibit DNA replication. DNA polymerase alpha also bound efficiently to a T-antigen affinity column, confirming the immunoprecipitation results and providing a useful method for purification of the complete protein complex. Taken together, these results suggest that the T-antigen-polymerase association may be a key step in the initiation of SV40 DNA replication. Images PMID:3025630

  9. Complex Antigens Drive Permissive Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C; Kepler, Thomas B; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-03-15

    Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve toward increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens-Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin-in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naive B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early "winners" were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection. PMID:26948373

  10. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Lauren M.; Baskerville, Edward B.; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype–phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens. PMID:26194759

  11. Gonococcal pilus vaccine. Studies of antigenicity and inhibition of attachment.

    PubMed Central

    Tramont, E C; Sadoff, J C; Boslego, J W; Ciak, J; McChesney, D; Brinton, C C; Wood, S; Takafuji, E

    1981-01-01

    A gonococcal pilus vaccine or placebo was injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly into 71 human volunteers. The vaccine was found to be safe. The principal adverse reaction was a complaint of a sore arm, which was caused, at least in part, to the volume of material injected. 6 of 64 (9%) volunteers receiving the larger doses also complained of malaise. The vaccine was found to be antigenic. All of the volunteers developed an immunoglobulin class-specific antibody response as measured by a solid phase radioimmunoassay. The antibody was capable of blocking the attachment of gonococci to epithelial cells. A slight antibody response was also demonstrated to gonococcal lipopolysaccharide but the antibody responsible for blocking attachment of gonococci was directed entirely at the pilus protein. The stimulated antibodies were shown to crossreact with isolated pili of heterologous gonococcal strains and to block the attachment of heterologous gonococci. Absorption of immune sera by a heterologous pilus reduced the inhibition of attachment antibodies to pre-immune level, suggesting that the immune response was directed at a common pilus determinant. PMID:6116723

  12. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erik D.; Simmons, Ryan S.; Palmer, Amy L.; Hildebrand, William H.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8+ T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8+ killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. PMID:26597986

  13. Immune complexes that contain HIV antigens activate peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, L B; Shmagel, K V; Saidakova, E V; Shmagel, N G; Chereshnev, V A

    2016-07-01

    Uninfected donor T cells were treated in vitro by model immune complexes that contained either HIV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens. Unlike HCV antigen-containing complexes, the immune complexes that contained HIV antigens have been shown to activate peripheral blood T cells of uninfected donors under in vitro conditions. Both the antiviral antibodies and HIV antigen were involved in the activation process. The unique properties of the immune complexes formed by HIV antigens and antiviral antibodies are believed to result from the virus-specific antibody properties and molecular conformation of the antigen-antibody complex. PMID:27595830

  14. Effective Inhibition of Kb- and Db-Restricted Antigen Presentation in Primary Macrophages by Murine Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    LoPiccolo, Diane M.; Gold, Marielle C.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Wagner, Markus; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.; Hill, Ann B.

    2003-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection in vivo, both in disseminating infection and in harboring latent virus. MCMV encodes three immune evasion genes (m4, m6, and m152) that interfere with the ability of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) to detect virus-infected fibroblasts, but the efficacy of immune evasion in macrophages has been controversial. Here we show that MCMV immune evasion genes function in H-2b primary bone marrow macrophages (BMMφ) in the same way that they do in fibroblasts. Metabolic labeling experiments showed that class I is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by MCMV infection and associates with m4/gp34 to a similar extent in fibroblasts and BMMφ. We tested a series of Kb- and Db-restricted CTL clones specific for MCMV early genes against a panel of MCMV wild-type virus and mutants lacking m152, m4, or m6. MCMV immune evasion genes effectively inhibited antigen presentation. m152 appeared sufficient to abolish Db-restricted presentation in infected macrophages, as has been previously observed in infected fibroblasts. However, for inhibition of recognition of infected macrophages by Kb-restricted CTL, m4, m6, and m152 were all required. The contribution of m4 to inhibition of recognition appeared much more important in macrophages than in fibroblasts. Thus, MCMV immune evasion genes function effectively in primary macrophages to prevent CTL recognition of early antigens and show the same pattern of major histocompatibility complex class I allele discrimination as is seen in fibroblasts. Furthermore, for inhibition of Kb-restricted presentation, a strong synergistic effect was noted among m152, m4, and m6. PMID:12477835

  15. Electron Microscopic Studies of the Antigen-Antibody Complex

    PubMed Central

    Easty, G. C.; Mercer, E. H.

    1958-01-01

    Electron micrographs of the ferritin antibody (rabbit) and ferritin (horse) complex have been obtained. The high iron content of the ferritin molecule (23 per cent Fe) allows its molecules to be recognized within the particles of precipitate. Three methods of visualizing the molecular distribution have been developed: (a) small particles of the precipitated complex have been dried on to electron microscope grids and either examined directly or first shadowed with metal and then examined, (b) the precipitate has been centrifuged to a plug which was embedded and thin sections cut from it for examination, (c) the bands formed by allowing antibody and antigen to diffuse together in agar gels have been fixed, embedded and sectioned. All methods have yielded pictures of the distribution of the ferritin within the complex which are broadly similar to what might have been expected from a somewhat irregular lattice as pictured in the Marrack-Heidelberger Lattice Theory. The antibody molecules are not clearly defined but appear as a halo of low density enveloping the ferritin clusters. The distance, centre to centre, between the ferritin molecules is variable, but is, on the average, in the range 200–400 Å. This is greater than the ferritin-ferritin contact distance (100 Å) and is thought to mean that the ferritin molecules are bridged by antibody molecules as pictured in the Lattice Theory. The bands produced in the gel-diffusion test contain islands of ferritin-antibody complex. When equivalent concentrations of reagents are used a single band of precipitate is formed. When excess of either antigen or antibody is used multiple bands of precipitate are formed which contain islands of ferritin antibody complex indistinguishable from those formed in the single band at equivalent concentrations, providing direct evidence for the formation of multiple bands from a single antigen. Ferritin-ferritin contacts have been observed within the complex. Under all the conditions of

  16. Efficient major histocompatibility complex class I presentation of exogenous antigen upon phagocytosis by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsovics-Bankowski, M; Clark, K; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1993-01-01

    Antigens in extracellular fluids can be processed and presented with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by a subset of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Chicken egg ovalbumin (Ova) linked to beads was presented with MHC class I molecules by these cells up to 10(4)-fold more efficiently than soluble Ova. This enhanced presentation was observed with covalently or noncovalently linked Ova and with beads of different compositions. A key parameter in the activity of these conjugates was the size of the beads. The APC that is responsible for this form of presentation is a macrophage. These cells internalize the antigen constructs through phagocytosis, since cytochalasin B inhibited presentation. Processing of the antigen and association with MHC class I molecules appears to occur intracellularly as presentation was observed under conditions where there was no detectable release of peptides into the extracellular fluids. When injected in vivo in C57BL/6 mice, Ova-beads, but not soluble Ova, primed CD4- CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Similar results were obtained in BALB/c mice immunized with beta-galactosidase-beads. The implications of these findings for development of nonliving vaccines that stimulate CTL immunity are discussed. PMID:8506338

  17. Monomeric and oligomeric complexes of the B cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Schamel, W W; Reth, M

    2000-07-01

    The current structural model of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) describes it as a symmetric protein complex in which one membrane-bound immunoglobulin molecule (mIg) is noncovalently bound on each side by an Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimer. Using peptide-tagged Ig-alpha proteins, blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), and biosynthetical labeling of B cells, we find that the mIg:Ig-alpha/Ig-beta complex has a stoichiometry of 1:1 and not 1:2. An anti-Flag stimulation of B cells coexpressing Flag-tagged and wild-type Ig-alpha proteins results in the phosphorylation of both Ig-alpha proteins, suggesting that on the surface of living B cells, several BCR monomers are in contact with each other. A BN-PAGE analysis after limited detergent lysis provides further evidence for an oligomeric BCR structure. PMID:10933390

  18. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  19. Antigens of Lyme disease of spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi inhibits antigen or mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chiao, J W; Pavia, C; Riley, M; Altmann-Lasekan, W; Abolhassani, M; Liegner, K; Mittelman, A

    1994-02-01

    Modulation of cellular immune responses by the spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacteria that causes Lyme disease, was demonstrated. When cultured in the presence of sonicated Borrelia preparation (Bb), the mitogen- or antigen-stimulated proliferative responses of normal lymphocytes were consistently lowered. Bb caused the greatest reduction in Concanavalin A (ConA) or antigen-stimulated proliferation, where almost 100% reduction in proliferation could be achieved. Bb also reduced phytohemagglutinin-M (PHA) or pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation, with the PWM proliferation being the least affected. This regulatory activity was not due to toxicity and was determined to be caused by Bb protein antigens. The degree of the proliferation reduction was directly proportional to both Bb quantity and length of exposure to lymphocytes. IL-2 production was significantly reduced from Bb-exposed lymphocytes. The entry of lymphocytes into the proliferating phases of the cell cycle was also shown to be blocked. These results have demonstrated an immune suppressive mechanism of B. burgdorferi. The magnitude of host immune responses may be dependent on the degree of suppression which is related to the spirochaete quantity and their length of presence in the host. PMID:8173554

  20. Optimisation of immuno-gold nanoparticle complexes for antigen detection.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Susan; Russell, David A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to define the optimum method of binding antibodies to the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then to apply the optimised antibody-functionalised AuNPs for the detection of a target antigen. A detailed investigation of three different techniques for the functionalisation of AuNPs with anti-cocaine antibody and methods for the subsequent characterisation of the antibody-functionalised AuNP are reported. The addition of anti-cocaine antibody onto the AuNP surface was facilitated by either: a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker with a COOH terminal functional group; an aminated PEG ligand; or an N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate (SPDP)-Protein A/G intermediate. Characterisation of the functionalised particles was performed using transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometry and by agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, the cocaine binding efficacy of the resultant AuNPs and their cocaine-binding capacity was determined using a cocaine-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, and by the application of a microtiter plate-based immunoassay. The results showed that the number of antibody per particle was the highest when the AuNP were functionalised with the Protein A/G intermediate. As compared to free antibody, the cocaine binding efficacy was significantly enhanced using the AuNP-Protein A/G-antibody complex. This optimal antibody-antigen binding efficacy is thought to be the result of the large number of antibody per particle and the oriented binding of the antibody to the Protein A/G on the AuNP surface. These results highlight the ideal immuno-gold nanoparticle characteristics for the detection of target antigens such as cocaine. PMID:26994353

  1. Inhibition of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation by gamma 2-herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, P G; Efstathiou, S; Doherty, P C; Lehner, P J

    2000-07-18

    The gamma-herpesviruses, in contrast to the alpha- and beta-herpesviruses, are not known to inhibit antigen presentation to CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during lytic cycle replication. However, murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 causes a chronic lytic infection in CD4(+) T cell-deficient mice despite the persistence of a substantial CTL response, suggesting that CTL evasion occurs. Here we show that, distinct from host protein synthesis shutoff, gamma-herpesvirus 68 down-regulates surface MHC class I expression on lytically infected fibroblasts and inhibits their recognition by antigen-specific CTLs. The viral K3 gene, encoding a zinc-finger-containing protein, dramatically reduced the half-life of nascent class I molecules and the level of surface MHC class I expression and was by itself sufficient to block antigen presentation. The homologous K3 and K5 genes of the related Kaposi's sarcoma-associated virus also inhibited antigen presentation and decreased cell surface expression of HLA class I antigens. Thus it appears that an immune evasion strategy shared by at least two gamma-herpesviruses allows continued lytic infection in the face of strong CTL immunity. PMID:10890918

  2. Vaccinia Virus A35R Inhibits MHC Class II Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Kristina E.; Connor, Ramsey F.; Jones, Gwendolyn J.B.; Yimbu, Kenneth; Roper, Rachel L.

    2009-01-01

    The Vaccinia virus gene A35R (Copenhagen designation) is highly conserved in mammalian-tropic poxviruses and is an important virulence factor, but its function was unknown. We show herein that A35 does not affect viral infectivity, apoptosis induction, or replication; however, we found that A35 significantly inhibited MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation, immune priming of T lymphocytes, and subsequent chemokine and cytokine synthesis. A35 localized to endosomes and reduced the amount of a model antigenic peptide displayed in the cleft of class II MHC. In addition, A35 decreased VV specific T cell responses in vivo. Thus, this is the first report identifying a function for the A35 protein in virulence as well as the first report identifying a VV gene that inhibits peptide antigen presentation. PMID:19954808

  3. Relationship between Fc receptors, antigen-binding sites on T and B cells, and H-2 complex-associated determinants.

    PubMed

    Basten, A; Miller, J F; Abraham, R

    1975-03-01

    The relationship between H-2 complex-associated determinants, Fc receptors, and specific antigen-recognition sites on T and B cells was examined by binding and functional assays. The Fc receptor was detected by radiolabeled immune complexes or aggregated human IgG. Both these reagents selectively bound to B cells, not to T cells. When spleen cells, from mice primed to several antigens, were exposed to highly substituted radioactive aggregates, their capacity to transfer both a direct and indirect plaque-forming cell response to these antigens was abrogated. Addition of B cells, but not of T cells, restored responsiveness. Complexed Ig binding to Fc receptors was prevented by pretreatment of mixed lymphoid cell populations with antisera directed against membrane components on the same cell (e.g., H-2) and on other cells (e.g., theta). The lack of specificity of inhibition was thought to be due to the formation on cell surfaces of antigen-antibody complexes which would then attach to the Fc receptor during the incubation precedure. Specific blockade of the Fc receptor during the incubation procedure. Specific blockade of the Fc receptor however occurred when B cells were pretreated with the Fab fragments of anti-H-2 antibody. This was demonstrated autoradiographically and by inhibition of aggregate-induced suicide. The blocking activity of ante-H-2 Fab was removed by absorption with spleen cells from thymectomized irradiated mice but not with thymus cells of appropriate specificity. This suggested that the antibodies involved had specificity for determinants on the B-cell membrane distinct from those coded by the K or D end of the H-2 complex, and either absent from, or poorly represented on, thymus cells. Specific antigen-induced suicide of B cells was achieved simply by incubating the cells with radioactive antigen in the cold. T-cell suicide on the other hand required that the 125I-labeled antigen be presented to the T cells at 37 degrees-C on the surface of

  4. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  5. Novel Mycobacteria Antigen 85 Complex Binding Motif on Fibronectin*

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Bell, Hannah; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Ptak, Christopher P.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2012-01-01

    The members of the antigen 85 protein family (Ag85), consisting of members Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C, are the predominantly secreted proteins of mycobacteria and possess the ability to specifically interact with fibronectin (Fn). Because Fn-binding proteins are likely to be important virulence factors of Mycobacterium spp., Ag85 may contribute to the adherence, invasion, and dissemination of organisms in host tissue. In this study, we reported the Fn binding affinity of Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) (KD values were determined from 33.6 to 68.4 nm) and mapped the Ag85-binding motifs of Fn. Fn14, a type III module located on the heparin-binding domain II (Hep-2) of Fn, was discovered to interact with Ag85 from MAP. The peptide inhibition assay subsequently demonstrated that a peptide consisting of residues 17–26 from Fn14 (17SLLVSWQPPR26, termed P17–26) could interfere with Ag85B binding to Fn (73.3% reduction). In addition, single alanine substitutions along the sequence of P17–26 revealed that the key residues involved in Ag85-Fn binding likely contribute through hydrophobic and charge interactions. Moreover, binding of Ag85 on Fn siRNA-transfected Caco2 cells was dramatically reduced (44.6%), implying the physiological significance of the Ag85-Fn interaction between mycobacteria and host cells during infection. Our results indicate that Ag85 binds to Fn at a novel motif and plays a critical role in mycobacteria adherence to host cells by initiating infection. Ag85 might serve as an important colonization factor potentially contributing to mycobacterial virulence. PMID:22128161

  6. Phospholipase treatment of accessory cells that have been exposed to antigen selectively inhibits antigen-specific Ia-restricted, but not allospecific, stimulation of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    The corecognition of antigen and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (Ia molecules) by the T-cell receptor is a cell surface event. Before antigen is recognized, it must be taken up, processed, and displayed on the surface of an Ia-bearing accessory cell (antigen-presenting cell, APC). The exact nature of antigen processing and the subsequent associations of antigen with the APC plasma membrane, Ia molecules, and/or the T-cell receptor are not well defined. To further analyze these events, we have characterized the processing and presentation of the soluble polypeptide antigen bovine insulin. We found that this antigen requires APC-dependent processing, as evidenced by the inability of metabolically inactivated APCs to present native antigen to antigen plus Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. The ability of the same APCs to present antigen after uptake and processing showed that this antigen subsequently becomes stably associated with the APC plasma membrane. To characterize the basis for this association, we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. APCs exposed to antigen, treated with phospholipase A2, and then immediately fixed lost the ability to stimulate bovine insulin plus I-Ad-specific hybridomas. In contrast, the ability of these same APCs to stimulate I-Ad allospecific hybridomas was unaffected. This effect of phospholipase is not mimicked by the broadly active protease Pronase, nor is there evidence for contaminating proteases in the phospholipase preparation. These results suggest that one consequence of antigen processing may be an antigen-lipid association that contributes to the anchoring of antigen to the APC membrane. The implications of this model are discussed. PMID:3529095

  7. Avian P1 antigens inhibit agglutination mediated by P fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R; Swanson, J L; Neill, M A

    1992-01-01

    Whole egg white from pigeon, dove, and cockatiel eggs, as well as the ovomucoid fraction of pigeon egg white, exhibited strong P1 antigenic activities and inhibited agglutination of human P1 erythrocytes and of digalactoside-coated latex beads by P-fimbriated Escherichia coli strains. In contrast, chicken egg white exhibited only weak P1 antigenic activity and had little impact on P-fimbrial agglutination. These preparations did not affect hemagglutination by E. coli strains expressing mannose-resistant adhesins other than P fimbriae, i.e., Dr, F1845, and S adhesins. Human anti-P1 serum diminished the P-fimbrial inhibitory activities of pigeon egg white and pigeon ovomucoid. Pigeon ovomucoid was equipotent on a molar basis with globoside, and the pigeon, dove, and cockatiel egg white preparations were equipotent with each other in P-fimbrial inhibition. Incubation of p erythrocytes in whole egg whites or in pigeon ovomucoid did not render them agglutinable by P-fimbriated bacteria, whereas incubation in globoside did. These data demonstrate that whole egg whites (and their ovomucoid fraction) from members of the families Columbidae (pigeons and doves) and Psittacidae (parrots) specifically and potently inhibit P-fimbrial agglutination, probably by providing P1 antigen as a receptor for the P-fimbrial adhesin. Avian egg white preparations may facilitate adhesin characterization of wild-type uropathogenic strains and may useful in preventing upper urinary tract infections due to P-fimbriated E. coli. PMID:1346125

  8. Human Antibodies to a Mr 155,000 Plasmodium falciparum Antigen Efficiently Inhibit Merozoite Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlin, Birgitta; Wahlgren, Mats; Perlmann, Hedvig; Berzins, Klavs; Bjorkman, Anders; Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Perlmann, Peter

    1984-12-01

    IgG from a donor clinically immune to Plasmodium falciparum malaria strongly inhibited reinvasion in vitro of human erythrocytes by the parasite. When added to monolayers of glutaraldehyde-fixed and air-dried erythrocytes infected with the parasite, this IgG also displayed a characteristic immunofluorescence restricted to the surface of infected erythrocytes. Elution of the IgG adsorbed to such monolayers gave an antibody fraction that was 40 times more efficient in the reinvasion inhibition assay (50% inhibition titer, <1 μ g/ml) than the original IgG preparation. The major antibody in this eluate was directed against a parasite-derived antigen of Mr 155,000 (Pf 155) deposited by the parasite in the erythrocyte membrane in the course of invasion. A detailed study of IgG fractions from 11 donors with acute P. falciparum malaria or clinical immunity revealed the existence of an excellent correlation between their capacities to stain the surface of infected erythrocytes, their titers in reinvasion inhibition, and the presence of antibodies to Pf 155 as detected by immunoblotting. No such correlations were seen when the IgG fractions were analyzed for immunofluorescence of intracellular parasites or for the presence of antibodies to other parasite antigens as detected by immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled and NaDodSO4/PAGE-separated parasite extracts. The results suggest that Pf 155 has an important role in the process of erythrocyte infection and that host antibodies to this antigen may efficiently interfere with this process.

  9. Estradiol-induced vaginal mucus inhibits antigen penetration and CD8+ T cell priming in response to intravaginal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Seavey, Matthew M.; Mosmann, Tim R.

    2010-01-01

    Although vaginal immunization has been explored as a strategy to induce mucosal immunity in the female reproductive tract, this site displays unique immunological features that probably evolved to inhibit anti-paternal T cell responses after insemination to allow successful pregnancy. We previously demonstrated that estradiol, which induces an estrus-like state, prevented CD8+ T cell priming during intravaginal immunization of mice. We now show that estradiol prevented antigen loading of vaginal antigen presenting cells (APC) after intravaginal immunization. Histological examination confirmed that estradiol prevented penetration of peptide antigen into the vaginal wall. Removal of the estradiol-induced mucus barrier by mucinase partially restored antigen loading of vaginal APC and CD8+ T cell proliferation in vivo. The estradiol-induced mucus barrier may thus prevent exposure to antigens delivered intravaginally, supplementing additional estradiol-dependent mechanism(s) that inhibit CD8+ T cell priming after insemination or vaginal vaccination. PMID:19428849

  10. Chick myotendinous antigen. II. A novel extracellular glycoprotein complex consisting of large disulfide-linked subunits.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, M; Fambrough, D M

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the biochemical characterization of a novel extracellular matrix component, " myotendinous antigen," which appears early in chick limb morphogenesis at sites connecting developing muscle fibers, tendons, and bone ( Chiquet , M., and D. Fambrough , 1984; J. Cell Biol., 98:1926-1936). This extracellular matrix antigen is a major component of the secretory proteins released into the medium by fibroblast and muscle cultures; the soluble form is characterized here. This form of myotendinous antigen is a large glycoprotein complex consisting of several disulfide linked subunits (Mr approximately 150,000-240,000). The differently sized antigen subunits are related, since they yielded very similar proteolytic cleavage patterns. M1 antibody can bind to the denatured subunits. The antigen subunits, as well as a Mr approximately 80,000 pepsin-resistant antigenic domain derived from them, are resistant to bacterial collagenase. Despite possessing subunits similar in size to fibronectin, myotendinous antigen appears to be both structurally and antigenically unrelated to fibronectin or to other known extracellular matrix components. About seven times more M1 antigen per cell nucleus was released into the medium in fibroblast as compared to muscle cultures. In muscle conditioned medium, myotendinous antigen is noncovalently complexed to very high molecular weight material that could be heavily labeled by [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulfate. This material is sensitive to chondroitinase ABC and hence appears to contain sulfated glycosaminoglycans. We speculate that myotendinous antigen might interact with proteoglycans on the surface of muscle fibers, thereby acting as a link to tendons. PMID:6202699

  11. Mutations which affect the inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A by simian virus 40 small-t antigen in vitro decrease viral transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Mungre, S; Enderle, K; Turk, B; Porrás, A; Wu, Y Q; Mumby, M C; Rundell, K

    1994-01-01

    Three independent point mutations within residues 97 to 103 of the simian virus 40-small-t antigen (small-t) greatly reduced the ability of purified small-t to inhibit protein phosphatase 2A in vitro. These mutations affected the interaction of small-t antigen with the protein phosphatase 2A A subunit translated in vitro, and a peptide from the region identified by these mutations released the A subunit from immune complexes. When introduced into virus, the mutations eliminated the ability of small-t to enhance viral transformation of growth-arrested rat F111 cells. In contrast, the mutant small-t antigens were unimpaired in the transactivation of the adenovirus E2 promoter, an activity which was reduced by a double mutation in small-t residues 43 and 45. Images PMID:8107228

  12. Application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to paratope mapping for larger antigen-Fab complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Kato, K; Yamato, S; Igarashi, T; Matsunaga, C; Ohtsuka, H; Higuchi, A; Nomura, N; Noguchi, H; Arata, Y

    1994-06-13

    For the purpose of engineering the antibody combining site, mapping residues that are involved in antigen binding provide us with valuable information. By use of 13C NMR spectroscopy with selectively 13C-labeled Fv fragments, we have established a general strategy to identify the residues that are perturbed upon binding of small antigen (hapten) molecules [(1990) Biochemistry 30, 6604-6610]. In the present paper, we demonstrate that this strategy can be extended to molecular structural analyses of the complexes of an Fab fragment and a larger antigen molecule such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A with a molecular mass of 67 kDa. PMID:8013642

  13. Structural investigation of the alpha-1-antichymotrypsin: prostate-specific antigen complex by comparative model building.

    PubMed Central

    Villoutreix, B. O.; Lilja, H.; Pettersson, K.; Lövgren, T.; Teleman, O.

    1996-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by prostate cells, provides an excellent serum marker for prostate cancer. It belongs to the human kallikrein family of enzymes, a second prostate-derived member of which is human glandular kallikrein-1 (hK2). Active PSA and hK2 are both 237-residue kallikrein-like proteases, based on sequence homology. An hK2 model structure based on the serine protease fold is presented and compared to PSA and six other serine proteases in order to analyze in depth the role of the surface-accessible loops surrounding the active site. The results show that PSA and hK2 share extensive structural similarity and that most amino acid replacements are centered on the loops surrounding the active site. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential surfaces are very similar for PSA and hK2. PSA interacts with at least two serine protease inhibitors (serpins): alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and protein C inhibitor (PCI). Three-dimensional model structures of the uncleaved ACT molecule were developed based upon the recent X-ray structure of uncleaved antithrombin. The serpin was docked both to PSA and hK2. Amino acid replacements and electrostatic complementarities indicate that the overall orientation of the proteins in these complexes is reasonable. In order to investigate PSA's heparin interaction sites, electrostatic computations were carried out on PSA, hK2, protein C, ACT, and PCI. Two heparin binding sites are suggested on the PSA surface and could explain the enhanced complex formation between PSA and PCI, while inhibiting the formation of the ACT-PSA complex, PSA, hK2, and their preliminary complexes with ACT should facilitate the understanding and prediction of structural and functional properties for these important proteins also with respect to prostate diseases. PMID:8732755

  14. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  15. Cancer-testis antigen MAGE-C2 binds Rbx1 and inhibits ubiquitin ligase-mediated turnover of cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Chengli; Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-testis antigen MAGE-C2 is normally expressed in testis but aberrantly expressed in various kinds of tumors. Its functions in tumor cells are mostly unknown. Here, we show that MAGE-C2 binds directly to the RING domain protein Rbx1, and participates in Skp1-Cullin1-F box protein (SCF) complex. Furthermore, MAGE-C2 can inhibit the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of SCF complex. Ablation of endogenous MAGE-C2 decreases the level of cyclin E and accelerates cyclin E turnover by inhibiting ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation. Overexpression of MAGE-C2 increases the level of cyclin E and promotes G1-S transition and cell proliferation, and the results are further confirmed by knockdown of MAGE-C2. Overall, the study indicates that MAGE-C2 is involved in SCF complex and increases the stability of cyclin E in tumor cells. PMID:26540345

  16. Mitochondrial electron transfer chain complexes inhibition by different organochalcogens.

    PubMed

    Puntel, Robson L; Roos, Daniel H; Seeger, Rodrigo Lopes; Rocha, João B T

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the cell toxicology and death decision. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of three organocompounds (ebselen [Ebs], diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)(2)] and diphenyl ditelluride [(PhTe)(2)]) on mitochondrial complexes (I, II, I-III, II-III and IV) activity from rat liver and kidney to determine their potential role as molecular targets of organochalcogens. All studied organochalcogens caused a statistically significant inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I activity. Ebs and (PhTe)(2) caused a statistically significant inhibition of the mitochondrial complex II activity in both hepatic and renal membranes. Hepatic mitochondrial complex II activity was practically unchanged by (PhSe)(2), whereas it significantly inhibited renal complex II activity. Mitochondrial complex IV activity was practically unchanged by the organochalcogens. Furthermore, organochalcogens inhibited the mitochondrial respiration supported by complex I or complex II substrates. The inhibitory effect of Ebs, (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2) on mitochondrial complex I was prevented by NADH, but it was not prevented by catalase (CAT) and/or superoxide dismutase (SOD). Additionally, the organochalcogens-induced inhibition of complex I and II was completely reversed by reduced glutathione (GSH). In conclusion, Ebs, (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2) were more effective inhibitors of renal and hepatic mitochondrial complex I than complex II, whereas complexes III and IV were little modified by these compounds. Taking into account the presented results, we suggest that organochalcogen-induced mitochondrial complexes I and II inhibition can be mediated by their thiol oxidation activity, i.e., Ebs, (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2) can oxidize critical thiol groups from mitochondrial complexes I and II. So, mitochondrial dysfunction can be considered an important factor in the toxicity of Ebs, (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2). PMID:23103426

  17. Evaluation of the Secretor Status of ABO Blood Group Antigens in Saliva among Southern Rajasthan Population Using Absorption Inhibition Method

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Mamta; Ramesh, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The ABO blood group system was the significant element for forensic serological examination of blood and body fluids in the past before the wide adaptation of DNA typing. A significant proportion of individuals (80%) are secretors, meaning that antigens present in the blood are also found in other body fluids such as saliva. Absorption inhibition is one such method that works by reducing strength of an antiserum based on type and amount of antigen present in the stains. Aim To check the efficacy of identifying the blood group antigens in saliva and to know the secretor status using absorption inhibition method among southern Rajasthan population. Materials and Methods Blood and saliva samples were collected from 80 individuals comprising 20 individuals in each blood group. The absorption inhibition method was used to determine the blood group antigens in the saliva and then the results were correlated with the blood group of the collected blood sample. The compiled data was statistically analysed using chi-square test. Results Blood groups A & O revealed 100% secretor status for both males and females. While blood groups B and AB revealed 95% secretor status. Conclusion Secretor status evaluation of the ABO blood group antigen in saliva using absorption inhibition method can be a useful tool in forensic examination. PMID:27042574

  18. Antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen PfMSPDBL1 inhibit merozoite invasion into human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Takeo, Satoru; Maier, Alexander G; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cowman, Alan F; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2012-03-01

    One approach to develop a malaria blood-stage vaccine is to target proteins that play critical roles in the erythrocyte invasion of merozoites. The merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) and the erythrocyte-binding antigens (EBAs) are considered promising vaccine candidates, for they are known to play important roles in erythrocyte invasion and are exposed to host immune system. Here we focused on a Plasmodium falciparum antigen, PfMSPDBL1 (encoded by PF10_0348 gene) that is a member of the MSP3 family and has both Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain and secreted polymorphic antigen associated with merozoites (SPAM) domain. Therefore, we aimed to characterize PfMSPDBL1 as a vaccine candidate. Recombinant full-length protein (rFL) of PfMSPDBL1 was synthesized by a wheat germ cell-free system, and rabbit antiserum was raised against rFL. We show that rabbit anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies inhibited erythrocyte invasion of wild type parasites in vitro in a dose dependent manner, and the specificity of inhibitory activity was confirmed using PfMSPDBL1 knockout parasites. Pre-incubation of the anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies with the recombinant SPAM domain had no effect on the inhibitory activity suggesting that antibodies to this region were not involved. In addition, antibodies to rFL were elicited by P. falciparum infection in malaria endemic area, suggesting the PfMSLDBL1 is immunogenic to humans. Our results suggest that PfMSPDBL1 is a novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate. PMID:22248820

  19. Vaccinia virus infection induces dendritic cell maturation but inhibits antigen presentation by MHC class II

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yongxue; Li, Ping; Singh, Pratibha; Thiele, Allison T.; Wilkes, David S.; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J.; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Luker, Gary D.; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Blum, Janice S.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) infection is known to inhibit dendritic cells (DC) functions in vitro. Paradoxically, VV is also highly immunogenic and thus has been used as a vaccine. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an in vivo VV infection on DC function by focusing on early innate immunity. Our data indicated that DC are activated upon in vivo VV infection of mice. Splenic DC from VV-infected mice expressed elevated levels of MHC class I and co-stimulatory molecules on their cell surface and exhibited the enhanced potential to produce cytokines upon LPS stimulation. DC from VV-infected mice also expressed a high level of interferon-β. However, a VV infection resulted in the down-regulation of MHC class II expression and the impairment of antigen presentation to CD4 T cells by DC. Thus, during the early stage of a VV infection, although DC are impaired in some of the critical antigen presentation functions, they can promote innate immune defenses against viral infection. PMID:17678637

  20. mTOR inhibition improves antitumor effects of vaccination with antigen-encoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Vascotto, Fulvia; Selmi, Abderraouf; Attig, Sebastian; Diekmann, Jan; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2013-12-01

    Vaccination with in vitro transcribed RNA encoding tumor antigens is an emerging approach in cancer immunotherapy. Attempting to further improve RNA vaccine efficacy, we have explored combining RNA with immunomodulators such as rapamycin. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR, was used originally for immunosuppression. Recent reports in mouse systems, however, suggest that mTOR inhibition may enhance the formation and differentiation of the memory CD8(+) T-cell pool. Because memory T-cell formation is critical to the outcome of vaccination approaches, we studied the impact of rapamycin on the in vivo primed RNA vaccine-induced immune response using the chicken ovalbumin-expressing B16 melanoma model in C57BL/6 mice. Our data show that treatment with rapamycin at the effector-to-memory transition phase skews the vaccine-induced immune response toward the formation of a quantitatively and qualitatively superior memory pool and results in a better recall response. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells from these mice display a favorable ratio of effector versus suppressor cell populations. Survival of mice treated with the combined regimen of RNA vaccination with rapamycin is significantly longer (91.5 days) than that in the control groups receiving only one of these compounds (32 and 46 days, respectively). Our findings indicate that rapamycin enhances therapeutic efficacy of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells induced by RNA vaccination, and we propose further clinical exploration of rapamycin as a component of immunotherapeutic regimens. PMID:24778131

  1. Rapid assessment of the antigenic integrity of tetrameric HLA complexes by human monoclonal HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Eijsink, Chantal; Kester, Michel G D; Franke, Marry E I; Franken, Kees L M C; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Claas, Frans H J; Mulder, Arend

    2006-08-31

    The ability of tetrameric major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-peptide complexes (tetramers) to detect antigen-specific T lymphocyte responses has yielded significant information about the generation of in vivo immunity in numerous antigenic systems. Here we present a novel method for rapid validation of tetrameric HLA molecules based on the presence of allodeterminants. Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing polymorphic determinants on HLA class I were immobilized on polystyrene microparticles and used to probe the structural integrity of tetrameric HLA class I molecules by flow cytometry. A total of 22 tetramers, based on HLA-A1, A2, A3, A24, B7 and B8 were reactive with their counterpart mAbs, thus confirming their antigenic integrity. A positive outcome of this mAb test ensures that tetrameric HLA class I can be used with greater confidence in subsequent functional assays. PMID:16973172

  2. HIV infection of monocytes inhibits the T-lymphocyte proliferative response to recall antigens, via production of eicosanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, P; Kazazi, F; Biti, R; Sorrell, T C; Cunningham, A L

    1992-01-01

    Human monocytes infected in vitro with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) soon after adherence to plastic substrate demonstrated a significantly decreased ability to restimulate autologous immune T-lymphocyte proliferation after exposure to soluble (tetanus toxoid) and particulate [herpes simplex virus (HSV)] antigen. Incubation with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (2-5 microM), prevented inhibition of antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. The inhibitory activity was identified in ultrafiltrates containing the low molecular weight fraction (less than 3000 MW) of supernatants from HIV-infected monocyte cultures. This activity was significantly and markedly reduced in similar ultrafiltrates prepared from indomethacin-treated cultures. Increased concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were detected in ultrafiltrates from HIV-infected monocyte cultures compared with uninfected cultures and cultures preincubated with indomethacin. Ultrafiltrates were inhibitory when added during the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes but not when removed from monocyte cultures prior to the addition of lymphocytes. In addition, ultrafiltrates inhibited antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and PHA-induced lymphocyte proliferation to the same extent. These data indicate that cyclo-oxygenase products of arachidonic acid, including PGE2, are produced in excess by HIV-infected monocytes and that PGE2 and perhaps other cyclo-oxygenase products are implicated in the inhibition of antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation via a direct effect on T lymphocytes. PMID:1572689

  3. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ limits B cell antigen receptor-dependent activation of ERK signaling to inhibit early antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew L; Dong, Matthew B; Brink, Robert; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; DeFranco, Anthony L

    2013-10-15

    Signaling downstream of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is tightly regulated to enable cells to gauge the strength and duration of antigen-receptor interactions and to respond appropriately. We investigated whether metabolism of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) by members of the family of DAG kinases (DGKs) played a role in modulating the magnitude of signaling by DAG downstream of the BCR. In the absence of DGKζ, the threshold for BCR signaling, measured as activation of the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, was markedly reduced in mature follicular B cells, which resulted in enhanced responses to antigen in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of DAG signaling by DGKζ limited the number of antibody-secreting cells that were generated early in response to T cell-independent type 2 antigens, as well as to T cell-dependent antigens. Furthermore, the effect of loss of DGKζ closely resembled the effect of increasing the affinity of the BCR for antigen during the T cell-dependent antibody response. These results suggest that the magnitude of DAG signaling is important for translating the affinity of the BCR for antigen into the amount of antibody produced during the early stages of an immune response. PMID:24129701

  4. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  5. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  6. Isoflurane Selectively Inhibits Distal Mitochondrial Complex I in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Suthammarak, Wichit; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC) is a possible target of volatile anesthetics (VAs). Complex I enzymatic activities are inhibited by VAs, and dysfunction of complex I can lead to hypersensitivity to VAs in worms and in people. Mutant analysis in Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans suggests that VAs may specifically interfere with complex I function at the binding site for its substrate ubiquinone. We hypothesized that isoflurane inhibits electron transport by competing with ubiquinone for binding to complex I. METHODS Wildtype and mutant C. elegans were used to study the effects of isoflurane on isolated mitochondria. Enzymatic activities of the ETC were assayed and dose-response curves determined using established techniques. Two-dimensional native gels of mitochondrial proteins were performed after exposure of mitochondria to isoflurane. RESULTS Complex I is the most sensitive component of the ETC to isoflurane inhibition; however the proximal portion of complex I (the flavoprotein) is relatively insensitive to isoflurane. Isoflurane and quinone do not compete for a common binding site on complex I. The absolute rate of complex I enzymatic activity in vitro does not predict immobilization of the animal by isoflurane. Isoflurane had no measurable effect on stability of mitochondrial supercomplexes. Reduction of ubiquinone by complex I displayed positive cooperative kinetics not disrupted by isoflurane. CONCLUSIONS Isoflurane directly inhibits complex I at a site distal to the flavoprotein subcomplex. However, we have excluded our original hypothesis that isoflurane and ubiquinone compete for a common hydrophobic binding site on complex I. In addition, immobilization of the nematode by isoflurane is not due to limiting absolute amounts of complex I electron transport as measured in isolated mitochondria. PMID:21467554

  7. Complex Minigene Library Vaccination for Discovery of Pre-Erythrocytic Plasmodium T Cell Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Brad C.; Kas, Arnold; Billman, Zachary P.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Fuller, James T.; Shendure, Jay; Murphy, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Development of a subunit vaccine targeting liver-stage Plasmodium parasites requires the identification of antigens capable of inducing protective T cell responses. However, traditional methods of antigen identification are incapable of evaluating T cell responses against large numbers of proteins expressed by these parasites. This bottleneck has limited development of subunit vaccines against Plasmodium and other complex intracellular pathogens. To address this bottleneck, we are developing a synthetic minigene technology for multi-antigen DNA vaccines. In an initial test of this approach, pools of long (150 bp) antigen-encoding oligonucleotides were synthesized and recombined into vectors by ligation-independent cloning to produce two DNA minigene library vaccines. Each vaccine encoded peptides derived from 36 (vaccine 1) and 53 (vaccine 2) secreted or transmembrane pre-erythrocytic P. yoelii proteins. BALB/cj mice were vaccinated three times with a single vaccine by biolistic particle delivery (gene gun) and screened for interferon-γ-producing T cell responses by ELISPOT. Library vaccination induced responses against four novel antigens. Naïve mice exposed to radiation-attenuated sporozoites mounted a response against only one of the four novel targets (PyMDH, malate dehydrogenase). The response to PyMDH could not be recalled by additional homologous sporozoite immunizations but could be partially recalled by heterologous cross-species sporozoite exposure. Vaccination against the dominant PyMDH epitope by DNA priming and recombinant Listeria boosting did not protect against sporozoite challenge. Improvements in library design and delivery, combined with methods promoting an increase in screening sensitivity, may enable complex minigene screening to serve as a high-throughput system for discovery of novel T cell antigens. PMID:27070430

  8. Complex Minigene Library Vaccination for Discovery of Pre-Erythrocytic Plasmodium T Cell Antigens.

    PubMed

    Stone, Brad C; Kas, Arnold; Billman, Zachary P; Fuller, Deborah H; Fuller, James T; Shendure, Jay; Murphy, Sean C

    2016-01-01

    Development of a subunit vaccine targeting liver-stage Plasmodium parasites requires the identification of antigens capable of inducing protective T cell responses. However, traditional methods of antigen identification are incapable of evaluating T cell responses against large numbers of proteins expressed by these parasites. This bottleneck has limited development of subunit vaccines against Plasmodium and other complex intracellular pathogens. To address this bottleneck, we are developing a synthetic minigene technology for multi-antigen DNA vaccines. In an initial test of this approach, pools of long (150 bp) antigen-encoding oligonucleotides were synthesized and recombined into vectors by ligation-independent cloning to produce two DNA minigene library vaccines. Each vaccine encoded peptides derived from 36 (vaccine 1) and 53 (vaccine 2) secreted or transmembrane pre-erythrocytic P. yoelii proteins. BALB/cj mice were vaccinated three times with a single vaccine by biolistic particle delivery (gene gun) and screened for interferon-γ-producing T cell responses by ELISPOT. Library vaccination induced responses against four novel antigens. Naïve mice exposed to radiation-attenuated sporozoites mounted a response against only one of the four novel targets (PyMDH, malate dehydrogenase). The response to PyMDH could not be recalled by additional homologous sporozoite immunizations but could be partially recalled by heterologous cross-species sporozoite exposure. Vaccination against the dominant PyMDH epitope by DNA priming and recombinant Listeria boosting did not protect against sporozoite challenge. Improvements in library design and delivery, combined with methods promoting an increase in screening sensitivity, may enable complex minigene screening to serve as a high-throughput system for discovery of novel T cell antigens. PMID:27070430

  9. Immunization against hepatitis B virus by mucosal administration of antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Wen, Y M; Di, Q; Davis, H L

    1998-01-01

    Antigen-antibody complexes have been shown to enhance immune responses against several antigens given by parenteral immunization. Herein, we have evaluated the potential of administering such immunostimulatory complexes by a mucosal route. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) complexed with antibodies against HBsAg (anti-HBs) (HBsAg/Ab) was administered to BALB/c mice by intranasal inhalation. HBsAg by itself did not induce immune responses, whereas with HBsAg/Ab complexes, both systemic and mucosal immune responses were observed and these could be modulated by adjuvants. With HBsAg/Ab (1 or 10 microg), anti-HBs antibodies induced were predominantly of the IgG1 isotype (Th2-like). In contrast, anti-HBs induced by HBsAg/Ab plus cholera toxin (CT) or oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG) (1 microg each) were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like). Results from this study indicate that HBsAg/Ab complexes can induce strong humoral immune responses when delivered by a noninvasive route, whether used alone or in combination with other mucosal adjuvants. PMID:10189191

  10. Experimental studies on the inhibition effects of 1000 Chinese medicinal herbs on the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M; Zheng, Y

    1992-09-01

    The reverse passive hemagglutination inhibition test was used in the screening of 1000 Chinese materia medica for inhibitors of hepatitis B virus surface antigen. The herbal drugs were commercially available and the surface antigen was from sera of hepatitis B patients. 127 effective drugs were obtained from the survey of which 28 were highly inhibitory (8:1), 35 were moderately effective (4:1), and 64 mildly effective (2:1). Further experiments with varying dosages of the drug, dosages of HBsAg and duration of contact showed 10 drugs to be of optimal effect. PMID:1453758

  11. Formation of DNA triple helices inhibits DNA unwinding by the SV40 large T-antigen helicase.

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, M; Kopel, V; Borowiec, J A; Manor, H

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that d(TC)n.d(GA)n microsatellites may serve as arrest signals for mammalian DNA replication through the ability of such sequences to form DNA triple helices and thereby inhibit replication enzymes. To further test this hypothesis, we examined the ability of d(TC)i.d(GA)i.d(TC)i triplexes to inhibit DNA unwinding in vitro by a model eukaryotic DNA helicase, the SV40 large T-antigen. DNA substrates that were able to form triplexes, and non-triplex-forming control substrates, were tested. We found that the presence of DNA triplexes, as assayed by endonuclease S1 and osmium tetroxide footprinting, significantly inhibited DNA unwinding by T-antigen. Strong inhibition was observed not only at acidic pH values, in which the triplexes were most stable, but also at physiological pH values in the range 6.9-7.2. Little or no inhibition was detected at pH 8.7. Based on these results, and on previous studies of DNA polymerases, we suggest that DNA triplexes may form in vivo and cause replication arrest through a dual inhibition of duplex unwinding by DNA helicases and of nascent strand synthesis by DNA polymerases. DNA triplexes also have the potential to inhibit recombination and repair processes in which helicases and polymerases are involved. Images PMID:7753619

  12. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix. PMID:27141819

  13. Concurrent feline immune-complex nephritis. Tubular antigen-positive and renal amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, S; Shimizu, F; Nagase, M; Kasegawa, A

    1979-08-01

    We describe tubular antigen-positive immune-complex nephritis in a case of feline renal amyloidosis. Amyloid deposition was observed in mesangial area, and thickening of capillary walls was shown in the majority of the glomeruli. This case was also characterized with typical fluorescent granular depositions of cat IgG and C3 along the glomerular capillary walls as seen in human membranous glomerulonephritis. The fluorescent pattern of tubular antigen was identical with that of IgG and C3. Electron micrograph showed the thickening and irregularity of glomerular basement membranes, fusion of foot processes, and deposits of electron-dense or sometimes translucent materials, mostly in the intramembranous location. The causal sequence of the coincidental deposition of amyloid and immune complexes is discussed. PMID:157110

  14. Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens on Cultured Human Biliary Epithelial Cells by Alloreactive Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saidman, Susan L.; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Zeevi, Adriana; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, A. Jake

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system to study the interactions between biliary epithelium and lymphocytes using cultured human biliary epithelial cells. No class II antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining of the normal biliary epithelial cells, but alloactivated lymphocyte culture supernatants were able to induce class II expression. The activity of the supernatants was blocked with an anti-γ-interferon monoclonal antibody. In addition, recombinant human γ-interferon alone induced the expression of class II antigens and increased the intensity of class I staining of cultured biliary epithelial cells. Biliary epithelial cell–induced proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex molecules carry functional lymphocyte-activating determinants. The recognition of major histocompatibility complex determinants was confirmed by monoclonal antibody–blocking studies and by stimulation of an alloreactive T-cell clone. However, the biliary epithelial cells were much less potent stimulators than arterial endothelial cells tested in the same assay system. PMID:1704868

  15. Epstein-Barr Viral BNLF2a Protein Hijacks the Tail-anchored Protein Insertion Machinery to Block Antigen Processing by the Transport Complex TAP*

    PubMed Central

    Wycisk, Agnes I.; Lin, Jiacheng; Loch, Sandra; Hobohm, Kathleen; Funke, Jessica; Wieneke, Ralph; Koch, Joachim; Skach, William R.; Mayerhofer, Peter U.; Tampé, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Virus-infected cells are eliminated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which recognize viral epitopes displayed on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules at the cell surface. Herpesviruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to escape this immune surveillance. During the lytic phase of EBV infection, the viral factor BNLF2a interferes with antigen processing by preventing peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Here we reveal details of the inhibition mechanism of this EBV protein. We demonstrate that BNLF2a acts as a tail-anchored protein, exploiting the mammalian Asna-1/WRB (Get3/Get1) machinery for posttranslational insertion into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, where it subsequently blocks antigen translocation by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). BNLF2a binds directly to the core TAP complex arresting the ATP-binding cassette transporter in a transport-incompetent conformation. The inhibition mechanism of EBV BNLF2a is distinct and mutually exclusive of other viral TAP inhibitors. PMID:21984826

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of antigen--antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Chitarra-Guillon, V; Souchon, H; Boulot, G; Riottot, M M; Mariuzza, R; Tello, D; Poljak, R J

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity have been purified and crystallized as single components or complexed with their specific antigens. The intersegmental flexibility of antibody molecules has imposed the strategy of attempting to crystallize their Fab fragments separately. Intrasegmental mobility in Fabs has rarely been an obstacle to their crystallization. The immune system, however, provides a large functional and structural diversity of antibody molecules suitable for crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:3147699

  17. Application of Fluorescent Monocytes for Probing Immune Complexes on Antigen Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Szittner, Zoltán; Papp, Krisztián; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Prechl, József

    2013-01-01

    Microarrayed antigens are used for identifying serum antibodies with given specificities and for generating binding profiles. Antibodies bind to these arrayed antigens forming immune complexes and are conventionally identified by secondary labelled antibodies.In the body immune complexes are identified by bone marrow derived phagocytic cells, such as monocytes. In our work we were looking into the possibility of replacing secondary antibodies with monocytoid cells for the generation of antibody profiles. Using the human monocytoid cell line U937, which expresses cell surface receptors for immune complex components, we show that cell adhesion is completely dependent on the interaction of IgG heavy chains and Fcγ receptors, and this recognition is susceptible to differences between heavy chain structures and their glycosylation. We also report data on a possible application of this system in autoimmune diagnostics.Compared to secondary antibodies, fluorescent monocytesas biosensors are superior in reflecting biological functions of microarray-bound antibodies and represent an easy and robust alternative for profiling interactions between serum proteins and antigens. PMID:24039758

  18. Investigation of vesicle-capsular plague antigen complex formation by elastic laser radiation scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, N. P.; Maximova, Irina S.; Romanov, Sergey V.; Shubochkin, L. P.; Tatarintsev, Sergey N.

    1991-05-01

    Recently a great deal of attention has been given to the investigation artificial lipid liposomes, due to their application as "containers" for directed transport of biologically active compounds into particular cells, organs and tissues for prophylaxis and therapy of infectious diseases. The use of traditional methods of liposome investigation, such as sedimentation, electrophoresis and chromatography is impeded by low liposome resistivity to different deformations. In conjunction with this, optical methods of laser light scattering are promising as they allow nondisturbing, precise and quick investigations. This paper describes the investigation of vesicle systems prepared from egg lecithin of Serva Corporation and their complexes with the capsular antigen of the plague microbe. The capsular antigen Fl was obtained from EV plague microbe grown at 37° C on Huttinger agar. Fl was isolated by gel-filtration on ASA-22 followed by freeze drying of the preparation. Angular dependences of polarized radiation scattering were measured for several liposome suspension samples in a saline solution before and after the interaction with the plague microbe capsular antigen. The aim of the investigation was to analyze the nature of mutual antigen arrangement in a liposome and to develop methods for measuring its inclusion percentage.

  19. Structure of the Malaria Antigen AMA1 in Complex with a Growth-Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Kim, Hanna; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2007-01-01

    Identifying functionally critical regions of the malaria antigen AMA1 (apical membrane antigen 1) is necessary to understand the significance of the polymorphisms within this antigen for vaccine development. The crystal structure of AMA1 in complex with the Fab fragment of inhibitory monoclonal antibody 1F9 reveals that 1F9 binds to the AMA1 solvent-exposed hydrophobic trough, confirming its importance. 1F9 uses the heavy and light chain complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) to wrap around the polymorphic loops adjacent to the trough, but uses a ridge of framework residues to bind to the hydrophobic trough. The resulting 1F9-AMA1–combined buried surface of 2,470 Å2 is considerably larger than previously reported Fab–antigen interfaces. Mutations of polymorphic AMA1 residues within the 1F9 epitope disrupt 1F9 binding and dramatically reduce the binding of affinity-purified human antibodies. Moreover, 1F9 binding to AMA1 is competed by naturally acquired human antibodies, confirming that the 1F9 epitope is a frequent target of immunological attack. PMID:17907804

  20. Engineering an intracellular pathway for major histocompatibility complex class II presentation of antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T C; Guarnieri, F G; Staveley-O'Carroll, K F; Viscidi, R P; Levitsky, H I; Hedrick, L; Cho, K R; August, J T; Pardoll, D M

    1995-01-01

    The presentation of antigenic peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules to CD4+ T cells is critical to the function of the immune system. In this study, we have utilized the sorting signal of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein LAMP-1 to target a model antigen, human papillomavirus 16 E7 (HPV-16 E7), into the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. The LAMP-1 sorting signal reroutes the antigen into the MHC class II processing pathway, resulting in enhanced presentation to CD4+ cells in vitro. In vivo immunization experiments in mice demonstrated that vaccinia containing the chimeric E7/LAMP-1 gene generated greater E7-specific lymphoproliferative activity, antibody titers, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activities than vaccinia containing the wild-type HPV-16 E7 gene. These results suggest that specific targeting of an antigen to the endosomal and lysosomal compartments enhances MHC class II presentation and vaccine potency. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8524826

  1. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits antigen-stimulated increases in vasoconstriction and glycogenolysis in perfused livers derived from sensitized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, K.L.; Bates, J.N.; Fisher, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Recent studies in the authors laboratory demonstrated that infusion of antigen into perfused livers from sensitized rats produces increases in hepatic portal pressure, increases in hepatic glucose output and decreases in hepatic oxygen consumption. In the present study, effects of NO on these hepatic responses to antigen challenge were investigated. Infusion of NO into perfused livers from sensitized rats attenuated ovalbumin induced increases in hepatic portal pressure and glucose output approximately 85% and 90%, respectively, and abolished ovalbumin-induced decreases in hepatic oxygen consumption. The duration of ovalbumin-stimulated increases in hepatic portal pressure was reduced nearly 90% by NO. Similarly, infusion of NO into perfused livers from sensitized rats inhibited increases in hepatic portal pressure and glucose output in response to platelet-activating factor (PAF) nearly 80 and 90%, respectively. In contrast, NO inhibited completely hepatic vasoconstriction in response to phenylephrine without altering glycogenolytic responses to this {alpha}-adrenergic agonist. These results provide evidence for regulatory effects of NO on hemodynamic and glycogenolytic responses to antigen in perfused livers from sensitized rats. These observations support previous findings which suggest that hepatic responses to sensitizing antigen may be mediated by PAF or other autacoid mediators which stimulate glycogenolysis in liver by indirect mechanisms involving hepatic vasoconstriction.

  2. Antigen targeting to dendritic cells combined with transient regulatory T cell inhibition results in long-term tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Wendy WJ; Mayer, Christian T; Engels, Steef; Hesse, Christina; Perdicchio, Maurizio; Puttur, Franz; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Litjens, Manja; Kalay, Hakan; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccinations against cancer are still largely ineffective. Major caveats are inefficient delivery of tumor antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) and excessive immune suppression by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), resulting in defective T cell priming and failure to induce tumor regression. To circumvent these problems we evaluated a novel combinatorial therapeutic strategy. We show that tumor antigen targeting to DC-SIGN in humanized hSIGN mice via glycans or specific antibodies induces superior T cell priming. Next, this targeted therapy was combined with transient Foxp3+ Treg depletion employing hSIGNxDEREG mice. While Treg depletion alone slightly delayed B16-OVA melanoma growth, only the combination therapy instigated long-term tumor regression in a substantial fraction of mice. This novel strategy resulted in optimal generation of antigen-specific activated CD8+ T cells which accumulated in regressing tumors. Notably, Treg depletion also allowed the local appearance of effector T cells specific for endogenous B16 antigens. This indicates that antitumor immune responses can be broadened by therapies aimed at controlling Tregs in tumor environments. Thus, transient inhibition of Treg-mediated immune suppression potentiates DC targeted antigen vaccination and tumor-specific immunity. PMID:26405564

  3. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen conce...

  4. Stability of free and complexed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antigen at 4 degrees C and at room temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, B P; Garner, R B; Chacko, T M

    1995-01-01

    Free and immune-complex-dissociated (ICD) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antigenemias in serum specimens stored at room temperature (RT) and 4 degrees C for 1 to 35 days were evaluated. At all time points examined, there was no significant loss in detectable levels of ICD HIV-1 antigen at either RT or 4 degrees C. Free HIV-1 antigen was not stable in serum samples stored at RT for more than 2 days but was stable in samples stored at 4 degrees C for up to 4 days. Loss of free antigen occurred more rapidly in samples with high antigen content at baseline. Use of the ICD antigen assay allowed accurate quantitation of antigen in samples stored at RT or 4 degrees C for as long as 1 month. PMID:7615753

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  6. Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1-Dependent Inhibition of Corneal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhijie; Burns, Alan R.; Smith, C. Wayne

    2006-01-01

    Abrasion of murine corneal epithelium induces neutrophil emigration through limbal vessels into the avascular corneal stroma, peaking within 12 to 18 hours after wounding. A central corneal wound closes within 24 hours by epithelial cell migration and division, and during wound closure corneal epithelial cells express intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 (CD54). We investigated the contributions of lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 (CD11a/CD18) and Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) by analyzing wound closure in mice with targeted deletions of CD11a (CD11a−/−) or CD11b (CD11b−/−). In contrast to CD11a−/− mice, CD11b deficiency revealed a much greater delay in epithelial wound closure with >90% inhibition of epithelial cell division at a time when neutrophil accumulation in the cornea was approximately threefold higher than normal. Treating CD11b−/− mice with anti-CD11a monoclonal antibody at the time of epithelial abrasion resulted in significant reductions in neutrophils and significant increases in corneal epithelial cell division and migration. Treating CD11b−/− mice with anti-ICAM-1 significantly increased measures of healing but marginally reduced neutrophil influx. In conclusion, wound healing after corneal epithelial abrasion is disrupted by the absence of CD11b. The disruption is apparently linked to excessive neutrophil accumulation at a time when epithelial division is essential to wound repair, and neutrophils appear to be detrimental through processes involving LFA-1 and ICAM-1. PMID:17071583

  7. A novel inhibition ELISA for the detection and monitoring of Penicillium marneffei antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Prakit, K; Nosanchuk, J D; Pruksaphon, K; Vanittanakom, N; Youngchim, S

    2016-04-01

    The thermally dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is a causative agent of penicilliosis marneffei, a disease considered to be an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining illness in Southeast Asia and southern China. We have developed an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (inh-ELISA) incorporating the yeast phase specific mannoprotein-binding monoclonal antibody 4D1 for the detection of P. marneffei infection. In our sample set, the test detected antigenemia in all 45 (100 %) patients with P. marneffei, with a mean antigen concentration of 4.32 μg/ml. No cross-reactivity in this assay was found using serum from 44 additional patients with other fungal infections, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans, as well as 44 patients with bacterial infections, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Streptococcus suis. Additionally, no reactivity occurred using serum from 31 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients without a history of fungal infections and 113 healthy controls residing in endemic areas. To investigate the potential of the inh-ELISA for disease monitoring, we followed the reduction in antigenemia in six patients who clinically responded to itraconazole and P. marneffei was no longer isolated from their blood or tissues. In contrast, we correlated increased concentrations of antigenemia in patients with relapsed P. marneffei infection with the progression of their clinical symptoms and the isolation of P. marneffei from their clinical specimens. In summary, the P. marneffei inh-ELISA is a promising new assay for the rapid diagnosis of P. marneffei, as well as a tool for evaluating clinical response and clearance of the fungus during treatment. PMID:26838686

  8. Cinacalcet inhibits neuroblastoma tumor growth and upregulates cancer-testis antigens

    PubMed Central

    Casalà, Carla; Briansó, Ferran; Castrejón, Nerea; Rodríguez, Eva; Suñol, Mariona; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The calcium–sensing receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that exerts cell-type specific functions in numerous tissues and some cancers. We have previously reported that this receptor exhibits tumor suppressor properties in neuroblastoma. We have now assessed cinacalcet, an allosteric activator of the CaSR approved for clinical use, as targeted therapy for this developmental tumor using neuroblastoma cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with different MYCN and TP53 status. In vitro, acute exposure to cinacalcet induced endoplasmic reticulum stress coupled to apoptosis via ATF4-CHOP-TRB3 in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells. Both phenotypes were partially abrogated by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. Prolonged in vitro treatment also promoted dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells and, irrespective of MYCN status, differentiation in surviving cells. Cinacalcet significantly inhibited tumor growth in MYCN-amplified xenografts and reduced that of MYCN-non amplified PDX. Morphology assessment showed fibrosis in MYCN-amplified xenografts exposed to the drug. Microarrays analyses revealed up-regulation of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) in cinacalcet-treated MYCN-amplified tumors. These were predominantly CTAs encoded by genes mapping on chromosome X, which are the most immunogenic. Other modulated genes upon prolonged exposure to cinacalcet were involved in differentiation, cell cycle exit, microenvironment remodeling and calcium signaling pathways. CTAs were up-regulated in PDX and in vitro models as well. Moreover, progressive increase of CaSR expression upon cinacalcet treatment was seen both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, cinacalcet reduces neuroblastoma tumor growth and up-regulates CTAs. This effect represents a therapeutic opportunity and provides surrogate circulating markers of neuroblastoma response to this treatment. PMID:26893368

  9. Trivalent Arsenic Inhibits the Functions of Chaperonin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuewen; Reissman, Stefanie; Douglas, Nick R.; Huang, Zhiwei; Yuan, Daniel S.; Wang, Xiaoling; McCaffery, J. Michael; Frydman, Judith; Boeke, Jef D.

    2010-01-01

    The exact molecular mechanisms by which the environmental pollutant arsenic works in biological systems are not completely understood. Using an unbiased chemogenomics approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that mutants of the chaperonin complex TRiC and the functionally related prefoldin complex are all hypersensitive to arsenic compared to a wild-type strain. In contrast, mutants with impaired ribosome functions were highly arsenic resistant. These observations led us to hypothesize that arsenic might inhibit TRiC function, required for folding of actin, tubulin, and other proteins postsynthesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that arsenic treatment distorted morphology of both actin and microtubule filaments. Moreover, arsenic impaired substrate folding by both bovine and archaeal TRiC complexes in vitro. These results together indicate that TRiC is a conserved target of arsenic inhibition in various biological systems. PMID:20660648

  10. Trivalent arsenic inhibits the functions of chaperonin complex.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuewen; Reissman, Stefanie; Douglas, Nick R; Huang, Zhiwei; Yuan, Daniel S; Wang, Xiaoling; McCaffery, J Michael; Frydman, Judith; Boeke, Jef D

    2010-10-01

    The exact molecular mechanisms by which the environmental pollutant arsenic works in biological systems are not completely understood. Using an unbiased chemogenomics approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that mutants of the chaperonin complex TRiC and the functionally related prefoldin complex are all hypersensitive to arsenic compared to a wild-type strain. In contrast, mutants with impaired ribosome functions were highly arsenic resistant. These observations led us to hypothesize that arsenic might inhibit TRiC function, required for folding of actin, tubulin, and other proteins postsynthesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that arsenic treatment distorted morphology of both actin and microtubule filaments. Moreover, arsenic impaired substrate folding by both bovine and archaeal TRiC complexes in vitro. These results together indicate that TRiC is a conserved target of arsenic inhibition in various biological systems. PMID:20660648

  11. Mechanism of HIV-1 Tat induced inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, M; Gutheil, W G; Bachovchin, W W; Huber, B T

    1993-03-15

    HIV-1 Tat has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the Ag-specific responsiveness of human peripheral T cells. We have previously demonstrated that this retroviral protein binds to and partially inhibits the enzymatic activity of dipeptidyl aminopeptidase type IV (DP IV), also known as CD26, which is expressed on a variety of mammalian tissue, including T lymphocytes. A number of studies have implicated a role for DP IV in the activation of T lymphocytes. By utilizing HIV-1 Tat, as well as ProboroPro, a potent and specific boronic acid analog inhibitor of DP IV, we show here that blocking DP IV partially inactivates Ag and anti-CD3-mediated T cell proliferation. Neither mitogen nor anti-CD2 mediated proliferation of T lymphocytes, however, is impaired by blocking DP IV. The target molecule for the inhibition induced by both compounds was confirmed by the finding that soluble DP IV neutralized the reduced Ag responsiveness. The Ag-specific inhibition could be overcome by the addition of exogenous IL-2, suggesting that blocking or inactivation of DP IV results in a state of anergy, probably by interfering with the delivery or amplification of a signal necessary for IL-2 production. This is further substantiated by the finding that costimulation of human PBMC via the CD28 molecule, which initiates a non-TCR-dependent signaling pathway, overcomes the reduced Ag responsiveness induced by Tat and ProboroPro. The fact that ProboroPro has no impact on stimulation of T cells with PMA and ionomycin implies that blocking DP IV is influencing events before the activation of protein kinase C and Ca2+ flux. These results suggest that DP IV is necessary for amplification of signals generated by the engagement of the TCR-CD3 complex by nominal Ag. PMID:8095514

  12. A Cronobacter turicensis O1 Antigen-Specific Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Bacterial Motility and Entry into Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Angelika; Dietrich, Richard; Kleinsteuber, Ina; Canals, Rocío; Zurfluh, Katrin; Weiner, Kerstin; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Cronobacter turicensis is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen that can cause a rare but sometimes lethal infection in neonates. Little is known about the virulence mechanisms and intracellular lifestyle of this pathogen. In this study, we developed an IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb; MAb 2G4) that specifically recognizes the O1 antigen of C. turicensis cells. The antilipopolysaccharide antibody bound predominantly monovalently to the O antigen and reduced bacterial growth without causing cell agglutination. Furthermore, binding of the antibody to the O1 antigen of C. turicensis cells caused a significant reduction of the membrane potential which is required to energize flagellar rotation, accompanied by a decreased flagellum-based motility. These results indicate that binding of IgG to the O antigen of C. turicensis causes a direct antimicrobial effect. In addition, this feature of the antibody enabled new insight into the pathogenicity of C. turicensis. In a tissue culture infection model, pretreatment of C. turicensis with MAb 2G4 showed no difference in adhesion to human epithelial cells, whereas invasion of bacteria into Caco-2 cells was significantly inhibited. PMID:25534937

  13. Induction of embryonic major histocompatibility complex antigen expression by gamma-IFN.

    PubMed

    Warner, C M; Almquist, C D; Toulimat, M H; Xu, Y

    1993-07-01

    Preimplantation mouse embryos were incubated in vitro with mouse recombinant gamma-interferon (IFN). The effect of the gamma-IFN on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen expression was tested using an ELISA procedure. It was found that there is a doubling of Db antigens and a tripling of Qa-2 antigens on C57BL/6 mouse embryos cultured from the 8-cell stage for 24 h in the presence of 10(5) units/ml gamma-IFN. The effect of gamma-IFN on the rate of preimplantation embryonic development was tested by culturing 2-cell embryos for 48 h and 8-cell embryos for 24 h in the presence of varying concentrations of gamma-IFN up to 10(6) units/ml. Two methods were used to assess the cell number per embryo after the culture period: incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, and direct counting of nuclei in fixed and stained embryos. Both methods showed that treatment with gamma-IFN increases the rate of development of preimplantation mouse embryos. Since rate of preimplantation embryonic development is genetically controlled by the Ped gene, it is suggested that gamma-IFN has a direct effect on the Ped gene phenotype of preimplantation mouse embryos. PMID:8229991

  14. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens in porcine leptospiral nephritis.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, E; Del Piero, F; Aresu, L; Sciarrone, F; Vicari, N; Mattiello, S; Tagliabue, S; Fabbi, M; Scanziani, E

    2009-09-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) is required for the presentation of antigens to CD4 helper T cells. During nephritis, not only primary antigen presenting cells such as histiocytes and lymphocytes, but also cytokine-stimulated tubular epithelial cells express MHCII. Leptospirosis in fattening pigs is characterized by several degrees of nephritis, from absence of lesions to severe multifocal tubulo-interstitial inflammation. Renal tissue from 20 8-month-old pigs with spontaneous nephritis and 6 control pigs without renal lesions were investigated for leptospirosis by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IHC for MHCII also was performed on renal samples. Serum samples were tested for different serovars of Leptospira interrogans. Control pigs were free of interstitial nephritis and negative for leptospirosis by all tests. In pigs with nephritis, serology was positive for serovar Pomona in 19/20 pigs. In 16 of these 19 pigs, leptospiral renal infection was confirmed by PCR and/or indirect IHC. Nephritic lesions were classified histologically into perivascular lymphocytic (4 pigs), lymphofollicular (6 pigs), lymphohistiocytic (8 pigs), and neutrophilic (2 pigs) pattern. MHCII expression by histiocytes and lymphocytes was observed in all lesions. Prominent MHCII expression in regenerating tubular epithelium was observed in lymphofollicular and lymphohistiocytic nephritis. No tubular colocalization between leptospiral and MHCII antigen was observed. Results suggest that during leptospiral nephritis, MHCII contributes to the intensity of the inflammatory response. Furthermore de novo MHCII expression in regenerating tubules may play a role in the defence mechanism against leptospiral tubular colonization. PMID:19179617

  15. Immunoglobulin-like Transcript 4 (ILT4) Inhibits Lipid Antigen Presentation through Direct CD1d Interaction1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Demin; Wang, Lili; Yu, Li; Freundt, Eric C.; Jin, Boquan; Screaton, Gavin R.; Xu, Xiao-Ning

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d molecules and play an important role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Here we report the identification of a membrane-associated protein, immunoglobulin-like transcript 4 (ILT4), as a novel human CD1d receptor that inhibits CD1d-mediated immune responses. We found that native CD1d tetramer generated by mammalian cells was able to specifically bind human monocytes in the peripheral blood, and this binding was at least partly mediated by monocyte-expressed ILT4. The interaction between ILT4 and CD1d involves the two N-terminal domains of ILT4 and the antigen-binding groove of CD1d (α1/α2 domain). This interaction has been identified on the cell surface as well as in the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. Functional analysis showed that ILT4 could block the loading of lipid antigens such as α-GalCer, and consequently inhibited NKT recognition. The interaction between ILT4 and CD1d may provide new insights into the regulation of NKT-mediated immunity. PMID:19124746

  16. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4+ T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  17. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  18. Analysis of tuberculous meningitis cases by an immunoblotting assay based on a mycobacterial antigen complex.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Y L; Van Antwerpen, M P; Shi, G Q; Chen, Q X; Sindic, C J; Cocito, C

    1994-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis cases were analyzed by an immunoblotting test based on Mycobacterium bovis BCG antigen complex A60. Anti-A60 immunoglobulin G (IgG) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowed early diagnosis, and concentrations decreased after recovery. In primary meningitis forms, anti-A60 IgGs were intrathecally synthesized and specific oligoclonal IgGs were present in CSF. In meningeal complications of pulmonary tuberculosis, there were matching titers of anti-A60 IgG in blood and CSF (mirror pattern). Correlation between CSF-restricted patterns and CSF pleocytosis was shown. Images PMID:7496976

  19. T-cell recognition of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in erythrocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii: inhibition of parasitemia by this antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, B; Engels, A; Camus, D; Haque, A

    1993-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the presence of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in the erythrocyte stage from Plasmodium yoelii (265 BY strain) and Plasmodium falciparum through recognition by T cells primed in vivo with antigens from each of these parasites. BALB/c mice are naturally resistant to P. falciparum but are susceptible to P. yoelii infection. Mice that had recovered from P. yoelii primary infection became resistant to a second infection. A higher in vitro proliferative response to a soluble blood stage preparation of P. falciparum was observed in splenic cells from immune animals than in those from mice with a patent P. yoelii infection. The antigen-induced proliferative response was enhanced when animals were exposed to a secondary infection. Animals exposed to a challenge infection were treated with anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies to deplete the corresponding subset of T cells. There was a marked diminution in P. falciparum antigen-induced proliferative response in the total splenic cell populations from CD8-depleted but not from CD4-depleted mice. In CD8-depleted and nondepleted animals, the antigen-induced proliferation in the total cell populations was markedly lower than in the T-cell-rich populations, indicating inhibitory activities of B cells and/or macrophages. There was no such difference in the stimulation between total and T-enriched cell populations from CD4-depleted animals. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated the presence of an almost equal percentage of CD8+ (59.6%) and CD4+ (64%) T cells in the spleen preparations following in vivo depletion of CD4- and CD8-bearing T cells, respectively. When cultured with P. yoelii blood stage antigen, splenocytes from animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen displayed a significant proliferative response which was markedly diminished by treatment with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement. Animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen and then challenged with P. yoelii blood stage

  20. Hepatitis delta virus antigen forms dimers and multimeric complexes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J G; Lemon, S M

    1993-01-01

    Although the hepatitis delta virus genome contains multiple open reading frames, only one of these reading frames is known to be expressed during replication of the virus. This open reading frame encodes two distinct molecular species of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg), p24 delta and p27 delta, depending on the location of the stop codon which terminates translation. We found antibody specific for p27 delta to be capable of precipitating p24 delta in extracts of infected liver, indicating that p27 delta and p24 delta form heterologous complexes in vivo. After cross-linking with 0.05% glutaraldehyde, specific HDAg dimers were detected in antigen prepared from both the liver and serum of an HDV-infected woodchuck carrier of woodchuck hepatitis virus. Guanidine HCl-denatured HDAg extracted from liver and dialyzed against phosphate-buffered saline sedimented in rate-zonal sucrose density gradients as 15S multimeric complexes. These 15S multimers were stable in the presence of 1.2% Nonidet P-40. After RNase digestion, the 15S complex was reduced to a 12S complex without associated RNA, while boiling for 3 min in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate-0.5% 2-mercaptoethanol further reduced the 15S complex to 3S HDAg monomers. In the absence of glutaraldehyde cross-linking, HDAg extracted from liver migrated as monomer species in reducing and nonreducing gels, suggesting that the conserved cysteine residue present in p27 delta does not play a role in the formation of either dimers or multimers. On the other hand, an amino-terminal chymotrypsin-digested HDAg fragment, with a predicted length of 81 or less amino acids, retained the ability to form dimers, consistent with the hypothesis that a coiled-coil motif present between residues 27 and 58 may play a role in HDAg protein interactions in vivo. Images PMID:7677957

  1. The preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) inhibits myeloid differentiation in normal hematopoietic and leukemic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Katherine A.; Cummings, Carrie L.; Sabo, Kathleen; Wood, Brent L.; Gooley, Ted; Yang, Taimei; Epping, Mirjam T.; Shou, Yaping; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era; Ladne, Paula; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Abkowitz, Janis L.; Radich, Jerald P.

    2009-01-01

    The preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) is expressed in several hematologic malignancies, but either is not expressed or is expressed at only low levels in normal hematopoietic cells, making it a target for cancer therapy. PRAME is a tumor-associated antigen and has been described as a corepressor of retinoic acid signaling in solid tumor cells, but its function in hematopoietic cells is unknown. PRAME mRNA expression increased with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) disease progression and its detection in late chronic-phase CML patients before tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy was associated with poorer therapeutic responses and ABL tyrosine kinase domain point mutations. In leukemia cell lines, PRAME protein expression inhibited granulocytic differentiation only in cell lines that differentiate along this lineage after all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) exposure. Forced PRAME expression in normal hematopoietic progenitors, however, inhibited myeloid differentiation both in the presence and absence of ATRA, and this phenotype was reversed when PRAME was silenced in primary CML progenitors. These observations suggest that PRAME inhibits myeloid differentiation in certain myeloid leukemias, and that its function in these cells is lineage and phenotype dependent. Lastly, these observations suggest that PRAME is a target for both prognostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:19625708

  2. Dissecting the genetic complexity of the association between human leukocyte antigens and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jawaheer, Damini; Li, Wentian; Graham, Robert R; Chen, Wei; Damle, Aarti; Xiao, Xiangli; Monteiro, Joanita; Khalili, Houman; Lee, Annette; Lundsten, Robert; Begovich, Ann; Bugawan, Teodorica; Erlich, Henry; Elder, James T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Seldin, Michael F; Amos, Christopher I; Behrens, Timothy W; Gregersen, Peter K

    2002-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease with a complex genetic component. An association between RA and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has long been observed in many different populations, and most studies have focused on a direct role for the HLA-DRB1 "shared epitope" in disease susceptibility. We have performed an extensive haplotype analysis, using 54 markers distributed across the entire HLA complex, in a set of 469 multicase families with RA. The results show that, in addition to associations with the DRB1 alleles, at least two additional genetic effects are present within the major histocompatibility complex. One of these lies within a 497-kb region in the central portion of the HLA complex, an interval that excludes DRB1. This genetic risk factor is present on a segment of a highly conserved ancestral A1-B8-DRB1*03 (8.1) haplotype. Additional risk genes may also be present in the HLA class I region in a subset of DRB1*0404 haplotypes. These data emphasize the importance of defining haplotypes when trying to understand the HLA associations with disease, and they clearly demonstrate that such associations with RA are complex and cannot be completely explained by the DRB1 locus. PMID:12181776

  3. Dissecting the Genetic Complexity of the Association between Human Leukocyte Antigens and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jawaheer, Damini; Li, Wentian; Graham, Robert R.; Chen, Wei; Damle, Aarti; Xiao, Xiangli; Monteiro, Joanita; Khalili, Houman; Lee, Annette; Lundsten, Robert; Begovich, Ann; Bugawan, Teodorica; Erlich, Henry; Elder, James T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Seldin, Michael F.; Amos, Christopher I.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease with a complex genetic component. An association between RA and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has long been observed in many different populations, and most studies have focused on a direct role for the HLA-DRB1 “shared epitope” in disease susceptibility. We have performed an extensive haplotype analysis, using 54 markers distributed across the entire HLA complex, in a set of 469 multicase families with RA. The results show that, in addition to associations with the DRB1 alleles, at least two additional genetic effects are present within the major histocompatibility complex. One of these lies within a 497-kb region in the central portion of the HLA complex, an interval that excludes DRB1. This genetic risk factor is present on a segment of a highly conserved ancestral A1-B8-DRB1*03 (8.1) haplotype. Additional risk genes may also be present in the HLA class I region in a subset of DRB1*0404 haplotypes. These data emphasize the importance of defining haplotypes when trying to understand the HLA associations with disease, and they clearly demonstrate that such associations with RA are complex and cannot be completely explained by the DRB1 locus. PMID:12181776

  4. Inhibition of respiratory complex I by copper(ii)-bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes.

    PubMed

    Djoko, Karrera Y; Donnelly, Paul S; McEwan, Alastair G

    2014-12-01

    Several copper(ii) complexes of bis(thiosemicarbazones) [Cu(btsc)s] show promise as therapeutics for the treatment of neurological diseases, cancers and bacterial infections. These complexes are thought to act primarily as copper ionophores or "copper boosting" agents, whereby the Cu(II) centre is reduced by cytosolic reductants and Cu(I) is released as "free" or "bioavailable" ion. It is then assumed that the dissociated Cu(I) ion is the species responsible for many of the observed biological effects of Cu(btsc)s. We recently showed that Cu(btsc) complexes inhibited NADH dehydrogenases in the bacterial respiratory chain. In this work, we demonstrate that Cu(btsc) complexes also inhibit mitochondrial respiration and that Complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport chain is a specific target of inhibition. However, bioavailable Cu ions do not appear to contribute to the action of Cu(btsc) as a respiratory inhibitor. Instead, an intact Cu(btsc) molecule may bind reversibly and competitively to the site of ubiquinone binding in Complex I. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that the intact complex may be important in the overall cellular activity of Cu(btsc) complexes and further the understanding of their biological effects as a potential therapeutic. PMID:25366244

  5. Sialic acid-modified antigens impose tolerance via inhibition of T-cell proliferation and de novo induction of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Ilarregui, Juan M; Verstege, Marleen I; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Schetters, Sjoerd T T; Engels, Steef; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Veninga, Henrike; den Haan, Joke M M; van Berkel, Lisette A; Samsom, Janneke N; Crocker, Paul R; Sparwasser, Tim; Berod, Luciana; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-03-22

    Sialic acids are negatively charged nine-carbon carboxylated monosaccharides that often cap glycans on glycosylated proteins and lipids. Because of their strategic location at the cell surface, sialic acids contribute to interactions that are critical for immune homeostasis via interactions with sialic acid-binding Ig-type lectins (siglecs). In particular, these interactions may be of importance in cases where sialic acids may be overexpressed, such as on certain pathogens and tumors. We now demonstrate that modification of antigens with sialic acids (Sia-antigens) regulates the generation of antigen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells via dendritic cells (DCs). Additionally, DCs that take up Sia-antigen prevent formation of effector CD4(+) and CD8(+)T cells. Importantly, the regulatory properties endowed on DCs upon Sia-antigen uptake are antigen-specific: only T cells responsive to the sialylated antigen become tolerized. In vivo, injection of Sia-antigen-loaded DCs increased de novo Treg-cell numbers and dampened effector T-cell expansion and IFN-γ production. The dual tolerogenic features that Sia-antigen imposed on DCs are Siglec-E-mediated and maintained under inflammatory conditions. Moreover, loading DCs with Sia-antigens not only inhibited the function of in vitro-established Th1 and Th17 effector T cells but also significantly dampened ex vivo myelin-reactive T cells, present in the circulation of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data indicate that sialic acid-modified antigens instruct DCs in an antigen-specific tolerogenic programming, enhancing Treg cells and reducing the generation and propagation of inflammatory T cells. Our data suggest that sialylation of antigens provides an attractive way to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance. PMID:26941238

  6. [The differentiation of the antigens making up the circulating immune complexes].

    PubMed

    Gorina, L G; Vul'fovich, Iu V

    1996-01-01

    A simple method for the detection and analysis of circulating immune complexes (CIC) in specimens of biological fluids is proposed. The method was approved in the examination of patients with chronic infections caused by mycoplasmas and Streptococcus pyogenes L-forms. The method made it possible to diagnose infectious diseases accompanied by the formation of immune complexes and to study the dynamics of the processes of the accumulation and elimination of CIC in the course of the disease. Thus, the detection rate of specific antigens (Ag) incorporated into CIC in patients with mycoplasmal pneumonia exceeded 90 %. In children aged up to 1 year this rate decreased to 40 %. The diagnostic value of the determination of specific Ag incorporated into CIC was shown in streptococcal infections caused by S.pyogenes L-forms, viz. in frequently relapsing erysipelas, as well as in subacute rheumatism and in infectious allergic myocarditis. PMID:8820681

  7. Inhibition of selective signaling events in natural killer cells recognizing major histocompatibility complex class I.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, D S; Schoon, R A; Robertson, M J; Leibson, P J

    1995-01-01

    Many studies have characterized the transmembrane signaling events initiated after T-cell antigen receptor recognition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound peptides. Yet, little is known about signal transduction from a set of MHC class I recognizing receptors on natural killer (NK) cells whose ligation dramatically inhibits NK cell-mediated killing. In this study we evaluated the influence of MHC recognition on the proximal signaling events in NK cells binding tumor targets. We utilized two experimental models where NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity was fully inhibited by the recognition of specific MHC class I molecules. NK cell binding to either class I-deficient or class I-transfected target cells initiated rapid protein tyrosine kinase activation. In contrast, whereas NK cell binding to class I-deficient targets led to inositol phosphate release and increased intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i), NK recognition of class I-bearing targets did not induce the activation of these phospholipase C-dependent signaling events. The recognition of class I by NK cells clearly had a negative regulatory effect since blocking this interaction using anti-class I F(ab')2 fragments increased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate release and [Ca2+]i and increased the lysis of the targets. These results suggest that one of the mechanisms by which NK cell recognition of specific MHC class I molecules can block the development of cell-mediated cytotoxicity is by inhibiting specific critical signaling events. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7604018

  8. Activation/Inhibition of mast cells by supra-optimal antigen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident cells of hemopoietic origin and are critically involved in allergic diseases. MCs bind IgE by means of their high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI). The FcεRI belongs to a family of multi-chain immune recognition receptors and is activated by cross-linking in response to multivalent antigens (Ags)/allergens. Activation of the FcεRI results in immediate release of preformed granular substances (e.g. histamine, heparin, and proteases), generation of arachidonic acid metabolites, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The FcεRI shows a remarkable, bell-shaped dose-response behavior with weak induction of effector responses at both low and high (so-called supra-optimal) Ag concentrations. This is significantly different from many other receptors, which reach a plateau phase in response to high ligand concentrations. To explain this unusual dose-response behavior of the FcεRI, scientists in the past have drawn parallels to so-called precipitin curves resulting from titration of Ag against a fixed concentration of antibody (Ab) in solution (a.k.a. Heidelberger curves). Thus, for high, supra-optimal Ag concentrations one could assume that every IgE-bound FcεRI formed a monovalent complex with "its own Ag", thus resulting in marginal induction of effector functions due to absence of receptor cross-linking. However, this was never proven to be the case. More recently, careful studies of FcεRI activation and signaling events in MCs in response to supra-optimal Ag concentrations have suggested a molecular explanation for the descending part of this bell-shaped curve. It is obvious now that extensive FcεRI/IgE/Ag clusters are formed and inhibitory molecules and signalosomes are engaged in response to supra-optimal cross-linking (amongst them the Src family kinase Lyn and the inositol-5'-phosphatase SHIP1) and they actively down-regulate MC effector responses. Thus, the analysis of MC signaling triggered by supra

  9. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex II by the Anticancer Agent Lonidamine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lili; Shestov, Alexander A; Worth, Andrew J; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S; Leeper, Dennis B; Glickson, Jerry D; Blair, Ian A

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor agent lonidamine (LND; 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid) is known to interfere with energy-yielding processes in cancer cells. However, the effect of LND on central energy metabolism has never been fully characterized. In this study, we report that a significant amount of succinate is accumulated in LND-treated cells. LND inhibits the formation of fumarate and malate and suppresses succinate-induced respiration of isolated mitochondria. Utilizing biochemical assays, we determined that LND inhibits the succinate-ubiquinone reductase activity of respiratory complex II without fully blocking succinate dehydrogenase activity. LND also induces cellular reactive oxygen species through complex II, which reduced the viability of the DB-1 melanoma cell line. The ability of LND to promote cell death was potentiated by its suppression of the pentose phosphate pathway, which resulted in inhibition of NADPH and glutathione generation. Using stable isotope tracers in combination with isotopologue analysis, we showed that LND increased glutaminolysis but decreased reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate. Our findings on the previously uncharacterized effects of LND may provide potential combinational therapeutic approaches for targeting cancer metabolism. PMID:26521302

  10. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex II by the Anticancer Agent Lonidamine*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lili; Shestov, Alexander A.; Worth, Andrew J.; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.; Blair, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor agent lonidamine (LND; 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid) is known to interfere with energy-yielding processes in cancer cells. However, the effect of LND on central energy metabolism has never been fully characterized. In this study, we report that a significant amount of succinate is accumulated in LND-treated cells. LND inhibits the formation of fumarate and malate and suppresses succinate-induced respiration of isolated mitochondria. Utilizing biochemical assays, we determined that LND inhibits the succinate-ubiquinone reductase activity of respiratory complex II without fully blocking succinate dehydrogenase activity. LND also induces cellular reactive oxygen species through complex II, which reduced the viability of the DB-1 melanoma cell line. The ability of LND to promote cell death was potentiated by its suppression of the pentose phosphate pathway, which resulted in inhibition of NADPH and glutathione generation. Using stable isotope tracers in combination with isotopologue analysis, we showed that LND increased glutaminolysis but decreased reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate. Our findings on the previously uncharacterized effects of LND may provide potential combinational therapeutic approaches for targeting cancer metabolism. PMID:26521302

  11. The antigen 85 complex: a major secretion product of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wiker, H G; Harboe, M

    1992-01-01

    The large number of different proteins synthesized by the mycobacterial cell are currently classified and studied in terms of groups of proteins with certain common properties such as physical and chemical characteristics, function, and localization in the mycobacterial cell. Proteins that are actively secreted during culture on synthetic media represent a particular group of great current interest. At least eight proteins secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been isolated and characterized to various extents. The genes coding for five proteins secreted from M. tuberculosis and/or Mycobacterium bovis BCG have been cloned and sequenced. All of them contain typical signal sequences. The proteins of the antigen 85 complex, which form the main subject of this review, are often the most common proteins in M. tuberculosis culture fluid. The constituents denoted 85A, 85B, and 85C are encoded by three genes located at different sites in the mycobacterial genome and show extensive cross-reactivity as well as homology at amino acid and gene levels. The proteins differ slightly in molecular mass in the 30- to 31-kDa region, and all of them are fibronectin-binding proteins, but the significance of the latter observation and the role of these proteins in mycobacterial physiology and interaction with the infected host remain to be elucidated. The antigen 85 complex proteins are strongly immunogenic in natural and experimental mycobacterial infections in terms of both induction of antibody synthesis and T-cell-mediated reactions. The well-recognized difference in the efficacy of live and dead mycobacterial vaccines should be considered in relation to the group of secreted antigens. After inoculation, live bacteria in vaccines such as BCG multiply in the host, probably releasing several constituents belonging to the class of secreted proteins and hence resulting in more efficient stimulation of the immune system. Secreted mycobacterial antigens are expected to be of

  12. Antigen/IgG immune complex-primed mucosal mast cells mediate antigen-specific activation of co-cultured T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Fang, Yu; Xiang, Zou

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are proposed to be one of the targets for mucosal vaccine adjuvants. We previously demonstrated that mucosal adjuvants containing IgG immune complexes could activate connective tissue mast cells enhancing immune responses. Here we suggest that mucosal mast cells (MMC) may also contribute to augmentation of antigen-specific immune responses following treatment with antigens complexed with IgG. We demonstrated that both bone marrow-derived cultured MMC and tissue resident MMC incorporated ovalbumin (OVA) at a greater level in the presence of anti-OVA IgG. Co-culture of OVA/IgG-pulsed bone marrow-derived MMC with splenocytes from OT-II mice promoted OVA-specific activation and proliferation of T cells, a process known as cross-presentation. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived cultured MMC underwent apoptosis following treatment with IgG immune complexes, a feature that has been described as favouring phagocytosis of mast cells by professional antigen-presenting cells. PMID:25196548

  13. Metformin Suppresses MHC-Restricted Antigen Presentation by Inhibiting Co-Stimulatory Factors and MHC Molecules in APCs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seulmee; Hyun, Bobae; Lee, Aeri; Kong, Hyunseok; Han, Shinha; Lee, Chong-Kil; Ha, Nam-Joo; Kim, Kyungjae

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is widely used for T2D therapy but its cellular mechanism of action is undefined. Recent studies on the mechanism of metformin in T2D have demonstrated involvement of the immune system. Current immunotherapies focus on the potential of immunomodulatory strategies for the treatment of T2D. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on the antigen-presenting function of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Metformin decreased both MHC class I and class II-restricted presentation of OVA and suppressed the expression of both MHC molecules and co-stimulatory factors such as CD54, CD80, and CD86 in DCs, but did not affect the phagocytic activity toward exogenous OVA. The class II-restricted OVA presentation-regulating activity of metformin was also confirmed using mice that had been injected with metformin followed by soluble OVA. These results provide an understanding of the mechanisms of the T cell response-regulating activity of metformin through the inhibition of MHC-restricted antigen presentation in relation to its actions on APCs. PMID:24009856

  14. Sialic acid-modified antigens impose tolerance via inhibition of T-cell proliferation and de novo induction of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Ilarregui, Juan M.; Verstege, Marleen I.; Cornelissen, Lenneke A. M.; Schetters, Sjoerd T. T.; Engels, Steef; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Veninga, Henrike; den Haan, Joke M. M.; van Berkel, Lisette A.; Samsom, Janneke N.; Crocker, Paul R.; Sparwasser, Tim; Berod, Luciana; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acids are negatively charged nine-carbon carboxylated monosaccharides that often cap glycans on glycosylated proteins and lipids. Because of their strategic location at the cell surface, sialic acids contribute to interactions that are critical for immune homeostasis via interactions with sialic acid-binding Ig-type lectins (siglecs). In particular, these interactions may be of importance in cases where sialic acids may be overexpressed, such as on certain pathogens and tumors. We now demonstrate that modification of antigens with sialic acids (Sia-antigens) regulates the generation of antigen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells via dendritic cells (DCs). Additionally, DCs that take up Sia-antigen prevent formation of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Importantly, the regulatory properties endowed on DCs upon Sia-antigen uptake are antigen-specific: only T cells responsive to the sialylated antigen become tolerized. In vivo, injection of Sia-antigen–loaded DCs increased de novo Treg-cell numbers and dampened effector T-cell expansion and IFN-γ production. The dual tolerogenic features that Sia-antigen imposed on DCs are Siglec-E–mediated and maintained under inflammatory conditions. Moreover, loading DCs with Sia-antigens not only inhibited the function of in vitro–established Th1 and Th17 effector T cells but also significantly dampened ex vivo myelin-reactive T cells, present in the circulation of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data indicate that sialic acid-modified antigens instruct DCs in an antigen-specific tolerogenic programming, enhancing Treg cells and reducing the generation and propagation of inflammatory T cells. Our data suggest that sialylation of antigens provides an attractive way to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance. PMID:26941238

  15. [Elaboration of new adjuvant lipid-saponin complex and its use at experimental immunization by bacterial antigen].

    PubMed

    Tsybul'skiĭ, A V; Sanina, N M; Li, I A; Popov, A M; Kostetskiĭ, E Ia; Portniagina, O Iu; Shnyrov, V L

    2007-01-01

    Results of experiments on modification of immunostimulating complexes (ISCOM's) matrix by the replacement of the phospholipid for the glycolipid (monogalactosyldiacylglycerol) from sea macrophytes, and saponin QuillA to triterpene glycoside of cucumarioside A2-2 from Cucumaria japonica are shown. The resultant complexes include the morphological structures of two types: ISCOM-like structures with the characteristic morphology and sizes and also the tubular structures with diameter of approximately 40 nm and length of 150-400 nm. We have named these structures as TI-complexes. These TI-complexes exhibit considerably lower toxicity than ISCOM. They may include an amphiphilic protein antigen and provide immunoadjuvant effect during experimental vaccination. Under conditions of experimental immunization of mice by a weak immunogen--(subunit membrane pore protein from Y. pseudotuberculosis), TI-complexes with antigen provided stronger humoral immune response to antigen than the complexes of porin with classical ISCOM, liposomes and Freund's adjuvant. Thus, it's shown the prospect of the use of TI-complexes as a new type of adjuvant carriers for antigens. PMID:17722580

  16. Synthesis of biocompatible nanoparticle drug complexes for inhibition of mycobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhave, Tejashree; Ghoderao, Prachi; Sanghavi, Sonali; Babrekar, Harshada; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Ganesan, V.; Kulkarni, Anjali

    2013-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most critical infectious diseases affecting the world today. Current TB treatment involves six months long daily administration of four oral doses of antibiotics. Due to severe side effects and the long treatment, a patient's adherence is low and this results in relapse of symptoms causing an alarming increase in the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. Hence, it is imperative to develop a new drug delivery technology wherein these effects can be reduced. Rifampicin (RIF) is one of the widely used anti-tubercular drugs (ATD). The present study discusses the development of biocompatible nanoparticle-RIF complexes with superior inhibitory activity against both Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by gas phase condensation and NP-RIF complexes were tested against M. smegmatis SN2 strain as well as M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain. These complexes showed significantly better inhibition of M. smegmatis SN2 strain at a much lower effective concentration (27.5 μg ml-1) as compared to neat RIF (125 μg ml-1). Similarly M. tuberculosis H37Rv laboratory strain was susceptible to both nanoparticle-RIF complex and neat RIF at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.22 and 1 μg ml-1, respectively. Further studies are underway to determine the efficacy of NPs-RIF complexes in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis as well as MDR isolates.

  17. Immune complexes in the spleen. The difference between competitive inhibition of immune complex trapping in spleen follicles and inhibition by paratyphoid vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    van Rooijen, N

    1975-01-01

    Paratyphoid vaccine injected between 4 days and 3 hours before injection of labelled immune complexes (125-I-labelled BGG-anti-BGG), inhibits follicular trapping of these complexes in the mouse spleen. Inhibition is maximal when paratyphoid vaccine is given 1 day before, almost no label being found in the spleen follicles. No inhibition of follicular trapping of the complexes occurred when paratyphoid vaccine was injected simultaneously with the labelled immune complexes. Competitive inhibition was found when unlabelled immune complexes were given together with labelled immune complexes. Simultaneous injection of mice with paratyphoid vaccine and labelled immune complexes resulted in an additonal form of localization of the labelled immune complexes in the white pulp, heavily labelled clumps also appearing in the periarteriolar lymphocyte sheaths and follicles. The results are discussed in relation to the mechanism of immune complex trapping in spleen follicles. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1132890

  18. Cancer-testis antigens and immunotherapy in the light of cancer complexity.

    PubMed

    Grizzi, F; Mirandola, L; Qehajaj, D; Cobos, E; Figueroa, J A; Chiriva-Internati, M

    2015-03-01

    The ability of immunotherapy to evoke successful antitumor immune responses has been well documented over the past decade. Despite abundant preclinical data, it is only with the recent approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the drugs such as sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab that immunotherapy is finally being recognized as a viable alternative to traditional therapies for treatment of various cancers. Despite the ability of immunotherapy to elicit successful antitumor immune responses, its efficacy is hindered by several factors. Among these are the paucity of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) that can be used as effective targets and the systemic toxicities that often lead to treatment interruption. Indeed, such adverse effects, which can be immunological and/or parenchymal, can be particularly severe and even fatal to some patients. A family of TAA called cancer-testis antigens (CTA) has been identified and their encoding genes have been extensively investigated. CTA expression has been demonstrated in a variety of human cancer tissues, and at least 19 CTA have been found to elicit humoral and/or cellular immune responses in cancer patients. Here we discuss how CTA and immunotherapy will most likely play a major role in the cure of cancer in the light of cancer complexity. PMID:25901859

  19. Identification of the Ro and La antigens in the endoribonuclease VII--ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, M; Mayet, W J; Schröder, H C; Pfeifer, K; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Müller, W E

    1987-01-01

    45 S RNP (ribonucleoprotein) particles from calf thymus or L5178y mouse lymphoma cells contain the poly(A)-modulated and oligo(U)-binding endoribonuclease VII [Bachmann, Zahn & Müller (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7033-7040]. From these particles a 4.5 S RNA was isolated that possesses an oligo(U) sequence. By using monospecific and non-cross-reacting antibodies directed against the La or Ro antigen, both proteins were identified in the endoribonuclease VII-RNP complex after phosphorylation in vitro. In a second approach, endoribonuclease VII activity was identified in immunoaffinity-purified Ro RNPs after preparative isoelectric focusing. Therefore we conclude that the 4.5 S RNA belongs to the Ro RNAs. The results indicate a possible function of endoribonuclease VII in activating stored mRNAs. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440423

  20. The influence of monogalactosyldiacylglycerols from different marine macrophytes on immunogenicity and conformation of protein antigen of tubular immunostimulating complex.

    PubMed

    Sanina, Nina M; Kostetsky, Eduard Y; Shnyrov, Valery L; Tsybulsky, Alexander V; Novikova, Olga D; Portniagina, Olga Y; Vorobieva, Natalia S; Mazeika, Andrey N; Bogdanov, Mikhail V

    2012-04-01

    The tubular immunostimulating complex (TI-complex) is a novel nanoparticulate antigen delivery system consisting of cholesterol, triterpene glycoside cucumarioside A(2)-2, and glycolipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) isolated from marine macrophytes. MGDG is crucial for the formation of a lipid matrix for the protein antigen incorporated in TI-complexes. Fatty acid composition and the physical state of this glycolipid depend on the taxonomic position of marine macrophytes. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to study the capacity of MGDGs, isolated from five species of marine macrophytes, to influence conformation and to enhance immunogenicity of porin from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YOmpF) as a model antigen of subunit vaccine based on TI-complexes. The trimeric porin was chosen for these experiments, because it was approximately two times more immunogenic than monomeric porin incorporated in TI-complexes. Immunization of mice with YOmpF within TI-complexes, comprised of different MGDGs, revealed a dependence of the immunostimulating effect of TI-complexes on the microvicosity of this glycolipid. TI-complexes comprising MGDGs from Sargassum pallidum and Ulva fenestrata with medium microviscosity induced maximal levels of anti-porin antibodies (four times higher when compared with those induced by pure porin). The adjuvant effect of TI-complexes based on other MGDGs varied by 2.8, 2.3 and 1.3 times for TI-complexes comprised of MGDGs from Zostera marina, Ahnfeltia tobuchiensis, and Laminaria japonica, respectively. MGDGs are also able to influence cytokine mechanisms of immunological regulation. DSC and spectroscopic studies showed that maximal immunostimulating effect of TI-complexes correlated with a moderate stabilizing influence of MGDGs from S. pallidum and U. fenestrata on the conformation of porin. The results obtained suggest lipid "nanofluidics" as a novel strategy for optimizing the immune response to protein antigens within lipid

  1. Characterization of anti-P monoclonal antibodies directed against the ribosomal protein–RNA complex antigen and produced using Murphy Roths large autoimmune-prone mice

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Onozuka, M; Hagiya, A; Hoshino, S; Narita, I; Uchiumi, T

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies, including anti-ribosomal P proteins (anti-P), are thought to be produced by an antigen-driven immune response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted the ribosomal antigenic complex in vitro using human P0, phosphorylated P1 and P2 and a 28S rRNA fragment covering the P0 binding site, and immunized Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lrp lupus mice with this complex without any added adjuvant to generate anti-P antibodies. Using hybridoma technology, we subsequently obtained 34 clones, each producing an anti-P monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognized the conserved C-terminal tail sequence common to all three P proteins. We also obtained two P0-specific monoclonal antibodies, but no antibody specific to P1, P2 or rRNA fragment. Two types of mAbs were found among these anti-P antibodies: one type (e.g. 9D5) reacted more strongly with the phosphorylated P1 and P2 than that with their non-phosphorylated forms, whereas the other type (e.g. 4H11) reacted equally with both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of P1/P2. Both 9D5 and 4H11 inhibited the ribosome/eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2)-coupled guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ase activity. However, preincubation with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to all three P proteins, but not the peptide that lacked the last three C-terminal amino acids, mostly prevented the mAb-induced inhibition of GTPase activity. Thus, at least two types of anti-P were produced preferentially following the immunization of MRL mice with the reconstituted antigenic complex. Presence of multiple copies of the C-termini, particularly that of the last three C-terminal amino acid residues, in the antigenic complex appears to contribute to the immunogenic stimulus. PMID:25255895

  2. Seminal plasma inhibits lymphocyte response to T-dependent and -independent antigens in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, I K; Erickson, K L

    1984-01-01

    The effect of seminal plasma, epididymal spermatozoa, or whole semen on antibody producing cells was examined in vitro after (i) direct culture with spleen or B cells, and (ii) cocultivation of B cells with T cells previously incubated with seminal plasma. Seminal plasma, and not epididymal spermatozoa, have an inhibitory effect on the direct hemolytic plague forming cell response. This was mediated by a direct inhibitory effect on the B cell and not through the generation of suppressor T cells as demonstrated by responses to T-independent and -dependent antigens. Thus, the mode of suppressive action of seminal plasma in vitro is probably different from that previously reported in vivo. PMID:6235181

  3. Immunostimulating complexes incorporating Eimeria tenella antigens and plant saponins as effective delivery system for coccidia vaccine immunization.

    PubMed

    Berezin, V E; Bogoyavlenskiy, A P; Tolmacheva, V P; Makhmudova, N R; Khudyakova, S S; Levandovskaya, S V; Omirtaeva, E S; Zaitceva, I A; Tustikbaeva, G B; Ermakova, O S; Aleksyuk, P G; Barfield, R C; Danforth, H D; Fetterer, R H

    2008-04-01

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique, multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids, and triterpene saponins of plant origin, and are an effective delivery system for various kinds of antigens. The uses of ISCOMs formulated with saponins from plants collected in Kazakhstan, with antigens from the poultry coccidian parasite Eimeria tenella, were evaluated for their potential use in developing a vaccine for control of avian coccidiosis. Saponins isolated from the plants Aesculus hippocastanum and Glycyrrhiza glabra were partially purified by HPLC. The saponin fractions obtained from HPLC were evaluated for toxicity in chickens and chicken embryos. The HPLC saponin fractions with the least toxicity, compared to a commercial saponin Quil A, were used to assemble ISCOMs. When chicks were immunized with ISCOMs prepared with saponins from Kazakhstan plants and E. tenella antigens, and then challenged with E. tenella oocysts, significant protection was conveyed compared to immunization with antigen alone. The results of this study indicate that ISCOMs formulated with saponins isolated from plants indigenous to Kazakhstan are an effective antigen delivery system which may be successfully used, with low toxicity, for preparation of highly immunogenic coccidia vaccine. PMID:18564738

  4. Inhibition of Simian Virus 40 replication by targeting the molecular chaperone function and ATPase activity of T antigen

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Christine M.; Seguin, Sandlin P.; Fewell, Sheara W.; Zhang, Haijiang; Ishwad, Chandra; Vats, Abhay; Lingwood, Cifford A.; Wipf, Peter; Fanning, Ellen; Pipas, James M.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Polyomaviruses such as BK virus and JC virus have been linked to several diseases, but treatments that thwart their propagation are limited in part because of slow growth and cumbersome culturing conditions. In contrast, the replication of one member of this family, Simian Virus 40 (SV40), is robust and has been well-characterized. SV40 replication requires two domains within the viral-encoded large tumor antigen (TAg): The ATPase domain and the N-terminal J domain, which stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone. To assess whether inhibitors of polyomavirus replication could be identified, we examined a recently described library of small molecules, some of which inhibit chaperone function. One compound, MAL2-11B, inhibited both TAg’s endogenous ATPase activity and the TAg-mediated activation of Hsp70. MAL2-11B also reduced SV40 propagation in plaque assays and compromised DNA replication in cell culture and in vitro. Furthermore, the compound significantly reduced the growth of BK virus in a human kidney cell line. These data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of TAg’s chaperone and ATPase activities may provide a route to combat polyomavirus-mediated disease. PMID:19200446

  5. Structural Insights into the Inhibition of Wnt Signaling by Cancer Antigen 5T4/Wnt-Activated Inhibitory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Malinauskas, Tomas; Harlos, Karl; Jones, E. Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The tumor antigen 5T4/WAIF1 (Wnt-activated inhibitory factor 1; also known as Trophoblast glycoprotein TPBG) is a cell surface protein targeted in multiple cancer immunotherapy clinical trials. Recently, it has been shown that 5T4/WAIF1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a signaling system central to many developmental and pathological processes. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is controlled by multiple inhibitors and activators. Here, we report crystal structures for the extracellular domain of 5T4/WAIF1 at 1.8 Å resolution. They reveal a highly glycosylated, rigid core, comprising eight leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), which serves as a platform to present evolutionarily conserved surface residues in the N-terminal LRR1. Structural and cell-based analyses, coupled with previously reported in vivo data, suggest that Tyr325 plus the LRR1 surface centered on a second exposed aromatic residue, Phe97, are essential for inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These results provide a structural basis for the development of 5T4/WAIF1-targeted therapies that preserve or block 5T4/WAIF1-mediated inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24582434

  6. Mechanism of inhibition of immunoglobulin G-mediated phagocytosis by monoclonal antibodies that recognize the Mac-1 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E J; Bohnsack, J F; Gresham, H D

    1988-01-01

    plasma membrane. Indeed, only approximately 60% of 125I-M1/70-biding sites were lost even after 4 h when monocytes were adherent to M1/70-coated surfaces. We conclude that some anti-Mac-1 antibodies can inhibit EA binding because of their epitope specificity, independent of any direct interaction with monocyte Fc receptors. This interference with IgG-Fc receptor-mediated binding and ingestion apparently occurs because of antibody binding to a subpopulation of Mac-1 molecules which are associated with IgG Fc receptors and remain on the apical membrane of monocytes adherent to anti-Mac-1-coated surfaces. We suggest that there may be two functionally distinct molecules on human monocytes recognized by M1/70 and Mo-1 that can be distinguished by their mobility in the plane of the monocyte membrane. The more mobile form of Mac-1 is involved in C3bi rosettes, and does not affect IgG-mediated phagocytosis. The other antigen recognized by M1/70 does not diffuse within the plane of the membrane; ligation of the latter molecule by antibody is associated with inhibition of IgG-mediated phagocytosis. Images PMID:2963020

  7. Heat-solubilized curry spice curcumin inhibits antibody-antigen interaction in in vitro studies: a possible therapy to alleviate autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; D'Souza, Anil; Scofield, R Hal

    2010-08-01

    Chronic and complex autoimmune diseases, currently treated palliatively with immunosuppressives, require multi-targeted therapy for greater effectiveness. The naturally occurring polyphenol curcumin has emerged as a powerful "nutraceutical" that interacts with multiple targets to regress diseases safely and inexpensively. Up to 8 g/day of curcumin for 18 months was non-toxic to humans. However, curcumin's utility is limited by its aqueous insolubility. We have demonstrated a heat-mediated 12-fold increase in curcumin's aqueous solubility. Here, we show by SDS-PAGE and surface plasmon resonance that heat-solubilized curcumin binds to proteins. Based on this binding we hypothesized that heat-solubilized curcumin or turmeric would prevent autoantibody targeting of cognate autoantigens. Heat-solubilized curcumin/turmeric significantly decreased binding of autoantibodies from Sjögren's syndrome (up to 43/70%, respectively) and systemic lupus erythematosus (up to 52/70%, respectively) patients as well as an animal model of Sjögren's syndrome (up to 50/60%, respectively) to their cognate antigens. However, inhibition was not specific to autoimmunity. Heat-solubilized curcumin/turmeric also inhibited binding of commercial polyclonal anti-spectrin to spectrin (50/56%, respectively). Thus, we suggest that the multifaceted heat-solubilized curcumin can ameliorate autoimmune disorders. In addition, the non-toxic curcumin could serve as a new protein stain in SDS-PAGE even though it is less sensitive than the Coomassie system which involves toxic chemicals. PMID:20146265

  8. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies.

  9. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies. PMID:24406986

  10. Cytokines Regulate Proteolysis in Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II–Dependent Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Edda; Meraner, Paul; Weber, Ekkehard; Fang, I-Fei; Stingl, Georg; Ploegh, Hidde; Maurer, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    Endo/lysosomal proteases control two key events in antigen (Ag) presentation: the degradation of protein Ag and the generation of peptide-receptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Here we show that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin (IL)-1β rapidly increase the activity of cathepsin (cat) S and catB in human dendritic cells (DCs). As a consequence, a wave of MHC class II sodium dodecyl sulfate stable dimer formation ensues in a catS-dependent fashion. In contrast, the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 renders DCs incapable of upregulating catS and catB activity and in fact, attenuates the level of both enzymes. Suppressed catS and catB activity delays MHC class II sodium dodecyl sulfate stable dimer formation and impairs Ag degradation. In DCs exposed to tetanus toxoid, IL-10 accordingly reduces the number of MHC class II–peptide complexes accessible to tetanus toxoid–specific T cell receptors, as analyzed by measuring T cell receptor downregulation in Ag-specific T cell clones. Thus, the control of protease activity by pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines is an essential feature of the Ag presentation properties of DCs. PMID:11304549

  11. Inactivation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 complex by covalent, allosteric inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Favrot, Lorenza; Lajiness, Daniel H; Ronning, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant and totally drug-resistant tuberculosis and the association with an increasing number of HIV-positive patients developing tuberculosis emphasize the necessity to find new antitubercular targets and drugs. The antigen 85 (Ag85) complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays important roles in the biosynthesis of major components of the mycobacterial cell envelope. For this reason, Ag85 has emerged as an attractive drug target. Recently, ebselen was identified as an effective inhibitor of the Ag85 complex through covalent modification of a cysteine residue proximal to the Ag85 active site and is therefore a covalent, allosteric inhibitor. To expand the understanding of this process, we have solved the x-ray crystal structures of Ag85C covalently modified with ebselen and other thiol-reactive compounds, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid and iodoacetamide, as well as the structure of a cysteine to glycine mutant. All four structures confirm that chemical modification or mutation at this particular cysteine residue leads to the disruption of the active site hydrogen-bonded network essential for Ag85 catalysis. We also describe x-ray crystal structures of Ag85C single mutants within the catalytic triad and show that a mutation of any one of these three residues promotes the same conformational change observed in the cysteine-modified forms. These results provide evidence for active site dynamics that may afford new strategies for the development of selective and potent Ag85 inhibitors. PMID:25028518

  12. Inactivation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen 85 Complex by Covalent, Allosteric Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Favrot, Lorenza; Lajiness, Daniel H.; Ronning, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant and totally drug-resistant tuberculosis and the association with an increasing number of HIV-positive patients developing tuberculosis emphasize the necessity to find new antitubercular targets and drugs. The antigen 85 (Ag85) complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays important roles in the biosynthesis of major components of the mycobacterial cell envelope. For this reason, Ag85 has emerged as an attractive drug target. Recently, ebselen was identified as an effective inhibitor of the Ag85 complex through covalent modification of a cysteine residue proximal to the Ag85 active site and is therefore a covalent, allosteric inhibitor. To expand the understanding of this process, we have solved the x-ray crystal structures of Ag85C covalently modified with ebselen and other thiol-reactive compounds, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid and iodoacetamide, as well as the structure of a cysteine to glycine mutant. All four structures confirm that chemical modification or mutation at this particular cysteine residue leads to the disruption of the active site hydrogen-bonded network essential for Ag85 catalysis. We also describe x-ray crystal structures of Ag85C single mutants within the catalytic triad and show that a mutation of any one of these three residues promotes the same conformational change observed in the cysteine-modified forms. These results provide evidence for active site dynamics that may afford new strategies for the development of selective and potent Ag85 inhibitors. PMID:25028518

  13. Accurate structure prediction of peptide–MHC complexes for identifying highly immunogenic antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Min-Sun; Park, Sung Yong; Miller, Keith R.; Collins, Edward J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2013-11-01

    Designing an optimal HIV-1 vaccine faces the challenge of identifying antigens that induce a broad immune capacity. One factor to control the breadth of T cell responses is the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex. Here, we present an in silico protocol for predicting peptide–MHC structure. A robust signature of a conformational transition was identified during all-atom molecular dynamics, which results in a model with high accuracy. A large test set was used in constructing our protocol and we went another step further using a blind test with a wild-type peptide and two highly immunogenic mutants, which predicted substantial conformational changes in both mutants. The center residues at position five of the analogs were configured to be accessible to solvent, forming a prominent surface, while the residue of the wild-type peptide was to point laterally toward the side of the binding cleft. We then experimentally determined the structures of the blind test set, using high resolution of X-ray crystallography, which verified predicted conformational changes. Our observation strongly supports a positive association of the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex to its immunogenicity. Our study offers the prospect of enhancing immunogenicity of vaccines by identifying MHC binding immunogens.

  14. Genetic factors influence level of proteinuria in cationic antigen-induced immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Thaiss, F; Oite, T; Günther, E; Batsford, S; Vogt, A

    1985-01-01

    The influence of genetic factors on the susceptibility of the rat to cationic antigen-induced in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis was investigated. The levels of proteinuria developing in 11 inbred strains of rats differing in MHC and in genetic background varied markedly. Susceptibility was not MHC associated but resided in the genetic background. PMID:3159528

  15. An AXL/LRP-1/RANBP9 complex mediates DC efferocytosis and antigen cross-presentation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Hayes, Crystal D.; Thome, Joseph J.; Thorp, Edward; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Herz, Joachim; Farber, Donna L.; Liu, Kang; Lakshmana, Madepalli; Tabas, Ira

    2014-01-01

    The phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (ACs), or efferocytosis, by DCs is critical for self-tolerance and host defense. Although many efferocytosis-associated receptors have been described in vitro, the functionality of these receptors in vivo has not been explored in depth. Using a spleen efferocytosis assay and targeted genetic deletion in mice, we identified a multiprotein complex — composed of the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL, LDL receptor–related protein–1 (LRP-1), and RAN-binding protein 9 (RANBP9) — that mediates DC efferocytosis and antigen cross-presentation. We found that AXL bound ACs, but required LRP-1 to trigger internalization, in murine CD8α+ DCs and human-derived DCs. AXL and LRP-1 did not interact directly, but relied on RANBP9, which bound both AXL and LRP-1, to form the complex. In a coculture model of antigen presentation, the AXL/LRP-1/RANBP9 complex was used by DCs to cross-present AC-associated antigens to T cells. Furthermore, in a murine model of herpes simplex virus–1 infection, mice lacking DC-specific LRP-1, AXL, or RANBP9 had increased AC accumulation, defective viral antigen-specific CD8+ T cell activation, enhanced viral load, and decreased survival. The discovery of this multiprotein complex that mediates functionally important DC efferocytosis in vivo may have implications for future studies related to host defense and DC-based vaccines. PMID:24509082

  16. Cestode Antigens Induce a Tolerogenic-Like Phenotype and Inhibit LPS Inflammatory Responses in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas, César A.; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Mejía-Domínguez, Ana M.; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis M.; Terrazas, Luis I.; Bojalil, Rafael; Gómez-García, Lorena

    2011-01-01

    Pathogens have developed strategies to modify Dendritic Cells (DCs) phenotypes and impair their functions in order to create a safer environment for their survival. DCs responses to helminths and their derivatives vary among different studies. Here we show that excretory/secretory products of the cestode Taenia crassiceps (TcES) do not induce the maturation of human DCs judged by a lack of increment in the expression of CD83, HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 molecules but enhanced the production of IL-10 and positively modulated the expression of the C-type lectin receptor MGL and negatively modulated the expression of DC-SIGN. Additionally, these antigens were capable of down-modulating the inflammatory response induced by LPS in these cells by reducing the expression of the maturation markers and the production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF, IL-12 and IL-6. The effects of TcES upon the DCs responses to LPS were stronger if cells were exposed during their differentiation to the helminth antigens. All together, these findings suggest the ability of TcES to induce the differentiation of human DCs into a tolerogenic-like phenotype and to inhibit the effects of inflammatory stimuli. PMID:22110390

  17. The Human EKC/KEOPS Complex Is Recruited to Cullin2 Ubiquitin Ligases by the Human Tumour Antigen PRAME

    PubMed Central

    Costessi, Adalberto; Mahrour, Nawel; Sharma, Vikram; Stunnenberg, Rieka; Stoel, Marieke A.; Tijchon, Esther; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    The human tumour antigen PRAME (preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma) is frequently overexpressed during oncogenesis, and high PRAME levels are associated with poor clinical outcome in a variety of cancers. However, the molecular pathways in which PRAME is implicated are not well understood. We recently characterized PRAME as a BC-box subunit of a Cullin2-based E3 ubiquitin ligase. In this study, we mined the PRAME interactome to a deeper level and identified specific interactions with OSGEP and LAGE3, which are human orthologues of the ancient EKC/KEOPS complex. By characterizing biochemically the human EKC complex and its interactions with PRAME, we show that PRAME recruits a Cul2 ubiquitin ligase to EKC. Moreover, EKC subunits associate with PRAME target sites on chromatin. Our data reveal a novel link between the oncoprotein PRAME and the conserved EKC complex and support a role for both complexes in the same pathways. PMID:22912744

  18. Viral Inhibition of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP): A Striking Example of Functional Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, Marieke C.; Horst, Daniëlle; Griffin, Bryan D.; Luteijn, Rutger D.; Davison, Andrew J.; Ressing, Maaike E.; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large DNA viruses that are highly abundant within their host populations. Even in the presence of a healthy immune system, these viruses manage to cause lifelong infections. This persistence is partially mediated by the virus entering latency, a phase of infection characterized by limited viral protein expression. Moreover, herpesviruses have devoted a significant part of their coding capacity to immune evasion strategies. It is believed that the close coexistence of herpesviruses and their hosts has resulted in the evolution of viral proteins that specifically attack multiple arms of the host immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in antiviral immunity. CTLs recognize their target through viral peptides presented in the context of MHC molecules at the cell surface. Every herpesvirus studied to date encodes multiple immune evasion molecules that effectively interfere with specific steps of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) plays a key role in the loading of viral peptides onto MHC class I molecules. This is reflected by the numerous ways herpesviruses have developed to block TAP function. In this review, we describe the characteristics and mechanisms of action of all known virus-encoded TAP inhibitors. Orthologs of these proteins encoded by related viruses are identified, and the conservation of TAP inhibition is discussed. A phylogenetic analysis of members of the family Herpesviridae is included to study the origin of these molecules. In addition, we discuss the characteristics of the first TAP inhibitor identified outside the herpesvirus family, namely, in cowpox virus. The strategies of TAP inhibition employed by viruses are very distinct and are likely to have been acquired independently during evolution. These findings and the recent discovery of a non-herpesvirus TAP inhibitor represent a striking example of functional convergent evolution

  19. Targeting Tumor Initiating Cells through Inhibition of Cancer Testis Antigens and Notch Signaling: A Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Michela; Mirandola, Leonardo; Reidy, Adair; Suvorava, Natallia; Konala, Venu; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Grizzi, Fabio; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Nugyen, Diane D; Dalhbeck, Scott; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) differ from normal stem cells (SCs) in their ability to initiate tumorigenesis, invasive growth, metastasis and the acquisition of chemo and/or radio-resistance. Over the past years, several studies have indicated the potential role of the Notch system as a key regulator of cellular stemness and tumor development. Furthermore, the expression of cancer testis antigens (CTA) in TICs, and their role in SC differentiation and biology, has become an important area of investigation. Here, we propose a model in which CTA expression and Notch signaling interacts to maintain the sustainability of self-replicating tumor populations, ultimately leading to the development of metastasis, drug resistance and cancer progression. We hypothesize that Notch-CTA interactions in TICs offer a novel opportunity for meaningful therapeutic interventions in cancer. PMID:25901861

  20. Inhibition of Histo-blood Group Antigen Binding as a Novel Strategy to Block Norovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Tan, Ming; Chhabra, Monica; Dai, Ying-Chun; Meller, Jarek; Jiang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the most important viral pathogens that cause epidemic acute gastroenteritis. NoVs recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as receptors or attachment factors. The elucidation of crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of a number of human NoVs representing different HBGA binding patterns opens a new strategy for the development of antiviral compounds against NoVs through rational drug design and computer-aided virtual screening methods. In this study, docking simulations and virtual screening were used to identify hit compounds targeting the A and B antigens binding sites on the surface of the capsid P protein of a GII.4 NoV (VA387). Following validation by re-docking of the A and B ligands, these structural models and AutoDock suite of programs were used to screen a large drug-like compound library (derived from ZINC library) for inhibitors blocking GII.4 binding to HBGAs. After screening >2 million compounds using multistage protocol, 160 hit compounds with best predicted binding affinities and representing a number of distinct chemical classes have been selected for subsequent experimental validation. Twenty of the 160 compounds were found to be able to block the VA387 P dimers binding to the A and/or B HBGAs at an IC50<40.0 µM, with top 5 compounds blocking the HBGA binding at an IC50<10.0 µM in both oligosaccharide- and saliva-based blocking assays. Interestingly, 4 of the top-5 compounds shared the basic structure of cyclopenta [a] dimethyl phenanthren, indicating a promising structural template for further improvement by rational design. PMID:23894462

  1. Inhibition of histo-blood group antigen binding as a novel strategy to block norovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Tan, Ming; Chhabra, Monica; Dai, Ying-Chun; Meller, Jarek; Jiang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the most important viral pathogens that cause epidemic acute gastroenteritis. NoVs recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as receptors or attachment factors. The elucidation of crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of a number of human NoVs representing different HBGA binding patterns opens a new strategy for the development of antiviral compounds against NoVs through rational drug design and computer-aided virtual screening methods. In this study, docking simulations and virtual screening were used to identify hit compounds targeting the A and B antigens binding sites on the surface of the capsid P protein of a GII.4 NoV (VA387). Following validation by re-docking of the A and B ligands, these structural models and AutoDock suite of programs were used to screen a large drug-like compound library (derived from ZINC library) for inhibitors blocking GII.4 binding to HBGAs. After screening >2 million compounds using multistage protocol, 160 hit compounds with best predicted binding affinities and representing a number of distinct chemical classes have been selected for subsequent experimental validation. Twenty of the 160 compounds were found to be able to block the VA387 P dimers binding to the A and/or B HBGAs at an IC50<40.0 µM, with top 5 compounds blocking the HBGA binding at an IC50<10.0 µM in both oligosaccharide- and saliva-based blocking assays. Interestingly, 4 of the top-5 compounds shared the basic structure of cyclopenta [a] dimethyl phenanthren, indicating a promising structural template for further improvement by rational design. PMID:23894462

  2. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  3. The Protective Antigen Component of Anthrax Toxin Forms Functional Octameric Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kintzer, Alexander F.; Thoren, Katie L.; Sterling, Harry J.; Dong, Ken C.; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Tang, Iok I.; Zhang, Teri T.; Williams, Evan R.; Berger, James M.; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2009-01-01

    The assembly of bacterial toxins and virulence factors is critical to their function, but the regulation of assembly during infection has not been studied. We begin to address this question using anthrax toxin as a model. The protective antigen (PA) component of the toxin assembles into ring-shaped homooligomers that bind the two other enzyme components of the toxin, lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF), to form toxic complexes. To disrupt the host, these toxic complexes are endocytosed, such that the PA oligomer forms a membrane-spanning channel that LF and EF translocate through to enter the cytosol. We show using single-channel electrophysiology that PA channels contain two populations of conductance states, which correspond with two different PA pre-channel oligomers observed by electron microscopy—the well-described heptamer and a novel octamer. Mass spectrometry demonstrates that the PA octamer binds four LFs, and assembly routes leading to the octamer are populated with even-numbered, dimeric and tetrameric, PA intermediates. Both heptameric and octameric PA complexes can translocate LF and EF with similar rates and efficiencies. Here we also report a 3.2-Å crystal structure of the PA octamer. The octamer comprises ∼20−30% of the oligomers on cells, but outside of the cell, the octamer is more stable than the heptamer under physiological pH. Thus the PA octamer is a physiological, stable, and active assembly state capable of forming lethal toxins that may withstand the hostile conditions encountered in the bloodstream. This assembly mechanism may provide a novel means to control cytotoxicity. PMID:19627991

  4. Transcriptional activation by simian virus 40 large T antigen: interactions with multiple components of the transcription complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gruda, M C; Zabolotny, J M; Xiao, J H; Davidson, I; Alwine, J C

    1993-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen is a potent transcriptional activator of both viral and cellular promoters. Within the SV40 late promoter, a specific upstream element necessary for T-antigen transcriptional activation is the binding site for transcription-enhancing factor 1 (TEF-1). The promoter structure necessary for T-antigen-mediated transcriptional activation appears to be simple. For example, a promoter consisting of upstream TEF-1 binding sites (or other factor-binding sites) and a downstream TATA or initiator element is efficiently activated. It has been demonstrated that transcriptional activation by T antigen does not require direct binding to the DNA; thus, the most direct effect that T antigen could have on these simple promoters would be through protein-protein interactions with either upstream-bound transcription factors, the basal transcription complex, or both. To determine whether such interactions occur, full-length T antigen or segments of it was fused to the glutathione-binding site (GST fusions) or to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain (amino acids 1 to 147) (Gal4 fusions). With the GST fusions, it was found that TEF-1 and the TATA-binding protein (TBP) bound different regions of T antigen. A GST fusion containing amino acids 5 to 172 (region T1) efficiently bound TBP. TEF-1 bound neither region T1 nor a region between amino acids 168 and 373 (region T2); however, it bound efficiently to the combined region (T5) containing amino acids 5 to 383.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8423815

  5. Antigen Transfer from Exosomes to Dendritic Cells as an Explanation for the Immune Enhancement Seen by IgE Immune Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Frida; Heyman, Birgitta; Conrad, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    IgE antigen complexes induce increased specific T cell proliferation and increased specific IgG production. Immediately after immunization, CD23+ B cells capture IgE antigen complexes, transport them to the spleen where, via unknown mechanisms, dendritic cells capture the antigen and present it to T cells. CD23, the low affinity IgE receptor, binds IgE antigen complexes and internalizes them. In this study, we show that these complexes are processed onto B-cell derived exosomes (bexosomes) in a CD23 dependent manner. The bexosomes carry CD23, IgE and MHC II and stimulate antigen specific T-cell proliferation in vitro. When IgE antigen complex stimulated bexosomes are incubated with dendritic cells, dendritic cells induce specific T-cell proliferation in vivo, similar to IgE antigen complexes. This suggests that bexosomes can provide the essential transfer mechanism for IgE antigen complexes from B cells to dendritic cells. PMID:25330118

  6. Crystal Structure of Plasmodium knowlesi Apical Membrane Antigen 1 and Its Complex with an Invasion-Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    van der Eijk, Marjolein; Thomas, Alan W.; Singh, Balbir; Kocken, Clemens H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, previously associated only with infection of macaques, is now known to infect humans as well and has become a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia. This species should therefore be targeted in vaccine and therapeutic strategies against human malaria. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), which plays a role in Plasmodium merozoite invasion of the erythrocyte, is currently being pursued in human vaccine trials against P. falciparum. Recent vaccine trials in macaques using the P. knowlesi orthologue PkAMA1 have shown that it protects against infection by this parasite species and thus should be developed for human vaccination as well. Here, we present the crystal structure of Domains 1 and 2 of the PkAMA1 ectodomain, and of its complex with the invasion-inhibitory monoclonal antibody R31C2. The Domain 2 (D2) loop, which is displaced upon binding the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) receptor, makes significant contacts with the antibody. R31C2 inhibits binding of the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) receptor by steric blocking of the hydrophobic groove and by preventing the displacement of the D2 loop which is essential for exposing the complete binding site on AMA1. R31C2 recognizes a non-polymorphic epitope and should thus be cross-strain reactive. PkAMA1 is much less polymorphic than the P. falciparum and P. vivax orthologues. Unlike these two latter species, there are no polymorphic sites close to the RON2-binding site of PkAMA1, suggesting that P. knowlesi has not developed a mechanism of immune escape from the host’s humoral response to AMA1. PMID:25886591

  7. Pectinesterase Inhibitor from Jelly Fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) Achene Inhibits Surface Antigen Expression by Human Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yu-Yawn

    2013-01-01

    Pectinesterase inhibitor (PEI) isolated from jelly fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) is an edible component of a popular drink consumed in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent in Asia, and current treatments for HBV infection need improvement. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PEI on the surface antigen expression by HBV (HBsAg). Human hepatoma cell lines Hep3B and Huh7 served as in vitro models for assessing the cytotoxicity and HBsAg expression. A culture of primary hepatocytes cultured from mice served as the normal counterpart. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. HBsAg expression was evaluated by measuring HBsAg secretion into the culture medium using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that PEI did not affect the viability of the human hepatoma cell lines or primary mouse hepatocytes. PEI inhibited the expression of HBsAg in hepatoma cell lines harboring endogenous (Hep3B) and integrated (Huh7) HBV genomes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, thus implicating a universal activity against HBV gene expression. In conclusion, it suggests that PEI from jelly fig inhibits the expression of human HBsAg in host cells without toxic effects on normal primary hepatocytes. PMID:24302965

  8. Porous nanoparticles as delivery system of complex antigens for an effective vaccine against acute and chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection.

    PubMed

    Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Carpentier, Rodolphe; N'Guyen, Thi Thanh Loi; Dahmani, Fatima; Ducournau, Céline; Betbeder, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Development of sub-unit mucosal vaccines requires the use of specific delivery systems or immune-modulators such as adjuvants to improve antigen immunogenicity. Nasal route for vaccine delivery by nanoparticles has attracted much interest but mechanisms triggering effective mucosal and systemic immune response are still poorly understood. Here we study the loading of porous nanoparticles (DGNP) with a total extract of Toxoplasma gondii antigens (TE), the delivery of TE by DGNP into airway epithelial, macrophage and dendritic cells, and the subsequent cellular activation. In vitro, DGNP are able to load complex antigens in a stable and quantitative manner. The outstanding amount of antigen association by DGNP is used to deliver TE in airway mucosa cells to induce a cellular maturation with an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Evaluation of nasal vaccine efficiency is performed in vivo on acute and chronic toxoplasmosis mouse models. A specific Th1/Th17 response is observed in vivo after vaccination with DGNP/TE. This is associated with high protection against toxoplasmosis regarding survival and parasite burden, correlated with an increased delivery of antigens by DGNP in airway mucosa cells. This study provides evidence of the potential of DGNP for the development of new vaccines against a range of pathogens. PMID:25736506

  9. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:157–171. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1262 PMID:25264139

  10. Class II major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on peripheral blood monocytes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, K R; Crockard, A D; Halliday, M I; Rowlands, B J

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen expression is associated with defective antigen presentation to T lymphocytes in animals and is predictive of patient outcome after major trauma or sepsis. In this study, class II antigen (HLA-DR and DQ) expression on peripheral blood monocytes was investigated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in relation to disease activity and outcome. The percentage positivity and fluorescent intensity of expression of HLA-DR and DQ antigens on monocytes were determined in whole blood samples using dual colour immunofluorescence labelling and flow cytometry. Disease activity was assessed using clinical and laboratory indices. There was no significant difference in percentage positivity or fluorescent intensity of class II antigen expression between patients with Crohn's disease, those with ulcerative colitis, and healthy volunteers. The percentage of monocytes displaying HLA-DR positivity was significantly decreased in patients with active ulcerative colitis (active %: 49.5 (5.6); inactive %: 78.9 (6.9); p = 0.01). Data expressed as mean (SEM). In patients requiring surgical resection of diseased bowel, the percentage of monocytes displaying HLA-DR positivity (51.9 (4.0) %) was significantly reduced compared with patients receiving medical treatment alone (81.1 (3.5) %; p < 0.001). Reduced monocyte HLA-DR expression is therefore associated with disease activity and seems to predict outcome in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:8174990

  11. Outcome of limbic encephalitis with VGKC-complex antibodies: relation to antigenic specificity.

    PubMed

    Malter, M P; Frisch, C; Schoene-Bake, J C; Helmstaedter, C; Wandinger, K P; Stoecker, W; Urbach, H; Surges, R; Elger, C E; Vincent, A V; Bien, C G

    2014-09-01

    In limbic encephalitis (LE) with antibodies (Abs) to the voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC), the Abs are mainly directed to the VGKC-complex proteins, leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein (LGI1) or contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR-2) or neither. Here, we relate the outcomes of VGKC-LE patients to the presence of Abs to LGI1, CASPR-2 or neither antigen (LGI1/CASPR-2-Ab(-)). Clinical, neuropsychology and MRI data were obtained from patient records for all LE patients from the Bonn Epilepsy Centre positive for VGKC-Abs by radioimmunoprecipitation assay between 2002 and 2011. Eighteen VGKC-LE patients were identified: nine patients (50 %) had LGI1-Abs, three (16 %) had CASPR-2-Abs; and six (33 %) were negative for both LGI1- and CASPR-2-Abs. At first assessment, the groups did not differ clinically or radiologically, but faciobrachial dystonic seizures were only observed in two LGI1-Ab(+) patients. All patients received monthly intravenous methylprednisolone (MP) pulses. At the most recent follow up (median 26 months), thirteen (72 %) were seizure-free, and seizure-freedom rates did not differ between the Ab groups. Hippocampal atrophy had developed in 7/9 LGI1-Ab(+) patients, but in none of the CASPR-2-Ab(+) or LGI/CASPR-2-Ab(-) patients (p = 0.003). While all subgroups improved, memory scores only normalized in six patients (33 %) and LGI1-Ab(+) patients were left with significantly poorer memory than the other two subgroups. Most VGKC-LE patients become seizure-free with pulsed monthly MP, but memory outcome is less favourable. Hippocampal atrophy and poor memory recovery is common in patients with LGI1-Abs and suggests permanent functional damage. More intense immunotherapies could improve outcomes in LGI1-Ab(+)-LE. PMID:24935858

  12. Tissue Localization of Australia Antigen Immune Complexes in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis and Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nowosławski, Adam; Krawczyński, Krzysztof; Brzosko, Witold J.; Madaliński, Kazimierz

    1972-01-01

    In a significant percentage of examined cases of fulminant hepatitis, subacute hepatitis, chronic aggressive hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and chronic persistent hepatitis, Australia (hepatitis-associated) antigen (Au HAA) was identified in the liver and in extrahepatic locations. The several immunofluorescent patterns of Au HAA localization in hepatocytes strongly suggested various stages of Au HAA accumulation and release. Deposits of a mixture of immunoglobulins G and M and occasionally β1C-globulin were found in the cytoplasm of Au HAA containing hepatocytes, on their plasma membranes, on or in the nuclei, in the cytoplasm of Kupffer cells and, rarely, in the sinusoids. The accompanying tissue changes were hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis. These intra- and extracellular complexes of Au HAA and immunoglobulins displayed strong affinity for guinea pig complement in the immunohistochemical complement fixation reaction. When tested by immunodiffusion in agar, IgG dissociated from these complexes by potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) treatment showed anti-Au HAA specificity. In fulminant hepatitis neither Au HAA nor immunoglobulins and complement were found in the liver. In chronic aggressive hepatitis and subacute hepatitis the amount of the Au HAA immune complexes identified in the liver was approximately inversely proportional to the extent and severity of the parenchymal lesions. In liver cirrhosis and chronic persistent hepatitis there was a positive correlation between the amount of the Au HAA immune complexes found in the liver and the degree of hepatocellular damage. The deposits of Au HAA, identified in extrahepatic locations including germinal centers of lymph nodes and spleen, kidney glomeruli and blood vessel walls, were as a rule accompanied by deposits of IgG, IgM, β1C-globulin and fibrin. All these deposits showed strong affinity for guinea pig complement in the immunohistochemical reaction of complement fixation. Germinal center activation, chronic

  13. BRAF and MEK inhibition variably affect GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Fraser, Cara K; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Brown, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has long been used in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, and an anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody treatment has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Targeted therapies such as small molecule kinase inhibitors targeting deregulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling have markedly improved melanoma control in up to 50% of metastatic disease patients and have likewise been recently approved. Combination therapies for melanoma have been proposed as a way to exploit the high-level but short-term responses associated with kinase inhibitor therapies and the low-level but longer-term responses associated with immunotherapy. Cancer immunotherapy now includes adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells and this mode of therapy is a candidate for combination with small molecule drugs. This paper describes CART cells that target GD2-expressing melanoma cells and investigates the effects of approved MAPK pathway-targeted therapies for melanoma [vemurafenib (Vem), dabrafenib (Dab), and trametinib (Tram)] on the viability, activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity of these CAR T cells, as well as on normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We report that, although all these drugs lead to inhibition of stimulated T cells at high concentrations in vitro, only Vem inhibited T cells at concentrations equivalent to reported plasma concentrations in treated patients. Although the combination of Dab and Tram also resulted in inhibition of T-cell effector functions at some therapeutic concentrations, Dab itself had little adverse effect on CAR T-cell function. These findings may have implications for novel therapeutic combinations of adoptive CAR T-cell immunotherapy and MAPK pathway inhibitors. PMID:25415284

  14. A prostate-specific antigen-dependent fusion polypeptide inhibits growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Ma, Yueyun; Wei, Hua; Li, Bin; Xiao, Fengjing; Yang, Jing; Yue, Qiaohong; Yang, Angang; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide APP8 is a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-activated prodrug that was designed to synergize the effects of the Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3) peptide, K237 and the DG2 peptide. The aim of this study is to evaluate its biodistribution and anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. In this study, APP8 and each component peptide were synthesized. The biodistribution was identified using con-focal microscopyin both PSA+ cell line and PSA- cell line in vitro. Then cell cycle, MTT and in-cell western blot were accessed to analyze the effect mechanisms. Finally, xenografts were used to confirm the anticancer effect in vivo. Here, it was shown that APP8 was hydrolyzed and BH3 was released into the nucleus, while K237 and DG2 were located predominantly in the cytoplasm, only in LNCaP cells (PSA+), but not PC3 cells (PSA-). K237 and DG2 could induce cell apoptosis through decreasing the phosphorylation of ERK-2 and Flk-1. APP8 also caused the death of LNCaP cells, and was predominantly dependent on BH3 in vitro. In addition, It was noted that as the tumor grew in vivo, APP8 could inhibit the tumor volume to 77.3%, mainly depending on K237 and DG2 via inhibition of the growth of vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggested that APP8 could promote prostate cancer cell death and stop prostate cancer growth via synergizing apoptosis induction of tumor cell and inhibition of the growth of vascular endothelial cells. It provides a novel candidate prodrug for specific therapy of prostate cancer. PMID:27293998

  15. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen and its precursor P20 inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Purvina, Maija; Hoste, Astrid; Rossignol, Jean-Michel; Lagaudriere-Gesbert, Cecile

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P20, precursor of the HBeAg, interacts with the cellular protein gC1qR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 bind to T cell surface and inhibit mitogen-induced T cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 inhibition of T cell proliferation is gC1qR and IL-1RAcP-independent. -- Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) Precore protein is processed through the secretory pathway directly as HBeAg or with the generation of an intermediate (P20). Precore gene has been shown to be implicated in viral persistence, but the functions of HBeAg and its precursors have not been fully elucidated. We show that the secreted proteins HBeAg and P20 interact with T cell surface and alter Kit-225 and primary T cells proliferation, a process which may facilitate the establishment of HBV persistence. Our data indicate that the N-terminal end of Precore is important for these inhibitory effects and exclude that they are dependent on the association of HBeAg and P20 with two characterized cell surface ligands, the Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein and gC1qR (present study).

  16. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells targeting HERV-K inhibit breast cancer and its metastasis through downregulation of Ras

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fuling; Krishnamurthy, Janani; Wei, Yongchang; Li, Ming; Hunt, Kelly; Johanning, Gary L; Cooper, Laurence JN; Wang-Johanning, Feng

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that human endogenous retrovirus-K (HERV-K) envelope (env) protein is a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) for cancer vaccines, and that its antibodies (mAbs) possess antitumor activity against cancer. In this study, a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for HERV-K env protein (K-CAR) was generated using anti-HERV-K mAb. K-CAR T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 9 breast cancer (BC) patients and 12 normal donors were able to inhibit growth of, and to exhibit significant cytotoxicity toward, BC cells but not MCF-10A normal breast cells. The antitumor effects in cancer cells were significantly reduced when control T cells were used, or the expression of HERV-K was knocked down by an shRNA. Secretion of multiple cytokines, including IFNγ, TNF-α, and IL-2, was significantly enhanced in culture media of BC cells treated with K-CARs. Significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor weight was observed in xenograft models bearing MDA-MB-231 or MDA-MB-435.eB1 BC cells. Importantly, the K-CAR prevented tumor metastasis to other organs. Furthermore, downregulation of HERV-K expression in tumors of mice treated with K-CAR correlated with upregulation of p53 and downregulation of MDM2 and p-ERK. Importantly, the expression of HERV-K env protein in metastatic tumor tissues treated with K-CAR T cells correlated with the expression of Ras. Our results indicate that HERV-K env protein is an oncoprotein and may play an important role in tumorigenesis related to p53 and Ras signaling pathways. Anti-HERV-K treatment, including K-CAR treatment, shows potential for immunotherapy of BC. PMID:26451325

  17. Inhibition of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 7 by simian virus 40 large T antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Thomas; Xu, Xinsong; Kronast, Mira; Muehlich, Susanne; Meyer, Kathleen; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Hurwitz, Jerard; Pan, Zhen-Qiang; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen (LT) triggers oncogenic transformation by inhibition of key tumor suppressor proteins, including p53 and members of the retinoblastoma family. In addition, SV40 transformation requires binding of LT to Cullin 7 (CUL7), a core component of Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 7 (CRL7). However, the pathomechanistic effects of LT–CUL7 interaction are mostly unknown. Here we report both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that SV40 LT suppresses the ubiquitin ligase function of CRL7. We show that SV40 LT, but not a CUL7 binding-deficient mutant (LTΔ69–83), impaired 26S proteasome-dependent proteolysis of the CRL7 target protein insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), a component of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling pathway. SV40 LT expression resulted in the accumulation and prolonged half-life of IRS1. In vitro, purified SV40 LT reduced CRL7-dependent IRS1 ubiquitination in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of SV40 LT, or depletion of CUL7 by RNA interference, resulted in the enhanced activation of IRS1 downstream signaling pathways phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT and Erk mitogen-activated pathway kinase, as well as up-regulation of the downstream target gene c-fos. Finally, SV40 LT-positive carcinoma of carcinoembryonic antigen 424/SV40 LT transgenic mice displayed elevated IRS1 protein levels and activation of downstream signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that SV40 LT protects IRS1 from CRL7-mediated degradation, thereby sustaining high levels of promitogenic IRS1 downstream signaling pathways. PMID:24550499

  18. Immunization with Immune Complexes Modulates the Fine Specificity of Antibody Responses to a Flavivirus Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Tsouchnikas, Georgios; Zlatkovic, Juergen; Jarmer, Johanna; Strauß, Judith; Vratskikh, Oksana; Kundi, Michael; Stiasny, Karin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The antibody response to proteins may be modulated by the presence of preexisting antigen-specific antibodies and the formation of immune complexes (ICs). Effects such as a general increase or decrease of the response as well as epitope-specific phenomena have been described. In this study, we investigated influences of IC immunization on the fine specificity of antibody responses in a structurally well-defined system, using the envelope (E) protein of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus as an immunogen. TBE virus occurs in Europe and Asia and—together with the yellow fever, dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses—represents one of the major human-pathogenic flaviviruses. Mice were immunized with a dimeric soluble form of E (sE) alone or in complex with monoclonal antibodies specific for each of the three domains of E, and the antibody response induced by these ICs was compared to that seen after immunization with sE alone. Immunoassays using recombinant domains and domain combinations of TBE virus sE as well as the distantly related West Nile virus sE allowed the dissection and quantification of antibody subsets present in postimmunization sera, thus generating fine-specificity patterns of the polyclonal responses. There were substantially different responses with two of the ICs, and the differences could be mechanistically related to (i) epitope shielding and (ii) antibody-mediated structural changes leading to dissociation of the sE dimer. The phenomena described may also be relevant for polyclonal responses upon secondary infections and/or booster immunizations and may affect antibody responses in an individual-specific way. IMPORTANCE Infections with flaviviruses such as yellow fever, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) viruses pose substantial public health problems in different parts of the world. Antibodies to viral envelope protein E induced by natural infection or vaccination were shown to

  19. Suppressive effects of Schizandra chinensis Baillon water extract on allergy-related cytokine generation and degranulation in IgE-antigen complex-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mi Ja; Kim, Jeong-Mi; Lee, Sangchul; Kim, Taewoo; Kim, Daejung; Baek, Jongmi; Kim, Taehyuk; Lee, Jaesung; Kim, Kyoungkon; Yoon, Jin A

    2012-01-01

    Schizandra chinensis Baillon is a traditional folk medicine plant that is used to treat and prevent several inflammatory diseases and cancer in Korea, but the underlying mechanisms involved in its anti-allergic activity are not fully understood. This study was designed to investigate mechanisms of anti-allergic activity of a Schizandra chinensis Baillon water extract (SCWE) in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-antigen complex-stimulated RBL2H3 cells and to assess whether gastric and intestinal digestion affects the anti-allergic properties of SCWE. Oxidative stress is an important consequence of the allergic inflammatory response. The antioxidant activities of SCWE increased in a concentration-dependent manner. RBL-2H3 cells were sensitized with monoclonal anti-dinitrophenol (DNP) specific IgE, treated with SCWE, and challenged with the antigen DNP-human serum albumin. SCWE inhibited β-hexosaminidase release and expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) mRNA and protein in IgE-antigen complex-stimulated RBL2H3 cells. We found that digested SCWE fully maintained its antioxidant activity and anti-allergic activity against the IgE-antigen complex-induced activation of RBL-2H3 cells. SCWE may be useful for preventing allergic diseases, such as asthma. Thus, SCWE could be used as a natural functional ingredient for allergic diseases in the food and/or pharmaceutical industries. PMID:22586497

  20. Characterization of nuclear targeting signal of hepatitis delta antigen: nuclear transport as a protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Y P; Yeh, C T; Ou, J H; Lai, M M

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) is the only protein encoded by hepatitis delta virus (HDV). HDAg has been demonstrated in the nuclei of HDV-infected hepatocytes, and its nuclear transport may be important for the replication of HDV RNA. In this report, we investigated the mechanism of nuclear transport of HDAg. By expressing fusion proteins consisting of the different portions of HDAg and alpha-globin, we have identified a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within the N-terminal one-third of HDAg. It consists of two stretches of basic amino acid domains separated by a short run of nonbasic amino acids. Both of the basic domains are necessary for the efficient nuclear transport of HDAg. The nonbasic spacer amino acids could be removed without affecting the nuclear targeting of HDAg significantly. Thus, the HDAg NLS belongs to a newly identified class of NLS which consists of two discontiguous stretches of basic amino acids. This NLS is separated from a stretch of steroid receptor NLS-like sequence, which is also present but not functioning as an NLS, in HDAg. Furthermore, we have shown that subfragments of HDAg which do not contain the NLS can be passively transported into the nucleus by a trans-acting full-length HDAg, provided that these subfragments contain the region with a leucine zipper sequence. Thus, our results indicate that HDAg forms aggregates in the cytoplasm and that the HDAg oligomerization is probably mediated by the leucine zipper sequence. Therefore, HDAg is likely transported into the nucleus as a protein complex. Images PMID:1731113

  1. A miniaturized assay for influenza neuraminidase‐inhibiting antibodies utilizing reverse genetics‐derived antigens

    PubMed Central

    Sandbulte, Matthew R.; Gao, Jin; Straight, Timothy M.; Eichelberger, Maryna C.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Antibodies to neuraminidase (NA) contribute to protection during influenza virus infection, but NA inhibition (NI) titers are not routinely analyzed in vaccine trials. One reason is the cumbersome nature of the conventional thiobarbituric acid (TBA) NI assay, which uses chemical methods to quantify free sialic acid following incubation of NA with substrate in the presence of serum. In addition, the assay is complicated by the need to use virus of a hemagglutinin (HA) subtype novel to the host to detect NA‐specific antibodies only. Objectives  Our primary objectives were to miniaturize the colorimetric NI assay to a format suitable for quantitative analysis of large numbers of samples, and validate the specificity and sensitivity of the miniaturized format with ferret and human sera. An additional aim was to use reverse genetics to construct HA‐mismatched viral reagents bearing NA of recent influenza A vaccine strains and H6 HA. Results  Analysis of ferret antisera by the miniaturized assay demonstrated sensitivity and specificity comparable with the conventional assay. Similar increases in the NI titers in sera from vaccinated human volunteers were measured in miniaturized and conventional assays. Inactivated and live‐attenuated vaccines increased NI titers against a given subtype at approximately the same rate. Conclusions  The reagents and miniaturized format of the TBA method described here provide a platform for practical serological monitoring of functional antibodies against NA. PMID:21462400

  2. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket.

    PubMed

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria; Krämer, Heiko; Rückerl, Dominik; Söderhäll, J Arvid; Gupta, Shashank; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Kühne, Ronald; Freund, Christian; Jung, Günther; Falk, Kirsten; Rötzschke, Olaf

    2006-12-15

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are a key element of the cellular immune response. Encoded by the MHC they are a family of highly polymorphic peptide receptors presenting peptide antigens for the surveillance by T cells. We have shown that certain organic compounds can amplify immune responses by catalyzing the peptide loading of human class II MHC molecules HLA-DR. Here we show now that they achieve this by interacting with a defined binding site of the HLA-DR peptide receptor. Screening of a compound library revealed a set of adamantane derivatives that strongly accelerated the peptide loading rate. The effect was evident only for an allelic subset and strictly correlated with the presence of glycine at the dimorphic position beta86 of the HLA-DR molecule. The residue forms the floor of the conserved pocket P1, located in the peptide binding site of MHC molecule. Apparently, transient occupation of this pocket by the organic compound stabilizes the peptide-receptive conformation permitting rapid antigen loading. This interaction appeared restricted to the larger Gly(beta86) pocket and allowed striking enhancements of T cell responses for antigens presented by these "adamantyl-susceptible" MHC molecules. As catalysts of antigen loading, compounds targeting P1 may be useful molecular tools to amplify the immune response. The observation, however, that the ligand repertoire can be affected through polymorphic sites form the outside may also imply that environmental factors could induce allergic or autoimmune reactions in an allele-selective manner. PMID:17005558

  3. Sequestration of inhaled particulate antigens by lung phagocytes. A mechanism for the effective inhibition of pulmonary cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, J. A.; Xia, W.; Pinto, C. E.; Zhao, L.; Liu, H. W.; Kradin, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have emerged as the dominant antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of the lung, playing a vital role in the induction of cell-mediated immunity to inhaled antigens. We have previously demonstrated that an airway challenge with the soluble antigen hen egg lysozyme yields rapid acquisition of specific antigen-presenting cell activity by purified pulmonary DCs and a cell-mediated immune response in the lung upon secondary challenge. To examine how a particulate antigen leads to a cell-mediated response in vivo, graded concentrations of heat-killed Listeria (HKL) were injected intratracheally into Lewis rats. The bacteria were rapidly ingested by lung macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The ability of purified pulmonary DCs pulsed in vivo by an airway challenge with HKL to subsequently stimulate HKL-specific responses ex vivo showed a threshold response, requiring a dose in excess of 10(9) organisms/rat. By contrast, all dosages of HKL yielded specific sensitization of lymphocytes in the draining bilar nodes. Pulmonary DCs purified from rats after a secondary in vivo airway challenge with HKL at day 14 were ineffective antigen-presenting cells except at high dosages of antigen. The generation of cell-mediated pulmonary inflammation paralleled the antigen-presenting cell activity of pulmonary DCs and was observed only at high antigen dosages. Hen egg lysozyme immobilized onto polystyrene beads and injected intratracheally yielded comparable results to those observed with HKL. We suggest that a pulmonary cellular immune response is generated to an inhaled particulate antigen when the protective phagocytic capacities of the lung are exceeded and antigen is able to interact directly with interstitial DCs. The diversion of particulate antigens by pulmonary phagocytes may help to limit undesirable pulmonary inflammation while allowing the generation of antigen-specific immune lymphocytes in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 9

  4. [Use of cell-surface antigens of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron in the passive hemagglutination test and in the inhibition of passive hemagglutination].

    PubMed

    Rokosz, A; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, F

    1995-01-01

    The antigens were prepared from three B. thetaiotaomicron strains of different origin (NCTC 10582--reference strain, 312/85--isolated from a pancreas fistula drain of a patient, and 9/18--derived from normal human intestinal microflora). Lipopolysaccharides were extracted by the hot phenol-water method and purified by nuclease tretment. Degradation of lipopolysaccharides was achieved by mild acid hydrolysis obtaining polysaccharide (PS) and lipid (LA) fractions. Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) was extracted from the clinical strain 312/85 producing thick capsules. Antibacterial sera were prepared by immunization of rabbits with formolized suspensions of investigated strains. HA and IHA were performed with all antigens and immune sera. Examined cell-surface antigens (LPSs and CPS) were capable of coating formolized sheep erythrocytes. The titres obtained in the passive hemagglutination test in homologous reactions were 160-320. Polysaccharide fractions (PS) prepared by means of mild acid hydrolysis of LPSs were unable to coat formolized sheep red blood cells. The activity of sensitization of sheep erythrocytes was revealed by lipid fractions of LPSs. All preparations were active as inhibitors in the inhibition of passive hemagglutination. The strongest inhibitors in homologous systems were polysaccharide fractions of LPSs and capsular polysaccharide (the concentration of inhuibitor 8-15 micrograms/ml). The results of performed serological tests indicated the antigenic similarity of standard B. thetaiotaomicron strain NCTC 10582 and clinical strain 312/85. The strain 9/18 from normal human intestinal microflora showed distinct antigenicity. High-molecular cell-surface B. thetaiotaomicron antigens containing carbohydrates (LPS and CPS) can be applied in the passive hemagglutination test and in the inhibition of passive hemagglutination. PMID:8833931

  5. Synthesis of a peptide-universal nucleotide antigen: towards next-generation antibodies to detect topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complexes.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Angela L; Peterson, Kevin L; Beito, Thomas G; Flatten, Karen S; Kaufmann, Scott H; Harki, Daniel A

    2016-04-26

    The topoisomerase (topo) I-DNA covalent complex represents an attractive target for developing diagnostic antibodies to measure responsiveness to drugs. We report a new antigen, peptide , and four murine monoclonal antibodies raised against that exhibit excellent specificity for recognition of in comparison to structurally similar peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Although topo I-DNA complex detection was not achieved in cellular samples by these new antibodies, a new strategy for antigen design is reported. PMID:27113574

  6. The pathogenesis of arthritis associated with acute hepatitis-B surface antigen-positive hepatitis. Complement activation and characterization of circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wands, J R; Mann, E; Alpert, E; Isselbacher, K J

    1975-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes were identified in cryoproteins isolated from serial samples of serum from six patients with acute viral hepatitis with and without arthritic symptoms. Cryoprecipitates were analyzed for the presence of hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis-B surface antibody (anti-HBs) by hemagglutination inhibition and hemagglutination. Complement components were detected by counter electrophoresis, and immunoglobulins were detected by gel diffusion. HBsAg, IgG, and IgM were identified in cryoprecipitates from all hepatitis patients, but were higher in concentration in patients with arthritis. Only cryoprecipitates from hepatitis patients with arthritis contained IgA and complement components C3, C4, and C5 as well as IgG and IgM, which disappear with resolution of the arthritis. The subtypes of IgG in these cryoprecipitates were predominantly the complement-fixing IgG1 and IgG3, HBsAg and anti-HBs were concentrated several-fold in the cryoprecipitates when compared to the serum concentration. Sequential studies in two patients demonstrated that the initial appearance of anti-HBs in the cryoprotein complex was associated with the detection in the complex of IgM suggesting a primary immune response to HBsAg. The C3 activator fragment (C3A) of the properdin complex was found in fresh serum obtained from three hepatitis patients with arthritis and not in uncomplicated hepatitis. The cryoprecipitable immune complexes from patients with arthritis converted C3PA in fresh normal sera to C3A in vitro whereas cryoprotein isolated from patients with uncomplicated hepatitis had no such effect. Thus, the transient appearance of circulating complement-fixing immune complexes in patients with the arthritis of acute hepatitis is associated with activation of both classical and alternate complement pathways and suggests that they play an important role in the pathogenesis of these serum sickness-like extrahepatic symptoms. Images PMID:1123429

  7. Inhibition of the HCV core protein on the immune response to HBV surface antigen and on HBV gene expression and replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenbo; Wu, Chunchen; Deng, Wanyu; Pei, Rongjun; Wang, Yun; Cao, Liang; Qin, Bo; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen

    2012-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is a multifunctional protein that can interfere with the induction of an immune response. It has been reported that the HCV core protein inhibits HBV replication in vitro. In this study, we test the effect of the HCV core gene on the priming of the immune response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and on the replication of HBV in vivo. Our results showed that the full-length HCV core gene inhibits the induction of an immune response to the heterogeneous antigen, HBsAg, at the site of inoculation when HCV core (pC191) and HBsAg (pHBsAg) expression plasmids are co-administered as DNA vaccines into BALB/c mice. The observed interference effect of the HCV core occurs in the priming stage and is limited to the DNA form of the HBsAg antigen, but not to the protein form. The HCV core reduces the protective effect of the HBsAg when the HBsAg and the HCV core are co-administered as vaccines in an HBV hydrodynamic mouse model because the HCV core induces immune tolerance to the heterogeneous HBsAg DNA antigen. These results suggest that HCV core may play an important role in viral persistence by the attenuation of host immune responses to different antigens. We further tested whether the HCV core interfered with the priming of the immune response in hepatocytes via the hydrodynamic co-injection of an HBV replication-competent plasmid and an HCV core plasmid. The HCV core inhibited HBV replication and antigen expression in both BALB/c (H-2d) and C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice, the mouse models of acute and chronic hepatitis B virus infections. Thus, the HCV core inhibits the induction of a specific immune response to an HBsAg DNA vaccine. However, HCV C also interferes with HBV gene expression and replication in vivo, as observed in patients with coinfection. PMID:23024803

  8. Resveratrol Suppresses Cytokine Production Linked to FcεRI-MAPK Activation in IgE-Antigen Complex-Exposed Basophilic Mast Cells and Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Seon-Young; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    A complicated interplay between resident mast cells and other recruited inflammatory cells contributes to the development and progression of allergic inflammation entailing the promotion of T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine responses. The current study examined whether resveratrol suppressed the production of inflammatory Th2 cytokines in cultured rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells. Cells pre-treated with resveratrol nontoxic at 1–25 μM were sensitized with anti-dinitrophenyl (anti-DNP), and subsequently stimulated by dinitrophenyl-human serum albumin (DNP–HSA) antigen. Resveratrol dose-dependently diminished the secretion of interleukin (IL)-3, IL-4, IL-13 as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the antigen stimulation from sensitized cells. It was found that resveratrol mitigated the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, and JNK elevated in mast cells exposed to Fc epsilon receptor I (FcεRI)-mediated immunoglobulin E (IgE)-antigen complex. The FcεRI aggregation was highly enhanced on the surface of mast cells following the HSA stimulation, which was retarded by treatment with 1–25 μM resveratrol. The IgE-receptor engagement rapidly induced tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src-related focal adhesion protein paxillin involved in the cytoskeleton rearrangement. The FcεRI-mediated rapid activation of c-Src and paxillin was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the paxillin activation entailed p38 MAPK and ERK-responsive signaling, but the JNK activation was less involved. Consistently, oral administration of resveratrol reduced the tissue level of phosphorylated paxillin in the dorsal skin of DNP–HSA-challenged mice. The other tyrosine kinase Tyk2-STAT1 signaling was activated in the dorsal epidermis of antigen-exposed mice, which was associated with allergic inflammation. These results showed that resveratrol inhibited Th2 cytokines- and paxillin-linked allergic responses dependent upon MAPK signaling. Therefore, resveratrol may possess the

  9. Hsp90-peptide complexes stimulate antigen presentation through the class II pathway after binding scavenger receptor SREC-I

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin; Calderwood, Stuart K

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones such as heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) have been shown to form complexes with tumor antigens and can be used to prepare anticancer vaccines largely due to this property. Earlier studies had suggested that, mice immunized with a molecular chaperone based vaccine derived from tumors became immune to further vaccination and that both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were activated by the chaperone vaccine in a manner dependent on scavenger receptor SREC-I. Here we have investigated mechanisms whereby SREC-I might facilitate uptake of Hsp90 conjugated peptides by APC into the MHC class II pathway for presentation to CD4+ T cells. Our studies showed that antigenic peptides associated with Hsp90 were taken up into the Class II pathway by a mechanism dependent on SREC-I binding and internalization and presented to CD4+ T cells. In addition our studies showed that SREC-I could associate with MHC class II molecules on the cell surface and in intracellular endosomes, suggesting a mechanism involving facilitated uptake of peptides into the MHC class II pathway. These studies in addition to our earlier findings showed SREC-I to play a primary role in chaperone-associated antigen uptake both through cross priming of MHC class I molecules and entry into the class II pathway. PMID:25155057

  10. Stoichiometric complex formation by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and its interacting protein: purification and crystallization of the DNA polymerase and PCNA monomer mutant complex from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hirokazu; Matsumiya, Shigeki; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2006-03-01

    A stable stoichiometric complex of archaeal DNA polymerase with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was formed using a PCNA monomer mutant and the complex was successfully crystallized. Replicative DNA polymerase interacts with processivity factors, the β-subunit of DNA polymerase III or proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), in order to function with a long template DNA. The archaeal replicative DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus furiosus interacts with PCNA via its PCNA-interacting protein (PIP) motif at the C-terminus. The PCNA homotrimeric ring contains one PIP interacting site on each monomer and since the ring can accommodate up to three molecules simultaneously, formation of a stable stoichiometric complex of PCNA with its interacting protein has been difficult to control in vitro. A stable complex of the DNA polymerase with PCNA, using a PCNA monomer mutant, has been purified and crystallized. The best ordered crystal diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 225.3, b = 123.3, c = 91.3 Å.

  11. Enriched HLA-DQ3 phenotype and decreased class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bonagura, V R; Siegal, F P; Abramson, A L; Santiago-Schwarz, F; O'Reilly, M E; Shah, K; Drake, D; Steinberg, B M

    1994-01-01

    Respiratory papillomas, caused by human papillomaviruses, are benign tumors that recur following removal. We evaluated immune function and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) phenotype and expression in these patients. MHC-independent immune function appeared normal. The frequency of peripheral blood MHC class II phenotypes was highly enriched for DQ3 and DR11, one split of DR5. Class I MHC antigen expression on papilloma tissue was markedly reduced. Together, these phenomena may facilitate papillomavirus evasion of the cellular immune response. Images PMID:7496977

  12. Preparation and diagnostic utility of a hemagglutination inhibition test antigen derived from the baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein gene of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kye, Soo-Jeong; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Park, Mi-Ja; Kim, Saeromi; Seul, Hee-Jung; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (rHN) protein from Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with hemagglutination (HA) activity was expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda cells using a baculovirus expression system. The rHN protein extracted from infected cells was used as an antigen in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection and titration of NDV-specific antibodies present in chicken sera. The rHN antigen produced high HA titers of 2(13) per 25 μL, which were similar to those of the NDV antigen produced using chicken eggs, and it remained stable without significant loss of the HA activity for at least 12 weeks at 4°C. The rHN-based HI assay specifically detected NDV antibodies, but not the sera of other avian pathogens, with a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 98.0%, respectively, in known positive and negative chicken sera (n = 430). Compared with an NDV-based HI assay, the rHN-based HI assay had a relative sensitivity and specificity of 96.1% and 95.5%, respectively, when applied to field chicken sera. The HI titers of the rHN-based HI assay were highly correlated with those in an NDV-based HI assay (r = 0.927). Overall, these results indicate that rHN protein provides a useful alternative to NDV antigen in HI assays. PMID:23820164

  13. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Berezin, V E; Bogoyavlenskyi, A P; Khudiakova, S S; Alexuk, P G; Omirtaeva, E S; Zaitceva, I A; Tustikbaeva, G B; Barfield, R C; Fetterer, R H

    2010-01-20

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen concentration of ISCOMs, containing Eimeria tenella antigens and saponins from native plants, were evaluated in their ability to stimulate humoral immunity and to protect chickens against a challenge infection with E. tenella. Broiler chickens were immunized with ISCOM preparations containing E. tenella antigens and the purified saponins Gg6, Ah6 and Gp7 isolated from Glycyrrhiza glabra, Aesculus hippocastanum and Gipsophila paniculata, respectively. The effects of the route of administration, dose of antigen and type of saponin used for construction of ISCOMs were evaluated for ability to stimulate serum IgG and IgM and to protect chickens against a homologous challenge. A single intranasal immunization was the most effective route for administering ISCOMs although the in ovo route was also quite effective. Dose titration experiments demonstrated efficacy after single immunization with various ISCOM doses but maximum effects were observed when ISCOMs contain 5-10mug antigen. Immunization of birds by any of the three routes with E. tenella antigens alone or antigens mixed with alum hydroxide adjuvant resulted in lower serum antibody and reduced protection to challenge relative to immunization with ISCOMs. Overall the results of this study confirm that significant immunostimulation and protection to challenge are achieved by immunization of chickens with ISCOMs containing purified saponins and native E. tenella antigens and suggest that ISCOMs may be successfully used to develop a safe and effective vaccine for prevention of avian coccidiosis. PMID:19879050

  14. Aptamer-targeted Antigen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wengerter, Brian C; Katakowski, Joseph A; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Park, Chae Gyu; Almo, Steven C; Palliser, Deborah; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Effective therapeutic vaccines often require activation of T cell-mediated immunity. Robust T cell activation, including CD8 T cell responses, can be achieved using antibodies or antibody fragments to direct antigens of interest to professional antigen presenting cells. This approach represents an important advance in enhancing vaccine efficacy. Nucleic acid aptamers present a promising alternative to protein-based targeting approaches. We have selected aptamers that specifically bind the murine receptor, DEC205, a C-type lectin expressed predominantly on the surface of CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs) that has been shown to be efficient at facilitating antigen crosspresentation and subsequent CD8+ T cell activation. Using a minimized aptamer conjugated to the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), DEC205-targeted antigen crosspresentation was verified in vitro and in vivo by proliferation and cytokine production by primary murine CD8+ T cells expressing a T cell receptor specific for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-restricted OVA257–264 peptide SIINFEKL. Compared with a nonspecific ribonucleic acid (RNA) of similar length, DEC205 aptamer-OVA-mediated antigen delivery stimulated strong proliferation and production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2. The immune responses elicited by aptamer-OVA conjugates were sufficient to inhibit the growth of established OVA-expressing B16 tumor cells. Our results demonstrate a new application of aptamer technology for the development of effective T cell-mediated vaccines. PMID:24682172

  15. Antigen nature and complexity influence human antibody light chain usage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth; Shah, Hemangi; Muther, Jennifer J; Duke, Angie L; Haley, Kathleen; James, Judith A

    2016-05-27

    Human antibodies consist of a heavy chain and one of two possible light chains, kappa (κ) or lambda (λ). Here we tested how these two possible light chains influence the overall antibody response to polysaccharide and protein antigens by measuring light chain usage in human monoclonal antibodies from antibody secreting cells obtained following vaccination with Pneumovax23. Remarkably, we found that individuals displayed restricted light chain usage to certain serotypes and that lambda antibodies have different specificities and modes of cross-reactivity than kappa antibodies. Thus, at both the monoclonal (7 kappa, no lambda) and serum levels (145μg/mL kappa, 2.82μg/mL lambda), antibodies to cell wall polysaccharide were nearly always kappa. The pneumococcal reference serum 007sp was analyzed for light chain usage to 12 pneumococcal serotypes for which it is well characterized. Similar to results at the monoclonal level, certain serotypes tended to favor one of the light chains (14 and 19A, lambda; 6A and 23F, kappa). We also explored differences in light chain usage at the serum level to a variety of antigens. We examined serum antibodies to diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 and Epstein-Barr virus protein EBNA-1. These responses tended to be kappa dominant (average kappa-to-lambda ratios of 4.52 and 9.72 respectively). Responses to the influenza vaccine were more balanced with kappa-to-lambda ratio averages having slight strain variations: seasonal H1N1, 1.1; H3N2, 0.96; B, 0.91. We conclude that antigens with limited epitopes tend to produce antibodies with restricted light chain usage and that in most individuals, antibodies with lambda light chains have specificities different and complementary to kappa-containing antibodies. PMID:27113164

  16. Aguacate virus, a new antigenic complex of the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae)

    PubMed Central

    Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Savji, Nazir; Sze, Wilson; Wick, Ivan; Guzman, Hilda; Hutchison, Stephen; Tesh, Robert; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Genomic and antigenic characterization of Aguacate virus, a tentative species of the genus Phlebovirus, and three other unclassified viruses, Armero virus, Durania virus and Ixcanal virus, demonstrate a close relationship to one another. They are distinct from the other nine recognized species within the genus Phlebovirus. We propose to designate them as a new (tenth) serogroup or species (Aguacate virus) within the genus. The four viruses were all isolated from phlebotomine sandflies (Lutzomyia sp.) collected in Central and South America. Aguacate virus appears to be a natural reassortant and serves as one more example of the high frequency of reassortment in this genus. PMID:21325481

  17. Aguacate virus, a new antigenic complex of the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae).

    PubMed

    Palacios, Gustavo; da Rosa, Amelia Travassos; Savji, Nazir; Sze, Wilson; Wick, Ivan; Guzman, Hilda; Hutchison, Stephen; Tesh, Robert; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-06-01

    Genomic and antigenic characterization of Aguacate virus, a tentative species of the genus Phlebovirus, and three other unclassified viruses, Armero virus, Durania virus and Ixcanal virus, demonstrate a close relationship to one another. They are distinct from the other nine recognized species within the genus Phlebovirus. We propose to designate them as a new (tenth) serogroup or species (Aguacate virus) within the genus. The four viruses were all isolated from phlebotomine sandflies (Lutzomyia sp.) collected in Central and South America. Aguacate virus appears to be a natural reassortant and serves as one more example of the high frequency of reassortment in this genus. PMID:21325481

  18. Immune-stimulating complexes as adjuvants for inducing local and systemic immunity after oral immunization with protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, A M; Maloy, K J; Donachie, A M

    1993-01-01

    Orally active synthetic vaccines containing purified antigens would have many benefits for immunizing against systemic and mucosal diseases. However, several factors have limited the development of such vaccines, including the poor immunogenicity of purified proteins and their usual ability to induce tolerance when given orally. Here, we show that incorporation of ovalbumin (OVA) into immune-stimulating complexes (ISCOMS) containing saponin prevents the induction of oral tolerance in mice. In parallel, the spleen and mesenteric lymph node of mice fed OVA ISCOMS are primed for class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic T-cell activity which recognizes physiologically processed epitopes on OVA. Oral immunization with OVA ISCOMS also stimulates high secretory IgA antibody responses in the intestine itself, as well as serum IgG antibodies. None of these active immune responses are detectable in mice fed OVA alone. Despite the potent priming of mucosal priming by OVA ISCOMS, re-exposure to antigen does not induce the intestinal immunopathology found in other systems after the breakdown of oral tolerance. Thus, ISCOMS have several unique properties as vectors for oral immunization and could provide a basis for future mucosal vaccines. PMID:7508416

  19. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  20. Identification of interface residues in protease-inhibitor and antigen-antibody complexes: a support vector machine approach

    PubMed Central

    Honavar, Vasant; Dobbs, Drena

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a machine learning approach for sequence-based prediction of protein-protein interaction sites. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was trained to predict whether or not a surface residue is an interface residue (i.e., is located in the protein-protein interaction surface), based on the identity of the target residue and its ten sequence neighbors. Separate classifiers were trained on proteins from two categories of complexes, antibody-antigen and protease-inhibitor. The effectiveness of each classifier was evaluated using leave-one-out (jack-knife) cross-validation. Interface and non-interface residues were classified with relatively high sensitivity (82.3% and 78.5%) and specificity (81.0% and 77.6%) for proteins in the antigen-antibody and protease-inhibitor complexes, respectively. The correlation between predicted and actual labels was 0.430 and 0.462, indicating that the method performs substantially better than chance (zero correlation). Combined with recently developed methods for identification of surface residues from sequence information, this offers a promising approach to predict residues involved in protein-protein interactions from sequence information alone. PMID:20526429

  1. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  2. Identification of an elaborate complex mediating postsynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Uezu, Akiyoshi; Kanak, Daniel J; Bradshaw, Tyler W A; Soderblom, Erik J; Catavero, Christina M; Burette, Alain C; Weinberg, Richard J; Soderling, Scott H

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitory synapses dampen neuronal activity through postsynaptic hyperpolarization. The composition of the inhibitory postsynapse and the mechanistic basis of its regulation, however, remain poorly understood. We used an in vivo chemico-genetic proximity-labeling approach to discover inhibitory postsynaptic proteins. Quantitative mass spectrometry not only recapitulated known inhibitory postsynaptic proteins but also revealed a large network of new proteins, many of which are either implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders or are of unknown function. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) depletion of one of these previously uncharacterized proteins, InSyn1, led to decreased postsynaptic inhibitory sites, reduced the frequency of miniature inhibitory currents, and increased excitability in the hippocampus. Our findings uncover a rich and functionally diverse assemblage of previously unknown proteins that regulate postsynaptic inhibition and might contribute to developmental brain disorders. PMID:27609886

  3. [Complexation between triterpene glycosides of holothurians and cholesterol is the basis of lipid-saponin carriers of subunit protein antigens].

    PubMed

    Mazeĭka, A N; Popov, A M; Kalinin, V I; Avilov, S A; Sil'chenko, A S; Kostetskiĭ, E Ia

    2008-01-01

    The ability of some triterpene glycosides of holothurians: cucumarioside A2-2 from Cucumaria japonica, cucumarioside G1 from Cucumaria fraudatrix, frondoside A from Cucumaria frondosa, and holotoxin A1 from A postichopus japonicus to form lipid-saponin supramolecular complexes was studied. The formation of supramolecular cholesterol-glycosides complexes between cholesterol and these glycosides in water medium was observed by transmission electron microscopy. These complexes were considered as nanoparticles with different structure. Complexes formed by cholesterol with cucumarioside A2-2, holotoxin A1, and frondoside A are tubular nanoparticles. In contrast, complexes between cholesterol and cucumarioside G1 have different structured. The structure of nanoparticles formed in the presence of cucumarioside A2-2, holotoxin A1, and cucumarioside G1 was dependent on the ratio of cholesterol in the lipid-saponin system. On the other hand, frondoside A did not shown this tendency. In lipid-saponin systems with a similar molar ratio cholesterol-glycoside, the ordering of the supramolecular structure decreases in the following order: cucumarioside A2-2, holotoxin A1, frondoside A. A comparative analysis of the morphology of the supramolecular complexes and the peculiarities of the molecular structure of triterpene glycosides studied, demonstrated that the structure of supramolecular complexes formed depends on the branching and length of the glycoside carbohydrate chain. On the other hand, the formation of monomeric cholesterol-glycosides complexes depends on the peculiarities of the structure of aglycone. Thus, the possibility of the formation of a new type of antigen carries on the basis of marine triterpene glycosides was proved. PMID:18954012

  4. TAR RNA decoys inhibit tat-activated HIV-1 transcription after preinitiation complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, P R; Liu, Y; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    The ability of the HIV-1 Tat protein to trans -activate HIV-1 transcription in vitro is specifically inhibited by a circular TAR RNA decoy. This inhibition is not overcome by adding an excess of Tat to the reaction but is partially overcome by adding Tat in combination with nuclear extract, suggesting that TAR RNA might function by interacting with a complex containing Tat and cellular factor(s). A cell-free transcription system involving immobilized DNA templates was used to further define the factor(s) that interact with TAR RNA. Preinitiation complexes formed in the presence or absence of Tat were purified on immobilized templates containing the HIV-1 promoter. After washing, nucleotides and radiolabelled UTP were added and transcription was measured. The presence of Tat during preinitiation complex formation resulted in an increase in the level of full-length HIV-1 transcripts. This Tat-activated increase in HIV-1 transcription was not inhibited by circular TAR decoys added during preinitiation complex formation but was inhibited by circular TAR decoys subsequently added during the transcription reaction. These results suggest that TAR decoys inhibit Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription after preinitiation complex formation, perhaps by interacting with components of transcription complexes. PMID:9358155

  5. Inhibition of antigen receptor-dependent Ca(2+) signals and NF-AT activation by P2X7 receptors in human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pippel, Anja; Beßler, Björn; Klapperstück, Manuela; Markwardt, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    One of the first intracellular signals after antigen binding by the antigen receptor of B lymphocytes is the increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which is followed by several intracellular signaling events like the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-AT controlling the fate of B lymphocytes after their activation. Extracellular ATP, which is released from cells under several pathological conditions, is considered a danger-associated signal serving as an immunomodulator. We investigated the interaction of antigen receptor (BCR) and P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) activation on [Ca(2+)]i signaling and on nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-AT in human B lymphocytes. Although the P2X7R is an ATP-gated Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel, P2X7R activation inhibits the BCR-mediated [Ca(2+)]i responses. This effect is mimicked by cell membrane depolarization induced by an increase in the extracellular K(+) concentration or by application of the Na(+) ionophore gramicidin, but is abolished by stabilization of the membrane potential using the K(+) ionophore valinomycin, by extracellular Mg(2+), which is known to inhibit P2X7R-dependent effects, or by replacing Na(+) by the less P2X7R-permeable Tris(+) ion. Furthermore, P2X7R activation by ATP inhibits the BCR-dependent translocation of the transcription factor NF-ATc1 to the nucleus. We therefore conclude that extracellular ATP via the P2X7R mediates inhibitory effects on B cell activation. This may be of relevance for understanding of the activation of the BCR under pathological conditions and for the development of therapeutic strategies targeting human B lymphocytes or P2X7 receptors. PMID:25678443

  6. TCRβ Feedback Signals Inhibit the Coupling of Recombinationally Accessible Vβ14 Segments with DJβ Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yang-Iott, Katherine S.; Carpenter, Andrea C.; Rowh, Marta A. W.; Steinel, Natalie; Brady, Brenna L.; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Bassing, Craig H.

    2010-01-01

    Antigen receptor allelic exclusion is thought to occur through mono-allelic initiation and subsequent feedback inhibition of recombinational accessibility. However, our previous analysis of mice containing a V(D)J recombination reporter inserted into Vβ14 (Vβ14Rep) indicated that Vβ14 chromatin accessibility is bi-allelic. To determine whether Vβ14 recombinational accessibility is subject to feedback inhibition, we analyzed TCRβ rearrangements in Vβ14Rep mice containing a pre-assembled in frame transgenic Vβ8.2Dβ1Jβ1.1 or an endogenous Vβ14Dβ1Jβ1.4 rearrangement on the homologous chromosome. Expression of either pre-assembled VβDJβCβ chain accelerated thymocyte development due to enhanced cellular selection, demonstrating that the rate-limiting step in early αβ T cell development is the assembly of an in-frame VβDJβ rearrangement. Expression of these pre-assembled VβDJβ rearrangements inhibited endogenous Vβ14-to-DJβ rearrangements as expected. However, in contrast to results predicted by the accepted model of TCRβ feedback inhibition, we found that expression of these pre-assembled TCRβ chains did not down-regulate recombinational accessibility of Vβ14 chromatin. Our findings suggest that TCRβ mediated feedback inhibition of Vβ14 rearrangements depends upon inherent properties of Vβ14, Dβ, and Jβ recombination signal sequences. PMID:20042591

  7. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  8. LSPR biomolecular assay with high sensitivity induced by aptamer-antigen-antibody sandwich complex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Longhua; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2012-01-15

    Herein we demonstrate a sensitive approach for protein detection based on peak shifts of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) induced by aptamer-antigen-antibody sandwich structures. The applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated using human α-thrombin as a model analyte. While the binding of thrombin to its specific receptor, thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) modified on Au nanorods (AuNRs), causes a measurable LSPR shift, a subsequent binding of an anti-thrombin antibody to the captured thrombin can exhibit a nearly 150% amplification in the LSPR response. This enhanced signal essentially leads to an improvement of limit of detection (LOD) by more than one order of magnitude. In addition, the use of TBA as thrombin recognition units makes the biosensor reusable. The feasibility of the proposed method was further exploited by the detection of thrombin in human serum, opening the possibility of a real application for diagnostics and medical investigations. PMID:22099957

  9. Structure of a lamprey variable lymphocyte receptor in complex with a protein antigen

    PubMed Central

    Velikovsky, C Alejandro; Deng, Lu; Tasumi, Satoshi; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Kerzic, Melissa C; Aravind, L; Pancer, Zeev; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2009-01-01

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins that mediate adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates. VLRs are fundamentally different from the antibodies of jawed vertebrates, which consist of immunoglobulin (Ig) domains. We determined the structure of an anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) VLRB, isolated by yeast display, bound to HEL. The VLR, whose affinity resembles that of IgM antibodies, uses nearly all its concave surface to bind the protein, in addition to a loop that penetrates into the enzyme active site. The VLR-HEL structure, combined with sequence analysis, revealed an almost perfect match between ligand-contacting positions and positions with highest sequence diversity. Thus, we have defined the generalized antigen-binding site of VLRs. We further demonstrated that VLRs can be affinity-matured to affinities as high as those of IgG antibodies, making VLRs potential alternatives to antibodies for biotechnology applications. PMID:19543291

  10. Muscle FBPase in a complex with muscle aldolase is insensitive to AMP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rakus, D; Pasek, M; Krotkiewski, H; Dzugaj, A

    2003-07-17

    Real-time interaction analysis, using the BIAcore biosensor, of rabbit muscle FBPase-aldolase complex revealed apparent binding constant [K(Aapp)] values of about 4.4x10(8) M(-1). The stability of the complex was down-regulated by the glycolytic intermediates dihydroxyacetone phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate, and by the regulator of glycolysis and glyconeogenesis--fructose 2,6-bisphosphate. FBPase in a complex with aldolase was entirely insensitive to inhibition by physiological concentrations of AMP (I(0.5) was 1.35 mM) and the cooperativity of the inhibition was not observed. The existence of an FBPase-aldolase complex that is insensitive to AMP inhibition explains the possibility of glycogen synthesis from carbohydrate precursors in vertebrates' myocytes. PMID:12860378

  11. Schistosoma japonicum egg antigen up-regulates fibrogenesis and inhibits proliferation in primary hepatic stellate cells in a concentration-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Wang, Mi; Lu, Xiao-Dan; Zhang, Shu-Juan; Tang, Wang-Xian

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of different concentrations of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) egg antigen on fibrogenesis and apoptosis in primary hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). METHODS: A mouse model of schistosomiasis-associated liver fibrosis (SSLF) was established by infecting mice with schistosomal cercaria via the abdomen. HSCs were isolated from SSLF mice by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, and their identity was confirmed by immunofluorescence double staining of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin. The growth inhibitory effect and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of S. japonicum egg antigen for primary HSCs (24 h) were determined using a cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The expression levels of α-SMA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMOL/LP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in HSCs in response to different concentrations of S. japonicum egg antigen were detected by Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The levels of phospho-P38 (P-P38), phospho-Jun N-terminal kinase (P-JNK) and phospho-Akt (P-AKT) in HSCs were detected by Western blotting. RESULTS: An SSLF mouse model was established, and primary HSCs were successfully isolated and cultured. S. japonicum egg antigen inhibited HSC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 of the S. japonicum egg antigen was 244.53 ± 35.26 μg/mL. S. japonicum egg antigen enhanced α-SMA expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and enhanced TIMP-1 expression at the mRNA level in HSCs (P < 0.05), whereas the expression of MMOL/LP-9 was attenuated at both the mRNA and protein levels in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.05). A high concentration of S. japonicum egg antigen enhanced P-P38, P-JNK and P-AKT activation (P < 0.05). The changes in α-SMA and MMOL/LP-9 expression induced by S. japonicum egg antigen were closely correlated with P-P38 and P-JNK activation (P < 0.05). The attenuation of MMOL/LP-9

  12. Proteasome Subtypes and Regulators in the Processing of Antigenic Peptides Presented by Class I Molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the breakdown of cellular proteins. Proteins targeted for degradation are allowed inside the proteasome particle, where they are cleaved into small peptides and released in the cytosol to be degraded into amino acids. In vertebrates, some of these peptides escape degradation in the cytosol, are loaded onto class I molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and displayed at the cell surface for scrutiny by the immune system. The proteasome therefore plays a key role for the immune system: it provides a continued sampling of intracellular proteins, so that CD8-positive T-lymphocytes can kill cells expressing viral or tumoral proteins. Consequently, the repertoire of peptides displayed by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface depends on proteasome activity, which may vary according to the presence of proteasome subtypes and regulators. Besides standard proteasomes, cells may contain immunoproteasomes, intermediate proteasomes and thymoproteasomes. Cells may also contain regulators of proteasome activity, such as the 19S, PA28 and PA200 regulators. Here, we review the effects of these proteasome subtypes and regulators on the production of antigenic peptides. We also discuss an unexpected function of the proteasome discovered through the study of antigenic peptides: its ability to splice peptides. PMID:25412285

  13. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1–40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1–40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  14. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-09-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response.

  15. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  16. Branched-chain amino acids complex inhibits melanogenesis in B16F0 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Young; Yang, Hyun-Ju; Moon, Hyung-In; Cho, Young-Su

    2012-04-01

    Present study was investigated the effect of each or complex of three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; isoleucine, leucine, and valine) on melanin production in B16F0 melanoma cells treated with various concentrations (1-16 mM) for 72 h. Among the 20 amino acids, lysine and glycine showed the highest activities of DPPH radical scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase inhibition, respectively. Each and combination of BCAAs reduced melanogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner without any morphological changes and cell viability in melanoma cells. Present study was also investigated the inhibitory effects of each or complex of BCAAs at each 10 mM concentration on the 100 μM IBMX-mediated stimulation of melanogenesis in melanoma cells for 72 h and found that IBMX treatment was stimulated to enhance melanin synthesis and that the complex of BCAAs was the most effectively inhibited in the melanin amounts of cellular and extracellular and the whitening the cell pellet. When the inhibitory effect of BCAAs on tyrosinase was examined by intracellular tyrosinase assay, both isoleucine and valine exhibit slightly inhibition, but leucine and combination of BCAAs did not inhibit the cell-derived tyrosinase activity. Present study demonstrated that complex of BCAAs inhibited melanin production without changes intercellular tyrosinase activity. Thus, the complex of BCAAs may be used in development of safe potentially depigmenting agents. PMID:21854182

  17. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  18. Schwann cell differentiation inhibits interferon-gamma induction of expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Robert P; Bealmear, Beverly; Benjamins, Joyce A

    2016-06-15

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II) antigens and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on Schwann cells (SC) in vitro, but in nerves of animals and patients MHC class II is primarily expressed on inflammatory cells. We investigated whether SC maturation influences their expression. IFN-γ induced MHC class II and upregulated ICAM-1; the axolemma-like signal 8-bromo cyclic adenosine monophosphate (8 Br cAMP) with IFN-γ inhibited expression. Delaying addition of 8 Br cAMP to SC already exposed to IFN-γ inhibited ongoing expression; addition of IFN-γ to SC already exposed to 8 Br cAMP resulted in minimal expression. Variability of cytokine-induced MHC class II and ICAM-1 expression by SC in vivo may represent the variability of signals from axolemma. PMID:27235355

  19. Generation of a monoclonal antibody recognizing the CEACAM glycan structure and inhibiting adhesion using cancer tissue-originated spheroid as an antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yumi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Adachi, Jun; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Endo, Hiroko; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Spheroids cultured directly from tumours can better reflect in vivo tumour characteristics than two-dimensional monolayer culture or three-dimensional culture of established cell lines. In this study, we generated antibodies by directly immunizing mice with primary-cultured living spheroids from human colorectal cancer. We performed phenotypic screening via recognition of the surface of the spheroids and inhibition of their adhesion to extracellular matrices to identify a monoclonal antibody, clone 5G2. The antibody inhibited cell migration in two-dimensional culture and promoted cell detachment. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry detected the 5G2 signal in many colorectal cancer spheroids, as well as patient tumours, but failed to detect in various cell lines examined. We found that 5G2 recognized the Lea and Lec on N-glycan, and their major carrier proteins were CEACAM5 and CEACAM6. Pre-incubation of the spheroids with 5G2 impaired translocation of integrin β4 from the lateral membrane to the contact interface between the extracellular matrix when embedded in it. As we successfully obtained a functional antibody, which antigen was glycan structures and lost in cell lines, cancer tissue-originated spheroids can be a useful antigen for generating novel anti-cancer antibodies. PMID:27098764

  20. Contribution of dopamine to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and dopaminergic deficits caused by methylenedioxymethamphetamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Barros-Miñones, L; Goñi-Allo, B; Suquia, V; Beitia, G; Aguirre, N; Puerta, E

    2015-06-01

    Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) causes a persistent loss of dopaminergic cell bodies in the substantia nigra of mice. Current evidence indicates that MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is mediated by oxidative stress probably due to the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. In this study we investigated the contribution of dopamine (DA) to such effects. For this, we modulated the dopaminergic system of mice at the synthesis, uptake or metabolism levels. Striatal mitochondrial complex I activity was decreased 1 h after MDMA; an effect not observed in the striatum of DA depleted mice or in the hippocampus, a dopamine spare region. The DA precursor, L-dopa, caused a significant reduction of mitochondrial complex I activity by itself and exacerbated the dopaminergic deficits when combined with systemic MDMA. By contrast, no damage was observed when L-dopa was combined with intrastriatal injections of MDMA. On the other hand, dopamine uptake blockade using GBR 12909, inhibited both, the acute inhibition of complex I activity and the long-term dopaminergic toxicity caused by MDMA. Moreover, the inhibition of DA metabolism with the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, pargyline, afforded a significant protection against MDMA-induced complex I inhibition and neurotoxicity. Taken together, these findings point to the formation of hydrogen peroxide subsequent to DA metabolism by MAO, rather than a direct DA-mediated mitochondrial complex I inhibition, and the contribution of a peripheral metabolite of MDMA, as the key steps in the chain of biochemical events leading to DA neurotoxicity caused by MDMA in mice. PMID:25666033

  1. Targeting metabolic flexibility by simultaneously inhibiting respiratory complex I and lactate generation retards melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Chaube, Balkrishna; Malvi, Parmanand; Singh, Shivendra Vikram; Mohammad, Naoshad; Meena, Avtar Singh; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is a largely incurable skin malignancy owing to the underlying molecular and metabolic heterogeneity confounded by the development of resistance. Cancer cells have metabolic flexibility in choosing either oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) or glycolysis for ATP generation depending upon the nutrient availability in tumor microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the involvement of respiratory complex I and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in melanoma progression. We show that inhibition of complex I by metformin promotes melanoma growth in mice via elevating lactate and VEGF levels. In contrast, it leads to the growth arrest in vitro because of enhanced extracellular acidification as a result of increased glycolysis. Inhibition of LDH or lactate generation causes decrease in glycolysis with concomitant growth arrest both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking lactate generation in metformin-treated melanoma cells results in diminished cell proliferation and tumor progression in mice. Interestingly, inhibition of either LDH or complex I alone does not induce apoptosis, whereas inhibiting both together causes depletion in cellular ATP pool resulting in metabolic catastrophe induced apoptosis. Overall, our study suggests that LDH and complex I play distinct roles in regulating glycolysis and cell proliferation. Inhibition of these two augments synthetic lethality in melanoma. PMID:26484566

  2. Affinities of human histo-blood group antigens for norovirus capsid protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N; Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Boraston, Alisdair B; Klassen, John S

    2015-01-01

    The binding profiles of many human noroviruses (huNoVs) for human histo-blood group antigens have been characterized. However, quantitative-binding data for these important virus–host interactions are lacking. Here, we report on the intrinsic (per binding site) affinities of HBGA oligosaccharides for the huNoV VA387 virus-like particles (VLPs) and the associated subviral P particles measured using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The affinities of 13 HBGA oligosaccharides, containing A, B and H epitopes, with variable sizes (disaccharide to tetrasaccharide) and different precursor chain types (types 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6), were measured for the P particle, while the affinities of the A and B trisaccharides and A and B type 6 tetrasaccharides for the VLP were determined. The intrinsic affinities of the HBGA oligosaccharides for the P particle range from 500 to 2300 M−1, while those of the A and B trisaccharides and the A and B type 6 tetrasaccharides for the VLP range from 1000 to 4000 M−1. Comparison of these binding data with those measured previously for the corresponding P dimer reveals that the HBGA oligosaccharides tested exhibit similar intrinsic affinities for the P dimer and P particle. The intrinsic affinities for the VLP are consistently higher than those measured for the P particle, but within a factor of three. While the cause of the subtle differences in HBGA oligosaccharide affinities for the P dimer and P particle and those for the VLP remains unknown, the present data support the use of P dimers or P particles as surrogates to the VLP for huNoV-receptor-binding studies. PMID:25395406

  3. T cell receptor reversed polarity recognition of a self-antigen major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Dennis X; Kleijwegt, Fleur S; Wiede, Florian; van der Slik, Arno R; Loh, Khai Lee; Petersen, Jan; Dudek, Nadine L; Duinkerken, Gaby; Laban, Sandra; Joosten, Antoinette; Vivian, Julian P; Chen, Zhenjun; Uldrich, Adam P; Godfrey, Dale I; McCluskey, James; Price, David A; Radford, Kristen J; Purcell, Anthony W; Nikolic, Tatjana; Reid, Hugh H; Tiganis, Tony; Roep, Bart O; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    Central to adaptive immunity is the interaction between the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. Presumably reflecting TCR-MHC bias and T cell signaling constraints, the TCR universally adopts a canonical polarity atop the MHC. We report the structures of two TCRs, derived from human induced T regulatory (iT(reg)) cells, complexed to an MHC class II molecule presenting a proinsulin-derived peptide. The ternary complexes revealed a 180° polarity reversal compared to all other TCR-peptide-MHC complex structures. Namely, the iT(reg) TCR α-chain and β-chain are overlaid with the α-chain and β-chain of MHC class II, respectively. Nevertheless, this TCR interaction elicited a peptide-reactive, MHC-restricted T cell signal. Thus TCRs are not 'hardwired' to interact with MHC molecules in a stereotypic manner to elicit a T cell signal, a finding that fundamentally challenges our understanding of TCR recognition. PMID:26437244

  4. Envelope protein complexes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and their antigenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric disease of ruminant animals. In the present study, blue native PAGE electrophoresis and 2D SDS-PAGE were used to separate MAP envelope protein complexes, followed by mass spectrometry (MS) ...

  5. A model of motor inhibition for a complex skill: baseball batting.

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob

    2009-06-01

    The ability to inhibit an ongoing action in response to a signal from the environment is important for many perceptual-motor actions. This paper examines a particular example of this behavior: attempting to inhibit or "check" a swing in baseball batting. A model of motor inhibition in batting is proposed. In the model there are three different inhibition signals (out of range launch angle, early expected-actual trajectory discrepancy, and late expected-actual trajectory discrepancy) resulting in four possible response outcomes for the batter's swing (full swing, inhibited swing, partial response, or interrupted swing). The predictions of the model were compared with the actual batting performance of 20 baseball players using a high-fidelity batting simulator. The proportions of the different response outcomes could be explained by the inhibition model for 17/20 of the batters in the study. These findings suggest that models of motor inhibition developed for simple, discrete tasks can be applied to complex, multistage behaviors. This batting inhibition model could be used to provide a quantitative measure of a player's bat control for training and player-screening purposes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:19586249

  6. Injury and differentiation following inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV in rat oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ziabreva, Iryna; Campbell, Graham; Rist, Julia; Zambonin, Jessica; Rorbach, Joanna; Wydro, Mateusz M; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J M; Mahad, Don

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage cells are susceptible to a variety of insults including hypoxia, excitotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species. Demyelination is a well-recognized feature of several CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis, white matter strokes, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and disorders due to mitochondrial DNA mutations. Although mitochondria have been implicated in the demise of oligodendrocyte lineage cells, the consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects have not been examined. We determine the in vitro impact of established inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV or cytochrome c oxidase on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and mature oligodendrocytes as well as on differentiation capacity of OPCs from P0 rat. Injury to mature oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition was significantly greater than to OPCs, judged by cell detachment and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes, although viability of cells that remained attached was not compromised. Active mitochondria were abundant in processes of differentiated oligodendrocytes and MMP was significantly greater in differentiated oligodendrocytes than OPCs. MMP dissipated following complex IV inhibition in oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, complex IV inhibition impaired process formation within oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Injury to and impaired process formation of oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition has potentially important implications for the pathogenesis and repair of CNS myelin disorders. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20665559

  7. The 2.5 Å Structure of CD1c in Complex with a Mycobacterial Lipid Reveals an Open Groove Ideally Suited for Diverse Antigen Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Louise; Li, Nan-Sheng; Hawk, Andrew J.; Garzón, Diana; Zhang, Tejia; Fox, Lisa M.; Kazen, Allison R.; Shah, Sneha; Haddadian, Esmael J.; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Saghatelian, Alan; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Adams, Erin J.

    2011-08-24

    CD1 molecules function to present lipid-based antigens to T cells. Here we present the crystal structure of CD1c at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, in complex with the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen mannosyl-{beta}1-phosphomycoketide (MPM). CD1c accommodated MPM's methylated alkyl chain exclusively in the A pocket, aided by a unique exit portal underneath the {alpha}1 helix. Most striking was an open F pocket architecture lacking the closed cavity structure of other CD1 molecules, reminiscent of peptide binding grooves of classical major histocompatibility complex molecules. This feature, combined with tryptophan-fluorescence quenching during loading of a dodecameric lipopeptide antigen, provides a compelling model by which both the lipid and peptide moieties of the lipopeptide are involved in CD1c presentation of lipopeptides.

  8. Serum from mice immunized in the context of Treg inhibition identifies DEK as a neuroblastoma tumor antigen

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jin; Kohler, M Eric; Chen, Qingrong; Weber, James; Khan, Javed; Johnson, Bryon D; Orentas, Rimas J

    2007-01-01

    Background We have developed a cell-based vaccine that features the expression of both CD80 and CD86 on the surface of a murine neuroblastoma cell line. The cellular immunity induced by this vaccine is enhanced by treatment with antibody that interferes with T-regulatory cell (Treg) function and we report here that immunization combined with interfering with Treg function also produces a profound serological effect. Serum from mice immunized with our cell-based vaccine in the context of Treg blockade was used to screen a cDNA expression library constructed from the parental neuroblastoma tumor cell line, AGN2a. Results Serum from mice vaccinated in the context of Treg blockade identified a number of potentially oncogenic transcripts that may serve as important immune targets in a tumor-derived cDNA library screen. This novel approach identified far more candidates than could be seen with serum derived from vaccine-treated only, Treg-depleted only, or tumor-bearing mice. The most commonly identified tumor-associated antigen, using serum from immunized and Treg-depleted mice, was the DEK oncogene. Altered expression of the DEK oncogene has been implicated in a number of human cancers. Importantly, we were able to demonstrate that the DEK oncogene also induces a T cell response. Conclusion The use of post-vaccine immune serum in this report differs from previous approaches where serum collected at the time of cancer onset or diagnosis and was used for tumor antigen identification. We hypothesize that the use of diagnostic serum samples may be inadequate for the clinical translation of this approach, and that identification of protective immunogenic tumor antigens may require the use of serum from post-treatment or vaccinated subjects. The identification of DEK as a tumor-associated antigen capable of eliciting a T cell response validates our experimental approach and argues for the antigens we have identified here to be evaluated as targets of effector immunity and as

  9. Immunization with antigenic peptides complexed with β-glucan induces potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in combination with CpG-ODNs.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ishii, Ken J; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-12-28

    The induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires immunization with not only antigens, but also adjuvants. CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) are well-known ligands for Toll-like receptor 9 and a potent adjuvant that induces both Th1-type humoral and cellular immune responses including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We previously demonstrated that β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG-ODNs with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses by co-administration of antigenic proteins, namely ovalbumin (OVA). Immunization with antigenic peptides, OVA257-264, did not induce these antigen-specific immune responses even in combination with CpG-dA/SPG, indicating that peptides require a carrier to antigen presenting cells. In this study, we prepared conjugates comprising OVA257-264 and dA40, and made complexes with SPG. Immunization with OVA257-264-dA/SPG induced peptide-specific immune responses in combination with CpG-dA regardless of complexation with SPG both in vitro and in vivo. When splenocytes from immunized mice were incubated with E.G7-OVA tumor model cells presenting OVA peptides, the number of cells drastically decreased after 24h. Furthermore, mice pre-immunized with OVA257-264-dA/SPG and CpG-ODNs exhibited a long delay in tumor growth after tumor inoculation. Therefore, these peptide-dA/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG complexes could be used as a potent vaccine for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases. PMID:26562685

  10. Functional effects of the antigen glatiramer acetate are complex and tightly associated with its composition.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Tal; Kolitz, Sarah; Towfic, Fadi; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Bakshi, Shlomo; Beriozkin, Olga; Shacham-Abramson, Maya; Timan, Bracha; Fowler, Kevin D; Birnberg, Tal; Konya, Attila; Komlosh, Arthur; Ladkani, David; Hayden, Michael R; Zeskind, Benjamin; Grossman, Iris

    2016-01-15

    Glatiramer acetate (Copaxone®; GA) is a non-biological complex drug for multiple sclerosis. GA modulated thousands of genes in genome-wide expression studies conducted in THP-1 cells and mouse splenocytes. Comparing GA with differently-manufactured glatiramoid Polimunol (Synthon) in mice yielded hundreds of differentially expressed probesets, including biologically-relevant genes (e.g. Il18, adj p<9e-6) and pathways. In human monocytes, 700+ probesets differed between Polimunol and GA, enriching for 130+ pathways including response to lipopolysaccharide (adj. p<0.006). Key differences were confirmed by qRT-PCR (splenocytes) or proteomics (THP-1). These studies demonstrate the complexity of GA's mechanisms of action, and may help inform therapeutic equivalence assessment. PMID:26711576

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells.

    PubMed

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Angel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Víctor, Víctor M; Esplugues, Juan V; Rojas, José M; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M

    2008-07-29

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys(118), suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys(118) contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  12. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase regulates N-Ras activation on the Golgi complex of antigen-stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibiza, Sales; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Ortega, Ángel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Barreiro, Olga; García-Domínguez, Carlota A.; Víctor, Víctor M.; Esplugues, Juan V.; Rojas, José M.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Ras/ERK signaling plays an important role in T cell activation and development. We recently reported that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived NO regulates T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent ERK activation by a cGMP-independent mechanism. Here, we explore the mechanisms through which eNOS exerts this regulation. We have found that eNOS-derived NO positively regulates Ras/ERK activation in T cells stimulated with antigen on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Intracellular activation of N-, H-, and K-Ras was monitored with fluorescent probes in T cells stably transfected with eNOS-GFP or its G2A point mutant, which is defective in activity and cellular localization. Using this system, we demonstrate that eNOS selectively activates N-Ras but not K-Ras on the Golgi complex of T cells engaged with APC, even though Ras isoforms are activated in response to NO from donors. We further show that activation of N-Ras involves eNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation on Cys118, suggesting that upon TCR engagement, eNOS-derived NO directly activates N-Ras on the Golgi. Moreover, wild-type but not C118S N-Ras increased TCR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of Cys118 contributes to activation-induced T cell death. Our data define a signaling mechanism for the regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway based on the eNOS-dependent differential activation of N-Ras and K-Ras at specific cell compartments. PMID:18641128

  13. Detection and purification of two antibody-antigen complexes via selective adsorption on lowly activated anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Manuel; Pessela, Benevides C C; Mateo, Cesar; Munilla, Roberto; Guisán, Jose M; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    Taken advantage of the mechanism of adsorption of macro-molecules on ionic exchangers, (a multipoint interaction between the protein and the support), it is possible to selectively adsorb large proteins leaving small ones in the supernatant. Associated proteins should present a significant difference in its size as compared to the non-associated forms. Thus, the protein complexes may have much larger surfaces to interact with the support. Here, by selecting the support with the highest activation degree that was unable to adsorb the non-associated proteins, we have shown the simple and selective adsorption of immuno complexes (as a model), while antibodies and antigens remained in the supernatant. Therefore, it was possible to selectively adsorb on lowly activated supports (e.g., agarose 4BCL having only 1 micromol of amino groups per g of support) rabbit IgG/anti-rabbit immunoglobulins (immuno complex), while these supports were unable to adsorb the individual immunoglobulines. Similarly, horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/anti-HRP were selectively adsorbed on lowly activated supports, while the individual proteins were not adsorbed at all. Afterwards, the adsorbed associated proteins (purified at least from the non-associated counterparts and concentrated by the adsorption on the support) may be cross-linked with aldehyde-dextran and be desorbed from the matrix for their analysis. This strategy may permit very simple experiments to detect the presence of protein-protein complexes. Finally, we have shown the advantages of this technique compared to the use of one of the proteins previous immobilized on a support. PMID:15628128

  14. Dectin-1 Is Essential for Reverse Transcytosis of Glycosylated SIgA-Antigen Complexes by Intestinal M Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rochereau, Nicolas; Drocourt, Daniel; Perouzel, Eric; Pavot, Vincent; Redelinghuys, Pierre; Brown, Gordon D.; Tiraby, Gerard; Roblin, Xavier; Verrier, Bernard; Genin, Christian; Corthésy, Blaise; Paul, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microfold (M) cells possess a high transcytosis capacity and are able to transport a broad range of materials including particulate antigens, soluble macromolecules, and pathogens from the intestinal lumen to inductive sites of the mucosal immune system. M cells are also the primary pathway for delivery of secretory IgA (SIgA) to the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. However, although the consequences of SIgA uptake by M cells are now well known and described, the mechanisms whereby SIgA is selectively bound and taken up remain poorly understood. Here we first demonstrate that both the Cα1 region and glycosylation, more particularly sialic acid residues, are involved in M cell–mediated reverse transcytosis. Second, we found that SIgA is taken up by M cells via the Dectin-1 receptor, with the possible involvement of Siglec-5 acting as a co-receptor. Third, we establish that transcytosed SIgA is taken up by mucosal CX3CR1+ dendritic cells (DCs) via the DC-SIGN receptor. Fourth, we show that mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV p24-SIgA complexes administered orally is strictly dependent on the expression of Dectin-1. Having deciphered the mechanisms leading to specific targeting of SIgA-based Ag complexes paves the way to the use of such a vehicle for mucosal vaccination against various infectious diseases. PMID:24068891

  15. Citrullinated vimentin as an important antigen in immune complexes from synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies against citrullinated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease, which results in destruction of the joint. The presence of immune complexes (IC) in serum and synovial fluid of RA patients might contribute to this articular damage through different mechanisms, such as complement activation. Therefore, identification of the antigens from these IC is important to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of RA. Since RA patients have antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA) in their serum and synovial fluid (SF) and since elevated levels of citrullinated proteins are detected in the joints of RA patients, citrullinated antigens are possibly present in IC from RA patients. Methods IC from serum of healthy persons, serum of RA patients and IC from synovial fluid of RA patients and Spondyloarthropathy (SpA) patients were isolated by immunoprecipitation. Identification of the antigens was performed by SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry and immunodetection. The presence of citrullinated proteins was evaluated by anti-modified citrulline (AMC) staining. Results Circulating IC in the serum of RA patients and healthy controls contain fibrinogenβ and fibronectin, both in a non-citrullinated form. Additionally, in IC isolated from RA SF, fibrinogenγ and vimentin were identified as well. More importantly, vimentin and a minor portion of fibrinogenβ were found to be citrullinated in the isolated complexes. Moreover these citrullinated antigens were only found in ACPA+ patients. No citrullinated antigens were found in IC from SF of SpA patients. Conclusions Citrullinated fibrinogenβ and citrullinated vimentin were found in IC from SF of ACPA+ RA patients, while no citrullinated antigens were found in IC from SF of ACPA- RA patients or SpA patients or in IC from serum of RA patients or healthy volunteers. The identification of citrullinated vimentin as a prominent citrullinated antigen in IC from SF of ACPA+ RA patients strengthens the hypothesis that citrullinated vimentin

  16. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star Tick, Amblyomma americanum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manife...

  17. The cytolytic C5b-9 complement complex: feedback inhibition of complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bhakdi, S; Maillet, F; Muhly, M; Kazatchkine, M D

    1988-01-01

    We describe a regulatory function of the terminal cytolytic C5b-9 complex [C5b-9(m)] of human complement. Purified C5b-9(m) complexes isolated from target membranes, whether in solution or bound to liposomes, inhibited lysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes by whole human serum in a dose-dependent manner. C9 was not required for the inhibitory function since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes isolated from membranes were also effective. No effect was found with the cytolytically inactive, fluid-phase SC5b-9 complex. However, tryptic modification of SC5b-9 conferred an inhibitory capacity to the complex, due probably to partial removal of the S protein. Experiments using purified components demonstrated that C5b-9(m) exerts a regulatory effect on the formation of the classical- and alternative-pathway C3 convertases and on the utilization of C5 by cell-bound C5 convertases. C5b-9(m) complexes were unable to inhibit the lysis of cells bearing C5b-7(m) by C8 and C9. Addition of C5b-9(m) to whole human serum abolished its bactericidal effect on the serum-sensitive Escherichia coli K-12 strain W 3110 and suppressed its hemolytic function on antibody-sensitized, autologous erythrocytes. Feedback inhibition by C5b-9(m) represents a biologically relevant mechanism through which complement may autoregulate its effector functions. Images PMID:3162317

  18. The Impact of Mitochondrial Complex Inhibition on mESC Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Impact of Mitochondrial Complex Inhibition on mESC Differentiation JE Royland, SH Warren, S Jeffay, MR Hoopes, HP Nichols, ES Hunter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC The importance of mitochondrial funct...

  19. Eliminating Inhibition of Return by Changing Salient Nonspatial Attributes in a Complex Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Frank K.; Samuel, Arthur G.; Chan, Agnes S.

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) occurs when a target is preceded by an irrelevant stimulus (cue) at the same location: Target detection is slowed, relative to uncued locations. In the present study, we used relatively complex displays to examine the effect of repetition of nonspatial attributes. For both color and shape, attribute repetition produced a…

  20. Crystal structure of tarocystatin-papain complex: implications for the inhibition property of group-2 phytocystatins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ming-Hung; Liu, Kai-Lun; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Tarocystatin (CeCPI) from taro (Colocasia esculenta cv. Kaohsiung no. 1), a group-2 phytocystatin, shares a conserved N-terminal cystatin domain (NtD) with other phytocystatins but contains a C-terminal cystatin-like extension (CtE). The structure of the tarocystatin-papain complex and the domain interaction between NtD and CtE in tarocystatin have not been determined. We resolved the crystal structure of the phytocystatin-papain complex at resolution 2.03 Å. Surprisingly, the structure of the NtD-papain complex in a stoichiometry of 1:1 could be built, with no CtE observed. Only two remnant residues of CtE could be built in the structure of the CtE-papain complex. Therefore, CtE is easily digested by papain. To further characterize the interaction between NtD and CtE, three segments of tarocystatin, including the full-length (FL), NtD and CtE, were used to analyze the domain-domain interaction and the inhibition ability. The results from glutaraldehyde cross-linking and yeast two-hybrid assay indicated the existence of an intrinsic flexibility in the region linking NtD and CtE for most tarocystatin molecules. In the inhibition activity assay, the glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fused FL showed the highest inhibition ability without residual peptidase activity, and GST-NtD and FL showed almost the same inhibition ability, which was higher than with NtD alone. On the basis of the structures, the linker flexibility and inhibition activity of tarocystatins, we propose that the overhangs from the cystatin domain may enhance the inhibition ability of the cystatin domain against papain. PMID:21416241

  1. Mechanisms of cell death pathway activation following drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Naoki; Kwang Lee, Kang; Zhang, Carmen; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex I inhibition by drugs and other chemicals has been implicated as a frequent mode of mitochondria-mediated cell injury. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the activation of cell death pathways are incompletely understood. This study was designed to explore the relative contributions to cell injury of three distinct consequences of complex I inhibition, i.e., impairment of ATP biosynthesis, increased formation of superoxide and, hence, peroxynitrite, and inhibition of the mitochondrial protein deacetylase, Sirt3, due to imbalance of the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We used the antiviral drug efavirenz (EFV) to model drug-induced complex I inhibition. Exposure of cultured mouse hepatocytes to EFV resulted in a rapid onset of cell injury, featuring a no-effect level at 30 µM EFV and submaximal effects at 50 µM EFV. EFV caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, EFV resulted in increased formation of peroxynitrite and oxidation of mitochondrial protein thiols, including cyclophilin D (CypD). This was prevented by the superoxide scavenger, Fe-TCP, or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, Fe-TMPyP. Both ferroporphyrins completely protected from EFV-induced cell injury, suggesting that peroxynitrite contributed to the cell injury. Finally, EFV increased the NADH/NAD+ ratio, inhibited Sirt3 activity, and led to hyperacetylated lysine residues, including those in CypD. However, hepatocytes isolated from Sirt3-null mice were protected against 40 µM EFV as compared to their wild-type controls. In conclusion, these data are compatible with the concept that chemical inhibition of complex I activates multiple pathways leading to cell injury; among these, peroxynitrite formation may be the most critical. PMID:25625582

  2. Autoantibodies to ribosomal P antigens with immune complex glomerulonephritis in SJL mice treated with pristane.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Hamilton, K J; Ajmani, A K; Dong, X; Wang, J; Kanwar, Y S; Reeves, W H

    1996-10-01

    BALB/c ByJ mice develop a lupus-like syndrome characterized by anti-nRNP/Sm and Su autoantibodies and immune complex glomerulonephritis after a single i.p. pristane injection. In contrast, mercuric chloride induces anti-fibrillarin Abs only in SJL and other H-2s mice, and not in BALB/c (H-2d) mice. In the present study, the specificities of autoantibodies induced by pristane and HgCl2 were compared in SJL and BALB/c mice to examine whether these strains are "programmed" to make different sets of autoantibodies in response to nonspecific immune stimulation. Unexpectedly, the predominant autoantibodies induced by pristane in SJL mice were neither those characteristic of HgCl2-treated SJL mice nor those associated with pristane-induced disease in BALB/c mice but, rather, anti-ribosomal P, another lupus-related specificity. The autoantibodies were strongly reactive with the C-terminal 22 amino acids of the ribosomal P2 protein, indicating that they exhibited similar fine specificities to anti-P Abs in human SLE and MRL/Ipr mice. Like BALB/c mice, pristane-treated SJL mice developed severe glomerulonephritis characterized by proteinuria, mesangial proliferation, and glomerular immune complex deposits. This is the first evidence that the induction of a lupus-like syndrome by pristane is not restricted to BALB/c mice. The predominance of anti-P Abs in SJL mice contrasts sharply with the predominance of anti-nRNP/Sm and Su, in pristane-treated BALB/c mice, even though the renal lesions were similar in both strains. The data suggest that H-2s does not program mice to produce anti-fibrillarin Abs in response to nonspecific immune stimulation, arguing that autoantibody induction by pristane involves Ag-specific mechanisms. PMID:8816434

  3. Immunocytochemical and biochemical characterization of the Heymann nephritis antigenic complex in rat L2 yolk sac cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, M.; Orlando, R. A.; Saedi, M. S.; Woodward, L.; Kurihara, H.; Farquhar, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    Heymann nephritis in the rat is the most widely used model of human membranous glomerulonephritis. Glycoprotein (gp)330, a large (M(r) > 550,000) membrane-associated glycoprotein, has been identified as the main antigen in this autoimmune disease. Studies of gp330 and receptor-associated protein (RAP), its 44-kd subunit, have been restricted largely to rat kidney, as no stable cultured cell line has been available that expresses gp330. We have recently identified a rat yolk sac carcinoma cell line (L2) that expresses both gp330 and RAP. In this report, we have carried out detailed morphological, immunocytochemical, and biochemical studies characterizing the biosynthesis and localization of gp330 and RAP in the L2 rat yolk sac cell line. At the electron microscope level, the L2 cells are seen to be attached by cell junctions, and their predominant morphological features include extensive networks of rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and numerous clathrin-coated pits found on the cell membrane. By immunocytochemistry, gp330 was localized primarily to clathrin-coated pits at the cell surface, whereas RAP was localized predominantly to the lumen of the rough ER. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that gp330 spends a prolonged time maturing in the ER of L2 cells, as transport of gp330 to the Golgi complex (based on acquisition of endoglycosidase H resistance) is slow (t1/2 = 90 to 120 minutes). Gp330 reached the L2 cell surface beginning at 2 hours after synthesis, where it could be detected by cell surface immunoprecipitation. RAP was found to be an N-linked glycoprotein, and it remained endoglycosidase H-sensitive up to 4 hours after synthesis. Co-precipitation and co-sedimentation experiments demonstrated that gp330 and RAP form a large heterodimer (M(r) approximately 669,000) immediately after biosynthesis and are further assembled into a large hetero-oligomer in the ER. These findings demonstrate that the localization and the kinetics of assembly of gp330 and RAP

  4. Primary structure of the 175K Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigen and identification of a peptide which elicits antibodies that inhibit malaria merozoite invasion.

    PubMed

    Sim, B K; Orlandi, P A; Haynes, J D; Klotz, F W; Carter, J M; Camus, D; Zegans, M E; Chulay, J D

    1990-11-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum gene encoding erythrocyte binding antigen-175 (EBA-175), a putative receptor for red cell invasion (Camus, D., and T. J. Hadley. 1985. Science (Wash. DC). 230:553-556.), has been isolated and characterized. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single open reading frame encoding a translation product of 1,435 amino acid residues. Peptides corresponding to regions on the deduced amino acid sequence predicted to be B cell epitopes were assessed for immunogenicity. Immunization of mice and rabbits with EBA-peptide 4, a synthetic peptide encompassing amino acid residues 1,062-1,103, produced antibodies that recognized P. falciparum merozoites in an indirect fluorescent antibody assay. When compared to sera from rabbits immunized with the same adjuvant and carrier protein, sera from rabbits immunized with EBA-peptide 4 inhibited merozoite invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by 80% at a 1:5 dilution. Furthermore, these sera inhibited the binding of purified, authentic EBA-175 to erythrocytes, suggesting that their activity in inhibiting merozoite invasion of erythrocytes is mediated by blocking the binding of EBA-175 to erythrocytes. Since the nucleotide sequence of EBA-peptide 4 is conserved among seven strains of P. falciparum from throughout the world (Sim, B. K. L. 1990. Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 41:293-296.), these data identify a region of the protein that should be a focus of vaccine development efforts. PMID:2229177

  5. Identification and Expression of a Mycoplasma gallisepticum Surface Antigen Recognized by a Monoclonal Antibody Capable of Inhibiting Both Growth and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Fujisawa, Ayumi; Tsuzaki, Yoshinari; Saitoh, Shuji

    2000-01-01

    In order to identify antigenic proteins of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against virulent M. gallisepticum R strain were produced in mice. MAb 35A6 was selected for its abilities to inhibit both growth and metabolism of M. gallisepticum in vitro. The MAb recognized a membrane protein with an apparent molecular mass of 120 kDa. The corresponding gene, designated the mgc3 gene, was cloned from an M. gallisepticum genomic DNA expression library and sequenced. The mgc3 gene is a homologue of the ORF6 gene encoding 130-kDa protein in the P1 operon of M. pneumoniae and is localized downstream of the mgc1 gene, a homologue of the P1 gene. To assess the characteristics of MGC3 protein, all 10 TGA codons in the mgc3 gene, which encode a tryptophan in the Mycoplasma species, were replaced with TGG codons, and recombinant fowlpox viruses (FPV) harboring the altered mgc3 gene were constructed. One of the recombinant FPVs was improved to express MGC3 protein on the cell surface in which the signal peptide of MGC3 protein was replaced with one from Marek's disease virus gB. These results should provide the impetus to develop a vaccine based on MGC3 protein which can induce antibodies with both growth inhibition and metabolic-inhibition activities using a recombinant FPV. PMID:10816462

  6. Physical mapping of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yashim, Y.; So, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic variation of the TCR loci and their contribution to autoimmune diseases is poorly defined, in direct contrast to the clear examples of disease association with the Class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. We have therefore started to determine the gene organization and polymorphism of the TCR {beta} locus. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human TCR {beta}-chain gene complex. Variable gene (V{beta}) sequences for the 25 known V{beta} subfamilies were amplified by PCR and were used as probes to screen a YAC library. Five positive YACs were identified. YACs designated B3, E11 and H11 of sizes 820, 400 and 600 kbp, respectively, were analyzed for their V{beta} content by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). YAC B3 was found to contain all 25 V{beta} subfamilies, E11 for 14 and H11 for 7. B3 was also positive for the constant region genes. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located V{beta} and C{beta} gene regions to four Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90 and 125 kbp, and was in accordance with published data. The data thus showed that YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCR {beta}-gene locus. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bssll II on B3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to chromosome 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained: one attributable to V{beta} orphon cluster on chromosome 9q21; the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. PCR amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid using primers for all 25 V{beta} gene families revealed the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCR {beta} locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. The determination of the TCR genomic organization will help extend studies of the role T-cells play in autoimmune diseases.

  7. Expression and T cell recognition of hybrid antigens with amino-terminal domains encoded by Qa-2 region of major histocompatibility complex and carboxyl termini of transplantation antigens.

    PubMed

    Stroynowski, I; Forman, J; Goodenow, R S; Schiffer, S G; McMillan, M; Sharrow, S O; Sachs, D H; Hood, L

    1985-05-01

    Coding potential of the Q6 gene from the Qa-2a region of BALB/c Crgl mice was analyzed by a combination of hybrid class I gene construction and DNA-mediated gene transfer. Recombinant genes were created by exon shuffling of the 5' coding region of the Q6 gene and the 3' coding region of a gene encoding a transplantation antigen (Kd, Dd, or Ld), or the inverse. Some of these hybrid class I genes were expressed in the transfected mouse fibroblasts (L cells). The hybrid class I molecules encoded by the 5' end of the Q6 gene and the 3' end of the Ld gene precipitated as 45,000 mol wt molecules associated with beta 2-microglobulin. The expression of the hybrid proteins indicates that 926 basepairs of the 5' flanking region upstream of the structural Q6 gene contain a promoter that functions as a transcription initiation site in L cells. The 3' portion of the Q6 gene appears to be responsible for the lack of cell surface expression of the intact Q6 and the hybrid Ld/Q6 genes in mouse fibroblasts. Accordingly, this portion of the Q6 class I gene may play a regulatory role in tissue-specific expression. Serological analyses of hybrid Q6 proteins suggested that Q6 may be a structural gene for CR (H-2 crossreactive) antigen found normally on subpopulations of lymphocytes. If this identification is correct, Q6 gene will define a new category of class I genes encoding approximately 40,000 mol wt molecules and carrying a characteristic truncated cytoplasmic tail. Analysis of L cells transfected with Q6 hybrid genes demonstrated also that the cytotoxic T cells specific for Qa-2a region-coded antigens recognize the amino-terminal alpha 1-alpha 2 domain of Q6 fusion products. This recognition can be blocked by anti-Qa-2a alloantiserum and monoclonal antibodies reactive with the alpha 3-beta 2-microglobulin portion of the Q6 hybrids. We propose that the structural requirements for the anti-Qa-2a cytotoxic T lymphocyte-specific epitopes on target molecules are the same as for anti

  8. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation. PMID:22634003

  9. A natural IgM antibody does inhibit polyclonal and antigen-specific IgM but not IgG B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Kiss, K; Uher, F; Gergely, J

    1994-03-01

    Since a B-cell growth-inhibitory natural IgM antibody was identified in the culture supernatants of LPS-stimulated murine splenic B lymphocytes [11], attempts have been made to define other possible functional role(s) of this antibody. Here we show that this regulatory IgM is able to inhibit not only the proliferation of splenic B cells, but also their IgM secretion during LPS-induced polyclonal, as well as antigen (FITC-KLH)-specific antibody responses. In contrast, IgG1 production of hapten (FITC)-specific B cells neither during restimulation with LPS nor in the presence of carrier-specific T lymphocytes in vitro was affected by regulatory IgM. Therefore, whereas newly emerging naive B cells are highly susceptible, IgG-secreting B cells appear to be completely resistant to inactivation by the regulatory IgM autoantibody. PMID:7518418

  10. Complex Living Conditions Impair Behavioral Inhibition but Improve Attention in Rats.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Rixt; Kentrop, Jiska; van der Tas, Liza; Loi, Manila; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Joëls, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid adaptation to changes, while maintaining a certain level of behavioral inhibition is an important feature in every day functioning. How environmental context and challenges in life can impact on the development of this quality is still unknown. In the present study, we examined the effect of a complex rearing environment during adolescence on attention and behavioral inhibition in adult male rats. We also tested whether these effects were affected by an adverse early life challenge, maternal deprivation (MD). We found that animals that were raised in large, two floor Marlau(TM) cages, together with 10 conspecifics, showed improved attention, but impaired behavioral inhibition in the 5-choice serial reaction time task. The early life challenge of 24 h MD on postnatal day 3 led to a decline in bodyweight during adolescence, but did not by itself influence responses in the 5-choice task in adulthood, nor did it moderate the effects of complex housing. Our data suggest that a complex rearing environment leads to a faster adaptation to changes in the environment, but at the cost of lower behavioral inhibition. PMID:26733839

  11. Inhibition of mitochondrial complex II affects dopamine metabolism and decreases its uptake into striatal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Cakała, Magdalena; Drabik, Jacek; Kaźmierczak, Anna; Kopczuk, Dorota; Adamczyk, Agata

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), is a specific inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, complex II in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between inhibition of mitochondrial complex II and dopamine (DA) metabolism and its transport into rat striatal synaptosomes after exposure to 3-NP. The study was carried out using spectrophotometric, radiochemical and HPLC methods. Our data showed that inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 3-NP (cumulated dose 100 mg/kg in 4 days) significantly affected DA metabolism, leading to the accumulation of its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxylphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the rat striatum. These experimental conditions had no effect on free radical dependent lipid peroxidation in the brain. In vitro experiments revealed that DA and DOPAC significantly decrease lipid peroxidation in the brain homogenate. Moreover, 3-NP significantly inhibited [3H]DA uptake into striatal synaptosomes by specific dopamine transporter (DAT). The scavengers of superoxide radical (O2-) Tempol and Trolox had no effect on DAT function, but the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N w-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) prevented 3-NP-evoked DAT down-regulation. In summary, our results indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial complex II by 3-NP enhances DA degradation and decreases its uptake into synaptosomes. It is suggested that NO and energy failure are responsible for alteration of the dopaminergic system in the striatum. PMID:17183449

  12. Complex Living Conditions Impair Behavioral Inhibition but Improve Attention in Rats

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Rixt; Kentrop, Jiska; van der Tas, Liza; Loi, Manila; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Joëls, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid adaptation to changes, while maintaining a certain level of behavioral inhibition is an important feature in every day functioning. How environmental context and challenges in life can impact on the development of this quality is still unknown. In the present study, we examined the effect of a complex rearing environment during adolescence on attention and behavioral inhibition in adult male rats. We also tested whether these effects were affected by an adverse early life challenge, maternal deprivation (MD). We found that animals that were raised in large, two floor MarlauTM cages, together with 10 conspecifics, showed improved attention, but impaired behavioral inhibition in the 5-choice serial reaction time task. The early life challenge of 24 h MD on postnatal day 3 led to a decline in bodyweight during adolescence, but did not by itself influence responses in the 5-choice task in adulthood, nor did it moderate the effects of complex housing. Our data suggest that a complex rearing environment leads to a faster adaptation to changes in the environment, but at the cost of lower behavioral inhibition. PMID:26733839

  13. Multi-antigen vaccines based on complex adenovirus vectors induce protective immune responses against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Holman, David H; Wang, Danher; Raja, Nicholas U; Luo, Min; Moore, Kevin M; Woraratanadharm, Jan; Mytle, Nutan; Dong, John Y

    2008-05-19

    There are legitimate concerns that the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus could adapt for human-to-human transmission and cause a pandemic similar to the 1918 "Spanish flu" that killed 50 million people worldwide. We have developed pandemic influenza vaccines by incorporating multiple antigens from both avian and Spanish influenza viruses into complex recombinant adenovirus vectors. In vaccinated mice, these vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses against pandemic influenza virus antigens, and protected vaccinated mice against lethal H5N1 virus challenge. These results indicate that this multi-antigen, broadly protective vaccine may serve as a safer and more effective approach than traditional methods for development of a pandemic influenza vaccine. PMID:18395306

  14. Dharmendra antigen but not integral M. leprae is an efficient inducer of immunostimulant cytokine production by human monocytes, and M. leprae lipids inhibit the cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, C; Fukutomi, Y; Kashiwabara, Y; Oomoto, Y; Kojima, M; Hayashi, H; Onozaki, K

    1997-03-01

    Killed integral Mycobacterium leprae, Mitsuda antigen, and chloroform-treated M. leprae, Dharmendra antigen (Dh-Ag), have been used for the classification of leprosy patients based on cell-mediated immunity. Heat-killed M. leprae also were used as a component of the Convit vaccine. Human blood monocytes were stimulated with M. leprae or Dh-Ag and their cytokine-inducing ability was compared. Monocytes were cultured in the presence of fresh human serum because of the efficiency of cytokine induction and the phagocytosis of M. leprae have been shown to be optimal in the presence of fresh serum. M. leprae and Dh-Ag were equally phagocytosed by monocytes. Dh-Ag was more potent than M. leprae in the induction of immunostimulatory/proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In contrast, a comparable level of IL-1ra, an immunosuppressive cytokine, was induced by M. leprae and Dh-Ag. The lipids extracted from M. leprae induced none of these cytokines by monocytes. Nevertheless, when monocytes were pretreated with the lipids followed by stimulation with Dh-Ag, productions of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF were all inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. However, the lipids did not inhibit the cytokine production induced by other stimuli including BCG and lipopolysaccharide. Moreover the lipids did not affect the production of IL-1ra. These results suggest that the lipids from M. leprae are responsible for the poor cytokine-inducing ability of M. leprae, thus favoring their infection. These results also suggest that Dh-Ag rather than integral M. leprae may be useful as a vaccine candidate because Dh-Ag is able to induce a large amount of cytokines from monocytes. PMID:9207755

  15. Inhibition of replicon initiation in human cells following stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, W K; Boyer, J C; Estabrooks, L L; Wilson, S J

    1991-01-01

    Diploid human fibroblast strains were treated for 10 min with inhibitors of type I and type II DNA topoisomerases, and after removal of the inhibitors, the rate of initiation of DNA synthesis at replicon origins was determined. By alkaline elution chromatography, 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (amsacrine), an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, was shown to produce DNA strand breaks. These strand breaks are thought to reflect drug-induced stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes. Removal of the drug led to a rapid resealing of the strand breaks by dissociation of the complexes. Velocity sedimentation analysis was used to quantify the effects of amsacrine treatment on DNA replication. It was demonstrated that transient exposure to low concentrations of amsacrine inhibited replicon initiation but did not substantially affect DNA chainelongation within operating replicons. Maximal inhibition of replicon initiation occurred 20 to 30 min after drug treatment, and the initiation rate recovered 30 to 90 min later. Ataxia telangiectasia cells displayed normal levels of amsacrine-induced DNA strand breaks during stabilization of cleavable complexes but failed to downregulate replicon initiation after exposure to the topoisomerase inhibitor. Thus, inhibition of replicon initiation in response to DNA damage appears to be an active process which requires a gene product which is defective or missing in ataxia telangiectasia cells. In normal human fibroblasts, the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I by camptothecin produced reversible DNA strand breaks. Transient exposure to this drug also inhibited replicon initiation. These results suggest that the cellular response pathway which downregulates replicon initiation following genotoxic damage may respond to perturbations of chromatin structure which accompany stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes. PMID:1646393

  16. Relationship between target antigens and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes in producing two pathogenic antibodies simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Zakka, L R; Keskin, D B; Reche, P; Ahmed, A R

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we present 15 patients with histological and immunopathologically proven pemphigus vulgaris (PV). After a mean of 80 months since the onset of disease, when evaluated serologically, they had antibodies typical of PV and pemphigoid (Pg). Similarly, 18 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP) and mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) were diagnosed on the basis of histology and immunopathology. After a mean of 60 months since the onset of disease, when their sera were evaluated they were found to have Pg and PV autoantibodies. In both groups of patients the diseases were characterized by a chronic course, which included several relapses and recurrences and were non-responsive to conventional therapy. The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes were studied in both groups of patients and phenotypes associated typically with them were observed. Hence, in 33 patients, two different pathogenic autoantibodies were detected simultaneously. The authors provide a computer model to show that each MHC II gene has relevant epitopes that recognize the antigens associated with both diseases. Using the databases in these computer models, the authors present the hypothesis that these two autoantibodies are produced simultaneously due to the phenomena of epitope spreading. PMID:21069937

  17. The Crystal Structure of the SV40 T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Moine, Stephanie; Bochkareva, Elena; Bochkarev, Alexey; Bullock, Peter A; Bohm, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    DNA replication is initiated upon binding of “initiators” to origins of replication. In simian virus 40 (SV40), the core origin contains four pentanucleotide binding sites organized as pairs of inverted repeats. Here we describe the crystal structures of the origin binding domain (obd) of the SV40 large T-antigen (T-ag) both with and without a subfragment of origin-containing DNA. In the co-structure, two T-ag obds are oriented in a head-to-head fashion on the same face of the DNA, and each T-ag obd engages the major groove. Although the obds are very close to each other when bound to this DNA target, they do not contact one another. These data provide a high-resolution structural model that explains site-specific binding to the origin and suggests how these interactions help direct the oligomerization events that culminate in assembly of the helicase-active dodecameric complex of T-ag. PMID:17253903

  18. Inhibition of antigen- and lectin-induced proliferation of rat spleen cells by a Taenia taeniaeformis proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Leid, R W; Suquet, C M; Perryman, L E

    1984-01-01

    Rat splenic lymphocytes, cultured in vitro for 3 days in the presence of a larval cestode proteinase inhibitor, exhibited a marked suppression of proliferation when stimulated with Con A, PHA, PWM and ovalbumin. Reduced responsiveness was observed over a full range of concentrations of Con A (16-fold), PHA (50-fold), PWM (four-fold) and ovalbumin (16-fold). These results indicated that the inhibitory action could not be overcome by increasing the mitogen or antigen doses beyond optimal levels. This suppressive effect disappeared when the Taenia taeniaeformis proteinase inhibitor was added 20 h after the initiation of culture, suggesting that the inhibitor affects lymphocyte blastogenesis during the early stages of lymphocyte activation. PMID:6744668

  19. MAGE-A Cancer/Testis Antigens Inhibit MDM2 Ubiquitylation Function and Promote Increased Levels of MDM4

    PubMed Central

    Marcar, Lynnette; Ihrig, Bianca; Hourihan, John; Bray, Susan E.; Quinlan, Philip R.; Jordan, Lee B.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Hupp, Ted R.; Meek, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma antigen A (MAGE-A) proteins comprise a structurally and biochemically similar sub-family of Cancer/Testis antigens that are expressed in many cancer types and are thought to contribute actively to malignancy. MAGE-A proteins are established regulators of certain cancer-associated transcription factors, including p53, and are activators of several RING finger-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligases. Here, we show that MAGE-A2 associates with MDM2, a ubiquitin E3 ligase that mediates ubiquitylation of more than 20 substrates including mainly p53, MDM2 itself, and MDM4, a potent p53 inhibitor and MDM2 partner that is structurally related to MDM2. We find that MAGE-A2 interacts with MDM2 via the N-terminal p53-binding pocket and the RING finger domain of MDM2 that is required for homo/hetero-dimerization and for E2 ligase interaction. Consistent with these data, we show that MAGE-A2 is a potent inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2, yet it does not have any significant effect on p53 turnover mediated by MDM2. Strikingly, however, increased MAGE-A2 expression leads to reduced ubiquitylation and increased levels of MDM4. Similarly, silencing of endogenous MAGE-A expression diminishes MDM4 levels in a manner that can be rescued by the proteasomal inhibitor, bortezomid, and permits increased MDM2/MDM4 association. These data suggest that MAGE-A proteins can: (i) uncouple the ubiquitin ligase and degradation functions of MDM2; (ii) act as potent inhibitors of E3 ligase function; and (iii) regulate the turnover of MDM4. We also find an association between the presence of MAGE-A and increased MDM4 levels in primary breast cancer, suggesting that MAGE-A-dependent control of MDM4 levels has relevance to cancer clinically. PMID:26001071

  20. Validation of nanodiamond-extracted CFP-10 antigen as a biomarker in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in broth culture media.

    PubMed

    Soo, Po-Chi; Horng, Yu-Tze; Chen, Ai-Ti; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Kai-Chih; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-09-01

    With detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we previously identified early secreted cell filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) as a candidate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) biomarker. The performance of the CFP-10 biomarker was initially evaluated in relatively small mycobacterial samples (n = 42 samples) in our previous study. In this study, we conducted DND MALDI-TOF MS experiments to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of the MTC biomarker with 312 MTC and 52 nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) clinical samples. The frequency and intensity of the acquired CFP-10 mass-to-charge (m/z) peaks were checked with a program to validate that the singly and doubly charged CFP-10 antigen can be treated as a MTC biomarker. We confirmed that by detecting the singly charged species of CFP-10 antigen, the sensitivity and the specificity of MTC samples could reach 97.4% and 100% and no CFP-10 biomarker could be found in NTM samples. This indicates with CFP-10 biomarker it is easy to distinguish MTC from NTM. Besides, the observed intensity ratio of singly and doubly charged species of CFP-10 antigen was 3.3 ± 2.6 and the CFP-10 antigen could maintain good signal intensity for a week. Our results suggest that, with the DND MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry approach, CFP-10 antigen can be used as an early diagnosis biomarker in clinical practice. PMID:26071665

  1. Versatility of using major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers for derivation and characterization of antigen-specific, autoreactive T cell hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Bharathi; Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Basavalingappa, Rakesh H; Rajasekaran, Rajkumar A; Kuszynski, Charles; Switzer, Barbara; Peterson, Daniel A; Reddy, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Antigen-specific, T cell hybridomas are useful to study the cellular, molecular and functional events, but their generation is a lengthy process. Thus, there is a need to develop robust methods to generate the hybridoma clones rapidly in a short period of time. To this end, we have demonstrated a novel approach using major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II dextramers to generate T cell hybridomas for an autoantigen, proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151. Using MHC class II dextramers assembled with PLP 139-151 as screening and sorting tools, we successfully obtained mono antigen-specific clones within seven to eight weeks. In conjunction with other T cell markers, dextramers permitted phenotypic characterization of hybridoma clones for their antigen specificity in a single step by flow cytometry. Importantly, we achieved successful fusions using dextramer(+) cells sorted by flow cytometry as a starting population, resulting in direct identification of multiple antigen-specific clones. Characterization of selected clones led us to identify chemokine receptor, CCR4(+) to be expressed consistently, but their cytokine-producing ability was variable. Our work provides a proof-of principle that the antigen-specific, CD4 T cell hybridoma clones can be generated directly using MHC class II dextramers. The availability of hybridoma clones that bind dextramers may serve as useful tools for various in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26268454

  2. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oncogenesis is frequently accompanied by the activation of specific metabolic pathways. One such pathway is fatty acid biosynthesis, whose induction is observed upon transformation of a wide variety of cell types. Here, we explored how defined oncogenic alleles, specifically the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigens and oncogenic Ras12V, affect fatty acid metabolism. Our results indicate that SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation of fibroblasts induces fatty acid biosynthesis in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. This oncogene-induced activation of fatty acid biosynthesis was found to be mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent, as it was attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation induced sensitivity to treatment with fatty acid biosynthetic inhibitors. Pharmaceutical inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC), a key fatty acid biosynthetic enzyme, induced caspase-dependent cell death in oncogene-transduced cells. In contrast, isogenic nontransformed cells were resistant to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. This oncogene-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the cells' growth rates and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Both the activation of fatty acid biosynthesis and the sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition could be conveyed to nontransformed breast epithelial cells through transduction with oncogenic Ras12V. Similar to what was observed in the transformed fibroblasts, the Ras12V-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the proliferative status and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Combined, our results indicate that specific oncogenic alleles can directly confer sensitivity to inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE Viral oncoproteins and cellular mutations

  3. Mitochondrial Complex 1 Inhibition Increases 4-Repeat Isoform Tau by SRSF2 Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    De Andrade, Anderson; Höglinger, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by intracellular aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The tau protein exists in 6 predominant isoforms. Depending on alternative splicing of exon 10, three of these isoforms have four microtubule-binding repeat domains (4R), whilst the others only have three (3R). In PSP there is an excess of the 4R tau isoforms, which are thought to contribute significantly to the pathological process. The cause of this 4R increase is so far unknown. Several lines of evidence link mitochondrial complex I inhibition to the pathogenesis of PSP. We demonstrate here for the first time that annonacin and MPP+, two prototypical mitochondrial complex I inhibitors, increase the 4R isoforms of tau in human neurons. We show that the splicing factor SRSF2 is necessary to increase 4R tau with complex I inhibition. We also found SRSF2, as well as another tau splicing factor, TRA2B, to be increased in brains of PSP patients. Thereby, we provide new evidence that mitochondrial complex I inhibition may contribute as an upstream event to the pathogenesis of PSP and suggest that splicing factors may represent an attractive therapeutic target to intervene in the disease process. PMID:25402454

  4. Simian virus 40 large T antigen's association with the CUL7 SCF complex contributes to cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jocelyn S; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Arai, Takehiro; Ali, Syed Hamid; DeCaprio, James A

    2005-09-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (T Ag) is capable of immortalizing and transforming rodent cells. The transforming activity of T Ag is due in large part to perturbation of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and the retinoblastoma (pRB) family members. Inactivation of these tumor suppressors may not be sufficient for T Ag-mediated cellular transformation. It has been shown that T Ag associates with an SCF-like complex that contains a member of the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, CUL7, as well as SKP1, RBX1, and an F-box protein, FBXW8. We identified T Ag residues 69 to 83 as required for T Ag binding to the CUL7 complex. We demonstrate that delta69-83 T Ag, while it lost its ability to associate with CUL7, retained binding to p53 and pRB family members. In the presence of CUL7, wild-type (WT) T Ag but not delta69-83 T Ag was able to induce proliferation of mouse embryo fibroblasts, an indication of cellular transformation. In contrast, WT and delta69-83 T Ag enabled mouse embryo fibroblasts to proliferate to similarly high densities in the absence of CUL7. Our data suggest that, in addition to p53 and the pRB family members, T Ag serves to bind to and inactivate the growth-suppressing properties of CUL7. In addition, these results imply that, at least in the presence of T Ag, CUL7 may function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:16140746

  5. The mammalian exocyst, a complex required for exocytosis, inhibits tubulin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Yan; Adamson, Crista L; Valdez, Gregorio; Guo, Wei; Hsu, Shu C

    2004-08-20

    The exocyst is a 734-kDa complex essential for development. Perturbation of its function results in early embryonic lethality. Extensive investigation has revealed that this complex participates in multiple biological processes, including protein synthesis and vesicle/protein targeting to the plasma membrane. In this article we report that the exocyst may also play a role in modulating microtubule dynamics. Using monoclonal antibodies, we observed that endogenous exocyst subunits co-localized with microtubules and mitotic spindles in normal rat kidney cells. To test for a functional relationship between the exocyst complex and microtubules, we established an in vitro exocyst reconstitution assay and studied exocyst effect on microtubule dynamics. We found that the exocyst complex reconstituted from eight recombinant exocyst subunits inhibited tubulin polymerization in vitro. Deletion of exocyst subunit sec5, sec6, sec15, or exo70 diminished its tubulin polymerization inhibition activity. Surprisingly, exocyst subunit exo70 itself was also capable of inhibiting tubulin polymerization, although exocyst complex with exo70 deletion did not lose its activity completely. Overexpression of exo70 in NRK cells resulted in microtubule network disruption and the formation of filopodia-like plasma membrane protrusions. The formation of these membrane protrusions was greatly hampered by stabilizing microtubules with taxol. Overexpression of exo84, an exocyst subunit that did not show tubulin polymerization inhibition activity, did not cause this phenotype. Results shown in this article, along with a previous report that localized microtubule instability induces plasma membrane addition, implicates a novel role for the exocyst in modulating microtubule dynamics underlying exocytosis. PMID:15205466

  6. Antigenic sites in carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Hammarstrom, S; Shively, J E; Paxton, R J; Beatty, B G; Larsson, A; Ghosh, R; Bormer, O; Buchegger, F; Mach, J P; Burtin, P

    1989-09-01

    The epitope reactivities of 52 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against carcinoembryonic antigen from 11 different research groups were studied using competitive solid-phase immunoassays. About 60% of all possible combinations of Mabs as inhibitors and as the primary binding antibody were investigated. The inhibition data were analyzed by a specially developed computer program "EPITOPES" which measures concordance and discordance in inhibition patterns between Mabs. The analysis showed that 43 of the 52 Mabs (83%) could be classified into one of five essentially noninteracting epitope groups (GOLD 1-5) containing between four and 15 Mabs each. The epitopes recognized by the Mabs belonging to groups 1 to 5 were peptide in nature. With one or two possible exceptions non-classifiable Mabs were either directed against carbohydrate epitopes (4 Mabs) or were inactive in the tests used. Within epitope groups GOLD 1, 4, and 5 two partially overlapping subgroups were distinguished. Mabs with a high degree of carcinoembryonic antigen specificity generally belonged to epitope groups GOLD 1 and 3. PMID:2474375

  7. Complex I and complex III inhibition specifically increase cytosolic hydrogen peroxide levels without inducing oxidative stress in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Forkink, Marleen; Basit, Farhan; Teixeira, José; Swarts, Herman G.; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Willems, Peter H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor studies with isolated mitochondria demonstrated that complex I (CI) and III (CIII) of the electron transport chain (ETC) can act as relevant sources of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we studied ROS generation and oxidative stress induction during chronic (24 h) inhibition of CI and CIII using rotenone (ROT) and antimycin A (AA), respectively, in intact HEK293 cells. Both inhibitors stimulated oxidation of the ROS sensor hydroethidine (HEt) and increased mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels without major effects on cell viability. Integrated analysis of cells stably expressing cytosolic- or mitochondria-targeted variants of the reporter molecules HyPer (H2O2-sensitive and pH-sensitive) and SypHer (H2O2-insensitive and pH-sensitive), revealed that CI- and CIII inhibition increased cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels. Total and mitochondria-specific lipid peroxidation was not increased in the inhibited cells as reported by the C11-BODIPY581/591 and MitoPerOx biosensors. Also expression of the superoxide-detoxifying enzymes CuZnSOD (cytosolic) and MnSOD (mitochondrial) was not affected. Oxyblot analysis revealed that protein carbonylation was not stimulated by CI and CIII inhibition. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of CI and CIII: (i) increases the levels of HEt-oxidizing ROS and (ii) specifically elevates cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels, (iii) does not induce oxidative stress or substantial cell death. We conclude that the increased ROS levels are below the stress-inducing level and might play a role in redox signaling. PMID:26516986

  8. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 inhibition of lipoprotein lipase: evidence for reversible complex formation.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Michael J; Bradford, Kira C; Erie, Dorothy A; Neher, Saskia B

    2013-10-01

    Elevated triglycerides are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triglycerides from circulating lipoproteins. The N-terminal domain of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) inhibits LPL activity. ANGPTL4 was previously described as an unfolding molecular chaperone of LPL that catalytically converts active LPL dimers into inactive monomers. Our studies show that ANGPTL4 is more accurately described as a reversible, noncompetitive inhibitor of LPL. We find that inhibited LPL is in a complex with ANGPTL4, and upon dissociation, LPL regains lipase activity. Furthermore, we have generated a variant of ANGPTL4 that is dependent on divalent cations for its ability to inhibit LPL. We show that LPL inactivation by this regulatable variant of ANGPTL4 is fully reversible after treatment with a chelator. PMID:23960078

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation: More Complex than the Inhibition of Cells and Excitation of Fibers.

    PubMed

    Florence, Gerson; Sameshima, Koichi; Fonoff, Erich T; Hamani, Clement

    2016-08-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for some movement disorders. Though mechanisms underlying DBS are still unclear, commonly accepted theories include a "functional inhibition" of neuronal cell bodies and the excitation of axonal projections near the electrodes. It is becoming clear, however, that the paradoxical dissociation "local inhibition" and "distant excitation" is far more complex than initially thought. Despite an initial increase in neuronal activity following stimulation, cells are often unable to maintain normal ionic concentrations, particularly those of sodium and potassium. Based on currently available evidence, we proposed an alternative hypothesis. Increased extracellular concentrations of potassium during DBS may change the dynamics of both cells and axons, contributing not only to the intermittent excitation and inhibition of these elements but also to interrupt abnormal pathological activity. In this article, we review mechanisms through which high extracellular potassium may mediate some of the effects of DBS. PMID:26150316

  10. Lectin-dependent inhibition of antigen-antibody reaction: application for measuring α2,6-sialylated glycoforms of transferrin.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Kyoka; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nara, Kiyomitsu; Ito, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Kana; Nagae, Masamichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Madoka; Miyajima, Masakazu; Arai, Hajime; Kuno, Atsushi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Shirotani, Keiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    2013-09-01

    We developed a high-throughput Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring α2,6-sialylated transferrin (Tf), based on inhibition of anti-Tf antibody binding to α2,6-sialylated Tf by a lectin, Sambucus sieboldiana Agglutinin (SSA). The inhibition was not observed with other glycoforms, such as periodate-treated, sialidase-treated and sialidase/galactosidase-treated Tf, suggesting that the assay was glycoform specific. This finding was applied to an automated latex-agglutination immunoassay, using SSA lectin as an inhibitor (SSA-ALI). The concentration of α2,6-sialylated Tf measured by SSA-ALI in human cerebrospinal fluid was correlated with that of ELISA (r2 = 0.8554), previously developed for measuring α2,6-sialylated Tf. PMID:23921500

  11. Modified bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to study the inhibition of transcription complex formation by JAZ proteins.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tiancong; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2013-01-01

    The jasmonate (JA) ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana repress JA signaling and negatively regulate the JA responses. Recently, JAZ proteins have been found to inhibit the transcriptional function of several transcription factors, among which the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) (GLABRA3 [GL3], ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 [EGL3], and TRANSPARENT TESTA8 [TT8]) and R2R3-MYB (GL1 and MYB75) that can interact with each other to form bHLH-MYB complexes and further control gene expression. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is a widely used technique to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. Here we describe a modified BiFC experimental procedure to study the inhibition of the formation of the bHLH (GL3)-MYB (GL1) complex by JAZ proteins. PMID:23615997

  12. Protein encoded by HSV-1 stimulation-related gene 1 (HSRG1) interacts with and inhibits SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Guo, H X; Cun, W; Liu, L D; Dong, S Z; Wang, L C; Dong, C H; Li, Q H

    2006-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 stimulation-related gene 1 (HSRG1) protein expression is induced in HSV-1 infected cells. We found that HSRG1 interacts with SV40 large T antigen (LT) in yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. This interaction alters LT's regulation of the SV40 promoter and its ability to influence the cell cycle. Choramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays revealed that initiation of gene transcription by LT is changed by HSRG1 expression. HSRG1 inhibits the ability of LT to activate SV40 late gene transcription. Further data indicate that the ability of LT protein to stimulate S-phase entry is also inhibited by the expression of HSRG1. The results of a colony-forming assay suggested that expression of HSRG1 in cells transfected by LT gene decreased the rate of colony formation. Yeast two-hybrid beta-galactosidase assay revealed that amino acid residues 132-450 in LT bind HSRG1. PMID:17109635

  13. Inhibition of acid, alkaline, and tyrosine (PTP1B) phosphatases by novel vanadium complexes.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, Craig C; Hooker, Jaqueline D; Jones, Marjorie A; Dymon, Zaneta; Backhus, Emily A; Greiner, Bradley A; Dorner, Nicole A; Youkhana, Mary A; Manus, Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    In the course of our investigations of vanadium-containing complexes for use as insulin-enhancing agents, we have generated a series of novel vanadium coordination complexes with bidentate ligands. Specifically we have focused on two ligands: anthranilate (anc(-)), a natural metabolite of tryptophan, and imidizole-4-carboxylate (imc(-)), meant to mimic naturally occurring N-donor ligands. For each ligand, we have generated a series of complexes containing the V(III), V(IV), and V(V) oxidation states. Each complex was investigated using phosphatase inhibition studies of three different phosphatases (acid, alkaline, and tyrosine (PTP1B) phosphatase) as prima facia evidence for potential use as an insulin-enhancing agent. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as an artificial phosphatase substrate, the levels of inhibition were determined by measuring the absorbance of the product at 405nm using UV/vis spectroscopy. Under our experimental conditions, for instance, V(imc)(3) appears to be as potent an inhibitor of alkaline phosphatase as sodium orthovanadate when comparing the K(cat)/K(m) term. VO(anc)(2) is as potent an inhibitor of acid phosphatase and tyrosine phosphatase as the Na(3)VO(4). Thus, use of these complexes can increase our mechanistic understanding of the effects of vanadium in vivo. PMID:20071031

  14. Cadmium inhibits mismatch repair by blocking the ATPase activity of the MSH2-MSH6 complex.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sreeparna; Flores-Rozas, Hernan

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a known carcinogen that inactivates the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In this study, we have tested the effect of Cd2+ exposure on the enzymatic activity of the mismatch binding complex MSH2-MSH6. Our results indicate that Cd2+ is highly inhibitory to the ATP binding and hydrolysis activities of MSH2-MSH6, and less inhibitory to its DNA mismatch binding activity. The inhibition of the ATPase activity appears to be dose and exposure time dependent. However, the inhibition of the ATPase activity by Cd2+ is prevented by cysteine and histidine, suggesting that these residues are essential for the ATPase activity and are targeted by Cd2+. A comparison of the mechanism of inhibition with N-ethyl maleimide, a sulfhydryl group inhibitor, indicates that this inhibition does not occur through direct inactivation of sulfhydryl groups. Zinc (Zn2+) does not overcome the direct inhibitory effect of Cd2+ on the MSH2-MSH6 ATPase activity in vitro. However, the increase in the mutator phenotype of yeast cells exposed to Cd2+ was prevented by excess Zn2+, probably by blocking the entry of Cd2+ into the cell. We conclude that the inhibition of MMR by Cd2+ is through the inactivation of the ATPase activity of the MSH2-MSH6 heterodimer, resulting in a dominant negative effect and causing a mutator phenotype. PMID:15746000

  15. The transcriptional corepressor DSP1 inhibits activated transcription by disrupting TFIIA-TBP complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, N C; Lieberman, P M; Rushlow, C

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional repression of eukaryotic genes is essential for many cellular and developmental processes, yet the precise mechanisms of repression remain poorly understood. The Dorsal Switch Protein (DSP1) was identified in a genetic screen for activities which convert Dorsal into a transcriptional repressor. DSP1 shares structural homology with the HMG-1/2 family and inhibits activation by the rel transcription factors Dorsal and NF-kappaB in transfection studies. Here we investigate the mechanism of transcriptional repression by DSP1. We found that DSP1 protein can act as a potent transcriptional repressor for multiple activator families in vitro and in transfection studies. DSP1 bound directly to the TATA binding protein (TBP), and formed a stable ternary complex with TBP bound to DNA. DSP1 preferentially disrupted the DNA binding of TBP complexes containing TFIIA and displaced TFIIA from binding to TBP. Consistent with the inhibition of TFIIA-bound complexes, DSP1 was shown to inhibit activated but not basal transcription reactions in vitro. The ability of DSP1 to interact with TBP and to repress transcription was mapped to the carboxy-terminal domain which contains two HMG boxes. Our results support the model that DSP1 represses activated transcription by interfering with the binding of TFIIA, a general transcription factor implicated in activated transcription pathways. Images PMID:9003783

  16. Wnt signaling through inhibition of β-catenin degradation in an intact Axin1 complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Vivian S W; Ng, Ser Sue; Boersema, Paul J; Low, Teck Y; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gerlach, Jan P; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Maurice, Madelon M; Mahmoudi, Tokameh; Clevers, Hans

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of cytosolic β-catenin by the APC/Axin1 destruction complex represents the key regulated step of the Wnt pathway. It is incompletely understood how the Axin1 complex exerts its Wnt-regulated function. Here, we examine the mechanism of Wnt signaling under endogenous levels of the Axin1 complex. Our results demonstrate that β-catenin is not only phosphorylated inside the Axin1 complex, but also ubiquinated and degraded via the proteasome, all within an intact Axin1 complex. In disagreement with current views, we find neither a disassembly of the complex nor an inhibition of phosphorylation of Axin1-bound β-catenin upon Wnt signaling. Similar observations are made in primary intestinal epithelium and in colorectal cancer cell lines carrying activating Wnt pathway mutations. Wnt signaling suppresses β-catenin ubiquitination normally occurring within the complex, leading to complex saturation by accumulated phospho-β-catenin. Subsequently, newly synthesized β-catenin can accumulate in a free cytosolic form and engage nuclear TCF transcription factors. PMID:22682247

  17. The effect of stable macromolecular complexes of ionic polyphosphazene on HIV Gag antigen and on activation of human dendritic cells and presentation to T-cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine D; Ninković, Jana; Prokopowicz, Zofia M; Mancuso, Christy J; Marin, Alexander; Andrianov, Alexander K; Dowling, David J; Levy, Ofer

    2014-10-01

    Neonates and infants are susceptible to infection due to distinct immune responses in early life. Therefore, development of vaccine formulation and delivery systems capable of activating human newborn leukocytes is of global health importance. Poly[di(carboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene] (PCPP) belongs to a family of ionic synthetic polyphosphazene polyelectrolyte compounds that can form non-covalent interactions with protein antigens and demonstrate adjuvant activity in animals and in human clinical trials. However, little is known about their ability to activate human immune cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of PCPP alone or in combination with a model antigen (recombinant HIV-Gag (Gag)), on the maturation, activation and antigen presentation by human adult and newborn dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. PCPP treatment induced DC activation as assessed by upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production. Studies benchmarking PCPP to Alum, the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant, demonstrated that both triggered cell death and release of danger signals in adult and newborn DCs. When complexed with Gag antigen, PCPP maintained its immunostimulatory characteristics while permitting internalization and presentation of Gag by DCs to HIV-Gag-specific CD4(+) T cell clones. The PCPP vaccine formulation outlined here has intrinsic adjuvant activity, can facilitate effective delivery of antigen to DCs, and may be advantageous for induction of beneficial T cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, polyphosphazenes can further reduce cost of vaccine production and distribution through their dose-sparing and antigen-stabilizing properties, thus potentially eliminating the need for cold chain distribution. PMID:25023392

  18. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Stallknecht, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America. PMID:25463613

  19. Diphosphoryl lipid A from Rhodobacter sphaeroides inhibits complexes that form in vitro between lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, soluble CD14, and spectrally pure LPS.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, B W; Lichenstein, H; Qureshi, N

    1997-01-01

    An early event in septic shock is the activation of macrophages by a complex consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS-binding protein (LBP), and the cell surface antigen CD14. The complexes that form between [3H]ReLPS (ReLPS is deep-rough-chemotype hexacyl LPS from E. coli D31m4), soluble CD14 (sCD14), and LBP were analyzed by two independent methods, native (nondenaturing) gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This is the first reported use of HPLC to purify and study LPS-protein complexes. The binding of [3H]ReLPS to LBP and sCD14 was inhibited by preincubation with diphosphoryl lipid A from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsDPLA), a potent LPS antagonist. In addition, [3H]ReLPS bound to LBP and to a truncated form of sCD14 [sCD14(1-152)] that contained the LPS binding domain. Binding to both proteins was blocked by RsDPLA. Thus, RsDPLA competes in a 1:1 ratio for the same or nearby binding sites on ReLPS complexes. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of aggregated ReLPS eluting from the HPLC indicated that only LBP, not sCD14, was bound to the aggregated ReLPS. This finding supports the binary model of LPS complex formation with LBP and sCD14. PMID:9234747

  20. Inhibition and promotion of tumor growth with adeno-associated virus carcinoembryonic antigen vaccine and Toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Triozzi, P L; Aldrich, W; Ponnazhagan, S

    2011-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cancer vaccines' target. Several features of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) are attractive for vaccine applications. Combining other viral vector vaccines with Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists enhances antitumor immunity. Wild-type and CEA transgenic (Tg) mice were immunized with rAAV-expressing CEA, the TLR9 agonist, oligodinucleotide (ODN)1826 and the TLR7 agonist, imiquimod. Mice were challenged with MC38 colon tumor cells and MC38 cells expressing CEA. rAAV-CEA immunization combined with ODN1826 or imiquimod enhanced CEA-specific T-helper 1 immunity and protected against tumor challenge in wild-type but not in CEA-Tg mice. In contrast, immunization with rAAV-CEA in CEA-Tg mice could abrogate the antitumor effects of ODN1826 and promote tumor growth. Compared to wild-type, CEA-Tg mice were characterized by a greater myeloid suppressor cell and T-helper 2 response to TLR agonists and to syngeneic tumors. Depleting PDCA1(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cells and Gr1(+) myeloid cells increased anti-CEA immune responses in CEA-Tg mice to rAAV-CEA-ODN1826 immunization, whereas depleting CD25(+) T cells did not. There are differences in the response of wild-type and CEA-Tg mice to rAAV-CEA, TLR agonists and syngeneic tumor. In CEA-Tg mice, tumor growth can be promoted with rAAV-CEA and TLR agonists. Dendritic and myeloid cells play a regulatory role. PMID:21869824

  1. Inhibition of cerebral vascular inflammation by brain endothelium-targeted oligodeoxynucleotide complex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Al-Waili, Daniah; Hassan, Aishlin; Fan, Guo-Chang; Xin, Mei; Hao, Jiukuan

    2016-08-01

    The present study generated a novel DNA complex to specifically target endothelial NF-κB to inhibit cerebral vascular inflammation. This DNA complex (GS24-NFκB) contains a DNA decoy which inhibits NF-κB activity, and a DNA aptamer (GS-24), a ligand of transferrin receptor (TfR), which allows for targeted delivery of the DNA decoy into cells. The results indicate that GS24-NFκB was successfully delivered into a murine brain-derived endothelial cell line, bEND5, and inhibited inflammatory responses induced by tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) or oxygen-glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R) via down-regulation of the nuclear NF-κB subunit, p65, as well as its downstream inflammatory cytokines, inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1). The inhibitory effect of the GS24-NFκB was demonstrated by a significant reduction in TNF-α or OGD/R induced monocyte adhesion to the bEND5 cells after GS24-NFκB treatment. Intravenous (i.v.) injection of GS24-'NFκB (15mg/kg) was able to inhibit the levels of phoseph-p65 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells in a mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory model in vivo. In conclusion, our approach using DNA nanotechnology for DNA decoy delivery could potentially be utilized for inhibition of inflammation in ischemic stroke and other neuro-inflammatory diseases affecting cerebral vasculature. PMID:27132231

  2. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A complex by carbohydrate receptor mimics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna-Magdalena; Mahrhold, Stefan; Perry, Kay; Cheng, Luisa W; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes for botulism. BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and is subsequently transported through the intestinal epithelium into the general circulation. Several hemagglutinin proteins form a multi-protein complex (HA complex) that recognizes host glycans on the intestinal epithelial cell surface to facilitate BoNT absorption. Blocking carbohydrate binding to the HA complex could significantly inhibit the oral toxicity of BoNT. Here, we identify lactulose, a galactose-containing non-digestible sugar commonly used to treat constipation, as a prototype inhibitor against oral BoNT/A intoxication. As revealed by a crystal structure, lactulose binds to the HA complex at the same site where the host galactose-containing carbohydrate receptors bind. In vitro assays using intestinal Caco-2 cells demonstrated that lactulose inhibits HA from compromising the integrity of the epithelial cell monolayers and blocks the internalization of HA. Furthermore, co-administration of lactulose significantly protected mice against BoNT/A oral intoxication in vivo. Taken together, these data encourage the development of carbohydrate receptor mimics as a therapeutic intervention to prevent BoNT oral intoxication. PMID:26272706

  3. Campylobacter jejuni binds intestinal H(O) antigen (Fuc alpha 1, 2Gal beta 1, 4GlcNAc), and fucosyloligosaccharides of human milk inhibit its binding and infection.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; Cervantes, Luz Elena; Ramos, Pilar; Chavez-Munguia, Bibiana; Newburg, David S

    2003-04-18

    The most common cause of infant mortality is diarrhea; the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea is Campylobacter jejuni, which is also the primary cause of motor neuron paralysis. The first step in campylobacter pathogenesis is adherence to intestinal mucosa. We found that such binding was inhibited in vitro by human milk and, with high avidity, by alpha1,2-fucosylated carbohydrate moieties containing the H(O) blood group epitope (Fuc alpha 1,2Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc em leader ). In studies on the mechanism of adherence, campylobacter, which normally does not bind to Chinese hamster ovary cells, bound avidly when the cells were transfected with a human alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase gene that caused overexpression of H-2 antigen; binding was specifically inhibited by H-2 ligands (lectins Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus and H-2 monoclonal antibody), H-2 mimetics, and human milk oligosaccharides. Human milk oligosaccharides inhibited campylobacter colonization of mice in vivo and human intestinal mucosa ex vivo. Campylobacter colonization of nursing mouse pups was inhibited if their dams had been transfected with a human alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase gene that caused expression of H(O) antigen in milk. We conclude that campylobacter binding to intestinal H-2 antigen is essential for infection. Milk fucosyloligosaccharides and specific fucosyl alpha1,2-linked molecules inhibit this binding and may represent a novel class of antimicrobial agents. PMID:12562767

  4. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  5. Dual-targeting organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes bearing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Erlong; Liu, Suyan; Wang, Fuyi

    2015-08-01

    We have recently demonstrated that complexation with (η(6)-arene)Ru(II) fragments confers 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores a higher potential for inducing cellular apoptosis while preserving the highly inhibitory activity of 4-anilinoquinazolines against EGFR and the reactivity of the ruthenium centre to 9-ethylguanine (Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 10224-10226). Reported herein are the synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of the biological activity of a new series of ruthenium(ii) complexes of the type [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L)Cl]PF6 (arene = p-cymene, benzene, 2-phenylethanol or indane, L = 4-anilinoquinazolines). These organometallic ruthenium complexes undergo fast hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Intriguingly, the ligation of (arene)Ru(II) fragments with 4-anilinoquinazolines not only makes the target complexes excellent EGFR inhibitors, but also confers the complexes high affinity to bind to DNA minor grooves while maintaining their reactivity towards DNA bases, characterising them with dual-targeting properties. Molecular modelling studies reveal that the hydrolysis of these complexes is a favourable process which increases the affinity of the target complexes to bind to EGFR and DNA. In vitro biological activity assays show that most of this group of ruthenium complexes are selectively active inhibiting the EGF-stimulated growth of the HeLa cervical cancer cell line, and the most active complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L13)Cl]PF6 (, IC50 = 1.36 μM, = 4-(3'-chloro-4'-fluoroanilino)-6-(2-(2-aminoethyl)aminoethoxy)-7-methoxyquinazoline) is 29-fold more active than its analogue, [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-ethylenediamine)Cl]PF6, and 21-fold more active than gefitinib, a well-known EGFR inhibitor in use clinically. These results highlight the strong promise to develop highly active ruthenium anticancer complexes by ligation of cytotoxic ruthenium pharmacophores with bioactive organic molecules. PMID:26106875

  6. Differential susceptibility of mitochondrial complex II to inhibition by oxaloacetate in brain and heart.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Anna; Shurubor, Yevgeniya; Valsecchi, Federica; Manfredi, Giovanni; Galkin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II is a key mitochondrial enzyme connecting the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the electron transport chain. Studies of complex II are clinically important since new roles for this enzyme have recently emerged in cell signalling, cancer biology, immune response and neurodegeneration. Oxaloacetate (OAA) is an intermediate of the TCA cycle and at the same time is an inhibitor of complex II with high affinity (Kd~10(-8)M). Whether or not OAA inhibition of complex II is a physiologically relevant process is a significant, but still controversial topic. We found that complex II from mouse heart and brain tissue has similar affinity to OAA and that only a fraction of the enzyme in isolated mitochondrial membranes (30.2±6.0% and 56.4±5.6% in the heart and brain, respectively) is in the free, active form. Since OAA could bind to complex II during isolation, we established a novel approach to deplete OAA in the homogenates at the early stages of isolation. In heart, this treatment significantly increased the fraction of free enzyme, indicating that OAA binds to complex II during isolation. In brain the OAA-depleting system did not significantly change the amount of free enzyme, indicating that a large fraction of complex II is already in the OAA-bound inactive form. Furthermore, short-term ischemia resulted in a dramatic decline of OAA in tissues, but it did not change the amount of free complex II. Our data show that in brain OAA is an endogenous effector of complex II, potentially capable of modulating the activity of the enzyme. PMID:27287543

  7. Monoclonal antibodies directed against major histocompatibility complex antigens bind to the surface of Treponema pallidum isolated from infected rabbits or humans.

    PubMed

    Marchitto, K S; Kindt, T J; Norgard, M V

    1986-09-01

    Evidence is presented for the association of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens with the surface of Treponema pallidum during infection. A monoclonal antibody (IgG2a) directed against a murine H-2Kb epitope of public specificity reacted with the cell surface of T. pallidum, as assayed by the binding of protein A-colloidal gold in immunoelectron microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies directed against class I rabbit MHC antigens also reacted in immunofluorescence assays with material on the surface of rabbit-cultivated T. pallidum. In addition, impression smears of human syphilitic genital ulcers that were darkfield-positive for the presence of spirochetes were tested in immunofluorescence assays with monoclonal antibodies directed against human MHC antigens; antibody directed against HLA-ABC (class I) was reactive whereas antibody directed against HLA-DR (class II) was nonreactive. Results of the study suggest that the association of host-derived class I MHC antigens or molecular mimicry may play a role in T. pallidum evasion of host immune defenses. PMID:2428519

  8. Molecular components of the B cell antigen receptor complex of class IgD differ partly from those of IgM.

    PubMed Central

    Wienands, J; Hombach, J; Radbruch, A; Riesterer, C; Reth, M

    1990-01-01

    Two classes of immunoglobulin, IgM and IgD, are present as antigen receptors on the surface of mature B lymphocytes. We show here that IgD molecules are noncovalently associated in the B cell membrane with a heterodimer consisting of two proteins of 35 kd (IgD-alpha) and 39 kd (Ig-beta), respectively. The two novel proteins are not found in the IgD-expressing myeloma J558L delta m, which fails to bring IgD antigen receptor onto the cell surface. In a surface IgD positive variant line of this myeloma, however, membrane-bound IgD molecules are associated with the heterodimer, suggesting that the formation of an antigen receptor complex is required for surface IgD expression. We further demonstrate that the IgD-associated heterodimer differs partly from that of the IgM antigen receptor and that its binding to the heavy chain only requires the presence of the last constant domain and the transmembrane part of the delta m chain. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2303036

  9. Cnn1 inhibits the interactions between the KMN complexes of the yeast kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Lucy J.; Pagliuca, Cinzia; Kobayashi, Norihiko; Grove, Ryan A.; Oku, Yusuke; Shrestha, Kriti; Alfieri, Claudio; Golfieri, Cristina; Oldani, Amanda; Maschio, Marianna Dal; Bermejo, Rodrigo; Hazbun, Tony R.; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U.; De Wulf, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Kinetochores attach the replicated chromosomes to the mitotic spindle and orchestrate their transmission to the daughter cells. Kinetochore–spindle binding and chromosome segregation are mediated by the multi-copy KNL1Spc105, MIS12Mtw1 and NDC80Ndc80 complexes that form the so-called KMN network. KMN–spindle attachment is regulated by the Aurora BIpl1 and MPS1Mps1 kinases. It is unclear whether other mechanisms exist that support KMN activity during the cell cycle. Using budding yeast, we show that kinetochore protein Cnn1 localizes to the base of the Ndc80 complex and promotes a functionally competent configuration of the KMN network. Cnn1 regulates KMN activity in a spatiotemporal manner by inhibiting the interaction between its complexes. Cnn1 activity peaks in anaphase and is driven by the Cdc28, Mps1 and Ipl1 kinases. PMID:22561345

  10. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  11. Identification of SNARE complex modulators that inhibit exocytosis from an alpha-helix-constrained combinatorial library.

    PubMed Central

    Blanes-Mira, Clara; Pastor, Maria T; Valera, Elvira; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; Merino, Jaime M; Gutierrez, Luis M; Perez-Payá, Enrique; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic peptides patterned after the proteins involved in vesicle fusion [the so-called SNARE (soluble N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor) proteins] are potent inhibitors of SNARE complex assembly and neuronal exocytosis. It is noteworthy that the identification of peptide sequences not related to the SNARE proteins has not been accomplished yet; this is due, in part, to the structural constraints and the specificity of the protein interactions that govern the formation of the SNARE complex. Here we have addressed this question and used a combinatorial approach to identify peptides that modulate the assembly of the SNARE core complex and inhibit neuronal exocytosis. An alpha-helix-constrained, mixture-based, 17-mer combinatorial peptide library composed of 137180 sequences was synthesized in a positional scanning format. Peptide mixtures were assayed for their ability to prevent the formation of the in vitro -reconstituted SDS-resistant SNARE core complex. Library deconvolution identified eight peptides that inhibited the assembly of the SNARE core complex. Notably, the most potent 17-mer peptide (acetyl-SAAEAFAKLYAEAFAKG-NH2) abolished both Ca2+-evoked catecholamine secretion from detergent-permeabilized chromaffin cells and L-glutamate release from intact hippocampal primary cultures. Collectively, these findings indicate that amino acid sequences that prevent SNARE complex formation are not restricted to those that mimic domains of SNARE proteins, thus expanding the diversity of molecules that target neuronal exocytosis. Because of the implication of neurosecretion in the aetiology of several human neurological disorders, these newly identified peptides may be considered hits for the development of novel anti-spasmodic drugs. PMID:12852787

  12. Cells involved in the immune response. XXXVI. The thymic antigen-specific suppressor cell in the immunized rabbit is a T cell with receptors for FcG and the antigen and it acts, via a secreted suppressor factor, directly on the immune splenic AFC B cell to inhibit antibody secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Talor, E; Jodouin, C A; Richter, M

    1988-01-01

    Following i.v. immunization of the normal outbred rabbit with sheep (SRBC) or horse (HRBC) erythrocytes, antigen-specific suppressor cells are generated in the thymus capable of inhibiting the generation of haemolytic plaques by the autologous or allogeneic splenic antibody-forming cells (AFC) in the plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. These suppressor cells secrete an antigen-specific suppressor factor in short-term (4-24 hr) culture in vitro. The suppressor cells are not detected in the thymus prior to Day 4, exhibit peak activity between Days 5 and 11 post-immunization, and decline slowly thereafter. Suppressor cells can no longer be detected in the thymus by Day 60 postimmunization. Suppressor cells are not detected in any of the other lymphoid organs of the immunized rabbit nor in any lymphoid organ in the unimmunized rabbit. The thymic suppressor cell is a T cell with surface receptors for the antigen (SRBC or HRBC) and for FcG. On the other hand, the AFC B cells generated in the spleen of the immunized rabbit possess cell-surface receptors for only the antigen and not for FcG. Both the suppressor cells and the secreted suppressor factor act directly on the AFC B lymphocytes to inhibit the generation of antigen-specific haemolytic plaques in the PFC assay. PMID:2455684

  13. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  14. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouser, Emily E. I. M.; Pollakis, Georgios; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Harnett, William

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs. PMID:26808476

  15. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus ORF7a Inhibits Bone Marrow Stromal Antigen 2 Virion Tethering through a Novel Mechanism of Glycosylation Interference

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Justin K.; Coleman, Christopher M.; Postel, Sandra; Sisk, Jeanne M.; Bernbaum, John G.; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Sundberg, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged in November 2002 as a case of atypical pneumonia in China, and the causative agent of SARS was identified to be a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2; also known as CD317 or tetherin) was initially identified to be a pre-B-cell growth promoter, but it also inhibits the release of virions of the retrovirus human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by tethering budding virions to the host cell membrane. Further work has shown that BST-2 restricts the release of many other viruses, including the human coronavirus 229E (hCoV-229E), and the genomes of many of these viruses encode BST-2 antagonists to overcome BST-2 restriction. Given the previous studies on BST-2, we aimed to determine if BST-2 has the ability to restrict SARS-CoV and if the SARS-CoV genome encodes any proteins that modulate BST-2's antiviral function. Through an in vitro screen, we identified four potential BST-2 modulators encoded by the SARS-CoV genome: the papain-like protease (PLPro), nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1), ORF6, and ORF7a. As the function of ORF7a in SARS-CoV replication was previously unknown, we focused our study on ORF7a. We found that BST-2 does restrict SARS-CoV, but the loss of ORF7a leads to a much greater restriction, confirming the role of ORF7a as an inhibitor of BST-2. We further characterized the mechanism of BST-2 inhibition by ORF7a and found that ORF7a localization changes when BST-2 is overexpressed and ORF7a binds directly to BST-2. Finally, we also show that SARS-CoV ORF7a blocks the restriction activity of BST-2 by blocking the glycosylation of BST-2. IMPORTANCE The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged from zoonotic sources in 2002 and caused over 8,000 infections and 800 deaths in 37 countries around the world. Identifying host factors that regulate SARS-CoV pathogenesis is critical to understanding how

  16. Oral Vaccination With Vaccinia Virus Expressing the Tick Antigen Subolesin Inhibits Tick Feeding and Transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bensaci, Mekki; Bhattacharya, Debaditya; Clark, Roger; Hu, Linden T.

    2014-01-01

    Immunization with the Ixodes scapularis protein, subolesin, has previously been shown to protect hosts against tick infestation and to decrease acquisition of Anaplsma marginale and Babesia bigemina. Here we report the efficacy of subolesin expressed from Vaccinia virus for use as an orally delivered reservoir–targeted vaccine for prevention of tick infestation and acquisition/transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi to its tick and mouse hosts. We cloned subolesin into Vaccinia virus and showed that it is expressed from mammalian cells infected with the recombinant virus in vitro. We then vaccinated mice by oral gavage. A single dose of the vaccine was sufficient for mice to generate antibody response to subolesin. Vaccination with the subolesin expressing Vaccinia virus inhibited tick infestation by 52% compared to control vaccination with Vaccinia virus and reduced uptake of B. burgdorferi among the surviving ticks that fed to repletion by 34%. There was a reduction in transmission of B. burgdorferi to uninfected vaccinated mice of 40% compared to controls. These results suggest that subolesin has potential as a component of a reservoir targeted vaccine to decrease B. burgdorferi, Babesia and Anaplasma species infections in their natural hosts. PMID:22864146

  17. On the possibility of lipid-induced regulation of conformation and immunogenicity of influenza a virus H1/N1 hemagglutinin as antigen of TI-complexes.

    PubMed

    Vorobieva, Natalia; Sanina, Nina; Vorontsov, Vladimir; Kostetsky, Eduard; Mazeika, Andrey; Tsybulsky, Alexander; Kim, Natalia; Shnyrov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    The tubular immunostimulating complex (TI-complex) consisting of cucumarioside A2-2, cholesterol and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) from marine macrophytes is the perspective antigen delivery system for subunit vaccines. MGDG is a lipid matrix for the protein antigen incorporated in the TI-complex. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of MGDGs from different macrophytes on conformation and immunogenicity of the secreted recombinant uncleaved hemagglutinin monomer (HA0S) of influenza A virus H1/N1. Differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism showed a dependence of the conformational changes of HA0S on the microviscosity of MGDG. The most viscous MGDG from Zostera marina induced the strongest rearrangements in protein conformation. Immunization of mice with HA0S within TI-complexes comprising different MGDGs resulted in an approximately 2-fold increase of the levels of anti-HA0S antibodies and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) compared with those induced by HA0S alone. TI-complexes based on MGDG from Z. marina stimulated the maximal production of GM-CSF. However, humoral immune response (anti-HA0S antibodies), unlike cell-mediated immune response (GM-CSF), did not depend on the physicochemical properties of MGDGs. It is assumed that this is due to the different localization and conformational lipid sensitivity of the HA0S regions, which are responsible for these types of immune responses. PMID:25060667

  18. Limitations of plasmid vaccines to complex viruses: selected myxoma virus antigens as DNA vaccines were not protective.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mathew M; van Leeuwen, Barbara H; Kerr, Peter J

    2004-11-25

    Myxoma virus, a poxvirus of the genus Leporipoxvirus, is the causative agent of the disease myxomatosis which is highly lethal in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Current vaccines to protect against myxomatosis are either attenuated live strains of the virus or the antigenically related rabbit fibroma virus. We examined the immune response of outbred domestic rabbits to the individual myxoma virus antigens M055R, M073R, M115L and M121R, delivered as DNA vaccines co-expressing rabbit interleukin-2 or interleukin-4. M115L and M121R were also delivered simultaneously. None of the vaccine constructs were able to protect the rabbits from disease or reduce mortality after challenge with virulent myxoma virus, despite induction of antigen-specific cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. PMID:15531037

  19. Selenite Treatment Inhibits LAPC-4 Tumor Growth and Prostate-Specific Antigen Secretion in a Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Rumi S.; Husbeck, Bryan; Feldman, David; Knox, Susan J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Selenium compounds have known chemopreventive effects on prostate cancer. However selenite, an inorganic form of selenium, has not been extensively studied as a treatment option for prostate cancer. Our previous studies have demonstrated the inhibition of androgen receptor expression and androgen stimulated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression by selenite in human prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of selenite as a therapy to treat mice with established LAPC-4 tumors. Methods and Materials: Male mice harboring androgen-dependent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were treated with selenite (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week) or vehicle for 42 days. In addition, androgen-independent LAPC-4 xenograft tumors were generated in female mice over 4 to 6 months. Once established, androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumor fragments were passaged into female mice and were treated with selenite or vehicle for 42 days. Changes in tumor volume and serum PSA levels were assessed. Results: Selenite significantly decreased androgen-dependent LAPC-4 tumor growth in male mice over 42 days (p < 0.001). Relative tumor volume was decreased by 41% in selenite-treated animals compared with vehicle-treated animals. The inhibition of LAPC-4 tumor growth corresponded to a marked decrease in serum PSA levels (p < 0.01). In the androgen-independent LAPC-4 tumors in female mice, selenite treatment decreased tumor volume by 58% after 42 days of treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that selenite may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent to treat both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  20. Slow-binding inhibition of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex by acetylphosphinate.

    PubMed

    Schönbrunn-Hanebeck, E; Laber, B; Amrhein, N

    1990-05-22

    The pyruvate analogue acetylphosphinate (CH3-CO-PO2H2) inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase component (E1) of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex in a time-dependent process with biphasic reaction kinetics. The formation of an initial, rapidly reversible enzyme-inhibitor complex (EI) with an apparent Ki of 0.12 +/- 0.025 microM is followed by the conversion to a tighter complex (EI) at a maximal rate of k3 = 0.87 +/- 0.34 min-1. The inhibition is reversible (dissociation rate constant k4 = 0.038 +/- 0.002 min-1), requires the presence of the cofactors thiamin pyrophosphate and Mg2+, and is competitive with regard to pyruvate. The microscopic rate constants give a value of 5 nM for the overall dissociation constant [Ki = [E] [I]/[( EI] + [EI]) = Kik4/(k3 + k4)] compared with values of 10 and 3.5 nM obtained by steady-state methods. Thus acetylphosphinate binds by 5 orders of magnitude more tightly to pyruvate dehydrogenase than does pyruvate (Km = 0.35 mM). Acetylphosphinate also affects the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex fluorescence when excited at 290 nm in a time-dependent manner with a maximal rate constant of 0.99 min-1, suggesting a conformational change in the enzyme complex as the slow step in conversion of EI to EI (k3). All these features taken together suggest that the interaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase with acetylphosphinate involves the formation of a thiamin pyrophosphate-acetylphosphinate adduct that resembles the normal reaction intermediate, 2-(1-carboxy-1-hydroxyethyl)thiamin pyrophosphate (alpha-lactylthiamin pyrophosphate). PMID:2194562

  1. Mitochondrial complex I inhibition is not required for dopaminergic neuron death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Kruse, Shane E.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Xia, Zhengui

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I is one of the leading hypotheses for dopaminergic neuron death associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). To test this hypothesis genetically, we used a mouse strain lacking functional Ndufs4, a gene encoding a subunit required for complete assembly and function of complex I. Deletion of the Ndufs4 gene abolished complex I activity in midbrain mesencephalic neurons cultured from embryonic day (E) 14 mice, but did not affect the survival of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive than other neurons in these cultures to cell death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat treatments, the absence of complex I activity did not protect the dopaminergic neurons, as would be expected if these compounds act by inhibiting complex 1. In fact, the dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive to rotenone. These data suggest that dopaminergic neuron death induced by treatment with rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat is independent of complex I inhibition. PMID:18812510

  2. Hydroxychloroquine protects melanocytes from autoantibody-induced injury by reducing the binding of antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Guang; Hu, Wen-Zhi; Ma, Hui-Jun; Liu, Wen; Yang, Qing-Qi; Zhao, Guang

    2016-08-01

    . HCQ also significantly decreased the effects of ADCC and CDC that were mediated by GV IgG. The present study provides evidence that HCQ dissociates autoantibody-antigen complexes on the surface of HMCs and reverses ADCC and CDC activity in vitro. Thus, in addition to its effectiveness as an antimalarial therapeutic agent, HCQ may also be a promising potential treatment for patients with vitiligo. PMID:27277530

  3. [Evaluation of penicillin expandase mutants and complex substrate inhibition characteristics at high concentrations of penicillin G].

    PubMed

    Wu, Linjun; Fan, Keqiang; Ji, Junjie; Yang, Keqian

    2015-12-01

    Penicillin expandase, also known as deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS), is an essential enzyme involved in cephalosporin C biosynthesis. To evaluate the catalytic behaviors of penicillin expandase under high penicillin G concentration and to identify mutants suitable for industrial applications, the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and several mutants with increased activities toward penicillin G were determined by HPLC under high penicillin G concentrations. Their specific activity profiles were compared with theoretical predictions by different catalytic dynamics models. We evaluated the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and previous reported high-activity mutants H4, H5, H6 and H7 at concentrations ranging from 5.6 to 500 mmol/L penicillin G. The specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and mutant H4 increased as penicillin G concentration increased, but decreased when concentrations of substrate go above 200 mmol/L. Other mutants H5, H6 and H7 showed more complex behaviors under high concentration of penicillin G. Among all tested enzymes, mutant H6 showed the highest activity when concentration of penicillin G is above 100 mmol/L. Our results revealed that the substrate inhibition to wild-type DAOCS' by penicillin G is noncompetitive. Other DAOCS mutants showed more complex trends in their specific activities at high concentration of penicillin G (>100 mmol/L), indicating more complex substrate inhibition mechanism might exist. The substrate inhibition and activity of DAOCS mutants at high penicillin G concentration provide important insight to help select proper mutants for industrial application. PMID:27093832

  4. High-resolution structure of HLA-A*0201 in complex with a tumour-specific antigenic peptide encoded by the MAGE-A4 gene.

    PubMed

    Hillig, R C; Coulie, P G; Stroobant, V; Saenger, W; Ziegler, A; Hülsmeyer, M

    2001-07-27

    The heterotrimeric complex of the human major histocompatibity complex (MHC) molecule HLA-A*0201, beta2-microglobulin and the decameric peptide GVYDGREHTV derived from the melanoma antigen (MAGE-A4 protein has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.4 A resolution. MAGE-A4 belongs to a family of genes that are specifically expressed in a variety of tumours. MAGE-A4-derived peptides are presented by MHC molecules at the cell surface to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. As the HLA-A*0201:MAGE-A4 complex occurs only on tumour cells, it is considered to be an appropriate target for immunotherapy. The structure presented here reveals potential epitopes specific to the complex and indicates which peptide residues could be recognised by T-cell receptors. In addition, as the structure could be refined anisotropically, it was possible to describe the movements of the bound peptide in more detail. PMID:11502003

  5. The Small Molecule IMR-1 Inhibits the Notch Transcriptional Activation Complex to Suppress Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Astudillo, Luisana; Da Silva, Thiago G; Wang, Zhiqiang; Han, Xiaoqing; Jin, Ke; VanWye, Jeffrey; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Weaver, Kelly; Oashi, Taiji; Lopes, Pedro E M; Orton, Darren; Neitzel, Leif R; Lee, Ethan; Landgraf, Ralf; Robbins, David J; MacKerell, Alexander D; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2016-06-15

    In many cancers, aberrant Notch activity has been demonstrated to play a role in the initiation and maintenance of the neoplastic phenotype and in cancer stem cells, which may allude to its additional involvement in metastasis and resistance to therapy. Therefore, Notch is an exceedingly attractive therapeutic target in cancer, but the full range of potential targets within the pathway has been underexplored. To date, there are no small-molecule inhibitors that directly target the intracellular Notch pathway or the assembly of the transcriptional activation complex. Here, we describe an in vitro assay that quantitatively measures the assembly of the Notch transcriptional complex on DNA. Integrating this approach with computer-aided drug design, we explored potential ligand-binding sites and screened for compounds that could disrupt the assembly of the Notch transcriptional activation complex. We identified a small-molecule inhibitor, termed Inhibitor of Mastermind Recruitment-1 (IMR-1), that disrupted the recruitment of Mastermind-like 1 to the Notch transcriptional activation complex on chromatin, thereby attenuating Notch target gene transcription. Furthermore, IMR-1 inhibited the growth of Notch-dependent cell lines and significantly abrogated the growth of patient-derived tumor xenografts. Taken together, our findings suggest that a novel class of Notch inhibitors targeting the transcriptional activation complex may represent a new paradigm for Notch-based anticancer therapeutics, warranting further preclinical characterization. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3593-603. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197169

  6. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  7. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 13.8 μM, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC50 5.3 μM). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells. PMID:18501397

  8. Gold (I) N-heterocyclic carbene complex inhibits mouse melanoma growth by p53 upregulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer treatment using gold (I) complexes is becoming popular. In this study, a gold (I) N-heterocyclic complex designated as complex 3 was synthesized, its cytotoxicity was examined, and its anti-melanoma activity was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Methods Viability of cancer cells was determined by MTT assay upon treatment with various concentrations of a gold (I) N-heterocyclic carbene complex (complex 3) in a dose and time dependent manner. Mouse melanoma cells B16F10 were selected for further apoptotic studies, including flowcytometric analysis of annexin binding, cell cycle arrest, intracellular ROS generation and loss in the mitochondrial membrane potential. ELISA based assays were done for caspase activities and western blots for determining the expression of various survival and apoptotic proteins. Immunocytology was performed to visualize the translocation of p53 to the nucleus. B16F10 cells were inoculated into mice and post tumor formation, complex 3 was administered. Immunohistology was performed to determine the expressions of p53, p21, NF-κB (p65 and p50), MMP-9 and VEGF. Student’s t test was used for determining statistical significance. The survival rate data were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results Complex 3 markedly inhibited the growth of HCT 116, HepG2, and A549, and induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells with nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, externalization of phosphatidylserine, activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9, PARP cleavage, downregulation of Bcl-2, upregulation of Bax, cytosolic cytochrome c elevation, ROS generation, and mitochondrial membrane potential loss indicating the involvement of an intrinsic mitochondrial death pathway. Further, upregulation of p53, p-p53 (ser 15) and p21 indicated the role of p53 in complex 3 mediated apoptosis. The complex reduced tumor size, and caused upregulation of p53 and p21 along with downregulation of NF-κB (p65 and p50), VEGF and MMP-9. These results suggest that it induced

  9. Identification and evaluation of major histocompatibility complex antigens in chicken chimeras and their relationship to germline transmission.

    PubMed

    Bacon, L D; Zajchowski, L; Clark, M E; Etches, R J

    2002-10-01

    Chimeric chickens were evaluated as an intermediate for development of transgenic chickens. The transfer of Barred Plymouth Rock (BR) blastodermal cells into White Leghorn (WL) embryos results in BR-->WL chimeras, and some breeder males generate over 30% germline transmission of the BR genotype to offspring based on a feather-color trait. The objectives of the current study were to 1) identify the MHC (B haplotypes) in resident BR and WL lines, 2) establish that B antigens could be detected and quantified in red blood cells (RBC) of chimeras, 3) establish if there is a correlation in chimeras between percentage of RBC with donor B antigens and percentage germline transmission, and 4) evaluate if the MHC genotype influences chimera development. The RBC agglutination data indicated three B haplotypes were present in each line. The B*2-like, and B*19-like genes were unique to the WL line, and B*13-like and B-15-like genes were unique to the BR line, whereas a B*21-like gene was present in both lines. In adult BR-->WL chimeras, as well as 10- to 14 d-old WL-->WL chimeras, donor-type B antigens were detectable and quantifiable on RBC using flow cytometry. In BR-->WL chimeras, the percentage germline transmission was significantly correlated with the percentage of RBC with donor B antigen, as well as percentage of black feathers in the plumage. In a retrospective study using previously developed BR-->WL chimeras, the level of chimerism and germline transmission was higher in B*21/*21 type recipients, but this was not statistically significant in two prospective studies. It was concluded that MHC antigens on RBC can be used for identifying, quantifying, and selecting chicken chimeras developed by the transfer of blastodermal cells. PMID:12412906

  10. Inhibition of experimental lung metastasis by aerosol delivery of PEI-p53 complexes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, A; Densmore, C L; Waldrep, J C

    2000-10-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and the pathways mediated by the p53 protein are common in many human cancers. Replacement of functional p53 by gene therapy is a potential way of combating these cancers and the associated drug resistance and tumor growth. Aerosol delivery of genes is a noninvasive way of targeting genes to the lung for gene therapy. Here we demonstrate, using a murine melanoma lung metastasis model, that aerosol delivery of polyethyleneimine-p53 (PEI-p53) complexes inhibits the growth of lung metastasis. A significantly reduced number of visible foci were observed in C57BL/6 mice injected with B16-F10 melanoma and treated with PEI-p53 complexes by aerosol for 3 weeks at twice a week. Fifty percent of the mice in the PEI-p53-treated group exhibited no visible tumor foci. There was a significant reduction in the lung weights of p53-treated mice (P < 0.01) compared to control groups. The tumor burden was also significantly lower (P < 0.001) in mice treated with PEI-p53 complexes. No extrapulmonary metastasis was observed in the groups treated with PEI-p53 complexes compared to 50% of the mice in control groups, which showed metastasis to lymph nodes in the neck or abdomen. Treatment with PEI-p53 aerosol also led to about a 50% increase in the mean length of survival of the mice injected with B16-F10 cells. These data suggest that delivery of the p53 gene by aerosol using PEI as the gene delivery vector can inhibit the growth of lung metastasis. PMID:11020346

  11. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC.

  12. Sestrin2 inhibits mTORC1 through modulation of GATOR complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Sig; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Myungjin; Park, Hwan-Woo; Semple, Ian A; Park, Haeli; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Wang, Wei; Guan, Kun-Liang; Karin, Michael; Lee, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Sestrins are stress-inducible metabolic regulators that suppress a wide range of age- and obesity-associated pathologies, many of which are due to mTORC1 overactivation. Upon various stresses, the Sestrins inhibit mTORC1 activity through an indirect mechanism that is still unclear. GATORs are recently identified protein complexes that regulate the activity of RagB, a small GTPase essential for mTORC1 activation. GATOR1 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RagB whereas GATOR2 functions as an inhibitor of GATOR1. However, how the GATORs are physiologically regulated is unknown. Here we show that Sestrin2 binds to GATOR2, and liberates GATOR1 from GATOR2-mediated inhibition. Released GATOR1 subsequently binds to and inactivates RagB, ultimately resulting in mTORC1 suppression. Consistent with this biochemical mechanism, genetic ablation of GATOR1 nullifies the mTORC1-inhibiting effect of Sestrin2 in both cell culture and Drosophila models. Collectively, we elucidate a new signaling cascade composed of Sestrin2-GATOR2-GATOR1-RagB that mediates stress-dependent suppression of mTORC1 activity. PMID:25819761

  13. Intestinal Dysplasia Induced by Simian Virus 40 T Antigen Is Independent of p53

    PubMed Central

    Markovics, Jennifer A.; Carroll, Patrick A.; Robles, M. Teresa Sáenz; Pope, Hannah; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Pipas, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing simian virus 40 large T antigen in enterocytes develop intestinal hyperplasia that progresses to dysplasia with age. Hyperplasia is dependent on T antigen binding to the retinoblastoma (pRb) family of tumor suppressor proteins. Mice expressing a truncated T antigen that inactivates the pRb-family, but is defective for binding p53, exhibit hyperplasia but do not progress to dysplasia. We hypothesized that the inhibition of the pRb family leads to entry of enterocytes into the cell cycle, resulting in hyperplasia, while inactivation of p53 is required for progression to dysplasia. Therefore, we examined T antigen/p53 complexes from the intestines of transgenic mice. We found that T antigen did not induce p53 stabilization, and we could not detect T antigen/p53 complexes in villus enterocytes. In contrast, T antigen expression led to a large increase in the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Furthermore, mice in which pRb was inactivated by a truncated T antigen in a p53 null background exhibited intestinal hyperplasia but no progression to dysplasia. These data indicate that loss of p53 function does not play a role in T antigen-induced dysplasia in the intestine. Rather, some unknown function of T antigen is essential for progression beyond hyperplasia. PMID:15919904

  14. In Silico Inhibition Studies of Jun-Fos-DNA Complex Formation by Curcumin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Bora, Utpal

    2012-01-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP1) is a transcription factor that consists of the Jun and Fos family proteins. It regulates gene expression in response to a variety of stimuli and controls cellular processes including proliferation, transformation, inflammation, and innate immune responses. AP1 binds specifically to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) responsive element 5′-TGAG/CTCA-3′ (AP1 site). It has been found constitutively active in breast, ovarian, cervical, and lung cancers. Numerous studies have shown that inhibition of AP1 could be a promising strategy for cancer therapeutic applications. The present in silico study provides insights into the inhibition of Jun-Fos-DNA complex formation by curcumin derivatives. These derivatives interact with the amino acid residues like Arg155 and Arg158 which play a key role in binding of Jun-Fos complex to DNA (AP1 site). Ala151, Ala275, Leu283, and Ile286 were the residues present at binding site which could contribute to hydrophobic contacts with inhibitor molecules. Curcumin sulphate was predicted to be the most potent inhibitor amongst all the natural curcumin derivatives docked. PMID:25374685

  15. Molecular Modeling Analysis of the Inhibition of Mitochondrial Cytochrome BC1 Complex Activity by Tocol Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Awantika; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Compadre, Cesar M.; Kumar, K. Sree

    2011-06-01

    The biological functions of vitamin E related compounds have been of interest in biomedical research for several decades. Among those compounds, α-, β-, δ-, and γ-tocopherols and their oxidation products, α-, β-, δ-, γ-tocopherylquinone and their analogs α-TQo, γ-TQo, TMC20 and TMC40 were recently shown to inhibit the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex. In this investigation the effects of the structural variation on the inhibition of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex were analyzed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). CoMFA performed using steric and electrostatic molecular fields produced a very good correlation. The best CoMFA models were obtained using the manual alignment of 12 compounds with 5 components (q2 = 0.589, SPRESS = 0.515, r2 = 0.992, s = 0.068 and F value = 156.520). The resulting contour maps produced by the best CoMFA model were helpful in identifying the structural features required for the biological activity of compounds under study. These results would be helpful for predicting the activity of new compounds, and they could be used for guiding the design, synthesis and development of new and more effective agents.

  16. Inhibition of Phosphate Uptake in Corn Roots by Aluminum-Fluoride Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Façanha, Arnoldo Rocha; Okorokova-Façanha, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    F forms stable complexes with Al at conditions found in the soil. Fluoroaluminate complexes (AlFx) have been widely described as effective analogs of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in Pi-binding sites of several proteins. In this work, we explored the possibility that the phytotoxicity of AlFx reflects their activity as Pi analogs. For this purpose, 32P-labeled phosphate uptake by excised roots and plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity were investigated in an Al-tolerant variety of maize (Zea mays L. var. dwarf hybrid), either treated or not with AlFx. In vitro, AlFx competitively inhibited the rate of root phosphate uptake as well as the H+-ATPase activity. Conversely, pretreatment of seedlings with AlFx in vivo promoted no effect on the H+-ATPase activity, whereas a biphasic effect on Pi uptake by roots was observed. Although the initial rate of phosphate uptake by roots was inhibited by AlFx pretreatment, this situation changed over the following minutes as the rate of uptake increased and a pronounced stimulation in subsequent 32Pi uptake was observed. This kinetic behavior suggests a reversible and competitive inhibition of the phosphate transporter by fluoroaluminates. The stimulation of root 32Pi uptake induced by AlFx pretreatment was tentatively interpreted as a phosphate starvation response. This report places AlF3 and AlF4− among Al-phytotoxic species and suggests a mechanism of action where the accumulation of Pi-mimicking fluoroaluminates in the soil may affect the phosphate absorption by plants. The biochemical, physiological, and environmental significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:12177489

  17. Differences in serological responses to specific glycopeptidolipid-core and common lipid antigens in patients with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yukiko; Doi, Takeshi; Maekura, Ryoji; Ito, Masami; Yano, Ikuya

    2006-02-01

    Disease due to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is one of the most important opportunistic pulmonary infections. Since the clinical features of MAC pulmonary disease and tuberculosis (TB) resemble each other, and the former is often difficult to treat with chemotherapy, early differential diagnosis is desirable. The humoral immune responses to both diseases were compared by a unique multiple-antigen ELISA using mycobacterial species-common and species-specific lipid antigens, including glycopeptidolipid (GPL)-core. The results were assessed for two patient groups hospitalized and diagnosed clinically as having TB or MAC pulmonary disease. Diverse IgG antibody responsiveness was demonstrated against five lipid antigens: (1) monoacyl phosphatidylinositol dimannoside (Ac-PIM2), (2) cord factor (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate) (TDM-T) and (3) trehalose monomycolate from Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) (TMM-T), and (4) trehalose monomycolate (TMM-M) and (5) GPL-core from MAC. Anti-GPL-core IgG antibody was critical, and detected only in the primary and the secondary MAC diseases with high positivity, up to 88.4 %. However, IgG antibodies against Ac-PIM2, TDM-T and TMM-T were elevated in both TB and MAC patients. Anti-TMM-M IgG antibody was also elevated in MAC disease preferentially, with a positive rate of 89.9 %, and therefore, it was also useful for the diagnosis of the disease. IgG antibody levels were increased at the early stages of the disease and declined in parallel to the decrease of bacterial burden to near the normal healthy control level, when the anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy was completed successfully. Unexpectedly, about 25 % of hospitalized TB patient sera were anti-GPL-core IgG antibody positive, although the specificity of GPL-core was sufficiently high (95.8 % negative in healthy controls), suggesting that a considerable number of cases of latent co-infection with MAC may exist in TB patients. Taken together, the combination of

  18. [Screening for Potential Drug Targets by Comprehensive Identification of Disease-specific Antigens Incorporated into Immune Complexes in Patients with Immunological Diseases].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Kaname

    2016-01-01

    Our immune system resembles an intelligent security system, which continually monitors for foreign invaders (infectious diseases); however, in some cases, this system recognizes healthy parts as something harmful or foreign and then attacks them (autoimmune diseases). The defining characteristics of an autoimmune disease are the existence of T- and B-cell autoreactivity against self proteins (autoantigens). In addition to autoimmune diseases, aberrant host proteins that occur during a certain state of diseases (e.g., cancer) can be recognized as an autoantigen. Immune complexes (ICs) are produced during an immune response and may reflect some aspects of an ongoing immune response. Therefore, the identity of antigens incorporated into ICs provides the information that in the future may aid in the development of diagnosis and treatment strategies for autoimmune diseases, infection, cancer, and transplantation therapy, and this information might be more relevant than information on free antigens. We developed a novel proteomic strategy (immune complexome analysis) in which ICs are separated from serum, followed by direct tryptic digestion and nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the identification and profiling of antigens in circulating ICs. We applied this strategy to the analysis of circulating ICs in autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, Takayasu's arteritis, mixed connective tissue disease, dermatomyositis, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, and systemic lupus erythematosus), infectious diseases and cancers. In this review, we mainly discuss the results for autoimmune diseases. PMID:26831786

  19. Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens in pulmonary epithelium and endothelium varies among different species.

    PubMed

    Houser, Stuart L; Benjamin, Louis C; Wain, John C; Madsen, Joren C; Allan, James S

    2004-02-27

    We have observed high constitutive levels of class II antigen expression on porcine and human coronary endothelium, but not on the endothelium of rats and mice. This study examines whether a similar interspecies difference exists in the expression of class II molecules on pulmonary epithelium and endothelium. Lung tissues from naïve human, porcine, and rodent sources were stained with the monoclonal antibody ISCR3 and examined by light microscopy. Immunoperoxidase staining of class II molecules was observed on human and porcine pulmonary epithelium and endothelium, but was absent in rats and mice. By using an antibody with cross-species reactivity, we demonstrated that naïve swine pulmonary epithelium and endothelium, unlike those of rodent species, express basal levels of class II antigens in a manner similar to that observed in human lung tissue. These interspecies differences may explain experimental differences observed between murine and large-animal constructs. PMID:15084944

  20. Expression patterns of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen in rat fetuses: detection with the lectin amaranthin.

    PubMed

    Sata, T; Zuber, C; Rinderle, S J; Goldstein, I J; Roth, J

    1990-06-01

    The lectin amaranthin, purified from the seeds of Amaranthus caudatus, has been shown to react specifically with the Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha and the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha sequence which represent the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen, respectively. We report here the development of labeling techniques that apply amaranthin to stain paraffin sections from rat fetuses. Amaranthin staining was inhibited by pre-incubation of lectin-gold complexes with 10 mM Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha-O-benzyl (synthetic T antigen) or 10 mM Gal beta 1,3GalNAc-alpha-O-aminophenylethyl-human serum albumin (T antigen neoglycoprotein), asialoglycophorin, asialofetuin, and asialomucin. The beta-elimination reaction also abolished the lectin staining demonstrating specificity for O-glycosidically linked structures. A comparison with monoclonal anti-T antigen antibody immunostaining demonstrated that amaranthin detects the T antigen and its cryptic form in tissue sections. Application of the galactose oxidase-Schiff sequence abolished amaranthin (and anti-T antibody) binding to the T antigen but not to its cryptic form, and therefore permitted their differentiation in tissue sections. Histochemical evidence was obtained indicating that amaranthin is a more specific anti-T reagent than peanut lectin. Data are presented that show the differential expression of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen in organs and cells of rat fetuses late in gestation. Therefore, amaranthin can be used for histochemical detection of the T antigen and the cryptic T antigen, and facilitates discrimination between them. PMID:2335739

  1. Conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active complex by the phosphate reaction in heart mitochondria is inhibited by alloxan-diabetes or starvation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hutson, N J; Kerbey, A L; Randle, P J; Sugden, P H

    1978-08-01

    1. The conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active (dephosphorylated) complex by pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase is inhibited in heart mitochondria prepared from alloxan-diabetic or 48h-starved rats, in mitochondria prepared from acetate-perfused rat hearts and in mitochondria prepared from normal rat hearts incubated with respiratory substrates for 6 min (as compared with 1 min). 2. This conclusion is based on experiments with isolated intact mitochondria in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction was inhibited by pyruvate or ATP depletion (by using oligomycin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), and in experiments in which the rate of conversion of inactive complex into active complex by the phosphatase was measured in extracts of mitochondria. The inhibition of the phosphatase reaction was seen with constant concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (activators of the phosphatase). The phosphatase reaction in these mitochondrial extracts was not inhibited when an excess of exogenous pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was used as substrate. It is concluded that this inhibition is due to some factor(s) associated with the substrate (pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex) and not to inhibition of the phosphatase as such. 3. This conclusion was verified by isolating pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex, free of phosphatase, from hearts of control and diabetic rats an from heart mitochondria incubed for 1min (control) or 6min with respiratory substrates. The rates of re-activation of the inactive complexes were then measured with preparations of ox heart or rat heart phosphatase. The rates were lower (relative to controls) with inactive complex from hearts of diabetic rats or from heart mitochondria incubated for 6min with respiratory substrates. 4. The incorporation of 32Pi into inactive complex took 6min to complete in rat heart mitocondria. The extent of incorporation was consistent with

  2. A Novel Prostate-Specific Membrane-Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Micelle-Encapsulating Wogonin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation via Inducing Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hailong; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Fengbo; Qin, Feifei; Feng, Ping; Xu, Ting; Li, Xiang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a malignant tumor for which there are no effective treatment strategies. In this study, we developed a targeted strategy for prostate-specific membrane-antigen (PSMA)-positive PCa in vitro based on 2-(3-((S)-5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)ureido) pentanedioic acid (ACUPA) modified polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Cholesterol micelles containing wogonin (WOG), which was named ACUPA-M-WOG. ACUPA-M-WOG was conventionally prepared using a self-assembling method, which produced stable particle size and ζ potential. Moreover, ACUPA-M-WOG showed good drug encapsulating capacity and drug release profiles. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) results suggested that ACUPA modified PEG-Cholesterol micelles could effectively enhance the drug uptake on PSMA(+) PCa cells, and the cytotoxicity of ACUPA-M-WOG was stronger than other controls according to in vitro cellular proliferation and apoptosis assays, separately through methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) staining. Finally, the molecular mechanisms of ACUPA-M-WOG's effects on human PSMA(+) PCa were investigated, and were mainly the intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis signaling pathways. The Western blot results suggested that ACUPA-M-WOG could enhance the WOG-induced apoptosis, which was mainly via the intrinsic signaling pathway rather than the extrinsic signaling pathway. In conclusion, ACUPA-M-WOG was successfully developed for WOG-selective delivery to PSMA(+) PCa cells and had stronger inhibition than free drugs, which might make it an effective strategy for PSMA(+) PCa. PMID:27196894

  3. A Novel Prostate-Specific Membrane-Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Micelle-Encapsulating Wogonin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation via Inducing Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hailong; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Fengbo; Qin, Feifei; Feng, Ping; Xu, Ting; Li, Xiang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a malignant tumor for which there are no effective treatment strategies. In this study, we developed a targeted strategy for prostate-specific membrane-antigen (PSMA)-positive PCa in vitro based on 2-(3-((S)-5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)ureido) pentanedioic acid (ACUPA) modified polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Cholesterol micelles containing wogonin (WOG), which was named ACUPA-M-WOG. ACUPA-M-WOG was conventionally prepared using a self-assembling method, which produced stable particle size and ζ potential. Moreover, ACUPA-M-WOG showed good drug encapsulating capacity and drug release profiles. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) results suggested that ACUPA modified PEG-Cholesterol micelles could effectively enhance the drug uptake on PSMA(+) PCa cells, and the cytotoxicity of ACUPA-M-WOG was stronger than other controls according to in vitro cellular proliferation and apoptosis assays, separately through methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) staining. Finally, the molecular mechanisms of ACUPA-M-WOG’s effects on human PSMA(+) PCa were investigated, and were mainly the intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis signaling pathways. The Western blot results suggested that ACUPA-M-WOG could enhance the WOG-induced apoptosis, which was mainly via the intrinsic signaling pathway rather than the extrinsic signaling pathway. In conclusion, ACUPA-M-WOG was successfully developed for WOG-selective delivery to PSMA(+) PCa cells and had stronger inhibition than free drugs, which might make it an effective strategy for PSMA(+) PCa. PMID:27196894

  4. Targeted disruption of the EZH2-EED complex inhibits EZH2-dependent cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojin; Bird, Gregory H; Neff, Tobias; Guo, Guoji; Kerenyi, Marc A; Walensky, Loren D; Orkin, Stuart H

    2013-10-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is the histone lysine N-methyltransferase component of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which, in conjunction with embryonic ectoderm development (EED) and suppressor of zeste 12 homolog, regulates cell lineage determination and homeostasis. Enzymatic hyperactivity has been linked to aberrant repression of tumor suppressor genes in diverse cancers. Here, we report the development of stabilized α-helix of EZH2 (SAH-EZH2) peptides that selectively inhibit H3 Lys27 trimethylation by dose-responsively disrupting the EZH2-EED complex and reducing EZH2 protein levels, a mechanism distinct from that reported for small-molecule EZH2 inhibitors targeting the enzyme catalytic domain. MLL-AF9 leukemia cells, which are dependent on PRC2, undergo growth arrest and monocyte-macrophage differentiation upon treatment with SAH-EZH2, consistent with observed changes in expression of PRC2-regulated, lineage-specific marker genes. Thus, by dissociating the EZH2-EED complex, we pharmacologically modulate an epigenetic 'writer' and suppress PRC2-dependent cancer cell growth. PMID:23974116

  5. Sibling rivalry: competition between MHC class II family members inhibits immunity.

    PubMed

    Denzin, Lisa K; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen-presenting cells is catalyzed by human leukocyte antigen-DM (HLA-DM) and modulated by HLA-DO. In a structural study in this issue, Guce et al. show that HLA-DO is an MHC class II mimic and functions as a competitive and essentially irreversible inhibitor of HLA-DM activity, thereby inhibiting MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:23288359

  6. Uniformity detector retinal ganglion cells fire complex spikes and receive only light-evoked inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Taylor, W. Rowland; Vaney, David I.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells convey information by increasing their firing in response to an optimal visual stimulus or “trigger feature.” However, one class of ganglion cell responds to changes in the visual scene by decreasing its firing. These cells, termed uniformity detectors in the rabbit retina, are encountered only rarely and the synaptic mechanisms underlying their unusual responses have not been investigated. In this study, patch-clamp recordings of uniformity detectors show that the action potentials underlying the maintained firing arise within “complex spikes.” Both ON and OFF visual stimuli elicit only inhibitory synaptic input, the immediate effect of which is to suppress the maintained firing. However, this inhibition also alters the properties of the “renascent” spiking by increasing the amplitude of the spikes within each burst, suggesting that the effect may increase the efficacy of spike propagation and transmission. PMID:20212117

  7. Cotranslational Folding Inhibits Translocation from Within the Ribosome–Sec61 Translocon Complex

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Brian J.; Elferich, Johannes; Yang, Zhongying; Shinde, Ujwal; Skach, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic secretory proteins cross the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane through a protein conducting channel contained within the Ribosome–Sec61Translocon Complex (RTC). Using a zinc-finger sequence as a folding switch, we show that cotranslational folding of a secretory passenger inhibits translocation in canine ER microsomes and in human cells. Folding occurs within a cytosolically inaccessible environment, after ER targeting but before translocation is initiated and is most effective when the folded domain is 15–54 residues beyond the signal sequence. Under these conditions, substrate is diverted into cytosol at the same stage of synthesis that unfolded substrate enters the ER lumen. Moreover, the translocation block is reversed by passenger unfolding even after cytosol emergence. These studies identify an enclosed compartment within the assembled RTC that allows a short span of nascent chain to reversibly abort translocation in a substrate-specific manner. PMID:24561504

  8. Pharmacological inhibition of polycomb repressive complex-2 activity induces apoptosis in human colon cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Yannick D.; Witherspoon, Mavee S.; Laursen, Kristian B.; Guezguez, Amel; Beauséjour, Marco; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois; Lipkin, Steven M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death in the USA. The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), including core components SUZ12 and EZH2, represents a key epigenetic regulator of digestive epithelial cell physiology and was previously shown to promote deleterious effects in a number of human cancers, including colon. Using colon cancer stem cells (CCSC) isolated from human primary colorectal tumors, we demonstrate that SUZ12 knockdown and treatment with DZNep, one of the most potent EZH2 inhibitors, increase apoptosis levels, marked by decreased Akt phosphorylation, in CCSCs, while embryonic stem (ES) cell survival is not affected. Moreover, DZNep treatments lead to increased PTEN expression in these highly tumorigenic cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of PRC2 histone methyltransferase activity may constitute a new, epigenetic therapeutic strategy to target highly tumorigenic and metastatic colon cancer stem cells. PMID:23588203

  9. BET bromodomain inhibition releases the Mediator complex from select cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly A.; Hohmann, Anja F.; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. An shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. PMID:27068464

  10. Inhibiting diffusion of complex contagions in social networks: theoretical and experimental results

    PubMed Central

    Anil Kumar, V.S.; Marathe, Madhav V.; Ravi, S.S.; Rosenkrantz, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of inhibiting undesirable contagions (e.g. rumors, spread of mob behavior) in social networks. Much of the work in this context has been carried out under the 1-threshold model, where diffusion occurs when a node has just one neighbor with the contagion. We study the problem of inhibiting more complex contagions in social networks where nodes may have thresholds larger than 1. The goal is to minimize the propagation of the contagion by removing a small number of nodes (called critical nodes) from the network. We study several versions of this problem and prove that, in general, they cannot even be efficiently approximated to within any factor ρ ≥ 1, unless P = NP. We develop efficient and practical heuristics for these problems and carry out an experimental study of their performance on three well known social networks, namely epinions, wikipedia and slashdot. Our results show that these heuristics perform significantly better than five other known methods. We also establish an efficiently computable upper bound on the number of nodes to which a contagion can spread and evaluate this bound on many real and synthetic networks. PMID:25750583

  11. Therapeutic Blockade of Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis by Highly Selective Inhibition of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Doerner, Jessica; Bosanac, Todd; Khalil, Sara; Smith, Dustin; Harcken, Christian; Dimock, Janice; Der, Evan; Herlitz, Leal; Webb, Deborah; Seccareccia, Elise; Feng, Di; Fine, Jay S; Ramanujam, Meera; Klein, Elliott; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially dangerous end organ pathology that affects upwards of 60% of lupus patients. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is important for B cell development, Fc receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel, highly selective and potent BTK inhibitor, BI-BTK-1, in an inducible model of LN in which mice receive nephrotoxic serum (NTS) containing anti-glomerular antibodies. Mice were treated once daily with vehicle alone or BI-BTK-1, either prophylactically or therapeutically. When compared with control treated mice, NTS-challenged mice treated prophylactically with BI-BTK-1 exhibited significantly attenuated kidney disease, which was dose dependent. BI-BTK-1 treatment resulted in decreased infiltrating IBA-1+ cells, as well as C3 deposition within the kidney. RT-PCR on whole kidney RNA and serum profiling indicated that BTK inhibition significantly decreased levels of LN-relevant inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Renal RNA expression profiling by RNA-seq revealed that BI-BTK-1 dramatically modulated pathways related to inflammation and glomerular injury. Importantly, when administered therapeutically, BI-BTK-1 reversed established proteinuria and improved renal histopathology. Our results highlight the important role for BTK in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated nephritis, and BTK inhibition as a promising therapeutic target for LN. PMID:27192942

  12. 1,10-Phenanthroline promotes copper complexes into tumor cells and induces apoptosis by inhibiting the proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Schmitt, Sara M; Fan, Yuhua; Dong, Lili; Zuo, Jian; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-12-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid, two potent natural plant growth hormones, have attracted attention as promising prodrugs in cancer therapy. Copper is known to be a cofactor essential for tumor angiogenesis. We have previously reported that taurine, L-glutamine, and quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde Schiff base copper complexes inhibit cell proliferation and proteasome activity in human cancer cells. In the current study, we synthesized two types of copper complexes, dinuclear complexes and ternary complexes, to investigate whether a certain structure could easily carry copper into cancer cells and consequently inhibit tumor proteasome activity and induce apoptosis. We observed that ternary complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline are more potent proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers than dinuclear complexes in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the ternary complexes potently inhibit proteasome activity before induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, but not in nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. Our results suggest that copper complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline as the third ligand could serve as potent, selective proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in tumor cells, and that the ternary complexes may be good potential anticancer drugs. PMID:23053530

  13. Differential inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes by inhalation of combustion smoke and carbon monoxide, in vivo, in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Hallberg, Lance M; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2010-08-01

    Combustion smoke contains gases and particulates, which act via hypoxia and cytotoxicity producing mechanisms to injure cells and tissues. While carbon monoxide (CO) is the major toxicant in smoke, its toxicity is exacerbated in the presence of other compounds. Here, we examined modulations of mitochondrial and cytosolic energy metabolism by inhalation of combustion smoke versus CO, in vivo, in the rat brain. Measurements revealed reduced activities of respiratory chain (RC) complexes, with greater inhibition by smoke than equivalent CO in ambient air. In the case of RC complex IV, inhibition by CO and smoke was similar--suggesting that complex IV inhibition is primarily by the action of CO. In contrast, inhibition of complexes I and III was greater by smoke. Increases in cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase activities accompanied inhibition of RC complexes, likely reflecting compensatory increases in cytosolic energy production. Together, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms of smoke inhalation-induced perturbations of brain energetics, which impact neuronal function and contribute to the development of neuropathologies in survivors of exposures to CO and combustion smoke. PMID:20429857

  14. Activation of human monocytes by streptococcal rhamnose glucose polymers is mediated by CD14 antigen, and mannan binding protein inhibits TNF-alpha release.

    PubMed

    Soell, M; Lett, E; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1995-01-15

    The present work was initiated to define mechanisms that account for the binding on human monocytes of streptococcal cell wall polysaccharides formed by rhamnose glucose polymers (RGPs), and subsequent stimulatory activities. We show here that RGPs bind to and stimulate human monocytes to produce TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. To detect cell surface RGPs binding proteins, intact monocytes were biotinylated before lysis with Nonidet P-40 and solubilized proteins were incubated with RGPs Affi-Prep beads. One major membrane protein of 55 kDa was specifically detected and identified as CD14 because it reacted with anti-CD14 mAbs. Furthermore, anti-CD14 mAbs were able to perform a dose-dependent inhibition of RGPs binding, and suppressed TNF-alpha release from RGPs-stimulated monocytes. Moreover, we demonstrated that RGPs also bind to CD11b; however, this binding is not implicated in synthesis of TNF-alpha. Interestingly, RGPs binding to monocytes was enhanced by human normal serum (HNS) whereas HNS inhibits the TNF-alpha-stimulating activity of RGPs. Western blotting analysis of HNS proteins purified on RGPs Affi-prep beads revealed three specific bands of 75, 55, and 32 kDa reactive with anti-C3 Abs, anti-CD14 mAbs (TUK4), and anti-human mannan binding protein (hMBP)-derived peptide IgG, respectively. These results suggest that C3, soluble CD14, and hMBP form complexes that are probably active in enhancing the binding of RGPs to monocytes. Additional studies have shown that hMBP that recognizes RGPs prevents, unlike the LPS binding protein, TNF-alpha release by inhibiting the binding of RGPs to CD14 Ag. By incubating cells with a constant amount of RGPs-hMBP complexes in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of C1q, we also demonstrated that C1q receptor mediates the binding and probably the uptake of RGPs-hMBP complexes by human monocytes. PMID:7529289

  15. A Kinase Activity Associated with Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen Phosphorylates Upstream Binding Factor (UBF) and Promotes Formation of a Stable Initiation Complex between UBF and SL1

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Weiguo; Comai, Lucio

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen is a multifunctional protein which has been shown to modulate the expression of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I (Pol I), II, and III. In all three transcription systems, a key step in the activation process is the recruitment of large T antigen to the promoter by direct protein-protein interaction with the TATA binding protein (TBP)-TAF complexes, namely, SL1, TFIID, and TFIIIB. However, our previous studies on large T antigen stimulation of Pol I transcription also revealed that the binding to the TBP-TAFI complex SL1 is not sufficient to activate transcription. To further define the molecular mechanism involved in large T antigen-mediated Pol I activation, we examined whether the high-mobility group box-containing upstream binding factor (UBF) plays any role in this process. Here, using cell labeling experiments, we showed that large T antigen expression induces an increase in UBF phosphorylation. Further biochemical analysis demonstrated that UBF is phosphorylated by a kinase activity that is strongly associated with large T antigen, and that the carboxy-terminal activation domain of UBF is required for the phosphorylation to occur. Using in vitro reconstituted transcription assays, we demonstrated that the inability of alkaline phosphatase treated UBF to efficiently activate transcription can be rescued by large T antigen. Moreover, we showed that large T antigen-induced UBF phosphorylation promotes the formation of a stable UBF-SL1 complex. Together, these results provide strong evidence for an important role for the large T antigen-associated kinase in mediating the stimulation of RNA Pol I transcription. PMID:10082545

  16. Synthesis and characterization of azolate gold(I) phosphane complexes as thioredoxin reductase inhibiting antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Rossana; Burini, Alfredo; Ricci, Simone; Pellei, Maura; Rigobello, Maria Pia; Citta, Anna; Dolmella, Alessandro; Gandin, Valentina; Marzano, Cristina

    2012-05-01

    Following an increasing interest in the gold drug therapy field, nine new neutral azolate gold(I) phosphane compounds have been synthesized and tested as anticancer agents. The azolate ligands used in this study are pyrazolates and imidazolates substituted with deactivating groups such as trifluoromethyl, nitro or chloride moieties, whereas the phosphane co-ligand is the triphenylphosphane or the more hydrophilic TPA (TPA = 1,3,5-triazaphosphaadamantane). The studied gold(I) complexes are: (3,5-bis-trifluoromethyl-1H-pyrazolate-1-yl)-triphenylphosphane-gold(I) (1), (3,5-dinitro-1H-pyrazolate-1-yl)-triphenylphosphane-gold(I) (2), (4-nitro-1H-pyrazolate-1-yl)-triphenylphosphane-gold(I) (5), (4,5-dichloro-1H-imidazolate-1-yl)-triphenylphosphane-gold(I) (7), with the related TPA complexes (3), (4), (6) and (8) and (1-benzyl-4,5-di-chloro-2H-imidazolate-2-yl)-triphenylphosphane-gold(I) (9). The presence of deactivating groups on the azole rings improves the solubility of these complexes in polar media. Compounds 1-8 contain the N-Au-P environment, whilst compound 9 is the only one to contain a C-Au-P environment. Crystal structures for compounds 1 and 2 have been obtained and discussed. Interestingly, the newly synthesized gold(I) compounds were found to possess a pronounced cytotoxic activity on several human cancer cells, some of which were endowed with cis-platin or multidrug resistance. In particular, among azolate gold(I) complexes, 1 and 2 proved to be the most promising derivatives eliciting an antiproliferative effect up to 70 times higher than cis-platin. Mechanistic experiments indicated that the inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) might be involved in the pharmacodynamic behavior of these gold species. PMID:22391922

  17. Molecular and biological interaction between major histocompatibility complex class I antigens and luteinizing hormone receptors or beta-adrenergic receptors triggers cellular response in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Solano, A R; Cremaschi, G; Sánchez, M L; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L; Podestá, E J

    1988-01-01

    Purified IgG from BALB/c mouse anti-C3H serum exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects in C3H mouse atria and induces testosterone synthesis in C3H mouse Leydig cells. The effect depends on IgG concentration and can be abolished by beta-adrenergic-receptor and luteinizing hormone-receptor antagonists. IgG interferes with the binding of dihydroalprenolol and luteinizing hormone. Monoclonal antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I antigens were active on the Leydig cells of C3H and BALB/c mice. There was a parallelism between the effect of each individual monoclonal antibody with specificity for a particular haplotype and the response of the target cell from the strains carrying such haplotypes. These antibodies could precipitate the soluble luteinizing hormone-receptor complex. The results suggested that bound hormone triggers the association of major histocompatibility class I antigen with the receptor, thereby activating the respective target cells. PMID:2839829

  18. Epitope mapping of 7S cashew antigen in complex with antibody by solution-phase H/D exchange monitored by FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaoyan; Noble, Kyle A; Tao, Yeqing; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K; Young, Nicolas L; Marshall, Alan G

    2015-06-01

    The potential epitope of a recombinant food allergen protein, cashew Ana o 1, reactive to monoclonal antibody, mAb 2G4, has been mapped by solution-phase amide backbone H/D exchange (HDX) monitored by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Purified mAb 2G4 was incubated with recombinant Ana o 1 (rAna o 1) to form antigen:monoclonal antibody (Ag:mAb) complexes. Complexed and uncomplexed (free) rAna o 1 were then subjected to HDX-MS analysis. Five regions protected from H/D exchange upon mAb binding are identified as potential conformational epitope-contributing segments. PMID:26169135

  19. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Inhibits Gamma Interferon and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Katharina; Wies, Effi; Neipel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) carries four genes with homology to human interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). One of these IRFs, the viral interferon regulatory factor 3 (vIRF-3), is expressed in latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells and required for their continuous proliferation. Moreover, vIRF-3 is known to be involved in modulation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. We now show that vIRF-3 also interferes with the type II interferon system and antigen presentation to the adaptive immune system. Starting with an analysis of the transcriptome, we show that vIRF-3 inhibits expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules: small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of vIRF-3 in KSHV-infected PEL cell lines resulted in increased MHC II levels; overexpression of vIRF-3 in KSHV-negative B cells leads to downmodulation of MHC II. This regulation could be traced back to inhibition of class II transactivator (CIITA) transcription by vIRF-3. Reporter assays revealed that the gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-sensitive CIITA promoters PIV and PIII were inhibited by vIRF-3. Consistently, IFN-γ levels increased upon vIRF-3 knockdown in PEL cells. IFN-γ regulation by vIRF-3 was confirmed in reporter assays as well as by upregulation of typical IFN-γ target genes upon knockdown of vIRF-3 in PEL cells. In summary, we conclude that vIRF-3 contributes to the viral immunoevasion by downregulation of IFN-γ and CIITA and thus MHC II expression. PMID:21345951

  20. Astrocyte-Specific Overexpression of Nrf2 Protects Striatal Neurons from Mitochondrial Complex II Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Marcus J.; Vargas, Marcelo R.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is known to regulate a variety of cytoprotective genes through the antioxidant response element (ARE). This endogenous response is one of the major pathways by which cells are protected from xenobiotic or innate oxidative insults. Furthermore, in neural systems, astrocyte-specific activation of Nrf2 is known to protect neurons. In previous work, our laboratory found that Nrf2 protects from intrastriatal injections of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate. Here, we extend these results to show that multiple methods of astrocyte-specific Nrf2 overexpression provide protection from neurotoxicity in vivo. GFAP-Nrf2 transgenic mice are significantly more resistant to malonate lesioning. This outcome is associated with an increased basal resistance, but more so, an enhanced Nrf2 response to lesioning that attenuated the ensuing neurotoxicity. Furthermore, striatal transplantation of neuroprogenitor cells overexpressing Nrf2 that differentiate into astrocytes after grafting also significantly reduced malonate toxicity. Overall, these data establish that enhanced astrocytic Nrf2 response and Nrf2 preconditioning are both sufficient to protect from acute lesions from mitochondrial complex II inhibition. PMID:20211941

  1. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Brown, Michelle Q; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Wu, Bin; Young, Michael C; Synek, Lukáš; Borchardt, Dan; Harrison, Reed; Pan, Songqin; Luo, Nan; Huang, Yu-Ming M; Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Ung, Nolan; Li, Ruixi; Isley, Jonathan; Morikis, Dimitrios; Song, Jikui; Guo, Wei; Hooley, Richard J; Chang, Chia-En A; Yang, Zhenbiao; Zarsky, Viktor; Muday, Gloria K; Hicks, Glenn R; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2016-01-01

    The exocyst complex regulates the last steps of exocytosis, which is essential to organisms across kingdoms. In humans, its dysfunction is correlated with several significant diseases, such as diabetes and cancer progression. Investigation of the dynamic regulation of the evolutionarily conserved exocyst-related processes using mutants in genetically tractable organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana is limited by the lethality or the severity of phenotypes. We discovered that the small molecule Endosidin2 (ES2) binds to the EXO70 (exocyst component of 70 kDa) subunit of the exocyst complex, resulting in inhibition of exocytosis and endosomal recycling in both plant and human cells and enhancement of plant vacuolar trafficking. An EXO70 protein with a C-terminal truncation results in dominant ES2 resistance, uncovering possible distinct regulatory roles for the N terminus of the protein. This study not only provides a valuable tool in studying exocytosis regulation but also offers a potentially new target for drugs aimed at addressing human disease. PMID:26607451

  2. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunhua; Brown, Michelle Q.; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Wu, Bin; Young, Michael C.; Synek, Lukáš; Borchardt, Dan; Harrison, Reed; Pan, Songqin; Luo, Nan; Huang, Yu-ming M.; Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Ung, Nolan; Li, Ruixi; Isley, Jonathan; Morikis, Dimitrios; Song, Jikui; Guo, Wei; Hooley, Richard J.; Chang, Chia-en A.; Yang, Zhenbiao; Zarsky, Viktor; Muday, Gloria K.; Hicks, Glenn R.; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2016-01-01

    The exocyst complex regulates the last steps of exocytosis, which is essential to organisms across kingdoms. In humans, its dysfunction is correlated with several significant diseases, such as diabetes and cancer progression. Investigation of the dynamic regulation of the evolutionarily conserved exocyst-related processes using mutants in genetically tractable organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana is limited by the lethality or the severity of phenotypes. We discovered that the small molecule Endosidin2 (ES2) binds to the EXO70 (exocyst component of 70 kDa) subunit of the exocyst complex, resulting in inhibition of exocytosis and endosomal recycling in both plant and human cells and enhancement of plant vacuolar trafficking. An EXO70 protein with a C-terminal truncation results in dominant ES2 resistance, uncovering possible distinct regulatory roles for the N terminus of the protein. This study not only provides a valuable tool in studying exocytosis regulation but also offers a potentially new target for drugs aimed at addressing human disease. PMID:26607451

  3. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle Rj; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie Sv; Figdor, Carl G; Ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  4. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle RJ; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie SV; Figdor, Carl G; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  5. Inhibition of Viability, Proliferation, Cytokines Secretion, Surface Antigen Expression, and Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Seven-Day Exposure to 0.5 T Static Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Jixian; Freed, Darren H.; Arora, Rakesh C.; Tian, Ganghong

    2016-01-01

    After seven-day exposure to 0.5-Tesla Static Magnetic Field (SMF), Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ASCs) and those labeled by superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were examined for viability by methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, proliferation by cell counting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, DNA integrity by single cell gel electrophoresis, surface antigen by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of cytokines and genetic markers by reverse transcription-PCR and underwent adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assessed by quantifying related specific genes expression. The SMF slightly reduced cell viability and proliferation and inhibited the expression of CD49d, CD54, and CD73 but did not damage DNA integrity. The SMF slightly downregulated the expression of cytokines including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 (TGF-β1), genetic markers comprising Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca1), Octamer-4 (Oct-4), ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1), adipogenic marker genes containing Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR-γ), and osteogenic marker genes including Secreted Phosphor-protein 1 (SPP1) and Osterix (OSX). Exposure to 0.5 T SMF for seven days inhibited viability, proliferation, surface antigen expression, cytokine secretion, stem cell genetic marker expression, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation but did not affect the DNA integrity in ASCs with or without SPIO labeling. PMID:26880984

  6. Inhibition of Viability, Proliferation, Cytokines Secretion, Surface Antigen Expression, and Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Seven-Day Exposure to 0.5 T Static Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Jixian; Freed, Darren H; Arora, Rakesh C; Tian, Ganghong

    2016-01-01

    After seven-day exposure to 0.5-Tesla Static Magnetic Field (SMF), Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ASCs) and those labeled by superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were examined for viability by methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, proliferation by cell counting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, DNA integrity by single cell gel electrophoresis, surface antigen by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of cytokines and genetic markers by reverse transcription-PCR and underwent adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assessed by quantifying related specific genes expression. The SMF slightly reduced cell viability and proliferation and inhibited the expression of CD49d, CD54, and CD73 but did not damage DNA integrity. The SMF slightly downregulated the expression of cytokines including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 (TGF-β1), genetic markers comprising Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca1), Octamer-4 (Oct-4), ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1), adipogenic marker genes containing Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR-γ), and osteogenic marker genes including Secreted Phosphor-protein 1 (SPP1) and Osterix (OSX). Exposure to 0.5 T SMF for seven days inhibited viability, proliferation, surface antigen expression, cytokine secretion, stem cell genetic marker expression, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation but did not affect the DNA integrity in ASCs with or without SPIO labeling. PMID:26880984

  7. An S6:S18 complex inhibits translation of E. coli rpsF

    PubMed Central

    Babina, Arianne M.; Soo, Mark W.; Fu, Yang; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    More than half of the ribosomal protein operons in Escherichia coli are regulated by structures within the mRNA transcripts that interact with specific ribosomal proteins to inhibit further protein expression. This regulation is accomplished using a variety of mechanisms and the RNA structures responsible for regulation are often not conserved across bacterial phyla. A widely conserved mRNA structure preceding the ribosomal protein operon containing rpsF and rpsR (encoding S6 and S18) was recently identified through comparative genomics. Examples of this RNA from both E. coli and Bacillus subtilis were shown to interact in vitro with an S6:S18 complex. In this work, we demonstrate that in E. coli, this RNA structure regulates gene expression in response to the S6:S18 complex. β-galactosidase activity from a lacZ reporter translationally fused to the 5′ UTR and first nine codons of E. coli rpsF is reduced fourfold by overexpression of a genomic fragment encoding both S6 and S18 but not by overexpression of either protein individually. Mutations to the mRNA structure, as well as to the RNA-binding site of S18 and the S6–S18 interaction surfaces of S6 and S18, are sufficient to derepress β-galactosidase activity, indicating that the S6:S18 complex is the biologically active effector. Measurement of transcript levels shows that although reporter levels do not change upon protein overexpression, levels of the native transcript are reduced fourfold, suggesting that the mRNA regulator prevents translation and this effect is amplified on the native transcript by other mechanisms. PMID:26447183

  8. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol. PMID:26453927

  9. Differential Effects of a Saturated and a Monounsaturated Fatty Acid on MHC Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, S. R.; Mitchell, D.; Carroll, E.; Li, M.; Schneck, J.; Edidin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid overload, associated with metabolic disorders, occurs when fatty acids accumulate in non-adipose tissues. Cells of these tissues use major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to present antigen to T cells in order to eliminate pathogens. As obesity is associated with impaired immune responses, we tested the hypothesis that the early stages of lipid overload with saturated fatty acids (SFA) alters MHC class I antigen presentation. Antigen presenting cells (APC) were treated with either the saturated palmitic acid (PA), abundant in the high fat Western diet, or the monounsaturated oleic acid (OA), a component of the Mediterranean diet. PA-treatment lowered APC lysis by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and inhibited APC ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Inhibition of immune responses with PA was due to a significant reduction in MHC class I surface expression, inhibition in the rate of APC–T-cell conjugation, and lowering of plasma membrane F-actin levels. OA-treatment had no effect on antigen presentation and upon exposure with PA, prevented the phenotypic effects of PA. OA-treatment conferred protection against changes in antigen presentation by accumulating fatty acids into triglyceride-rich lipid droplets of APC. Our findings establish for the first time a link between the early stages of lipid overload and antigen presentation and suggest that dietary SFA could impair immunity by affecting MHC I-mediated antigen presentation; this could be prevented, paradoxically, by accumulation of triglycerides rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. PMID:18533931

  10. Differential effects of a saturated and a monounsaturated fatty acid on MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, S R; Mitchell, D; Carroll, E; Li, M; Schneck, J; Edidin, M

    2008-07-01

    Lipid overload, associated with metabolic disorders, occurs when fatty acids accumulate in non-adipose tissues. Cells of these tissues use major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to present antigen to T cells in order to eliminate pathogens. As obesity is associated with impaired immune responses, we tested the hypothesis that the early stages of lipid overload with saturated fatty acids (SFA) alters MHC class I antigen presentation. Antigen presenting cells (APC) were treated with either the saturated palmitic acid (PA), abundant in the high fat Western diet, or the monounsaturated oleic acid (OA), a component of the Mediterranean diet. PA-treatment lowered APC lysis by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and inhibited APC ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Inhibition of immune responses with PA was due to a significant reduction in MHC class I surface expression, inhibition in the rate of APC-T-cell conjugation, and lowering of plasma membrane F-actin levels. OA-treatment had no effect on antigen presentation and upon exposure with PA, prevented the phenotypic effects of PA. OA-treatment conferred protection against changes in antigen presentation by accumulating fatty acids into triglyceride-rich lipid droplets of APC. Our findings establish for the first time a link between the early stages of lipid overload and antigen presentation and suggest that dietary SFA could impair immunity by affecting MHC I-mediated antigen presentation; this could be prevented, paradoxically, by accumulation of triglycerides rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. PMID:18533931

  11. Cytotoxic and Nitric Oxide Inhibition Activities of Propolis Extract along with Microencapsulation by Complex Coacervation.

    PubMed

    Onbas, Rabia; Kazan, Aslihan; Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2016-09-01

    In this study, cytotoxicity of ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) originating from Sivas, Turkey was screened against several cancer cell lines, namely PC-3, U87MG, A-549, mPANC96, CaCo-2, MCF-7, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and a non-tumor cell line HEK293 by MTT assay. The inhibition levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were also determined by using RAW 264.7 macrophage cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. EEP exhibited significant cytotoxic nitric oxide inhibition activities with an IC50 value of 0.1 ± 0.1 μg/ml indicating a high potential as an anti-inflammatory agent. In spite of these promising results and the fact that propolis is a highly nutritive substance, its low solubility and bitter taste limit the applications as a natural supplement. Encapsulation might serve as a good strategy in order to overcome these problems. Complex coacervation was applied where the main focus was on surfactant type, polymer ratio (alginate:gelatin), stirring rate and concentration of core material. The mean particle size of unloaded microparticles were 22.62 μm obtained with gelatin:alginate ratio of 1:1 at a stirring rate of 1400 rpm with 2 ml of 1 % (w/v) sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (Na-CMC), whereas addition of EEP at a concentration of 100 mg/ml increased the mean particle size to 36.44 μm and yielded an encapsulation efficiency of 98.77 %. The cytotoxicities of EEP loaded microparticles were also assessed both on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 where similar results were achieved as free EEP which can enhance the possible use of propolis extract in the industry as a natural supplement. PMID:27380456

  12. Inhibition of the fungal fatty acid synthase type I multienzyme complex

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Patrik; Wiltschi, Birgit; Kumari, Preeti; Kessler, Brigitte; Vonrhein, Clemens; Vonck, Janet; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Grininger, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acids are among the major building blocks of living cells, making lipid biosynthesis a potent target for compounds with antibiotic or antineoplastic properties. We present the crystal structure of the 2.6-MDa Saccharomyces cerevisiae fatty acid synthase (FAS) multienzyme in complex with the antibiotic cerulenin, representing, to our knowledge, the first structure of an inhibited fatty acid megasynthase. Cerulenin attacks the FAS ketoacyl synthase (KS) domain, forming a covalent bond to the active site cysteine C1305. The inhibitor binding causes two significant conformational changes of the enzyme. First, phenylalanine F1646, shielding the active site, flips and allows access to the nucleophilic cysteine. Second, methionine M1251, placed in the center of the acyl-binding tunnel, rotates and unlocks the inner part of the fatty acid binding cavity. The importance of the rotational movement of the gatekeeping M1251 side chain is reflected by the cerulenin resistance and the changed product spectrum reported for S. cerevisiae strains mutated in the adjacent glycine G1250. Platensimycin and thiolactomycin are two other potent inhibitors of KSs. However, in contrast to cerulenin, they show selectivity toward the prokaryotic FAS system. Because the flipped F1646 characterizes the catalytic state accessible for platensimycin and thiolactomycin binding, we superimposed structures of inhibited bacterial enzymes onto the S. cerevisiae FAS model. Although almost all side chains involved in inhibitor binding are conserved in the FAS multienzyme, a different conformation of the loop K1413–K1423 of the KS domain might explain the observed low antifungal properties of platensimycin and thiolactomycin. PMID:18725634

  13. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E; Fugger, L; Engberg, J; Buus, S

    1996-01-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined peptide/MHC complexes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8700842

  14. EBV Nuclear Antigen 3C Mediates Regulation of E2F6 to Inhibit E2F1 Transcription and Promote Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Saha, Abhik; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is considered a ubiquitous herpesvirus with the ability to cause latent infection in humans worldwide. EBV-association is evidently linked to different types of human malignancies, mainly of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Of interest is the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) which is critical for EBV-mediated immortalization. Recently, EBNA3C was shown to bind the E2F1 transcription regulator. The E2F transcription factors have crucial roles in various cellular functions, including cell cycle, DNA replication, DNA repair, cell mitosis, and cell fate. Specifically, E2F6, one of the unique E2F family members, is known to be a pRb-independent transcription repressor of E2F-target genes. In our current study, we explore the role of EBNA3C in regulating E2F6 activities. We observed that EBNA3C plays an important role in inducing E2F6 expression in LCLs. Our study also shows that EBNA3C physically interacts with E2F6 at its amino and carboxy terminal domains and they form a protein complex in human cells. In addition, EBNA3C stabilizes the E2F6 protein and is co-localized in the nucleus. We also demonstrated that both EBNA3C and E2F6 contribute to reduction in E2F1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, E2F1 forms a protein complex with EBNA3C and E2F6, and EBNA3C competes with E2F1 for E2F6 binding. E2F6 is also recruited by EBNA3C to the E2F1 promoter, which is critical for EBNA3C-mediated cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical role for E2F family members in EBV-induced malignancies, and provide new insights for targeting E2F transcription factors in EBV-associated cancers as potential therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:27548379

  15. EBV Nuclear Antigen 3C Mediates Regulation of E2F6 to Inhibit E2F1 Transcription and Promote Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yonggang; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Saha, Abhik; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is considered a ubiquitous herpesvirus with the ability to cause latent infection in humans worldwide. EBV-association is evidently linked to different types of human malignancies, mainly of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Of interest is the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) which is critical for EBV-mediated immortalization. Recently, EBNA3C was shown to bind the E2F1 transcription regulator. The E2F transcription factors have crucial roles in various cellular functions, including cell cycle, DNA replication, DNA repair, cell mitosis, and cell fate. Specifically, E2F6, one of the unique E2F family members, is known to be a pRb-independent transcription repressor of E2F-target genes. In our current study, we explore the role of EBNA3C in regulating E2F6 activities. We observed that EBNA3C plays an important role in inducing E2F6 expression in LCLs. Our study also shows that EBNA3C physically interacts with E2F6 at its amino and carboxy terminal domains and they form a protein complex in human cells. In addition, EBNA3C stabilizes the E2F6 protein and is co-localized in the nucleus. We also demonstrated that both EBNA3C and E2F6 contribute to reduction in E2F1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, E2F1 forms a protein complex with EBNA3C and E2F6, and EBNA3C competes with E2F1 for E2F6 binding. E2F6 is also recruited by EBNA3C to the E2F1 promoter, which is critical for EBNA3C-mediated cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical role for E2F family members in EBV-induced malignancies, and provide new insights for targeting E2F transcription factors in EBV-associated cancers as potential therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:27548379

  16. Effects of combined treatment with complex S. typhimurium antigens and factors stimulating osteogenesis (curettage, BMP-2) on multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and serum concentration of cytokines in CBA mice.

    PubMed

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Karyagina, A S; Lunin, V G; Grabko, V I; Bartov, M S; Gromov, A V; Grunina, T M; Soboleva, L A; Shapoval, I M; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-02-01

    The content of multipotent stromal cells (MSC) in the bone marrow and efficiency of their cloning (ECF-MSC) increased by 3 times 1 day after administration of complex S. typhimurium antigens to CBA mice, while the relative content of alkaline phosphatase-positive MSC colonies (marker of osteogenesis; P(+) colonies) decreased from 14% (control) to 3%. After administration of the complex S. typhimurium antigens to CBA mice 3 h after (or 3 h before) curettage or treatment with morphogenetic protein (BMP-2), the content of MSC and ECF-MSC decreased on the next day by ~3 times in comparison with animals receiving antigens alone and approached the control level. The relative content of P(+) colonies increased to 20 and 35%, respectively, in comparison with animals receiving antigens (3%), but was significantly lower than after curettage (34%) or BMP-2 (42%) administration. Expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ genes in the primary cultures of stromal bone marrow cells induced by antigen administration was suppressed, while the concentrations of IL-12 and TNF-α in the culture medium sharply decreased after antigen treatment in combination with curettage or BMP-2 administration. Administration of complex S. typhimurium antigens after pretreatment with BMP-2 (3 h before) was associated with a decrease in serum levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α in mice receiving BMP-2+S. typhimurium group 4 h after treatment in comparison with the animals receiving only S. typhimurium antigens alone by 1.9, 4.4, 1.5, and 6 times, respectively, i.e. to normal level or below it, while the concentration of IL-10 increased by almost 2 times, which probably reflected anti-inflammatory properties of BMP-2. These data probably attest to competitive relations between osteogenesis and immune response at the level of MSC. PMID:25708327

  17. The Presence of Tumour Specific Membrane Antigen in the Serum of Rats with Chemically Induced Sarcomata

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, D. M. P.; Steele, K.; Alexander, P.

    1973-01-01

    Antibodies to the tumour-specific transplantation type antigen (TSTA) of a transplanted methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma (MC-1) in syngeneic rats were studied using the techniques of indirect membrane immunofluorescence and mixed haemadsorption with a 51Cr-labelled indicator cell. After tumour excision, anti-TSTA antibody was readily measurable in both serum and lymph. In contrast, the tumour-bearing animal had no measurable anti-TSTA antibody in the serum but low titres in the lymph. Consequently, we formed the hypothesis that in the presence of a growing tumour the serum contained antigen-antibody complexes with antigen in excess. To test this hypothesis, tumour-bearing serum was examined for the presence of free antigen and antigen-antibody complexes by 2 different methods. In the first method, tumour-bearing serum was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and was found to absorb specifically the anti-TSTA antibody, indicating free circulating TSTA. Next, antigen-antibody complexes were split with salt or acid and separated into a low molecular weight (or “antigen”) fraction (<100,000) and a high molecular weight (or “antibody”) fraction (>100,000). The low M.W. fraction specifically inhibited the anti-TSTA antibody when tested by either membrane immunofluorescence or mixed haemadsorption, indicating the presence of antigen from antigen-antibody complexes in the tumour-bearing circulation. The possible effect on the host's immune response of circulating free tumour antigen and antigen-antibody complexes are discussed. PMID:4568460

  18. Ternary complex consisting of DNA, polycation, and a natural polysaccharide of schizophyllan to induce cellular uptake by antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Shimada, Naohiko; Kaneko, Kenji; Shinkai, Seiji; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2007-04-01

    A natural polysaccharide called schizophyllan (SPG) can form a complex with polynucleotides, and the complex has been shown to deliver biofunctional short DNAs such as antisense DNAs and CpG-DNAs. Although it is a novel and efficient method, there is a drawback: attachment of homo-polynucleotide tails [for example, poly(dA) or poly(C)] to the end of DNA is necessary to stabilize the complex, because DNA heterosequences cannot bind to SPG. The aim of this paper is to present an alternative method in which SPG/DNA complexes can be made without using the tails. The basic strategy is as follows: since SPG can form hydrophobic domains in aqueous solutions, hydrophobic objects should be encapsulated by this domain. DNA alone is highly hydrophilic; however, once DNA/polycation complexes are made, they should be included by the SPG hydrophobic domain. The aim of this paper is to prove the formation of the polycation/DNA/SPG ternary complex. Gel electrophoresis showed that presence of SPG influenced the migration pattern of polycation+DNA mixtures. With increasing the SPG ratio, the zeta potential (zeta) of the polycation+DNA+SPG mixture decreased drastically to reach almost zeta = 0 and the particle size distributions were altered due to the ternary complex formation. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the polycation/DNA/SPG ternary complexes showed high uptake efficiency when the complexes were exposed to macrophage-like cells (J774.A1). IL-12 secretion was enhanced when CpG-DNA was added as the ternary complex. These features can be ascribed to the fact that J774.A1 has a SPG recognition site called Dectin-1 on the cellular surface and the ternary complex can be ingested by this pathway. PMID:17328571

  19. Major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers: New tools for the detection of antigen-specific, CD4 T cells in basic and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Krishnan, Bharathi; Reddy, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The advent of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramer technology has been a major contribution to T cell immunology, because tetramer reagents permit detection of antigen-specific T cells at the single-cell level in heterogeneous populations by flow cytometry. However, unlike MHC class I tetramers, the utility of MHC class II tetramers has been less frequently reported. MHC class II tetramers can be used successfully to enumerate the frequencies of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in cells activated in vitro, but their use for ex vivo analyses continues to be a problem, due in part to their activation dependency for binding with T cells. To circumvent this problem, we recently reported the creation of a new generation of reagents called MHC class II dextramers, which were found to be superior to their counterparts. In this review, we discuss the utility of class II dextramers vis-a-vis tetramers, with respect to their specificity and sensitivity, including potential applications and limitations. PMID:26207337

  20. A Model of Motor Inhibition for a Complex Skill: Baseball Batting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rob

    2009-01-01

    The ability to inhibit an ongoing action in response to a signal from the environment is important for many perceptual-motor actions. This paper examines a particular example of this behavior: attempting to inhibit or "check" a swing in baseball batting. A model of motor inhibition in batting is proposed. In the model there are three different…

  1. Synthesis and characterization of complexes of a novel proton transfer salt and their inhibition studies on carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    İlkimen, Halil; Yenikaya, Cengiz; Sarı, Musa; Bülbül, Metin; Tunca, Ekrem; Dal, Hakan; Baş, Metin

    2015-04-01

    A novel proton transfer compound (HClABT)(+)(HDPC.H2DPC)(-) (1) and its Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II) and two different Cu(II) complexes (2-6) have been prepared and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. Additionally, single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques were applied to all complexes. All compounds, including acetazolamide (AAZ) as the control compound, were also evaluated for their in vitro inhibition effects on human hCA I and hCA II for their hydratase and esterase activities. Although there is no inhibition for hydratase activities, all compounds have inhibited the esterase activities of hCA I and II. The comparison of the inhibition studies of 1-6 to parent compounds, ClABT and H2DPC, indicates that 1-6 have superior inhibitory effects. The inhibition effects of 2-6 are also compared to the inhibitory properties of the simple metal complexes of ClABT and H2DPC, revealing an improved transfection profile. Data have been analysed by using a one-way analysis of variance for multiple comparisons. PMID:24758349

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and in Vitro Antitumor Activity of Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes Tethering EGFR-Inhibiting 4-Anilinoquinazolines.

    PubMed

    Du, Jun; Kang, Yan; Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Lin, Yu; Wang, Zhaoying; Wang, Yuanyuan; Luo, Qun; Wu, Kui; Wang, Fuyi

    2016-05-01

    Ruthenium-based anticancer complexes are promising antitumor agents for their low system toxicity and versatile chemical structures. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to be overexpressed in a broad range of tumor cells and is regarded as a drug target in developing novel antitumor drugs. In this work, five ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes containing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores were synthesized and characterized. These complexes showed both high EGFR-inhibiting activity and strong DNA minor groove-binding activity. In vitro antiproliferation screening demonstrated that the prepared ruthenium complexes are highly cytotoxic against a series of cancer cell lines, in particular non-small-cell lung A549 and human epidermoid carcinoma A431. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the most active complex, K4, induced much more late-stage cell apoptosis and necrosis than gefitinib, the first EGFR-targeting antitumor drug in clinical use. These results indicate that the ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes bearing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazolines possess highly active dual-targeting anticancer activity and are promising in developing new anticancer agents. PMID:27093574

  3. Native MS and ECD Characterization of a Fab-Antigen Complex May Facilitate Crystallization for X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Wecksler, Aaron T.; Zhang, Hao; Molina, Patricia; Deperalta, Galahad; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-07-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) and top-down electron-capture dissociation (ECD) combine as a powerful approach for characterizing large proteins and protein assemblies. Here, we report their use to study an antibody Fab (Fab-1)-VEGF complex in its near-native state. Native ESI with analysis by FTICR mass spectrometry confirms that VEGF is a dimer in solution and that its complex with Fab-1 has a binding stoichiometry of 2:2. Applying combinations of collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), ECD, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) allows identification of flexible regions of the complex, potentially serving as a guide for crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  4. Native MS and ECD Characterization of a Fab-Antigen Complex May Facilitate Crystallization for X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Wecksler, Aaron T.; Zhang, Hao; Molina, Patricia; Deperalta, Galahad; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-04-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) and top-down electron-capture dissociation (ECD) combine as a powerful approach for characterizing large proteins and protein assemblies. Here, we report their use to study an antibody Fab (Fab-1)-VEGF complex in its near-native state. Native ESI with analysis by FTICR mass spectrometry confirms that VEGF is a dimer in solution and that its complex with Fab-1 has a binding stoichiometry of 2:2. Applying combinations of collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), ECD, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) allows identification of flexible regions of the complex, potentially serving as a guide for crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  5. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  6. The Structure of KinA-Sda Complex Suggests An Allosteric Mechanism of Histidine Kinase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, A.E.; Jacques, D.A.; Hammouda, B.; Hanley, T.; King, G.F.; Guss, J.Mitchell.; Trewhella, J.; Langley, D.B.; /Sydney U. /NIST, Wash., D.C. /Utah U.

    2007-07-13

    The Bacillus subtilis histidine kinase KinA controls activation of the transcription factor governing sporulation, Spo0A. The decision to sporulate involves KinA phosphorylating itself on a conserved histidine residue, after which the phosphate moiety is relayed via two other proteins to Spo0A. The DNA-damage checkpoint inhibitor Sda halts this pathway by binding KinA and blocking the autokinase reaction. We have performed small-angle X-ray scattering and neutron contrast variation studies on the complex formed by KinA and Sda. The data show that two Sda molecules bind to the base of the DHp dimerization domain of the KinA dimer. In this position Sda does not appear to be able to sterically block the catalytic domain from accessing its target histidine, as previously proposed, but rather may effect an allosteric mode of inhibition involving transmission of the inhibitory signal via the four-helix bundle that forms the DHp domain.

  7. Mutant p53 inhibits miRNA biogenesis by interfering with the microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, F; Falcone, E; Trisciuoglio, D; Colombo, T; Lisek, K; Walerych, D; Del Sal, G; Paci, P; Bossi, G; Piaggio, G; Gurtner, A

    2016-07-21

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in cancers and promotes tumorigenesis suggesting that miRNAs may function as tumor suppressors. However, the mechanism through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer, and the connection between oncogenes and miRNA biogenesis remain poorly understood. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is mutated in half of human cancers resulting in an oncogene with gain-of-function activities. Here we demonstrate that mutant p53 (mutp53) oncoproteins modulate the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs in cancer cells inhibiting their post-transcriptional maturation. Interestingly, among these miRNAs several are also downregulated in human tumors. By confocal, co-immunoprecipitation and RNA-chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that endogenous mutp53 binds and sequesters RNA helicases p72/82 from the microprocessor complex, interfering with Drosha-pri-miRNAs association. In agreement with this, the overexpression of p72 leads to an increase of mature miRNAs levels. Moreover, functional experiments demonstrate the oncosuppressive role of mutp53-dependent miRNAs (miR-517a, -519a, -218, -105). Our study highlights a previously undescribed mechanism by which mutp53 interferes with Drosha-p72/82 association leading, at least in part, to miRNA deregulation observed in cancer. PMID:26996669

  8. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  9. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 1 (AAV1)- and AAV5-Antibody Complex Structures Reveal Evolutionary Commonalities in Parvovirus Antigenic Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Gurda, Brittney L.; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Afione, Sandra; Chiorini, John A.; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Olson, Norman H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clinical utility of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery system has been validated by the regulatory approval of an AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) vector for the treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency. However, neutralization from preexisting antibodies is detrimental to AAV transduction efficiency. Hence, mapping of AAV antigenic sites and engineering of neutralization-escaping vectors are important for improving clinical efficacy. We report the structures of four AAV-monoclonal antibody fragment complexes, AAV1-ADK1a, AAV1-ADK1b, AAV5-ADK5a, and AAV5-ADK5b, determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction to a resolution of ∼11 to 12 Å. Pseudoatomic modeling mapped the ADK1a epitope to the protrusions surrounding the icosahedral 3-fold axis and the ADK1b and ADK5a epitopes, which overlap, to the wall between depressions at the 2- and 5-fold axes (2/5-fold wall), and the ADK5b epitope spans both the 5-fold axis-facing wall of the 3-fold protrusion and portions of the 2/5-fold wall of the capsid. Combined with the six antigenic sites previously elucidated for different AAV serotypes through structural approaches, including AAV1 and AAV5, this study identified two common AAV epitopes: one on the 3-fold protrusions and one on the 2/5-fold wall. These epitopes coincide with regions with the highest sequence and structure diversity between AAV serotypes and correspond to regions determining receptor recognition and transduction phenotypes. Significantly, these locations overlap the two dominant epitopes reported for autonomous parvoviruses. Thus, rather than the amino acid sequence alone, the antigenic sites of parvoviruses appear to be dictated by structural features evolved to enable specific infectious functions. IMPORTANCE The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors for in vivo therapeutic gene delivery, with more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials that

  10. Structures of MART-126/27-35Peptide/HLA-A2 Complexes Reveal a Remarkable Disconnect between Antigen Structural Homology and T Cell Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Insaidoo, Francis K; Baxter, Tiffany K; Powell, Jr., Daniel J.; Johnson, Laura A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Baker, Brian M

    2008-09-17

    Small structural changes in peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules often result in large changes in immunogenicity, supporting the notion that T cell receptors are exquisitely sensitive to antigen structure. Yet there are striking examples of TCR recognition of structurally dissimilar ligands. The resulting unpredictability of how T cells will respond to different or modified antigens impacts both our understanding of the physical bases for TCR specificity as well as efforts to engineer peptides for immunomodulation. In cancer immunotherapy, epitopes and variants derived from the MART-1/Melan-A protein are widely used as clinical vaccines. Two overlapping epitopes spanning amino acid residues 26 through 35 are of particular interest: numerous clinical studies have been performed using variants of the MART-1 26-35 decamer, although only the 27-35 nonamer has been found on the surface of targeted melanoma cells. Here, we show that the 26-35 and 27-35 peptides adopt strikingly different conformations when bound to HLA-A2. Nevertheless, clonally distinct MART-1{sub 26/27-35}-reactive T cells show broad cross-reactivity towards these ligands. Simultaneously, however, many of the cross-reactive T cells remain unable to recognize anchor-modified variants with very subtle structural differences. These dichotomous observations challenge our thinking about how structural information on unligated peptide/MHC complexes should be best used when addressing questions of TCR specificity. Our findings also indicate that caution is warranted in the design of immunotherapeutics based on the MART-1 26/27-35 epitopes, as neither cross-reactivity nor selectivity is predictable based on the analysis of the structures alone.

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class I-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 association on the surface of target cells: implications for antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Tatiana; Anikeeva, Nadja; Kalams, Spyros A; Walker, Bruce D; Gaidarov, Ibragim; Keen, James H; Sykulev, Yuri

    2004-12-01

    Polarization and segregation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and integrins upon productive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) target cell encounters are well documented. Much less is known about the redistribution of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) proteins on target cells interacting with CTLs. Here we show that human leucocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) MHC-I and ICAM-1 are physically associated and recovered from both the raft fraction and the fraction of soluble membranes of target cells. Conjugation of target cells with surrogate CTLs, i.e. polystyrene beads loaded with antibodies specific for HLA-A2 and ICAM-1, induced the accumulation of membrane rafts, and beads loaded with ICAM-1-specific antibodies caused the selective recruitment of HLA-A2 MHC-I at the contact area of the target cells. Disruption of raft integrity on target cells led to a release of HLA-A2 and ICAM-1 from the raft fraction, abatement of HLA-A2 polarization, and diminished the ability of target cells bearing viral peptides to induce a Ca(2+) flux in virus-specific CTLs. These data suggest that productive engagement of ICAM-1 on target cells facilitates the polarization of MHC-I at the CTL-target cell interface, augmenting presentation of cognate peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes to CTLs. We propose that ICAM-1-MHC-I association on the cell membrane is a mechanism that enhances the linkage between antigen recognition and early immunological synapse formation. PMID:15554924

  12. Isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding the antigenic protein of the human tRNP(Ser)Sec complex recognized by autoantibodies from patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J L; Czaja, A J; Gelpí, C

    2000-01-01

    We previously described autoantibodies against a UGA serine tRNA–protein complex (tRNP(Ser)Sec) in patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis [1] and now define the specificity and frequency of this autoantibody and the DNA sequence encoding the tRNA(Ser)Sec-associated antigenic protein. The presence of anti‐tRNP(Ser)Sec antibodies was highly specific for type-1 autoimmune hepatitis, as 47·5% of patients were positive compared with none of the control subjects. To characterize the antigenic protein(s), we immunoscreened a human cDNA library with anti-tRNP(Ser)Sec-positive sera. Two clones (19 and 13) were isolated. Clone 19 encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 48·8 kD. Clone 13 is a shorter cDNA, almost identical to clone 19, which encodes a 35·9-kD protein. Expression of both cDNAs was accomplished in Escherichia coli as His-tagged recombinant proteins. Antibodies eluted from both purified recombinant proteins were able to immunoprecipitate the tRNA(Ser)Sec from a HeLa S3 cell extract, demonstrating their cross-reactivity with the mammalian antigenic complex. Recent cloning data relating to the target antigen(s) of autoantibodies in autoimmune hepatitis patients that react with a soluble liver antigen (SLA) and a liver-pancreas antigen (LP) have revealed that these two autoantibodies are identical and that the cloned antigen shows 99% amino acid sequence homology with tRNP(Ser)Sec. PMID:10931155

  13. A Simple Proteomics-Based Approach to Identification of Immunodominant Antigens from a Complex Pathogen: Application to the CD4 T Cell Response against Human Herpesvirus 6B

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Artiles, Aniuska; Dominguez-Amorocho, Omar; Stern, Lawrence J.; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Most of humanity is chronically infected with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), with viral replication controlled at least in part by a poorly characterized CD4 T cell response. Identification of viral epitopes recognized by CD4 T cells is complicated by the large size of the herpesvirus genome and a low frequency of circulating T cells responding to the virus. Here, we present an alternative to classical epitope mapping approaches used to identify major targets of the T cell response to a complex pathogen like HHV-6B. In the approach presented here, extracellular virus preparations or virus-infected cells are fractionated by SDS-PAGE, and eluted fractions are used as source of antigens to study cytokine responses in direct ex vivo T cell activation studies. Fractions inducing significant cytokine responses are analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify viral proteins, and a subset of peptides from these proteins corresponding to predicted HLA-DR binders is tested for IFN-γ production in seropositive donors with diverse HLA haplotypes. Ten HHV-6B viral proteins were identified as immunodominant antigens. The epitope-specific response to HHV-6B virus was complex and variable between individuals. We identified 107 peptides, each recognized by at least one donor, with each donor having a distinctive footprint. Fourteen peptides showed responses in the majority of donors. Responses to these epitopes were validated using in vitro expanded cells and naturally expressed viral proteins. Predicted peptide binding affinities for the eight HLA-DRB1 alleles investigated here correlated only modestly with the observed CD4 T cell responses. Overall, the response to the virus was dominated by peptides from the major capsid protein U57 and major antigenic protein U11, but responses to other proteins including glycoprotein H (U48) and tegument proteins U54 and U14 also were observed. These results provide a means to follow and potentially modulate the CD4 T-cell immune response to HHV-6

  14. Structures of a pan-specific antagonist antibody complexed to different isoforms of TGFβ reveal structural plasticity of antibody–antigen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, Aaron; Mathieu, Magali; Lawrence, Catherine; Bigelow, Russell; Levine, Mark; Hamel, Christine; Marquette, Jean-Piere; Le Parc, Josiane; Loux, Christophe; Ferrari, Paul; Capdevila, Cecile; Dumas, Jacques; Dumas, Bruno; Rak, Alexey; Bird, Julie; Qiu, Huawei; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim; Wei, Ronnie R

    2014-01-01

    Various important biological pathways are modulated by TGFβ isoforms; as such they are potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Fresolimumab, also known as GC1008, is a pan-TGFβ neutralizing antibody that has been tested clinically for several indications including an ongoing trial for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The structure of the antigen-binding fragment of fresolimumab (GC1008 Fab) in complex with TGFβ3 has been reported previously, but the structural capacity of fresolimumab to accommodate tight interactions with TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 was insufficiently understood. We report the crystal structure of the single-chain variable fragment of fresolimumab (GC1008 scFv) in complex with target TGFβ1 to a resolution of 3.00 Å and the crystal structure of GC1008 Fab in complex with TGFβ2 to 2.83 Å. The structures provide further insight into the details of TGFβ recognition by fresolimumab, give a clear indication of the determinants of fresolimumab pan-specificity and provide potential starting points for the development of isoform-specific antibodies using a fresolimumab scaffold. 4KV5; 4KXZ PMID:25209176

  15. Two-domain MHC class II molecules form stable complexes with myelin basic protein 69-89 peptide that detect and inhibit rat encephalitogenic T cells and treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Burrows, G G; Bebo, B F; Adlard, K L; Vandenbark, A A; Offner, H

    1998-12-01

    We designed and expressed in bacteria a single-chain two-domain MHC class II molecule capable of binding and forming stable complexes with antigenic peptide. The prototype "beta1alpha1" molecule included the beta1 domain of the rat RT1.B class II molecule covalently linked to the amino terminus of the alpha1 domain. In association with the encephalitogenic myelin basic protein (MBP) 69-89 peptide recognized by Lewis rat T cells, the beta1alpha1/MBP-69-89 complex specifically labeled and inhibited activation of MBP-69-89 reactive T cells in an IL-2-reversible manner. Moreover, this complex both suppressed and treated clinical signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and inhibited delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and lymphocyte proliferation in an Ag-specific manner. These data indicate that the beta1alpha1/MBP-69-89 complex functions as a simplified natural TCR ligand with potent inhibitory activity that does not require additional signaling from the beta2 and alpha2 domains. This new class of small soluble polypeptide may provide a template for designing human homologues useful in detecting and regulating potentially autopathogenic T cells. PMID:9834080

  16. Native MS and ECD Characterization of a Fab-Antigen Complex May Facilitate Crystallization for X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Wecksler, Aaron T; Zhang, Hao; Molina, Patricia; Deperalta, Galahad; Gross, Michael L

    2016-07-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) and top-down electron-capture dissociation (ECD) combine as a powerful approach for characterizing large proteins and protein assemblies. Here, we report their use to study an antibody Fab (Fab-1)-VEGF complex in its near-native state. Native ESI with analysis by FTICR mass spectrometry confirms that VEGF is a dimer in solution and that its complex with Fab-1 has a binding stoichiometry of 2:2. Applying combinations of collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), ECD, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) allows identification of flexible regions of the complex, potentially serving as a guide for crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27103115

  17. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  18. Complex preimplantation genetic diagnosis for beta-thalassaemia, sideroblastic anaemia, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Georgia; Vrettou, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Destouni, Aspasia; Poulou, Myrto; Moutafi, Maria; Kokkali, Georgia; Pantos, Konstantinos; Davies, Stephen; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select histocompatible siblings to facilitate curative haematopoeitic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is now an acceptable option in the absence of an available human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatible donor. We describe a case where the couple who requested HLA-PGD, were both carriers of two serious haematological diseases, beta-thalassaemia and sideroblastic anaemia. Their daughter, affected with sideroblastic anaemia, was programmed to have HSCT. A multiplex-fluorescent-touchdown-PCR protocol was optimized for the simultaneous amplification of: the two HBB-gene mutated regions (c.118C> T, c.25-26delAA), four short tandem repeats (STRs) in chr11p15.5 linked to the HBB gene, the SLC25A38 gene mutation (c.726C > T), two STRs in chr3p22.1 linked to the SLC25A38 gene, plus eleven informative STRs for HLA-haplotyping (chr6p22.1-21.3). This was followed by real-time nested PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for the detection of HBB and SLC25A38 gene mutations, as well as the analysis of all STRs on an automatic genetic analyzer (sequencer). The couple completed four clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF)/PGD cycles. At least one matched unaffected embryo was identified and transferred in each cycle. A twin pregnancy was established in the fourth PGD cycle and genotyping results at all loci were confirmed by prenatal diagnosis. Two healthy baby girls were delivered at week 38 of pregnancy. The need to exclude two familial disorders for HLA-PGD is rarely encountered. The methodological approach described here is fast, accurate, clinically-validated, and of relatively low cost. PMID:26636621

  19. Structures and contribution to the antigenicity of oligosaccharides of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen allergen Cry j I: relationship between the structures and antigenic epitopes of plant N-linked complex-type glycans.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, H; Hijikata, A; Amano, M; Kojima, K; Fukushima, H; Ishizuka, I; Kurihara, Y; Matsumoto, I

    1996-08-01

    The oligosaccharide structures of Cry j I, a major allergenic glycoprotein of Cryptomeria japonica (Japanese cedar, sugi), were analysed by 400 MHz 1H-NMR and two-dimensional sugar mapping analyses. The four major fractions comprised a series of biantennary complex type N-linked oligosaccharides that share a fucose/xylose-containing core and glucosamine branches including a novel structure with a nongalactosylated fucosylglucosamine branch. Rabbit polyclonal anti-Cry j I IgG antibodies cross-reacted with three different plant glycoproteins having the same or shorter N-linked oligosaccharides as Cry j I. ELISA and ELISA inhibition studies with intact glycoproteins, glycopeptides and peptides indicated that both anti-Cry j I IgGs and anti-Sophora japonica bark lectin II (B-SJA-II) IgGs included oligosaccharide-specific antibodies with different specificities, and that the epitopic structures against anti-Cry j I IgGs include a branch containing alpha 1-6 linked fucose and a core containing fucose/xylose, while those against anti-B-SJA-II IgGs include nonreducing terminal mannose residues. The cross-reactivities of human allergic sera to miraculin and Clerodendron Trichotomum lectin (CTA) were low, and inhibition studies suggested that the oligosaccharides on Cry j I contribute little or only conformationally to the reactivity of specific IgE antibodies. PMID:8872112

  20. The Role of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase in Apoptosis Induction in Response to Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III

    PubMed Central

    Khutornenko, A. A.; Dalina, A. A.; Chernyak, B. V.; Chumakov, P. M.; Evstafieva, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    A mechanism for the induction of programmed cell death (apoptosis) upon dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been studied. Previously, we had found that inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, a component of the electron transport chain complex III, leads to activation of tumor suppressor p53, followed by apoptosis induction. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is coupled to the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway via the mitochondrial enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). The p53 activation induced in response to the inhibition of the electron transport chain complex III has been shown to be triggered by the impairment of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis due to the suppression of DHODH. However, it remained unclear whether the suppression of the DHODH function is the main cause of the observed apoptotic cell death. Here, we show that apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells induced by the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III inhibition can be prevented by supplementation with uridine or orotate (products of the reaction catalyzed by DHODH) rather than with dihydroorotate (a DHODH substrate). We conclude that apoptosis is induced in response to the impairment of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis caused by the inhibition of DHODH. The conclusion is supported by the experiment showing that downregulation of DHODH by RNA interference leads to accumulation of the p53 tumor suppressor and to apoptotic cell death. PMID:24772329

  1. Electron transport inhibition of the cytochrome bc1 complex of rat-liver mitochondria by phenolic uncouplers.

    PubMed

    Tokutake, N; Miyoshi, H; Fujita, T

    1991-05-01

    The respiration inhibition of rat-liver mitochondria by a series of substituted phenolic uncouplers was studied. The inhibitory effects were classified into three types, I-III, depending on the pattern of the changes in inhibitory potency observed when the potent uncoupler SF6847 was simultaneously applied. The extent of inhibition by type I phenols did not change as the transmembrane potential was dissipated by SF6847, but the extent of inhibition by type II and III phenols was decreased and increased, respectively. With the addition of another potent uncoupler, fluazinam, the uncoupling activity of which disappears with time, the inhibitory potency of type II phenols was decreased, but increased reversibly with the disappearance of the uncoupling effect of fluazinam. However, the inhibitory potency of type III phenols increased by fluazinam was not reduced. The inhibitory site of the phenols studied here was the cytochrome bc1 complex. This complex undergoes conformational changes when the transmembrane potential changes. The findings suggested that inhibition by substituted phenolic uncouplers depends partially on conformational changes of the cytochrome bc1 complex that accompany variations in the transmembrane potential. PMID:1851439

  2. The pro-oxidant chromium(VI) inhibits mitochondrial complex I, complex II, and aconitase in the bronchial epithelium: EPR markers for Fe-S proteins

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Charles R.; Antholine, William E.; Myers, Judith M.

    2010-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds (e.g. chromates) are strong oxidants that readily enter cells where they are reduced to reactive Cr species that also facilitate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Recent studies demonstrated inhibition and oxidation of the thioredoxin system, with greater effects on mitochondrial thioredoxin (Trx2). This implies that Cr(VI)-induced oxidant stress may be especially directed at the mitochondria. Examination of other redox-sensitive mitochondrial functions showed that Cr(VI) treatments that cause Trx2 oxidation in human bronchial epithelial cells also result in pronounced and irreversible inhibition of aconitase, a TCA cycle enzyme that has an iron-sulfur (Fe-S) center that is labile with respect to certain oxidants. The activities of electron transport complexes I and II were also inhibited, whereas complex III was not. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of samples at liquid helium temperature (10 K) showed a strong signal at g = 1.94 that is consistent with the inhibition of electron flow through complexes I and/or II. A signal at g = 2.02 was also observed which is consistent with oxidation of the Fe-S center of aconitase. The g = 1.94 signal was particularly intense and remained after extracellular Cr(VI) was removed, whereas the g = 2.02 signal declined in intensity after Cr(VI) was removed. A similar inhibition of these activities and analogous EPR findings were noted in bovine airways treated ex vivo with Cr(VI). Overall, the data support the hypothesis that Cr(VI) exposure has deleterious effects on a number of redox-sensitive core mitochondrial proteins. The g = 1.94 signal could prove to be an important biomarker for oxidative damage resulting from Cr(VI) exposure. The EPR spectra simultaneously showed signals for Cr(V) and Cr(III) which verify Cr(VI) exposure and its intracellular reductive activation. PMID:20883776

  3. Vaccination with ubiquitin-hepatitis B core antigen-cytoplasmic transduction peptide enhances the hepatitis B virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune response and inhibits hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Meng; Song, Linlin; Tang, Yuyan; Dai, Shenglan; Chen, Xiaohua; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqing; Tang, Zhenghao

    2015-09-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by functionally impaired type 1 T-helper cell (Thl) immunity and poor HBV‑specific T‑cell responses. Ubiquitin (Ub), a highly conserved small regulatory protein, commonly serves as a signal for target proteins that are recognized and degraded in proteasomes. The rapid degradation of Ub‑mediated antigens results in efficient stimulation of cell‑mediated immune responses. Thus, the Ub‑HBV core antigen (HBcAg)‑cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) fusion protein was designed for specific delivery of a foreign modified antigen to the cytoplasm of antigen‑presenting cells. HBV transgenic mice were used to determine whether Ub‑HBcAg‑CTP would restore HBV‑specific immune responses and anti‑viral immunity in these animals. The results demonstrated that synthesized Ub‑HBcAg‑CTP not only significantly increased the levels of interleukin‑2 and interferon (IFN)‑γ compared with those in the HBcAg‑CTP, IFN‑α, Ub‑HBcAg, HBcAg and phosphate‑buffered saline groups, but additionally induced the highest IFN‑γ+ CD8+ T‑cell numbers and HBV‑specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, indicating a strong immune response. In addition, enhancement of specific CTL activity provoked by the fusion protein reduced hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV DNA serum levels and diminished the expression of HBsAg and HBcAg in liver tissue of HBV transgenic mice, suggesting that there was a therapeutic effect. In conclusion, the present study provided evidence that Ub‑HBcAg‑CTP activated the Th1‑dependent immunity, triggered functional T cell responses and subsequently inhibited viral replication in HBV transgenic mice. These observations suggested that the fusion protein may represent an innovative and promising candidate for active immunotherapy during chronic and persistent HBV. PMID:26004262

  4. The carboxy terminus of pp60c-src is a regulatory domain and is involved in complex formation with the middle-T antigen of polyomavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S H; Piwnica-Worms, H; Harvey, R W; Roberts, T M; Smith, A E

    1988-01-01

    A large number of mutations were introduced into the carboxy-terminal domain of pp60c-src. The level of phosphorylation on Tyr-416 and Tyr-527, the transforming activity (as measured by focus formation on NIH 3T3 cells), kinase activity, and the ability of the mutant pp60c-src to associate with the middle-T antigen of polyomavirus were examined. The results indicate that Tyr-527 is a major carboxy-terminal element responsible for regulating pp60c-src in vivo. A good but not perfect correlation exists between lack of phosphorylation at Tyr-527 and increased phosphorylation at Tyr-416, between elevated phosphorylation on Tyr-416 and activated kinase activity, and between activated kinase activity and transforming activity. Phosphorylation of Tyr-527 was insensitive to the mutation of adjacent residues, indicating that the primary sequence only has a minor role in recognition by kinases or phosphatases which regulate it in vivo. Three mutants which have in common a modified Glu-524 residue were phosphorylated on Tyr-416 and Tyr-527 and were weakly transforming. This suggests that other mechanisms besides complete dephosphorylation of Tyr-527 can lead to increased phosphorylation of Tyr-416 and activation of the transforming activity of pp60c-src. Furthermore, the residues between Asp-518 and Pro-525 were required to form a stable complex with middle-T antigen. The proximity of these sequences to Tyr-527 suggests a model in which middle-T activates pp60c-src by binding directly to this region of the molecular and thereby preventing phosphorylation of Tyr-527. Alternatively, middle-T binding may mediate a conformational change in this region, which in turn induces an alteration in the level of phosphorylation at Tyr-527 and Tyr-416. Images PMID:2454396

  5. Salivary Antigen-5/CAP Family Members Are Cu2+-dependent Antioxidant Enzymes That Scavenge O2⨪ and Inhibit Collagen-induced Platelet Aggregation and Neutrophil Oxidative Burst*

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Teresa C. F.; Ma, Dongying; Schwarz, Alexandra; Reiter, Karine; Santana, Jaime M.; Andersen, John F.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Nardone, Glenn; Yu, Lee L.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The function of the antigen-5/CAP family of proteins found in the salivary gland of bloodsucking animals has remained elusive for decades. Antigen-5 members from the hematophagous insects Dipetalogaster maxima (DMAV) and Triatoma infestans (TIAV) were expressed and discovered to attenuate platelet aggregation, ATP secretion, and thromboxane A2 generation by low doses of collagen (<1 μg/ml) but no other agonists. DMAV did not interact with collagen, glycoprotein VI, or integrin α2β1. This inhibitory profile resembles the effects of antioxidants Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) in platelet function. Accordingly, DMAV was found to inhibit cytochrome c reduction by O2⨪ generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase, implying that it exhibits antioxidant activity. Moreover, our results demonstrate that DMAV blunts the luminescence signal of O2⨪ generated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. Mechanistically, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that DMAV, like Cu,Zn-SOD, interacts with Cu2+, which provides redox potential for catalytic removal of O2⨪. Notably, surface plasmon resonance experiments (BIAcore) determined that DMAV binds sulfated glycosaminoglycans (e.g. heparin, KD ∼100 nmol/liter), as reported for extracellular SOD. Finally, fractions of the salivary gland of D. maxima with native DMAV contain Cu2+ and display metal-dependent antioxidant properties. Antigen-5/CAP emerges as novel family of Cu2+-dependent antioxidant enzymes that inhibit neutrophil oxidative burst and negatively modulate platelet aggregation by a unique salivary mechanism. PMID:23564450

  6. T−B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency caused by complete deficiency of the CD3ζ subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter H.; Cooney, Myriah; Parrott, Roberta E.; Sajaroff, Elisa O.; Win, Chan M.; Keller, Michael D.; Carpenter, Jeffery H.; Carabana, Juan; Krangel, Michael S.; Sarzotti, Marcella; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Wiest, David L.; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2007-01-01

    CD3ζ is a subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex required for its assembly and surface expression that also plays an important role in TCR-mediated signal transduction. We report here a patient with T−B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) who was homozygous for a single C insertion following nucleotide 411 in exon 7 of the CD3ζ gene. The few T cells present contained no detectable CD3ζ protein, expressed low levels of cell surface CD3ε, and were nonfunctional. CD4+CD8−CD3εlow, CD4−CD8+CD3εlow, and CD4−CD8−CD3εlow cells were detected in the periphery, and the patient also exhibited an unusual population of CD56−CD16+ NK cells with diminished cytolytic activity. Additional studies demonstrated that retrovirally transduced patient mutant CD3ζ cDNA failed to rescue assembly of nascent complete TCR complexes or surface TCR expression in CD3ζ-deficient MA5.8 murine T-cell hybridoma cells. Nascent transduced mutant CD3ζ protein was also not detected in metabolically labeled MA5.8 cells, suggesting that it was unstable and rapidly degraded. Taken together, these findings provide the first demonstration that complete CD3ζ deficiency in humans can cause SCID by preventing normal TCR assembly and surface expression. PMID:17170122

  7. Insulin receptor substrate 1 translocation to the nucleus by the human JC virus T-antigen.

    PubMed

    Lassak, Adam; Del Valle, Luis; Peruzzi, Francesca; Wang, Jin Ying; Enam, Sahnila; Croul, Sidney; Khalili, Kamel; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2002-05-10

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is the major signaling molecule for the insulin and insulin-like growth factor I receptors, which transduces both metabolic and growth-promoting signals, and has transforming properties when overexpressed in the cells. Here we show that IRS-1 is translocated to the nucleus in the presence of the early viral protein-T-antigen of the human polyomavirus JC. Nuclear IRS-1 was detected in T-antigen-positive cell lines and in T-antigen-positive biopsies from patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma. The IRS-1 domain responsible for a direct JC virus T-antigen binding was localized within the N-terminal portion of IRS-1 molecule, and the binding was independent from IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and was strongly inhibited by IRS-1 serine phosphorylation. In addition, competition for the IRS-1-T-antigen binding by a dominant negative mutant of IRS-1 inhibited growth and survival of JC virus T-antigen-transformed cells in anchorage-independent culture conditions. Based on these findings, we propose a novel role for the IRS-1-T-antigen complex in controlling cellular equilibrium during viral infection. It may involve uncoupling of IRS-1 from its surface receptor and translocation of its function to the nucleus. PMID:11877394

  8. Calmodulin kinase II regulates the maturation and antigen presentation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Tara L; Morita, Craig T; Lee, Kelvin; Kusner, David J

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells, which activate the adaptive immune system. Upon receiving a danger signal, they undergo a maturation process, which increases their antigen presentation capacity, but the responsible regulatory mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A Ca2+-calmodulin (Cam)-Cam kinase II (CamK II) pathway regulates phagosome maturation in macrophages, and this pathway is inhibited by pathogenic microbes. Our hypothesis is that signal transduction events which control phagosome maturation also regulate antigen presentation. Stimulation of primary human DC or the human DC line KG-1, with particulate antigen, resulted in the activation of CamK II and its localization to the phagosome and plasma membrane. Two mechanistically distinct inhibitors of CamK II significantly reduced DC maturation, as determined by up-regulation of surface costimulatory and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and secretion of cytokines. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the CamK II inhibitors blocked the antigen-induced increase in total cellular MHC class molecules as well as their trafficking to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of CamK II was associated with decreased presentation of particulate and soluble MHC class II-restricted antigen, with a greater effect on the former. These data support a model in which CamK II regulates critical stages of the maturation and antigen presentation capacity of human DC, particularly in response to stimulation via phagocytosis. PMID:16204647

  9. Reversal of nitric oxide-, peroxynitrite- and S-nitrosothiol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration or complex I activity by light and thiols.

    PubMed

    Borutaite, V; Budriunaite, A; Brown, G C

    2000-08-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives peroxynitrite and S-nitrosothiols inhibit mitochondrial respiration by various means, but the mechanisms and/or the reversibility of such inhibitions are not clear. We find that the NO-induced inhibition of respiration in isolated mitochondria due to inhibition of cytochrome oxidase is acutely reversible by light. Light also acutely reversed the inhibition of respiration within iNOS-expressing macrophages, and this reversal was partly due to light-induced breakdown of NO, and partly due to reversal of the NO-induced inhibition of cytochrome oxidase. NO did not cause inhibition of complex I activity within isolated mitochondria, but 0.34 mM peroxynitrite, 1 mM S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine or 1 mM S-nitrosoglutathione did cause substantial inhibition of complex I activity. Inhibition by these reagents was reversed by light, dithiothreitol or glutathione-ethyl ester, either partially or completely, depending on the reagent used. The rapid inhibition of complex I activity by S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine also occurred in conditions where there was little or no release of free NO, suggesting that the inhibition was due to transnitrosylation of the complex. These findings have implications for the physiological and pathological regulation of respiration by NO and its derivatives. PMID:11004457

  10. E-cadherin inhibits cell surface localization of the pro-migratory 5T4 oncofetal antigen in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Helen L; Eastham, Angela M; Merry, Catherine L R; Southgate, Thomas D; Perez-Campo, Flor; Soncin, Francesca; Ritson, Sarah; Kemler, Rolf; Stern, Peter L; Ward, Christopher M

    2007-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) events occur during embryonic development and are important for the metastatic spread of epithelial tumors. We show here that spontaneous differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is associated with an E- to N-cadherin switch, up-regulation of E-cadherin repressor molecules (Snail and Slug proteins), gelatinase activity (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-2 and -9), and increased cellular motility, all characteristic EMT events. The 5T4 oncofetal antigen, previously shown to be associated with very early ES cell differentiation and altered motility, is also a part of this coordinated process. E- and N-cadherin and 5T4 proteins are independently regulated during ES cell differentiation and are not required for induction of EMT-associated transcripts and proteins, as judged from the study of the respective knockout ES cells. Further, abrogation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contact in undifferentiated ES cells using neutralizing antibody results in a reversible mesenchymal phenotype and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement that is concomitant with translocation of the 5T4 antigen from the cytoplasm to the cell surface in an energy-dependent manner. E-cadherin null ES cells are constitutively cell surface 5T4 positive, and although forced expression of E-cadherin cDNA in these cells is sufficient to restore cell-cell contact, cell surface expression of 5T4 antigen is unchanged. 5T4 and N-cadherin knockout ES cells exhibit significantly decreased motility during EMT, demonstrating a functional role for these proteins in this process. We conclude that E-cadherin protein stabilizes cortical actin cytoskeletal arrangement in ES cells, and this can prevent cell surface localization of the promigratory 5T4 antigen. PMID:17507657

  11. Human cytochrome p450 inhibition and metabolic-intermediate complex formation by goldenseal extract and its methylenedioxyphenyl components.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Parnali; Franklin, Michael R

    2003-11-01

    The concurrent use of herbal medicinals with prescription and over-the-counter drugs carries a risk for unanticipated adverse drug-botanical pharmacokinetic interactions, particularly as a result of cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition. Extracts of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) containing approximately equal concentrations ( approximately 17 mM) of two methylenedioxyphenyl alkaloids, berberine and hydrastine, inhibited with increasing potency (CYP2C9) diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation, (CYP2D6) bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation, and (CYP3A4) testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation activities in human hepatic microsomes. The inhibition of testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation activity was noncompetitive with an apparent Ki of 0.11% extract. Of the methylenedioxyphenyl alkaloids, berberine (IC50 = 45 microM) was the more inhibitory toward bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation and hydrastine (IC50 approximately 350 microM for both isomers), toward diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation. For testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation, berberine was the least inhibitory component (IC50 approximately 400 microM). Hydrastine inhibited testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation with IC50 values for the (+)- and (-)-isomers of 25 and 30 microM, respectively. For (-)-hydrastine, an apparent Ki value of 18 microM without preincubation and an NADPH-dependent mechanism-based inhibition with a kinactivation of 0.23 min(-1) and a KI of approximately 110 microM were determined. Cytochrome P450 metabolic-intermediate (MI) complex formation could be demonstrated for both hydrastine isomers. With expressed P450 isoforms, hydrastine formed a P450 MI complex with CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4. Coexpression of cytochrome b5 with the P450 isoforms enhanced the rate but not the extent of P450 MI complex formation. PMID:14570772

  12. Electrochemical Study on the Inhibition Effect of Phenanthroline and Its Cobalt Complex as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Okafor, Peter C.; Jiang, Bin; Hu, Hongxiang; Zheng, Yugui

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of phenanthroline (Phen) and its cobalt complex (CoPhen) on the corrosion of carbon steel in sulphuric acid solutions was studied using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques at 20, 30, and 40 °C. Scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the mild steel surface. The results indicate that the compounds inhibit the corrosion of mild steel in H2SO4 solutions through a predominant physical adsorption following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Polarization curves suggest that the complex and ligand are mixed-type inhibitors. The efficiency of the inhibitors is concentration- and temperature-dependent and follows the trend CoPhen > Phen.

  13. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  14. Cadmium inhibits mismatch repair by blocking the ATPase activity of the MSH2–MSH6 complex

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sreeparna; Flores-Rozas, Hernan

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a known carcinogen that inactivates the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In this study, we have tested the effect of Cd2+ exposure on the enzymatic activity of the mismatch binding complex MSH2–MSH6. Our results indicate that Cd2+ is highly inhibitory to the ATP binding and hydrolysis activities of MSH2–MSH6, and less inhibitory to its DNA mismatch binding activity. The inhibition of the ATPase activity appears to be dose and exposure time dependent. However, the inhibition of the ATPase activity by Cd2+ is prevented by cysteine and histidine, suggesting that these residues are essential for the ATPase activity and are targeted by Cd2+. A comparison of the mechanism of inhibition with N-ethyl maleimide, a sulfhydryl group inhibitor, indicates that this inhibition does not occur through direct inactivation of sulfhydryl groups. Zinc (Zn2+) does not overcome the direct inhibitory effect of Cd2+ on the MSH2–MSH6 ATPase activity in vitro. However, the increase in the mutator phenotype of yeast cells exposed to Cd2+ was prevented by excess Zn2+, probably by blocking the entry of Cd2+ into the cell. We conclude that the inhibition of MMR by Cd2+ is through the inactivation of the ATPase activity of the MSH2–MSH6 heterodimer, resulting in a dominant negative effect and causing a mutator phenotype. PMID:15746000

  15. Non-classical MHC class Ib-restricted cytotoxic T cells monitor antigen processing in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Gonzalez, Federico; Shastri, Nilabh

    2012-01-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP, is essential for trimming peptides presented by MHC I molecules. ERAAP inhibition by cytomegalovirus causes immune evasion, and ERAAP polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune disorders. How normal ERAAP function is monitored is unknown. We found that ERAAP inhibition rapidly induced presentation of the FL9 peptide by the Qa-1b MHC Ib molecule. Antigen-experienced T cells specific for the Qa-1b-FL9 complex were frequent in naïve mice. Wild-type mice immunized with ERAAP-deficient cells mounted a potent CD8+ T cell response specific for the Qa-1b-FL9- complex. MHC Ib-restricted cytolytic effectors specifically eliminated ERAAP-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, non-classical peptide-Qa-1b complexes direct cytotoxic T cells to targets with defective antigen processing in the ER. PMID:22522492

  16. The PD-1/PD-L1 complex resembles the antigen-binding Fv domains of antibodies and T cell receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Masashi; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Su, Hua-Poo; Mikami, Bunzo; Okazaki, Taku; Honjo, Tasuku; Minato, Nagahiro; Garboczi, David N.

    2008-07-29

    Signaling through the programmed death 1 (PD-1) inhibitory receptor upon binding its ligand, PD-L1, suppresses immune responses against autoantigens and tumors and plays an important role in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance. Release from PD-1 inhibitory signaling revives 'exhausted' virus-specific T cells in chronic viral infections. Here we present the crystal structure of murine PD-1 in complex with human PD-L1. PD-1 and PD-L1 interact through the conserved front and side of their Ig variable (IgV) domains, as do the IgV domains of antibodies and T cell receptors. This places the loops at the ends of the IgV domains on the same side of the PD-1/PD-L1 complex, forming a surface that is similar to the antigen-binding surface of antibodies and T cell receptors. Mapping conserved residues allowed the identification of residues that are important in forming the PD-1/PD-L1 interface. Based on the structure, we show that some reported loss-of-binding mutations involve the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction but that others compromise protein folding. The PD-1/PD-L1 interaction described here may be blocked by antibodies or by designed small-molecule drugs to lower inhibitory signaling that results in a stronger immune response. The immune receptor-like loops offer a new surface for further study and potentially the design of molecules that would affect PD-1/PD-L1 complex formation and thereby modulate the immune response.

  17. Small molecule binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex can be exploited for inhibition of Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jon J G; Anderson, Malcolm; Blades, Kevin; Brassington, Claire; Breeze, Alexander L; Chresta, Christine; Embrey, Kevin; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Finlay, M Raymond V; Kettle, Jason G; Nowak, Thorsten; Overman, Ross; Patel, S Joe; Perkins, Paula; Spadola, Loredana; Tart, Jonathan; Tucker, Julie A; Wrigley, Gail

    2015-03-12

    Constitutively active mutant KRas displays a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis via both intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein-catalyzed mechanisms, resulting in the perpetual activation of Ras pathways. We describe a fragment screening campaign using X-ray crystallography that led to the discovery of three fragment binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex. The identification of tool compounds binding at each of these sites allowed exploration of two new approaches to Ras pathway inhibition by stabilizing or covalently modifying the Ras:SOS complex to prevent the reloading of Ras with GTP. Initially, we identified ligands that bound reversibly to the Ras:SOS complex in two distinct sites, but these compounds were not sufficiently potent inhibitors to validate our stabilization hypothesis. We conclude by demonstrating that covalent modification of Cys118 on Ras leads to a novel mechanism of inhibition of the SOS-mediated interaction between Ras and Raf and is effective at inhibiting the exchange of labeled GDP in both mutant (G12C and G12V) and wild type Ras. PMID:25695162

  18. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 by oxindolimine ligands and corresponding copper and zinc complexes.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Rodrigo Bernardi; Petersen, Philippe Alexandre Divina; Gonzales-Zubiate, Fernando A; Oliveira, Carla Columbano; Kumar, Naresh; do Nascimento, Rafael Rodrigues; Petrilli, Helena Maria; da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Oxindolimine-copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes that previously have shown to induce apoptosis, with DNA and mitochondria as main targets, exhibit here significant inhibition of kinase CDK1/cyclin B protein. Copper species are more active than the corresponding zinc, and the free ligand shows to be less active, indicating a major influence of coordination in the process, and a further modulation by the coordinated ligand. Molecular docking and classical molecular dynamics provide a better understanding of the effectiveness and kinase inhibition mechanism by these compounds, showing that the metal complex provides a stronger interaction than the free ligand with the ATP-binding site. The metal ion introduces charge in the oxindole species, giving it a more rigid conformation that then becomes more effective in its interactions with the protein active site. Analogous experiments resulted in no significant effect regarding phosphatase inhibition. These results can explain the cytotoxicity of these metal complexes towards different tumor cells, in addition to its capability of binding to DNA, and decreasing membrane potential of mitochondria. PMID:26411703

  19. Polyubiquitination of lysine-48 is an essential but indirect signal for MHC class I antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M; Pfister, Heike; Behrends, Uta; Mautner, Josef

    2015-03-01

    Peptides presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are generated via cytosolic proteolysis. However, the nature of the endogenous peptide precursors and the intracellular processing steps preceding protein degradation remain poorly defined. Here, we assessed whether ubiquitination is an essential signal for proteasomal cleavage of antigen substrates in human cells. Conversion into antigenic peptides occurred in the absence of any detectable N-terminal ubiquitination of the model antigens, and did not require the presence of any of the four types, nor a minimum number of ubiquitinatable amino acids within the antigen substrate. However, the knockdown of ubiquitin, expression of a lysine 48 (K48) ubiquitin mutant, or inhibition of proteasome-associated deubiquitinases significantly impaired antigen presentation. The results presented here are consistent with a model in which the binding of the antigen substrate by an adaptor protein leads to its K48-polyubiquitination and the subsequent delivery of the antigen cargo for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Altogether, these findings show an important but indirect role of K48-polyubiquitination in preproteasomal antigen sampling. PMID:25500897

  20. Crystal structures of human group-VIIA phospholipase A2 inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agents exhibit non-aged complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Kirby, Stephen D.; Srinivasan, Prabhavathi; Cerasoli, Douglas M.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-09-02

    The enzyme group-VIIA phospholipase A2 (gVIIA-PLA2) is bound to lipoproteins in human blood and hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-2 position of phospholipid substrates with a short sn-2 chain. The enzyme belongs to a serine hydrolase superfamily of enzymes, which react with organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents. OPs ultimately exert their toxicity by inhibiting human acetycholinesterase at nerve synapses, but may additionally have detrimental effects through inhibition of other serine hydrolases. We have solved the crystal structures of gVIIA-PLA2 following inhibition with the OPs diisopropylfluorophosphate, sarin, soman and tabun. The sarin and soman complexes displayed a racemic mix of P{sub R} and P{sub S} stereoisomers at the P-chiral center. The tabun complex displayed only the P{sub R} stereoisomer in the crystal. In all cases, the crystal structures contained intact OP adducts that had not aged. Aging refers to a secondary process OP complexes can go through, which dealkylates the nerve agent adduct and results in a form that is highly resistant to either spontaneous or oxime-mediated reactivation. Non-aged OP complexes of the enzyme were corroborated by trypsin digest and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of OP-enzyme complexes. The lack of stereoselectivity of sarin reaction was confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a chiral column to separate and quantitate the unbound stereoisomers of sarin following incubation with enzyme. The structural details and characterization of nascent reactivity of several toxic nerve agents is discussed with a long-term goal of developing gVIIA-PLA2 as a catalytic bioscavenger of OP nerve agents.

  1. Anti-thyroid and antifungal activities, BSA interaction and acid phosphatase inhibition of methimazole copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Urquiza, Nora M; Islas, María S; Ariza, Santiago T; Jori, Nadir; Martínez Medina, Juan J; Lavecchia, Martín J; López Tévez, Leonor L; Lezama, Luis; Rojo, Teófilo; Williams, Patricia A M; Ferrer, Evelina G

    2015-03-01

    It has been reported that various metal coordination compounds have improved some biological properties. A high activity of acid phosphatase (AcP) is associated to several diseases (osteoporosis, Alzheimer's, prostate cancer, among others) and makes it a target for the development of new potential inhibitors. Anti-thyroid agents have disadvantageous side effects and the scarcity of medicines in this area motivated many researchers to synthesize new ones. Several copper(II) complexes have shown antifungal activities. In this work we presented for a first time the inhibition of AcP and the anti-thyroid activity produced by methimazole-Cu(II) complexes. Cu-Met ([Cu(MeimzH)2(H2O)2](NO3)2·H2O) produces a weak inhibition action while Cu-Met-phen ([Cu(MeimzH)2(phen)(H2O)2]Cl2) shows a strong inhibition effect (IC50 = 300 μM) being more effective than the reported behavior of vanadium complexes. Cu-Met-phen also presented a fairly good anti-thyroid activity with a formation constant value, Kc=1.02 × 10(10)M(-1) being 10(6) times more active than methimazole (Kc = 4.16 × 10(4)M(-1)) in opposition to Cu-Met which presented activity (Kc=9.54 × 10(3)M(-1)) but in a lesser extent than that of the free ligand. None of the complexes show antifungal activity except Cu-phen (MIC = 11.71 μgmL(-1) on Candidaalbicans) which was tested for comparison. Besides, albumin interaction experiments denoted high affinity toward the complexes and the calculated binding constants indicate reversible binding to the protein. PMID:25641192

  2. Crystal structures of human group-VIIA phospholipase A2 inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agents exhibit non-aged complexes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Kirby, Stephen D; Srinivasan, Prabhavathi; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Bahnson, Brian J

    2009-08-15

    The enzyme group-VIIA phospholipase A2 (gVIIA-PLA2) is bound to lipoproteins in human blood and hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-2 position of phospholipid substrates with a short sn-2 chain. The enzyme belongs to a serine hydrolase superfamily of enzymes, which react with organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents. OPs ultimately exert their toxicity by inhibiting human acetycholinesterase at nerve synapses, but may additionally have detrimental effects through inhibition of other serine hydrolases. We have solved the crystal structures of gVIIA-PLA2 following inhibition with the OPs diisopropylfluorophosphate, sarin, soman and tabun. The sarin and soman complexes displayed a racemic mix of P(R) and P(S) stereoisomers at the P-chiral center. The tabun complex displayed only the P(R) stereoisomer in the crystal. In all cases, the crystal structures contained intact OP adducts that had not aged. Aging refers to a secondary process OP complexes can go through, which dealkylates the nerve agent adduct and results in a form that is highly resistant to either spontaneous or oxime-mediated reactivation. Non-aged OP complexes of the enzyme were corroborated by trypsin digest and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of OP-enzyme complexes. The lack of stereoselectivity of sarin reaction was confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a chiral column to separate and quantitate the unbound stereoisomers of sarin following incubation with enzyme. The structural details and characterization of nascent reactivity of several toxic nerve agents is discussed with a long-term goal of developing gVIIA-PLA2 as a catalytic bioscavenger of OP nerve agents. PMID:19394314

  3. Fludarabine phosphate selectively inhibits growth and modifies the antigenic phenotype of human glioblastoma-multiforme cells expressing a multidrug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Su, Z; Datta, S; Guarini, L; Waxman, S; Fisher, P

    1992-07-01

    Fludarabine phosphate (FLU), the 2-fluro derivative of Ara-A, 9-beta-D-arabino-furanosyl-2-fluoroadenine, has been shown to display both in vitro and in vivo antiproliferative activity toward a variety of murine tumors and human lymphoid malignancies. In the present study, we have determined the effect of FLU, alone and in combination with recombinant human fibroblast interferon (IFN-B), on in vitro growth, gene expression and the antigenic phenotype of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells displaying a multidrug sensitive and a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. FLU exhibited a marked differential toxicity toward GBM-MDR cells versus the multidrug sensitive GBM parental cell line. Growth of GBM-MDR cells for seven days in 2.5 to 7.5 muM FLU resulted in a dose-dependent reduction or elimination of growth which persisted after removal of this agent. In contrast, recovery from FLU-induced growth suppression was observed in parental multidrug sensitive GBM cells. Acquisition of increased FLU sensitivity in GBM-MDR cells did not appear to result from selection for a subset of sensitive cells or an artifact associated with the DNA-transfection process. This conclusion is supported by the similar pattern of FLU resistance in GBM-18 clones isolated after transfection with a cloned hygromycin resistance gene and selection for resistance to hygromycin. The antiproliferative and toxic effect of FLU was increased in GBM-MDR cells by simultaneous growth in IFN-B and the toxic effect of FLU could be blocked in a dose-dependent manner by the simultaneous addition of deoxycytidine. In contrast, the toxicity of FLU toward GBM-MDR cells was not altered when cells were grown in the presence or absence of colchicine or by the administration of verapamil, which can reverse the MDR phenotype in GBM-MDR cells. The selective toxicity of FLU toward GBM-MDR versus GBM-18 cells was not associated with a consistent differential change in all of the GBM-18 MDR clones in the steady

  4. Intraduodenal capsaicin inhibits gastric migrating motor complex via an extrinsic neural reflex in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Shibata, C; Naito, H; Ueno, T; Jin, X-L; Funayama, Y; Fukushima, K; Matsuno, S; Sasaki, I

    2002-10-01

    The aim was to study the effect of intraduodenal capsaicin on interdigestive gastric contractions. Mongrel dogs were equipped with strain-gauge force transducers to measure gastroduodenal motility. The effects of intraduodenal capsaicin with or without pharmacological antagonists on spontaneous and motilin-induced interdigestive gastric contractions and on plasma motilin were studied in dogs with intact stomachs. The effect of intraduodenal capsaicin on gastric contractions was also studied in vagally denervated gastric (Heidenhain) pouch and vagally innervated antral pouch. Intraduodenal capsaicin inhibited spontaneous and motilin-induced gastric contractions. The spontaneous peak in plasma motilin was inhibited by intraduodenal capsaicin. The effect of intraduodenal capsaicin on motilin-induced gastric contractions was not affected by blockade of nitric oxide synthase, or by beta-adrenoceptor antagonist. Administration of alpha-adrenergic blocker inhibited basal interdigestive gastric motility. Intraduodenal capsaicin had no effect on contractions in the Heidenhain pouch but inhibited those in vagally innervated antral pouch. Duodenal afferent fibres stimulated by capsaicin inhibit gastric contractions via a nitric oxide-independent extrinsic neural reflex. PMID:12358683

  5. The inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed

    Vink, A A; Moodycliffe, A M; Shreedhar, V; Ullrich, S E; Roza, L; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1997-05-13

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase (Photosomes; Applied Genetics, Freeport, NY), which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosome treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function. PMID:9144224

  6. ATP is required for the release of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome from inhibition by the mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Teichner, Adar; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Hershko, Avram

    2010-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes by delaying anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. This system acts by inhibiting the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase to target securin for degradation. APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20. The molecular mechanisms of the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint, including the release of APC/C from inhibition, remain obscure. It has been reported that polyubiquitylation by the APC/C is required for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint [Reddy SK, Rape M, Margansky WA, Kirschner MW (2007) Nature, 446:921–924]. We confirmed the involvement of polyubiquitylation, but found that another process, which requires ATP cleavage at the β–γ position (as opposed to α–β bond scission involved in ubiquitylation), is essential for the release of APC/C from checkpoint inhibition. ATP (β–γ) cleavage is required both for the dissociation of MCC components from APC/C and for the disassembly of free MCC, whereas polyubiquitylation is involved only in the former process. We find that the requirement for ATP (β–γ) cleavage is not due to the involvement of the 26S proteasome and that the phenomena observed are not due to sustained activity of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B, caused by inhibition of the degradation of cyclin B. Thus, some other energy-consuming process is needed for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint. PMID:20212161

  7. Macrophage Antigen Complex-1 Mediates Reactive Microgliosis and Progressive Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in the MPTP Model of Parkinson's Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Dan; Pang, Hao; Caudle, W. Michael; Li, Yachen; Gao, Huiming; Liu, Yuxin; Qian, Li; Wilson, Belinda; Monte, Donato A. Di; Ali, Syed F.; Zhang, Jing; Block, Michelle L.; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal death is known to trigger reactive microgliosis. However, little is known regarding the manner by which microglia are activated by injured neurons and how microgliosis participates in neurodegeneration. In this study we delineate the critical role of macrophage Ag complex-1 (MAC1), a member of the β2 integrin family, in mediating reactive microgliosis and promoting dopaminergic (DAergic) neurodegeneration in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of Parkinson's disease. MAC1 deficiency greatly attenuated the DAergic neurodegeneration induced by MPTP or 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridium iodide (MPP+) exposure both in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Reconstituted experiments created by adding microglia from MAC1–/– or MAC1+/+ mice back to MAC1+/+ neuron-enriched cultures showed that microglia with functional MAC1 expression was mandatory for microglia-enhanced neurotoxicity. Both in vivo and in vitro morphological and Western blot studies demonstrated that MPTP/MPP+ produced less microglia activation in MAC1–/– mice than MAC1+/+ mice. Further mechanistic studies revealed that a MPP+-mediated increase in superoxide production was reduced in MAC1–/– neuron-glia cultures compared with MAC1+/+ cultures. The stunted production of superoxide in MAC1–/– microglia is likely linked to the lack of translocation of the cytosolic NADPH oxidase (PHOX) subunit (p47phox) to the membrane. In addition, the production of PGE2 markedly decreased in neuron plus MAC1–/– microglia cocultures vs neuron plus MAC1+/+ microglia cocultures. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MAC1 plays a critical role in MPTP/MPP+-induced reactive microgliosis and further support the hypothesis that reactive microgliosis is an essential step in the self-perpetuating cycle leading to progressive DAergic neurodegeneration observed in Parkinson's disease. PMID:18981141

  8. Expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens on mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells in relation to susceptibility to cerebral malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Monso-Hinard, C; Lou, J N; Behr, C; Juillard, P; Grau, G E

    1997-01-01

    The physiopathology of experimental cerebral malaria (CM), an acute neurological complication of Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection, involves interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), two cytokines that are known to modulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the genetic susceptibility to CM is related to the constitutive or IFN-gamma-induced expression of MHC molecules on brain microvessels. To this end, brain microvascular endothelial cells (B-MVEC) were isolated from CM-susceptible (CM-S, CBA/J) and resistant (CM-R, BALB/c) mice. By flow cytometry, we found that less than 5% of CM-S B-MVEC constitutively expressed MHC class I molecules, in contrast to up to 90% of CM-R B-MVEC. Upon stimulation with IFN-gamma, the percentage of positive cells for MHC class I molecules in CM-S B-MVEC became comparable to CM-R B-MVEC, but a higher fluorescence intensity existed on CM-S B-MVEC compared with CM-R B-MVEC. MHC class II molecules were not constitutively expressed on B-MVEC from either strain. IFN-gamma-induced expression of MHC class II (I-A, I-E) molecules was significantly higher in CM-S than CM-R B-MVEC both in percentage of positive cells and fluorescence intensity. These data demonstrate that absent or low MHC class I and higher inducibility of MHC class II expression on B-MVEC are associated with the genetic susceptibility to CM. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9370924

  9. A New Way Forward in Cancer Drug Discovery: Inhibiting the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Complex.

    PubMed

    Zinzalla, Giovanna

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex are found in 20 % of human cancers. At face value, this would appear to indicate that this multiprotein complex is a potent tumour suppressor. However, it has recently emerged that some mutations in the SWI/SNF complex can have a gain-of-function effect and that in other tumours, such as pancreatic cancer, leukaemia, and breast cancer, the wild-type complex is used to drive cancer. Thus, paradoxically, this "tumour suppressor" has become an attractive target for developing anticancer agents. The SWI/SNF complex makes several protein-protein interactions both within the complex and with a wide range of transcription factors, and targeting these protein-protein interactions is emerging as the best approach to modulating the activity of the complex selectively. PMID:26684344

  10. Pharmacokinetics of an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody conjugated to a bifunctional transition metal carborane complex (venus flytrap cluster) in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Beatty, B G; Paxton, R J; Hawthorne, M F; Williams, L E; Rickard-Dickson, K J; Do, T; Shively, J E; Beatty, J D

    1993-08-01

    An anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody, T84.66, has been conjugated to a metallocarborane complex (Venus flytrap cluster, VFC) containing 57Co. This radioimmunoconjugate, 57Co-VFC-T84.66, retained > 90% immunoreactivity, was stable in serum (7 days) and demonstrated good localization in LS174T tumor xenografts. Pharmacokinetics of 57Co-VFC-T84.66 in tumor-bearing mice were compared to T84.66 Mab conjugated with either DTPA or its benzylisothiocyanate derivative (BzDTPA) labeled with 111In. Whole-body half-life for VFC-T84.66 was less (t1/2 = 62 hr) than that for either DTPA-T84.66 (t1/2 = 157 hr) or BzDTPA-T84.66 (t1/2 = 167 hr). Blood clearance was similar for all three radioimmunoconjugates (t1/2 = 22 hr). Hepatic uptake of the radiolabel was rapid and remained constant for 7 days for both DTPA radioimmunoconjugates (DTPA radioimmunoconjugate = 13.7 +/- 1.5 %ID/g; BzDTPA radioimmunoconjugate = 10.4 +/- 1.7%ID/g). For VFC, however, liver radioactivity decreased from 19.1 +/- 0.6%ID/g at 1 hr to 0.9 +/- 0.1 %ID/g 7 days postinjection, suggesting a possible role for VFC radioimmunoconjugate in the imaging and therapy of liver metastases. PMID:8326387

  11. An unexpected effect of an ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity on the amount of antigen-antibody complexes formed in situ.

    PubMed

    Mentré, P; Debey, P

    1999-09-01

    A classical method of indirect immunofluorescence was applied on various kinds of lightly fixed and permeabilized cells to analyze the formation of the complexes between a nuclear antigen and its antibody (AAC). The amount of AAC decreased dramatically when the incubation with the first antibody was realized in the presence of ATP in a sodium-rich medium with 0.5 mM KCl. Addition of sodium vanadate, a general inhibitor of ATPases, ouabain or tetrabutylammonium ion, specific inhibitors of the Na+,K+-ATPase, prevented this effect. The established role of this enzyme is to increase free-K+ concentration and decrease free Na+ concentration in the cell. It is not surprising to find an ATPase still active since light fixation and permeabilization do not destroy phosphatases. But it is rather surprising to find something looking like Na+,K+-ATPase activity in permeabilized cells. The importance of potassium in this puzzling result is suggested by the fact that appearance of ACC was equally suppressed if the incubation was made in the absence of ATP in a potassium-rich medium without sodium. Results are discussed, taking into account the properties of cell-associated water and recently found interrelation between Na+,K+-ATPase and tubulin. In any case, the results seem interesting in the field of immunocytochemistry. PMID:10541475

  12. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus interacts with origin recognition complexes at the LANA binding sequence within the terminal repeats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Subhash C; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Kaul, Rajeev; Robertson, Erle S

    2006-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) DNA persists in latently infected cells as an episome via tethering to the host chromosomes. The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of KSHV binds to the cis-acting elements in the terminal repeat (TR) region of the genome through its carboxy terminus. Previous studies have demonstrated that LANA is important for episome maintenance and replication of the TR-containing plasmids. Here we report that LANA associates with origin recognition complexes (ORCs) when bound to its 17-bp LANA binding cognate sequence (LBS). Chromatin immunoprecipitation of multiple regions across the entire genome from two KSHV-infected cell lines, BC-3 and BCBL-1, revealed that the ORCs predominantly associated with the chromatin structure at the TR as well as two regions within the long unique region of the genome. Coimmunoprecipitation of ORCs with LANA-specific antibodies shows that ORCs can bind and form complexes with LANA in cells. This association was further supported by in vitro binding studies which showed that ORCs associate with LANA predominantly through the carboxy-terminal DNA binding region. KSHV-positive BC-3 and BCBL-1 cells arrested in G(1)/S phase showed colocalization of LANA with ORCs. Furthermore, replication of The TR-containing plasmid required both the N- and C termini of LANA in 293 and DG75 cells. Interestingly, our studies did not detect cellular ORCs associated with packaged viral DNA as an analysis of purified virions did not reveal the presence of ORCs, minichromosome maintenance proteins, or LANA. PMID:16474132

  13. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  14. Selective inhibition of tumor growth by clonal NK cells expressing an ErbB2/HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, Kurt; Sahm, Christiane; Zhang, Congcong; Naundorf, Sonja; Brendel, Christian; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Bönig, Halvard; Köhl, Ulrike; Kloess, Stephan; Köhler, Sylvia; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Jauch, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; Schubert, Ralf; Kühlcke, Klaus; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans G; Rieger, Michael A; Tonn, Torsten; Grez, Manuel; Wels, Winfried S

    2015-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important effector cell type for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Similar to T cells, NK cells can be modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to enhance antitumor activity, but experience with CAR-engineered NK cells and their clinical development is still limited. Here, we redirected continuously expanding and clinically usable established human NK-92 cells to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2) antigen. Following GMP-compliant procedures, we generated a stable clonal cell line expressing a humanized CAR based on ErbB2-specific antibody FRP5 harboring CD28 and CD3ζ signaling domains (CAR 5.28.z). These NK-92/5.28.z cells efficiently lysed ErbB2-expressing tumor cells in vitro and exhibited serial target cell killing. Specific recognition of tumor cells and antitumor activity were retained in vivo, resulting in selective enrichment of NK-92/5.28.z cells in orthotopic breast carcinoma xenografts, and reduction of pulmonary metastasis in a renal cell carcinoma model, respectively. γ-irradiation as a potential safety measure for clinical application prevented NK cell replication, while antitumor activity was preserved. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to engineer CAR-expressing NK cells as a clonal, molecularly and functionally well-defined and continuously expandable cell therapeutic agent, and suggest NK-92/5.28.z cells as a promising candidate for use in adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25373520

  15. Selective Inhibition of Tumor Growth by Clonal NK Cells Expressing an ErbB2/HER2-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, Kurt; Sahm, Christiane; Zhang, Congcong; Naundorf, Sonja; Brendel, Christian; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Bönig, Halvard; Köhl, Ulrike; Kloess, Stephan; Köhler, Sylvia; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Jauch, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; Schubert, Ralf; Kühlcke, Klaus; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans G; Rieger, Michael A; Tonn, Torsten; Grez, Manuel; Wels, Winfried S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important effector cell type for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Similar to T cells, NK cells can be modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to enhance antitumor activity, but experience with CAR-engineered NK cells and their clinical development is still limited. Here, we redirected continuously expanding and clinically usable established human NK-92 cells to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2) antigen. Following GMP-compliant procedures, we generated a stable clonal cell line expressing a humanized CAR based on ErbB2-specific antibody FRP5 harboring CD28 and CD3ζ signaling domains (CAR 5.28.z). These NK-92/5.28.z cells efficiently lysed ErbB2-expressing tumor cells in vitro and exhibited serial target cell killing. Specific recognition of tumor cells and antitumor activity were retained in vivo, resulting in selective enrichment of NK-92/5.28.z cells in orthotopic breast carcinoma xenografts, and reduction of pulmonary metastasis in a renal cell carcinoma model, respectively. γ-irradiation as a potential safety measure for clinical application prevented NK cell replication, while antitumor activity was preserved. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to engineer CAR-expressing NK cells as a clonal, molecularly and functionally well-defined and continuously expandable cell therapeutic agent, and suggest NK-92/5.28.z cells as a promising candidate for use in adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25373520

  16. Light-Activated Protein Inhibition through Photoinduced Electron Transfer of a Ruthenium(II)–Cobalt(III) Bimetallic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. These results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers. PMID:25671465

  17. Rapid Mycobacterial Liquid Culture-Screening Method for Mycobacterium avium Complex Based on Secreted Antigen-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Jae; Anklam, Kelly; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Collins, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Sensors in automated liquid culture systems for mycobacteria, such as MGIT, BacT/Alert 3D, and Trek ESP II, flag growth of any type of bacteria; a positive signal does not mean that the target mycobacteria are present. All signal-positive cultures thus require additional and often laborious testing. An immunoassay was developed to screen liquid mycobacterial cultures for evidence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). The method, called the MAC-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), relies on detection of MAC-specific secreted antigens in liquid culture. Secreted MAC antigens were captured by the MAC-ELISA with polyclonal anti- Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY), detected using rabbit anti-MAC IgG, and then revealed using horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG. When the MAC-ELISA was evaluated using pure cultures of known mycobacterial (n = 75) and nonmycobacterial (n = 17) organisms, no false-positive or false-negative MAC-ELISA results were found. By receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis of 1,275 previously identified clinical isolates, at the assay optimal cutoff the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the MAC-ELISA were 92.6% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 90.3 to 94.5) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.2 to 100), respectively, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.992. Prospective evaluation of the MAC-ELISA with an additional 652 clinical samples inoculated into MGIT ParaTB medium and signaling positive per the manufacturer's instructions found that the MAC-ELISA was effective in determining those cultures that actually contained MAC species and warranting the resources required to identify the organism by PCR. Of these 652 MGIT-positive cultures, the MAC-ELISA correctly identified 96.8% (of 219 MAC-ELISA-positive cultures) as truly containing MAC mycobacteria, based on PCR or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as reference tests. Only 6 of 433 MGIT signal-positive cultures (1

  18. Inhibition of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 reduces complex coronary atherosclerotic plaque development

    PubMed Central

    Wilensky, Robert L; Shi, Yi; Mohler, Emile R; Hamamdzic, Damir; Burgert, Mark E; Li, Jun; Postle, Anthony; Fenning, Robert S; Bollinger, James G; Hoffman, Bryan E; Pelchovitz, Daniel J; Yang, Jisheng; Mirabile, Rosanna C; Webb, Christine L; Zhang, LeFeng; Zhang, Ping; Gelb, Michael H; Walker, Max C; Zalewski, Andrew; Macphee, Colin H

    2010-01-01

    Increased lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity is associated with increased risk of cardiac events, but it is not known whether Lp-PLA2 is a causative agent. Here we show that selective inhibition of Lp-PLA2 with darapladib reduced development of advanced coronary atherosclerosis in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic swine. Darapladib markedly inhibited plasma and lesion Lp-PLA2 activity and reduced lesion lysophosphatidylcholine content. Analysis of coronary gene expression showed that darapladib exerted a general anti-inflammatory action, substantially reducing the expression of 24 genes associated with macrophage and T lymphocyte functioning. Darapladib treatment resulted in a considerable decrease in plaque area and, notably, a markedly reduced necrotic core area and reduced medial destruction, resulting in fewer lesions with an unstable phenotype. These data show that selective inhibition of Lp-PLA2 inhibits progression to advanced coronary atherosclerotic lesions and confirms a crucial role of vascular inflammation independent from hypercholesterolemia in the development of lesions implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and stroke. PMID:18806801

  19. Role of Metalation in the Topoisomerase IIα Inhibition and Antiproliferation Activity of a Series of α-Heterocyclic-N4-Substituted Thiosemicarbazones and Their Cu(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zeglis, Brian M.; Divilov, Vadim; Lewis, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    The topoisomerase-IIα inhibition and antiproliferative activity of α-heterocyclic thiosemicarbazones and their corresponding copper(II) complexes have been investigated. The CuII(thiosemicarbazonato)Cl complexes were shown to catalytically inhibit topoisomerase-IIα at concentrations (0.3–7.2 μM) over an order of magnitude lower than their corresponding thiosemicarbazone ligands alone. The copper complexes were also shown to inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells expressing high levels of topoisomerase-IIα (SK-BR-3) at lower concentrations than cells expressing lower levels of the enzyme (MCF-7). PMID:21391686

  20. Regulation of antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a role for Toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Clifford V.; Boom, W. Henry

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as macrophages and dendritic cells. APCs present antigens in association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules to stimulate CD4+ T cells, and this process is essential to contain M. tuberculosis infection. Immune evasion allows M. tuberculosis to establish persistent or latent infection in macrophages and results in Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent inhibition of MHC class II transactivator expression, MHC class II molecule expression and antigen presentation. This reduction of antigen presentation might reflect a general mechanism of negative-feedback regulation that prevents excessive T cell-mediated inflammation and that M. tuberculosis has subverted to create a niche for survival in infected macrophages and evasion of recognition by CD4+ T cells. PMID:20234378

  1. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  2. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB proteins-platinated DNA interactions correlates with cytotoxic effectiveness of the platinum complexes

    PubMed Central

    Brabec, Viktor; Kasparkova, Jana; Kostrhunova, Hana; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear DNA is the target responsible for anticancer activity of platinum anticancer drugs. Their activity is mediated by altered signals related to programmed cell death and the activation of various signaling pathways. An example is activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB). Binding of NF-κB proteins to their consensus sequences in DNA (κB sites) is the key biochemical activity responsible for the biological functions of NF-κB. Using gel-mobility-shift assays and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy we examined the interactions of NF-κB proteins with oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplexes containing κB site damaged by DNA adducts of three platinum complexes. These complexes markedly differed in their toxic effects in tumor cells and comprised highly cytotoxic trinuclear platinum(II) complex BBR3464, less cytotoxic conventional cisplatin and ineffective transplatin. The results indicate that structurally different DNA adducts of these platinum complexes exhibit a different efficiency to affect the affinity of the platinated DNA (κB sites) to NF-κB proteins. Our results support the hypothesis that structural perturbations induced in DNA by platinum(II) complexes correlate with their higher efficiency to inhibit binding of NF-κB proteins to their κB sites and cytotoxicity as well. However, the full generalization of this hypothesis will require to evaluate a larger series of platinum(II) complexes. PMID:27574114

  3. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB proteins-platinated DNA interactions correlates with cytotoxic effectiveness of the platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Brabec, Viktor; Kasparkova, Jana; Kostrhunova, Hana; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear DNA is the target responsible for anticancer activity of platinum anticancer drugs. Their activity is mediated by altered signals related to programmed cell death and the activation of various signaling pathways. An example is activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB). Binding of NF-κB proteins to their consensus sequences in DNA (κB sites) is the key biochemical activity responsible for the biological functions of NF-κB. Using gel-mobility-shift assays and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy we examined the interactions of NF-κB proteins with oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplexes containing κB site damaged by DNA adducts of three platinum complexes. These complexes markedly differed in their toxic effects in tumor cells and comprised highly cytotoxic trinuclear platinum(II) complex BBR3464, less cytotoxic conventional cisplatin and ineffective transplatin. The results indicate that structurally different DNA adducts of these platinum complexes exhibit a different efficiency to affect the affinity of the platinated DNA (κB sites) to NF-κB proteins. Our results support the hypothesis that structural perturbations induced in DNA by platinum(II) complexes correlate with their higher efficiency to inhibit binding of NF-κB proteins to their κB sites and cytotoxicity as well. However, the full generalization of this hypothesis will require to evaluate a larger series of platinum(II) complexes. PMID:27574114

  4. Complex N-glycans or core 1-derived O-glycans are not required for the expression of stage-specific antigens SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, or LeY in the preimplantation mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Suzannah A; Stanley, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The glycan epitopes termed stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEA) occur on glycoproteins and glycolipids in mammals. However, it is not known whether these epitopes are attached to N- or O-glycans on glycoproteins and/or on glycolipids in the developing mouse embryo. In this paper the expression of the antigens SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4 and LeY was examined on ovulated eggs, early embryos and blastocysts lacking either complex and hybrid N-glycans or core-1 derived O-glycans. In all cases, antigen expression determined by fluorescence microscopy of bound monoclonal antibodies to embryos at the stage of development of maximal expression, was similar in mutant and control embryos. Thus, none of these developmental antigens are expressed solely on either complex N- or core 1-derived O-glycans attached to glycoproteins in the preimplantation mouse embryo. Furthermore, neither of these classes of glycan is essential for the expression of SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4 or LeY on mouse embryos. PMID:18773292

  5. Binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL) to antigen presenting cells prevents upregulation of CD11b and inhibits T cell activation and transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sushmita; Miller, Lisa; Subramanian, Sandhya; McCarty, Owen J T; Proctor, Thomas; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Huan, Jianya; Burrows, Gregory G; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2010-08-25

    Recombinant T cell ligands (RTLs) ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an antigen-specific manner. We evaluated effects of RTL401 (I-A(s) alpha1beta1+PLP-139-151) on splenocytes from SJL/J mice with EAE to study RTL-T cell tolerance-inducing mechanisms. RTLs bound to B, macrophages and DCs, through RTL-MHC-alpha1beta1 moiety. RTL binding reduced CD11b expression on splenic macrophages/DC, and RTL401-conditioned macrophages/DC, not B cells, inhibited T cell activation. Reduced ability of RTL- incubated splenocytes to transfer EAE was likely mediated through macrophages/DC, since B cells were unnecessary for RTL treatment of EAE. These results demonstrate a novel pathway of T cell regulation by RTL-bound APCs. PMID:20546940

  6. Binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL) to antigen presenting cells prevents upregulation of CD11b and inhibits T cell activation and transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sushmita; Miller, Lisa; Subramanian, Sandhya; McCarty, Owen; Proctor, Thomas; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant T cell ligands (RTLs) ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in antigen specific manner. We evaluated effects of RTL401 (I-As α1β1 + PLP-139-151) on splenocytes from mice with EAE to study RTL- T cell-tolerance-inducing mechanisms. RTLs bound to B, macrophages and DCs, through RTL-MHC-α1β1 moiety. RTL binding reduced CD11b expression on splenic macrophages/DC, and RTL401-conditioned macrophages/DC, not B cells, inhibited T cell activation. Reduced ability of RTL- incubated splenocytes to transfer EAE was likely mediated through macrophages/DC, since B cells were unnecessary for RTL treatment of EAE. These results demonstrate novel pathway of T cell regulation by RTL bound APCs. PMID:20546940

  7. Characterization of cationic lipid DNA transfection complexes differing in susceptability to serum inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Background Cationic lipid DNA complexes based on DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-(trimethyammonium) propane) and mixtures of DOTAP and cholesterol (DC) have been previously optimized for transfection efficiency in the absence of serum and used as a non-viral gene delivery system. To determine whether DOTAP and DC lipid DNA complexes could be obtained with increased transfection effciency in the presence of high serum concentrations, the composition of the complexes was varied systematically and a total of 162 different complexes were analyzed for transfection efficiency in the presence and absence of high serum concentrations. Results Increasing the ratio of DOTAP or DC to DNA led to a dose dependent enhancement of transfection efficiency in the presence of high serum concentrations up to a ratio of approximately 128 nmol lipid/μg DNA. Transfection efficiency could be further increased for all ratios of DOTAP and DC to DNA by addition of the DNA condensing agent protamine sulfate (PS). For DOTAP DNA complexes with ratios of ≤ 32 nmol/μg DNA, peak transfection efficiencies were obtained with 4 μg PS/μg DNA. In contrast, increasing the amount of PS of DC complexes above 0.5 μg PS /μg DNA did not lead to significant further increases in transfection efficiency in the presence of high serum concentrations. Four complexes, which had a similar high transfection efficiency in cell culture in the presence of low serum concentrations but which differed largely in the lipid to DNA ratio and the amount of PS were selected for further analysis. Intravenous injection of the selected complexes led to 22-fold differences in transduction efficiency, which correlated with transfection efficiency in the presence of high serum concentrations. The complex with the highest transfection efficiency in vivo consisted of 64 nmol DC/ 16 μg PS/ μg DNA. Physical analysis revealed a predicted size of 440 nm and the highest zeta potential of the complexes analyzed. Conclusions Optimization of

  8. Peptide-MHC-I from Endogenous Antigen Outnumber Those from Exogenous Antigen, Irrespective of APC Phenotype or Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Haskett, Scott; Kaminsky, Lauren W.; Lin, Eugene; Truckenmiller, Mary E.; Bellone, Clifford J.; Buller, R. Mark; Norbury, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Naïve anti-viral CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) are activated by the presence of peptide-MHC Class I complexes (pMHC-I) on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC). Increasing the number of pMHC-I in vivo can increase the number of responding TCD8+. Antigen can be presented directly or indirectly (cross presentation) from virus-infected and uninfected cells, respectively. Here we determined the relative importance of these two antigen presenting pathways in mousepox, a natural disease of the mouse caused by the poxvirus, ectromelia (ECTV). We demonstrated that ECTV infected several pAPC types (macrophages, B cells, and dendritic cells (DC), including DC subsets), which directly presented pMHC-I to naïve TCD8+ with similar efficiencies in vitro. We also provided evidence that these same cell-types presented antigen in vivo, as they form contacts with antigen-specific TCD8+. Importantly, the number of pMHC-I on infected pAPC (direct presentation) vastly outnumbered those on uninfected cells (cross presentation), where presentation only occurred in a specialized subset of DC. In addition, prior maturation of DC failed to enhance antigen presentation, but markedly inhibited ECTV infection of DC. These results suggest that direct antigen presentation is the dominant pathway in mice during mousepox. In a broader context, these findings indicate that if a virus infects a pAPC then the presentation by that cell is likely to dominate over cross presentation as the most effective mode of generating large quantities of pMHC-I is on the surface of pAPC that endogenously express antigens. Recent trends in vaccine design have focused upon the introduction of exogenous antigens into the MHC Class I processing pathway (cross presentation) in specific pAPC populations. However, use of a pantropic viral vector that targets pAPC to express antigen endogenously likely represents a more effective vaccine strategy than the targeting of exogenous antigen to a limiting p

  9. Peptide-MHC-I from Endogenous Antigen Outnumber Those from Exogenous Antigen, Irrespective of APC Phenotype or Activation.

    PubMed

    Sei, Janet J; Haskett, Scott; Kaminsky, Lauren W; Lin, Eugene; Truckenmiller, Mary E; Bellone, Clifford J; Buller, R Mark; Norbury, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Naïve anti-viral CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) are activated by the presence of peptide-MHC Class I complexes (pMHC-I) on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC). Increasing the number of pMHC-I in vivo can increase the number of responding TCD8+. Antigen can be presented directly or indirectly (cross presentation) from virus-infected and uninfected cells, respectively. Here we determined the relative importance of these two antigen presenting pathways in mousepox, a natural disease of the mouse caused by the poxvirus, ectromelia (ECTV). We demonstrated that ECTV infected several pAPC types (macrophages, B cells, and dendritic cells (DC), including DC subsets), which directly presented pMHC-I to naïve TCD8+ with similar efficiencies in vitro. We also provided evidence that these same cell-types presented antigen in vivo, as they form contacts with antigen-specific TCD8+. Importantly, the number of pMHC-I on infected pAPC (direct presentation) vastly outnumbered those on uninfected cells (cross presentation), where presentation only occurred in a specialized subset of DC. In addition, prior maturation of DC failed to enhance antigen presentation, but markedly inhibited ECTV infection of DC. These results suggest that direct antigen presentation is the dominant pathway in mice during mousepox. In a broader context, these findings indicate that if a virus infects a pAPC then the presentation by that cell is likely to dominate over cross presentation as the most effective mode of generating large quantities of pMHC-I is on the surface of pAPC that endogenously express antigens. Recent trends in vaccine design have focused upon the introduction of exogenous antigens into the MHC Class I processing pathway (cross presentation) in specific pAPC populations. However, use of a pantropic viral vector that targets pAPC to express antigen endogenously likely represents a more effective vaccine strategy than the targeting of exogenous antigen to a limiting p

  10. Structural basis of oncogenic histone H3K27M inhibition of human polycomb repressive complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Justin, Neil; Zhang, Ying; Tarricone, Cataldo; Martin, Stephen R.; Chen, Shuyang; Underwood, Elizabeth; De Marco, Valeria; Haire, Lesley F.; Walker, Philip A.; Reinberg, Danny; Wilson, Jon R.; Gamblin, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) silences gene expression through trimethylation of K27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) via its catalytic SET domain. A missense mutation in the substrate of PRC2, histone H3K27M, is associated with certain pediatric brain cancers and is linked to a global decrease of H3K27me3 in the affected cells thought to be mediated by inhibition of PRC2 activity. We present here the crystal structure of human PRC2 in complex with the inhibitory H3K27M peptide bound to the active site of the SET domain, with the methionine residue located in the pocket that normally accommodates the target lysine residue. The structure and binding studies suggest a mechanism for the oncogenic inhibition of H3K27M. The structure also reveals how binding of repressive marks, like H3K27me3, to the EED subunit of the complex leads to enhancement of the catalytic efficiency of the SET domain and thus the propagation of this repressive histone modification. PMID:27121947

  11. Structural basis of oncogenic histone H3K27M inhibition of human polycomb repressive complex 2.

    PubMed

    Justin, Neil; Zhang, Ying; Tarricone, Cataldo; Martin, Stephen R; Chen, Shuyang; Underwood, Elizabeth; De Marco, Valeria; Haire, Lesley F; Walker, Philip A; Reinberg, Danny; Wilson, Jon R; Gamblin, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) silences gene expression through trimethylation of K27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) via its catalytic SET domain. A missense mutation in the substrate of PRC2, histone H3K27M, is associated with certain pediatric brain cancers and is linked to a global decrease of H3K27me3 in the affected cells thought to be mediated by inhibition of PRC2 activity. We present here the crystal structure of human PRC2 in complex with the inhibitory H3K27M peptide bound to the active site of the SET domain, with the methionine residue located in the pocket that normally accommodates the target lysine residue. The structure and binding studies suggest a mechanism for the oncogenic inhibition of H3K27M. The structure also reveals how binding of repressive marks, like H3K27me3, to the EED subunit of the complex leads to enhancement of the catalytic efficiency of the SET domain and thus the propagation of this repressive histone modification. PMID:27121947

  12. Whole-genome sequencing reveals complex mechanisms of intrinsic resistance to BRAF inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Turajlic, S.; Furney, S. J.; Stamp, G.; Rana, S.; Ricken, G.; Oduko, Y.; Saturno, G.; Springer, C.; Hayes, A.; Gore, M.; Larkin, J.; Marais, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background BRAF is mutated in ∼42% of human melanomas (COSMIC. http://www.sanger.ac.uk/genetics/CGP/cosmic/) and pharmacological BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib and dabrafenib achieve dramatic responses in patients whose tumours harbour BRAFV600 mutations. Objective responses occur in ∼50% of patients and disease stabilisation in a further ∼30%, but ∼20% of patients present primary or innate resistance and do not respond. Here, we investigated the underlying cause of treatment failure in a patient with BRAF mutant melanoma who presented primary resistance. Methods We carried out whole-genome sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis of five metastatic tumours from the patient. We validated mechanisms of resistance in a cell line derived from the patient's tumour. Results We observed that the majority of the single-nucleotide variants identified were shared across all tumour sites, but also saw site-specific copy-number alterations in discrete cell populations at different sites. We found that two ubiquitous mutations mediated resistance to BRAF inhibition in these tumours. A mutation in GNAQ sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling, whereas a mutation in PTEN activated the PI3 K/AKT pathway. Inhibition of both pathways synergised to block the growth of the cells. Conclusions Our analyses show that the five metastases arose from a common progenitor and acquired additional alterations after disease dissemination. We demonstrate that a distinct combination of mutations mediated primary resistance to BRAF inhibition in this patient. These mutations were present in all five tumours and in a tumour sample taken before BRAF inhibitor treatment was administered. Inhibition of both pathways was required to block tumour cell growth, suggesting that combined targeting of these pathways could have been a valid therapeutic approach for this patient. PMID:24504448

  13. Inhibition of carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema by crotapotin, a polypeptide complexed with phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Landucci, E C; Antunes, E; Donato, J L; Faro, R; Hyslop, S; Marangoni, S; Oliveira, B; Cirino, G; de Nucci, G

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of purified crotapotin, a non-toxic non-enzymatic chaperon protein normally complexed to a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in South America rattlesnake venom, was studied in the acute inflammatory response induced by carrageenin (1 mg/paw), compound 48/80 (3 micrograms/paw) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) (3 micrograms/paw) in the rat hind-paw. The effects of crotapotin on platelet aggregation, mast cell degranulation and eicosanoid release from guinea-pig isolated lung were also investigated. 2. Subplantar co-injection of crotapotin (1 and 10 micrograms/paw) with carrageenin or injection of crotapotin (10 micrograms/paw) into the contralateral paw significantly inhibited the carrageenin-induced oedema. This inhibition was also observed when crotapotin (10-30 micrograms/paw) was administered either intraperitoneally or orally. Subplantar injection of heated crotapotin (15 min at 60 degrees C) failed to inhibit carrageenin-induced oedema. Subplantar injection of crotapotin (10 micrograms/paw) also significantly inhibited the rat paw oedema induced by compound 48/80, but it did not affect 5-HT-induced oedema. 3. In adrenalectomized animals, subplantar injection of crotapotin markedly inhibited the oedema induced by carrageenin. The inhibitory effect of crotapotin was also observed in rats depleted of histamine and 5-HT stores. 4. Crotapotin (30 micrograms/paw) had no effect on either the histamine release induced by compound 48/80 in vitro or on the platelet aggregation induced by both arachidonic acid (1 nM) and platelet activating factor (1 microM) in human platelet-rich plasma. The platelet aggregation and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) release induced by thrombin (100 mu ml-1) in washed human platelets were also not affected by crotapotin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7537590

  14. Inhibiting complex IL-17A and IL-17RA interactions with a linear peptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shenping; Desharnais, Joel; Sahasrabudhe, Parag V.; Jin, Ping; Li, Wei; Oates, Bryan D.; Shanker, Suman; Banker, Mary Ellen; Chrunyk, Boris A.; Song, Xi; Feng, Xidong; Griffor, Matt; Jimenez, Judith; Chen, Gang; Tumelty, David; Bhat, Abhijit; Bradshaw, Curt W.; Woodnutt, Gary; Lappe, Rodney W.; Thorarensen, Atli; Qiu, Xiayang; Withka, Jane M.; Wood, Lauren D.

    2016-01-01

    IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Monoclonal antibodies inhibiting IL-17A signaling have demonstrated remarkable efficacy, but an oral therapy is still lacking. A high affinity IL-17A peptide antagonist (HAP) of 15 residues was identified through phage-display screening followed by saturation mutagenesis optimization and amino acid substitutions. HAP binds specifically to IL-17A and inhibits the interaction of the cytokine with its receptor, IL-17RA. Tested in primary human cells, HAP blocked the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines. Crystal structure studies revealed that two HAP molecules bind to one IL-17A dimer symmetrically. The N-terminal portions of HAP form a β-strand that inserts between two IL-17A monomers while the C-terminal section forms an α helix that directly blocks IL-17RA from binding to the same region of IL-17A. This mode of inhibition suggests opportunities for developing peptide antagonists against this challenging target. PMID:27184415

  15. Inhibiting complex IL-17A and IL-17RA interactions with a linear peptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenping; Desharnais, Joel; Sahasrabudhe, Parag V; Jin, Ping; Li, Wei; Oates, Bryan D; Shanker, Suman; Banker, Mary Ellen; Chrunyk, Boris A; Song, Xi; Feng, Xidong; Griffor, Matt; Jimenez, Judith; Chen, Gang; Tumelty, David; Bhat, Abhijit; Bradshaw, Curt W; Woodnutt, Gary; Lappe, Rodney W; Thorarensen, Atli; Qiu, Xiayang; Withka, Jane M; Wood, Lauren D

    2016-01-01

    IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Monoclonal antibodies inhibiting IL-17A signaling have demonstrated remarkable efficacy, but an oral therapy is still lacking. A high affinity IL-17A peptide antagonist (HAP) of 15 residues was identified through phage-display screening followed by saturation mutagenesis optimization and amino acid substitutions. HAP binds specifically to IL-17A and inhibits the interaction of the cytokine with its receptor, IL-17RA. Tested in primary human cells, HAP blocked the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines. Crystal structure studies revealed that two HAP molecules bind to one IL-17A dimer symmetrically. The N-terminal portions of HAP form a β-strand that inserts between two IL-17A monomers while the C-terminal section forms an α helix that directly blocks IL-17RA from binding to the same region of IL-17A. This mode of inhibition suggests opportunities for developing peptide antagonists against this challenging target. PMID:27184415

  16. Low micromolar concentrations of the superoxide probe MitoSOX uncouple neural mitochondria and inhibit complex IV.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Brian A; Ge, Shealinna X; Studlack, Paige E; Polster, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    MitoSOX Red is a fluorescent probe used for the detection of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species by live cell imaging. The lipophilic, positively charged triphenylphosphonium moiety within MitoSOX concentrates the superoxide-sensitive dihydroethidium conjugate within the mitochondrial matrix. Here we investigated whether common MitoSOX imaging protocols influence mitochondrial bioenergetic function in primary rat cortical neurons and microglial cell lines. MitoSOX dose-dependently uncoupled neuronal respiration, whether present continuously in the assay medium or washed following a ten minute loading protocol. Concentrations of 5-10μM MitoSOX caused severe loss of ATP synthesis-linked respiration. Redistribution of MitoSOX to the cytoplasm and nucleus occurred concomitant to mitochondrial uncoupling. MitoSOX also dose-dependently decreased the maximal respiration rate and this impairment could not be rescued by delivery of a complex IV specific substrate, revealing complex IV inhibition. As in neurons, loading microglial cells with MitoSOX at low micromolar concentrations resulted in uncoupled mitochondria with reduced respiratory capacity whereas submicromolar MitoSOX had no adverse effects. The MitoSOX parent compound dihydroethidium also caused mitochondrial uncoupling and respiratory inhibition at low micromolar concentrations. However, these effects were abrogated by pre-incubating dihydroethidium with cation exchange beads to remove positively charged oxidation products, which would otherwise by sequestered by polarized mitochondria. Collectively, our results suggest that the matrix accumulation of MitoSOX or dihydroethidium oxidation products causes mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition of complex IV. Because MitoSOX is inherently capable of causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction with the potential to alter superoxide production, its use therefore requires careful optimization in imaging protocols. PMID:26057935

  17. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats. PMID:18182256

  18. Solvolysis of the Tumor-Inhibiting Ru(III)-Complex trans-Tetrachlorobis(Indazole)Ruthenate(III).

    PubMed

    Pieper, T; Peti, W; Keppler, B K

    2000-01-01

    The ruthenium(III) complex Hlnd trans-[RuCl(4),(ind)(2)], with two trans-standing indazole (ind) ligands bound to ruthenium via nitrogen, shows remarkable activity in different tumor models in vitro and in vivo. The solvolysis of the complex trans-[RuCl(4),(ind)(2)](-) has been investigated by means of spectroscopic techniques (UV/vis, NMR)in different solvents. We investigated the indazolium as well as the sodium salt, the latter showing improved solubility in water. In aqueous acetonitrile and ethanol the solvolysis results in one main solvento complex. The hydrolysis of the complex is more complicated and depends on the pH of the solution as well as on the buffer system. PMID:18475949

  19. Up-regulation of lymphocyte antigen 6 complex expression in side-population cells derived from a human trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Tetsunori; Kusunoki, Soshi; Tabu, Kouichi; Okabe, Hitomi; Yamada, Izumi; Taga, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Akemi; Makino, Shintaro; Takeda, Satoru; Kato, Kiyoko

    2016-01-01

    The continual proliferation and differentiation of trophoblasts are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy. It is well known that the tissue stem cells are associated with the development of tissues and pathologies. It has been demonstrated that side-population (SP) cells identified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) are enriched with stem cells. The SP cells in HTR-8/SVneo cells derived from human primary trophoblast cells were isolated by FACS. HTR-8/SVneo-SP cell cultures generated both SP and non-SP (NSP) subpopulations. In contrast, NSP cell cultures produced NSP cells and failed to produce SP cells. These SP cells showed self-renewal capability by serial colony-forming assay. Microarray expression analysis using a set of HTR-8/SVneo-SP and -NSP cells revealed that SP cells overexpressed several stemness genes including caudal type homeobox2 (CDX2) and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus D (LY6D) gene was the most highly up-regulated in HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. LY6D gene reduced its expression in the course of a 7-day cultivation in differentiation medium. SP cells tended to reduce its fraction by treatment of LY6D siRNA indicating that LY6D had potential to maintain cell proliferation of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. On ontology analysis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway was involved in the up-regulated genes on microarray analysis. HTR-SVneo-SP cells showed enhanced migration. This is the first report that LY6D was important for the maintenance of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. EMT was associated with the phenotype of these SP cells. PMID:26223706

  20. Evaluation of squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin M complex (SCCA-IGM) and alpha-L-fucosidase (AFU) as novel diagnostic biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Nehad A; Mahmoud, Enas H; Osman, Enas A; Mahmoud, Sherif H; Shousha, Hend I

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance lacks a reliable biomarker. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is the most widely used. However, not all HCCs secrete AFP. AFP may be elevated with cirrhosis in the absence of HCC. Serum alpha-L-fucosidase (AFU) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen-immunoglobulin M complex (SCCA-IgM) were found to be useful markers in diagnosing HCC. SCCA-IgM and AFU were assessed by ELISA technique; AFP was measured by enzyme chemiluminescence in serum of 40 patients with HCC, 30 patients with liver cirrhosis, and 20 healthy control participants to compare their accuracy in early diagnosis of HCC. Serum SCCA-IgM and AFU levels were significantly elevated in HCC group compared to cirrhotic group (P value<0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curve showed the optimal cutoff value for SCCA-IgM was 233 AU/ml with sensitivity 87.5% and specificity 66% and for AFU was 25 U/L with sensitivity 87.5% and specificity 98%. AFP cutoff value was 48 ng/mL with sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 53.3%. The simultaneous determination of AFP and SCCA-IgM activity increased the sensitivity to 92.5% and specificity to 62.1%. There were positive significant correlations between SCCA-IgM and each of AFU (r=0.296, P=0.005) and AFP (r=0.284, P=0.007) and no correlation between AFP and AFU. All markers did not correlate with the tumor size or affected by the Child score. The significant difference between SCCA-IgM and AFU levels among HCC and cirrhotic patients suggests their use as potential diagnostic tools and allows identifying a new group of HCC patients even in the absence of elevated AFP. PMID:25129443

  1. A comparative evaluation of assays for markers of activated coagulation and/or fibrinolysis: thrombin-antithrombin complex, D-dimer and fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen.

    PubMed

    Boisclair, M D; Lane, D A; Wilde, J T; Ireland, H; Preston, F E; Ofosu, F A

    1990-04-01

    Measurements were made of levels of D-dimer in plasma and serum, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) in plasma and fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen (FgE) in serum in a normal healthy control group and in patients with a range of disorders associated with hypercoagulability. Levels were determined in 31 normal healthy controls, 30 patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), 21 patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 27 patients with myocardial infarction (MI), 26 patients with acute leukaemia and 56 patients with liver disease. Considering all subjects, significant correlations were established between the results of all assays. Notably high correlations (r greater than 0.9) were established between plasma and serum levels of D-dimer, between plasma levels of D-dimer and serum levels of FgE, and between serum levels of D-dimer and FgE. All assays showed very high discrimination (sensitivity) between the normal control group and patients with DIC (97-100%), but there were marked differences between the assays in sensitivity for DVT and MI. In general, the FgE assay was more sensitive than the D-dimer assay, whilst both the FgE and D-dimer assays were more sensitive than the TAT assay. The same trends were apparent in the capability of the assays to discriminate between the normal control group and patients with acute leukaemia and liver disease: disorders with an unknown prevalence of activation of coagulation/fibrinolysis. Our results indicated that measurements of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDPs) in serum were almost unaffected by artefacts. The data further suggested that the broad-spectrum FgE assay was better than the more specific D-dimer assay in detecting clinical hypercoagulability. Our study showed that, in the clinical conditions examined, FDPs were more effective markers of hypercoagulability than TAT. PMID:2189490

  2. Antigen-Specific Signaling by a Soluble, Dimeric Peptide/Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II/Fc Chimera Leading to T Helper Cell Type 2 Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Sofia; Zong, Cong S.; Radu, Dorel L.; Miller, Alexander; Bona, Constantin A.; Brumeanu, Teodor-Doru

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between a T cell receptor (TCR) and various ligands, i.e., anti-TCR antibodies, superantigens, peptides, or altered peptide ligands in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules can trigger different T helper cell (Th) effector functions. Herein, we studied the T cell response induced by a soluble, dimeric peptide/MHC class II chimera, namely hemagglutinin (HA)110-120/I-Edαβ/Fcγ2a (DEF). We have previously demonstrated that the soluble DEF molecule binds stably and specifically to HA110-120–specific TCRs expressed by a T cell hybridoma. Administration of DEF in vivo induced differentiation of resting and activated peptide-specific T cells toward a Th2 response, as indicated by the increase of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, and specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 antibodies and decrease of IL-2, specific IgG2a antibodies, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. In contrast to HA110-120 peptide presented by the DEF molecule to T cells, the nominal synthetic peptide induced a predominant Th1 response, and the PR8 virus–derived HA110-120 peptides induced a mixed Th1/Th2 response. Independent of antigen processing, soluble DEF was almost 2 logs more potent in stimulating cognate T cells than the nominal peptide. Polarization of cognate T cells toward the Th2 response occurred upon interaction of soluble DEF with TCR and CD4 molecules followed by early activation of p56lck and ZAP-70 tyrosine kinases, and negative signaling of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)4 pathway of Th1 differentiation. DEF-like molecules may provide a new tool to study the mechanisms of signaling toward Th2 differentiation and may also provide a potential immunotherapeutic approach to modulate autoreactive T cells toward protective Th2 immune responses. PMID:10449525

  3. Genomic Analyses, Gene Expression and Antigenic Profile of the Trans-Sialidase Superfamily of Trypanosoma cruzi Reveal an Undetected Level of Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Luiz, Gabriela F.; Mendes, Tiago A. O.; Rodrigues, Thiago S.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a highly debilitating human pathology that affects millions of people in the Americas. The sequencing of this parasite's genome reveals that trans-sialidase/trans-sialidase-like (TcS), a polymorphic protein family known to be involved in several aspects of T. cruzi biology, is the largest T. cruzi gene family, encoding more than 1,400 genes. Despite the fact that four TcS groups are well characterized and only one of the groups contains active trans-sialidases, all members of the family are annotated in the T. cruzi genome database as trans-sialidase. After performing sequence clustering analysis with all TcS complete genes, we identified four additional groups, demonstrating that the TcS family is even more heterogeneous than previously thought. Interestingly, members of distinct TcS groups show distinctive patterns of chromosome localization. Members of the TcSgroupII, which harbor proteins involved in host cell attachment/invasion, are preferentially located in subtelomeric regions, whereas members of the largest and new TcSgroupV have internal chromosomal locations. Real-time RT-PCR confirms the expression of genes derived from new groups and shows that the pattern of expression is not similar within and between groups. We also performed B-cell epitope prediction on the family and constructed a TcS specific peptide array, which was screened with sera from T. cruzi-infected mice. We demonstrated that all seven groups represented in the array are antigenic. A highly reactive peptide occurs in sixty TcS proteins including members of two new groups and may contribute to the known cross-reactivity of T. cruzi epitopes during infection. Taken together, our results contribute to a better understanding of the real complexity of the TcS family and open new avenues for investigating novel roles of this family during T. cruzi infection. PMID:22039427

  4. Biopsy Quantitative Patohistology and Seral Values of Prostate Specific Antigen-Alpha (1) Antichymotrypsine Complex in Prediction of Adverse Pathology Findings after Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Tomasković, Igor; Milicić, Valerija; Tomić, Miroslav; Ruzić, Boris; Ulamec, Monika

    2015-09-01

    In this prospective study we examined the utility of parameters obtained on prostate needle biopsy and prostate specific antigen-alpha(1)-antichymotripsine complex (PSA-ACT) to predict adverse pathologic findings after radical prostatectomy. 45 consecutive patients assigned for radical prostatectomy due to clinically localized prostate cancer were included in the study. Prostate biopsy parameters such as number of positive cores, the greatest percentage of tumor in the positive cores, Gleason score, perineural invasion, unilaterality or bilaterality of the tumor were recorded. PSA-ACT was determined using sandwich immunoassay chemiluminiscent method (Bayer, Tarrytown, New York). We analyzed relationship of preoperative PSA, PSA-ACTand quantitative biopsy parameters with final pathology after prostatectomy. Adverse findings were considered when extracapsular extension of cancer (pT3) was noted. Postoperatively, 29 (64.4%) patients were diagnosed with pT2 disease and 16 (35.6%) with pT3 disease. There was a significant difference in localized vs. locally advanced disease in number of positive biopsy cores (p<0.001), greatest percentage of tumor in the core (p=0.008), localization of the tumor (p=0.003) and perineural invasion (p=0.004). Logistic regression was used to develop a model on the multivariate level. It included number of positive cores and PSA-ACT and was significant on our cohort with the reliability of 82.22%. The combination of PSA-ACT and a large scale of biopsy parameters could be used in prediction of adverse pathologic findings after radical prostatectomy. Clinical decisions and patients counselling could be influenced by these predictors but further confirmation on a larger population is necessary. PMID:26898067

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and TLR2 Agonists Inhibit Induction of Type I IFN and Class I MHC Antigen Cross Processing by TLR9

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Daimon P.; Canaday, David H.; Liu, Yi; Li, Qing; Huang, Alex; Boom, W. Henry; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) cross process exogenous Ags and present them by class I MHC (MHC-I) molecules to CD8+ T cells specific for Ags from viruses and bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unmethylated CpG DNA signals through TLR9 to induce type I IFN (IFN-α/β), which enhances MHC-I Ag cross processing, but lipoproteins that signal through TLR2 do not induce IFN-α/β. In these studies we observed that M. tuberculosis, which expresses agonists of both TLR9 and TLR2, did not induce production of IFN-α/β or cross processing by murine DCs. Furthermore, M. tuberculosis and TLR2 agonists inhibited induction of IFN-α/β and DC cross processing by CpG DNA. Exogenous IFN-α/β effectively enhanced cross processing of M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing OVA, bypassing the inhibition of induction of endogenous IFN-α/β. In addition, inhibition of TLR9-induced cross processing of M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing OVA could be circumvented by pretreating cells with CpG DNA to induce IFN-α/β and MHC-I cross processing before inhibitory mycobacterial TLR2 agonists were present. Inhibition of the response to one TLR by another may affect the ultimate response to pathogens like M. tuberculosis that express agonists of multiple TLRs, including TLR2 and TLR9. This mechanism may contribute to immune evasion and explain why IFN-α/β provides little contribution to host immunity to M. tuberculosis. However, downregulation of certain TLR responses may benefit the host by preventing detrimental excessive inflammation that may occur in the presence of persistent infection. PMID:20660347

  6. Extended intermolecular interactions in a serine protease-canonical inhibitor complex account for strong and highly specific inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Krisztián; Harmat, Veronika; Hetényi, Csaba; Kardos, József; Antal, József; Perczel, András; Patthy, András; Katona, Gergely; Gráf, László

    2005-07-01

    We have previously shown that a trypsin inhibitor from desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (SGTI) is a taxon-specific inhibitor that inhibits arthropod trypsins, such as crayfish trypsin, five orders of magnitude more effectively than mammalian trypsins. Thermal denaturation experiments, presented here, confirm the inhibition kinetics studies; upon addition of SGTI the melting temperatures of crayfish and bovine trypsins increased 27 degrees C and 4.5 degrees C, respectively. To explore the structural features responsible for this taxon specificity we crystallized natural crayfish trypsin in complex with chemically synthesized SGTI. This is the first X-ray structure of an arthropod trypsin and also the highest resolution (1.2A) structure of a trypsin-protein inhibitor complex reported so far. Structural data show that in addition to the primary binding loop, residues P3-P3' of SGTI, the interactions between SGTI and the crayfish enzyme are also extended over the P12-P4 and P4'-P5' regions. This is partly due to a structural change of region P10-P4 in the SGTI structure induced by binding of the inhibitor to crayfish trypsin. The comparison of SGTI-crayfish trypsin and SGTI-bovine trypsin complexes by structure-based calculations revealed a significant interaction energy surplus for the SGTI-crayfish trypsin complex distributed over the entire binding region. The new regions that account for stronger and more specific binding of SGTI to crayfish than to bovine trypsin offer new inhibitor sites to engineer in order to develop efficient and specific protease inhibitors for practical use. PMID:15922357

  7. In vitro inhibition of hyaluronidase by sodium copper chlorophyllin complex and chlorophyllin analogs

    PubMed Central

    McCook, John P; Dorogi, Peter L; Vasily, David B; Cefalo, Dustin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Inhibitors of hyaluronidase are potent agents that maintain hyaluronic acid homeostasis and may serve as anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial agents. Sodium copper chlorophyllin complex is being used therapeutically as a component in anti-aging cosmeceuticals, and has been shown to have anti-hyaluronidase activity. In this study we evaluated various commercial lots of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex to identify the primary small molecule constituents, and to test various sodium copper chlorophyllin complexes and their small molecule analog compounds for hyaluronidase inhibitory activity in vitro. Ascorbate analogs were tested in combination with copper chlorophyllin complexes for potential additive or synergistic activity. Materials and methods For hyaluronidase activity assays, dilutions of test materials were evaluated for hydrolytic activity of hyaluronidase by precipitation of non-digested hyaluronate by measuring related turbidity at 595 nm. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy was used to analyze and identify the primary small molecule constituents in various old and new commercial lots of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex. Results The most active small molecule component of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex was disodium copper isochlorin e4, followed by oxidized disodium copper isochlorin e4. Sodium copper chlorophyllin complex and copper isochlorin e4 disodium salt had hyaluronidase inhibitory activity down to 10 µg/mL. The oxidized form of copper isochlorin e4 disodium salt had substantial hyaluronidase inhibitory activity at 100 µg/mL but not at 10 µg/mL. Ascorbate derivatives did not enhance the hyaluronidase inhibitory activity of sodium copper chlorophyllin. Copper isochlorin e4 analogs were always the dominant components of the small molecule content of the commercial lots tested; oxidized copper isochlorin e4 was found in increased concentrations in older compared to newer lots tested

  8. Dopaminergic inhibition by G9a/Glp complex on tyrosine hydroxylase in nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Shen, Xiaofeng; Bao, Senzhu; Feng, Shan-Wu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Yiquan; Wang, Xian; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Wu, Haibo; Lei, Liming; Xu, Shiqin; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    The neural balance between facilitation and inhibition determines the final tendency of central sensitization. Nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity was considered as the results from the enhanced ascending facilitation and the diminished descending inhibition. The role of dopaminergic transmission in the descending inhibition has been well documented, but its underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a/G9a-like protein (Glp) complex plays a critical role in cocaine-induced central plasticity, and given cocaine's role in the nerve system is relied on its function on dopamine system, we herein proposed that the reduced inhibition of dopaminergic transmission was from the downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression by G9a/Glp complex through methylating its gene Th After approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee, C57BL/6 mice were used for pain behavior using von Frey after spared nerve injury, and Th CpG islands methylation was measured using bisulfite sequencing at different nerve areas. The inhibitor of G9a/Glp, BIX 01294, was administered intraventricularly daily with bolus injection. The protein levels of G9a, Glp, and tyrosine hydroxylase were measured with immunoblotting. Dopamine levels were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of G9a but not Glp was upregulated in ventral tegmental area at post-injury day 4 till day 49 (the last day of the behavioral test). Correspondingly, the Th CpG methylation is increased, but the tyrosine hydroxylase expression was downregulated and the dopamine level was decreased. After the intracerebroventriclar injection of BIX 01294 since the post-injury days 7 and 14 for consecutive three days, three weeks, and six weeks, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was upregulated with a significant decrease in Th methylation and increase in dopamine level. Moreover, the pain after G9a/Glp inhibitor was attenuated

  9. Dopaminergic inhibition by G9a/Glp complex on tyrosine hydroxylase in nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Shen, Xiaofeng; Bao, Senzhu; Feng, Shan-Wu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yusheng; Wang, Yiquan; Wang, Xian; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Wu, Haibo; Lei, Liming; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    The neural balance between facilitation and inhibition determines the final tendency of central sensitization. Nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity was considered as the results from the enhanced ascending facilitation and the diminished descending inhibition. The role of dopaminergic transmission in the descending inhibition has been well documented, but its underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a/G9a-like protein (Glp) complex plays a critical role in cocaine-induced central plasticity, and given cocaine’s role in the nerve system is relied on its function on dopamine system, we herein proposed that the reduced inhibition of dopaminergic transmission was from the downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase expression by G9a/Glp complex through methylating its gene Th. After approval by the Animal Care and Use Committee, C57BL/6 mice were used for pain behavior using von Frey after spared nerve injury, and Th CpG islands methylation was measured using bisulfite sequencing at different nerve areas. The inhibitor of G9a/Glp, BIX 01294, was administered intraventricularly daily with bolus injection. The protein levels of G9a, Glp, and tyrosine hydroxylase were measured with immunoblotting. Dopamine levels were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression of G9a but not Glp was upregulated in ventral tegmental area at post-injury day 4 till day 49 (the last day of the behavioral test). Correspondingly, the Th CpG methylation is increased, but the tyrosine hydroxylase expression was downregulated and the dopamine level was decreased. After the intracerebroventriclar injection of BIX 01294 since the post-injury days 7 and 14 for consecutive three days, three weeks, and six weeks, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was upregulated with a significant decrease in Th methylation and increase in dopamine level. Moreover, the pain after G9a/Glp inhibitor was attenuated

  10. Allelic exclusion of IgH through inhibition of E2A in a VDJ recombination complex.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Jannek; Grundström, Christine; Grundström, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    A key feature of the immune system is the paradigm that one lymphocyte has only one Ag specificity that can be selected for or against. This requires that only one of the alleles of genes for AgR chains is made functional. However, the molecular mechanism of this allelic exclusion has been an enigma. In this study, we show that B lymphocytes with E2A that cannot be inhibited by calmodulin are dramatically defective in allelic exclusion of the IgH locus. Furthermore, we provide data supporting that E2A, PAX5, and the RAGs are in a VDJ recombination complex bound to key sequences on the Igh gene. We show that pre-BCR activation releases the VDJ recombination complex through calmodulin binding to E2A. We also show that pre-BCR signaling downregulates several components of the recombination machinery, including RAG1, RAG2, and PAX5, through calmodulin inhibition of E2A. PMID:24470503

  11. Studies on Inhibition of Respiratory Cytochrome bc1 Complex by the Fungicide Pyrimorph Suggest a Novel Inhibitory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yu-Mei; Esser, Lothar; Zhou, Fei; Li, Chang; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Yu, Chang-An; Qin, Zhao-Hai; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory chain cytochrome bc1 complex (cyt bc1) is a major target of numerous antibiotics and fungicides. All cyt bc1 inhibitors act on either the ubiquinol oxidation (QP) or ubiquinone reduction (QN) site. The primary cause of resistance to bc1 inhibitors is target site mutations, creating a need for novel agents that act on alternative sites within the cyt bc1 to overcome resistance. Pyrimorph, a synthetic fungicide, inhibits the growth of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi, though little is known concerning its mechanism of action. In this study, using isolated mitochondria from pathogenic fungus Phytophthora capsici, we show that pyrimorph blocks mitochondrial electron transport by affecting the function of cyt bc1. Indeed, pyrimorph inhibits the activities of both purified 11-subunit mitochondrial and 4-subunit bacterial bc1 with IC50 values of 85.0 μM and 69.2 μM, respectively, indicating that it targets the essential subunits of cyt bc1 complexes. Using an array of biochemical and spectral methods, we show that pyrimorph acts on an area near the QP site and falls into the category of a mixed-type, noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate ubiquinol. In silico molecular docking of pyrimorph to cyt b from mammalian and bacterial sources also suggests that pyrimorph binds in the vicinity of the quinol oxidation site. PMID:24699450

  12. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in human Schwann cell cultures and effects of infection with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Samuel, N M; Mirsky, R; Grange, J M; Jessen, K R

    1987-06-01

    Recent experiments on rats have raised the possibility that Schwann cells can present antigens to T lymphocytes. We have investigated whether this mechanism might be relevant in leprosy by determining under what conditions human Schwann cells express class I and class II antigens, and whether infection with Mycobacterium leprae affects this expression. The distribution of these antigens was examined on human Schwann cells in dissociated cell cultures derived from human fetal peripheral nerves. We find that both Schwann cells and fibroblastic cells in these cultures normally express class I antigens but not class II antigens. When Schwann cells are infected with live Mycobacterium leprae for 48 h, 73% of Schwann cells phagocytose the bacteria. Mycobacterium leprae prevents 3H-thymidine incorporation into cultured human Schwann cells, but does not affect class I expression in these cells. Treatment of normal and Mycobacterium leprae infected cultures with gamma-interferon for 72 h induces class II expression on most Schwann cells but not on the majority of fibroblastic cells. The fact that human Schwann cells infected with Mycobacterium leprae can be induced by gamma-interferon to express class II antigens suggests that they may be able to present Mycobacterium leprae antigens to T lymphocytes and thus initiate immune responses against the bacteria. We suggest that a failure of this response, such as that seen within nerve trunks in lepromatous leprosy, is caused by deficient class II expression on Schwann cells. This deficiency in class II expression, in turn, may be caused by the reduced gamma-interferon production characteristic of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:3115648

  13. Metabolites from invasive pests inhibit mitochondrial complex II: A potential strategy for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Guerra, Flora; Felline, Serena; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; Mollo, Ernesto; Zara, Vincenzo; Terlizzi, Antonio

    2016-05-13

    The red pigment caulerpin, a secondary metabolite from the marine invasive green algae Caulerpa cylindracea can be accumulated and transferred along the trophic chain, with detrimental consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Despite increasing research efforts to understand how caulerpin modifies fish physiology, little is known on the effects of algal metabolites on mammalian cells. Here we report for the first time the mitochondrial targeting activity of both caulerpin, and its closely related derivative caulerpinic acid, by using as experimental model rat liver mitochondria, a system in which bioenergetics mechanisms are not altered. Mitochondrial function was tested by polarographic and spectrophotometric methods. Both compounds were found to selectively inhibit respiratory complex II activity, while complexes I, III, and IV remained functional. These results led us to hypothesize that both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in cell lines with defects in mitochondrial complex I. Ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells are a good example of cell lines with a defective complex I function on which these molecules seem to have a toxic effect on proliferation. This provided novel insight toward the potential use of metabolites from invasive Caulerpa species for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma cisplatin-resistant cells. PMID:27091429

  14. Water-soluble coenzyme q10 inhibits nuclear translocation of apoptosis inducing factor and cell death caused by mitochondrial complex I inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Haining; Chen, Guisheng; Ma, Wanrui; Li, Ping-An Andy

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to explore the mechanism of rotenone-induced cell damage and to examine the protective effects of water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on the toxic effects of rotenone. Murine hippocampal HT22 cells were cultured with mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Water-soluble CoQ10 was added to the culture media 3 h prior to the rotenone incubation. Cell viability was determined by alamar blue, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by dihydroethidine (DHE) and mitochondrial membrane potential by tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM). Cytochrome c, caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were measured using Western blotting after 24 h rotenone incubation. Rotenone caused more than 50% of cell death, increased ROS production, AIF nuclear translocation and reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, but failed to cause mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Pretreatment with water-soluble CoQ10 enhanced cell viability, decreased ROS production, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented AIF nuclear translocation. The results suggest that rotenone activates a mitochondria-initiated, caspase-independent cell death pathway. Water-soluble CoQ10 reduces ROS accumulation, prevents the fall of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibits AIF translocation and subsequent cell death. PMID:25089873

  15. Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen: Inhibition of Channel Function by Chloroquine and Related Compounds and Study of Binding Kinetics Using the Current Noise Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orlik, Frank; Schiffler, Bettina; Benz, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) of the tripartite anthrax toxin binds to a cell surface receptor and mediates the transport of two enzymatic components, edema factor and lethal factor, into the cytosol of host cells. Here recombinant PA63 from Bacillus anthracis was reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayer membranes and formed ion permeable channels. The heptameric PA63-channel contains a binding site for 4-aminoquinolones, which block ion transport through PA in vitro. This result allowed a detailed investigation of ligand binding and the stability constants for the binding of chloroquine, fluphenazine, and quinacrine to the binding site inside the PA63-channel were determined using titration experiments. Open PA63-channels exhibit 1/f noise in the frequency range between 1 and 100 Hz, whereas the spectral density of the ligand-induced current noise was of Lorentzian type. The analysis of the power density spectra allowed the evaluation of the on- and off-rate constants (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}k_{1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}k_{-1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) of ligand binding. The on-rate constants of ligand binding were between 106 and 108 M−1 s−1 and were dependent on the ionic strength of the aqueous phase, sidedness of ligand addition, as well as the orientation and intensity of the applied electric field. The off-rates varied between ∼10 s−1 and 2600 s−1 and depended mainly on the structure of the ligand. PMID:15596516

  16. Crystallographic Analysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes: End-on Insertion of Ligands in Antibodies-CDR3 Loops as Arbiters

    PubMed

    Edmundson; Shan; Fan; Guddat; Hanson; Andersen

    1996-06-01

    As the dominant constituents of the active sites, complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) and particularly the CDR3 loops strongly influence the size and shape of this interdomain space. Six sets of CDR3 loops were extracted from our collection of crystal structures and examined for their modes of association. The CDR3 loops of the NC6.8 Fab face each other across a small crevice that is expanded further by end-on insertion of its high-affinity ligand (a trisubstituted guanidine sweet-tasting compound). This wedging event triggers a series of extensive local and transmitted conformational changes. In the 4-4-20 Fab, the CDR3 loops provide scaffolding for the high-affinity binding of fluorescein and shield the ligand from bulk solvent in the interdomain space above and below the very compact binding slot. Constituents of the CDR2 and CDR3 loops of the BV04-01 Fab interact to form "false floors" over potential cavity-type sites and thereby eliminate end-on insertion. Instead, fragments of single-stranded DNA are bound with low affinity in a groove whose course is altered on complex formation by global movements of VH relative to VL and by local shifts of HCDR3. Trafficking of even small peptide ligands between the V domains of the Pot Fv is prevented by the collapse of the large HCDR3 segment into the residual interdomain space. This protein is better suited to polyreactive binding of a variety of large protein antigens on its external surfaces. By comparison, the space available between the CDR3 loops of the Mcg light-chain dimer is very large. It has proved to be accessible for end-on insertion of peptides and other ligands ranging over seven orders of magnitude in affinity. Recently, an insect neuropeptide hormone, with pGlu as its penetrating agent, has been found to pierce the entire V dimer interface from the entrance of the traditional active site to the solvent pool between the V and C domains. In an Mcg x Hud heterodimer, the Hud CDR3 plays a role similar

  17. Interaction of NCOR/SMRT Repressor Complexes with Papillomavirus E8^E2C Proteins Inhibits Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Dreer, Marcel; Fertey, Jasmin; van de Poel, Saskia; Straub, Elke; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) such as HPV16 and 31 can lead to ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers and HPV types from the beta genus have been implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. HPV replicate as nuclear extrachromosomal plasmids at low copy numbers in undifferentiated cells. HPV16 and 31 mutants have indicated that these viruses express an E8^E2C protein which negatively regulates genome replication. E8^E2C shares the DNA-binding and dimerization domain (E2C) with the essential viral replication activator E2 and the E8 domain replaces the replication/transcription activation domain of E2. The HR-HPV E8 domain is required for inhibiting viral transcription and the replication of the viral origin mediated by viral E1 and E2 proteins. We show now that E8^E2C also limits replication of HPV1, a mu-PV and HPV8, a beta-PV, in normal human keratinocytes. Proteomic analyses identified all NCoR/SMRT corepressor complex components (HDAC3, GPS2, NCoR, SMRT, TBL1 and TBLR1) as co-precipitating host cell proteins for HPV16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization experiments revealed that NCoR/SMRT components interact with HPV1, 8, 16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins in an E8-dependent manner. SiRNA knock-down experiments confirm that NCoR/SMRT components are critical for both the inhibition of transcription and HPV origin replication by E8^E2C proteins. Furthermore, a dominant-negative NCoR fragment activates transcription and replication only from HPV16 and 31 wt but not from mutant genomes encoding NCoR/SMRT-binding deficient E8^E2C proteins. In summary, our data suggest that the repressive function of E8^E2C is highly conserved among HPV and that it is mediated by an E8-dependent interaction with NCoR/SMRT complexes. Our data also indicate for the first time that NCoR/SMRT complexes not only are involved in inhibiting cellular and viral transcription but also in controlling the replication of HPV origins

  18. Interaction of NCOR/SMRT Repressor Complexes with Papillomavirus E8^E2C Proteins Inhibits Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Marcel; Fertey, Jasmin; van de Poel, Saskia; Straub, Elke; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) such as HPV16 and 31 can lead to ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers and HPV types from the beta genus have been implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. HPV replicate as nuclear extrachromosomal plasmids at low copy numbers in undifferentiated cells. HPV16 and 31 mutants have indicated that these viruses express an E8^E2C protein which negatively regulates genome replication. E8^E2C shares the DNA-binding and dimerization domain (E2C) with the essential viral replication activator E2 and the E8 domain replaces the replication/transcription activation domain of E2. The HR-HPV E8 domain is required for inhibiting viral transcription and the replication of the viral origin mediated by viral E1 and E2 proteins. We show now that E8^E2C also limits replication of HPV1, a mu-PV and HPV8, a beta-PV, in normal human keratinocytes. Proteomic analyses identified all NCoR/SMRT corepressor complex components (HDAC3, GPS2, NCoR, SMRT, TBL1 and TBLR1) as co-precipitating host cell proteins for HPV16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization experiments revealed that NCoR/SMRT components interact with HPV1, 8, 16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins in an E8-dependent manner. SiRNA knock-down experiments confirm that NCoR/SMRT components are critical for both the inhibition of transcription and HPV origin replication by E8^E2C proteins. Furthermore, a dominant-negative NCoR fragment activates transcription and replication only from HPV16 and 31 wt but not from mutant genomes encoding NCoR/SMRT-binding deficient E8^E2C proteins. In summary, our data suggest that the repressive function of E8^E2C is highly conserved among HPV and that it is mediated by an E8-dependent interaction with NCoR/SMRT complexes. Our data also indicate for the first time that NCoR/SMRT complexes not only are involved in inhibiting cellular and viral transcription but also in controlling the replication of HPV origins

  19. Antigen Recognition By Variable Lymphocyte Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.W.; Herrin, B.R.; Cooper, M.D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-18

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) rather than antibodies play the primary role in recognition of antigens in the adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates. Combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments achieves the required repertoire for antigen recognition. We have determined a crystal structure for a VLR-antigen complex, VLR RBC36 in complex with the H-antigen trisaccharide from human blood type O erythrocytes, at 1.67 angstrom resolution. RBC36 binds the H-trisaccharide on the concave surface of the LRR modules of the solenoid structure where three key hydrophilic residues, multiple van der Waals interactions, and the highly variable insert of the carboxyl-terminal LRR module determine antigen recognition and specificity. The concave surface assembled from the most highly variable regions of the LRRs, along with diversity in the sequence and length of the highly variable insert, can account for the recognition of diverse antigens by VLRs.

  20. Nucleolin inhibits Fas ligand binding and suppresses Fas-mediated apoptosis in vivo via a surface nucleolin-Fas complex.

    PubMed

    Wise, Jillian F; Berkova, Zuzana; Mathur, Rohit; Zhu, Haifeng; Braun, Frank K; Tao, Rong-Hua; Sabichi, Anita L; Ao, Xue; Maeng, Hoyoung; Samaniego, Felipe

    2013-06-01

    Resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis is associated with poor cancer outcomes and chemoresistance. To elucidate potential mechanisms of defective Fas signaling, we screened primary lymphoma cell extracts for Fas-associated proteins that would have the potential to regulate Fas signaling. An activation-resistant Fas complex selectively included nucleolin. We confirmed the presence of nucleolin-Fas complexes in B-cell lymphoma cells and primary tissues, and the absence of such complexes in B-lymphocytes from healthy donors. RNA-binding domain 4 and the glycine/arginine-rich domain of nucleolin were essential for its association with Fas. Nucleolin colocalized with Fas on the surface of B-cell lymphoma cells. Nucleolin knockdown sensitized BJAB cells to Fas ligand (FasL)-induced and Fas agonistic antibody-induced apoptosis through enhanced binding, suggesting that nucleolin blocks the FasL-Fas interaction. Mice transfected with nucleolin were protected from the lethal effects of agonistic anti-mouse Fas antibody (Jo2) and had lower rates of hepatocyte apoptosis, compared with vector and a non-Fas-binding mutant of nucleolin. Our results show that cell surface nucleolin binds Fas, inhibits ligand binding, and thus prevents induction of Fas-mediated apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas and may serve as a new therapeutic target. PMID:23599269

  1. Substrate complexes of human dipeptidyl peptidase III reveal the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Reithofer, Viktoria; Reisinger, Manuel; Wallner, Silvia; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (hDPP III) is a zinc-dependent hydrolase cleaving dipeptides off the N-termini of various bioactive peptides. Thus, the enzyme is likely involved in a number of physiological processes such as nociception and is also implicated in several forms of cancer. We present high-resolution crystal structures of hDPP III in complex with opioid peptides (Met-and Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2) as well as with angiotensin-II and the peptide inhibitor IVYPW. These structures confirm the previously reported large conformational change of the enzyme upon ligand binding and show that the structure of the closed conformation is independent of the nature of the bound peptide. The overall peptide-binding mode is also conserved ensuring the correct positioning of the scissile peptide bond with respect to the catalytic zinc ion. The structure of the angiotensin-II complex shows, how longer peptides are accommodated in the binding cleft of hDPP III. Differences in the binding modes allow a distinction between real substrates and inhibitory peptides or “slow” substrates. The latter displace a zinc bound water molecule necessitating the energetically much less favoured anhydride mechanism as opposed to the favoured promoted-water mechanism. The structural data also form the necessary framework for the design of specific hDPP III inhibitors. PMID:27025154

  2. The ternary complex factor Net regulates cell migration through inhibition of PAI-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Buchwalter, Gilles; Gross, Christian; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2005-12-01

    Net, Elk-1, and Sap-1 are members of the ternary complex factor (TCF) subfamily of Ets transcription factors. They form ternary complexes with serum response factor (SRF) on serum response elements of immediate early genes such as c-fos and egr-1 and mediate responses to growth factors and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Although the TCFs have been extensively studied as intermediates in signaling cascades, surprisingly little is known about their different target genes and physiological functions. We report that Net homozygous mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts have a defect in cell migration. This defect results at least in part from increased expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) that controls extracellular proteolysis and cell matrix adhesion. The defect in cell migration can be reverted by the addition of a PAI-1 blocking antibody. Net represses PAI-1 promoter activity and binds to a specific region of the promoter containing Ets binding sites in the absence of SRF. We conclude that Net is a negative regulator of PAI-1 expression and is thereby involved in cell migration. PMID:16314510

  3. Plin2 Inhibits Cellular Glucose Uptake through Interactions with SNAP23, a SNARE Complex Protein

    PubMed Central

    Senthivinayagam, Subramanian; McIntosh, Avery L.; Moon, Kenneth C.; Atshaves, Barbara P.

    2013-01-01

    Although a link between excess lipid storage and aberrant glucose metabolism has been recognized for many years, little is known what role lipid storage droplets and associated proteins such as Plin2 play in managing cellular glucose levels. To address this issue, the influence of Plin2 on glucose uptake was examined using 2-NBD-Glucose and [3H]-2-deoxyglucose to show that insulin-mediated glucose uptake was decreased 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively in L cell fibroblasts overexpressing Plin2. Conversely, suppression of Plin2 levels by RNAi-mediated knockdown increased 2-NBD-Glucose uptake several fold in transfected L cells and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The effect of Plin2 expression on proteins involved in glucose uptake and transport was also examined. Expression of the SNARE protein SNAP23 was increased 1.6-fold while levels of syntaxin-5 were decreased 1.7-fold in Plin2 overexpression cells with no significant changes observed in lipid droplet associated proteins Plin1 or FSP27 or with the insulin receptor, GLUT1, or VAMP4. FRET experiments revealed a close proximity of Plin2 to SNAP23 on lipid droplets to within an intramolecular distance of 51 Å. The extent of targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets was determined by co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to show increased partitioning of SNAP23 to lipid droplets when Plin2 was overexpressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Plin2 inhibits glucose uptake by interacting with, and regulating cellular targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets. In summary, the current study for the first time provides direct evidence for the role of Plin2 in mediating cellular glucose uptake. PMID:24040030

  4. Complex effects of inhibiting hepatic apolipoprotein B100 synthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Soffer, Gissette; Moon, Byoung; Hernandez-Ono, Antonio; Dionizovik-Dimanovski, Marija; Jimenez, Jhonsua; Obunike, Joseph; Thomas, Tiffany; Ngai, Colleen; Fontanez, Nelson; Donovan, Daniel S.; Karmally, Wahida; Holleran, Stephen; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Mittleman, Robert S.; Ginsberg, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    Mipomersen is a 20mer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that inhibits apolipoprotein B (apoB) synthesis; its low-density lipoprotein (LDL)–lowering effects should therefore result from reduced secretion of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). We enrolled 17 healthy volunteers who received placebo injections weekly for 3 weeks followed by mipomersen weekly for 7 to 9 weeks. Stable isotopes were used after each treatment to determine fractional catabolic rates and production rates of apoB in VLDL, IDL (intermediate-density lipoprotein), and LDL, and of triglycerides in VLDL. Mipomersen significantly reduced apoB in VLDL, IDL, and LDL, which was associated with increases in fractional catabolic rates of VLDL and LDL apoB and reductions in production rates of IDL and LDL apoB. Unexpectedly, the production rates of VLDL apoB and VLDL triglycerides were unaffected. Small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of apoB expression in human liver cells demonstrated preservation of apoB secretion across a range of apoB synthesis. Titrated ASO knockdown of apoB mRNA in chow-fed mice preserved both apoB and triglyceride secretion. In contrast, titrated ASO knockdown of apoB mRNA in high-fat–fed mice resulted in stepwise reductions in both apoB and triglyceride secretion. Mipomersen lowered all apoB lipoproteins without reducing the production rate of either VLDL apoB or triglyceride. Our human data are consistent with longstanding models of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation of apoB secretion and are supported by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Targeting apoB synthesis may lower levels of apoB lipoproteins without necessarily reducing VLDL secretion, thereby lowering the risk of steatosis associated with this therapeutic strategy. PMID:26819195

  5. Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 Inhibits the Classical Pathway by Blocking Activation of the C1 Complement Complex.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zhi, Hui; Wager, Beau; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens that traffic in blood, lymphatics, or interstitial fluids must adopt strategies to evade innate immune defenses, notably the complement system. Through recruitment of host regulators of complement to their surface, many pathogens are able to escape complement-mediated attack. The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces a number of surface proteins that bind to factor H related molecules, which function as the dominant negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement. Relatively less is known about how B. burgdorferi evades the classical pathway of complement despite the observation that some sensu lato strains are sensitive to classical pathway activation. Here we report that the borrelial lipoprotein BBK32 potently and specifically inhibits the classical pathway by binding with high affinity to the initiating C1 complex of complement. In addition, B. burgdorferi cells that produce BBK32 on their surface bind to both C1 and C1r and a serum sensitive derivative of B. burgdorferi is protected from killing via the classical pathway in a BBK32-dependent manner. Subsequent biochemical and biophysical approaches localized the anti-complement activity of BBK32 to its globular C-terminal domain. Mechanistic studies reveal that BBK32 acts by entrapping C1 in its zymogen form by binding and inhibiting the C1 subcomponent, C1r, which serves as the initiating serine protease of the classical pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of a spirochetal protein acting as a direct inhibitor of the classical pathway and is the only example of a biomolecule capable of specifically and noncovalently inhibiting C1/C1r. By identifying a unique mode of complement evasion this study greatly enhances our understanding of how pathogens subvert and potentially manipulate host innate immune systems. PMID:26808924

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 Inhibits the Classical Pathway by Blocking Activation of the C1 Complement Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Beau; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens that traffic in blood, lymphatics, or interstitial fluids must adopt strategies to evade innate immune defenses, notably the complement system. Through recruitment of host regulators of complement to their surface, many pathogens are able to escape complement-mediated attack. The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces a number of surface proteins that bind to factor H related molecules, which function as the dominant negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement. Relatively less is known about how B. burgdorferi evades the classical pathway of complement despite the observation that some sensu lato strains are sensitive to classical pathway activation. Here we report that the borrelial lipoprotein BBK32 potently and specifically inhibits the classical pathway by binding with high affinity to the initiating C1 complex of complement. In addition, B. burgdorferi cells that produce BBK32 on their surface bind to both C1 and C1r and a serum sensitive derivative of B. burgdorferi is protected from killing via the classical pathway in a BBK32-dependent manner. Subsequent biochemical and biophysical approaches localized the anti-complement activity of BBK32 to its globular C-terminal domain. Mechanistic studies reveal that BBK32 acts by entrapping C1 in its zymogen form by binding and inhibiting the C1 subcomponent, C1r, which serves as the initiating serine protease of the classical pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of a spirochetal protein acting as a direct inhibitor of the classical pathway and is the only example of a biomolecule capable of specifically and noncovalently inhibiting C1/C1r. By identifying a unique mode of complement evasion this study greatly enhances our understanding of how pathogens subvert and potentially manipulate host innate immune systems. PMID:26808924

  7. Mapping of four discontiguous antigenic determinants on horse cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Oertle, M; Immergluck, K; Paterson, Y; Bosshard, H R

    1989-07-01

    The epitopes (antigenic determinants) recognized by four different monoclonal antibodies on horse cytochrome c have been partially characterized by differential acetylation of lysine residues of free and antibody-bound cytochrome c. The degree of acetylation in the bound and free antigen molecule was assessed by a double-labeling procedure with [3H]acetic anhydride and [14C]acetic anhydride. Out of the 19 lysine residues of cytochrome c only very few were less reactive in the antigen-antibody complex, i.e. presumably located at the epitope for the antibody under study. The protection varied from 1.5-fold to over 20-fold lower reactivity in antibody-bound cytochrome c. The present results are complemented by previous data obtained by cross-reactivity analysis with cytochromes c from different species, with chemically modified cytochrome c derivatives, and by inhibition of proteolysis of cytochrome c in the presence of the antibodies. From the combined data we conclude that each of the four epitopes depends on the precise spatial folding of the antigen and contains residues which are brought together by the folding of the polypeptide chain. This work exemplifies that mapping of conformation-dependent epitopes can be achieved by applying a combination of mapping procedures of which each by itself provides partial information. PMID:2473902

  8. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  9. The effects of serial skin testing with purified protein derivative on the level and quality of antibodies to complex and defined antigens in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several serologic tests designed to detect antibodies to immunodominant Mycobacterium bovis antigens have recently emerged as ancillary tests for the detection of bovine tuberculosis in cattle, particularly when applied after injection of purified protein derivative (PPD) for skin test that signific...

  10. Lack of association between Behçet's disease and major histocompatibility complex class II antigens in an ethnically diverse North American Caucasoid patient group.

    PubMed

    Moore, S B; O'Duffy, J D

    1986-08-01

    A group of 25 North American Caucasoid patients with well defined Behcet's disease were serologically typed for HLA-DR and DQw antigens. No significant associations were seen when results were compared with a group of 73 normal Caucasoid controls tested concomitantly. PMID:3772926

  11. Struvite crystal growth inhibition by trisodium citrate and the formation of chemical complexes in growth solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa; Olszynski, Marcin

    2015-05-01

    Effect of trisodium citrate on the crystallization of struvite was studied. To evaluate such an effect an experiment of struvite growth from artificial urine was performed. The investigations are related to infectious urinary stones formation. The crystallization process was induced by the addition of aqueous ammonia solution to mimic the bacterial activity. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that trisodium citrate increases induction time with respect to struvite formation and decreases the growth efficiency of struvite. The inhibitory effect of trisodium citrate on the nucleation and growth of struvite is explained in base of chemical speciation analysis. Such an analysis demonstrates that the inhibitory effect is related with the fact that trisodium citrate binds NH4 + and Mg2+ ions in the range of pH from 7 to 9.5 characteristic for struvite precipitation. The most important is the MgCit- complex whose concentration strongly depends on an increase in pH rather than on an increase in citrate concentrations.

  12. Tetrathiomolybdate inhibits mitochondrial complex IV and mediates degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwang Kim, Kyu; Abelman, Sarah; Yano, Naohiro; Ribeiro, Jennifer R.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Tipping, Marla; Moore, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription factor that triggers adaptive responses upon low oxygen conditions and plays a crucial role in cancer metabolism and therapy resistance. Tetrathiomolybdate (TM), a therapy option for copper overload disorder, has also been shown to be capable of limiting tumor angiogenesis, although its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Using ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines, we observed that TM downregulates HIF-1α protein levels and HIF-transcriptional targets involved in tumor angiogenesis and glycolysis, but did not affect HIF-1α protein synthesis. TM-mediated HIF-1α downregulation was suppressed when HIF-prolyl hydroxylase activity was pharmacologically inhibited using deferoxamine or dimethyloxaloylglycine, and also when the oxygen-dependent degradation domains of HIF-1α, which are responsible for the interaction with HIF-prolyl hydroxylase, were deleted. These findings suggest that TM causes HIF-1α downregulation in a HIF-prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner. Our studies showed that TM inhibits the activity of the copper-dependent mitochondrial complex IV and reduces mitochondrial respiration, thereby possibly increasing oxygen availability, which is crucial for HIF-prolyl hydroxylase activity. Pimonidazole staining also showed that TM elevates oxygen tension in hypoxic cells. Our studies provide mechanistic evidence for TM-mediated HIF-1α regulation and suggest its therapeutic potential as a method of blocking angiogenesis in ovarian and endometrial tumors. PMID:26469226

  13. Inhibition of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1) by Finasteride and Structure of the Enzyme-Inhibitor Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.; Di Costanzo, L; Penning, T; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    The {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid functionality is present in nearly all steroid hormones apart from estrogens. The first step in functionalization of the A-ring is mediated in humans by steroid 5{alpha}- or 5{beta}-reductase. Finasteride is a mechanism-based inactivator of 5{alpha}-reductase type 2 with subnanomolar affinity and is widely used as a therapeutic for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. It is also used for androgen deprivation in hormone-dependent prostate carcinoma, and it has been examined as a chemopreventive agent in prostate cancer. The effect of finasteride on steroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1) has not been previously reported. We show that finasteride competitively inhibits AKR1D1 with low micromolar affinity but does not act as a mechanism-based inactivator. The structure of the AKR1D1 {center_dot} NADP{sup +} {center_dot} finasteride complex determined at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution shows that it is not possible for NADPH to reduce the {Delta}{sup 1-2}-ene of finasteride because the cofactor and steroid are not proximal to each other. The C3-ketone of finasteride accepts hydrogen bonds from the catalytic residues Tyr-58 and Glu-120 in the active site of AKR1D1, providing an explanation for the competitive inhibition observed. This is the first reported structure of finasteride bound to an enzyme involved in steroid hormone metabolism.

  14. Inhibition of Tumor Proteasome Activity by Gold Dithiocarbamato Complexes via both Redox-Dependent and –Independent Processes

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Ronconi, Luca; Fan, Yuhua; Bi, Caifeng; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q Ping

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported on a gold(III) complex, namely [AuBr2(DMDT)] (N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate) showing potent in vitro and in vivo growth inhibitory activities toward human cancer cells and identifying the cellular proteasome as one of the major targets. However, the importance of the oxidation state of the gold center and the involved mechanism of action has yet to be established. Here we show that both gold(III)- and gold(I)-dithiocarbamato species, namely [AuBr2(ESDT)] (AUL12) and [Au(ESDT)]2 (AUL15), could inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome and 26S proteasome in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, resulting in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and proteasome target proteins, and induction of cell death, but at significantly different levels. Gold(I) and gold(III) compounds-mediated proteasome inhibition and cell death induction were completely reversed by the addition of a reducing agent, dithiothreitol or N-acetyl-l-cysteine, suggesting the involvement of redox processes. Furthermore, treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with gold(III) compound (AUL12), but not the gold(I) analogue (AUL15), resulted in the production of significant level of reactive oxygen species. Our study provides strong evidence that the cellular proteasome is an imporant target of both gold(I) and gold(III) dithiocarbamates, but distinct cellular mechanisms of action are responsible for their different overall effect. PMID:19911377

  15. Salicylic Acid Inhibits the Replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus by Directly Targeting a Host Component in the Replication Complex.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaoying; Sasvari, Zsuzsanna; Gonzalez, Paulina Alatriste; Friso, Giulia; Rowland, Elden; Liu, Xiao-Min; van Wijk, Klaas J; Nagy, Peter D; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-04-01

    Although the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays a central role in signaling resistance to viral infection, the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. Identification and characterization of SA's direct targets have been shown to be an effective strategy for dissecting the complex SA-mediated defense signaling network. In search of additional SA targets, we previously developed two sensitive approaches that utilize SA analogs in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology to identify and evaluate candidate SA-binding proteins (SABPs) from Arabidopsis. Using these approaches, we have now identified several members of the Arabidopsis glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) protein family, including two chloroplast-localized and two cytosolic isoforms, as SABPs. Cytosolic GAPDH is a well-known glycolytic enzyme; it also is an important host factor involved in the replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a single-stranded RNA virus. Using a yeast cell-free extract, an in vivo yeast replication system, and plant protoplasts, we demonstrate that SA inhibits TBSV replication. SA does so by inhibiting the binding of cytosolic GAPDH to the negative (-)RNA strand of TBSV. Thus, this study reveals a novel molecular mechanism through which SA regulates virus replication. PMID:25584724

  16. Therapeutic Blockade of Immune Complex-Mediated Glomerulonephritis by Highly Selective Inhibition of Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Samantha A.; Doerner, Jessica; Bosanac, Todd; Khalil, Sara; Smith, Dustin; Harcken, Christian; Dimock, Janice; Der, Evan; Herlitz, Leal; Webb, Deborah; Seccareccia, Elise; Feng, Di; Fine, Jay S.; Ramanujam, Meera; Klein, Elliott; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially dangerous end organ pathology that affects upwards of 60% of lupus patients. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is important for B cell development, Fc receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel, highly selective and potent BTK inhibitor, BI-BTK-1, in an inducible model of LN in which mice receive nephrotoxic serum (NTS) containing anti-glomerular antibodies. Mice were treated once daily with vehicle alone or BI-BTK-1, either prophylactically or therapeutically. When compared with control treated mice, NTS-challenged mice treated prophylactically with BI-BTK-1 exhibited significantly attenuated kidney disease, which was dose dependent. BI-BTK-1 treatment resulted in decreased infiltrating IBA-1+ cells, as well as C3 deposition within the kidney. RT-PCR on whole kidney RNA and serum profiling indicated that BTK inhibition significantly decreased levels of LN-relevant inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Renal RNA expression profiling by RNA-seq revealed that BI-BTK-1 dramatically modulated pathways related to inflammation and glomerular injury. Importantly, when administered therapeutically, BI-BTK-1 reversed established proteinuria and improved renal histopathology. Our results highlight the important role for BTK in the pathogenesis of immune complex-mediated nephritis, and BTK inhibition as a promising therapeutic target for LN. PMID:27192942

  17. Complex stenosis morphology and vasomotor responses to inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tousoulis, D; Tentolouris, C; Crake, T; Goumas, G; Stefanadis, C; Toutouzas, P; Davies, G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the relation between coronary vasomotor effects of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (LNMMA) administration and coronary stenosis morphology, length, and severity in patients with stable angina.
DESIGN—In 28 patients (24 male, four female) with coronary artery disease and chronic stable angina, intracoronary normal saline and 4 µmol/min LNMMA were infused for four minutes each, followed by an intracoronary bolus of 250 µg glyceryl trinitrate. Coronary stenoses were classified as concentric (smooth), eccentric (smooth), or complicated (irregular). The diameters of these stenoses and their adjacent reference proximal segments were measured by quantitative angiography.
RESULTS—During LNMMA infusion a significantly larger proportion of complicated stenoses than concentric and eccentric stenoses constricted by ⩾ 5% (p < 0.01) and the magnitude of vasoconstriction was greater in complicated than in concentric and eccentric stenoses (p < 0.05). For complicated stenoses the magnitude of constriction (in mm) with reference to normal saline was greater than that of the concentric and eccentric stenoses (p < 0.05), whereas concentric and eccentric stenoses constricted similarly. Irrespective of the type of morphology, there was a correlation (p < 0.05) between both the severity and the length of stenoses and the magnitude of vasoconstriction to LNMMA. A similar proportion of concentric, eccentric, and complicated stenoses showed ⩾ 5% increase in diameter with glyceryl trinitrate, and the magnitude of the response was similar in the three groups.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients with coronary artery disease, the response to LNMMA is greater when stenosis morphology is complex, indicating greater nitric oxide activity. This provides further evidence that plaques with complex morphology are in an active state.


Keywords: endothelium; nitric oxide; coronary artery disease; stenosis morphology PMID:11040015

  18. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  19. Regulation of the Min Cell Division Inhibition Complex by the Rcs Phosphorelay in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Howery, Kristen E.; Clemmer, Katy M.; Şimşek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A key regulator of swarming in Proteus mirabilis is the Rcs phosphorelay, which represses flhDC, encoding the master flagellar regulator FlhD4C2. Mutants in rcsB, the response regulator in the Rcs phosphorelay, hyperswarm on solid agar and differentiate into swarmer cells in liquid, demonstrating that this system also influences the expression of genes central to differentiation. To gain a further understanding of RcsB-regulated genes involved in swarmer cell differentiation, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) was used to examine the RcsB regulon. Among the 133 genes identified, minC and minD, encoding cell division inhibitors, were identified as RcsB-activated genes. A third gene, minE, was shown to be part of an operon with minCD. To examine minCDE regulation, the min promoter was identified by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′-RACE), and both transcriptional lacZ fusions and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (qRT) PCR were used to confirm that the minCDE operon was RcsB activated. Purified RcsB was capable of directly binding the minC promoter region. To determine the role of RcsB-mediated activation of minCDE in swarmer cell differentiation, a polar minC mutation was constructed. This mutant formed minicells during growth in liquid, produced shortened swarmer cells during differentiation, and exhibited decreased swarming motility. IMPORTANCE This work describes the regulation and role of the MinCDE cell division system in P. mirabilis swarming and swarmer cell elongation. Prior to this study, the mechanisms that inhibit cell division and allow swarmer cell elongation were unknown. In addition, this work outlines for the first time the RcsB regulon in P. mirabilis. Taken together, the data presented in this study begin to address how P. mirabilis elongates upon contact with a solid surface. PMID:25986901

  20. Ribonucleotide reductase inhibition by metal complexes of Triapine (3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone): A combined experimental and theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Kowol, Christian R.; Lind, Maria E.S.; Luo, Jinghui; Himo, Fahmi; Enyedy, Éva A.; Arion, Vladimir B.; Gräslund, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Triapine (3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone, 3-AP) is currently the most promising chemotherapeutic compound among the class of α-N-heterocyclic thiosemicarbazones. Here we report further insights into the mechanism(s) of anticancer drug activity and inhibition of mouse ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) by Triapine. In addition to the metal-free ligand, its iron(III), gallium(III), zinc(II) and copper (II) complexes were studied, aiming to correlate their cytotoxic activities with their effects on the diferric/tyrosyl radical center of the RNR enzyme in vitro. In this study we propose for the first time a potential specific binding pocket for Triapine on the surface of the mouse R2 RNR protein. In our mechanistic model, interaction with Triapine results in the labilization of the diferric center in the R2 protein. Subsequently the Triapine molecules act as iron chelators. In the absence of external reductants, and in presence of the mouse R2 RNR protein, catalytic amounts of the iron(III)–Triapine are reduced to the iron(II)–Triapine complex. In the presence of an external reductant (dithiothreitol), stoichiometric amounts of the potently reactive iron (II)–Triapine complex are formed. Formation of the iron(II)–Triapine complex, as the essential part of the reaction outcome, promotes further reactions with molecular oxygen, which give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thereby damage the RNR enzyme. Triapine affects the diferric center of the mouse R2 protein and, unlike hydroxyurea, is not a potent reductant, not likely to act directly on the tyrosyl radical. PMID:21955844

  1. Carbon monoxide impairs mitochondria-dependent endosomal maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Pogu, Julien; Anegon, Ignacio; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) prevents T cell-mediated inflammatory disease by producing carbon monoxide (CO) and impairing DC immunogenicity. However, the cellular mechanisms causing this inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that CO impairs mitochondrial function in DCs by reducing both the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, and resembling the effect of a nonlethal dose of a classical mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). Moreover, both CO and CCCP reduced cargo transport, endosome-to-lysosome fusion, and antigen processing, dampening the production of peptide-MHC complexes on the surface of DCs. As a result, the inhibition of naive CD4(+) T-cell priming was observed. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction in DCs also significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent type 1 diabetes onset in vivo. These results showed for the first time that CO interferes with T-cell priming by blocking an unknown mitochondria-dependent antigen-processing pathway in mature DC. Interestingly, other immune functions in DCs such as antigen capture, cytokine secretion, costimulation, and cell survival relied on glycolysis, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation might only play a key role for the maturation of antigen-containing endosomes. In conclusion, CO produced by HO-1 impairs antigen-dependent inflammation by regulating DC immunogenicity by a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. PMID:26461179

  2. Inhibition of the Tcf/beta-catenin complex increases apoptosis and impairs adrenocortical tumor cell proliferation and adrenal steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Letícia F.; Bueno, Ana Carolina; Gomes, Débora C.; Abduch, Rafael; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, there is no effective therapy for patients with advanced/metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC). The activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is frequent in ACC and this pathway is a promising therapeutic target. Aim To investigate the effects of the inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin in ACC cells. Methods Adrenal (NCI-H295 and Y1) and non-adrenal (HeLa) cell lines were treated with PNU-74654 (5–200 μM) for 24–96 h to assess cell viability (MTS-based assay), apoptosis (Annexin V), expression/localization of beta-catenin (qPCR, immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and western blot), expression of beta-catenin target genes (qPCR and western blot), and adrenal steroidogenesis (radioimmunoassay, qPCR and western blot). Results In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 significantly decreased cell proliferation 96 h after treatment, increased early and late apoptosis, decreased nuclear beta-catenin accumulation, impaired CTNNB1/beta-catenin expression and increased beta-catenin target genes 48 h after treatment. No effects were observed on HeLa cells. In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione secretion 24 and 48 h after treatment. Additionally, in NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased SF1 and CYP21A2 mRNA expression as well as the protein levels of STAR and aldosterone synthase 48 h after treatment. In Y1 cells, PNU-74654 impaired corticosterone secretion 24 h after treatment but did not decrease cell viability. Conclusions Blocking the Tcf/beta-catenin complex inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in adrenocortical tumor cells triggering increased apoptosis, decreased cell viability and impairment of adrenal steroidogenesis. These promising findings pave the way for further experiments inhibiting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in pre-clinical models of ACC. The inhibition of this pathway may become a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with ACC. PMID:26515592

  3. Mondo complexes regulate TFEB via TOR inhibition to promote longevity in response to gonadal signals

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuhei; Karalay, Özlem; Jäger, Philipp S.; Horikawa, Makoto; Klein, Corinna; Nakamura, Kayo; Latza, Christian; Templer, Sven E.; Dieterich, Christoph; Antebi, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Germline removal provokes longevity in several species and shifts resources towards survival and repair. Several Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factors regulate longevity arising from germline removal; yet, how they work together is unknown. Here we identify a Myc-like HLH transcription factor network comprised of Mondo/Max-like complex (MML-1/MXL-2) to be required for longevity induced by germline removal, as well as by reduced TOR, insulin/IGF signalling and mitochondrial function. Germline removal increases MML-1 nuclear accumulation and activity. Surprisingly, MML-1 regulates nuclear localization and activity of HLH-30/TFEB, a convergent regulator of autophagy, lysosome biogenesis and longevity, by downregulating TOR signalling via LARS-1/leucyl-transfer RNA synthase. HLH-30 also upregulates MML-1 upon germline removal. Mammalian MondoA/B and TFEB show similar mutual regulation. MML-1/MXL-2 and HLH-30 transcriptomes show both shared and preferential outputs including MDL-1/MAD-like HLH factor required for longevity. These studies reveal how an extensive interdependent HLH transcription factor network distributes responsibility and mutually enforces states geared towards reproduction or survival. PMID:27001890

  4. Mondo complexes regulate TFEB via TOR inhibition to promote longevity in response to gonadal signals.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shuhei; Karalay, Özlem; Jäger, Philipp S; Horikawa, Makoto; Klein, Corinna; Nakamura, Kayo; Latza, Christian; Templer, Sven E; Dieterich, Christoph; Antebi, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Germline removal provokes longevity in several species and shifts resources towards survival and repair. Several Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factors regulate longevity arising from germline removal; yet, how they work together is unknown. Here we identify a Myc-like HLH transcription factor network comprised of Mondo/Max-like complex (MML-1/MXL-2) to be required for longevity induced by germline removal, as well as by reduced TOR, insulin/IGF signalling and mitochondrial function. Germline removal increases MML-1 nuclear accumulation and activity. Surprisingly, MML-1 regulates nuclear localization and activity of HLH-30/TFEB, a convergent regulator of autophagy, lysosome biogenesis and longevity, by downregulating TOR signalling via LARS-1/leucyl-transfer RNA synthase. HLH-30 also upregulates MML-1 upon germline removal. Mammalian MondoA/B and TFEB show similar mutual regulation. MML-1/MXL-2 and HLH-30 transcriptomes show both shared and preferential outputs including MDL-1/MAD-like HLH factor required for longevity. These studies reveal how an extensive interdependent HLH transcription factor network distributes responsibility and mutually enforces states geared towards reproduction or survival. PMID:27001890

  5. Plasmodium falciparum antigens synthesized by schizonts and stabilized at the merozoite surface by antibodies when schizonts mature in the presence of growth inhibitory immune serum.

    PubMed

    Lyon, J A; Haynes, J D; Diggs, C L; Chulay, J D; Pratt-Rossiter, J M

    1986-03-15

    Some immune sera that inhibit erythrocyte invasion by merozoites also agglutinate the merozoites as they emerge from rupturing schizonts. These immune clusters of merozoites (ICM) possess a surface coat that is cross-linked by antibody and is thicker than the surface coat associated with normal merozoites (NM) obtained from cultures containing preimmune serum. Analysis of metabolically labeled ICM and NM performed by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that washed ICM possessed immune complexes containing antigens representative of schizonts and merozoites. Characteristics of the immune complexes included: a) they were not soluble in pH 8 Triton X-100, b) they were soluble at an acid pH, and c) after pH neutralization they were precipitated by using staphylococcal protein A. Merozoite antigens having Mr of 83, 73, and 45 kDa were associated with immune complexes in ICM. The 83 and 73 kDa antigens were recovered in considerably larger quantities from ICM than from NM. Schizont antigens having Mr of 230, 173 (triplet), 152 (doublet), and 31 kDa were associated with immune complexes in ICM, and a 195 kDa antigen(s) from schizonts and merozoites was also present in the immune complexes. In addition, other antigens of Mr 113, 101, 65, and 51 kDa may have been immune complexed. These 15 antigens accounted for less than 30% of the schizont and merozoite antigens recognized by the immune serum. Immune complexes probably formed between antibodies and a) surface antigens of schizont-infected erythrocytes exposed to antibody before schizont rupture, b) surface antigens of merozoites and schizonts exposed during schizont rupture, and c) soluble antigens normally released during schizont rupture. The antibody components of the immune complexes may have prevented rapid degradation or shedding of some antigens from the merozoite surface. Allowing schizonts to rupture in the presence of inhibitory antibodies (to form ICM) is a useful approach to

  6. Inhibition of the FACT Complex Reduces Transcription from the Human Cytomegalovirus Major Immediate Early Promoter in Models of Lytic and Latent Replication.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Christine M; Nukui, Masatoshi; Gurova, Katerina V; Murphy, Eain A

    2016-04-01

    The successful colonization of the majority of the population by human cytomegalovirus is a direct result of the virus's ability to establish and, more specifically, reactivate from latency. The underlying cellular factors involved in viral reactivation remain unknown. Here, we show that the host complexfacilitateschromatintranscription (FACT) binds to the major immediate early promoter (MIEP) and that inhibition of this complex reduces MIEP transactivation, thus inhibiting viral reactivation. PMID:26865717

  7. Protein C inhibits endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes in A549 lung cancer cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, I.; Majerus, P.W.

    1987-05-01

    We investigated the effect of protein C on the endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes. We previously showed that exposure of umbilical vein endothelial cells to thrombin stimulated the internalization and degradation of thrombin. A similar internalization was stimulated by a monoclonal antithrombomodulin antibody. We have repeated these studies in the presence of protein C and found that endocytosis of /sup 125/I-thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes, but not /sup 125/I-antithrombomodulin-thrombomodulin complexes, is inhibited. Activated protein C did not inhibit endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes. Protein C inhibited both internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-thrombin and diisopropylphosphoryl (DIP) /sup 125/I-thrombin in human lung cancer cells (A549). These effects were observed at protein C concentrations found in human plasma. Protein S had no effect on the inhibition of endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes by protein C. We propose that protein C may regulate the rate of endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes in vivo and thereby control the capacity for endothelium to activate protein C.

  8. Inhibition of Neuronal Cell Mitochondrial Complex I with Rotenone Increases Lipid β-Oxidation, Supporting Acetyl-Coenzyme A Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Worth, Andrew J.; Basu, Sankha S.; Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Rotenone is a naturally occurring mitochondrial complex I inhibitor with a known association with parkinsonian phenotypes in both human populations and rodent models. Despite these findings, a clear mechanistic link between rotenone exposure and neuronal damage remains to be determined. Here, we report alterations to lipid metabolism in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to rotenone. The absolute levels of acetyl-CoA were found to be maintained despite a significant decrease in glucose-derived acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, palmitoyl-CoA levels were maintained, whereas the levels of many of the medium-chain acyl-CoA species were significantly reduced. Additionally, using isotopologue analysis, we found that β-oxidation of fatty acids with varying chain lengths helped maintain acetyl-CoA levels. Rotenone also induced increased glutamine utilization for lipogenesis, in part through reductive carboxylation, as has been found previously in other cell types. Finally, palmitoylcarnitine levels were increased in response to rotenone, indicating an increase in fatty acid import. Taken together, these findings show that alterations to lipid and glutamine metabolism play an important compensatory role in response to complex I inhibition by rotenone. PMID:25122772

  9. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor; Anderson, Robert P.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  10. Characterization of the Candiru Antigenic Complex (Bunyaviridae: Phlebovirus), a Highly Diverse and Reassorting Group of Viruses Affecting Humans in Tropical America ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Tesh, Robert; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Savji, Nazir; Sze, Wilson; Jain, Komal; Serge, Robert; Guzman, Hilda; Guevara, Carolina; Nunes, Marcio R. T.; Nunes-Neto, Joaquim P.; Kochel, Tade