Sample records for complex dna repair

  1. DNA repair. Proteomics reveals dynamic assembly of repair complexes during bypass of DNA cross-links.

    PubMed

    Räschle, Markus; Smeenk, Godelieve; Hansen, Rebecca K; Temu, Tikira; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Hein, Marco Y; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Long, David T; Walter, Johannes C; Hofmann, Kay; Storchova, Zuzana; Cox, Jürgen; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Mann, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) block replication fork progression by inhibiting DNA strand separation. Repair of ICLs requires sequential incisions, translesion DNA synthesis, and homologous recombination, but the full set of factors involved in these transactions remains unknown. We devised a technique called chromatin mass spectrometry (CHROMASS) to study protein recruitment dynamics during perturbed DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts. Using CHROMASS, we systematically monitored protein assembly and disassembly on ICL-containing chromatin. Among numerous prospective DNA repair factors, we identified SLF1 and SLF2, which form a complex with RAD18 and together define a pathway that suppresses genome instability by recruiting the SMC5/6 cohesion complex to DNA lesions. Our study provides a global analysis of an entire DNA repair pathway and reveals the mechanism of SMC5/6 relocalization to damaged DNA in vertebrate cells. PMID:25931565

  2. Drug-induced DNA repair: X-ray structure of a DNA-ditercalinium complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Qi; Williams, L.D.; Egli, M.; Rabinovich, D.; Rich, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States)); Chen, Shunle; Quigley, G.J. (Hunter College, New York, NY (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Ditercalinium is a synthetic anticancer drug that binds to DNA by bis-intercalation and activates DNA repair processes. In prokaryotes, noncovalent DNA-ditercalinium complexes are incorrectly recognized by the uvrABC repair system as covalent lesions on DNA. In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA is degraded by excess and futile DNA repair. Using x-ray crystallography, the authors have determined, to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, the three-dimensional structure of a complex of ditercalinium bound to the double-stranded DNA fragment (d(CGCG)){sub 2}. The DNA in the complex with ditercalinium is kinked (by 15{degrees}) and severely unsound (by 36{degrees}) with exceptionally wide major and minor grooves. Recognition of the DNA-ditercalinium complex by uvrABC in prokaryotes, and by mitochondrial DNA repair systems in eukaryotes, might be related to drug-induced distortion of the DNA helix.

  3. Mystery of DNA repair: the role of the MRN complex and ATM kinase in DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Czornak, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H

    2008-01-01

    Genomes are subject to a number of exogenous or endogenous DNA-damaging agents that cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These critical DNA lesions can result in cell death or a wide variety of genetic alterations, including deletions, translocations, loss of heterozygosity, chromosome loss, or chromosome fusions, which enhance genome instability and can trigger carcinogenesis. The cells have developed an efficient mechanism to cope with DNA damages by evolving the DNA repair machinery. There are 2 major DSB repair mechanisms: nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). One element of the repair machinery is the MRN complex, consisting of MRE11, RAD50 and NBN (previously described as NBS1), which is involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and signaling to the cell cycle checkpoints. A number of kinases, like ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad-3-related), and DNA PKcs (DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit), phosphorylate various protein targets in order to repair the damage. If the damage cannot be repaired, they direct the cell to apoptosis. The MRN complex as well as repair kinases are also involved in telomere maintenance and genome stability. The dysfunction of particular elements involved in the repair mechanisms leads to genome instability disorders, like ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), A-T-like disorder (ATLD) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS). The mutated genes responsible for these disorders code for proteins that play key roles in the process of DNA repair. Here we present a detailed review of current knowledge on the MRN complex, kinases engaged in DNA repair, and genome instability disorders. PMID:19029686

  4. Stalled transcription complexes promote DNA repair at a distance.

    PubMed

    Haines, Nia M; Kim, Young-In T; Smith, Abigail J; Savery, Nigel J

    2014-03-18

    Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCR) accelerates the removal of noncoding lesions from the template strand of active genes, and hence contributes to genome-wide variations in mutation frequency. Current models for TCR suppose that a lesion must cause RNA polymerase (RNAP) to stall if it is to be a substrate for accelerated repair. We have examined the substrate requirements for TCR using a system in which transcription stalling and damage location can be uncoupled. We show that Mfd-dependent TCR in bacteria involves the formation of a damage search complex that can detect lesions downstream of a stalled RNAP, and that the strand specificity of the accelerated repair pathway is independent of the requirement for a lesion to stall RNAP. We also show that an ops (operon polarity suppressor) transcription pause site, which causes backtracking of RNAP, can promote the repair of downstream lesions when those lesions do not themselves cause the polymerase to stall. Our findings indicate that the transcription-repair coupling factor Mfd, which is an ATP-dependent superfamily 2 helicase that binds to RNAP, continues to translocate along DNA after RNAP has been displaced until a lesion in the template strand is located. The discovery that pause sites can promote the repair of nonstalling lesions suggests that TCR pathways may play a wider role in modulating mutation frequencies in different parts of the genome than has previously been suspected. PMID:24554077

  5. Stochastic and reversible assembly of a multiprotein DNA repair complex ensures accurate target site recognition and efficient repair

    PubMed Central

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; Gourdin, Audrey M.; Politi, Antonio Z.; Moné, Martijn J.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Goedhart, Joachim; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding. PMID:20439997

  6. The NF90/NF45 Complex Participates in DNA Break Repair via Nonhomologous End Joining ? †

    PubMed Central

    Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Hoque, Mainul; Lewis-Antes, Anita; Azzam, Edouard I.; Lagunoff, David; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor 90 (NF90), an RNA-binding protein implicated in the regulation of gene expression, exists as a heterodimeric complex with NF45. We previously reported that depletion of the NF90/NF45 complex results in a multinucleated phenotype. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that binucleated cells arise by incomplete abscission of progeny cells followed by fusion. Multinucleate cells arose through aberrant division of binucleated cells and displayed abnormal metaphase plates and anaphase chromatin bridges suggestive of DNA repair defects. NF90 and NF45 are known to interact with the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), which is involved in telomere maintenance and DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We hypothesized that NF90 modulates the activity of DNA-PK. In an in vitro NHEJ assay system, DNA end joining was reduced by NF90/NF45 immunodepletion or by RNA digestion to an extent similar to that for catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs immunodepletion. In vivo, NF90/NF45-depleted cells displayed increased ?-histone 2A.X foci, indicative of an accumulation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation consistent with decreased DSB repair. Further, NF90/NF45 knockdown reduced end-joining activity in vivo. These results identify the NF90/NF45 complex as a regulator of DNA damage repair mediated by DNA-PK and suggest that structured RNA may modulate this process. PMID:21969602

  7. A human RNA polymerase II complex associated with SRB and DNA-repair proteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edio Maldonado; Ramin Shiekhattar; Michael Sheldon; Helen Cho; Ronny Drapkin; Paula Rickert; Emma Lees; Carl W. Anderson; Stuart Linn; Danny Reinberg

    1996-01-01

    WE report here the isolation of a human RNA polymerase II complex containing a subset of the basal transcription factors and the human homologues of the yeast SRB (for suppressors of RNA polymerase B) proteins1-3. The complex contains transcriptional coactivators and increases the activation of transcription. In addition, some components of the RNA polymerase II complex participate in DNA repair.

  8. The RSC and INO80 chromatin-remodeling complexes in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin and is therefore relatively inaccessible to DNA repair enzymes. In order to perform efficient DNA repair, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes are required to alter the chromatin structure near the site of damage to facilitate processing and allow access to repair enzymes. Two of the best-studied remodeling complexes involved in repair are RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and INO80 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are both conserved in higher eukaryotes. RSC is very rapidly recruited to breaks and mobilizes nucleosomes to promote phosphorylation of H2A S129 and resection. INO80 enrichment at a break occurs later and is dependent on phospho-S129 H2A. INO80 activity at the break site also facilitates resection. Consequently, both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining are defective in rsc mutants, while subsets of these repair pathways are affected in ino80 mutants. PMID:22749148

  9. Characterization of DNA binding and pairing activities associated with the native SFPQ·NONO DNA repair protein complex.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Dynan, William S

    2015-08-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have previously shown that a complex of SFPQ (PSF) and NONO (p54(nrb)) cooperates with Ku protein at an early step of NHEJ, forming a committed preligation complex and stimulating end-joining activity by 10-fold or more. SFPQ and NONO show no resemblance to other repair factors, and their mechanism of action is uncertain. Here, we use an optimized microwell-based assay to characterize the in vitro DNA binding behavior of the native SFPQ·NONO complex purified from human (HeLa) cells. SFPQ·NONO and Ku protein bind independently to DNA, with little evidence of cooperativity and only slight mutual interference at high concentration. Whereas Ku protein requires free DNA ends for binding, SFPQ·NONO does not. Both Ku and SFPQ·NONO have pairing activity, as measured by the ability of DNA-bound protein to capture a second DNA fragment in a microwell-based assay. Additionally, SFPQ·NONO stimulates DNA-dependent protein kinase autophosphorylation, consistent with the ability to promote formation of a synaptic complex formation without occluding the DNA termini proper. These findings suggest that SFPQ·NONO promotes end joining by binding to internal DNA sequences and cooperating with other repair proteins to stabilize a synaptic pre-ligation complex. PMID:25998385

  10. MRN complex function in the repair of chromosomal Rag-mediated DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Helmink, Beth A.; Bredemeyer, Andrea L.; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Huang, Ching-Yu; Sharma, Girdhar G.; Walker, Laura M.; Bednarski, Jeffrey J.; Lee, Wan-Ling; Pandita, Tej K.; Bassing, Craig H.

    2009-01-01

    The Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN) complex functions in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) at postreplicative stages of the cell cycle. During HR, the MRN complex functions directly in the repair of DNA DSBs and in the initiation of DSB responses through activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) serine-threonine kinase. Whether MRN functions in DNA damage responses before DNA replication in G0/G1 phase cells has been less clear. In developing G1-phase lymphocytes, DNA DSBs are generated by the Rag endonuclease and repaired during the assembly of antigen receptor genes by the process of V(D)J recombination. Mice and humans deficient in MRN function exhibit lymphoid phenotypes that are suggestive of defects in V(D)J recombination. We show that during V(D)J recombination, MRN deficiency leads to the aberrant joining of Rag DSBs and to the accumulation of unrepaired coding ends, thus establishing a functional role for MRN in the repair of Rag-mediated DNA DSBs. Moreover, these defects in V(D)J recombination are remarkably similar to those observed in ATM-deficient lymphocytes, suggesting that ATM and MRN function in the same DNA DSB response pathways during lymphocyte antigen receptor gene assembly. PMID:19221393

  11. Sufficient Amounts of Functional HOP2/MND1 Complex Promote Interhomolog DNA Repair but Are Dispensable for Intersister DNA Repair during Meiosis in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Uanschou, Clemens; Ronceret, Arnaud; Von Harder, Mona; De Muyt, Arnaud; Vezon, Daniel; Pereira, Lucie; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Schlögelhofer, Peter; Grelon, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous recombination (HR) is essential to repair programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and a dedicated protein machinery ensures that the homologous chromosome is favored over the nearby sister chromatid as a repair template. The HOMOLOGOUS-PAIRING PROTEIN2/MEIOTIC NUCLEAR DIVISION PROTEIN1 (HOP2/MND1) protein complex has been identified as a crucial factor of meiotic HR in Arabidopsis thaliana, since loss of either MND1 or HOP2 results in failure of DNA repair. We isolated two mutant alleles of HOP2 (hop2-2 and hop2-3) that retained the capacity to repair meiotic DSBs via the sister chromatid but failed to use the homologous chromosome. We show that in these alleles, the recombinases RADIATION SENSITIVE51 (RAD51) and DISRUPTED MEIOTIC cDNA1 (DMC1) are loaded, but only the intersister DNA repair pathway is activated. The hop2-2 phenotype is correlated with a decrease in HOP2/MND1 complex abundance. In hop2-3, a truncated HOP2 protein is produced that retains its ability to bind to DMC1 and DNA but forms less stable complexes with MND1 and fails to efficiently stimulate DMC1-driven D-loop formation. Genetic analyses demonstrated that in the absence of DMC1, HOP2/MND1 is dispensable for RAD51-mediated intersister DNA repair, while in the presence of DMC1, a minimal amount of functional HOP2/MND1 is essential to drive intersister DNA repair. PMID:24363313

  12. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  13. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P. (Harvard-Med); (Cornell); (MSKCC)

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  14. Nijmegen breakage syndrome and DNA double strand break repair by NBS1 complex.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Shinya; Kobayashi, Junya; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2004-01-01

    The isolation of the NBS1 gene revealed the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair. In response to DNA damage, histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs is phosphorylated by ATM. NBS1 then targets the MRE11/RAD50 complex to the sites of DSBs through interaction of the FHA/BRCT domain with gamma-H2AX. NBS1 complex binds to damaged-DNA directly, and HR repair is initiated. To collaborate DSB repair, ATM also regulates cell cycle checkpoints at G1, G2, and intra-S phases via phosphorylation of SMC, CHK2 and FANCD2. The phosphorylation of these proteins require NBS1 complex. Thus, NBS1 has at least two important roles in genome maintenance, as a DNA repair protein in HR pathway and as a signal modifier in intra-S phase checkpoints. NBS1 is also known to be involved in maintenance of telomeres, which have DSB-like structures and defects here can cause telomeric fusion. Therefore, NBS1 should be a multifunctional protein for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Further studies on NBS1 will provide insights into the mechanisms of DNA damage response and the network of these factors involved in genomic stability. PMID:15493328

  15. Quantitative characterization of protein-protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Moor, Nina A; Vasil'eva, Inna A; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Antson, Alfred A; Lavrik, Olga I

    2015-07-13

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase ? (Pol?), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Pol?, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Pol?-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Pol?. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Pol? complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein-protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Pol?, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Pol? is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  16. The DNA repair complex Ku70\\/86 modulates Apaf1 expression upon DNA damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D De Zio; M Bordi; E Tino; C Lanzuolo; E Ferraro; E Mora; F Ciccosanti; G M Fimia; V Orlando; F Cecconi

    2011-01-01

    Apaf1 is a key regulator of the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as it activates executioner caspases by forming the apoptotic machinery apoptosome. Its genetic regulation and its post-translational modification are crucial under the various conditions where apoptosis occurs. Here we describe Ku70\\/86, a mediator of non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA repair, as a novel regulator of Apaf1 transcription. Through

  17. In vitro repair of complex unligatable oxidatively induced DNA double-strand breaks by human cell extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elzbieta Pastwa; Ronald D. Neumann; Thomas A. Winters

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new assay for in vitro repair of oxida- tively induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by HeLa cell nuclear extracts. The assay employs linear plasmid DNA containing DNA DSBs produced by the radiomimetic drug bleomycin. The bleomycin- induced DSB possesses a complex structure similar to that produced by oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. Bleomycin DSBs are composed of

  18. Human DNA Repair Genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard D. Wood; Michael Mitchell; John Sgouros; Tomas Lindahl

    2001-01-01

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered

  19. Assembly of base excision repair complex on abasic DNA and role of adenomatous polyposis coli on its functional activity

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Aruna S.; Narayan, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Assembly and stability of base excision repair (BER) proteins in vivo onto abasic DNA and the role of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein in this process is currently unclear. We have studied the assembly of a multiprotein BER complex onto abasic DNA (F-DNA) and characterized the physical and functional activity of the associated proteins. We found that the BER complex contained all the essential components of the Long-patch BER system, such as APE1, Pol-?, Fen-1 and DNA ligase I. Interestingly, wild-type APC was also present in the BER complex. Kinetics of the assembly of BER proteins onto the F-DNA were rapid and appeared in sequential order depending upon their requirement in the repair process. Presence of wild-type APC in the BER complex caused a decrease in the assembly of BER proteins and negatively affected long-patch BER. These results suggest that major BER proteins in the complex are assembled onto F-DNA, and are competent in performing DNA repair. Wild-type APC in the BER complex reduces the repair activity, probably, due to interaction with multiple components of the system. PMID:21261287

  20. Hypoxia and DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Peter M.; Hegan, Denise C.; Lu, Yuhong; Czochor, Jennifer; Scanlon, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a characteristic feature of solid tumors and occurs very early in neoplastic development. Hypoxia transforms cell physiology in multiple ways, with profound changes in cell metabolism, cell growth, susceptibility to apoptosis, induction of angiogenesis, and increased motility. Over the past 20 years, our lab has determined that hypoxia also induces genetic instability. We have conducted a large series of experiments revealing that this instability occurs through the alteration of DNA repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair, DNA mismatch repair, and homology dependent repair. Our work suggests that hypoxia, as a key component of solid tumors, can drive cancer progression through its impact on genomic integrity. However, the acquired changes in DNA repair that are induced by hypoxia may also render hypoxic cancer cells vulnerable to tailored strategies designed to exploit these changes. PMID:24348208

  1. DNA Damage Response: Three Levels of DNA Repair Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sirbu, Bianca M.; Cortez, David

    2013-01-01

    Genome integrity is challenged by DNA damage from both endogenous and environmental sources. This damage must be repaired to allow both RNA and DNA polymerases to accurately read and duplicate the information in the genome. Multiple repair enzymes scan the DNA for problems, remove the offending damage, and restore the DNA duplex. These repair mechanisms are regulated by DNA damage response kinases including DNA-PKcs, ATM, and ATR that are activated at DNA lesions. These kinases improve the efficiency of DNA repair by directly phosphorylating repair proteins to modify their activities, by initiating a complex series of changes in the local chromatin structure near the damage site, and by altering the overall cellular environment to make it more conducive to repair. In this review, we focus on these three levels of regulation to illustrate how the DNA damage kinases promote efficient repair to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. PMID:23813586

  2. The Shu complex, which contains Rad51 paralogues, promotes DNA repair through inhibition of the Srs2 anti-recombinase.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Kara A; Reid, Robert J D; Sunjevaric, Ivana; Demuth, Kimberly; Burgess, Rebecca C; Rothstein, Rodney

    2011-05-01

    The Shu complex, which contains RAD51 paralogues, is involved in the decision between homologous recombination and error-prone repair. We discovered a link to ribosomal DNA (rDNA) recombination when we found an interaction between one member of the Shu complex, SHU1, and UAF30, a component of the upstream activating factor complex (UAF), which regulates rDNA transcription. In the absence of Uaf30, rDNA copy number increases, and this increase depends on several functional subunits of the Shu complex. Furthermore, in the absence of Uaf30, we find that Shu1 and Srs2, an anti-recombinase DNA helicase with which the Shu complex physically interacts, act in the same pathway regulating rDNA recombination. In addition, Shu1 modulates Srs2 recruitment to both induced and spontaneous foci correlating with a decrease in Rad51 foci, demonstrating that the Shu complex is an important regulator of Srs2 activity. Last, we show that Shu1 regulation of Srs2 to double-strand breaks is not restricted to the rDNA, indicating a more general function for the Shu complex in the regulation of Srs2. We propose that the Shu complex shifts the balance of repair toward Rad51 filament stabilization by inhibiting the disassembly reaction of Srs2. PMID:21372173

  3. Sequential and ordered assembly of a large DNA repair complex on undamaged chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Ziani, Salim; Nagy, Zita; Alekseev, Sergey; Soutoglou, Evi; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In nucleotide excision repair (NER), damage recognition by XPC-hHR23b is described as a critical step in the formation of the preincision complex (PInC) further composed of TFIIH, XPA, RPA, XPG, and ERCC1-XPF. To obtain new molecular insights into the assembly of the PInC, we analyzed its formation independently of DNA damage by using the lactose operator/repressor reporter system. We observed a sequential and ordered self-assembly of the PInC operating upon immobilization of individual NER factors on undamaged chromatin and mimicking that functioning on a bona fide NER substrate. We also revealed that the recruitment of the TFIIH subunit TTDA, involved in trichothiodystrophy group A disorder (TTD-A), was key in the completion of the PInC. TTDA recruits XPA through its first 15 amino acids, depleted in some TTD-A patients. More generally, these results show that proteins forming large nuclear complexes can be recruited sequentially on chromatin in the absence of their natural DNA target and with no reciprocity in their recruitment. PMID:25154395

  4. Sequential and ordered assembly of a large DNA repair complex on undamaged chromatin.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Salim; Nagy, Zita; Alekseev, Sergey; Soutoglou, Evi; Egly, Jean-Marc; Coin, Frédéric

    2014-09-01

    In nucleotide excision repair (NER), damage recognition by XPC-hHR23b is described as a critical step in the formation of the preincision complex (PInC) further composed of TFIIH, XPA, RPA, XPG, and ERCC1-XPF. To obtain new molecular insights into the assembly of the PInC, we analyzed its formation independently of DNA damage by using the lactose operator/repressor reporter system. We observed a sequential and ordered self-assembly of the PInC operating upon immobilization of individual NER factors on undamaged chromatin and mimicking that functioning on a bona fide NER substrate. We also revealed that the recruitment of the TFIIH subunit TTDA, involved in trichothiodystrophy group A disorder (TTD-A), was key in the completion of the PInC. TTDA recruits XPA through its first 15 amino acids, depleted in some TTD-A patients. More generally, these results show that proteins forming large nuclear complexes can be recruited sequentially on chromatin in the absence of their natural DNA target and with no reciprocity in their recruitment. PMID:25154395

  5. Dynamics of DNA Mismatch Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Julie; Lin, Yuyen; Rasnik, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair protects the genome from spontaneous mutations by recognizing errors, excising damage, and re-synthesizing DNA in a pathway that is highly conserved. Mismatch recognition is accomplished by the MutS family of proteins which are weak ATPases that bind specifically to damaged DNA, but the specific molecular mechanisms by which these proteins recognize damage and initiate excision are not known. Previous structural investigations have implied that protein-induced conformational changes are central to mismatch recognition. Because damage detection is a highly dynamic process in which conformational changes of the protein-DNA complexes occur on a time scale of a few seconds, it is difficult to obtain meaningful kinetic information with traditional ensemble techniques. In this work, we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study the conformational dynamics of fluorescently labeled DNA substrates in the presence of the mismatch repair protein MutS from E. coli and its human homolog MSH2/MSH6. Our studies allow us to obtain quantitative kinetic information about the rates of binding and dissociation and to determine the conformational states for each protein-DNA complex.

  6. DNA end resection is needed for the repair of complex lesions in G1-phase human cells.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, Nicole B; Ringel, Oliver; Herrlitz, Maren; Jakob, Burkhard; Durante, Marco; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) is influenced by the chemical complexity of the lesion. Clustered lesions (complex DSBs) are generally considered more difficult to repair and responsible for early and late cellular effects after exposure to genotoxic agents. Resection is commonly used by the cells as part of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway in S- and G2-phase. In contrast, DNA resection in G1-phase may lead to an error-prone microhomology-mediated end joining. We induced DNA lesions with a wide range of complexity by irradiation of mammalian cells with X-rays or accelerated ions of different velocity and mass. We found replication protein A (RPA) foci indicating DSB resection both in S/G2- and G1-cells, and the fraction of resection-positive cells correlates with the severity of lesion complexity throughout the cell cycle. Besides RPA, Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) was recruited to complex DSBs both in S/G2- and G1-cells. Resection of complex DSBs is driven by meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11), CTBP-interacting protein (CtIP), and exonuclease 1 (EXO1) but seems not controlled by the Ku heterodimer or by phosphorylation of H2AX. Reduced resection capacity by CtIP depletion increased cell killing and the fraction of unrepaired DSBs after exposure to densely ionizing heavy ions, but not to X-rays. We conclude that in mammalian cells resection is essential for repair of complex DSBs in all phases of the cell-cycle and targeting this process sensitizes mammalian cells to cytotoxic agents inducing clustered breaks, such as in heavy-ion cancer therapy. PMID:25486192

  7. NF-?B regulates DNA double-strand break repair in conjunction with BRCA1–CtIP complexes

    PubMed Central

    Volcic, Meta; Karl, Sabine; Baumann, Bernd; Salles, Daniela; Daniel, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    NF-?B is involved in immune responses, inflammation, oncogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Even though NF-?B can be activated by DNA damage via Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signalling, little was known about an involvement in DNA repair. In this work, we dissected distinct DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms revealing a stimulatory role of NF-?B in homologous recombination (HR). This effect was independent of chromatin context, cell cycle distribution or cross-talk with p53. It was not mediated by the transcriptional NF-?B targets Bcl2, BAX or Ku70, known for their dual roles in apoptosis and DSB repair. A contribution by Bcl-xL was abrogated when caspases were inhibited. Notably, HR induction by NF-?B required the targets ATM and BRCA2. Additionally, we provide evidence that NF-?B interacts with CtIP–BRCA1 complexes and promotes BRCA1 stabilization, and thereby contributes to HR induction. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed accelerated formation of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 foci upon NF-?B activation indicating HR stimulation through DSB resection by the interacting CtIP–BRCA1 complex and Rad51 filament formation. Taken together, these results define multiple NF-?B-dependent mechanisms regulating HR induction, and thereby providing a novel intriguing explanation for both NF-?B-mediated resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies as well as for the sensitization by pharmaceutical intervention of NF-?B activation. PMID:21908405

  8. DNA Mismatch Repair Complex MutS? Promotes GAA·TTC Repeat Expansion in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Anasheh; Ditch, Scott; Wang, Jeffrey; Grabczyk, Ed

    2012-01-01

    While DNA repair has been implicated in CAG·CTG repeat expansion, its role in the GAA·TTC expansion of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is less clear. We have developed a human cellular model that recapitulates the DNA repeat expansion found in FRDA patient tissues. In this model, GAA·TTC repeats expand incrementally and continuously. We have previously shown that the expansion rate is linked to transcription within the repeats. Our working hypothesis is that structures formed within the GAA·TTC repeat during transcription attract DNA repair enzymes that then facilitate the expansion process. MutS?, a heterodimer of MSH2 and MSH3, is known to have a role in CAG·CTG repeat expansion. We now show that shRNA knockdown of either MSH2 or MSH3 slowed GAA·TTC expansion in our system. We further characterized the role of MutS? in GAA·TTC expansion using a functional assay in primary FRDA patient-derived fibroblasts. These fibroblasts have no known propensity for instability in their native state. Ectopic expression of MSH2 and MSH3 induced GAA·TTC repeat expansion in the native FXN gene. MSH2 is central to mismatch repair and its absence or reduction causes a predisposition to cancer. Thus, despite its essential role in GAA·TTC expansion, MSH2 is not an attractive therapeutic target. The absence or reduction of MSH3 is not strongly associated with cancer predisposition. Accordingly, MSH3 has been suggested as a therapeutic target for CAG·CTG repeat expansion disorders. Our results suggest that MSH3 may also serve as a therapeutic target to slow the expansion of GAA·TTC repeats in the future. PMID:22787155

  9. Complex repair kinetics of DNA strand breaks induced by ?-rays or UV radiation in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Mlejnek; S. Kozubek

    1996-01-01

    Fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) — a sensitive technique for the detection of strand breaks in DNA — has been\\u000a modified and used for the detailed investigation of repair kinetics of DNA-strand breaks arising under different conditions\\u000a in Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells irradiated by ?-rays or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The repair kinetics of DNA-strand\\u000a breaks induced in EAT

  10. DNA Transcription and Repair: A Confluence*

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Robb E.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair and transcription process complex nucleic acid structures. The mammalian cell can cross-utilize select components of either pathway to respond to general or special situations arising in either path. These functions comprise activity networks capable of addressing unique requirements for each process. Here, we discuss examples of such networks that are tailored to respond to the demands of both DNA repair and transcription. PMID:22605334

  11. HSP90 regulates DNA repair via the interaction between XRCC1 and DNA polymerase ?

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qingming; Inanc, Burcu; Schamus, Sandy; Wang, Xiao-hong; Wei, Leizhen; Brown, Ashley R.; Svilar, David; Sugrue, Kelsey F.; Goellner, Eva M.; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Lan, Li; Vens, Conchita; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular DNA repair processes are crucial to maintain genome stability and integrity. In DNA base excision repair, a tight heterodimer complex formed by DNA polymerase ? (Pol?) and XRCC1 is thought to facilitate repair by recruiting Pol? to DNA damage sites. Here we show that disruption of the complex does not impact DNA damage response or DNA repair. Instead, the heterodimer formation is required to prevent ubiquitylation and degradation of Pol?. In contrast, the stability of the XRCC1 monomer is protected from CHIP-mediated ubiquitylation by interaction with the binding partner HSP90. In response to cellular proliferation and DNA damage, proteasome and HSP90-mediated regulation of Pol? and XRCC1 alters the DNA repair complex architecture. We propose that protein stability, mediated by DNA repair protein complex formation, functions as a regulatory mechanism for DNA repair pathway choice in the context of cell cycle progression and genome surveillance. PMID:25423885

  12. Mesoscale conformational changes in the DNA-repair complex Rad50/Mre11/Nbs1

    E-print Network

    Dekker, Cees

    Dekker1 The human Rad50/Mre11/Nbs1 complex (hR/M/N) functions as an essential guardian of genome-coil apex contains a CXXC amino-acid motif that forms a structure described as a zinc hook. Genetic the apices of the coiled coils then tether DNA molecules8 . Conformational changes that alter the orientation

  13. DNA repair and synthetic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Gong-she; Zhang, Feng-mei; Gao, Rui-jie; Delsite, Robert; Feng, Zhi-hui; Powell, Simon N

    2011-01-01

    Tumors often have DNA repair defects, suggesting additional inhibition of other DNA repair pathways in tumors may lead to synthetic lethality. Accumulating data demonstrate that DNA repair-defective tumors, in particular homologous recombination (HR), are highly sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. Thus, HR-defective tumors exhibit potential vulnerability to the synthetic lethality approach, which may lead to new therapeutic strategies. It is well known that poly (adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors show the synthetically lethal effect in tumors defective in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes encoded proteins that are required for efficient HR. In this review, we summarize the strategies of targeting DNA repair pathways and other DNA metabolic functions to cause synthetic lethality in HR-defective tumor cells. PMID:22010575

  14. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.C.; Parsons, S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. The relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor have been examined. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation has been assessed. The comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  15. Structure of p15(PAF)-PCNA complex and implications for clamp sliding during DNA replication and repair.

    PubMed

    De Biasio, Alfredo; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Mortuza, Gulnahar B; Molina, Rafael; Cordeiro, Tiago N; Castillo, Francisco; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Delgado, Sandra; Gil-Cartón, David; Luque, Irene; Diercks, Tammo; Bernadó, Pau; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein p15(PAF) regulates DNA replication and repair by binding to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp. We present the structure of the human p15(PAF)-PCNA complex. Crystallography and NMR show the central PCNA-interacting protein motif (PIP-box) of p15(PAF) tightly bound to the front-face of PCNA. In contrast to other PCNA-interacting proteins, p15(PAF) also contacts the inside of, and passes through, the PCNA ring. The disordered p15(PAF) termini emerge at opposite faces of the ring, but remain protected from 20S proteasomal degradation. Both free and PCNA-bound p15(PAF) binds DNA mainly through its histone-like N-terminal tail, while PCNA does not, and a model of the ternary complex with DNA inside the PCNA ring is consistent with electron micrographs. We propose that p15(PAF) acts as a flexible drag that regulates PCNA sliding along the DNA and facilitates the switch from replicative to translesion synthesis polymerase binding. PMID:25762514

  16. Structural biology of disease-associated repetitive DNA sequences and protein-DNA complexes involved in DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Chen, X.; Catasti, P.; Silks, L.A. III; Moyzis, R.K.; Bradbury, E.M.; Garcia, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    This project is aimed at formulating the sequence-structure-function correlations of various microsatellites in the human (and other eukaryotic) genomes. Here the authors have been able to develop and apply structure biology tools to understand the following: the molecular mechanism of length polymorphism microsatellites; the molecular mechanism by which the microsatellites in the noncoding regions alter the regulation of the associated gene; and finally, the molecular mechanism by which the expansion of these microsatellites impairs gene expression and causes the disease. Their multidisciplinary structural biology approach is quantitative and can be applied to all coding and noncoding DNA sequences associated with any gene. Both NIH and DOE are interested in developing quantitative tools for understanding the function of various human genes for prevention against diseases caused by genetic and environmental effects.

  17. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  18. DNA Repair Deficiency in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby causing Huntington’s disease. Single-strand breaks are common DNA lesions and are associated with the neurodegenerative diseases, ataxia-oculomotor apraxia-1 and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1. DNA double-strand breaks are toxic lesions and two main pathways exist for their repair: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage may be linked with the age-associated neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Mutation in the WRN protein leads to the premature aging disease Werner syndrome, a disorder that features neurodegeneration. In this article we review the evidence linking deficiencies in the DNA repair pathways with neurodegeneration. PMID:21550379

  19. DNA demethylation by DNA repair

    E-print Network

    Gehring, Mary

    Active DNA demethylation underlies key facets of reproduction in flowering plants and mammals and serves a general genome housekeeping function in plants. A family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases catalyzes plant ...

  20. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Taichi [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan) [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan)] [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Kondo, Natsuko [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)] [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Mori, Eiichiro [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan)] [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Okamoto, Noritomo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan)] [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yosuke [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan)] [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ohnishi, Ken [Department of Biology, Ibaraki Prefectual University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-mati, Inasiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan)] [Department of Biology, Ibaraki Prefectual University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-mati, Inasiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus-Copernicus-University in Torun, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz (Poland)] [Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus-Copernicus-University in Torun, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Thompson, Larry H. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, L452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States)] [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, L452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Helleday, Thomas [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom) [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Asada, Hideo [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan)] [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  1. Photoimmunology, DNA repair and photocarcinogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Berneburg; Jean Krutmann

    2000-01-01

    In recent years major progress has been made in identifying the molecular mechanisms by which UV radiation modulates the immune system of the skin. From these studies it appears that the generation of DNA damage and the subsequent activation of DNA repair enzymes play a critical role in the generation of UV-B-induced immunosuppression. These studies have made use of cells

  2. DNA repair: the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, C; Jackson, S P

    1998-08-27

    The gene mutated in Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a chromosome instability disorder, has been identified and sequenced. The protein product of this gene forms a complex with hMre11 and hRad50--proteins that are involved in repairing double-strand breaks in DNA. PMID:9742394

  3. XRCC1 phosphorylation by CK2 is required for its stability and efficient DNA repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason L. Parsons; Irina I. Dianova; David Finch; Phillip S. Tait; Cecilia E. Ström; Thomas Helleday; Grigory L. Dianov

    2010-01-01

    XRCC1 is a scaffold protein that interacts with several DNA repair proteins and plays a critical role in DNA base excision repair (BER). XRCC1 protein is in a tight complex with DNA ligase III? (Lig III) and this complex is involved in the ligation step of both BER and repair of DNA single strand breaks. The majority of XRCC1 has

  4. Recruitment Kinetics of DNA Repair Proteins Mdc1 and Rad52 but Not 53BP1 Depend on Damage Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Hable, Volker; Drexler, Guido A.; Brüning, Tino; Burgdorf, Christian; Greubel, Christoph; Derer, Anja; Seel, Judith; Strickfaden, Hilmar; Cremer, Thomas; Friedl, Anna A.; Dollinger, Günther

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment kinetics of double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair proteins Mdc1, 53BP1 and Rad52 into radiation-induced foci was studied by live-cell fluorescence microscopy after ion microirradiation. To investigate the influence of damage density and complexity on recruitment kinetics, which cannot be done by UV laser irradiation used in former studies, we utilized 43 MeV carbon ions with high linear energy transfer per ion (LET?=?370 keV/µm) to create a large fraction of clustered DSBs, thus forming complex DNA damage, and 20 MeV protons with low LET (LET ?=?2.6 keV/µm) to create mainly isolated DSBs. Kinetics for all three proteins was characterized by a time lag period T0 after irradiation, during which no foci are formed. Subsequently, the proteins accumulate into foci with characteristic mean recruitment times ?1. Mdc1 accumulates faster (T0?=?17±2 s, ?1?=?98±11 s) than 53BP1 (T0?=?77±7 s, ?1?=?310±60 s) after high LET irradiation. However, recruitment of Mdc1 slows down (T0?=?73±16 s, ?1?=?1050±270 s) after low LET irradiation. The recruitment kinetics of Rad52 is slower than that of Mdc1, but exhibits the same dependence on LET. In contrast, the mean recruitment time ?1 of 53BP1 remains almost constant when varying LET. Comparison to literature data on Mdc1 recruitment after UV laser irradiation shows that this rather resembles recruitment after high than low LET ionizing radiation. So this work shows that damage quality has a large influence on repair processes and has to be considered when comparing different studies. PMID:22860035

  5. K63-linked ubiquitination of FANCG is required for its association with the Rap80-BRCA1 complex to modulate homologous recombination repair of DNA interstand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Yan, K; Li, L; Lin, M; Zhang, S; He, Q; Zheng, D; Yang, H; Shao, G

    2015-05-28

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are extremely deleterious lesions that are repaired by homologous recombination (HR) through coordination of Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins and breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) product, but the exact role these proteins have remains unclear. Here we report that FANCG was modified by the addition of lysine63-linked polyubiquitin chains (K63Ub) in response to DNA damage. We show that FANCG K63Ub was dispensable for monoubiquitination of FANCD2, but was required for FANCG to interact with the Rap80-BRCA1 (receptor-associated protein 80-BRCA1) complex for subsequent modulation of HR repair of ICLs induced by mitomycin C. Mutation of three lysine residues within FANCG to arginine (K182, K258 and K347, 3KR) reduced FANCG K63Ub modification, as well as its interaction with the Rap80-BRCA1 complex, and therefore impeded HR repair. In addition, we demonstrated that K63Ub-modified FANCG was deubiquitinated by BRCC36 complex in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of BRCC36 resulted in increased K63Ub modification of FANCG. Taken together, our results identify a new role of FANCG in HR repair of ICL through K63Ub-mediated interaction with the Rap80-BRCA1 complex. PMID:25132264

  6. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  7. DNA damage, mutation and fine structure DNA repair in aging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vilhelm A. Bohr; R. Michael Anson

    1995-01-01

    The primary focus of this review is on correlations found between DNA damage, repair, and aging. New techniques for the measurement of DNA damage and repair at the level of individual genes, in individual DNA strands and in individual nucleotides will allow us to gain information regarding the nature of these correlations. Fine structure studies of DNA damage and repair

  8. DNA replication, repair, and repair tests. [Rat; human leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, B.

    1980-09-01

    The rate of inhibition and recovery of DNA synthesis can be used in a rapid assay system to detect genotoxic potentials of chemicals. Also, the observation that an agent stimulates DNA repair in a test system indicates its ability to cause damage in DNA. Different experimental approaches to the study of repair synthesis are discussed.

  9. DNA double-strand–break complexity levels and their possible contributions to the probability for error-prone processing and repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Schipler, Agnes; Iliakis, George

    2013-01-01

    Although the DNA double-strand break (DSB) is defined as a rupture in the double-stranded DNA molecule that can occur without chemical modification in any of the constituent building blocks, it is recognized that this form is restricted to enzyme-induced DSBs. DSBs generated by physical or chemical agents can include at the break site a spectrum of base alterations (lesions). The nature and number of such chemical alterations define the complexity of the DSB and are considered putative determinants for repair pathway choice and the probability that errors will occur during this processing. As the pathways engaged in DSB processing show distinct and frequently inherent propensities for errors, pathway choice also defines the error-levels cells opt to accept. Here, we present a classification of DSBs on the basis of increasing complexity and discuss how complexity may affect processing, as well as how it may cause lethal or carcinogenic processing errors. By critically analyzing the characteristics of DSB repair pathways, we suggest that all repair pathways can in principle remove lesions clustering at the DSB but are likely to fail when they encounter clusters of DSBs that cause a local form of chromothripsis. In the same framework, we also analyze the rational of DSB repair pathway choice. PMID:23804754

  10. The Nse5-Nse6 dimer mediates DNA repair roles of the Smc5-Smc6 complex.

    PubMed

    Pebernard, Stephanie; Wohlschlegel, James; McDonald, W Hayes; Yates, John R; Boddy, Michael N

    2006-03-01

    Stabilization and processing of stalled replication forks is critical for cell survival and genomic integrity. We characterize a novel DNA repair heterodimer of Nse5 and Nse6, which are nonessential nuclear proteins critical for chromosome segregation in fission yeast. The Nse5/6 dimer facilitates DNA repair as part of the Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex (Smc5/6), the basic architecture of which we define. Nse5-Nse6 [corrected] (Nse5 and Nse6) [corrected] mutants display a high level of spontaneous DNA damage and mitotic catastrophe in the absence of the master checkpoint regulator Rad3 (hATR). Nse5/6 mutants are required for the response to genotoxic agents that block the progression of replication forks, acting in a pathway that allows the tolerance of irreparable UV lesions. Interestingly, the UV sensitivity of Nse5/6 [corrected] is suppressed by concomitant deletion of the homologous recombination repair factor, Rhp51 (Rad51). Further, the viability of Nse5/6 mutants depends on Mus81 and Rqh1, factors that resolve or prevent the formation of Holliday junctions. Consistently, the UV sensitivity of cells lacking Nse5/6 can be partially suppressed by overexpressing the bacterial resolvase RusA. We propose a role for Nse5/6 mutants in suppressing recombination that results in Holliday junction formation or in Holliday junction resolution. PMID:16478984

  11. DNA repair mechanisms in cancer development and therapy.

    PubMed

    Torgovnick, Alessandro; Schumacher, Björn

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage has been long recognized as causal factor for cancer development. When erroneous DNA repair leads to mutations or chromosomal aberrations affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cells undergo malignant transformation resulting in cancerous growth. Genetic defects can predispose to cancer: mutations in distinct DNA repair systems elevate the susceptibility to various cancer types. However, DNA damage not only comprises a root cause for cancer development but also continues to provide an important avenue for chemo- and radiotherapy. Since the beginning of cancer therapy, genotoxic agents that trigger DNA damage checkpoints have been applied to halt the growth and trigger the apoptotic demise of cancer cells. We provide an overview about the involvement of DNA repair systems in cancer prevention and the classes of genotoxins that are commonly used for the treatment of cancer. A better understanding of the roles and interactions of the highly complex DNA repair machineries will lead to important improvements in cancer therapy. PMID:25954303

  12. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  13. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of the DNA repair-defective cell lines were smaller than those of normal cells, with the DNA-PK-deficient cells having RBEs near unity. To further investigate the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, chromosomal aberrations were analyzed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933 (a specific ATM kinase inhibitor) or Mirin (an Mre11- Rad50-Nbs1 complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM). We also performed siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Preliminary data indicate that chromosome exchanges increase in cells treated with the specific ATM inhibitor. Possible cytogenetic signatures of acute and low dose-rate gamma irradiation in ATM or nibrin deficient and suppressed cells will be discussed.

  14. The growing complexity of HIF-1?'s role in tumorigenesis: DNA repair and beyond.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, N; Zasada, C; Kempa, S; Cramer, T

    2013-08-01

    Lack of oxygen (hypoxia) is a central hallmark of cancer and a pivotal driving force of malignant progression. Transcriptional activators of the hypoxia-inducible factor ? (HIF?) family represent the principal molecular mediators of hypoxia under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. While HIF-2? is expressed in a tissue- and cell-type-restricted manner, stabilization of HIF-1? was reported in tumours of widely different origin, and functional analyses led to the perception of HIF-1? as an oncoprotein. In this review, we aim to acknowledge HIF?'s growing complexity by outlining its functional relevance for genomic integrity and tumour heterogeneity, two features of paramount importance for basic and clinical oncology. Pharmaceutical companies around the globe are ambitiously hunting for HIF-1?-inhibiting compounds, some of which are currently being evaluated in phase 1 trials. To avoid the rather disappointing clinical efficacy emblematic of most targeted therapeutics, potential resistance mechanisms of, as well as potential combination partners for, HIF-1?-inhibiting drugs should be evaluated. In this regard, the interrelation of HIF-1? with genomic integrity and tumour heterogeneity offers ample possibilities, potentially resulting in more efficient clinical translation of HIF-1?'s pathobiology. PMID:23160373

  15. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Noda, Taichi; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kondo, Natsuko; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Ohnishi, Ken; Zdzienicka, Ma?gorzata Z; Thompson, Larry H; Helleday, Thomas; Asada, Hideo; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA(-/-), FANCC(-/-), FANCA(-/-)C(-/-), FANCD2(-/-) and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical ?H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA(-/-), FANCC(-/-) and FANCA(-/-)C(-/-) cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2(-/-) cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, ?H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. PMID:21111709

  16. Crystal structure analysis of DNA lesion repair and tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sabine; Schorr, Stephanie; Carell, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    Selective base pairing of the four canonical nucleobases is fundamental for the integrity of the genetic system. Information loss associated with DNA damage is a constant challenge and in response, organisms have evolved specialized defence systems consisting of DNA repair and lesion tolerance. DNA repair requires the action of different lesion recognition proteins such as lesion-specific glycosylases and DNA endonucleases. Lesion tolerance is established by special translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases, which are able to bypass lesions during replication. In the past decade a large number of structures of repair proteins and TLS polymerases in complex with DNA containing individual lesions provided detailed insight into the chemistry of DNA repair and TLS. This review summarizes recent structural results. PMID:19200715

  17. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 ...and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA...

  18. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 ...and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA...

  19. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 ...and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a) Purpose. Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests measure DNA...

  20. DNA polymerase. delta. and DNA repair: DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts requires DNA polymerase. delta

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    When UV-irradiated cultured diploid human fibroblasts were permeabilized with Brij-58 then separated from soluble material by centrifugation, conservative DNA repair synthesis could be restored by a soluble factor obtained from the supernate of similarly treated HeLa cells. Monoclonal antibody to KB cell DNA polymerase {alpha}, while binding to HeLa DNA polymerase {alpha}, did not bind to the HeLa DNA polymerase {delta}. Moreover, at micromolar concentrations N{sup 2}-(p-n-butylphenyl)-2{prime}-deoxyguanosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (BuPdGT) and 2(p-n-butylanilino)-2{prime}-deoxyadenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (BuAdATP) were potent inhibitors of DNA polymerase {alpha}, but did not inhibit the DNA polymerase {delta}. Neither purified DNA polymerase {alpha} nor {beta} could promote repair DNA synthesis in the permeabilized cells. Furthermore, if monoclonal antibodies to DNA polymerase {alpha} BuPdGTP, or BuAdATP was added to the reconstituted system, there was no significant inhibition.

  1. Effect of acrylamide on hepatocellular DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.; McQueen, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Acrylamide has recently been reported to induce tumors in laboratory animals. The effect of acrylamide on unscheduled DNA synthesis using the hepatocyte primary culture (HPC)/DNA repair test was examined. Isolated hepatocytes were exposed to acrylamide and (3H)thymidine ( (3H)TdR) for 18 hr. Incorporation of (3H)TdR into DNA was determined by autoradiography. No DNA repair was observed at acrylamide concentrations up to 10(-2) M. These findings were confirmed using density gradients. Acrylamide concentrations exceeding 10(-2) M were cytotoxic to hepatocytes. Because both autoradiography and density gradients measure DNA repair as an endpoint, the ability of acrylamide to inhibit these repair processes was also determined. Acrylamide had no effect on the repair of UV-damaged DNA. These results show that acrylamide is not genotoxic in isolated hepatocytes.

  2. DNA repair pathways as targets for cancer therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Petermann; Cecilia Lundin; Ben Hodgson; Ricky A. Sharma; Thomas Helleday

    2008-01-01

    DNA repair pathways can enable tumour cells to survive DNA damage that is induced by chemotherapeutic treatments; therefore, inhibitors of specific DNA repair pathways might prove efficacious when used in combination with DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition, alterations in DNA repair pathways that arise during tumour development can make some cancer cells reliant on a reduced set of DNA repair

  3. The efficiency of photolyase and indole complexes to repair DNA containing dimers of pyrimidine: A theoretical analysis of the electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volcov, Flávia; Goldman, Carla

    2004-02-01

    We analyze the effects of competing reactions to the efficiency of enzymatic splitting of pyrimidine dimers formed in DNA by the incidence of ultraviolet radiation. This is accomplished with the aid of a formula that expresses the efficiency of the repair in terms of parameters that regulate the reaction rates for primary and for back long-range electron transfers taking place in the process. Comparison of experimental data with estimations on account of this formula supports early conjectures in the literature that attribute the relative high performance of the enzymatic complexes of photolyase to its ability to suppress the back reaction.

  4. Robustness of DNA repair through collective rate control.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Paul; Heinemann, Tim; Manders, Erik; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; van Driel, Roel; Höfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair and other chromatin-associated processes are carried out by enzymatic macromolecular complexes that assemble at specific sites on the chromatin fiber. How the rate of these molecular machineries is regulated by their constituent parts is poorly understood. Here we quantify nucleotide-excision DNA repair in mammalian cells and find that, despite the pathways' molecular complexity, repair effectively obeys slow first-order kinetics. Theoretical analysis and data-based modeling indicate that these kinetics are not due to a singular rate-limiting step. Rather, first-order kinetics emerge from the interplay of rapidly and reversibly assembling repair proteins, stochastically distributing DNA lesion repair over a broad time period. Based on this mechanism, the model predicts that the repair proteins collectively control the repair rate. Exploiting natural cell-to-cell variability, we corroborate this prediction for the lesion-recognition factor XPC and the downstream factor XPA. Our findings provide a rationale for the emergence of slow time scales in chromatin-associated processes from fast molecular steps and suggest that collective rate control might be a widespread mode of robust regulation in DNA repair and transcription. PMID:24499930

  5. Robustness of DNA Repair through Collective Rate Control

    PubMed Central

    Manders, Erik; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; van Driel, Roel; Höfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair and other chromatin-associated processes are carried out by enzymatic macromolecular complexes that assemble at specific sites on the chromatin fiber. How the rate of these molecular machineries is regulated by their constituent parts is poorly understood. Here we quantify nucleotide-excision DNA repair in mammalian cells and find that, despite the pathways' molecular complexity, repair effectively obeys slow first-order kinetics. Theoretical analysis and data-based modeling indicate that these kinetics are not due to a singular rate-limiting step. Rather, first-order kinetics emerge from the interplay of rapidly and reversibly assembling repair proteins, stochastically distributing DNA lesion repair over a broad time period. Based on this mechanism, the model predicts that the repair proteins collectively control the repair rate. Exploiting natural cell-to-cell variability, we corroborate this prediction for the lesion-recognition factor XPC and the downstream factor XPA. Our findings provide a rationale for the emergence of slow time scales in chromatin-associated processes from fast molecular steps and suggest that collective rate control might be a widespread mode of robust regulation in DNA repair and transcription. PMID:24499930

  6. Molecular mechanisms of DNA repair inhibition by caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, C.P.; Sancar, A. (Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Caffeine potentiates the mutagenic and lethal effects of genotoxic agents. It is thought that this is due, at least in some organisms, to inhibition of DNA repair. However, direct evidence for inhibition of repair enzymes has been lacking. Using purified Escherichia coli DNA photolyase and (A)BC excinuclease, we show that the drug inhibits photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair by two different mechanisms. Caffeine inhibits photoreactivation by interfering with the specific binding of photolyase to damaged DNA, and it inhibits nucleotide excision repair by promoting nonspecific binding of the damage-recognition subunit, UvrA, of (A)BC excinuclease. A number of other intercalators, including acriflavin and ethidium bromide, appear to inhibit the excinuclease by a similar mechanism--that is, by trapping the UvrA subunit in nonproductive complexes on undamaged DNA.

  7. Regulation of DNA repair by ubiquitylation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony T. Huang; Alan D. D'Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The process of ubiquitylation is best known for its role in targeting proteins for degradation by the proteasome. However, recent studies of DNA-repair and DNA-damage-response pathways have significantly broadened the scope of the role of ubiquitylation to include non-proteolytic functions of ubiquitin. These pathways involve the monoubiquitylation of key DNA-repair proteins that have regulatory functions in homologous recombination and translesion

  8. DNA triplet repeat expansion and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ravi R; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutS? and the MutL? (and/or possibly MutL?) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  9. The Rad50 zinc-hook is a structure joining Mre11 complexes in DNA recombination and repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl-Peter Hopfner; Lisa Craig; Gabriel Moncalian; Robert A. Zinkel; Takehiko Usui; Barbara A. L. Owen; Annette Karcher; Brendan Henderson; Jean-Luc Bodmer; Cynthia T. McMurray; James P. Carney; John H. J. Petrini; John A. Tainer

    2002-01-01

    The Mre11 complex (Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1) is central to chromosomal maintenance and functions in homologous recombination, telomere maintenance and sister chromatid association. These functions all imply that the linked binding of two DNA substrates occurs, although the molecular basis for this process remains unknown. Here we present a 2.2Å crystal structure of the Rad50 coiled-coil region that reveals an unexpected dimer interface

  10. DNA Repair Pathways in Trypanosomatids: from DNA Repair to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Paquet, Eric R.; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Maity, Ranjan; Rodrigue, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY All living organisms are continuously faced with endogenous or exogenous stress conditions affecting genome stability. DNA repair pathways act as a defense mechanism, which is essential to maintain DNA integrity. There is much to learn about the regulation and functions of these mechanisms, not only in human cells but also equally in divergent organisms. In trypanosomatids, DNA repair pathways protect the genome against mutations but also act as an adaptive mechanism to promote drug resistance. In this review, we scrutinize the molecular mechanisms and DNA repair pathways which are conserved in trypanosomatids. The recent advances made by the genome consortiums reveal the complete genomic sequences of several pathogens. Therefore, using bioinformatics and genomic sequences, we analyze the conservation of DNA repair proteins and their key protein motifs in trypanosomatids. We thus present a comprehensive view of DNA repair processes in trypanosomatids at the crossroads of DNA repair and drug resistance. PMID:24600040

  11. Coordination and Processing of DNA Ends During Double-Strand Break Repair: The Role of the Bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Almond, Joshua R.; Stohr, Bradley A.; Panigrahi, Anil K.; Albrecht, Dustin W.; Nelson, Scott W.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo functions of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex (gp46/47) in double-strand-end processing, double-strand break repair, and recombination-dependent replication were investigated. The complex is essential for T4 growth, but we wanted to investigate the in vivo function during productive infections. We therefore generated a suppressed triple amber mutant in the Rad50 subunit to substantially reduce the level of complex and thereby reduce phage growth. Growth-limiting amounts of the complex caused a concordant decrease in phage genomic recombination-dependent replication. However, the efficiencies of double-strand break repair and of plasmid-based recombination-dependent replication remained relatively normal. Genetic analyses of linked markers indicated that double-strand ends were less protected from nuclease erosion in the depleted infection and also that end coordination during repair was compromised. We discuss models for why phage genomic recombination-dependent replication is more dependent on Mre11/Rad50 levels when compared to plasmid recombination-dependent replication. We also tested the importance of the conserved histidine residue in nuclease motif I of the T4 Mre11 protein. Substitution with multiple different amino acids (including serine) failed to support phage growth, completely blocked plasmid recombination-dependent replication, and led to the stabilization of double-strand ends. We also constructed and expressed an Mre11 mutant protein with the conserved histidine changed to serine. The mutant protein was found to be completely defective for nuclease activities, but retained the ability to bind the Rad50 subunit and double-stranded DNA. These results indicate that the nuclease activity of Mre11 is critical for phage growth and recombination-dependent replication during T4 infections. PMID:23979587

  12. Antibody specific for a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-07-11

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  13. DNA repair: how to PIKK a partner.

    PubMed

    Hiom, Kevin

    2005-06-21

    In eukaryotes, members of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family co-ordinate the cellular response to DNA damage. But how do these important kinases detect DNA damage and relay this information to the DNA repair and checkpoint machinery? PMID:15964271

  14. Early Evolution of DNA Repair Mechanisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jocelyne DiRuggiero; Frank T. Robb

    DNA repair is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity and replication fidelity in all cells, and therefore was arguably\\u000a of major importance in the Last Universal Cellular Ancestor (LUCA) as well. Archaea, and hyperthermophiles in particular,\\u000a are well suited for studying early DNA repair mechanisms from two perspectives. First, these prokaryotes embody a mix of bacterial\\u000a and eukaryal molecular

  15. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  16. DNA repair in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Lechner, J.F.; Grafstrom, R.C.; Harris, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the response of human cell types (bronchial epithelial cells and fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts) to various DNA damaging agents. Repair of DNA single strand breaks (SSB) induced by 5 krads of X-ray was similar for all cell types; approximately 90% of the DNA SSB were rejoined within one hour. During excision repair of DNA damage from u.v.-radiation, the frequencies of DNA SSB as estimated by the alkaline elution technique, were similar in all cell types. Repair replication as measured by BND cellulose chromatography was also similar in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after u.v.-irradiation. Similar levels of SSB were also observed in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after exposure to chemical carcinogens: 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene; benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE); or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Significant repair replication of BPDE-induced DNA damage was detected in both bronchial epithelial and fibroblastic cells, although the level in fibroblasts was approximately 40% of that in epithelial cells. The pulmonary carcinogen asbestos did not damage DNA. DNA-protein crosslinks induced by formaldehyde were rapidly removed in bronchial cells. Further, epithelial and fibroblastic cells, which were incubated with formaldehyde and the polymerase inhibitor combination of cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea, accumulated DNA SSB at approximately equal frequencies. These results should provide a useful background for further investigations of the response of human bronchial cells to various DNA damaging agents.

  17. DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts requires DNA polymerase delta

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, C.; Reinhard, P.; Linn, S.

    1988-01-05

    When UV-irradiated cultured diploid human fibroblasts were permeabilized with Brij-58 then separated from soluble material by centrifugation, conservative DNA repair synthesis could be restored by a soluble factor obtained from the supernatant of similarly treated HeLa cells. Extensive purification of this factor yielded a 10.2 S, 220,000-dalton polypeptide with the DNA polymerase and 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activities reported for DNA polymerase delta II. Monoclonal antibody to KB cell DNA polymerase alpha, while binding to HeLa DNA polymerase alpha, did not bind to the HeLa DNA polymerase delta. Moreover, at micromolar concentrations N2-(p-n-butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (BuPdGTP) and 2-(p-n-butylanilino)-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate (BuAdATP) were potent inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha, but did not inhibit the DNA polymerase delta. Neither purified DNA polymerase alpha nor beta could promote repair DNA synthesis in the permeabilized cells. Furthermore, under conditions which inhibited purified DNA polymerase alpha by greater than 90%, neither monoclonal antibodies to DNA polymerase alpha, BuPdGTP, nor BuAdATP was able to inhibit significantly the DNA repair synthesis mediated by the DNA polymerase delta. Thus, it appears that a major portion of DNA repair synthesis induced by UV irradiation might be catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta. When xeroderma pigmentosum human diploid fibroblasts were utilized, DNA repair synthesis dependent upon ultraviolet light could be restored by addition of both T4 endonuclease V and DNA polymerase delta, but not by addition of either one alone.

  18. DNA INTERSTRAND CROSSLINK REPAIR IN MAMMALIAN CELLS: STEP BY STEP

    PubMed Central

    Muniandy, Parameswary; Liu, Jia; Majumdar, Alokes; Liu, Su-ting; Seidman, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs) are formed by natural products of metabolism and by chemotherapeutic reagents. Work in E. coli identified a two cycle repair scheme involving incisions on one strand on either side of the ICL (unhooking) producing a gapped intermediate with the incised oligonucleotide attached to the intact strand. The gap is filled by recombinational repair or lesion bypass synthesis. The remaining monoadduct is then removed by Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). Despite considerable effort, our understanding of each step in mammalian cells is still quite limited. In part this reflects the variety of crosslinking compounds, each with distinct structural features, used by different investigators. Also, multiple repair pathways are involved, variably operative during the cell cycle. G1 phase repair requires functions from NER, although the mechanism of recognition has not been determined. Repair can be initiated by encounters with the transcriptional apparatus, or a replication fork. In the case of the latter, the reconstruction of a replication fork, stalled or broken by collision with an ICL, adds to the complexity of the repair process. The enzymology of unhooking, the identity of the lesion bypass polymerases required to fill the first repair gap, and the functions involved in the second repair cycle are all subjects of active inquiry. Here we will review current understanding of each step in ICL repair in mammalian cells. PMID:20039786

  19. Current topics in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junya; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Takata, Minoru; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) is one of the most critical types of damage which is induced by ionizing radiation. In this review, we summarize current progress in investigations on the function of DSB repair-related proteins. We focused on recent findings in the analysis of the function of proteins such as 53BP1, histone H2AX, Mus81-Eme1, Fanc complex, and UBC13, which are found to be related to homologous recombination repair or to non-homologous end joining. In addition to the function of these proteins in DSB repair, the biological function of nuclear foci formation following DSB induction is discussed. PMID:18285658

  20. Single molecule techniques in DNA repair: a primer.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig D; Simons, Michelle; Mackenzie, Cassidy E; Van Houten, Bennett; Kad, Neil M

    2014-08-01

    A powerful new approach has become much more widespread and offers insights into aspects of DNA repair unattainable with billions of molecules. Single molecule techniques can be used to image, manipulate or characterize the action of a single repair protein on a single strand of DNA. This allows search mechanisms to be probed, and the effects of force to be understood. These physical aspects can dominate a biochemical reaction, where at the ensemble level their nuances are obscured. In this paper we discuss some of the many technical advances that permit study at the single molecule level. We focus on DNA repair to which these techniques are actively being applied. DNA repair is also a process that encompasses so much of what single molecule studies benefit--searching for targets, complex formation, sequential biochemical reactions and substrate hand-off to name just a few. We discuss how single molecule biophysics is poised to transform our understanding of biological systems, in particular DNA repair. PMID:24819596

  1. Epigenetic reduction of DNA repair in progression to gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Carol; Bernstein, Harris

    2015-05-15

    Deficiencies in DNA repair due to inherited germ-line mutations in DNA repair genes cause increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. In sporadic GI cancers, mutations in DNA repair genes are relatively rare. However, epigenetic alterations that reduce expression of DNA repair genes are frequent in sporadic GI cancers. These epigenetic reductions are also found in field defects that give rise to cancers. Reduced DNA repair likely allows excessive DNA damages to accumulate in somatic cells. Then either inaccurate translesion synthesis past the un-repaired DNA damages or error-prone DNA repair can cause mutations. Erroneous DNA repair can also cause epigenetic alterations (i.e., epimutations, transmitted through multiple replication cycles). Some of these mutations and epimutations may cause progression to cancer. Thus, deficient or absent DNA repair is likely an important underlying cause of cancer. Whole genome sequencing of GI cancers show that between thousands to hundreds of thousands of mutations occur in these cancers. Epimutations that reduce DNA repair gene expression and occur early in progression to GI cancers are a likely source of this high genomic instability. Cancer cells deficient in DNA repair are more vulnerable than normal cells to inactivation by DNA damaging agents. Thus, some of the most clinically effective chemotherapeutic agents in cancer treatment are DNA damaging agents, and their effectiveness often depends on deficient DNA repair in cancer cells. Recently, at least 18 DNA repair proteins, each active in one of six DNA repair pathways, were found to be subject to epigenetic reduction of expression in GI cancers. Different DNA repair pathways repair different types of DNA damage. Evaluation of which DNA repair pathway(s) are deficient in particular types of GI cancer and/or particular patients may prove useful in guiding choice of therapeutic agents in cancer therapy. PMID:25987950

  2. Genotoxic stress in plants: shedding light on DNA damage, repair and DNA repair helicases.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Panda, Brahma B; Tuteja, Renu

    2009-01-01

    Plant cells are constantly exposed to environmental agents and endogenous processes that inflict damage to DNA and cause genotoxic stress, which can reduce plant genome stability, growth and productivity. Plants are most affected by solar UV-B radiation, which damage the DNA by inducing the formation of two main UV photoproducts such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also generated extra- or intra-cellularly, which constitute yet another source of genotoxic stress. As a result of this stress, the cellular DNA-damage responses (DDR) are activated, which transiently arrest the cell cycle and allow cells to repair DNA before proceeding into mitosis. DDR requires the activation of Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Rad3-related (ATR) genes, which regulate the cell cycle and transmit the damage signals to downstream effectors of cell-cycle progression. Since genomic protection and stability are fundamental to ensure and sustain plant diversity and productivity, therefore, repair of DNA damages is essential. In plants the bulky DNA lesions, CPDs and 6-4PPs, are repaired by a simple and error-free mechanism: photoreactivation, which is a light-dependent mechanism and requires CPD or 6-4PP specific photolyases. In addition to this direct repair process, the plants also have sophisticated light-independent general repair mechanisms, such as the nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER). The completed plant genome sequences reveal that most of the genes involved in NER and BER are present in higher plants, which suggests that the network of in-built DNA-damage repair mechanisms is conserved. This article describes the insight underlying the DNA damage and repair pathways in plants. The comet assay to measure the DNA damage and the role of DNA repair helicases such as XPD and XPB are also covered. PMID:18652913

  3. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  4. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  6. The RASSF1A Tumor Suppressor Regulates XPA-Mediated DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Donninger, Howard; Clark, Jennifer; Rinaldo, Francesca; Nelson, Nicholas; Barnoud, Thibaut; Schmidt, M. Lee; Hobbing, Katharine R.; Vos, Michele D.; Sils, Brian

    2014-01-01

    RASSF1A may be the most frequently inactivated tumor suppressor identified in human cancer so far. It is a proapoptotic Ras effector and plays an important role in the apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR). We now show that in addition to DDR regulation, RASSF1A also plays a key role in the DNA repair process itself. We show that RASSF1A forms a DNA damage-regulated complex with the key DNA repair protein xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA). XPA requires RASSF1A to exert full repair activity, and RASSF1A-deficient cells exhibit an impaired ability to repair DNA. Moreover, a cancer-associated RASSF1A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant exhibits differential XPA binding and inhibits DNA repair. The interaction of XPA with other components of the repair complex, such as replication protein A (RPA), is controlled in part by a dynamic acetylation/deacetylation cycle. We found that RASSF1A and its SNP variant differentially regulate XPA protein acetylation, and the SNP variant hyperstabilizes the XPA-RPA70 complex. Thus, we identify two novel functions for RASSF1A in the control of DNA repair and protein acetylation. As RASSF1A modulates both apoptotic DDR and DNA repair, it may play an important and unanticipated role in coordinating the balance between repair and death after DNA damage. PMID:25368379

  7. Recombination and DNA Repair in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Dorer, Marion S.; Sessler, Tate H.; Salama, Nina R.

    2013-01-01

    All organisms have pathways that repair the genome, ensuring their survival and that of their progeny. But these pathways also serve to diversify the genome, causing changes on the level of nucleotide, whole gene, and genome structure. Sequencing of bacteria has revealed wide allelic diversity and differences in gene content within the same species, highlighting the importance of understanding pathways of recombination and DNA repair. The human stomach pathogen Helicobacter pylori is an excellent model system for studying these pathways. H. pylori harbors major recombination and repair pathways and is naturally competent, facilitating its ability to diversify its genome. Elucidation of DNA recombination, repair, and diversification programs in this pathogen will reveal connections between these pathways and their importance to infection. PMID:21682641

  8. Oxidative DNA damage repair in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Tapas K.; Das, Aditi; Das, Soumita; Choudhury, Sujata; Kow, Yoke W.; Roy, Rabindra

    2009-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA lesions have been implicated in the etiology of many diseases (including cancer) and in aging. Repair of oxidatively damaged bases in all organisms occurs primarily via the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway, initiated with their excision by DNA glycosylases. Only two mammalian DNA glycosylases, OGG1 and NTH1 of E. coli Nth family, were previously characterized, which excise majority of the oxidatively damaged base lesions. We recently discovered and characterized two human orthologs of E. coli Nei, the prototype of the second family of oxidized base-specific glycosylases and named them NEIL (Nei-like)-1 and 2. NEILs are distinct from NTH1 and OGG1 in structural features and reaction mechanism but act on many of the same substrates. Nth-type DNA glycosylases after base excision, cleave the DNA strand at the resulting AP-site to produce a 3?-?? unsaturated aldehyde whereas Nei-type enzymes produce 3?-phosphate terminus. E. coli APEs efficiently remove both types of termini in addition to cleaving AP sites to generate 3?-OH, the primer terminus for subsequent DNA repair synthesis. In contrast, the mammalian APE, APE1, which has an essential role in NTH1/OGG1-initiated BER, has negligible 3?-phosphatase activity and is dispensable for NEIL-initiated BER. Polynucleotide kinase (PNK), present in mammalian cells but not in E. coli, removes the 3? phosphate, and is involved in NEIL-initiated BER. NEILs show a unique preference for excising lesions from a DNA bubble, while most DNA glycosylases, including OGG1 and NTH1, are active only with duplex DNA. The dichotomy in the preference of NEILs and NTH1/OGG1 for bubble versus duplex DNA substrates suggests that NEILs function preferentially in repair of base lesions during replication and/or transcription and hence play a unique role in maintaining the functional integrity of mammalian genomes. PMID:17116430

  9. Sumoylation of the Rad1 nuclease promotes DNA repair and regulates its DNA association

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Bartosova, Zdenka; Altmannova, Veronika; Holland, Cory; Chavdarova, Melita; Lee, Sang Eun; Krejci, Lumir; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad1-Rad10 complex is a conserved, structure-specific endonuclease important for repairing multiple types of DNA lesions. Upon recruitment to lesion sites, Rad1-Rad10 removes damaged sequences, enabling subsequent gap filling and ligation. Acting at mid-steps of repair, the association and dissociation of Rad1-Rad10 with DNA can influence repair efficiency. We show that genotoxin-enhanced Rad1 sumoylation occurs after the nuclease is recruited to lesion sites. A single lysine outside Rad1's nuclease and Rad10-binding domains is sumoylated in vivo and in vitro. Mutation of this site to arginine abolishes Rad1 sumoylation and impairs Rad1-mediated repair at high doses of DNA damage, but sustains the repair of a single double-stranded break. The timing of Rad1 sumoylation and the phenotype bias toward high lesion loads point to a post-incision role for sumoylation, possibly affecting Rad1 dissociation from DNA. Indeed, biochemical examination shows that sumoylation of Rad1 decreases the complex's affinity for DNA without affecting other protein properties. These findings suggest a model whereby sumoylation of Rad1 promotes its disengagement from DNA after nuclease cleavage, allowing it to efficiently attend to large numbers of DNA lesions. PMID:24753409

  10. Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and Cancer: Recent Progress in DNA Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Timothy L.; Rangaswamy, Suganya; Wicker, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by exogenous and environmental genotoxins, but also arise from mitochondria as byproducts of respiration in the body. ROS generate DNA damage of which pathological consequence, including cancer is well established. Research efforts are intense to understand the mechanism of DNA base excision repair, the primary mechanism to protect cells from genotoxicity caused by ROS. Recent Advances: In addition to the notion that oxidative DNA damage causes transformation of cells, recent studies have revealed how the mitochondrial deficiencies and ROS generation alter cell growth during the cancer transformation. Critical Issues: The emphasis of this review is to highlight the importance of the cellular response to oxidative DNA damage during carcinogenesis. Oxidative DNA damage, including 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine, play an important role during the cellular transformation. It is also becoming apparent that the unusual activity and subcellular distribution of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, an essential DNA repair factor/redox sensor, affect cancer malignancy by increasing cellular resistance to oxidative stress and by positively influencing cell proliferation. Future Directions: Technological advancement in cancer cell biology and genetics has enabled us to monitor the detailed DNA repair activities in the microenvironment. Precise understanding of the intracellular activities of DNA repair proteins for oxidative DNA damage should provide help in understanding how mitochondria, ROS, DNA damage, and repair influence cancer transformation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 708–726. PMID:23901781

  11. Early Days of DNA Repair: Discovery of Nucleotide Excision Repair and Homology-Dependent Recombinational Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, W. Dean

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of nucleotide excision repair in 1964 showed that DNA could be repaired by a mechanism that removed the damaged section of a strand and replaced it accurately by using the remaining intact strand as the template. This result showed that DNA could be actively metabolized in a process that had no precedent. In 1968, experiments describing postreplication repair, a process dependent on homologous recombination, were reported. The authors of these papers were either at Yale University or had prior Yale connections. Here we recount some of the events leading to these discoveries and consider the impact on further research at Yale and elsewhere. PMID:24348214

  12. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical support for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the

  13. DNA Repair, Antibody Diversity, and Aging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Johnson; A. C. Wang

    1985-01-01

    Proposed relationships of DNA repair, mutation, and the process of generation of antibody diversity allow new insights into the mechanism of aging. Pathways of antibody development are reviewed with special attention to steps which generate diversity. The normal process of combinatorial fusion of V region gene segments (i.e. V, D, and J) coding for the entire V region, plus the

  14. Activity of a trinuclear platinum complex in human ovarian cancer cell lines sensitive and resistant to cisplatin: cytotoxicity and induction and gene-specific repair of DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Colella, G; Pennati, M; Bearzatto, A; Leone, R; Colangelo, D; Manzotti, C; Daidone, M G; Zaffaroni, N

    2001-01-01

    A collateral sensitivity or a very modest cross-resistance to BBR 3464 was found in 2 ovarian cancer cell lines with experimentally induced resistance to cisplatin. Loss of mismatch repair proteins (hMLH1, hPMS2) or overexpression of nucleotide excision repair proteins (ERCC1) was not detrimental for the cellular sensitivity to BBR 3464. Moreover, interesting differences in the kinetics of formation and removal of DNA lesions at the single-gene (N- ras) level were observed between BBR 3464 and CDDP. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign www.bjcancer.com PMID:11355952

  15. Collagen-DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Svintradze, David V; Mrevlishvili, George M; Metreveli, Nunu; Jariashvili, Ketevan; Namicheishvili, Luisa; Skopinska, Joana; Sionkowska, Alina

    2008-01-01

    Previously presented models of collagen-DNA (7) and collagen-siRNA (8) complexes point to a general description of delivery systems and indicate to what specific topology that system should be equipped with to effectively deliver the gene into the living body via in vivo and in vitro injection. We focused our interest on the nature of collagen-DNA complex structure and the molecular and environmental determinants of the self-association processes of collagen with the presence of DNA. In this aspect, the self-association of collagen-DNA complex offers an opportunity to characterize a unique system, which may be related to the general mechanisms of self-association of fiber macromolecules by water bridges. For characterizing the collagen-DNA interaction, we used FTIR-ATR, NMR, and AFM experiments done on a separate collagen film, DNA film, and on the peptide-DNA aqueous solution. We demonstrate that collagen-DNA spontaneously forms self-assembling complex systems in aqueous solution. Such self-association of the complex could be induced by electrostatic interactions between neutral collagen cylinders, having strong dipole moment, and negatively charged DNA cylinders. A final complex could be formed by hydrogen bonds between specified donor groups of collagen and phosphate acceptor groups of DNA. According to FTIR measurements, a collagen triple helix should not change global conformation during collagen-DNA complex formation. PMID:18052128

  16. Importance of DNA repair in tumor suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumer, Yisroel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2004-12-01

    The transition from a normal to cancerous cell requires a number of highly specific mutations that affect cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, differentiation, and many other cell functions. One hallmark of cancerous genomes is genomic instability, with mutation rates far greater than those of normal cells. In microsatellite instability (MIN tumors), these are often caused by damage to mismatch repair genes, allowing further mutation of the genome and tumor progression. These mutation rates may lie near the error catastrophe found in the quasispecies model of adaptive RNA genomes, suggesting that further increasing mutation rates will destroy cancerous genomes. However, recent results have demonstrated that DNA genomes exhibit an error threshold at mutation rates far lower than their conservative counterparts. Furthermore, while the maximum viable mutation rate in conservative systems increases indefinitely with increasing master sequence fitness, the semiconservative threshold plateaus at a relatively low value. This implies a paradox, wherein inaccessible mutation rates are found in viable tumor cells. In this paper, we address this paradox, demonstrating an isomorphism between the conservatively replicating (RNA) quasispecies model and the semiconservative (DNA) model with post-methylation DNA repair mechanisms impaired. Thus, as DNA repair becomes inactivated, the maximum viable mutation rate increases smoothly to that of a conservatively replicating system on a transformed landscape, with an upper bound that is dependent on replication rates. On a specific single fitness peak landscape, the repair-free semiconservative system is shown to mimic a conservative system exactly. We postulate that inactivation of post-methylation repair mechanisms is fundamental to the progression of a tumor cell and hence these mechanisms act as a method for the prevention and destruction of cancerous genomes.

  17. The interplay between DNA repair and autophagy in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Tang, Bo; Xie, Xia; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Yang, Shi-Ming; Zhang, Jian-Wei

    2015-07-01

    DNA is the prime target of anticancer treatments. DNA damage triggers a series of signaling cascades promoting cellular survival, including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, and autophagy. The elevated basal and/or stressful levels of both DNA repair and autophagy observed in tumor cells, in contrast to normal cells, have been identified as the most important drug-responsive programs that impact the outcome of anticancer therapy. The exact relationship between DNA repair and autophagy in cancer cells remains unclear. On one hand, autophagy has been shown to regulate some of the DNA repair proteins after DNA damage by maintaining the balance between their synthesis, stabilization, and degradation. One the other hand, some evidence has demonstrated that some DNA repair molecular have a crucial role in the initiation of autophagy. In this review, we mainly discuss the interplay between DNA repair and autophagy in anticancer therapy and expect to enlighten some effective strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:25985143

  18. DNA repair in Bacillus subtilis: excision repair capacity of competent cells. [uv radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Yasbin; J. D. Fernwalt; P. I. Fields

    1979-01-01

    Competent Bacillus subtilis were investigated for their ability to support the repair of uv-irradiated bacteriophage and bacteriophage DNA. uv-irradiated bacteriophage DNA cannot be repaired to the same level as uv-irradiated bacteriophage, suggesting a deficiency in the ability of competent cells to repair uv damage. However, competent cells were as repair proficient as noncompetent cells in their ability to repair irradiated

  19. Arsenic-induced promoter hypomethylation and over-expression of ERCC2 reduces DNA repair capacity in humans by non-disjunction of the ERCC2-Cdk7 complex.

    PubMed

    Paul, Somnath; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Chatterjee, Aditi; Sau, Tanmoy J; Das, Jayanta K; Mishra, Prafulla K; Chakrabarti, Partha; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Giri, Ashok K

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is of critical concern in West Bengal, India, as it results in several physiological symptoms including dermatological lesions and cancers. Impairment of the DNA repair mechanism has been associated with arsenic-induced genetic damage as well as with several cancers. ERCC2 (Excision Repair Cross-Complementing rodent repair, complementation group 2), mediates DNA-repair by interacting with Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, which helps in DNA proof-reading during transcription. Arsenic metabolism alters epigenetic regulation; we tried to elucidate the regulation of ERCC2 in arsenic-exposed humans. Water, urine, nails, hair and blood samples from one hundred and fifty seven exposed and eighty eight unexposed individuals were collected. Dose dependent validation was done in vitro using HepG2 and HEK-293. Arsenic content in the biological samples was higher in the exposed individuals compared with the content in unexposed individuals (p < 0.001). Bisulfite-modified methylation specific PCR showed a significant (p < 0.0001) hypomethylation of the ERCC2 promoter in the arsenic-exposed individuals. Densitometric analysis of immunoblots showed a nearly two-fold increase in expression of ERCC2 in exposed individuals, but there was an enhanced genotoxic insult as measured by micronuclei frequency. Immuno-precipitation and western blotting revealed an increased (p < 0.001) association of Cdk7 with ERCC2 in highly arsenic exposed individuals. The decrease in CAK activity was determined by observing the intensity of Ser(392) phosphorylation in p53, in vitro, which decreased with an increase in arsenic dose. Thus we infer that arsenic biotransformation leads to promoter hypomethylation of ERCC2, which in turn inhibits the normal functioning of the CAK-complex, thus affecting DNA-repair; this effect was highest among the arsenic exposed individuals with dermatological lesions. PMID:24473091

  20. The Ku heterodimer: function in DNA repair and beyond.

    PubMed

    Fell, Victoria L; Schild-Poulter, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Ku is an abundant, highly conserved DNA binding protein found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes that plays essential roles in the maintenance of genome integrity. In eukaryotes, Ku is a heterodimer comprised of two subunits, Ku70 and Ku80, that is best characterized for its central role as the initial DNA end binding factor in the "classical" non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) pathway, the main DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammals. Ku binds double-stranded DNA ends with high affinity in a sequence-independent manner through a central ring formed by the intertwined strands of the Ku70 and Ku80 subunits. At the break, Ku directly and indirectly interacts with several C-NHEJ factors and processing enzymes, serving as the scaffold for the entire DNA repair complex. There is also evidence that Ku is involved in signaling to the DNA damage response (DDR) machinery to modulate the activation of cell cycle checkpoints and the activation of apoptosis. Interestingly, Ku is also associated with telomeres, where, paradoxically to its DNA end-joining functions, it protects the telomere ends from being recognized as DSBs, thereby preventing their recombination and degradation. Ku, together with the silent information regulator (Sir) complex is also required for transcriptional silencing through telomere position effect (TPE). How Ku associates with telomeres, whether it is through direct DNA binding, or through protein-protein interactions with other telomere bound factors remains to be determined. Ku is central to the protection of organisms through its participation in C-NHEJ to repair DSBs generated during V(D)J recombination, a process that is indispensable for the establishment of the immune response. Ku also functions to prevent tumorigenesis and senescence since Ku-deficient mice show increased cancer incidence and early onset of aging. Overall, Ku function is critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity and to proper cellular and organismal development. PMID:25795113

  1. After sun reversal of DNA damage: enhancing skin repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel B. Yarosh; Matthew T. Canning; Danielle Teicher; David A. Brown

    2005-01-01

    UV-induced DNA damage has been directly linked to skin cancer, and DNA repair is an important protection against this neoplasm. This is illustrated by the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum wherein a serious defect in DNA repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers dramatically increases the rate of skin cancer. In other instances in which skin cancer rates are elevated, deficits in DNA

  2. Transformation and DNA repair: linkage by DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Tønjum, Tone; Håvarstein, Leiv S; Koomey, Michael; Seeberg, Erling

    2004-01-01

    The stability of microbial genomes is constantly challenged by horizontal gene transfer, recombination and DNA damage. Mechanisms for rapid genome variation, adaptation and maintenance are a necessity to ensure microbial fitness and survival in changing environments. Indeed, genome sequences reveal that most, if not all, bacterial species have numerous gene functions for DNA repair and recombination. These important topics were addressed at the Second Genome Maintenance Meeting (GMM2). PMID:14700543

  3. Aging processes, DNA damage, and repair.

    PubMed

    Gilchrest, B A; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-01

    The second triennial FASEB Summer Research Conference on "Clonal Senescence and Differentiation" (August 17-22, 1996) focused on the interrelationships between aging processes and DNA damage and repair. The attendees represented a cross section of senior and junior investigators working in fields ranging from classic cellular gerontology to yeast and nematode models of aging to basic mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. The meeting opened with a keynote address by Dr. Bruce Ames that emphasized the documented relationships between oxidative damage, cancer, and aging. This was followed by eight platform sessions, one poster discussion, one featured presentation, and an after-dinner address. The following sections highlight the key points discussed. PMID:9141498

  4. Tilting at windmills? The nucleotide excision repair of chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Waters, Raymond; Teng, Yumin; Yu, Yachuan; Yu, Shirong; Reed, Simon H

    2009-02-01

    A typical view of how DNA repair functions in chromatin usually depicts a struggle in which the DNA repair machinery battles to overcome the inhibitory effect of chromatin on the repair process. It may be that in this current interpretation the repair mechanisms are 'tilting at windmills', fighting an imaginary foe. An emerging picture suggests that we should not consider chromatin as an inhibitory force to be overcome like some quixotic giant by the DNA repair processes. Instead we should now recognize that DNA repair and chromatin metabolism are inextricably and mechanistically linked. Here we discuss the latest findings which are beginning to reveal how changes in chromatin dynamics integrate with the DNA repair process in response to UV induced DNA damage, with an emphasis on events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19041427

  5. Targeting DNA repair pathways for cancer treatment: what's new?

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Mark R; Logsdon, Derek; Fishel, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Disruptions in DNA repair pathways predispose cells to accumulating DNA damage. A growing body of evidence indicates that tumors accumulate progressively more mutations in DNA repair proteins as cancers progress. DNA repair mechanisms greatly affect the response to cytotoxic treatments, so understanding those mechanisms and finding ways to turn dysregulated repair processes against themselves to induce tumor death is the goal of all DNA repair inhibition efforts. Inhibition may be direct or indirect. This burgeoning field of research is replete with promise and challenge, as more intricacies of each repair pathway are discovered. In an era of increasing concern about healthcare costs, use of DNA repair inhibitors can prove to be highly effective stewardship of R&D resources and patient expenses. PMID:24947262

  6. Inducible repair of alkylated DNA in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mielecki, Damian; Wrzesi?ski, Micha?; Grzesiuk, El?bieta

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents, which are widespread in the environment, also occur endogenously as primary and secondary metabolites. Such compounds have intrinsically extremely cytotoxic and frequently mutagenic effects, to which organisms have developed resistance by evolving multiple repair mechanisms to protect cellular DNA. One such defense against alkylation lesions is an inducible Adaptive (Ada) response. In Escherichia coli, the Ada response enhances cell resistance by the biosynthesis of four proteins: Ada, AlkA, AlkB, and AidB. The glycosidic bonds of the most cytotoxic lesion, N3-methyladenine (3meA), together with N3-methylguanine (3meG), O(2)-methylthymine (O(2)-meT), and O(2)-methylcytosine (O(2)-meC), are cleaved by AlkA DNA glycosylase. Lesions such as N1-methyladenine (1meA) and N3-methylcytosine (3meC) are removed from DNA and RNA by AlkB dioxygenase. Cytotoxic and mutagenic O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)meG) is repaired by Ada DNA methyltransferase, which transfers the methyl group onto its own cysteine residue from the methylated oxygen. We review (i) the individual Ada proteins Ada, AlkA, AlkB, AidB, and COG3826, with emphasis on the ubiquitous and versatile AlkB and its prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologs; (ii) the organization of the Ada regulon in several bacterial species; (iii) the mechanisms underlying activation of Ada transcription. In vivo and in silico analysis of various microorganisms shows the widespread existence and versatile organization of Ada regulon genes, including not only ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB but also COG3826, alkD, and other genes whose roles in repair of alkylated DNA remain to be elucidated. This review explores the comparative organization of Ada response and protein functions among bacterial species beyond the classical E. coli model. PMID:25795127

  7. DNA Repair 4 (2005) 11891194 Brief report

    E-print Network

    Burgers, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Plasmids used in this study Plasmid Expressed gene Selection Reference pBL760 DDC1 TRP1 [13] pBL761 MEC3 URDNA Repair 4 (2005) 1189­1194 Brief report Function of Rad17/Mec3/Ddc1 and its partial complexes heterotrimeric checkpoint clamp consisting of the Rad17, Mec3, and Ddc1 subunits (Rad17/3/1, the 9-1-1 complex

  8. Srs2: the "Odd-Job Man" in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Marini, Victoria; Krejci, Lumir

    2010-03-01

    Homologous recombination plays a key role in the maintenance of genome integrity, especially during DNA replication and the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). Just a single un-repaired break can lead to aneuploidy, genetic aberrations or cell death. DSBs are caused by a vast number of both endogenous and exogenous agents including genotoxic chemicals or ionizing radiation, as well as through replication of a damaged template DNA or the replication fork collapse. It is essential for cell survival to recognise and process DSBs as well as other toxic intermediates and launch most appropriate repair mechanism. Many helicases have been implicated to play role in these processes, however their detail roles, specificities and co-operativity in the complex protein-protein interaction networks remain unclear. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about Saccharomyces cerevisiae helicase Srs2 and its effect on multiple DNA metabolic processes that generally affect genome stability. It would appear that Srs2 functions as an "Odd-Job Man" in these processes to make sure that the jobs proceed when and where they are needed. PMID:20096651

  9. Comet assay to measure DNA repair: approach and applications

    PubMed Central

    Azqueta, Amaya; Slyskova, Jana; Langie, Sabine A. S.; O’Neill Gaivão, Isabel; Collins, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cellular repair enzymes remove virtually all DNA damage before it is fixed; repair therefore plays a crucial role in preventing cancer. Repair studied at the level of transcription correlates poorly with enzyme activity, and so assays of phenotype are needed. In a biochemical approach, substrate nucleoids containing specific DNA lesions are incubated with cell extract; repair enzymes in the extract induce breaks at damage sites; and the breaks are measured with the comet assay. The nature of the substrate lesions defines the repair pathway to be studied. This in vitro DNA repair assay has been modified for use in animal tissues, specifically to study the effects of aging and nutritional intervention on repair. Recently, the assay was applied to different strains of Drosophila melanogaster proficient and deficient in DNA repair. Most applications of the repair assay have been in human biomonitoring. Individual DNA repair activity may be a marker of cancer susceptibility; alternatively, high repair activity may result from induction of repair enzymes by exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Studies to date have examined effects of environment, nutrition, lifestyle, and occupation, in addition to clinical investigations. PMID:25202323

  10. DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics

    E-print Network

    DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics Soo­Yong Shin 1 , Eun Jeong the complexity of DNA computing. The complexity of any computational algorithm is typically measured in terms of time and space. In DNA computing, the time complexity can be measured by the total reaction time

  11. Brc1-Mediated DNA Repair and Damage Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sheedy, Daniel M.; Dimitrova, Dora; Rankin, Jessica K.; Bass, Kirstin L.; Lee, Karen M.; Tapia-Alveal, Claudia; Harvey, Susan H.; Murray, Johanne M.; O'Connell, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) proteins are key elements in controlling chromosome dynamics. In eukaryotic cells, three essential SMC complexes have been defined: cohesin, condensin, and the Smc5/6 complex. The latter is essential for DNA damage responses; in its absence both repair and checkpoint responses fail. In fission yeast, the UV-C and ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity of a specific hypomorphic allele encoding the Smc6 subunit, rad18-74 (renamed smc6-74), is suppressed by mild overexpression of a six-BRCT-domain protein, Brc1. Deletion of brc1 does not result in a hypersensitivity to UV-C or IR, and thus the function of Brc1 relative to the Smc5/6 complex has remained unclear. Here we show that brc1? cells are hypersensitive to a range of radiomimetic drugs that share the feature of creating lesions that are an impediment to the completion of DNA replication. Through a genetic analysis of brc1? epistasis and by defining genes required for Brc1 to suppress smc6-74, we find that Brc1 functions to promote recombination through a novel postreplication repair pathway and the structure-specific nucleases Slx1 and Mus81. Activation of this pathway through overproduction of Brc1 bypasses a repair defect in smc6-74, reestablishing resolution of lesions by recombination. PMID:15972456

  12. Good timing in the cell cycle for precise DNA repair by BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Durant, Stephen T; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2005-09-01

    It is now clear that large DNA-binding proteins have evolved in mammals to orchestrate the relatively ancient process of DNA recombinational repair. These proteins are recruited to accurately repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs)--the frequent, potentially lethal and mutagenic lesions in the genomes of all organisms. An essential mammalian regulator of DSB repair is BRCA1. Heterozygous BRCA1 mutations predispose individuals to breast, ovarian and other secondary cancers. BRCA1-defective cells exhibit reduced DSB repair, sensitivity to a wide range of DNA damaging agents, genomic instability and defects in the S-phase checkpoint, transcription and chromatin remodelling. DSBs can be repaired by RAD51/RPA-dependent homologous recombination (HR) or DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Both of these pathways can be imprecise and mutagenic. BRCA1 plays a central role in promoting accurate repair by both HR and NHEJ. Consistent with recent evidence, we have assembled a novel cell-cycle-dependent model in which DNA-PK inhibits RPA in S-phase of the cell cycle, while BRCA1 inhibits the exonuclease processivity of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex and facilitates the removal of RPA in S and G2 phase. This model provides an explanation for how BRCA1 promotes accurate DSB repair during various phases of the cell cycle and also accounts for the dual effects that BRCA1 and MRN activity have upon DNA repair and S-phase arrest. PMID:16103751

  13. Restoring DNA repair capacity of cells from three distinct diseases by XPD gene-recombinant adenovirus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melissa Gava Armelini; Alysson Renato Muotri; Maria Carolina Nasser Marchetto; Keronninn Moreno de Lima-Bessa; Alain Sarasin; Carlos Frederico Martins Menck

    2005-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one of the major human DNA repair pathways. Defects in one of the proteins that act in this system result in three distinct autosomal recessive syndromes: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). TFIIH is a nine-protein complex essential for NER activity, initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription and with a possible

  14. Importin KPNA2, NBS1, DNA repair and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shu-Chun; Wu, Kou-Juey; Tseng, Shun-Fu; Wong, Chui-Wei; Kao, Li

    2006-09-01

    During the past 20 years, the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex has become an increasingly important focus in basic and clinical cancer research. One main conceptual step forward was made with the discovery of NBS1 and the understanding of its critical pathophysiological role in Nijmegen breakage syndrome. Major efforts were carried out to define the role in DNA repair of this complex. Recently, basic research has continuously extended our understanding of the complexity of the NBS1 complex. MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex can no longer be viewed as having a single role in DNA damage repair since it also serves as a sensor and a mediator in cell cycle checkpoint signaling. Meanwhile, studies have challenged the concept that NBS1 only functions as a tumor suppressor in preserving genome integrity in the nucleus. It may also provide an oncogenic role in the cytoplasm which is associated with the PI3-kinase/AKT-activation pathway. Consistent with this aspect, a growing body of clinical evidence suggests that NBS1 contains a deleterious character that depends on its subcellular localization. This review focuses on recent experimental evidences demonstrating how NBS1 is translocated into the nucleus by an importin KPNA2 which mediates NBS1 subcellular localization and the functions of the NBS1 complex in tumorigenesis. PMID:16752129

  15. The hMre11\\/hRad50 Protein Complex and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome: Linkage of Double-Strand Break Repair to the Cellular DNA Damage Response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James P. Carney; Richard S. Maser; Heidi Olivares; Elizabeth M. Davis; Michelle Le Beau; John R. Yates; Lara Hays; William F. Morgan; John H. J. Petrini

    1998-01-01

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increased cancer incidence, cell cycle checkpoint defects, and ionizing radiation sensitivity. We have isolated the gene encoding p95, a member of the hMre11\\/hRad50 double-strand break repair complex. The p95 gene mapped to 8q21.3, the region that contains the NBS locus, and p95 was absent from NBS cells established from

  16. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Chen, D.S. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  17. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chen, D.S. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  18. The Tumor Microenvironment and DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Thomas J.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic instability is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. As tumors grow, they progressively acquire mutations that ultimately allow them to invade normal tissues and metastasize to distant sites. This increased propensity for mutation also leads to cancers that are resistant to therapeutic intervention. Recent evidence has shown that the tumor microenvironment plays a major role in the etiology of this phenomenon; as tumors are exposed to repeated cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation, they downregulate a number of DNA repair pathways, thus leading to genetic instability. Understanding the mechanisms involved in this process may provide insights into the development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:20832021

  19. Participation of DNA repair in the response to 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Michael D.; Wilson, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-metabolite 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is employed clinically to manage solid tumors including colorectal and breast cancer. Intracellular metabolites of 5-FU can exert cytotoxic effects via inhibition of thymidylate synthetase, or through incorporation into RNA and DNA, events that ultimately activate apoptosis. In this review, we cover the current data implicating DNA repair processes in cellular responsiveness to 5-FU treatment. Evidence points to roles for base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). However, mechanistic details remain unexplained, and other pathways have not been exhaustively interrogated. Homologous recombination is of particular interest, because it resolves unrepaired DNA intermediates not properly dealt with by BER or MMR. Furthermore, crosstalk among DNA repair pathways and S-phase checkpoint signaling has not been examined. Ongoing efforts aim to design approaches and reagents that (i) approximate repair capacity and (ii) mediate strategic regulation of DNA repair in order to improve the efficacy of current anti-cancer treatments. PMID:18979208

  20. Identification of KIAA1018/FAN1, a DNA Repair Nuclease Recruited to DNA Damage by Monoubiquitinated FANCD2

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Craig; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Lundin, Cecilia; Agostinho, Ana; Deans, Andrew J.; MacArtney, Thomas J.; Hofmann, Kay; Gartner, Anton; West, Stephen C.; Helleday, Thomas; Lilley, David M.J.; Rouse, John

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are highly toxic because they block the progression of replisomes. The Fanconi Anemia (FA) proteins, encoded by genes that are mutated in FA, are important for repair of ICLs. The FA core complex catalyzes the monoubiquitination of FANCD2, and this event is essential for several steps of ICL repair. However, how monoubiquitination of FANCD2 promotes ICL repair at the molecular level is unknown. Here, we describe a highly conserved protein, KIAA1018/MTMR15/FAN1, that interacts with, and is recruited to sites of DNA damage by, the monoubiquitinated form of FANCD2. FAN1 exhibits endonuclease activity toward 5? flaps and has 5? exonuclease activity, and these activities are mediated by an ancient VRR_nuc domain. Depletion of FAN1 from human cells causes hypersensitivity to ICLs, defects in ICL repair, and genome instability. These data at least partly explain how ubiquitination of FANCD2 promotes DNA repair. PMID:20603015

  1. Identification of KIAA1018/FAN1, a DNA repair nuclease recruited to DNA damage by monoubiquitinated FANCD2.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Craig; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Lundin, Cecilia; Agostinho, Ana; Deans, Andrew J; MacArtney, Thomas J; Hofmann, Kay; Gartner, Anton; West, Stephen C; Helleday, Thomas; Lilley, David M J; Rouse, John

    2010-07-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are highly toxic because they block the progression of replisomes. The Fanconi Anemia (FA) proteins, encoded by genes that are mutated in FA, are important for repair of ICLs. The FA core complex catalyzes the monoubiquitination of FANCD2, and this event is essential for several steps of ICL repair. However, how monoubiquitination of FANCD2 promotes ICL repair at the molecular level is unknown. Here, we describe a highly conserved protein, KIAA1018/MTMR15/FAN1, that interacts with, and is recruited to sites of DNA damage by, the monoubiquitinated form of FANCD2. FAN1 exhibits endonuclease activity toward 5' flaps and has 5' exonuclease activity, and these activities are mediated by an ancient VRR_nuc domain. Depletion of FAN1 from human cells causes hypersensitivity to ICLs, defects in ICL repair, and genome instability. These data at least partly explain how ubiquitination of FANCD2 promotes DNA repair. PMID:20603015

  2. DNA-PK: a dynamic enzyme in a versatile DSB repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Anthony J.; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Chen, David J.

    2014-01-01

    DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs) are the most cytoxic DNA lesion as the inability to properly repair them can lead to genomic instability and tumorigenesis. The prominent DSB repair pathway in humans is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). In the simplest sense, NHEJ mediates the direct re-ligation of the broken DNA molecule. However, NHEJ is a complex and versatile process that can repair DSBs with a variety of damages and ends via the utilization of a significant number of proteins. In this review we will describe the important factors and mechanisms modulating NHEJ with emphasis given to the versatility of this repair process and the DNA-PK complex. PMID:24680878

  3. Human DNA polymerase ? grasps the primer terminus to mediate DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Karl E; Averill, April M; Aller, Pierre; Wood, Richard D; Doublié, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    DNA polymerase ? protects against genomic instability via an alternative end-joining repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks. Polymerase ? is overexpressed in breast, lung and oral cancers, and reduction of its activity in mammalian cells increases sensitivity to double-strand break-inducing agents, including ionizing radiation. Reported here are crystal structures of the C-terminal polymerase domain from human polymerase ?, illustrating two potential modes of dimerization. One structure depicts insertion of ddATP opposite an abasic-site analog during translesion DNA synthesis. The second structure describes a cognate ddGTP complex. Polymerase ? uses a specialized thumb subdomain to establish unique upstream contacts to the primer DNA strand, including an interaction with the 3'-terminal phosphate from one of five distinctive insertion loops. These observations demonstrate how polymerase ? grasps the primer to bypass DNA lesions or extend poorly annealed DNA termini to mediate end-joining. PMID:25775267

  4. DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics

    E-print Network

    DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics Soo-Yong Shin1 , Eun Jeong of DNA computing. The complexity of any computational algorithm is typically measured in terms of time and space. In DNA computing, the time complexity can be measured by the total reaction time

  5. DNA Repair and Genome Maintenance in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Justin S.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Walsh, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: From microbes to multicellular eukaryotic organisms, all cells contain pathways responsible for genome maintenance. DNA replication allows for the faithful duplication of the genome, whereas DNA repair pathways preserve DNA integrity in response to damage originating from endogenous and exogenous sources. The basic pathways important for DNA replication and repair are often conserved throughout biology. In bacteria, high-fidelity repair is balanced with low-fidelity repair and mutagenesis. Such a balance is important for maintaining viability while providing an opportunity for the advantageous selection of mutations when faced with a changing environment. Over the last decade, studies of DNA repair pathways in bacteria have demonstrated considerable differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Here we review and discuss the DNA repair, genome maintenance, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We present their molecular mechanisms and compare the functions and regulation of several pathways with known information on other organisms. We also discuss DNA repair during different growth phases and the developmental program of sporulation. In summary, we present a review of the function, regulation, and molecular mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria, with a strong emphasis on B. subtilis. PMID:22933559

  6. Formation and Repair of Tobacco Carcinogen-Derived Bulky DNA Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    DNA adducts play a central role in chemical carcinogenesis. The analysis of formation and repair of smoking-related DNA adducts remains particularly challenging as both smokers and nonsmokers exposed to smoke are repetitively under attack from complex mixtures of carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and N-nitrosamines. The bulky DNA adducts, which usually have complex structure, are particularly important because of their biological relevance. Several known cellular DNA repair pathways have been known to operate in human cells on specific types of bulky DNA adducts, for example, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and direct reversal involving O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase or AlkB homologs. Understanding the mechanisms of adduct formation and repair processes is critical for the assessment of cancer risk resulting from exposure to cigarette smoke, and ultimately for developing strategies of cancer prevention. This paper highlights the recent progress made in the areas concerning formation and repair of bulky DNA adducts in the context of tobacco carcinogen-associated genotoxic and carcinogenic effects. PMID:21234336

  7. XRCC1 phosphorylation by CK2 is required for its stability and efficient DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Jason L; Dianova, Irina I; Finch, David; Tait, Phillip S; Ström, Cecilia E; Helleday, Thomas; Dianov, Grigory L

    2010-07-01

    XRCC1 is a scaffold protein that interacts with several DNA repair proteins and plays a critical role in DNA base excision repair (BER). XRCC1 protein is in a tight complex with DNA ligase IIIalpha (Lig III) and this complex is involved in the ligation step of both BER and repair of DNA single strand breaks. The majority of XRCC1 has previously been demonstrated to exist in a phosphorylated form and cells containing mutant XRCC1, that is unable to be phosphorylated, display a reduced rate of single strand break repair. Here, in an unbiased assay, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic form of the casein kinase 2 (CK2) protein is the major protein kinase activity involved in phosphorylation of XRCC1 in human cell extracts and that XRCC1 phosphorylation is required for XRCC1-Lig III complex stability. We demonstrate that XRCC1-Lig III complex containing mutant XRCC1, in which CK2 phosphorylation sites have been mutated, is unstable. We also find that a knockdown of CK2 by siRNA results in both reduced XRCC1 phosphorylation and stability, which also leads to a reduced amount of Lig III and accumulation of DNA strand breaks. We therefore propose that CK2 plays an important role in DNA repair by contributing to the stability of XRCC1-Lig III complex. PMID:20471329

  8. Repair of Sparfloxacin-Induced Photochemical DNA Damage In Vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie Struwe; Karl-Otto Greulich; Elias Perentes; Hans-Jörg Martus; Willi Suter; Ulla Plappert-Helbig

    2009-01-01

    The induction and subsequent repair of photochemically induced DNA damage by sparfloxacin was assessed in different tissues of juvenile Wistar rats. The animals were treated once orally with 500 mg kg?1 of sparfloxacin and irradiated 3 hours later with 7 J cm?2 UVA. Induction and repair of DNA damage was studied in the skin, retina and cornea using the alkaline

  9. Alkyltransferase-like proteins: Molecular switches between DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tubbs, Julie L.; Tainer, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) play a role in the protection of cells from the biological effects of DNA alkylation damage. Although ATLs share functional motifs with the DNA repair protein and cancer chemotherapy target O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase, they lack the reactive cysteine residue required for alkyltransferase activity, so its mechanism for cell protection was previously unknown. Here, we review recent advances in unravelling the enigmatic cellular protection provided by ATLs against the deleterious effects of DNA alkylation damage. We discuss exciting new evidence that ATLs aid in the repair of DNA O6-alkylguanine lesions through a novel repair cross-talk between DNA-alkylation base damage responses and the DNA nucleotide excision repair pathway. PMID:20502938

  10. Brca1 Controls Homology-Directed DNA Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Ellen Moynahan; Joanne W Chiu; Beverly H Koller; Maria Jasin

    1999-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 confer a high risk of breast and ovarian tumors. The role of BRCA1 in tumor suppression is not yet understood, but both transcription and repair functions have been ascribed. Evidence that BRCA1 is involved in DNA repair stems from its association with RAD51, a homolog of the yeast protein involved in the repair of DNA double-strand

  11. Repair of DNA in xeroderma pigmentosum conjunctiva. [UV radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Newsome; K. H. Kraemer; J. H. Robbins

    1975-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease with tumor formation on sun-exposed areas of the skin and eyes. Cells from most XP patients are deficient in repairing DNA damaged by ultraviolet (uv) light as shown by a reduced rate of tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) incorporation during their DNA repair synthesis. We have studied such repair synthesis in conjunctival cells from

  12. Supramolecular Complexes of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, G.; Scherman, D.

    Deoxyribose nucleic acid or DNA is a linear polymer in the form of a double strand, synthesised by sequential polymerisation of a large number of units chosen from among the nucleic bases called purines (adenosine A and guanosine G) and pyrimidines (cytosine C and thymidine T). DNA contains all the genetic information required for life. It exists in the form of a limited number (a few dozen) of very big molecules, called chromosomes. This genetic information is first of all transcribed. In this process, a restricted fragment of the DNA called a gene is copied in the form of ribonucleic acid, or RNA. This RNA is itself a polymer, but with a single strand in which the sequence of nucleic acids is schematically analogous to the sequence on one of the two strands of the transcribed DNA. Finally, this RNA is translated into a protein, yet another linear polymer. The proteins make up the main part of the active constituents ensuring the survival of the cell. Any loss of information, either by mutation or by deletion of the DNA, will cause an imbalance in the cell's metabolism that may in turn lead to incurable pathologies. Several strategies have been developed to reduce the consequences of such genetic deficiencies or, more generally, to act, by amplifying or suppressing them, on the mechanisms leading from the reading of the genetic information to the production of proteins: Strategies aiming to introduce synthetic DNA or RNA, which selectively block the expression of certain genes, are now being studied by an increasing number of research scientists and pharmacologists. They use antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides or interfering oligoribonucleotides and they already have clinical applications. This kind of therapy is often called gene pharmacology. Other, more ambitious strategies aim to repair in situ mutated or incomplete DNA within the chromosomes themselves, by introducing short sequences of DNA or RNA which recognise and take the place of mutations. This is the underlying principle of genetic correction. Yet other strategies aim to reintroduce the deficient DNA fragments into the cells in the form of genes. Indeed, in certain diseases, the only solution is to bring genetic information back into the cells by transferring exogeneous DNA into the cell nucleus. This approach goes by the name of gene therapy.

  13. Role of DNA repair in host immune response and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Fabrícia Lima; Pinheiro, Daniele Maria Lopes; Oliveira, Ana Helena Sales de; Oliveira, Rayssa Karla de Medeiros; Lajus, Tirzah Braz Petta; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the understanding of how DNA repair contributes to the development of innate and acquired immunity has emerged. The DNA damage incurred during the inflammatory response triggers the activation of DNA repair pathways, which are required for host-cell survival. Here, we reviewed current understanding of the mechanism by which DNA repair contributes to protection against the oxidized DNA damage generated during infectious and inflammatory diseases and its involvement in innate and adaptive immunity. We discussed the functional role of DNA repair enzymes in the immune activation and the relevance of these processes to: transcriptional regulation of cytokines and other genes involved in the inflammatory response; V(D)J recombination; class-switch recombination (CSR); and somatic hypermutation (SHM). These three last processes of DNA damage repair are required for effective humoral adaptive immunity, creating genetic diversity in developing T and B cells. Furthermore, viral replication is also dependent on host DNA repair mechanisms. Therefore, the elucidation of the pathways of DNA damage and its repair that activate innate and adaptive immunity will be important for a better understanding of the immune and inflammatory disorders and developing new therapeutic interventions for treatment of these diseases and for improving their outcome. PMID:25795123

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA repair proteins following laser microbeam induced DNA damage – When is a DSB not a DSB??

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Pamela; Botchway, Stanley W.; Parker, Anthony W.; O’Neill, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The formation of DNA lesions poses a constant threat to cellular stability. Repair of endogenously and exogenously produced lesions has therefore been extensively studied, although the spatiotemporal dynamics of the repair processes has yet to be fully understood. One of the most recent advances to study the kinetics of DNA repair has been the development of laser microbeams to induce and visualize recruitment and loss of repair proteins to base damage in live mammalian cells. However, a number of studies have produced contradictory results that are likely caused by the different laser systems used reflecting in part the wavelength dependence of the damage induced. Additionally, the repair kinetics of laser microbeam induced DNA lesions have generally lacked consideration of the structural and chemical complexity of the DNA damage sites, which are known to greatly influence their reparability. In this review, we highlight the key considerations when embarking on laser microbeam experiments and interpreting the real time data from laser microbeam irradiations. We compare the repair kinetics from live cell imaging with biochemical and direct quantitative cellular measurements for DNA repair. PMID:23688615

  15. DNA repair and the evolution of transformation in Bacillus subtilis. II. Role of inducible repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wojciechowski, M.F.; Hoelzer, M.A.; Michod, R.E.

    1989-03-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, DNA repair and recombination are intimately associated with competence, the physiological state in which the bacterium can bind, take up and recombine exogenous DNA. Previously, we have shown that the homologous DNA transformation rate (ratio of transformants to total cells) increases with increasing UV dosage if cells are transformed after exposure to UV radiation (UV-DNA), whereas the transformation rate decreases if cells are transformed before exposure to UV (DNA-UV). In this report, by using different DNA repair-deficient mutants, we show that the greater increase in transformation rate in UV-DNA experiments than in DNA-UV experiments does not depend upon excision repair or inducible SOS-like repair, although certain quantitative aspects of the response do depend upon these repair systems. We also show that there is no increase in the transformation rate in a UV-DNA experiment when repair and recombination proficient cells are transformed with nonhomologous plasmid DNA, although the results in a DNA-UV experiment are essentially unchanged by using plasmid DNA. We have used din operon fusions as a sensitive means of assaying for the expression of genes under the control of the SOS-like regulon in both competent and noncompetent cell subpopulations as a consequence of competence development and our subsequent experimental treatments. Results indicate that the SOS-like system is induced in both competent and noncompetent subpopulations in our treatments and so should not be a major factor in the differential response in transformation rate observed in UV-DNA and DNA-UV treatments. These results provide further support to the hypothesis that the evolutionary function of competence is to bring DNA into the cell for use as template in the repair of DNA damage.

  16. Structural Insights Into DNA Repair by RNase T—An Exonuclease Processing 3? End of Structured DNA in Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Fang, Woei-Horng; Lee, Chia-Chia; Chen, Yi-Ping; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are essential for preservation of genome integrity. However, it is not clear how DNA are selected and processed at broken ends by exonucleases during repair pathways. Here we show that the DnaQ-like exonuclease RNase T is critical for Escherichia coli resistance to various DNA-damaging agents and UV radiation. RNase T specifically trims the 3? end of structured DNA, including bulge, bubble, and Y-structured DNA, and it can work with Endonuclease V to restore the deaminated base in an inosine-containing heteroduplex DNA. Crystal structure analyses further reveal how RNase T recognizes the bulge DNA by inserting a phenylalanine into the bulge, and as a result the 3? end of blunt-end bulge DNA can be digested by RNase T. In contrast, the homodimeric RNase T interacts with the Y-structured DNA by a different binding mode via a single protomer so that the 3? overhang of the Y-structured DNA can be trimmed closely to the duplex region. Our data suggest that RNase T likely processes bulge and bubble DNA in the Endonuclease V–dependent DNA repair, whereas it processes Y-structured DNA in UV-induced and various other DNA repair pathways. This study thus provides mechanistic insights for RNase T and thousands of DnaQ-like exonucleases in DNA 3?-end processing. PMID:24594808

  17. Chronodisruption, cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shlomo, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    Chronodisruption, a disturbance in "natural" daily light/dark regulation, is possibly linked to disturbances in cell cycle homeostasis. The association and the synchronization between circadian rhythms and mitosis are not yet clear. The circadian oscillator is involved in the major cellular pathways of cell division. A molecular link between the circadian clock and the mammalian DNA damage checkpoints has been outlined. Analyses suggest an association between light disruption and obstruction of the cell cycle homeostasis. Disruption in the homeostatic control of the cell cycle has been associated with cancer and acceleration of malignant growth, possibly as a result of the interruption of DNA damage check-points. Studies further indicate that light signal during the dark phase affects the transcription level of a substantial number of genes that are associated with cell cycle progression, cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Indeed, the International Agency for Research in Cancer categorized "shift work that involves circadian disruption" as possibly carcinogenic. In this review the current finding on light pollution and its potential influence on cell cycle check-points and DNA repair is presented. PMID:24851401

  18. Mammalian SWI\\/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are required to prevent apoptosis after DNA damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ji-Hye Park; Eun-Jung Park; Shin-Kyoung Hur; Sungsu Kim; Jongbum Kwon

    2009-01-01

    Although SWI\\/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes play important roles in transcription, recent studies suggest that they also participate directly in DNA repair. In yeast, SWI\\/SNF and related RSC complexes have been shown to be recruited to the sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to facilitate DNA repair. We recently have shown that mammalian SWI\\/SNF complexes contribute to DBS repair by

  19. A cell cycle-regulated Slx4–Dpb11 complex promotes the resolution of DNA repair intermediates linked to stalled replication

    PubMed Central

    Gritenaite, Dalia; Princz, Lissa N.; Szakal, Barnabas; Bantele, Susanne C.S.; Wendeler, Lina; Schilbach, Sandra; Habermann, Bianca H.; Matos, Joao; Lisby, Michael; Branzei, Dana; Pfander, Boris

    2014-01-01

    A key function of the cellular DNA damage response is to facilitate the bypass of replication fork-stalling DNA lesions. Template switch reactions allow such a bypass and involve the formation of DNA joint molecules (JMs) between sister chromatids. These JMs need to be resolved before cell division; however, the regulation of this process is only poorly understood. Here, we identify a regulatory mechanism in yeast that critically controls JM resolution by the Mus81–Mms4 endonuclease. Central to this regulation is a conserved complex comprising the scaffold proteins Dpb11 and Slx4 that is under stringent control. Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of Slx4 by Cdk1 promotes the Dpb11–Slx4 interaction, while in mitosis, phosphorylation of Mms4 by Polo-like kinase Cdc5 promotes the additional association of Mus81–Mms4 with the complex, thereby promoting JM resolution. Finally, the DNA damage checkpoint counteracts Mus81–Mms4 binding to the Dpb11–Slx4 complex. Thus, Dpb11–Slx4 integrates several cellular inputs and participates in the temporal program for activation of the JM-resolving nuclease Mus81. PMID:25030699

  20. Lesion-specific DNA-binding and repair activities of human O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Melikishvili, Manana; Fried, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Binding experiments with alkyl-transfer-active and -inactive mutants of human O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) show that it forms an O6-methylguanine (6mG)-specific complex on duplex DNA that is distinct from non-specific assemblies previously studied. Specific complexes with duplex DNA have a 2:1 stoichiometry that is formed without accumulation of a 1:1 intermediate. This establishes a role for cooperative interactions in lesion binding. Similar specific complexes could not be detected with single-stranded DNA. The small difference between specific and non-specific binding affinities strongly limits the roles that specific binding can play in the lesion search process. Alkyl-transfer kinetics with a single-stranded substrate indicate that two or more AGT monomers participate in the rate-limiting step, showing for the first time a functional link between cooperative binding and the repair reaction. Alkyl-transfer kinetics with a duplex substrate suggest that two pathways contribute to the formation of the specific 6mG-complex; one at least first order in AGT, we interpret as direct lesion binding. The second, independent of [AGT], is likely to include AGT transfer from distal sites to the lesion in a relatively slow unimolecular step. We propose that transfer between distal and lesion sites is a critical step in the repair process. PMID:22810209

  1. DNA repair in cancer: emerging targets for personalized therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abbotts, Rachel; Thompson, Nicola; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is under constant threat from endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair machinery to process DNA damage and maintain genomic integrity. Impaired DNA repair is a major driver for carcinogenesis and could promote aggressive cancer biology. Interestingly, in established tumors, DNA repair activity is required to counteract oxidative DNA damage that is prevalent in the tumor microenvironment. Emerging clinical data provide compelling evidence that overexpression of DNA repair factors may have prognostic and predictive significance in patients. More recently, DNA repair inhibition has emerged as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Synthetic lethality exploits intergene relationships where the loss of function of either of two related genes is nonlethal, but loss of both causes cell death. Exploiting this approach by targeting DNA repair has emerged as a promising strategy for personalized cancer therapy. In the current review, we focus on recent advances with a particular focus on synthetic lethality targeting in cancer. PMID:24600246

  2. Mitochondrial DNA repair and association with aging - an update

    PubMed Central

    Gredilla, Ricardo; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is constantly exposed to oxidative injury. Due to its location close to the main site of reactive oxygen species, the inner mitochondrial membrane, mtDNA is more susceptible than nuclear DNA to oxidative damage. The accumulation of DNA damage is thought to play a critical role in the aging process and to be particularly deleterious in post-mitotic cells. Thus, DNA repair is an important mechanism for maintenance of genomic integrity. Despite the importance of mitochondria in the aging process, it was thought for many years that mitochondria lacked an enzymatic DNA repair system comparable to that in the nuclear compartment. However, it is now well established that DNA repair actively takes place in mitochondria. Oxidative DNA damage processing, base excision repair mechanisms were the first to be described in these organelles, and consequently the best understood. However, new proteins and novel DNA repair pathways, thought to be exclusively present in the nucleus, have recently been described also to be present in mitochondria. Here we review the main mitochondrial DNA repair pathways and their association with the aging process. PMID:20096766

  3. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  4. DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2006-04-01

    You probably weren't thinking about your body's cellular DNA repair systems the last time you sat on the beach in the bright sunshine. Fortunately, however, while you were subjecting your DNA to the harmful effects of ultraviolet light, your cells were busy repairing the damage. The idea that our genetic material could be damaged by the sun was not appreciated in the early days of molecular biology. When Watson and Crick discovered the structure of DNA in 1953 [1], it was assumed that DNA is fundamentally stable since it carries the blueprint of life. However, over 50 years of research have revealed that our DNA is under constant assault by sunlight, oxygen, radiation, various chemicals, and even our own cellular processes. Cleverly, evolution has provided our cells with a diverse set of tools to repair the damage that Mother Nature causes. DNA repair processes restore the normal nucleotide sequence and DNA structure of the genome after damage [2]. These responses are highly varied and exquisitely regulated. DNA repair mechanisms are traditionally characterized by the type of damage repaired. A large variety of chemical modifications can alter normal DNA bases and either lead to mutations or block transcription if not repaired, and three distinct pathways exist to remove base damage. Base excision repair (BER) corrects DNA base alterations that do not distort the overall structure of the DNA helix such as bases damaged by oxidation resulting from normal cellular metabolism. While BER removes single damaged bases, nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes short segments of nucleotides (called oligonucleotides) containing damaged bases. NER responds to any alteration that distorts the DNA helix and is the mechanism responsible for repairing bulky base damage caused by carcinogenic chemicals such as benzo [a]pyrene (found in cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust) as well as covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine bases resulting from the ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight. NER can be divided into two classes based on where the repair occurs. NER occurring in DNA that is not undergoing transcription (i.e., most of the genome) is called global genome repair (GGR or GGNER), while NER taking place in the transcribed strand of active genes is called transcription-coupled repair (TCR or TC-NER). We will explore NER in more detail below. Mismatch repair (MMR) is another type of excision repair that specifically removes mispaired bases resulting from replication errors. DNA damage can also result in breaks in the DNA backbone, in one or both strands. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) are efficiently repaired by a mechanism that shares common features with the later steps in BER. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially devastating since by definition there is no intact complementary strand to serve as a template for repair, and even one unrepaired DSB can be lethal [3]. In cells that have replicated their DNA prior to cell division, the missing information can be supplied by the duplicate copy, or sister chromatid, and DSBs in these cells are faithfully repaired by homologous recombination involving the exchange of strands of DNA between the two copies. However, most cells in the body are non-dividing, and in these cells the major mechanism for repairing DSBs is by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which as the name implies involves joining two broken DNA ends together without a requirement for homologous sequence and which therefore has a high potential for loss of genetic information.

  5. Is Thymidine Glycol Containing DNA a Substrate of E. coli DNA Mismatch Repair System?

    PubMed Central

    Perevozchikova, Svetlana A.; Trikin, Roman M.; Heinze, Roger J.; Romanova, Elena A.; Oretskaya, Tatiana S.; Friedhoff, Peter; Kubareva, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a crucial role in the prevention of replication errors and in the correction of some oxidative damages of DNA bases. In the present work the most abundant oxidized pyrimidine lesion, 5,6-dihydro-5,6-dihydroxythymidine (thymidine glycol, Tg) was tested for being recognized and processed by the E. coli MMR system, namely complex of MutS, MutL and MutH proteins. In a partially reconstituted MMR system with MutS-MutL-MutH proteins, G/Tg and A/Tg containing plasmids failed to provoke the incision of DNA. Tg residue in the 30-mer DNA duplex destabilized double helix due to stacking disruption with neighboring bases. However, such local structural changes are not important for E. coli MMR system to recognize this lesion. A lack of repair of Tg containing DNA could be due to a failure of MutS (a first acting protein of MMR system) to interact with modified DNA in a proper way. It was shown that Tg in DNA does not affect on ATPase activity of MutS. On the other hand, MutS binding affinities to DNA containing Tg in G/Tg and A/Tg pairs are lower than to DNA with a G/T mismatch and similar to canonical DNA. Peculiarities of MutS interaction with DNA was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence anisotropy. Binding of MutS to Tg containing DNAs did not result in the formation of characteristic DNA kink. Nevertheless, MutS homodimer orientation on Tg-DNA is similar to that in the case of G/T-DNA. In contrast to G/T-DNA, neither G/Tg- nor A/Tg-DNA was able to stimulate ADP release from MutS better than canonical DNA. Thus, Tg residue in DNA is unlikely to be recognized or processed by the E. coli MMR system. Probably, the MutS transformation to active “sliding clamp” conformation on Tg-DNA is problematic. PMID:25133614

  6. Nuclear GIT2 is an ATM substrate and promotes DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Lu, Daoyuan; Cai, Huan; Park, Sung-Soo; Siddiqui, Sana; Premont, Richard T; Schmalzigaug, Robert; Paramasivam, Manikandan; Seidman, Michael; Bodogai, Ionoa; Biragyn, Arya; Daimon, Caitlin M; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Insults to nuclear DNA induce multiple response pathways to mitigate the deleterious effects of damage and mediate effective DNA repair. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein 2 (GIT2) regulates receptor internalization, focal adhesion dynamics, cell migration, and responses to oxidative stress. Here we demonstrate that GIT2 coordinates the levels of proteins in the DNA damage response (DDR). Cellular sensitivity to irradiation-induced DNA damage was highly associated with GIT2 expression levels. GIT2 is phosphorylated by ATM kinase and forms complexes with multiple DDR-associated factors in response to DNA damage. The targeting of GIT2 to DNA double-strand breaks was rapid and, in part, dependent upon the presence of H2AX, ATM, and MRE11 but was independent of MDC1 and RNF8. GIT2 likely promotes DNA repair through multiple mechanisms, including stabilization of BRCA1 in repair complexes; upregulation of repair proteins, including HMGN1 and RFC1; and regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. Furthermore, GIT2-knockout mice demonstrated a greater susceptibility to DNA damage than their wild-type littermates. These results suggest that GIT2 plays an important role in MRE11/ATM/H2AX-mediated DNA damage responses. PMID:25605334

  7. Transcription bypass of DNA lesions enhances cell survival but attenuates transcription coupled DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Selvam, Kathiresan; Ko, Tengyu; Li, Shisheng

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) dedicated to rapid removal of DNA lesions in the transcribed strand of actively transcribed genes. The precise nature of the TCR signal and how the repair machinery gains access to lesions imbedded in stalled RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) complexes in eukaryotic cells are still enigmatic. RNAP II has an intrinsic capacity for transcription bypass of DNA lesions by incorporation or misincorporation of nucleotides across the lesions. It has been suggested that transcription bypass of lesions, which exposes the lesions, may be required for TCR. Here, we show that E1103G mutation of Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNAP II, which promotes transcription bypass of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), increases survival of UV irradiated yeast cells but attenuates TCR. The increased cell survival is independent of any NER subpathways. In contrast, G730D mutation of Rpb1, which impairs transcription bypass of CPDs, enhances TCR. Our results suggest that transcription bypass of lesions attenuates TCR but enhances cell tolerance to DNA lesions. Efficient stalling of RNAP II is essential for efficient TCR. PMID:25389266

  8. Radiation-Induced Survivin Nuclear Accumulation is Linked to DNA Damage Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Gianni [Departments of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt/Main, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Dittmann, Klaus [Division of Radiobiology and Molecular Environmental Research, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Weiss, Christian; Reichert, Sebastian [Departments of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt/Main, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Hausmann, Eva [Division of Radiobiology and Molecular Environmental Research, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Roedel, Claus [Departments of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt/Main, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Roedel, Franz, E-mail: franz.roedel@kgu.d [Departments of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt/Main, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Increased expression of survivin has been identified as a negative prognostic marker in a variety of human cancers. We have previously shown that survivin is a radiation-resistance factor and that the therapeutic effect of survivin knock-down might result from an impaired DNA repair capacity. In this study, we aimed to elucidate an interrelationship between survivin's cellular localization and DNA double-strand break repair. Methods and Materials: Survivin's cellular distribution and nuclear complex formation were assayed by Western blotting of subcellular fractions, by immunofluorescence staining, and co-immunoprecipitation in SW480 colorectal cancer cells. DNA repair capacity was analyzed by kinetics of gamma-H2AX foci formation, and by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) assays in the presence of survivin-specific or nonspecific control siRNA. Results: Following irradiation, we observed a rapid nuclear accumulation of survivin and subsequent phosphorylation of the protein in the nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses from nuclear extracts revealed an interaction among survivin, Ku70, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, and DNA-PKcs that was confirmed by immunofluorescence co-localization in nuclear foci. Survivin knock down by siRNA resulted in an impaired DNA double strand break repair, as demonstrated by an increased detection of gamma-H2AX foci/nucleus at 60 min and a higher amount of residual gamma-H2AX foci at 24 hr postirradiation. Furthermore, we detected in survivin-depleted cells a hampered S2056 autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs and a significantly decreased DNA-PKcs kinase activity. Conclusion: These data indicate that nuclear survivin is linked to DNA double-strand break repair by interaction with members of the DNA double-strand breaks repair machinery, thus regulating DNA-PKcs activity.

  9. Chromatin modifications and DNA repair: beyond double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    House, Nealia C. M.; Koch, Melissa R.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair must take place in the context of chromatin, and chromatin modifications and DNA repair are intimately linked. The study of double-strand break repair has revealed numerous histone modifications that occur after induction of a DSB, and modification of the repair factors themselves can also occur. In some cases the function of the modification is at least partially understood, but in many cases it is not yet clear. Although DSB repair is a crucial activity for cell survival, DSBs account for only a small percentage of the DNA lesions that occur over the lifetime of a cell. Repair of single-strand gaps, nicks, stalled forks, alternative DNA structures, and base lesions must also occur in a chromatin context. There is increasing evidence that these repair pathways are also regulated by histone modifications and chromatin remodeling. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of chromatin modifications that occur during non-DSB repair, highlighting similarities and differences to DSB repair as well as remaining questions. PMID:25250043

  10. Fanconi Anemia: A Signal Transduction and DNA Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a fascinating, rare genetic disorder marked by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Research in recent years has led to the elucidation of FA as a DNA repair disorder and involved multiple pathways as well as having wide applicability to common cancers, including breast, ovarian, and head and neck. This review will describe the clinical aspects of FA as well as the current state of its molecular pathophysiology. In particular, work from the Kupfer laboratory will be described that demonstrates how the FA pathway interacts with multiple DNA repair pathways, including the mismatch repair system and signal transduction pathway of the DNA damage response. PMID:24348213

  11. The molecular origin of high DNA-repair efficiency by photolyase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Zhong, Dongping

    2015-01-01

    The primary dynamics in photomachinery such as charge separation in photosynthesis and bond isomerization in sensory photoreceptor are typically ultrafast to accelerate functional dynamics and avoid energy dissipation. The same is also true for the DNA repair enzyme, photolyase. However, it is not known how the photoinduced step is optimized in photolyase to attain maximum efficiency. Here, we analyse the primary reaction steps of repair of ultraviolet-damaged DNA by photolyase using femtosecond spectroscopy. With systematic mutations of the amino acids involved in binding of the flavin cofactor and the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer substrate, we report our direct deconvolution of the catalytic dynamics with three electron-transfer and two bond-breaking elementary steps and thus the fine tuning of the biological repair function for optimal efficiency. We found that the maximum repair efficiency is not enhanced by the ultrafast photoinduced process but achieved by the synergistic optimization of all steps in the complex repair reaction. PMID:26065359

  12. Methods to alter levels of a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-10-17

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  13. Mutation Research 509 (2002) 127151 Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    E-print Network

    Santos, Janine H.

    2002-01-01

    Mutation Research 509 (2002) 127­151 Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging Bhaskar S. Mandavilli an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA

  14. Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 is a keystone complex connecting DNA repair machinery, double-strand break signaling, and the chromatin template.

    PubMed

    Williams, R Scott; Williams, Jessica S; Tainer, John A

    2007-08-01

    The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is providing paradigm-shifting results of exceptional biomedical interest. MRN is among the earliest respondents to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and MRN mutations cause the human cancer predisposition diseases Nijmegen breakage syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder (ATLD). MRN's 3-protein multidomain composition promotes its central architectural, structural, enzymatic, sensing, and signaling functions in DSB responses. To organize the MRN complex, the Mre11 exonuclease directly binds Nbs1, DNA, and Rad50. Rad50, a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) related protein, employs its ATP-binding cassette (ABC) ATPase, Zn hook, and coiled coils to bridge DSBs and facilitate DNA end processing by Mre11. Contributing to MRN regulatory roles, Nbs1 harbors N-terminal phosphopeptide interacting FHA and BRCT domains, as well as C-terminal ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and Mre11 interaction domains. Current emerging structural and biological evidence suggests that MRN has 3 coupled critical roles in DSB sensing, stabilization, signaling, and effector scaffolding: (1) expeditious establishment of protein--nucleic acid tethering scaffolds for the recognition and stabilization of DSBs; (2) initiation of DSB sensing, cell-cycle checkpoint signaling cascades, and establishment of epigenetic marks via the ATM kinase; and (3) functional regulation of chromatin remodeling in the vicinity of a DSB. PMID:17713585

  15. Functional characterization of excision repair and RecA-dependent recombinational DNA repair in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Gaasbeek, Esther J; van der Wal, Fimme J; van Putten, Jos P M; de Boer, Paulo; van der Graaf-van Bloois, Linda; de Boer, Albert G; Vermaning, Bart J; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2009-06-01

    The presence and functionality of DNA repair mechanisms in Campylobacter jejuni are largely unknown. In silico analysis of the complete translated genome of C. jejuni NCTC 11168 suggests the presence of genes involved in methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR), nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair (BER), and recombinational repair. To assess the functionality of these putative repair mechanisms in C. jejuni, mutS, uvrB, ung, and recA knockout mutants were constructed and analyzed for their ability to repair spontaneous point mutations, UV irradiation-induced DNA damage, and nicked DNA. Inactivation of the different putative DNA repair genes did not alter the spontaneous mutation frequency. Disruption of the UvrB and RecA orthologues, but not the putative MutS or Ung proteins, resulted in a significant reduction in viability after exposure to UV irradiation. Assays performed with uracil-containing plasmid DNA showed that the putative uracil-DNA glycosylase (Ung) protein, important for initiation of the BER pathway, is also functional in C. jejuni. Inactivation of recA also resulted in a loss of natural transformation. Overall, the data indicate that C. jejuni has multiple functional DNA repair systems that may protect against DNA damage and limit the generation of genetic diversity. On the other hand, the apparent absence of a functional MMR pathway may enhance the frequency of on-and-off switching of phase variable genes typical for C. jejuni and may contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of the C. jejuni population. PMID:19376866

  16. The role of DNA repair in brain related disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Misiak, Magdalena; Ferarelli, Leslie K.; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is implicated in brain aging, neurodegeneration and neurological diseases. Damage can be created by normal cellular metabolism, which accumulates with age, or by acute cellular stress conditions which create bursts of oxidative damage. Brain cells have a particularly high basal level of metabolic activity and use distinct oxidative damage repair mechanisms to remove oxidative damage from DNA and dNTP pools. Accumulation of this damage in the background of a functional DNA repair response is associated with normal aging, but defective repair in brain cells can contribute to neurological dysfunction. Emerging research strongly associates three common neurodegenerative conditions, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and stroke, with defects in the ability to repair chronic or acute oxidative damage in neurons. This review explores the current knowledge of the role of oxidative damage repair in preserving brain function and highlights the emerging models and methods being used to advance our knowledge of the pathology of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:23721970

  17. Smc5–Smc6 mediate DNA double-strand-break repair by promoting sister-chromatid recombination

    PubMed Central

    De Piccoli, Giacomo; Cortes-Ledesma, Felipe; Ira, Gregory; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Uhle, Stefan; Farmer, Sarah; Hwang, Ji-Young; Machin, Felix; Ceschia, Audrey; McAleenan, Alexandra; Cordon-Preciado, Violeta; Clemente-Blanco, Andrés; Vilella-Mitjana, Felip; Ullal, Pranav; Jarmuz, Adam; Leitao, Beatriz; Bressan, Debra; Dotiwala, Farokh; Papusha, Alma; Zhao, Xiaolan; Myung, Kyungjae; Haber, James E.; Aguilera, Andrés; Aragón, Luis

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can arise during DNA replication, or after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, and their correct repair is fundamental for cell survival and genomic stability. Here, we show that the Smc5–Smc6 complex is recruited to DSBs de novo to support their repair by homologous recombination between sister chromatids. In addition, we demonstrate that Smc5–Smc6 is necessary to suppress gross chromosomal rearrangements. Our findings show that the Smc5–Smc6 complex is essential for genome stability as it promotes repair of DSBs by error-free sister-chromatid recombination (SCR), thereby suppressing inappropriate non-sister recombination events. PMID:16892052

  18. Molecular regulation of UV-induced DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Shah, Palak; He, Yu-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight is a major etiologic factor for skin cancer, the most prevalent cancer in the United States, as well as premature skin aging. In particular, UVB radiation causes formation of specific DNA damage photoproducts between pyrimidine bases. These DNA damage photoproducts are repaired by a process called nucleotide excision repair, also known as UV-induced DNA repair. When left unrepaired, UVB-induced DNA damage leads to accumulation of mutations, predisposing people to carcinogenesis as well as to premature aging. Genetic loss of nucleotide excision repair leads to severe disorders, namely, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), trichothiodystrophy (TTD) and Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are associated with predisposition to skin carcinogenesis at a young age as well as developmental and neurological conditions. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair is an attractive avenue to preventing or reversing these detrimental consequences of impaired nucleotide excision repair. Here, we review recent studies on molecular mechanisms regulating nucleotide excision repair by extracellular cues and intracellular signaling pathways, with a special focus on the molecular regulation of individual repair factors. PMID:25534312

  19. Repair of complex parastomal hernias.

    PubMed

    Hwang, G S; Hanna, M H; Carmichael, J C; Mills, S D; Pigazzi, A; Stamos, M J

    2015-03-01

    Development of parastomal hernias (PH) is very common after stoma formation and carries a risk of subsequent bowel incarceration, obstruction and strangulation. The management of PH remains a challenge for the colorectal surgeon, and there are currently no standardized guidelines for the treatment of PH. Even more difficult is the management of complex parastomal hernias (CPH). We conducted a review of the literature to identify recent developments in the treatment of CPH, including analysis of the use of synthetic and biologic mesh prostheses, method of mesh placement and surgical approach. PMID:25732736

  20. Modeling Damage Complexity-Dependent Non-Homologous End-Joining Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfeng; Reynolds, Pamela; O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several repair proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, and XRCC4. It has been experimentally shown that the choice of NHEJ proteins is determined by the complexity of DSB. In this paper, we built a mathematical model, based on published data, to study how NHEJ depends on the damage complexity. Under an appropriate set of parameters obtained by minimization technique, we can simulate the kinetics of foci track formation in fluorescently tagged mammalian cells, Ku80-EGFP and DNA-PKcs-YFP for simple and complex DSB repair, respectively, in good agreement with the published experimental data, supporting the notion that simple DSB undergo fast repair in a Ku-dependent, DNA-PKcs-independent manner, while complex DSB repair requires additional DNA-PKcs for end processing, resulting in its slow repair, additionally resulting in slower release rate of Ku and the joining rate of complex DNA ends. Based on the numerous experimental descriptions, we investigated several models to describe the kinetics for complex DSB repair. An important prediction of our model is that the rejoining of complex DSBs is through a process of synapsis formation, similar to a second order reaction between ends, rather than first order break filling/joining. The synapsis formation (SF) model allows for diffusion of ends before the synapsis formation, which is precluded in the first order model by the rapid coupling of ends. Therefore, the SF model also predicts the higher number of chromosomal aberrations observed with high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation due to the higher proportion of complex DSBs compared to low LET radiation, and an increased probability of misrejoin following diffusion before the synapsis is formed, while the first order model does not provide a mechanism for the increased effectiveness in chromosomal aberrations observed. PMID:24520318

  1. Heat Shock Protein 90? (Hsp90?) Is Phosphorylated in Response to DNA Damage and Accumulates in Repair Foci*

    PubMed Central

    Quanz, Maria; Herbette, Aurélie; Sayarath, Mano; de Koning, Leanne; Dubois, Thierry; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Dutreix, Marie

    2012-01-01

    DNA damage triggers a complex signaling cascade involving a multitude of phosphorylation events. We found that the threonine 7 (Thr-7) residue of heat shock protein 90? (Hsp90?) was phosphorylated immediately after DNA damage. The phosphorylated Hsp90? then accumulated at sites of DNA double strand breaks and formed repair foci with slow kinetics, matching the repair kinetics of complex DNA damage. The phosphorylation of Hsp90? was dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinases, including the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in particular. DNA-PK plays an essential role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining and in the signaling of DNA damage. It is also present in the cytoplasm of the cell and has been suggested to play a role in cytoplasmic signaling pathways. Using stabilized double-stranded DNA molecules to activate DNA-PK, we showed that an active DNA-PK complex could be assembled in the cytoplasm, resulting in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic pool of Hsp90?. In vivo, reverse phase protein array data for tumors revealed that basal levels of Thr-7-phosphorylated Hsp90? were correlated with phosphorylated histone H2AX levels. The Thr-7 phosphorylation of the ubiquitously produced and secreted Hsp90? may therefore serve as a surrogate biomarker of DNA damage. These findings shed light on the interplay between central DNA repair enzymes and an essential molecular chaperone. PMID:22270370

  2. Role of nicotinamide in DNA damage, mutagenesis, and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinamide is a water-soluble amide form of niacin (nicotinic acid or vitamin B3). Both niacin and nicotinamide are widely available in plant and animal foods, and niacin can also be endogenously synthesized in the liver from dietary tryptophan. Nicotinamide is also commercially available in vitamin supplements and in a range of cosmetic, hair, and skin preparations. Nicotinamide is the primary precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in ATP production and the sole substrate of the nuclear enzyme poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that PARP-1 and NAD(+) status influence cellular responses to genotoxicity which can lead to mutagenesis and cancer formation. This paper will examine the role of nicotinamide in the protection from carcinogenesis, DNA repair, and maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:20725615

  3. Induced DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, R.

    1985-01-01

    The survival of cultured rat kangaroo cells (PtK-2) and human xeroderma pigmentosum cells incubated with 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide subsequent to ultraviolet irradiation is lower than that of cells incubated without cycloheximide. The drop in survival is considerably larger than that produced by incubation of unirradiated cells with cycloheximide. The phenomenon was also observed when PtK-2 cells were incubated with emetine, another protein synthesis inhibitor, or with 5,6-dichloro-1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a RNA synthesis inhibitor. PtK cells which received a preliminary UV treatment followed by an incubation period without cycloheximide and then a second irradiation and 24 hour incubation with cycloheximide, survived the effects of the second irradiation better than cells which were incubated in the presence of cycloheximide after the first and second UV irradiation. The application of cycloheximide for 24 hours after UV irradiation of PtK cells resulted in one-half as many 6-thioguanine resistant cells as compared to the number of 6-thioguanine resistant cells found when cycloheximide was not used. These experiments indicate that a UV-inducible cycloheximide-sensitive DNA repair pathway is present in PtK and xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which is error-prone in PtK cells.

  4. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once.

    PubMed

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Tainer, John A

    2014-07-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by James Watson and Francis Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure twice these nucleases act as molecular level transformers that typically reshape the DNA and sometimes themselves to achieve extraordinary specificity and efficiency. PMID:24754999

  5. New approaches to biochemical radioprotection: antioxidants and DNA repair enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riklis, E.; Emerit, I.; Setlow, R. B.

    Chemical repair may be provided by radioprotective compounds present during exposure to ionizing radiation. Considering DNA as the most sensitive target it is feasible to biochemically improve protection by enhancing DNA repair mechanisms. Protection of DNA by reducing the amount of damage (by radical scavenging and chemical repair) followed by enhanced repair of DNA will provide much improved protection and recovery. Furthermore, in cases of prolonged exposure, such as is possible in prolonged space missions, or of unexpected variations in the intensity of radiation, as is possible when encountering solar flares, it is important to provide long-acting protection, and this may be provided by antioxidants and well functioning DNA repair systems. It has also become important to provide protection from the potentially damaging action of long-lived clastogenic factors which have been found in plasma of exposed persons from Hiroshima & Nagasaki, radiation accidents, radiotherapy patients and recently in ``liquidators'' - persons involved in salvage operations at the Chernobyl reactor. The clastogenic factor, which causes chromatid breaks in non-exposed plasma, might account for late effects and is posing a potential carcinogenic hazard /1/. The enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been shown to eliminate the breakage factor from cultured plasma of exposed persons /2/. Several compounds have been shown to enhance DNA repair: WR-2721 /3/, nicotinamide /4/, glutathione monoester (Riklis et al., unpublished) and others. The right combination of such compounds may prove effective in providing protection from a wide range of radiation exposures over a long period of time.

  6. DNA repair mechanisms in dividing and non-dividing cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage created by endogenous or exogenous genotoxic agents can exist in multiple forms, and if allowed to persist, can promote genome instability and directly lead to various human diseases, particularly cancer, neurological abnormalities, immunodeficiency and premature aging. To avoid such deleterious outcomes, cells have evolved an array of DNA repair pathways, which carry out what is typically a multiple-step process to resolve specific DNA lesions and maintain genome integrity. To fully appreciate the biological contributions of the different DNA repair systems, one must keep in mind the cellular context within they operate. For example, the human body is composed of non-dividing and dividing cell types, including, in the brain, neurons and glial cells. We describe herein the molecular mechanisms of the different DNA repair pathways, and review their roles in non-dividing and dividing cells, with an eye towards how these pathways may regulate the development of neurological disease. PMID:23684800

  7. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  8. The mutagenic potential of DNA double-strand break repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petra Pfeiffer

    1998-01-01

    Numerous environmental pollutants are considered DNA-damaging agents with defined mutagenic potential. Therefore, toxicological studies have focused mainly on the impact of such substances on human health, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. The possible effects of cellular processes, such as DNA repair and recombination, as causes of spontaneous mutations and genome instability, however, have been less extensively studied but are of major importance

  9. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. [Department of Cell and Cancer Biology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)], E-mail: tichyed@email.uc.edu; Stambrook, Peter J. [Department of Cell and Cancer Biology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  10. Nucleolin mediates nucleosome disruption critical for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Michael; Derheimer, Frederick A.; Tait-Mulder, Jacqueline; Kastan, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of DNA repair factors and modulation of chromatin structure at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a complex and highly orchestrated process. We developed a system that can induce DSBs rapidly at defined endogenous sites in mammalian genomes and enables direct assessment of repair and monitoring of protein recruitment, egress, and modification at DSBs. The tight regulation of the system also permits assessments of relative kinetics and dependencies of events associated with cellular responses to DNA breakage. Distinct advantages of this system over focus formation/disappearance assays for assessing DSB repair are demonstrated. Using ChIP, we found that nucleosomes are partially disassembled around DSBs during nonhomologous end-joining repair in G1-arrested mammalian cells, characterized by a transient loss of the H2A/H2B histone dimer. Nucleolin, a protein with histone chaperone activity, interacts with RAD50 via its arginine-glycine rich domain and is recruited to DSBs rapidly in an MRE11-NBS1-RAD50 complex-dependent manner. Down-regulation of nucleolin abrogates the nucleosome disruption, the recruitment of repair factors, and the repair of the DSB, demonstrating the functional importance of nucleosome disruption in DSB repair and identifying a chromatin-remodeling protein required for the process. Interestingly, the nucleosome disruption that occurs during DSB repair in cycling cells differs in that both H2A/H2B and H3/H4 histone dimers are removed. This complete nucleosome disruption is also dependent on nucleolin and is required for recruitment of replication protein A to DSBs, a marker of DSB processing that is a requisite for homologous recombination repair. PMID:24082117

  11. Dynamics and mechanisms of DNA repair by photolyase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheyun; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2015-01-01

    Photolyase, a class of flavoproteins, uses blue light to repair two types of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6–4) photoproduct (6–4PP). In this perspective, we review the recent progress on the repair dynamics and mechanisms of both types of DNA restoration by photolyases. We first report the spectroscopic characterization of flavin in various redox states and the active-site solvation dynamics in photolyases. We then systematically summarize the detailed repair dynamics of damaged DNA by photolyases and a biomimetic system through resolving all elementary steps on the ultrafast timescales, including multiple intermolecular electron- and proton-transfer reactions and bond-breaking and -making processes. We determined the unique electron tunneling pathways, identified the key functional residues and revealed the molecular origin of high repair efficiency, and thus elucidate the molecular mechanisms and repair photocycles at the most fundamental level. We finally conclude that the active sites of photolyases, unlike aqueous solution for the biomimetic system, provide a unique electrostatic environment and local flexibility and thus a dedicated synergy for all elementary dynamics to maximize the repair efficiency. This repair photomachine is the first enzyme that the entire functional evolution is completely mapped out in real time. PMID:25870862

  12. Electron transfer mechanisms of DNA repair by photolyase.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer. PMID:25830375

  13. UvrD facilitates DNA repair by pulling RNA polymerase backwards

    PubMed Central

    Epshtein, Vitaly; Kamarthapu, Venu; McGary, Katelyn; Svetlov, Vladimir; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    UvrD helicase is required for nucleotide excision repair, although its role in this process is not well defined. Here we show that Escherichia coli UvrD binds RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and, using its helicase/translocase activity, forces RNA polymerase to slide backward along DNA. By inducing backtracking, UvrD exposes DNA lesions shielded by blocked RNA polymerase, allowing nucleotide excision repair enzymes to gain access to sites of damage. Our results establish UvrD as a bona fide transcription elongation factor that contributes to genomic integrity by resolving conflicts between transcription and DNA repair complexes. We further show that the elongation factor NusA cooperates with UvrD in coupling transcription to DNA repair by promoting backtracking and recruiting nucleotide excision repair enzymes to exposed lesions. Because backtracking is a shared feature of all cellular RNA polymerases, we propose that this mechanism enables RNA polymerases to function as global DNA damage scanners in bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:24402227

  14. Identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA ligase IV: involvement in DNA double-strand break repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soo-Hwang Teo; Stephen P. Jackson

    1997-01-01

    DNA ligases catalyse the joining of single and double-strand DNA breaks, which is an essential final step in DNA replication, recombination and repair. Mammalian cells have four DNA ligases, termed ligases I–IV. In contrast, other than a DNA ligase I homologue (encoded by CDC9), no other DNA ligases have hitherto been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report the identification

  15. Alkyltransferase-like proteins: molecular switches between DNA repair pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie L. TubbsJohn; John A. Tainer

    2010-01-01

    Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) play a role in the protection of cells from the biological effects of DNA alkylation\\u000a damage. Although ATLs share functional motifs with the DNA repair protein and cancer chemotherapy target O\\u000a 6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase, they lack the reactive cysteine residue required for alkyltransferase activity, so its\\u000a mechanism for cell protection was previously unknown. Here we review recent advances

  16. Altered spectra of hypermutation in DNA repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, D B; Gearhart, P J

    2001-01-01

    Affinity maturation of the humoral immune response is based on the ability of immunoglobulin variable genes to undergo a process of rapid and extensive somatic mutation followed by antigenic selection for antibodies with higher affinity. While the behaviour of this somatic hypermutation phenomenon has been well characterized over the last 20 years, the molecular mechanism responsible for inserting mutations has remained shrouded. To better understand this mechanism, we studied the interplay between hypermutation and other DNA associated activities such as DNA repair. There was no effect on the frequency and pattern of hypermutation in mice deficient for nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene repair of double strand breaks. However, variable genes from mice lacking some components of mismatch repair had an increased frequency of tandem mutations and had more mutations of G and C nucleotides. These results suggest that the DNA polymerase(s) involved in the hypermutation pathway produces a unique spectra of mutations, which is then altered by mismatch repair and antigenic selection. We, also describe the differential pattern of expression of some nuclear DNA polymerases in hypermutating versus non-hypermutating B lymphocytes. The rapidly dividing germinal centre B cells expressed DNA polymerases alpha, beta, delta, epsilon and zeta, whereas the resting non-germinal centre cells did not express polymerases alpha or epsilon at detectable levels, although they did express polymerases beta, delta and zeta. The lack of expression of polymerase epsilon in the non-germinal centre cells suggests that this enzyme has a critical role in chromosomal replication but does not participate in DNA repair in these cells. PMID:11205330

  17. Thermodynamics of the DNA Damage Repair Steps of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG). In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van’t Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves. PMID:24911585

  18. Investigation of repair of single DNA breaks in Vicia faba cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. F. Krupnova; T. B. Seregina

    1978-01-01

    The molecular nature of DNA repair in plant cells was investigated. The repair of single-strand DNA of horse bean seedling roots were evaluated according to the change in electrophoretic mobility of denatured DNA specimens in agarose-polyacrylamide gel. The inhibitory effects of caffeine administered after irradiation on repair of DNA were also discussed.

  19. Direct Observation of Thymine Dimer Repair in DNA by Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2006-03-01

    Departments of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Programs of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, OH 43210. Photolyase uses light energy to split ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in damaged DNA, but its molecular mechanism has never been directly revealed. We report here the direct mapping of catalytic processes through femtosecond synchronization of the enzymatic dynamics with the repair function. We observed direct electron transfer from the excited flavin cofactor to the dimer in 170 ps and back electron transfer from the repaired thymines in 560 ps. Both reactions are strongly modulated by active-site solvation to achieve maximum repair efficiency. These results show that the photocycle of DNA repair by photolyase is through a radical mechanism and completed on subnanosecond time scale at the dynamic active site with no net electron change in redox states of the flavin cofactor.

  20. Modulation of DNA damage\\/DNA repair capacity by XPC polymorphisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yimin Zhu; Hushan Yang; Qin Chen; Jie Lin; H. Barton Grossman; Colin P. Dinney; Xifeng Wu; Jian Gu

    2008-01-01

    XPC, a key protein in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, recognizes damaged DNA and initiates NER. Genetic variations in the XPC gene might be associated with altered DNA repair capacities (DRC). In this study, we genotyped three XPC polymorphisms, Ala499Val (C?T), PAT (?\\/+) and Lys939Gln (A?C), and measured the DNA damage\\/DRC by alkaline comet assay challenged by BPDE and

  1. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase is required for effective DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Segal-Raz, Hava; Mass, Gilad; Baranes-Bachar, Keren; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Wang, Shih-Ya; Chung, Young Min; Ziv-Lehrman, Shelly; Ström, Cecilia E; Helleday, Thomas; Hu, Mickey C.-T.; Chen, David J; Shiloh, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    The cellular response to double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA is a complex signalling network, mobilized by the nuclear protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which phosphorylates many factors in the various branches of this network. A main question is how ATM regulates DSB repair. Here, we identify the DNA repair enzyme polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) as an ATM target. PNKP phosphorylates 5?-OH and dephosphorylates 3?-phosphate DNA ends that are formed at DSB termini caused by DNA-damaging agents, thereby regenerating legitimate ends for further processing. We establish that the ATM phosphorylation targets on human PNKP—Ser 114 and Ser 126—are crucial for cellular survival following DSB induction and for effective DSB repair, being essential for damage-induced enhancement of the activity of PNKP and its proper accumulation at the sites of DNA damage. These findings show a direct functional link between ATM and the DSB-repair machinery. PMID:21637298

  2. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase is required for effective DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Segal-Raz, Hava; Mass, Gilad; Baranes-Bachar, Keren; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Wang, Shih-Ya; Chung, Young Min; Ziv-Lehrman, Shelly; Ström, Cecilia E; Helleday, Thomas; Hu, Mickey C-T; Chen, David J; Shiloh, Yosef

    2011-07-01

    The cellular response to double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA is a complex signalling network, mobilized by the nuclear protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which phosphorylates many factors in the various branches of this network. A main question is how ATM regulates DSB repair. Here, we identify the DNA repair enzyme polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) as an ATM target. PNKP phosphorylates 5'-OH and dephosphorylates 3'-phosphate DNA ends that are formed at DSB termini caused by DNA-damaging agents, thereby regenerating legitimate ends for further processing. We establish that the ATM phosphorylation targets on human PNKP-Ser 114 and Ser 126-are crucial for cellular survival following DSB induction and for effective DSB repair, being essential for damage-induced enhancement of the activity of PNKP and its proper accumulation at the sites of DNA damage. These findings show a direct functional link between ATM and the DSB-repair machinery. PMID:21637298

  3. Monitoring populations for DNA repair deficiency and for cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Au, W W; Wilkinson, G S; Tyring, S K; Legator, M S; el Zein, R; Hallberg, L; Heo, M Y

    1996-01-01

    The induction of a mutator phenotype has been hypothesized to cause the accumulation of multiple mutations in the development of cancer. Recent evidence suggests that the mutator phenotype is associated with DNA repair deficiencies. We have been using a challenge assay to study exposed populations to test our hypothesis that exposure to environmental toxicants induce DNA repair deficiency in somatic cells. In this assay, lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro to challenge cells to repair the radiation-induction DNA strand breaks. An increase of chromosome aberrations in the challenged cells from toxicant-exposed populations compared to nonexposed populations is used to indicate abnormal DNA repair response. From studies of cigarette smokers, butadiene-exposed workers, and uranium-exposed residents, the assay showed that these exposed populations had mutagen-induced abnormal DNA repair response. The phenomenon was also demonstrated using experimental animals. Mice were exposed in vivo to two different doses of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) and their lymphocytes were challenged with one dose of a radiomimetic chemical, bleomycin, in vitro. These challenged lymphocytes showed an MNNG dose-dependent increase of abnormal DNA repair response. In a population that was potentially exposed to teratogens--mothers having children with neural tube defects--lymphocytes from these mothers did not have the abnormal response in our assay. In studies with patients, we reported that lymphocytes from Down's syndrome patients have the abnormal DNA repair response. Lymphocytes from skin cancer-prone patients (epidermodysplasia verruciformis) have normal response to gamma-ray challenge but abnormal response to UV-light challenge. These patient studies also indicate that the challenge assay is useful in documenting the radiosensitivity of Down's syndrome and the UV sensitivity in EV patients. In most cases, the challenge assay is more sensitive in detecting biological effects than the standard chromosome aberration assay. Our series of studies indicates that the challenge assay can be used to document biological effects from exposure to mutagens and that the effect is an abnormal DNA repair response. This abnormality can increase the risk for development of cancer. The repair deficiency is currently being validated using a plasmid transfection (host-reactivation) assay. The need to integrate chromosome aberration and the challenge assays with other relevant assays for better documentation of biological effects and for more precise prediction of health risk will be presented. Our experience in using genetic polymorphism and host-reactivation assays will be discussed. PMID:8781386

  4. Modeling DNA Repair: Approaching In Vivo Techniques in the Hyperthermophile Sulfolobus Solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, J.; Fuss, J.; Yannone, S.M.; Tainer, J.A.; Cooper, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Archaea are found in some of the most extreme environments on earth and represent a third domain of life distinct from Eukarya and Eubacteria. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, isolated from acidic hot springs (80oC, pH 3) in Yellowstone National Park, has emerged as a potential model system for studying human DNA repair processes. Archaea are more closely related to Eukarya than to Eubacteria, suggesting that archaeal DNA repair machinery may model the complex human system much more closely than that of other prokaryotes. DNA repair requires coordinated protein-protein interactions that are frequently transient. Protein complexes that are transient at extreme temperatures where archaea thrive may be more stable at room temperature, allowing for the characterization of otherwise short-lived complexes. However, characterization of these systems in archaea has been limited by the absence of a stable in vivo transformation and expression system. The work presented here is a pilot study in gene cloning and recombinant protein expression in S. solfataricus. Three genes associated with DNA repair were selected for expression: MRE11, PCNA1, and a putative CSB homologue. Though preparation of these recombinant genes followed standard methods, preparation of a suitable vector proved more challenging. The shuttle vector pSSV64, derived from the SSV1 virus and the E. coli vector pBSSK+, was most successfully isolated from the DH5? E. coli strain. Currently, alternative vectors are being designed for more efficient genetic manipulations in S. solfataricus.

  5. Heterochromatin formation via recruitment of DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, Jacob G.; Peterson, Misty R.; Still, Christopher D.; Brueggeman, Leo; Dhillon, Namrita; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2015-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation and nuclear organization are important in gene regulation and genome fidelity. Proteins involved in gene silencing localize to sites of damage and some DNA repair proteins localize to heterochromatin, but the biological importance of these correlations remains unclear. In this study, we examined the role of double-strand-break repair proteins in gene silencing and nuclear organization. We find that the ATM kinase Tel1 and the proteins Mre11 and Esc2 can silence a reporter gene dependent on the Sir, as well as on other repair proteins. Furthermore, these proteins aid in the localization of silenced domains to specific compartments in the nucleus. We identify two distinct mechanisms for repair protein–mediated silencing—via direct and indirect interactions with Sir proteins, as well as by tethering loci to the nuclear periphery. This study reveals previously unknown interactions between repair proteins and silencing proteins and suggests insights into the mechanism underlying genome integrity. PMID:25631822

  6. Elevated DNA excision repair capacity in the extraembryonic mesoderm of the midgestation mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Latimer, J J; Hultner, M L; Cleaver, J E; Pedersen, R A

    1996-10-10

    In order to determine whether there is differential cell-type-specific DNA repair we measured the nucleotide excision repair capacity of the four distinct cell lineages that comprise the extraembryonic yolk sac using the unscheduled DNA synthesis assay. Yolk sacs from mouse embryos at 11.5-12.5 days gestation were microdissected to yield purified trophoblast, parietal endoderm, mesoderm, and visceral endoderm, as well as fetal skin fibroblasts which were then grown as primary explants. At this midgestational stage of development, the yolk sac provides essential functions for the sustenance of the embryo while the complex process of organogenesis is proceeding in the liver, kidney, and gut. Trophoblast giant cells, parietal endoderm, and visceral endoderm all demonstrated low levels of unscheduled DNA synthesis consistent with levels measured in adult mouse skin fibroblasts. As has previously been documented, embryonic mouse skin fibroblasts were reproducibly 2- to 3-fold higher than adult mouse skin fibroblasts in levels of DNA excision repair. The extraembryonic mesoderm, however, displayed a statistically significant level of unscheduled DNA synthesis 10-fold higher than adult mouse skin fibroblasts or the other lineages of the midgestation yolk sac. Further, the S-indexes of these lineages were also determined to assess the possible relevance of differential repair to the proliferative status of the cells. These data demonstrate that DNA excision repair capacity is lineage-specific during embryogenesis in the mouse. These studies may begin to provide a context for understanding the perplexing developmental aspects such as the characteristic congenital abnormalities associated with the human heritable DNA repair deficiency diseases. PMID:8892966

  7. Charge transport-mediated recruitment of DNA repair enzymes

    E-print Network

    Pak-Wing Fok; Chin-Lin Guo; Tom Chou

    2008-11-18

    Damaged or mismatched bases in DNA can be repaired by Base Excision Repair (BER) enzymes that replace the defective base. Although the detailed molecular structures of many BER enzymes are known, how they colocalize to lesions remains unclear. One hypothesis involves charge transport (CT) along DNA [Yavin, {\\it et al.}, PNAS, {\\bf 102}, 3546, (2005)]. In this CT mechanism, electrons are released by recently adsorbed BER enzymes and travel along the DNA. The electrons can scatter (by heterogeneities along the DNA) back to the enzyme, destabilizing and knocking it off the DNA, or, they can be absorbed by nearby lesions and guanine radicals. We develop a stochastic model to describe the electron dynamics, and compute probabilities of electron capture by guanine radicals and repair enzymes. We also calculate first passage times of electron return, and ensemble-average these results over guanine radical distributions. Our statistical results provide the rules that enable us to perform implicit-electron Monte-Carlo simulations of repair enzyme binding and redistribution near lesions. When lesions are electron absorbing, we show that the CT mechanism suppresses wasteful buildup of enzymes along intact portions of the DNA, maximizing enzyme concentration near lesions.

  8. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3?), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. PMID:26124332

  9. Exploiting the homologous recombination DNA repair network for targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2011-01-01

    Genomic instability is a characteristic of cancer cells. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells have evolved a complex DNA repair system to detect, signal and repair a diversity of DNA lesions. Homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair represents an error-free repair mechanism to maintain genomic integrity and ensure high-fidelity transmission of genetic information. Deficiencies in HR repair are of tremendous importance in the etiology of human cancers and at the same time offer great opportunities for designing targeted therapeutic strategies. The increase in the number of proteins identified as being involved in HR repair has dramatically shifted our concept of the proteins involved in this process: traditionally viewed as existing in a linear and simple pathway, today they are viewed as existing in a dynamic and interconnected network. Moreover, exploration of the targets within this network that can be modulated by small molecule drugs has led to the discovery of many effective kinase inhibitors, such as ATM, ATR, DNA-PK, CHK1, and CHK2 inhibitors. In preclinical studies, these inhibitors have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The most exciting discovery in the field of HR repair is the identification of the synthetic lethality relationship between poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and HR deficiency. The promises of clinical applications of PARP inhibitors and the concept of synthetic lethality also bring challenges into focus. Future research directions in the area of HR repair include determining how to identify the patients most likely to benefit from PARP inhibitors and developing strategies to overcome resistance to PARP inhibitors. PMID:21603316

  10. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Slyskova, Jana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Karlsen, Anette; Carlsen, Monica H; Novosadova, Vendula; Blomhoff, Rune; Vodicka, Pavel; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by ?-cryptoxanthin and ?-tocopherol (p<0.05). XPG 1104His homozygotes appeared more vulnerable to DNA damage accumulation (p=0.001). Sex and individual antioxidants were also associated with DNA repair capacity; both the base and nucleotide excision repairs were lower in women and the latter increased with higher plasma levels of ascorbic acid and ?-carotene (p<0.05). We have determined genetic and dietary factors that modulate DNA integrity. We propose that the positive health effect of fruit intake is partially mediated via DNA damage suppression and a simultaneous increase in DNA repair capacity. PMID:24674629

  11. Metal Complexes for DNA-Mediated Charge Transport

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Jacqueline K.; Olmon, Eric D.; Sontz, Pamela A.

    2010-01-01

    In all organisms, oxidation threatens the integrity of the genome. DNA-mediated charge transport (CT) may play an important role in the generation and repair of this oxidative damage. In studies involving long-range CT from intercalating Ru and Rh complexes to 5?-GG-3? sites, we have examined the efficiency of CT as a function of distance, temperature, and the electronic coupling of metal oxidants bound to the base stack. Most striking is the shallow distance dependence and the sensitivity of DNA CT to how the metal complexes are stacked in the helix. Experiments with cyclopropylamine-modified bases have revealed that charge occupation occurs at all sites along the bridge. Using Ir complexes, we have seen that the process of DNA-mediated reduction is very similar to that of DNA-mediated oxidation. Studies involving metalloproteins have, furthermore, shown that their redox activity is DNA-dependent and can be DNA-mediated. Long range DNA-mediated CT can facilitate the oxidation of DNA-bound base excision repair proteins to initiate a redox-active search for DNA lesions. DNA CT can also activate the transcription factor SoxR, triggering a cellular response to oxidative stress. Indeed, these studies show that within the cell, redox-active proteins may utilize the same chemistry as that of synthetic metal complexes in vitro, and these proteins may harness DNA-mediated CT to reduce damage to the genome and regulate cellular processes. PMID:21643528

  12. The effect of nicotine on DNA repair in adult myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kozlovskis-Wade, P L; Smets, M J; Myerburg, R J

    1998-08-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that terminally differentiated adult ventricular myocytes are capable of repairing DNA that has been damaged by exposure to oxygen free radicals. Despite the potential importance of DNA repair in cells that may survive many decades after injury, little is known about the mechanisms or regulation of repair. Since tobacco use has a well-defined role in the epidemiology and pathophysiology of heart disease, we tested the effects of nicotine on repair of free radical damaged plasmids by whole-cell protein extracts from adult myocytes. Exposure to a concentration of 25 microM nicotine increased incorporation of (32P)dCTP into damaged plasmids by 16%, and 50 or 100 microM nicotine increased incorporation by 32%. Nicotine did not alter the rate or amount of poly (ADP-ribose) on the major protein acceptor of molecular weight 113-116 kDa. Inhibition of DNA polymerase activity with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate revealed greater plasmid degradation in the presence of nicotine. We conclude that nicotine enhances DNA degradation and the increased repair is a consequence of this greater degradation. PMID:9737935

  13. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of XPG as well as the C-terminal region of WRN. The physical interaction between XPG and WRN links NER, (made evident by the disease XP) with DSBR, which imparts additional knowledge of the overlapping nature of these two proteins and the previously distinct DNA repair pathways they are associated with. Since genomic integrity is constantly threatened by both endogenous and exogenous (internal and external) damage, understanding the roles of these proteins in coordinating DNA repair processes with replication will signifi cantly further understanding how defects instigate physiological consequences in response to various DNA damaging sources. This ultimately contributes to our understanding of cancer and premature aging.

  14. Methylating agents and DNA repair responses: methylated bases and sources of strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Michael D.; Pittman, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical methylating agents methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N?-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) have been used for decades as classical DNA damaging agents. These agents have been utilized to uncover and explore pathways of DNA repair, DNA damage response, and mutagenesis. MMS and MNNG modify DNA by adding methyl groups to a number of nucleophilic sites on the DNA bases, although MNNG produces a greater percentage of O-methyl adducts. There has been substantial progress elucidating direct reversal proteins that remove methyl groups and base excision repair (BER), which removes and replaces methylated bases. Direct reversal proteins and BER thus counteract the toxic, mutagenic and clastogenic effects of methylating agents. Despite recent progress, the complexity of DNA damage responses to methylating agents is still being discovered. In particular, there is growing understanding of pathways such as homologous recombination, lesion bypass, and mismatch repair that react when the response of direct reversal proteins and BER is insufficient. Furthermore, the importance of proper balance within the steps in BER has been uncovered with the knowledge that DNA structural intermediates during BER are deleterious. A number of issues complicate elucidating the downstream responses when direct reversal is insufficient or BER is imbalanced. These include inter-species differences, cell-type specific differences within mammals and between cancer cell lines, and the type of methyl damage or BER intermediate encountered. MMS also carries a misleading reputation of being a ‘radiomimetic,’ i.e., capable of directly producing strand breaks. This review focuses on the DNA methyl damage caused by MMS and MNNG for each site of potential methylation to summarize what is known about the repair of such damage and the downstream responses and consequences if not repaired. PMID:17173371

  15. PARP1–TDP1 coupling for the repair of topoisomerase I–induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Das, Benu Brata; Huang, Shar-yin N.; Murai, Junko; Rehman, Ishita; Amé, Jean-Christophe; Sengupta, Souvik; Das, Subhendu K.; Majumdar, Papiya; Zhang, Hongliang; Biard, Denis; Majumder, Hemanta K.; Schreiber, Valérie; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) attach poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) chains to various proteins including themselves and chromatin. Topoisomerase I (Top1) regulates DNA supercoiling and is the target of camptothecin and indenoisoquinoline anticancer drugs, as it forms Top1 cleavage complexes (Top1cc) that are trapped by the drugs. Endogenous and carcinogenic DNA lesions can also trap Top1cc. Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a key repair enzyme for trapped Top1cc, hydrolyzes the phosphodiester bond between the DNA 3?-end and the Top1 tyrosyl moiety. Alternative repair pathways for Top1cc involve endonuclease cleavage. However, it is unknown what determines the choice between TDP1 and the endonuclease repair pathways. Here we show that PARP1 plays a critical role in this process. By generating TDP1 and PARP1 double-knockout lymphoma chicken DT40 cells, we demonstrate that TDP1 and PARP1 are epistatic for the repair of Top1cc. The N-terminal domain of TDP1 directly binds the C-terminal domain of PARP1, and TDP1 is PARylated by PARP1. PARylation stabilizes TDP1 together with SUMOylation of TDP1. TDP1 PARylation enhances its recruitment to DNA damage sites without interfering with TDP1 catalytic activity. TDP1–PARP1 complexes, in turn recruit X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1). This work identifies PARP1 as a key component driving the repair of trapped Top1cc by TDP1. PMID:24493735

  16. Kinetic analysis of DNA double-strand break repair pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Charbonnel, Cyril; Allain, Elisabeth; Gallego, Maria Eugenia; White, Charles I

    2011-06-10

    Double-strand breaks in genomic DNA (DSB) are potentially lethal lesions which separate parts of chromosome arms from their centromeres. Repair of DSB by recombination can generate mutations and further chromosomal rearrangements, making the regulation of recombination and the choice of recombination pathways of the highest importance. Although knowledge of recombination mechanisms has considerably advanced, the complex interrelationships and regulation of pathways are far from being fully understood. We analyse the different pathways of DSB repair acting in G2/M phase nuclei of irradiated plants, through quantitation of the kinetics of appearance and loss of ?-H2AX foci in Arabidopsis mutants. These analyses show the roles for the four major recombination pathways in post-S-phase DSB repair and that non-homologous recombination pathways constitute the major response. The data suggest a hierarchical organisation of DSB repair in these cells: C-NHEJ acts prior to B-NHEJ which can also inhibit MMEJ. Surprisingly the quadruple ku80 xrcc1 xrcc2 xpf mutant can repair DSB, although with severely altered kinetics. This repair leads to massive genetic instability with more than 50% of mitoses showing anaphase bridges following irradiation. This study thus clarifies the relationships between the different pathways of DSB repair in the living plant and points to the existence of novel DSB repair processes. PMID:21530420

  17. Genetics and biochemistry of DNA repair in Neurospora crassa. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1981-10-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) isolation and characterization of DNA repair deficient mutants of Neurospora; (2) enzymology of DNA repair enzymes in Neurospora wild type and mutants; and (3) molecular cloning. (ACR)

  18. New epistasis group for the repair of DNA damage in bacteriophage T4: replication repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, J.T.; Drake, J.W.

    1987-03-01

    The gene 32 mutation amA453 sensitizes bacteriophage T4 to the lethal effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, methyl methanesulfonate and angelicin-mediated photodynamic irradiation when treated particles are plated on amber-suppressing host cells. The increased UV sensitivity caused by amA453 is additive to that caused by mutations in both the T4 excision repair (denV) and recombination repair (uvsWXY) systems, suggesting the operation of third kind of repair system. The mutation uvs79, with many similarities to amA453 but mapping in gene 41, is largely epistatic to amA453. The mutation mms1, also with many similarities to amA453, maps close to amA453 within gene 32 and is largely epistatic to uvs79. Neither amA453 nor uvs79 affect the ratio of UV-induced mutational to lethal hits, nor does amA453 affect spontaneous or UV-enhanced recombination frequencies. Gene 32 encode the major T4 ssDNA-binding protein (the scaffolding of the DNA replication) and gene 41 encodes a DNA helicase, both being required for T4 DNA replication. The authors conclude that a third repair process operates in phage T4 and suggest that it acts during rather than before of after DNA replication.

  19. DNA repair in microgravity: studies on bacteria and mammalian cells in the experiments REPAIR and KINETICS.

    PubMed

    Horneck, G; Rettberg, P; Baumstark-Khan, C; Rink, H; Kozubek, S; Schäfer, M; Schmitz, C

    1996-06-27

    The impact of microgravity on cellular repair processes was tested in the space experiments REPAIR and KINETICS, which were performed during the IML-2 mission in the Biorack of ESA: (a) survival of spores of Bacillus subtilis HA101 after UV-irradiation (up to 340 J m-2) in the experiment REPAIR; (b) in the experiment KINETICS the kinetics of DNA repair in three different test systems: rejoining of X-ray-induced DNA strand breaks (B1) in cells of Escherichia coli B/r (120 Gy) and (B2) in human fibroblasts (5 and 10 Gy) as well as (B3) induction of the SOS response after gamma-irradiation (300 Gy) of cells of Escherichia coli PQ37. Cells were irradiated prior to the space mission and were kept in a non-metabolic state (metabolically inactive spores of B. subtilis on membrane filters, frozen cells of E. coli and human fibroblasts) until incubation in orbit. Germination and growth of B. subtilis were initiated by humidification, E. coli and fibroblasts were thawed up and incubated at 37 degrees C for defined repair periods (up to 4.5 h), thereafter they were frozen again for laboratory analysis. Relevant controls were performed in-flight (1 x g reference centrifuge) and on ground (1 x g and 1.4 x g) The results show no significant differences between the microgravity samples and the corresponding controls neither in the survival curves nor in the kinetics of DNA strand break rejoining and induction of the SOS response (proven by Student's t-test, 2 P = 0.05). These observations provide evidence that in the microgravity environment cells are able to repair radiation-induced DNA damage close to normality. The results suggest that a disturbance of cellular repair processes in the microgravity environment might not be the explanation for the reported synergism of radiation and microgravity. PMID:8987564

  20. RecA-mediated excision repair: a novel mechanism for repairing DNA lesions at sites of arrested DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bichara, Marc; Pinet, Isabelle; Lambert, Iain B; Fuchs, Robert P P

    2007-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, bulky DNA lesions are repaired primarily by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Unrepaired lesions encountered by DNA polymerase at the replication fork create a blockage which may be relieved through RecF-dependent recombination. We have designed an assay to monitor the different mechanisms through which a DNA polymerase blocked by a single AAF lesion may be rescued by homologous double-stranded DNA sequences. Monomodified single-stranded plasmids exhibit low survival in non-SOS induced E. coli cells; we show here that the presence of a homologous sequence enhances the survival of the damaged plasmid more than 10-fold in a RecA-dependent way. Remarkably, in an NER proficient strain, 80% of the surviving colonies result from the UvrA-dependent repair of the AAF lesion in a mechanism absolutely requiring RecA and RecF activity, while the remaining 20% of the surviving colonies result from homologous recombination mechanisms. These results uncover a novel mechanism - RecA-mediated excision repair - in which RecA-dependent pairing of the mono-modified single-stranded template with a complementary sequence allows its repair by the UvrABC excinuclease. PMID:17581130

  1. Base excision repair: NMR backbone assignments of Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Wallace, Susan S.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Oxidative damage is emerging as one of the most important mechanisms responsible for mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging, and various diseases (Farr and Kogma, 1991). One of the potential targets for oxidation is cellular DNA. While exposure to exogenous agents, such as ionizing radiation and chemicals, contributes to damaging DNA, the most important oxidative agents are endogenous, such as the reactive free radicals produced during normal oxidative metabolism (Adelman et., 1988). To mitigate the potentially deleterious effects of oxidative DNA damage virtually all aerobic organisms have developed complex repair mechanisms (Petit and Sancar, 1999). One repair mechanism, base excision repair (BER), appears to be responsible for replacing most oxidative DNA damage (David and Williams, 1998). Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), a 269-residue metalloprotein with a molecular weight of 30.2 kDa, is a key BER enzyme in prokaryotes (Boiteaux et al., 1987). Substrates recognized and released by Fpg include 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), 2,6 diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamido pyrimidine (Fapy-G), the adenine equivalents 8-oxoA and Fapy-A, 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-hydroxyuracil, B ureidoisobutiric acid, and a-R-hydroxy-B-ureidoisobutiric acid (Freidberg et al., 1995). In vitro Fpg bind double-stranded DNA and performs three catalytic activities: (i) DNA glycosylase, (ii) AP lyase, and (iii) deoxyribophosphodiesterase.

  2. Role of JC Virus Agnoprotein in DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Darbinyan, Armine; Siddiqui, Khwaja M.; Slonina, Dorota; Darbinian, Nune; Amini, Shohreh; White, Martyn K.; Khalili, Kamel

    2004-01-01

    The late region of human neurotropic JC virus encodes a small 71-amino-acid agnoprotein that is also found in the polyomaviruses simian virus 40 and BK virus. Several functions of agnoprotein have been identified, including roles in regulating viral transcription and virion maturation. Earlier studies showed that agnoprotein expressed alone induced p21/WAF-1 expression and caused cells to accumulate in the G2/M stage of the cell cycle. Here we report that agnoprotein expression sensitized cells to the cytotoxic effects of the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin. Agnoprotein reduced the viability of cisplatin-treated cells and increased chromosome fragmentation and micronucleus formation. Whereas cisplatin-treated control cells accumulated in S phase, cells expressing agnoprotein did not, instead becoming aneuploid. Agnoprotein expression correlated with impaired double-strand-break repair activity in cellular extracts and reduced expression of the Ku70 and Ku80 DNA repair proteins. After agnoprotein expression, much of the Ku70 protein was located in the perinuclear space, where agnoprotein was also found. Results from binding studies showed an interaction of agnoprotein with Ku70 which was mediated by the N terminus. The ability of agnoprotein to inhibit double-strand break repair activity when it was added to cellular extracts was also mediated by the N terminus. We conclude that agnoprotein inhibits DNA repair after DNA damage and interferes with DNA damage-induced cell cycle regulation. Since Ku70 is a subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase that is responsible both for double-strand break repair and for signaling damage-induced cell cycle arrest, the modulation of Ku70 and/or Ku80 by agnoprotein may represent an important event in the polyomavirus life cycle and in cell transformation. PMID:15280468

  3. Involvement of DNA-PK(sub cs) in DSB Repair Following Fe-56 Ion Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Harper, Jane; Anderson, Jennifer a.; Cucinnota, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    When cells are exposed to radiation, cellular lesions are induced in the DNA including double strand breaks (DSBs), single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage, which if not repaired with high fidelity may lead to detrimental biological consequences. Complex DSBs are induced by ionizing radiation and characterized by the presence of base lesions close to the break termini. They are believed to be one of the major causes of the biological effects of IR. The complexity of DSBs increases with the ionization density of the radiation and these complex DSBs are distinct from the damage induced by sparsely ionizing gamma-radiation. It has been hypothesized that complex DSBs produced by heavy ions in space pose problems to the DNA repair machinery. We have used imm uno-cyto-chemical staining of phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX) foci, as a marker of DSBs. We have investigated the formation and loss of gamma-H2AX foci and RAD51 foci (a protein involved in the homologous recombination pathway) in mammalian cells induced by low fluences of low-LET gamma-radiation and high-LET Fe-56 ions (1GeV/n, 151 keV/micron LET). M059J and M059K cells, which are deficient and proficient in DNA-PK(sub cs) activity respectively, were used to examine the role of DNA-PK(sub cs), a key protein in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DSB repair, along with HF19 human fibroblasts. Followi ng irradiation with Fe-56 ions the rate of repair was slower in M059J cells compared with that in M059K, indicating a role for DNA-PK(sub cs) in the repair of DSB induced by Fe-56 ions. However a small percentage of DSBs induced are rejoined within 5 h although many DSBs still persist up to 24 h. When RAD51 was examined in M059J/K cells, RAD51 foci are visible 24 hours after irradiation in approximately 40% of M059J cells compared with <5% of M059K cells indicating that persistent DSBs or those formed at stalled replication forks recruit RAD51 in DNA-PK(sub cs) deficient cells. Following 1 Gy gamma-radiation the induction of gamma-H2AX foci is similar in M059J and M059K cells. However, the repair rate of DSBs is slower in M059J cells than in M059K as shown previously but faster than seen with DSB induced by 56Fe ions. Vanillin, an inhibitor of DNA-PK(sub cs), reduces significantly the rate of DSB repair in HF19 cells following 1 Gy gamma-radiation but at 0.25 Gy gamma-irradiation the rate of DSB repair is similar in the presence or absence vanillin, thus suggesting the repair of a sub-set of DSBs induced by low dose, low-LET radiation does not require DNA-PK(sub cs). This sub-set of DSBs is formed in lower yield with high LET radiation. T he complexity of DNA DSBs induced by HZE radiation will be discussed in terms of reduced repair efficiency and provide scope to model different sub-classes of DSBs as precursors that may lead to the detrimental health effects of HZE radiation.

  4. Human syndromes with genomic instability and multiprotein machines that repair DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    De la Torre, C; Pincheira, J; López-Sáez, J F

    2003-01-01

    The present report deals with the functional relationships among protein complexes which, when mutated, are responsible for four human syndromes displaying cancer proneness, and whose cells are deficient in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. In some of them, the cells are also unable to activate the proper checkpoint, while in the others an unduly override of the checkpoint-induced arrest occurs. As a consequence, all these patients display genome instability. In ataxia-telangiectasia, the mutated protein (ATM) is a kinase, which acts as a transducer of DNA damage signalling. The defective protein in the ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder is a DNase (the Mre11 nuclease) that in vivo produces single-strand tails at both sides of DSBs. Mre11 is always present with the Rad50 ATPase in a protein machine: the nuclease complex. In mammals, this complex also contains nibrin, the protein mutated in the Nijmegen syndrome. Nibrin confers new abilities to the nuclease complex, and can also bind to BRCA1 (one of the two proteins mutated in familial breast cancer). BRCA1 has a central motif that binds with high affinity to cruciform DNA, a structure present in places where the DNA loops are anchored to the chromosomal axis or scaffold. The BRCA1 x cruciform DNA complex should be released to allow the nuclease complex to work in DNA recombinational repair of DSBs. BRCA1 also acts as a scaffold for the assembly of ATPases such as Rad51, responsible for the somatic homologous recombination. Loss of the BRCA1 gene prevents cell survival after exposure to cross-linkers. The BRCA1-RING domain is an E3-ubiquitin ligase. It can mono-ubiquitinate the FANCD2 protein, mutated in one of the Fanconi anemia complementation groups, to regulate it. Finally, during DNA replication, the nuclease complex and its activating ATM kinase are integrated in the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC) that contains, among others, enzymes required for mismatch excision repair. In short, the proteins missing in these syndromes have in common their BRCA1-mediated assembly into multimeric machines responsible for the surveillance of DNA replication, DSB recombinational repair, and the removal of DNA cross-links. PMID:12507302

  5. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Lauren E; Santella, Regina M; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Millikan, Robert C; Olshan, Andrew F; North, Kari E; Bradshaw, Patrick T; Eng, Sybil M; Terry, Mary Beth; Shen, Jing; Crew, Katherine D; Rossner, Pavel; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Neugut, Alfred I; Gammon, Marilie D

    2014-02-01

    The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single-strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes (MSH3, MLH1 and MSH2) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions (p < 0.05) between MSH2 and MLH1, as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (XPC-Ala499Val, XPF-Arg415Gln, XPG-Asp1104His and MLH1-lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for XPC (OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36-0.81) and XPF (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44-0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in XPG (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29-0.77) and MLH1 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30-0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both MSH2 and MLH1 could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. PMID:23852586

  6. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in teratogenesis and neurodevelopmental deficits.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; McCallum, Gordon P; Lam, Kyla C H; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Ondovcik, Stephanie L

    2010-06-01

    Several teratogenic agents, including ionizing radiation and xenobiotics such as phenytoin, benzo[a]pyrene, thalidomide, and methamphetamine, can initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules including DNA. Oxidative DNA damage, and particularly the most prevalent 8-oxoguanine lesion, may adversely affect development, likely via alterations in gene transcription rather than via a mutational mechanism. Contributions from oxidative DNA damage do not exclude roles for alternative mechanisms of initiation like receptor-mediated processes or the formation of covalent xenobiotic-macromolecular adducts, damage to other macromolecular targets like proteins and lipids, and other effects of ROS like altered signal transduction. Even in the absence of teratogen exposure, endogenous developmental oxidative stress can have embryopathic consequences in the absence of key pathways for detoxifying ROS or repairing DNA damage. Critical proteins in pathways for DNA damage detection/repair signaling, like p53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and DNA repair itself, like oxoguanine glycosylase 1 and Cockayne syndrome B, can often, but not always, protect the embryo from ROS-initiating teratogens. Protection may be variably dependent upon such factors as the nature of the teratogen and its concentration within the embryo, the stage of development, the species, strain, gender, target tissue and cell type, among other factors. PMID:20544694

  7. Toward Compact Inherently Self-Repairing DNA Lattices Using Reversibility

    E-print Network

    Reif, John H.

    sets of DNA tiles to be self-healing due to Winfree increased the lattice area by a significant-assembly techniques. This involves, among other things, developing self-assembly methods for patterning nano-materials: This question leads us to realize that nature's capability to self-repair still far exceeds the self-healing

  8. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  9. Fluoroquinolone-Gyrase-DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M.; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Drlica, Karl

    2014-01-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys466 gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly81 and GyrB-Glu466 residues are far apart (17 ?) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases. PMID:24497635

  10. A newly identified DNA ligase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in RAD52-independent repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Schär, P; Herrmann, G; Daly, G; Lindahl, T

    1997-08-01

    Eukaryotic DNA ligases are ATP-dependent DNA strand-joining enzymes that participate in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Whereas mammalian cells contain several different DNA ligases, encoded by at least three distinct genes, only one DNA ligase has been detected previously in either budding yeast or fission yeast. Here, we describe a newly identified nonessential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene that encodes a DNA ligase distinct from the CDC9 gene product. This DNA ligase shares significant amino acid sequence homology with human DNA ligase IV; accordingly, we designate the yeast gene LIG4. Recombinant LIG4 protein forms a covalent enzyme-AMP complex and can join a DNA single-strand break in a DNA/RNA hybrid duplex, the preferred substrate in vitro. Disruption of the LIG4 gene causes only marginally increased cellular sensitivity to several DNA damaging agents, and does not further sensitize cdc9 or rad52 mutant cells. In contrast, lig4 mutant cells have a 1000-fold reduced capacity for correct recircularization of linearized plasmids by illegitimate end-joining after transformation. Moreover, homozygous lig4 mutant diploids sporulate less efficiently than isogenic wild-type cells, and show retarded progression through meiotic prophase I. Spore viability is normal, but lig4 mutants appear to produce a higher proportion of tetrads with only three viable spores. The mutant phenotypes are consistent with functions of LIG4 in an illegitimate DNA end-joining pathway and ensuring efficient meiosis. PMID:9271115

  11. E2F-7 couples DNA damage-dependent transcription with the DNA repair process.

    PubMed

    Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Coutts, Amanda S; Helleday, Thomas; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-09-15

    The cellular response to DNA damage, mediated by the DNA repair process, is essential in maintaining the integrity and stability of the genome. E2F-7 is an atypical member of the E2F family with a role in negatively regulating transcription and cell cycle progression under DNA damage. Surprisingly, we found that E2F-7 makes a transcription-independent contribution to the DNA repair process, which involves E2F-7 locating to and binding damaged DNA. Further, E2F-7 recruits CtBP and HDAC to the damaged DNA, altering the local chromatin environment of the DNA lesion. Importantly, the E2F-7 gene is a target for somatic mutation in human cancer and tumor-derived mutant alleles encode proteins with compromised transcription and DNA repair properties. Our results establish that E2F-7 participates in 2 closely linked processes, allowing it to directly couple the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response with the DNA repair machinery, which has relevance in human malignancy. PMID:23974101

  12. E2F-7 couples DNA damage-dependent transcription with the DNA repair process

    PubMed Central

    Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Coutts, Amanda S; Helleday, Thomas; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA damage, mediated by the DNA repair process, is essential in maintaining the integrity and stability of the genome. E2F-7 is an atypical member of the E2F family with a role in negatively regulating transcription and cell cycle progression under DNA damage. Surprisingly, we found that E2F-7 makes a transcription-independent contribution to the DNA repair process, which involves E2F-7 locating to and binding damaged DNA. Further, E2F-7 recruits CtBP and HDAC to the damaged DNA, altering the local chromatin environment of the DNA lesion. Importantly, the E2F-7 gene is a target for somatic mutation in human cancer and tumor-derived mutant alleles encode proteins with compromised transcription and DNA repair properties. Our results establish that E2F-7 participates in 2 closely linked processes, allowing it to directly couple the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response with the DNA repair machinery, which has relevance in human malignancy. PMID:23974101

  13. Reduction in DNA repair capacity following differentiation of murine proadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tofilon, P.J.; Meyn, R.E. (Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston (USA))

    1988-02-01

    It has been suggested that terminally differentiated mammalian cells have a decreased DNA repair capacity, compared with proliferating stem cells. To investigate this hypothesis, we have examined {gamma}-ray-induced DNA strand breaks and their repair in the murine proadipocyte stem cell line 3T3-T. By exposure to human plasma, 3T3-T cells can be induced to undergo nonterminal and then terminal differentiation. DNA strand breaks were evaluated using the technique of alkaline elution. No difference was detected among stem, nonterminally differentiated, and terminally differentiated cells in the initial levels of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. Each of the strand break dose responses increased as a linear function of {gamma}-ray dose. The strand breaks induced by 4 Gy rejoined following biphasic kinetics for each cell type. At each time point examined after irradiation, however, the percentage of strand breaks that had not rejoined in terminally differentiated cells was three to six times greater than in stem cells. The rate of strand break rejoining in nonterminally differentiated cells was of an intermediate value between that of the stem and of the terminally differentiated cells. These results indicate that, at least for 3T3-T cells, differentiated cells have a reduced capacity for DNA repair.

  14. Hypomorphic PCNA mutation underlies a human DNA repair disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baple, Emma L.; Chambers, Helen; Cross, Harold E.; Fawcett, Heather; Nakazawa, Yuka; Chioza, Barry A.; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Mansour, Sahar; Sreekantan-Nair, Ajith; Patton, Michael A.; Muggenthaler, Martina; Rich, Phillip; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Stein, Constance K.; Last, James I.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Ogi, Tomoo; Lehmann, Alan R.; Green, Catherine M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous human disorders, including Cockayne syndrome, UV-sensitive syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and trichothiodystrophy, result from the mutation of genes encoding molecules important for nucleotide excision repair. Here, we describe a syndrome in which the cardinal clinical features include short stature, hearing loss, premature aging, telangiectasia, neurodegeneration, and photosensitivity, resulting from a homozygous missense (p.Ser228Ile) sequence alteration of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PCNA is a highly conserved sliding clamp protein essential for DNA replication and repair. Due to this fundamental role, mutations in PCNA that profoundly impair protein function would be incompatible with life. Interestingly, while the p.Ser228Ile alteration appeared to have no effect on protein levels or DNA replication, patient cells exhibited marked abnormalities in response to UV irradiation, displaying substantial reductions in both UV survival and RNA synthesis recovery. The p.Ser228Ile change also profoundly altered PCNA’s interaction with Flap endonuclease 1 and DNA Ligase 1, DNA metabolism enzymes. Together, our findings detail a mutation of PCNA in humans associated with a neurodegenerative phenotype, displaying clinical and molecular features common to other DNA repair disorders, which we showed to be attributable to a hypomorphic amino acid alteration. PMID:24911150

  15. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, J.; Sancar, G.B. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States))

    1991-12-15

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. The authors here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5{prime} flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription.

  16. BRCA1 is Required for Post-replication Repair After UV-induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shailja; Nguyen, Jenna; Hill, Sarah J.; Scully, Ralph; Feunteun, Jean; Livingston, David M.

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 contributes to the response to UV irradiation. Utilizing its BRCT motifs, it is recruited during S/G2 to UV-damaged sites in a DNA replication-dependent, but nucleotide excision repair- independent manner. More specifically, at UV- stalled replication forks, it promotes photoproduct excision, suppression of translesion synthesis, and the localization and activation of replication factor C complex (RFC) subunits. The last function, in turn, triggers post-UV checkpoint activation and post- replicative repair. These BRCA1 functions differ from those required for DSBR. PMID:21963239

  17. Large conformational changes in MutS during DNA scanning, mismatch recognition and repair signalling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ruoyi; DeRocco, Vanessa C; Harris, Credle; Sharma, Anushi; Hingorani, Manju M; Erie, Dorothy A; Weninger, Keith R

    2012-01-01

    MutS protein recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and targets them for mismatch repair. Little is known about the transient conformations of MutS as it signals initiation of repair. We have used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements to report the conformational dynamics of MutS during this process. We find that the DNA-binding domains of MutS dynamically interconvert among multiple conformations when the protein is free and while it scans homoduplex DNA. Mismatch recognition restricts MutS conformation to a single state. Steady-state measurements in the presence of nucleotides suggest that both ATP and ADP must be bound to MutS during its conversion to a sliding clamp form that signals repair. The transition from mismatch recognition to the sliding clamp occurs via two sequential conformational changes. These intermediate conformations of the MutS:DNA complex persist for seconds, providing ample opportunity for interaction with downstream proteins required for repair. PMID:22505031

  18. Repair of DNA Damage Induced by the Cytidine Analog Zebularine Requires ATR and ATM in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Hsin; Finke, Andreas; Díaz, Mariana; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Baubec, Tuncay; Pecinka, Ales

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage repair is an essential cellular mechanism that maintains genome stability. Here, we show that the nonmethylable cytidine analog zebularine induces a DNA damage response in Arabidopsis thaliana, independent of changes in DNA methylation. In contrast to genotoxic agents that induce damage in a cell cycle stage-independent manner, zebularine induces damage specifically during strand synthesis in DNA replication. The signaling of this damage is mediated by additive activity of ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED AND RAD3-RELATED and ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED kinases, which cause postreplicative cell cycle arrest and increased endoreplication. The repair requires a functional STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES5 (SMC5)-SMC6 complex and is accomplished predominantly by synthesis-dependent strand-annealing homologous recombination. Here, we provide insight into the response mechanism for coping with the genotoxic effects of zebularine and identify several components of the zebularine-induced DNA damage repair pathway. PMID:26023162

  19. DNA damage induction and repair inhibition among building construction workers in South India.

    PubMed

    Sellappa, Sudha; Prathyumnan, Shibily; Balachandar, Vellingiri

    2010-01-01

    Construction industry workers are exposed to many known carcinogens in their complex occupational environment. Since there are no past studies on genotoxicity among this group in the Indian subcontinent, workers engaged in different construction sites at Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India, were assessed here. We enrolled 96 workers and 68 control subjects with similar mean age, smoking, tobacco chewing prevalence and alcohol consumption, for analysis of DNA damage in blood leucocytes by micronucleus (MN) and comet assays. DNA repair inhibition was also analyzed by assessing the XPD gene. Construction workers showed a significant increase in MN and comet tail length compared to controls with adjustment for smoking habits, tobacco chewing, alcohol consumption and years of exposure (P<0.05). The results indicated that chronic occupational exposure to cement during construction work could lead to increased levels of DNA damage and repair inhibition. PMID:21133594

  20. [DNA repair and antioxidant defence in the repair-deficient human cells (Marfan's syndrome) after gamma-irradiation].

    PubMed

    Sinel'shchikova, T A; Semiachkina, A N; Zasukhina, G D

    2005-01-01

    DNA repair synthesis (RS) was investigated in lymphocytes of healty donors and repair-deficient cells (Marfan's syndrome), treated with inhibitor of superoxidedismutase (SOD)--TRIEN--after gamma-irradiation. Significant difference was revealed in cells of healthy donors and Marfan's syndrome: in cells of healthy donors TRIEN stimulated DNA RS whereas this effect didn't observed in Marfan's syndrome cells. So it is possible to suppose that SOD activity is different in normal and gamma-repair-deficient cells. PMID:15906854

  1. Homologous recombination repair is essential for repair of vosaroxin-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Hawtin, Rachael Elizabeth; Stockett, David Elliot; Wong, Oi Kwan; Lundin, Cecilia; Helleday, Thomas; Fox, Judith Ann

    2010-11-01

    Vosaroxin (formerly voreloxin) is a first-in-class anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and inhibits topoisomerase II, inducing site-selective double-strand breaks (DSB), G2 arrest and apoptosis. Objective responses and complete remissions were observed in phase 2 studies of vosaroxin in patients with solid and hematologic malignancies, and responses were seen in patients whose cancers were resistant to anthracyclines. The quinolone-based scaffold differentiates vosaroxin from the anthracyclines and anthracenediones, broadly used DNA intercalating topoisomerase II poisons. Here we report that vosaroxin induces a cell cycle specific pattern of DNA damage and repair that is distinct from the anthracycline, doxorubicin. Both drugs stall replication and preferentially induce DNA damage in replicating cells, with damage in G2 / M > S > G1. However, detectable replication fork collapse, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation and long tract recombination during S phase, is induced only by doxorubicin. Furthermore, vosaroxin induces less overall DNA fragmentation. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is critical for recovery from DNA damage induced by both agents, identifying the potential to clinically exploit synthetic lethality. PMID:21317456

  2. Homologous recombination repair is essential for repair of vosaroxin-induced DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Hawtin, Rachael Elizabeth; Stockett, David Elliot; Wong, Oi Kwan; Lundin, Cecilia; Helleday, Thomas; Fox, Judith Ann

    2010-01-01

    Vosaroxin (formerly voreloxin) is a first-in-class anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and inhibits topoisomerase II, inducing site-selective double-strand breaks (DSB), G2 arrest and apoptosis. Objective responses and complete remissions were observed in phase 2 studies of vosaroxin in patients with solid and hematologic malignancies, and responses were seen in patients whose cancers were resistant to anthracyclines. The quinolone-based scaffold differentiates vosaroxin from the anthracyclines and anthracenediones, broadly used DNA intercalating topoisomerase II poisons. Here we report that vosaroxin induces a cell cycle specific pattern of DNA damage and repair that is distinct from the anthracycline, doxorubicin. Both drugs stall replication and preferentially induce DNA damage in replicating cells, with damage in G2 / M > S >> G1. However, detectable replication fork collapse, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation and long tract recombination during S phase, is induced only by doxorubicin. Furthermore, vosaroxin induces less overall DNA fragmentation. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is critical for recovery from DNA damage induced by both agents, identifying the potential to clinically exploit synthetic lethality. PMID:21317456

  3. Requirement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae APN1 Gene for the Repair of Mitochondrial DNA Alkylation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Torres, Karina; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Ayala-Torres, Sylvette; Torres-Ramos, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae APN1 gene that participates in base excision repair has been localized both in the nucleus and the mitochondria. APN1 deficient cells (apn1?) show increased mutation frequencies in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggesting that APN1 is also important for mtDNA stability. To understand APN1-dependent mtDNA repair processes we studied the formation and repair of mtDNA lesions in cells exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). We show that MMS induces mtDNA damage in a dose-dependent fashion and that deletion of the APN1 gene enhances the susceptibility of mtDNA to MMS. Repair kinetic experiments demonstrate that in wild-type cells (WT) it takes 4 hr to repair the damage induced by 0.1% MMS, whereas in the apn1? strain there is a lag in mtDNA repair that results in significant differences in the repair capacity between the two yeast strains. Analysis of lesions in nuclear DNA (nDNA) after treatment with 0.1% MMS shows a significant difference in the amount of nDNA lesions between WT and apn1? cells. Interestingly, comparisons between nDNA and mtDNA damage show that nDNA is more sensitive to the effects of MMS treatment. However, both strains are able to repair the nDNA lesions, contrary to mtDNA repair, which is compromised in the apn1? mutant strain. Therefore, although nDNA is more sensitive than mtDNA to the effects of MMS, deletion of APN1 has a stronger phenotype in mtDNA repair than in nDNA. These results highlight the prominent role of APN1 in the repair of environmentally induced mtDNA damage. PMID:19197988

  4. Preferential Repair of the Transcribed DNA Strand in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fidantsef, Ana Lena; Britt, Anne Bagg

    2012-01-01

    UV-induced pyrimidine dimers block the progression of both DNA and RNA polymerases. In order to reduce the disruptive effect of these lesions on gene expression, bacteria, yeasts, and animals preferentially repair the transcribed strand of actively expressed genes, essentially employing the stalled polymerase as a detector for bulky lesions. It has been assumed, but not demonstrated, that this prioritization of repair also occurs in plants. Here we demonstrate that in the constitutively expressed gene encoding the RNA polymerase II large subunit cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are removed from the transcribed strand more rapidly than from the non-transcribed strand. PMID:22629267

  5. Crystal Structure of the Human Hsmar1-Derived Transposase Domain in the DNA Repair Enzyme Metnase

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Kristie D.; He, Hongzhen; Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Suk-Hee; Georgiadis, Millie M. (Indiana-Med)

    2010-08-12

    Although the human genome is littered with sequences derived from the Hsmar1 transposon, the only intact Hsmar1 transposase gene exists within a chimeric SET-transposase fusion protein referred to as Metnase or SETMAR. Metnase retains many of the transposase activities including terminal inverted repeat (TIR) specific DNA-binding activity, DNA cleavage activity, albeit uncoupled from TIR-specific binding, and the ability to form a synaptic complex. However, Metnase has evolved as a DNA repair protein that is specifically involved in nonhomologous end joining. Here, we present two crystal structures of the transposase catalytic domain of Metnase revealing a dimeric enzyme with unusual active site plasticity that may be involved in modulating metal binding. We show through characterization of a dimerization mutant, F460K, that the dimeric form of the enzyme is required for its DNA cleavage, DNA-binding, and nonhomologous end joining activities. Of significance is the conservation of F460 along with residues that we propose may be involved in the modulation of metal binding in both the predicted ancestral Hsmar1 transposase sequence as well as in the modern enzyme. The Metnase transposase has been remarkably conserved through evolution; however, there is a clustering of substitutions located in alpha helices 4 and 5 within the putative DNA-binding site, consistent with loss of transposition specific DNA cleavage activity and acquisition of DNA repair specific cleavage activity.

  6. DNA conformations in mismatch repair probed in solution by X-ray scattering from gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hura, Greg L; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Claridge, Shelley A; Mendillo, Marc L; Smith, Jessica M; Williams, Gareth J; Mastroianni, Alexander J; Alivisatos, A Paul; Putnam, Christopher D; Kolodner, Richard D; Tainer, John A

    2013-10-22

    DNA metabolism and processing frequently require transient or metastable DNA conformations that are biologically important but challenging to characterize. We use gold nanocrystal labels combined with small angle X-ray scattering to develop, test, and apply a method to follow DNA conformations acting in the Escherichia coli mismatch repair (MMR) system in solution. We developed a neutral PEG linker that allowed gold-labeled DNAs to be flash-cooled and stored without degradation in sample quality. The 1,000-fold increased gold nanocrystal scattering vs. DNA enabled investigations at much lower concentrations than otherwise possible to avoid concentration-dependent tetramerization of the MMR initiation enzyme MutS. We analyzed the correlation scattering functions for the nanocrystals to provide higher resolution interparticle distributions not convoluted by the intraparticle distribution. We determined that mispair-containing DNAs were bent more by MutS than complementary sequence DNA (csDNA), did not promote tetramer formation, and allowed MutS conversion to a sliding clamp conformation that eliminated the DNA bends. Addition of second protein responder MutL did not stabilize the MutS-bent forms of DNA. Thus, DNA distortion is only involved at the earliest mispair recognition steps of MMR: MutL does not trap bent DNA conformations, suggesting migrating MutL or MutS/MutL complexes as a conserved feature of MMR. The results promote a mechanism of mismatch DNA bending followed by straightening in initial MutS and MutL responses in MMR. We demonstrate that small angle X-ray scattering with gold labels is an enabling method to examine protein-induced DNA distortions key to the DNA repair, replication, transcription, and packaging. PMID:24101514

  7. A unified view of base excision repair: lesion-dependent protein complexes regulated by post-translational modification

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Karen H.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) proteins act upon a significantly broad spectrum of DNA lesions that result from endogenous and exogenous sources. Multiple sub-pathways of BER (short-path or long-patch) and newly designated DNA repair pathways (e.g., SSBR and NIR) that utilize BER proteins complicate any comprehensive understanding of BER and its role in genome maintenance, chemotherapeutic response, neurodegeneration, cancer or aging. Herein, we propose a unified model of BER, comprised of three functional processes: Lesion Recognition/Strand Scission, Gap Tailoring and DNA Synthesis/Ligation, each represented by one or more multiprotein complexes and coordinated via the XRCC1/DNA Ligase III and PARP1 scaffold proteins. BER therefore may be represented by a series of repair complexes that assemble at the site of the DNA lesion and mediates repair in a coordinated fashion involving protein-protein interactions that dictate subsequent steps or sub-pathway choice. Complex formation is influenced by post-translational protein modifications that arise from the cellular state or the DNA damage response, providing an increase in specificity and efficiency to the BER pathway. In this review, we have summarized the reported BER protein-protein interactions and protein post-translational modifications and discuss the impact on DNA repair capacity and complex formation. PMID:17337257

  8. DNA Repair 5 (2006) 145152 Mini review

    E-print Network

    Santos, Janine H.

    2006-01-01

    peroxide (H2O2) that in conjunction with its large iron stores can lead to a witch's brew of reactiveIII, endonuclease III; EndoVIII, endonuclease VIII; ExoIII, exonuclease III; FAD, flavine adenine dinucleotide; H2O2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 4. mtDNA damage leads to loss of membrane potential, ATP synthesis and cell death

  9. Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 Promotes Immunoglobulin Gene Conversion and DNA Repair through a Mechanism Related to Homologous Recombination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuhiko Yamamoto; Seiki Hirano; Masamichi Ishiai; Kenichi Morishima; Hiroyuki Kitao; Keiko Namikoshi; Masayo Kimura; Nobuko Matsushita; Hiroshi Arakawa; Jean-Marie Buerstedde; Kenshi Komatsu; Larry H. Thompson; Minoru Takata

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies show overlap between Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins and those involved in DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). However, the mechanism by which FA proteins affect HR is unclear. FA proteins (FancA\\/C\\/E\\/F\\/G\\/L) form a multiprotein complex, which is responsible for DNA damage- induced FancD2 monoubiquitination, a key event for cellular resistance to DNA damage. Here, we show that

  10. DNA repair in human cells: in Cockayne syndrome cells rejoining of DNA strands is impaired.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, H; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Schweiger, M

    1986-08-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with Cockayne Syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to UV light. DNA repair was analyzed in these cells by sedimentation behaviour of DNA nucleoids in sucrose gradients and compared to normal control cells. The initiation of repair, the incision of the DNA strand next to the UV lesion appeared to be normal. The rejoining of DNA stretches, however, is retarded in CS cells. DNA repair synthesis of UV damages was measured by autoradiography of [14C]thymidine incorporation into resting cells. Up to 4 h the DNA repair synthesis was comparable with normal cells. From 4 to 7 h the incorporation of radioactive precursors declined in CS cells. Besides a defective DNA polymerase this could be due to accelerated excorporation of radioactive nucleotides as a consequence of delayed ligation. In ligation the enzyme itself could be affected as well as its activation by ADP-ribosylation. Nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is needed for the ADP ribosylation process. The cellular NAD+ content, however, was found to be the same in normal and in CS fibroblasts. Increase of the extracellular NAD+ supply accelerated the rejoining of UV damaged DNA in CS cells. PMID:3758088

  11. PURINE-SPECIFIC REPAIR OF ?-PROPIOLACTONE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE IN MOUSE SKIN CELLS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry Hennings; Delores M. Michael; Sol del Ande Eaton; David L. Morgan

    1974-01-01

    The incorporation of tritiated deoxyribonucleosides into DNA was studied during DNA repair in mouse skin cells treated with the skin carcinogen ?-propiolactone. Although all four deoxyribonucleosides were utilized in DNA replication, only the purines deoxyguanosine and deoxyadenosine were incorporated in repair. Since ?-propiolactone interacts almost exclusively with purines in DNA, this result may represent insertion of a single base at

  12. Defective DNA single-strand break repair in spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sherif F. El-Khamisy; Gulam M. Saifi; Michael Weinfeld; Fredrik Johansson; Thomas Helleday; James R. Lupski; Keith W. Caldecott

    2005-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1 (SCAN1) is a neurodegenerative disease that results from mutation of tyrosyl phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1). In lower eukaryotes, Tdp1 removes topoisomerase 1 (top1) peptide from DNA termini during the repair of double-strand breaks created by collision of replication forks with top1 cleavage complexes in proliferating cells. Although TDP1 most probably fulfils a similar function in human

  13. Oncogene-triggered suppression of DNA repair leads to DNA instability in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yaglom, Julia A.; McFarland, Christopher; Mirny, Leonid; Sherman, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    DNA instability is an important contributor to cancer development. Previously, defects in the chromosome segregation and excessive DNA double strand breaks due to the replication or oxidative stresses were implicated in DNA instability in cancer. Here, we demonstrate that DNA instability can directly result from the oncogene-induced senescence signaling. Expression of the activated form of Her2 oncogene, NeuT, in immortalized breast epithelial cells led to downregulation of the major DNA repair factor histone H2AX and a number of other components of the HR and NHEJ double strand DNA breaks repair pathways. H2AX expression was regulated at the transcriptional level via a senescence pathway involving p21-mediated regulation of CDK and Rb1. The p21-dependent downregulation of H2AX was seen both in cell culture and the MMTV-neu mouse model of Her2-positive breast cancer. Importantly, downregulation of H2AX upon Her2/NeuT expression impaired repair of double strand DNA breaks. This impairment resulted in both increased DNA instability in the form of somatic copy number alterations, and in increased sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. Overall, these findings indicate that the Her2/NeuT oncogene signaling directly potentiates DNA instability and increases sensitivity to DNA damaging treatments. PMID:25252808

  14. DNA polymerase III requirement for repair of DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hagensee, M.E.; Bryan, S.K.; Moses, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    The pcbA1 mutation allows DNA replication dependent on DNA polymerase I at the restrictive temperature in polC(Ts) strains. Cells which carry pcbA1, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive DNA polymerase III gene were used to study the role of DNA polymerase III in DNA repair. At the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III, these strains were more sensitive to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide than normal cells. The same strains showed no increase in sensitivity to bleomycin, UV light, or psoralen at the restrictive temperature. The sensitivity of these strains to MMS and hydrogen peroxide was not due to the pcbAl allele, and normal sensitivity was restored by the introduction of a chromosomal or cloned DNA polymerase III gene, verifying that the sensitivity was due to loss of DNA polymerase III alpha-subunit activity. A functional DNA polymerase III is required for the reformation of high-molecular-weight DNA after treatment of cells with MMS or hydrogen peroxide, as demonstrated by alkaline sucrose sedimentation results. Thus, it appears that a functional DNA polymerase III is required for the optimal repair of DNA damage by MMS or hydrogen peroxide.

  15. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  16. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  17. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism Anuradha Mudipalli. Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  18. UV radiation damage and bacterial DNA repair systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michal Zion; Daniel Guy; Ruth Yarom; Michaela Slesak

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in order to induce the production of the melanin-like

  19. Dark repair of DNA containing “spore photoproduct” in Bacillus subtilis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nobuo Munakata; Claud S. Rupert

    1974-01-01

    The major thymine-containing photoproduct—5-thyminyl-5, 6-dihydrothymine, or TDHT—in DNA of UV-irradiated bacterial spores is known to be removed during spore germination. In normal Bacillus subtilis this removal is now shown to occur both by excision and by a second, distinct, “spore repair” process, which changes the photoproduct to a harmless form in situ. An energy source for the cells, suppliable by

  20. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meena Shrivastav; Leyma P De Haro; Jac A Nickoloff

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are critical lesions that can result in cell death or a wide variety of genetic alterations including large- or small-scale deletions, loss of heterozygosity, translocations, and chromosome loss. DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR), and defects in these pathways cause genome instability and promote tumorigenesis. DSBs arise from endogenous sources including

  1. Beyond DNA Repair: Additional Functions of PARP-1 in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Alice N.; Yang, Eddy S.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are DNA-dependent nuclear enzymes that transfer negatively charged ADP-ribose moieties from cellular nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide (NAD+) to a variety of protein substrates, altering protein–protein and protein-DNA interactions. The most studied of these enzymes is poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which is an excellent therapeutic target in cancer due to its pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Clinical studies have shown susceptibility to PARP inhibitors in DNA repair defective cancers with only mild adverse side effects. Interestingly, additional studies are emerging which demonstrate a role for this therapy in DNA repair proficient tumors through a variety of mechanisms. In this review, we will discuss additional functions of PARP-1 – including regulation of inflammatory mediators, cellular energetics and death pathways, gene transcription, sex hormone- and ERK-mediated signaling, and mitosis – and the role these PARP-1-mediated processes play in oncogenesis, cancer progression, and the development of therapeutic resistance. As PARP-1 can act in both a pro- and anti-tumor manner depending on the context, it is important to consider the global effects of this protein in determining when, and how, to best use PARP inhibitors in anticancer therapy. PMID:24350055

  2. DNA repair inhibition by UVA photoactivated fluoroquinolones and vemurafenib

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Matthew; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Karran, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous photosensitization is a common side effect of drug treatment and can be associated with an increased skin cancer risk. The immunosuppressant azathioprine, the fluoroquinolone antibiotics and vemurafenib—a BRAF inhibitor used to treat metastatic melanoma—are all recognized clinical photosensitizers. We have compared the effects of UVA radiation on cultured human cells treated with 6-thioguanine (6-TG, a DNA-embedded azathioprine surrogate), the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin and vemurafenib. Despite widely different structures and modes of action, each of these drugs potentiated UVA cytotoxicity. UVA photoactivation of 6-TG, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was associated with the generation of singlet oxygen that caused extensive protein oxidation. In particular, these treatments were associated with damage to DNA repair proteins that reduced the efficiency of nucleotide excision repair. Although vemurafenib was also highly phototoxic to cultured cells, its effects were less dependent on singlet oxygen. Highly toxic combinations of vemurafenib and UVA caused little protein carbonylation but were nevertheless inhibitory to nucleotide excision repair. Thus, for three different classes of drugs, photosensitization by at least two distinct mechanisms is associated with reduced protection against potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic DNA damage. PMID:25414333

  3. Clinical Radiation Sensitivity With DNA Repair Disorders: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Julianne M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Graduate Program, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gatti, Richard A. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Human Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)], E-mail: rgatti@mednet.ucla.edu

    2009-08-01

    Adverse reactions to radiotherapy represent a confounding phenomenon in radiation oncology. These reactions are rare, and many have been associated with individuals with DNA repair disorders such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen Breakage syndrome. A paucity of published data is available detailing such circumstances. This overview describes four exemplary situations, a comprehensive list of 32 additional cases, and some insights gleaned from this overall experience. Fanconi anemia was associated with more than one-half of the reports. The lowest dose given to a patient that resulted in a reaction was 3 Gy, given to an ataxia-telangiectasia patient. Most patients died within months of exposure. It is clear that the patients discussed in this report had complicated illnesses, in addition to cancer, and the radiotherapy administered was most likely their best option. However, the underlying DNA repair defects make conventional radiation doses dangerous. Our findings support previous wisdom that radiotherapy should either be avoided or the doses should be selected with great care in the case of these radiosensitive genotypes, which must be recognized by their characteristic phenotypes, until more rapid, reliable, and functional assays of DNA repair become available.

  4. DNA repair inhibition by UVA photoactivated fluoroquinolones and vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Matthew; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Karran, Peter

    2014-12-16

    Cutaneous photosensitization is a common side effect of drug treatment and can be associated with an increased skin cancer risk. The immunosuppressant azathioprine, the fluoroquinolone antibiotics and vemurafenib-a BRAF inhibitor used to treat metastatic melanoma-are all recognized clinical photosensitizers. We have compared the effects of UVA radiation on cultured human cells treated with 6-thioguanine (6-TG, a DNA-embedded azathioprine surrogate), the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin and vemurafenib. Despite widely different structures and modes of action, each of these drugs potentiated UVA cytotoxicity. UVA photoactivation of 6-TG, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was associated with the generation of singlet oxygen that caused extensive protein oxidation. In particular, these treatments were associated with damage to DNA repair proteins that reduced the efficiency of nucleotide excision repair. Although vemurafenib was also highly phototoxic to cultured cells, its effects were less dependent on singlet oxygen. Highly toxic combinations of vemurafenib and UVA caused little protein carbonylation but were nevertheless inhibitory to nucleotide excision repair. Thus, for three different classes of drugs, photosensitization by at least two distinct mechanisms is associated with reduced protection against potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic DNA damage. PMID:25414333

  5. The COP9 signalosome is vital for timely repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Michal; Galanty, Yaron; Kashani, Lior; Blank, Michael; Khosravi, Rami; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Cruz-García, Andrés; Star, Ayelet; Shochot, Lea; Thomas, Yann; Garrett, Lisa J.; Chamovitz, Daniel A.; Bodine, David M.; Kurz, Thimo; Huertas, Pablo; Ziv, Yael; Shiloh, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response is vigorously activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The chief mobilizer of the DSB response is the ATM protein kinase. We discovered that the COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a crucial player in the DSB response and an ATM target. CSN is a protein complex that regulates the activity of cullin ring ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complexes by removing the ubiquitin-like protein, NEDD8, from their cullin scaffold. We find that the CSN is physically recruited to DSB sites in a neddylation-dependent manner, and is required for timely repair of DSBs, affecting the balance between the two major DSB repair pathways—nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair (HRR). The CSN is essential for the processivity of deep end-resection—the initial step in HRR. Cullin 4a (CUL4A) is recruited to DSB sites in a CSN- and neddylation-dependent manner, suggesting that CSN partners with CRL4 in this pathway. Furthermore, we found that ATM-mediated phosphorylation of CSN subunit 3 on S410 is critical for proper DSB repair, and that loss of this phosphorylation site alone is sufficient to cause a DDR deficiency phenotype in the mouse. This novel branch of the DSB response thus significantly affects genome stability. PMID:25855810

  6. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  7. Inter-individual variation in DNA repair capacity: a need for multi-pathway functional assays to promote translational DNA repair research.

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Zachary D.; Chaim, Isaac. A.; Samson, Leona D.

    2014-01-01

    Why does a constant barrage of DNA damage lead to disease in some individuals, while others remain healthy? This article surveys current work addressing the implications of inter-individual variation in DNA repair capacity for human health, and discusses the status of DNA repair assays as potential clinical tools for personalized prevention or treatment of disease. In particular, we highlight research showing that there are significant inter-individual variations in DNA Repair Capacity (DRC), and that measuring these differences provides important biological insight regarding disease susceptibility and cancer treatment efficacy. We emphasize work showing that it is important to measure repair capacity in multiple pathways, and that functional assays are required to fill a gap left by genome wide association studies, global gene expression and proteomics. Finally, we discuss research that will be needed to overcome barriers that currently limit the use of DNA repair assays in the clinic. PMID:24780560

  8. DNA repair in pollen: Range of mutagens inducing repair, effect of replication inhibitors and changes in thymidine nucleotide metabolism during repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Jackson; H. F. Linskens

    1980-01-01

    Pollen of Petunia hybrida carry out DNA repair during the first two hours of germination when certain mutagens are included in the germination medium. This repair, detected readily as unscheduled DNA synthesis, since there is no replicative DNA synthesis in Petunia pollen, can be induced by the chemical mutagens N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, azaserine and methyl methanesulphonate. These compounds are all considered

  9. Involvement of DNA polymerase delta in DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts at late times after ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dresler, S.L.; Gowans, B.J.; Robinson-Hill, R.M.; Hunting, D.J.

    1988-08-23

    DNA repair synthesis following UV irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts has a biphasic time course with an early phase of rapid nucleotide incorporation and a late phase of much slower nucleotide incorporation. The biphasic nature of this curve suggests that two distinct DNA repair systems may be operative. Previous studies have specifically implicated DNA polymerase delta as the enzyme involved in DNA repair synthesis occurring immediately after UV damage. In this paper, the authors describe studies of DNA polymerase involvement in DNA repair synthesis in confluent human fibroblasts at late times after UV irradiation. Late UV-induced DNA repair synthesis in both intact and permeable cells was found to be inhibited by aphidicolin, indicating the involvement of one of the aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases, ..cap alpha.. or delta. In permeable cells, the process was further analyzed by using the nucleotide analogue (butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate, which inhibits DNA polymerase ..cap alpha.. several hundred times more strongly than it inhibits DNA polymerase delta. The (butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate inhibition curve for late UV-induced repair synthesis was very similar to that for polymerase delta. It appears that repair synthesis at late time after UV irradiation, like repair synthesis at early times, is mediated by DNA polymerase delta.

  10. Untangling the relationships between DNA repair pathways by silencing more than 20 DNA repair genes in human stable clones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. F. Biard

    2007-01-01

    Much effort has long been devoted to unraveling the coordinated cellular response to genotoxic insults. In view of the difficulty of obtaining human biological samples of homogeneous origin, I have established a set of stable human clones where one DNA repair gene has been stably silenced by means of RNA interference. I used pEBVsiRNA plasmids that greatly enhance long-term gene

  11. Base excision repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage in G1 and G2 cell cycle phases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Ahmad Chaudhry

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major genomic surveillance mechanisms regulated in response to DNA damage exist at the G1\\/S and G2\\/M checkpoints. It is presumed that these delays provide time for the repair of damaged DNA. Cells have developed multiple DNA repair pathways to protect themselves from different types of DNA damage. Oxidative DNA damage is processed by the base excision repair (BER) pathway.

  12. A moonlighting metabolic protein influences repair at DNA double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Machorro, Ana Lilia; Aris, John P.; Pillus, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Catalytically active proteins with divergent dual functions are often described as ‘moonlighting’. In this work we characterize a new, chromatin-based function of Lys20, a moonlighting protein that is well known for its role in metabolism. Lys20 was initially described as homocitrate synthase (HCS), the first enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathway in yeast. Its nuclear localization led to the discovery of a key role for Lys20 in DNA damage repair through its interaction with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase Esa1. Overexpression of Lys20 promotes suppression of DNA damage sensitivity of esa1 mutants. In this work, by taking advantage of LYS20 mutants that are active in repair but not in lysine biosynthesis, the mechanism of suppression of esa1 was characterized. First we analyzed the chromatin landscape of esa1 cells, finding impaired histone acetylation and eviction. Lys20 was recruited to sites of DNA damage, and its overexpression promoted enhanced recruitment of the INO80 remodeling complex to restore normal histone eviction at the damage sites. This study improves understanding of the evolutionary, structural and biological relevance of independent activities in a moonlighting protein and links metabolism to DNA damage repair. PMID:25628362

  13. Mediator links transcription and DNA repair by facilitating Rad2/XPG recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Eyboulet, Fanny; Cibot, Camille; Eychenne, Thomas; Neil, Helen; Alibert, Olivier; Werner, Michel; Soutourina, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Mediator is a large multiprotein complex conserved in all eukaryotes. The crucial function of Mediator in transcription is now largely established. However, we found that this complex also plays an important role by connecting transcription with DNA repair. We identified a functional contact between the Med17 Mediator subunit and Rad2/XPG, the 3? endonuclease involved in nucleotide excision DNA repair. Genome-wide location analyses revealed that Rad2 is associated with RNA polymerase II (Pol II)- and Pol III-transcribed genes and telomeric regions in the absence of exogenous genotoxic stress. Rad2 occupancy of Pol II-transcribed genes is transcription-dependent. Genome-wide Rad2 occupancy of class II gene promoters is well correlated with that of Mediator. Furthermore, UV sensitivity of med17 mutants is correlated with reduced Rad2 occupancy of class II genes and concomitant decrease of Mediator interaction with Rad2 protein. Our results suggest that Mediator is involved in DNA repair by facilitating Rad2 recruitment to transcribed genes. PMID:24298055

  14. DNA polymerases beta and lambda mediate overlapping and independent roles in base excision repair in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    E-print Network

    Braithwaite, Elena K.

    Base excision repair (BER) is a DNA repair pathway designed to correct small base lesions in genomic DNA. While DNA polymerase beta (pol ?) is known to be the main polymerase in the BER pathway, various studies have ...

  15. DNA damage and nucleotide excision repair capacity in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Slyskova, Jana; Naccarati, Alessio; Polakova, Veronika; Pardini, Barbara; Vodickova, Ludmila; Stetina, Rudolf; Schmuczerova, Jana; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Lipska, Ludmila; Vodicka, Pavel

    2011-08-01

    Interindividual differences in DNA repair capacity (DRC) represent an important source of variability in genome integrity and thus influence health risk. In the last decade, DRC measurement has attracted attention as a potential biomarker in cancer prediction. Aim of the present exploratory study was to characterize the variability in DNA damage and DRC on 100 healthy individuals and to identify biological, lifestyle, or genetic factors modulating these parameters. The ultimate goal was to obtain reference data from cancer-free population, which may constitute background for further investigations on cancer patients. The endogenous DNA damage was measured as a level of DNA single-strand breaks and DRC, specific for nucleotide excision repair (NER), was evaluated using modified comet assay, following the challenge of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide. Additionally, genetic polymorphisms in NER genes (XPA, XPC, XPD, and XPG) were assessed. We have observed a substantial interindividual variability for both examined parameters. DNA damage was significantly affected by gender and alcohol consumption (P = 0.003 and P = 0.012, respectively), whereas DRC was associated with family history of cancer (P = 0.012). The stratification according to common variants in NER genes showed that DNA damage was significantly modulated by the presence of the variant T allele of XPC Ala499Val polymorphism (P = 0.01), while DRC was modulated by the presence of the A allele of XPA G23A polymorphism (P = 0.048). Our results indicate the range of endogenous DNA single-strand breaks and capacity of NER in healthy volunteers as well as the role of potentially relevant confounders. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21520291

  16. RPA Antagonizes Microhomology-Mediated Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Sarah K; Gibb, Bryan; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Greene, Eric C; Symington, Lorraine S

    2014-01-01

    Microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) is a Ku and Ligase IV independent mechanism for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, which contributes to chromosome rearrangements. Here we used a chromosomal end-joining assay to determine the genetic requirements for MMEJ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that end resection influences the ability to expose microhomologies; however, it is not rate limiting for MMEJ in wild-type cells. The frequency of MMEJ increased by up to 350-fold in rfa1 hypomorphic mutants, suggesting that replication protein A (RPA) bound to the ssDNA overhangs formed by resection prevents spontaneous annealing between microhomologies. In vitro, the mutant RPA complexes were unable to fully extend ssDNA and were compromised in their ability to prevent spontaneous annealing. We propose the helix-destabilizing activity of RPA channels ssDNA intermediates from mutagenic MMEJ to error-free homologous recombination, thus preserving genome integrity. PMID:24608368

  17. Membrane association of mitochondrial DNA facilitates base excision repair in mammalian mitochondria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Boesch; Noha Ibrahim; A. Dietrich; R. N. Lightowlers

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA encodes a set of 13 polypeptides and is subjected to constant oxidative stress due to ROS production within the organelle. It has been shown that DNA repair in the mitochondrion proceeds through both short- and long-patch base excision repair (BER). In the present article, we have used the natural competence of mammalian mito- chondria to import DNA and

  18. Host DNA repair proteins in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in lung epitehlial cells and in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host DNA damage and DNA repair response to bacterial infections and its significance are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that infection by Gram-negative bacterium P. aeruginosa significantly altered the expression and enzymatic activity of base excision DNA repair protein OGG1 in lung epi...

  19. Pol ? associated complex and base excision repair factors in mouse fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rajendra; Williams, Jason G.; Hou, Esther W.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    During mammalian base excision repair (BER) of lesion-containing DNA, it is proposed that toxic strand-break intermediates generated throughout the pathway are sequestered and passed from one step to the next until repair is complete. This stepwise process is termed substrate channeling. A working model evaluated here is that a complex of BER factors may facilitate the BER process. FLAG-tagged DNA polymerase (pol) ? was expressed in mouse fibroblasts carrying a deletion in the endogenous pol ? gene, and the cell extract was subjected to an ‘affinity-capture’ procedure using anti-FLAG antibody. The pol ? affinity-capture fraction (ACF) was found to contain several BER factors including polymerase-1, X-ray cross-complementing factor1-DNA ligase III and enzymes involved in processing 3?-blocked ends of BER intermediates, e.g. polynucleotide kinase and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1. In contrast, DNA glycosylases, apurinic/aprymidinic endonuclease 1 and flap endonuclease 1 and several other factors involved in BER were not present. Some of the BER factors in the pol ? ACF were in a multi-protein complex as observed by sucrose gradient centrifugation. The pol ? ACF was capable of substrate channeling for steps in vitro BER and was proficient in in vitro repair of substrates mimicking a 3?-blocked topoisomerase I covalent intermediate or an oxidative stress-induced 3?-blocked intermediate. PMID:23042675

  20. 3-Aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, is a stimulator, not an inhibitor, of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.; Morgan, W.F. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1987-10-01

    An inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), at low concentrations was found to reduce strand-break frequencies and increase repair replication in human lymphoid cells damaged by methyl methanoesulfonate. A concentration of 0.1 mM 3AB was adequate to produce a maximum effect on strand-break frequencies and repair replication. This evidence, together with previous measurements, demonstrates that 3AB cannot be regarded as an inhibitor of DNA repair; rather, it actually accelerates the ligation of DNA repair patches. Previous considerations of 3AB as a repair inhibitor may have derived from the use of excessive concentrations above 1 mM that may have stimulated additional damage and from the use of ethyl alcohol as a solvent for 3AB. Interpretations of the role of single-strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) in DNA repair, differentiation, and gene activity may need reevaluation because they have frequently been based on an erroneous notion of 3AB as a repair inhibitor, when its mode of action is, in fact, more complex.

  1. Green tea and skin cancer: photoimmunology, angiogenesis and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Suchitra; Elmets, Craig A; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2007-05-01

    Human skin is constantly exposed to numerous noxious physical, chemical and environmental agents. Some of these agents directly or indirectly adversely affect the skin. Cutaneous overexposure to environmental solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation (290-400 nm) has a variety of adverse effects on human health, including the development of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Therefore, there is a need to develop measures or strategies, and nutritional components are increasingly being explored for this purpose. The polyphenols present in green tea (Camellia sinensis) have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including protection from UV carcinogenesis. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major and most photoprotective polyphenolic component of green tea. In this review article, we have discussed the most recent investigations and mechanistic studies that define and support the photoprotective efficacy of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) against UV carcinogenesis. The oral administration of GTPs in drinking water or the topical application of EGCG prevents UVB-induced skin tumor development in mice, and this prevention is mediated through: (a) the induction of immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 12; (b) IL-12-dependent DNA repair following nucleotide excision repair mechanism; (c) the inhibition of UV-induced immunosuppression through IL-12-dependent DNA repair; (d) the inhibition of angiogenic factors; and (e) the stimulation of cytotoxic T cells in a tumor microenvironment. New mechanistic information strongly supports and explains the chemopreventive activity of GTPs against photocarcinogenesis. PMID:17049833

  2. DNA interstrand cross-link repair requires replication-fork convergence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jieqiong; Dewar, James M; Budzowska, Magda; Motnenko, Anna; Cohn, Martin A; Walter, Johannes C

    2015-03-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) prevent strand separation during DNA replication and transcription and therefore are extremely cytotoxic. In metazoans, a major pathway of ICL repair is coupled to DNA replication, and it requires the Fanconi anemia pathway. In most current models, collision of a single DNA replication fork with an ICL is sufficient to initiate repair. In contrast, we show here that in Xenopus egg extracts two DNA replication forks must converge on an ICL to trigger repair. When only one fork reaches the ICL, the replicative CMG helicase fails to unload from the stalled fork, and repair is blocked. Arrival of a second fork, even when substantially delayed, rescues repair. We conclude that ICL repair requires a replication-induced X-shaped DNA structure surrounding the lesion, and we speculate on how this requirement helps maintain genomic stability in S phase. PMID:25643322

  3. Bleomycin-induced double-strand breaks in mitochondrial DNA of Drosophila cells are repaired.

    PubMed

    Morel, Frederic; Renoux, Monique; Lachaume, Philippe; Alziari, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA lesions cause numerous human diseases, and it is therefore important to identify the mechanisms whereby the mitochondrion repairs the damage. We have studied in cultured Drosophila cells the repair of bleomycin-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mitochondrial DNA. Our results show that DSBs are repaired as rapidly and effectively in the mitochondria as in the nucleus. DNA repair is complete within 2h following bleomycin treatment, showing that Drosophila mitochondria have an effective system of DSB repair. The mechanism and mitochondrial proteins involved remain to be identified. PMID:17825327

  4. Crystal Structure of the Vaccinia Virus Uracil-DNA Glycosylase in Complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Wim P; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Fender, Pascal; Contesto-Richefeu, Céline; Peyrefitte, Christophe N; Iseni, Frédéric

    2015-07-17

    Vaccinia virus polymerase holoenzyme is composed of the DNA polymerase catalytic subunit E9 associated with its heterodimeric co-factor A20·D4 required for processive genome synthesis. Although A20 has no known enzymatic activity, D4 is an active uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG). The presence of a repair enzyme as a component of the viral replication machinery suggests that, for poxviruses, DNA synthesis and base excision repair is coupled. We present the 2.7 Å crystal structure of the complex formed by D4 and the first 50 amino acids of A20 (D4·A201-50) bound to a 10-mer DNA duplex containing an abasic site resulting from the cleavage of a uracil base. Comparison of the viral complex with its human counterpart revealed major divergences in the contacts between protein and DNA and in the enzyme orientation on the DNA. However, the conformation of the dsDNA within both structures is very similar, suggesting a dominant role of the DNA conformation for UNG function. In contrast to human UNG, D4 appears rigid, and we do not observe a conformational change upon DNA binding. We also studied the interaction of D4·A201-50 with different DNA oligomers by surface plasmon resonance. D4 binds weakly to nonspecific DNA and to uracil-containing substrates but binds abasic sites with a Kd of <1.4 ?m. This second DNA complex structure of a family I UNG gives new insight into the role of D4 as a co-factor of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase and allows a better understanding of the structural determinants required for UNG action. PMID:26045555

  5. DNA double-strand break repair: From mechanistic understanding to cancer treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Helleday; Justin Lo; Dik C. van Gent; Bevin P. Engelward

    2007-01-01

    Accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks is essential to life. Indeed, defective DNA double-strand break repair can lead to toxicity and large scale sequence rearrangements that cause cancer and promote premature aging. Here, we highlight the two major repair systems for handling DNA double-strand breaks: homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. To clarify recombination mechanisms, we present animations that illustrate

  6. Regulation of DNA repair in serum-stimulated xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, P.K.; Sirover, M.A.

    1984-10-01

    The regulation of DNA repair during serum stimulation of quiescent cells was examined in normal human cells, in fibroblasts from three xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups (A, C, and D), in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, and in ataxia telangiectasia cells. The regulation of nucleotide excision repair was examined by exposing cells to ultraviolet irradiation at discrete intervals after cell stimulation. Similarly, base excision repair was quantitated after exposure to methylmethane sulfonate. WI-38 normal human diploid fibroblasts, xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, as well as ataxia telangiectasia cells enhanced their capacity for both nucleotide excision repair and for base excision repair prior to their enhancement of DNA synthesis. Further, in each cell strain, the base excision repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase was increased prior to the induction of DNA polymerase using the identical cells to quantitate each activity. In contrast, each of the three xeroderma complementation groups that were examined failed to increase their capacity for nucleotide excision repair above basal levels at any interval examined. This result was observed using either unscheduled DNA synthesis in the presence of 10 mM hydroxyurea or using repair replication in the absence of hydroxyurea to quantitate DNA repair. However, each of the three complementation groups normally regulated the enhancement of base excision repair after methylmethane sulfonate exposure and each induced the uracil DNA glycosylase prior to DNA synthesis. 62 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Analysis of DNA repair helicase UvrD from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-10-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) proteins play important roles in maintaining genome stability in all the organisms. Studies of MMR genes in plants have identified several homologs of the Escherichia coli genes. Crop yield is directly related to genome stability, which is crucially required for optimal plant growth and development. Numerous genotoxic stresses such as UV light, radiations, pollutants and heavy metals cause DNA damage leading to genome instability, which can interfere with the plant growth and crop productivity. But the efficient repair mechanisms can help to overcome the deleterious effects of the damage. Therefore it is important to study the genes involved in various repair pathways in the plants in greater detail. UvrD helicase is a component of MMR complex and plays an essential role in the DNA repair by providing the unwinding function. In the present manuscript we present an in silico analysis of UvrD helicase from two plant species (Arabidopsis and rice). The Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa UvrD are 1149 (~129 kDa) and 1165 amino-acids (~130 kDa) proteins, respectively. These proteins contain all the conserved domains and are larger than the E. coli UvrD because they contain a longer N-terminal extension. In order to decipher the role of plant UvrD in various stresses it will be important to study the biochemical and functional properties of this enzyme. PMID:23974358

  8. PTIP associates with Artemis to dictate DNA repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiadong; Aroumougame, Asaithamby; Lobrich, Markus; Li, Yujing; Chen, David

    2014-01-01

    PARP inhibitors (PARPis) are being used in patients with BRCA1/2 mutations. However, doubly deficient BRCA1?/?53BP1?/? cells or tumors become resistant to PARPis. Since 53BP1 or its known downstream effectors, PTIP and RIF1 (RAP1-interacting factor 1 homolog), lack enzymatic activities directly implicated in DNA repair, we decided to further explore the 53BP1-dependent pathway. In this study, we uncovered a nuclease, Artemis, as a PTIP-binding protein. Loss of Artemis restores PARPi resistance in BRCA1-deficient cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that Artemis is the major downstream effector of the 53BP1 pathway, which prevents end resection and promotes nonhomologous end-joining and therefore directly competes with the homologous recombination repair pathway. PMID:25512557

  9. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Julio C.; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J.; Motea, Edward A.; Patidar, Praveen L.; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N.; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L.; Boothman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed ?-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair. PMID:24589584

  10. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julio C; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J; Motea, Edward A; Patidar, Praveen L; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L; Boothman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed ?-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair. PMID:24589584

  11. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  12. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  13. The role of NBS1 in DNA double strand break repair, telomere stability, and cell cycle checkpoint control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Junqing; Lim, Chang Uk

    2006-01-01

    The genomes of eukaryotic cells are under continuous assault by environmental agents and endogenous metabolic byproducts. Damage induced in DNA usually leads to a cascade of cellular events, the DNA damage response. Failure of the DNA damage response can lead to development of malignancy by reducing the efficiency and fidelity of DNA repair. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex (MRN) that plays a critical role in the cellular response to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Mutations in the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), a hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The phenotypic characteristics of cells isolated from NBS patients point to a deficiency in the repair of DNA double strand breaks. Here, we review the current knowledge of the role of NBS1 in the DNA damage response. Emphasis is placed on the role of NBS1 in the DNA double strand repair, modulation of the DNA damage sensing and signaling, cell cycle checkpoint control and maintenance of telomere stability. PMID:16467875

  14. A novel function for the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex in base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Steininger, Sylvia; Ahne, Fred; Winkler, Klaudia; Kleinschmidt, Anja; Eckardt-Schupp, Friederike; Moertl, Simone

    2010-01-01

    The Mre11/Rad50/Xrs2 (MRX) complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has well-characterized functions in DNA double-strand break processing, checkpoint activation, telomere length maintenance and meiosis. In this study, we demonstrate an involvement of the complex in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. We studied the repair of methyl-methanesulfonate-induced heat-labile sites in chromosomal DNA in vivo and the in vitro BER capacity for the repair of uracil- and 8-oxoG-containing oligonucleotides in MRX-deficient cells. Both approaches show a clear BER deficiency for the xrs2 mutant as compared to wildtype cells. The in vitro analyses revealed that both subpathways, long-patch and short-patch BER, are affected and that all components of the MRX complex are similarly important for the new function in BER. The investigation of the epistatic relationship of XRS2 to other BER genes suggests a role of the MRX complex downstream of the AP-lyases Ntg1 and Ntg2. Analysis of individual steps in BER showed that base recognition and strand incision are not affected by the MRX complex. Reduced gap-filling activity and the missing effect of aphidicoline treatment, an inhibitor for polymerases, on the BER efficiency indicate an involvement of the MRX complex in providing efficient polymerase activity. PMID:20040573

  15. Molecular Characterization of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe nbs1+ Gene Involved in DNA Repair and Telomere Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Masaru; Nakazaki, Tomofumi; Akamatsu, Yufuko; Watanabe, Kikuo; Tomita, Kazunori; Lindsay, Howard D.; Shinagawa, Hideo; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    The human MRN complex is a multisubunit nuclease that is composed of Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1 and is involved in homologous recombination and DNA damage checkpoints. Mutations of the MRN genes cause genetic disorders such as Nijmegen breakage syndrome. Here we identified a Schizosaccharomyces pombe nbs1+ homologue by screening for mutants with mutations that caused methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) sensitivity and were synthetically lethal with the rad2? mutation. Nbs1 physically interacts with the C-terminal half of Rad32, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mre11 homologue, in a yeast two-hybrid assay. nbs1 mutants showed sensitivities to ?-rays, UV, MMS, and hydroxyurea and displayed telomere shortening similar to the characteristics of rad32 and rad50 mutants. nbs1, rad32, and rad50 mutant cells were elongated and exhibited abnormal nuclear morphology. These findings indicate that S. pombe Nbs1 forms a complex with Rad32-Rad50 and is required for homologous recombination repair, telomere length regulation, and the maintenance of chromatin structure. Amino acid sequence features and some characteristics of the DNA repair function suggest that the S. pombe Rad32-Rad50-Nbs1 complex has functional similarity to the corresponding MRN complexes of higher eukaryotes. Therefore, S. pombe Nbs1 will provide an additional model system for studying the molecular function of the MRN complex associated with genetic diseases. PMID:12944481

  16. Mismatch repair in correction of replication errors and processing of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, G; Bignami, M

    2001-05-01

    The primary role of mismatch repair (MMR) is to maintain genomic stability by removing replication errors from DNA. This repair pathway was originally implicated in human cancer through an association between microsatellite instability in colorectal tumors in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) kindreds. Microsatellites are short repetitive sequences which are often copied incorrectly by DNA polymerases because the template and daughter strands in these regions are particularly prone to misalignment. These replication-dependent events create loops of extrahelical bases which would produce frameshift mutations unless reversed by MMR. One consequence of MMR loss is a widespread expansion and contraction of these repeated sequences that affects the whole genome. Defective MMR is therefore associated with a mutator phenotype. Since the same pathway is also responsible for repairing base:base mismatches, defective cells also experience large increases in the frequency of spontaneous transition and transversion mutations. Three different approaches have been used to investigate the function of individual components of the MMR pathway. The first is based on the biochemical characterization of the purified protein complexes using synthetic DNA substrates containing loops or single mismatches. In the second, the biological consequences of MMR loss are inferred from the phenotype of cell lines established from repair-deficient human tumors, from tolerant cells or from mice defective in single MMR genes. In particular, molecular analysis of the mutations in endogenous or reporter genes helped to identify the DNA substrates for MMR. Finally, mice bearing single inactive MMR genes have helped to define the involvement of MMR in cancer prevention. PMID:11267994

  17. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Xi, T; Mohrenweiser, H W; Nelson, D O

    2006-07-03

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by Random Forests Regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach 6 SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate analytical methods for epidemiological studies of the association of genetic variation in complex genotypes with risk of common diseases.

  18. Repair of DNA Lesions by a Reductive Electron Tansfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carell, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Electron transfer phenomena in DNA are of fundamental importance for DNA damage[1] and DNA repair.[2] The movement of a positive charge (hole) through DNA[3-6] has been shown to proceed over significant distances. Two mechanisms, namely coherent superexchange for small transfer distances and hole, or polaron hopping for long range transfer are used to describe this phenomenon. In contrast to hole transfer, little is known about the transport of excess electrons (negative charges) through a DNA duplex. Such an excess electron transfer, however, is important in biology because DNA photolyase enzymes repair UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions (T=T) in the DNA duplex by an electron transfer from a reduced an deprotonated FADH-cofactor to the dimer lesion. The presentation covers recent results obtained in our group about the distance and sequence dependence of an excess electron transfer in a defined donor-DNA-acceptor system.[7-9] The prepared DNA double strands contain a reduced flavin electron donor and a thymine dimer acceptor, separated by adenine:thymine (A:T)n bridges of various lengths. The electron injection is initiated by irradiation of the DNA-double strand at 360 nm, which causes excitation of the reduced and deprotonated flavin donor. The injected electron, if captured by the dimer (T=T), triggers subsequently a cycloreversion, which is detectable by HPLC. A plot of the observed splitting yields against the distance between the flavin donor and the dimer gave a straight line with a small beta'-value of beta' = 0.1 Å-1. Such small beta'-values were determined for long range hole transfer as well. Our data show that excess electron transfer proceeds similarly efficient. Plotting of the yield data according to the hopping model ln(yield per minute) against ln(N) by assuming that every T between the flavin donor and the dimer acceptor can function as a discrete charge carrier (N), gives a straight line with a reasonable eta-value of close to 2. The result indicates that the negative charge transfer may proceed by hopping. [1] J. P. Pouget, T. Douki, M. J. Richard, J. Cadet, Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2000, 13, 541. [2] E. C. Friedberg, DNA repair and mutagenesis, ASM Press, Washington, D.C., 1995. [3] R. E. Holmlin, P. J. Dandlicker, J. K. Barton, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 1997, 36, 2715. [4] B. Giese, Acc. Chem. Res. 2000, 33, 631. [5] F. D. Lewis, R. L. Letsinger, M. R. Wasielewski, Acc. Chem. Res. 2001, 34, 159. [6] G. B. Schuster, Acc. Chem. Res. 2000, 33, 253. [7] A. Schwögler, L. T. Burgdorf, T. Carell, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2000, 39, 3918. [8] A. Schwögler, T. Carell, Org. Lett. 2000, 2, 1415. [9] M. K. Cichon, C. H. Haas, F. Grolle, A. Mees, T. Carell.J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 13984-13985.

  19. Human DNA2 is a mitochondrial nuclease/helicase for efficient processing of DNA replication and repair intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li; Zhou, Mian; Guo, Zhigang; Lu, Huiming; Qian, Limin; Dai, Huifang; Qiu, Junzhuan; Yakubovskaya, Elena; Bogenhagen, Daniel F.; Demple, Bruce; Shen, Binghui

    2008-01-01

    Summary DNA2, a helicase/nuclease family member, plays versatile roles in processing DNA intermediates during DNA replication and repair. Yeast Dna2 (yDna2) is essential in RNA primer removal during nuclear DNA replication and is important in repairing UV damage, base damage, and double-strand breaks. Our data demonstrate that, surprisingly, human DNA2 (hDNA2) does not localize to nuclei, as it lacks a nuclear localization signal equivalent to that present in yDna2. Instead, hDNA2 migrates to the mitochondria, interacts with mitochondrial DNA polymerase ?, and significantly stimulates polymerase activity. We further demonstrate that hDNA2 and flap endonuclease 1 synergistically process intermediate 5’ flap structures occurring in DNA replication and long-patch base excision repair (LP-BER) in mitochondria. Depletion of hDNA2 from a mitochondrial extract reduces its efficiency in RNA primer removal and LP-BER. Taken together, our studies illustrate an evolutionarily diversified role of hDNA2 in mitochondrial DNA replication and repair in a mammalian system. PMID:18995831

  20. A rapid, comprehensive system for assaying DNA repair activity and cytotoxic effects of DNA-damaging reagents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Nan; Nakazawa, Yuka; Guo, Chaowan; Shimada, Mayuko; Sethi, Mieran; Takahashi, Yoshito; Ueda, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Yuji; Ogi, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair systems protect cells from genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Therefore, assays for measuring DNA repair activity are valuable, not only for clinical diagnoses of DNA repair deficiency disorders but also for basic research and anticancer drug development. Two commonly used assays are UDS (unscheduled DNA synthesis, requiring a precise measurement of an extremely small amount of repair DNA synthesis) and RRS (recovery of RNA synthesis after DNA damage). Both UDS and RRS are major endpoints for assessing the activity of nucleotide excision repair (NER), the most versatile DNA repair process. Conventional UDS and RRS assays are laborious and time-consuming, as they measure the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides associated with NER. Here we describe a comprehensive protocol for monitoring nonradioactive UDS and RRS by studying the incorporation of alkyne-conjugated nucleoside analogs followed by a fluorescent azide-coupling click-chemistry reaction. The system is also suitable for quick measurement of cell sensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and for lentivirus-based complementation assays, which can be used to systematically determine the pathogenic genes associated with DNA repair deficiency disorders. A typical UDS or RRS assay using primary fibroblasts, including a virus complementation test, takes 1 week to complete. PMID:25474029

  1. Mouse DNA Polymerase Kappa Has A Functional Role In the Repair of DNA Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuli; Lv, Lingna; Chen, Qian; Yuan, Fenghua; Zhang, Ting; Yang, Yeran; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yun; Jia, Yan; Qian, Liangyue; Chen, Benjamin; Zhang, Yanbin; Friedberg, Errol C.; Tang, Tie-Shan; Guo, Caixia

    2013-01-01

    The Y-family of DNA polymerases support of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) associated with stalled DNA replication by DNA damage. Recently, a number of studies suggest that some specialized TLS polymerases also support other aspects of DNA metabolism beyond TLS in vivo. Here we show that mouse polymerase kappa (Pol?) could accumulate at laser-induced sites of damage in vivo resembling polymerases eta and iota. The recruitment was mediated through Pol? C-terminus which contains the PCNA-interacting peptide, ubiquitin zinc finger motif 2 and nuclear localization signal. Interestingly, this recruitment was significantly reduced in MSH2-deficient LoVo cells and Rad18-depleted cells. We further observed that Pol?-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts were abnormally sensitive to H2O2 treatment and displayed defects in both single-strand break repair and double-strand break repair. We speculate that Pol? may have an important role in strand break repair following oxidative stress in vivo. PMID:23522793

  2. Repeat instability during DNA repair: Insights from model systems.

    PubMed

    Usdin, Karen; House, Nealia C M; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of repeated sequences is the cause of over 30 inherited genetic diseases, including Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy (types 1 and 2), fragile X syndrome, many spinocerebellar ataxias, and some cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Repeat expansions are dynamic, and disease inheritance and progression are influenced by the size and the rate of expansion. Thus, an understanding of the various cellular mechanisms that cooperate to control or promote repeat expansions is of interest to human health. In addition, the study of repeat expansion and contraction mechanisms has provided insight into how repair pathways operate in the context of structure-forming DNA, as well as insights into non-canonical roles for repair proteins. Here we review the mechanisms of repeat instability, with a special emphasis on the knowledge gained from the various model systems that have been developed to study this topic. We cover the repair pathways and proteins that operate to maintain genome stability, or in some cases cause instability, and the cross-talk and interactions between them. PMID:25608779

  3. Oxidative charge transfer To repair thymine dimers and damage guanine bases in DNA assemblies containing tethered metallointercalators.

    PubMed

    Dandliker, P J; Núñez, M E; Barton, J K

    1998-05-01

    Potent oxidants which intercalate in DNA serve as tools to probe DNA-mediated electron-transfer reactions. A photoexcited rhodium intercalator, Rh(phi)2DMB3+ (phi = 9,10-phenanthrenequinone diimine and DMB = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine), tethered to DNA, promotes both oxidative damage to 5'-GG-3' doublets in DNA and the repair of thymine dimers from a remote site on the DNA duplex. DNA-mediated repair of a thymine dimer lesion by charge transfer from the tethered rhodium intercalator is quantitative, albeit with low photoefficiency, occurs in an intraduplex reaction over long range (36 A), and requires that the intervening bases be paired. When both oxidative reactions, repair and oxidative damage, are monitored on the same duplex, competition is evident; the presence of both a 5'-GG-3' site and the thymine dimer diminished the dimer repair efficiency by 20-40% and decreased damage at the 5'-GG-3' sites 2-fold compared to similar sequences lacking either the guanine doublet or thymine dimer, respectively. In addition to damage at the 5'-G of 5'-GG-3' sites, we also observe oxidation at the 3'-G of the 5'-GT<>TG-3' tetrad only in the presence of thymine dimer. Overall, the yield of repaired thymine strand was at least 10 times higher than the yield of oxidized guanine in the same sequences. While the 5-GG-3' may represent the thermodynamically favored site for oxidative reaction, repair of the thymine dimer appears to be kinetically more favorable. Dipyridophenanzine (dppz) complexes of ruthenium(III), less potent oxidants which intercalate in DNA, oxidize 5'-GG-3' doublets efficiently but cannot trigger the repair of the thymine dimer lesion. Oxidative damage to DNA from a distance, mediated by the DNA base pair stack, can, however, be utilized to probe the disruption in the base stack generated by the thymine dimer. The presence of the dimer does not diminish oxidation by a Ru(III) intercalator at a distal guanine doublet, suggesting that the disruption caused by the dimer does not block charge transfer through the DNA duplex. DNA-mediated electron-transfer reactions of metallointercalators therefore serve to illustrate important aspects of radical migration and its consequence with respect to reactions at a distance through the DNA base pair stack. PMID:9572867

  4. Correction of liver dysfunction in DNA repair-deficient mice with an ERCC1 transgene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim Selfridge; Kan-Tai Hsia; Nicola J. Redhead; David W. Melton

    2001-01-01

    The ERCC1 gene is essential for the repair of UV- induced DNA damage. Unlike most genes in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, ERCC1 is also involved in recombinational repair. Perhaps for this reason, ERCC1 knockout mice are not a model for the human NER deficiency disorder, xeroderma pigmentosum. Instead, ERCC1 null mice are severely runted and die before weaning

  5. DNA repair: the culprit for tumor-initiating cell survival?

    PubMed

    Mathews, Lesley A; Cabarcas, Stephanie M; Farrar, William L

    2011-06-01

    The existence of "tumor-initiating cells" (TICs) has been a topic of heated debate for the last few years within the field of cancer biology. Their continuous characterization in a variety of solid tumors has led to an abundance of evidence supporting their existence. TICs are believed to be responsible for resistance against conventional treatment regimes of chemotherapy and radiation, ultimately leading to metastasis and patient demise. This review summarizes DNA repair mechanism(s) and their role in the maintenance and regulation of stem cells. There is evidence supporting the hypothesis that TICs, similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), display an increase in their ability to survive genotoxic stress and injury. Mechanistically, the ability of ES cells, HSCs and TICs to survive under stressful conditions can be attributed to an increase in the efficiency at which these cells undergo DNA repair. Furthermore, the data presented in this review summarize the results found by our lab and others demonstrating that TICs have an increase in their genomic stability, which can allow for TIC survival under conditions such as anticancer treatments, while the bulk population of tumor cells dies. We believe that these data will greatly impact the development and design of future therapies being engineered to target and eradicate this highly aggressive cancer cell population. PMID:21340664

  6. In TFIIH, XPD Helicase Is Exclusively Devoted to DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kuper, Jochen; Braun, Cathy; Elias, Agnes; Michels, Gudrun; Sauer, Florian; Schmitt, Dominik R.; Poterszman, Arnaud; Egly, Jean-Marc; Kisker, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic XPD helicase is an essential subunit of TFIIH involved in both transcription and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Mutations in human XPD are associated with several inherited diseases such as xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome, and trichothiodystrophy. We performed a comparative analysis of XPD from Homo sapiens and Chaetomium thermophilum (a closely related thermostable fungal orthologue) to decipher the different molecular prerequisites necessary for either transcription or DNA repair. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrate that mutations in the 4Fe4S cluster domain of XPD abrogate the NER function of TFIIH and do not affect its transcriptional activity. We show that the p44-dependent activation of XPD is promoted by the stimulation of its ATPase activity. Furthermore, we clearly demonstrate that XPD requires DNA binding, ATPase, and helicase activity to function in NER. In contrast, these enzymatic properties are dispensable for transcription initiation. XPD helicase is thus exclusively devoted to NER and merely acts as a structural scaffold to maintain TFIIH integrity during transcription. PMID:25268380

  7. Repair of DNA Strand Breaks in a Minichromosome In Vivo: Kinetics, Modeling, and Effects of Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumala, Slawomir; Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Jayaraju, Dheekollu; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna; Hancock, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    To obtain an overall picture of the repair of DNA single and double strand breaks in a defined region of chromatin in vivo, we studied their repair in a ?170 kb circular minichromosome whose length and topology are analogous to those of the closed loops in genomic chromatin. The rate of repair of single strand breaks in cells irradiated with ? photons was quantitated by determining the sensitivity of the minichromosome DNA to nuclease S1, and that of double strand breaks by assaying the reformation of supercoiled DNA using pulsed field electrophoresis. Reformation of supercoiled DNA, which requires that all single strand breaks have been repaired, was not slowed detectably by the inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 NU1025 or 1,5-IQD. Repair of double strand breaks was slowed by 20–30% when homologous recombination was supressed by KU55933, caffeine, or siRNA-mediated depletion of Rad51 but was completely arrested by the inhibitors of nonhomologous end-joining wortmannin or NU7441, responses interpreted as reflecting competition between these repair pathways similar to that seen in genomic DNA. The reformation of supercoiled DNA was unaffected when topoisomerases I or II, whose participation in repair of strand breaks has been controversial, were inhibited by the catalytic inhibitors ICRF-193 or F11782. Modeling of the kinetics of repair provided rate constants and showed that repair of single strand breaks in minichromosome DNA proceeded independently of repair of double strand breaks. The simplicity of quantitating strand breaks in this minichromosome provides a usefull system for testing the efficiency of new inhibitors of their repair, and since the sequence and structural features of its DNA and its transcription pattern have been studied extensively it offers a good model for examining other aspects of DNA breakage and repair. PMID:23382828

  8. Use of hydroxyurea in the measurement of DNA repair by the BND cellulose method

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.; Strauss, B.

    1980-01-01

    Hydroxyurea inhibition is a convenient method of suppressing replicative DNA synthesis for DNA excision-repair measurement by the BND cellulose technique. Nonetheless, hydroxyurea can introduce artefacts by direct reaction with repair-inducing compounds and by long-term inhibition of the overall repair process. A simple technique of overcoming these problems is described. Cells are reacted with repair-inducing compounds in the absence of hydroxyurea, the cells are washed free of inducer, hydroxyurea is added to 2 mM, and after a short period to establish replication inhibition, /sup 3/H dThd is added and repair measured over a one-hour incubation period.

  9. DNA lesions, inducible DNA repair, and cell division: three key factors in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, B N; Shigenaga, M K; Gold, L S

    1993-01-01

    DNA lesions that escape repair have a certain probability of giving rise to mutations when the cell divides. Endogenous DNA damage is high: 10(6) oxidative lesions are present per rat cell. An exogenous mutagen produces an increment in lesions over the background rate of endogenous lesions. The effectiveness of a particular lesion depends on whether it is excised by a DNA repair system and the probability that it gives rise to a mutation when the cell divides. When the cell divides, an unrepaired DNA lesion has a certain probability of giving rise to a mutation. Thus, an important factor in the mutagenic effect of an exogenous agent whether it is genotoxic or non-genotoxic, is the increment it causes over the background cell division rate (mitogenesis) in cells that appear to matter most in cancer, the stem cells, which are not on their way to being discarded. Increasing their cell division rate increases mutation and therefore cancer. There is little cancer from nondividing cells. Endogenous cell division rates can be influenced by hormone levels, decreased by calorie restriction, or increased by high doses of chemicals. If both the rate of DNA lesions and cell division are increased, then there will be a multiplicative effect on mutagenesis (and carcinogenesis), for example, by high doses of a mutagen that also increases mitogenesis through cell killing. The defense system against reactive electrophilic mutagens, such as the glutathione transferases, are also almost all inducible and buffer cells against increments in active forms of chemicals that can cause DNA lesions. A variety of DNA repair defense systems, almost all inducible, buffer the cell against any increment in DNA lesions. Therefore, the effect of a particular chemical insult depends on the level of each defense, which in turn depends on the past history of exposure. Exogenous agents can influence the induction and effectiveness of these defenses. Defenses can be partially disabled by lack of particular micronutrients in the diet (e.g., antioxidants). PMID:8013423

  10. Krüppel-associated Box (KRAB)-associated Co-repressor (KAP-1) Ser-473 Phosphorylation Regulates Heterochromatin Protein 1? (HP1-?) Mobilization and DNA Repair in Heterochromatin*

    PubMed Central

    Bolderson, Emma; Savage, Kienan I.; Mahen, Robert; Pisupati, Venkat; Graham, Mark E.; Richard, Derek J.; Robinson, Phillip J.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2012-01-01

    The DNA damage response encompasses a complex series of signaling pathways that function to regulate and facilitate the repair of damaged DNA. Recent studies have shown that the repair of transcriptionally inactive chromatin, named heterochromatin, is dependent upon the phosphorylation of the co-repressor, Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain-associated protein (KAP-1), by the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase. Co-repressors, such as KAP-1, function to regulate the rigid structure of heterochromatin by recruiting histone-modifying enzymes, such HDAC1/2, SETDB1, and nucleosome-remodeling complexes such as CHD3. Here, we have characterized a phosphorylation site in the HP1-binding domain of KAP-1, Ser-473, which is phosphorylated by the cell cycle checkpoint kinase Chk2. Expression of a nonphosphorylatable S473A mutant conferred cellular sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and led to defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks in heterochromatin. In addition, cells expressing S473A also displayed defective mobilization of the HP1-? chromodomain protein. The DNA repair defect observed in cells expressing S473A was alleviated by depletion of HP1-?, suggesting that phosphorylation of KAP-1 on Ser-473 promotes the mobilization of HP1-? from heterochromatin and subsequent DNA repair. These results suggest a novel mechanism of KAP-1-mediated chromatin restructuring via Chk2-regulated HP1-? exchange from heterochromatin, promoting DNA repair. PMID:22715096

  11. DNA repair in higher plants; photoreactivation is the major DNA repair pathway in non-proliferating cells while excision repair (nucleotide excision repair and base excision repair) is active in proliferating cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seisuke Kimura; Yasue Tahira; Toyotaka Ishibashi; Yoko Mori; Toshio Mori; Junji Hashimoto; Kengo Sakaguchi

    2004-01-01

    We investigated expression patterns of DNA repair genes such as the CPD photolyase, UV-DDB1, CSB, PCNA, RPA32 and FEN-1 genes by northern hybridi- zation analysis and in situ hybridization using a higher plant, rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare). We found that all the genes tested were expressed in tissues rich in proliferating cells, but only CPD photolyase was expressed

  12. DNA repair in organelles: Pathways, organization, regulation, relevance in disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Pierre; Weber-Lotfi, Frédérique; Ibrahim, Noha; Tarasenko, Vladislav; Cosset, Anne; Paulus, François; Lightowlers, Robert N; Dietrich, André

    2011-01-01

    Both endogenous processes and exogenous physical and chemical sources generate deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in the nucleus and organelles of living cells. To prevent deleterious effects, damage is balanced by repair pathways. DNA repair was first documented for the nuclear compartment but evidence was subsequently extended to the organelles. Mitochondria and chloroplasts possess their own repair processes. These share a number of factors with the nucleus but also rely on original mechanisms. Base excision repair remains the best characterized. Repair is organized with the other DNA metabolism pathways in the organelle membrane-associated nucleoids. DNA repair in mitochondria is a regulated, stress-responsive process. Organelle genomes do not encode DNA repair enzymes and translocation of nuclear-encoded repair proteins from the cytosol seems to be a major control mechanism. Finally, changes in the fidelity and efficiency of mitochondrial DNA repair are likely to be involved in DNA damage accumulation, disease and aging. The present review successively addresses these different issues. PMID:20950654

  13. Role for Artemis nuclease in the repair of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks by alternative end joining.

    PubMed

    Moscariello, Mario; Wieloch, Radi; Kurosawa, Aya; Li, Fanghua; Adachi, Noritaka; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2015-07-01

    Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs generates DNA double-strand breaks that are processed either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or by canonical, DNA-PKcs-dependent non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ). Chemical or genetic inactivation of factors involved in C-NHEJ or HRR, but also their local failure in repair proficient cells, promotes an alternative, error-prone end-joining pathway that serves as backup (A-EJ). There is evidence for the involvement of Artemis endonuclease, a protein deficient in a human radiosensitivity syndrome associated with severe immunodeficiency (RS-SCID), in the processing of subsets of DSBs by HRR or C-NHEJ. It is thought that within HRR or C-NHEJ Artemis processes DNA termini at complex DSBs. Whether Artemis has a role in A-EJ remains unknown. Here, we analyze using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and specialized reporter assays, DSB repair in wild-type pre-B NALM-6 lymphocytes, as well as in their Artemis(-/-), DNA ligase 4(-/-) (LIG4(-/-)), and LIG4(-/-)/Artemis(-/-) double mutant counterparts, under conditions allowing evaluation of A-EJ. Our results substantiate the suggested roles of Artemis in C-NHEJ and HRR, but also demonstrate a role for the protein in A-EJ that is confirmed in Artemis deficient normal human fibroblasts. We conclude that Artemis is a nuclease participating in DSB repair by all major repair pathways. PMID:25973742

  14. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, South Mimms, (United Kingdom))

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  15. Base excision repair initiation revealed by crystal structures and binding kinetics of human uracil-DNA glycosylase with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, S S; Mol, C D; Slupphaug, G; Bharati, S; Krokan, H E; Tainer, J A

    1998-01-01

    Three high-resolution crystal structures of DNA complexes with wild-type and mutant human uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG), coupled kinetic characterizations and comparisons with the refined unbound UDG structure help resolve fundamental issues in the initiation of DNA base excision repair (BER): damage detection, nucleotide flipping versus extrahelical nucleotide capture, avoidance of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site toxicity and coupling of damage-specific and damage-general BER steps. Structural and kinetic results suggest that UDG binds, kinks and compresses the DNA backbone with a 'Ser-Pro pinch' and scans the minor groove for damage. Concerted shifts in UDG simultaneously form the catalytically competent active site and induce further compression and kinking of the double-stranded DNA backbone only at uracil and AP sites, where these nucleotides can flip at the phosphate-sugar junction into a complementary specificity pocket. Unexpectedly, UDG binds to AP sites more tightly and more rapidly than to uracil-containing DNA, and thus may protect cells sterically from AP site toxicity. Furthermore, AP-endonuclease, which catalyzes the first damage-general step of BER, enhances UDG activity, most likely by inducing UDG release via shared minor groove contacts and flipped AP site binding. Thus, AP site binding may couple damage-specific and damage-general steps of BER without requiring direct protein-protein interactions. PMID:9724657

  16. (DNA repair and the regulation of replication): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    DNA sequences containing the modified base, 5-methyl cytosine (5mC), are at an elevated risk of losing their informational content by mutation. Yet, this modified base is found in all vertebrate DNA, an observation which suggests that it plays a useful role in the life of the cell. Essentially all methyl-C occurs in the mini-palindrome GpC/CpG in vertebrate cells. Because 5mC is spontaneously deaminated in an in vivo reaction that converts it to thymine, a normal but mismatched base is produced. We are investigating the ability of the cell's repair systems to recognize the mismatch (T/G) and replace it with the correct base pair C:G rather than T:A, which would be a mutation. We have devised procedures for producing single base mismatches at specific sites in the DNA of the eukaryotic virus, SV40. The heteroduplexes are transfected into the host cell (CV-1) from the kidney of the African Green Monkey. Single clones of the resulting virus are isolated and the DNA examined after restriction with appropriate enzymes and separation in gels by electrophoresis.

  17. Comparison of phosphorylation kinetics in DNA repair proteins after exposure to high and low LET radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, R.; Okabe, A.; Takakura, K.

    We irradiated plateau phase normal human fibroblasts with 2 Gy X-rays 70 keV um carbon 290MeV n and 200 keV um iron ions 500 MeV n and observed the kinetics of phosphorylation in various proteins associated with DNA double strand break DSB repair GammaH2AX foci a marker for DSBs were detected immediately after irradiation and the peak of phosphorylation was seen 30 to 60 min post-irradiation for three kinds of radiations Disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci was much faster for X-irradiated samples than that for heavy ion irradiated samples the phosphorylation kinetics for carbon and iron ions are similar for gamma-H2AX foci In contrast phosphorylation of an NHEJ protein DNA-PKcs threonine 2609 was significantly delayed in carbon and iron irradiated cells when compared to X-irradiated cells Disappearance of DNA-PKcs sites was much faster in X-irradiated samples than carbon and iron samples which showed a similar pattern as in the case of gamma-H2AX Furthermore in the case of ATM protein phosphorylation serine 1981 iron irradiation alone caused a significant initial delay but the kinetics of disappearance is similar for iron and carbon samples with much higher remaining number of foci in iron samples than those for X-rays and carbon ions These results suggest that 1 high LET irradiation induces complex and or severe DNA DSB damage which affects the function of DSB repair proteins 2 Both ATM and DNA-PKcs may recognize the complexity of DSBs but ATM may be more sensitive to detecting the complexity of DSB damage 3 gamma-H2AX may

  18. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further investigate the sensitivity differences for low and low high doses, we performed chronic low dose-rate irradiation, and have begun studies with ATM and Nibrin inhibitors and siRNA knockout of these proteins. Results support the conclusion that for the endpoint of simple chromosomal aberrations (translocation or dicentrics), the increased radiation sensitivity of AT cells found at high doses (>1 Gy) does not carry over to low doses or doserates, while NBS cells show increased sensitivity for both high and low dose exposures.

  19. The Structure of DNA within Cationic Lipid/DNA Complexes

    E-print Network

    Braun, Chad S.; Jas, Gouri S.; Choosakoonriang, Sirirat; Koe, Gary S.; Smith, Janet G.; Middaugh, C. Russell

    2003-02-01

    The structure of DNA within CLDCs used for gene delivery is controversial. Previous studies using CD have been interpreted to indicate that the DNA is converted from normal B to C form in complexes. This investigation reexamines this interpretation...

  20. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    E-print Network

    Eugene Surdutovich; David C. Gallagher; Andrey V. Solov'yov

    2012-01-27

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The analysis and assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We studied the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculated the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's track. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. Comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  1. Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dragony Fu; Jennifer A. Calvo; Leona D. Samson

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents constitute a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR), respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance

  2. The role of DNA damage repair in aging of adult stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Kenyon; Stanton L. Gerson

    2007-01-01

    DNA repair maintains genomic stability and the loss of DNA repair capacity results in genetic instability that may lead to a decline of cellular function. Adult stem cells are extremely important in the long-term maintenance of tissues throughout life. They regen- erate and renew tissues in response to damage and replace senescent terminally differentiated cells that no longer function. Oxidative

  3. DNA Repair, Dysplastic Nevi, and Sunlight Sensitivity in the Development of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Teresa Landi; Andrea Baccarelli; Robert E. Tarone; Angela Pesatori; Margaret A. Tucker; Mohammad Hedayati; Lawrence Grossman

    2002-01-01

    Background: Exposure to UV radiation is associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). In mammalian cells, UV radiation induces DNA damage that can be re- paired by the nucleotide excision repair system. We designed this case-control study to determine whether DNA repair capacity (DRC) is associated with the risk of CMM and to identify risk factors that may interact biologically with

  4. How RecBCD Enzyme and Chi Promote DNA Break Repair and Recombination: a Molecular Biologist's View

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell viability and important for homologous genetic recombination. In enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli, the major pathway of DSB repair requires the RecBCD enzyme, a complex helicase-nuclease regulated by a simple unique DNA sequence called Chi. How Chi regulates RecBCD has been extensively studied by both genetics and biochemistry, and two contrasting mechanisms to generate a recombinogenic single-stranded DNA tail have been proposed: the nicking of one DNA strand at Chi versus the switching of degradation from one strand to the other at Chi. Which of these reactions occurs in cells has remained unproven because of the inability to detect intracellular DNA intermediates in bacterial recombination and DNA break repair. Here, I discuss evidence from a combination of genetics and biochemistry indicating that nicking at Chi is the intracellular (in vivo) reaction. This example illustrates the need for both types of analysis (i.e., molecular biology) to uncover the mechanism and control of complex processes in living cells. PMID:22688812

  5. Structural Basis of O6-Alkylguanine Recognition by a Bacterial Alkyltransferase-like DNA Repair Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Aramini, James M.; Tubbs, Julie L.; Kanugula, Sreenivas; Rossi, Paolo; Ertekin, Asli; Maglaqui, Melissa; Hamilton, Keith; Ciccosanti, Colleen T.; Jiang, Mei; Xiao, Rong; Soong, Ta-Tsen; Rost, Burkhard; Acton, Thomas B.; Everett, John K.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Tainer, John A.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2010-01-01

    Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) are a novel class of DNA repair proteins related to O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferases (AGTs) that tightly bind alkylated DNA and shunt the damaged DNA into the nucleotide excision repair pathway. Here, we present the first structure of a bacterial ATL, from Vibrio parahaemolyticus (vpAtl). We demonstrate that vpAtl adopts an AGT-like fold and that the protein is capable of tightly binding to O6-methylguanine-containing DNA and disrupting its repair by human AGT, a hallmark of ATLs. Mutation of highly conserved residues Tyr23 and Arg37 demonstrate their critical roles in a conserved mechanism of ATL binding to alkylated DNA. NMR relaxation data reveal a role for conformational plasticity in the guanine-lesion recognition cavity. Our results provide further evidence for the conserved role of ATLs in this primordial mechanism of DNA repair. PMID:20212037

  6. Analysis of in vivo DNA repair rates of alkylpurines in defined segments of human DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.W.; Weiss, R.B.; Gallagher, P.E. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Simple alkylating agents, such as methyl methanesulfonate or dimethyl sulfate, react with DNA bases to yield 7-methylguanine as the major product, with 3-methyladenine and O{sup 6}-methylguanine in lesser amounts. It has been shown that these alkylated bases are actively repaired in vivo in both bacteria and mammalian cells. The authors have employed a polymerase chain reaction assay to examine the in vivo formation and repair rates of alkylpurines in a defined segment of the human dihydrofolate reductase gene. Human lymphoblasts were treated with varying doses of dimethyl sulfate and a limiting concentration of the isolated DNA was used in the amplification reactions. Alkylation resulted in a dose-dependent loss of primer extension, presumably due to 3-methyladenine blockage of the Taq polymerase. Analysis of the amplified reaction products by radioautography following polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the prematurely truncated amplified products terminated at adenines as compared to DNA sequencing fragments. Heat treatment of the amplified DNAs prior to gel analysis resulted in fragments that terminated at adenines and guanines. The lymphoblast DNA was isolated at various times after alkylation and the repair rate of alkyladenine in the DHFR fragment was found to be more efficient than that of the overall genome.

  7. A Genome-Scale DNA Repair RNAi Screen Identifies SPG48 as a Novel Gene Associated with Hereditary

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Genome-Scale DNA Repair RNAi Screen Identifies SPG48 as a Novel Gene Associated with Hereditary, Samsonov S, Mundwiller E, et al. (2010) A Genome-Scale DNA Repair RNAi Screen Identifies SPG48 as a Novel

  8. DNA-Damage Foci to Detect and Characterize DNA Repair Alterations in Children Treated for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mareike; Betten, Dominik; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Rübe, Christian; Graf, Norbert; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA) suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. Methods and Materials In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting ?H2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. Results Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. Conclusions Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies. PMID:24637877

  9. DNA repair by Ogt alkyltransferase influences EMS mutational specificity.

    PubMed

    Vidal, A; Abril, N; Pueyo, C

    1995-04-01

    Forward mutations induced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) in the lacI gene of Escherichia coli were recovered from bacteria proficient or deficient in the alkyltransferase encoded by the constitutive ogt gene. EMS doses of 100 or 200 mM (Ogt+) and of 50 mM (Ogt-) were selected from the corresponding dose-response curves for DNA sequence analysis. A total of 239 induced mutations affecting the N-terminal region of the lacI gene were characterized. All mutations were G:C-->A:T transitions, consistent with the predominant role of the O6-ethylguanine miscoding lesion in mutagenesis by EMS. In the Ogt+ spectrum at the lowest tested dose of 100 mM EMS, guanines preceded by an A or T base at the 5' side were on average 3.2 times more likely to mutate than those preceded by a G or C base. This bias diminished at the higher EMS dose (200 mM) and disappeared in the Ogt- genetic background. Previously reported data for Ogt+ bacteria in a Uvr-proficient background show an opposite bias in favor of mutations at guanines preceded by a G or C base. The overall 5' flanking base influence was estimated as 8-fold. These data suggest that DNA repair by Ogt alkyltransferase plays an important role in the processing of ethylation-induced lesions responsible for GC-->AT transitions, influencing their ultimate distribution with respect to sequence context. The data further suggest that Ogt and UvrABC excision repair, the two major mechanisms of protection against the biological consequences of long-chain alkylating agents, show different DNA sequence specificity and that the relative importance of these two systems is highly dependent upon the chemical dose. PMID:7728961

  10. Human T-lymphotropic type 1 virus p30 inhibits homologous recombination and favors unfaithful DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Baydoun, Hicham H; Pancewicz, Joanna; Nicot, Christophe

    2011-06-01

    Whereas oncogenic retroviruses are common in animals, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is the only transmissible retrovirus associated with cancer in humans and is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia. The leukemogenesis process is still largely unknown, but relies on extended survival and clonal expansion of infected cells, which in turn accumulate genetic defects. A common feature of human tumor viruses is their ability to stimulate proliferation and survival of infected pretumoral cells and then hide by establishing latency in cells that have acquired a transformed phenotype. Whereas disruption of the DNA repair is one of the major processes responsible for the accumulation of genomic abnormalities and carcinogenesis, the absence of DNA repair also poses the threat of cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis of virus-infected cells. This study describes how the HTLV-1 p30 viral protein inhibits conservative homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair by targeting the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex and favors the error-prone nonhomologous-end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathway instead. As a result, HTLV-1 p30 may facilitate the accumulation of mutations in the host genome and the cumulative risk of transformation. Our results provide new insights into how human tumor viruses may manipulate cellular DNA-damage responses to promote cancer. PMID:21427292

  11. Human T-lymphotropic type 1 virus p30 inhibits homologous recombination and favors unfaithful DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Baydoun, Hicham H.; Pancewicz, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Whereas oncogenic retroviruses are common in animals, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is the only transmissible retrovirus associated with cancer in humans and is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia. The leukemogenesis process is still largely unknown, but relies on extended survival and clonal expansion of infected cells, which in turn accumulate genetic defects. A common feature of human tumor viruses is their ability to stimulate proliferation and survival of infected pretumoral cells and then hide by establishing latency in cells that have acquired a transformed phenotype. Whereas disruption of the DNA repair is one of the major processes responsible for the accumulation of genomic abnormalities and carcinogenesis, the absence of DNA repair also poses the threat of cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis of virus-infected cells. This study describes how the HTLV-1 p30 viral protein inhibits conservative homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair by targeting the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex and favors the error-prone nonhomologous-end–joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathway instead. As a result, HTLV-1 p30 may facilitate the accumulation of mutations in the host genome and the cumulative risk of transformation. Our results provide new insights into how human tumor viruses may manipulate cellular DNA-damage responses to promote cancer. PMID:21427292

  12. Oncogenic RAS regulates BRIP1 expression to induce dissociation of BRCA1 from chromatin, inhibit DNA repair, and promote senescence.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhigang; Aird, Katherine M; Bitler, Benjamin G; Nicodemus, Jasmine P; Beeharry, Neil; Xia, Bing; Yen, Tim J; Zhang, Rugang

    2011-12-13

    Here, we report a cell-intrinsic mechanism by which oncogenic RAS promotes senescence while predisposing cells to senescence bypass by allowing for secondary hits. We show that oncogenic RAS inactivates the BRCA1 DNA repair complex by dissociating BRCA1 from chromatin. This event precedes senescence-associated cell cycle exit and coincides with the accumulation of DNA damage. Downregulation of BRIP1, a physiological partner of BRCA1 in the DNA repair pathway, triggers BRCA1 chromatin dissociation. Conversely, ectopic BRIP1 rescues BRCA1 chromatin dissociation and suppresses RAS-induced senescence and the DNA damage response. Significantly, cells undergoing senescence do not exhibit a BRCA1-dependent DNA repair response when exposed to DNA damage. Overall, our study provides a molecular basis by which oncogenic RAS promotes senescence. Because DNA damage has the potential to produce additional "hits" that promote senescence bypass, our findings may also suggest one way a small minority of cells might bypass senescence and contribute to cancer development. PMID:22137763

  13. Oncogenic Ras regulates BRIP1 expression to induce dissociation of BRCA1 from chromatin, inhibit DNA repair, and promote senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhigang; Aird, Katherine M.; Bitler, Benjamin G.; Nicodemus, Jasmine P.; Beeharry, Neil; Xia, Bing; Yen, Tim J.; Zhang, Rugang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Here, we report a cell-intrinsic mechanism by which oncogenic RAS promotes senescence while predisposing cells to senescence bypass by allowing for secondary hits. We show that oncogenic RAS inactivates the BRCA1 DNA repair complex by dissociating BRCA1 from chromatin. This event precedes senescence-associated cell cycle exit and coincides with the accumulation of DNA damage. Downregulation of BRIP1, a physiological partner of BRCA1 in the DNA repair pathway, triggers BRCA1 chromatin dissociation. Conversely, ectopic BRIP1 rescues BRCA1 chromatin dissociation and suppresses RAS-induced senescence and the DNA damage response. Significantly, cells undergoing senescence do not exhibit a BRCA1-dependent DNA repair response when exposed to DNA damage. Overall, our study provides a molecular basis by which oncogenic RAS promotes senescence. Since DNA damage has the potential to produce additional "hits" that promote senescence bypass, our findings may also suggest one way a small minority of cells might bypass senescence and contribute to cancer development. PMID:22137763

  14. Chromatin remodelling complex RSC promotes base excision repair in chromatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Wioletta; Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is a conserved DNA repair system required to maintain genomic integrity and prevent mutagenesis in all eukaryotic cells. Nevertheless, how BER operates in vivo (i.e. in the context of chromatin) is poorly understood. We have investigated the role of an essential ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling (ACR) complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) in BER of intact yeast cells. We show that depletion of STH1, the ATPase subunit of RSC, causes enhanced sensitivity to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and results in a substantial inhibition of BER, at the GAL1 locus and in the genome overall. Consistent with this observation, the DNA in chromatin is less accessible to micrococcal nuclease digestion in the absence of RSC. Quantitative PCR results indicate that repair deficiency in STH1 depleted cells is not due to changes in the expression of BER genes. Collectively, our data indicates the RSC complex promotes efficient BER in chromatin. These results provide, for the first time, a link between ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling and BER in living cells. PMID:24674626

  15. DNA repair and the evolution of transformation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Michod, R.E.; Wojciechowski, M.F.; Hoelzer, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the work reported here is to test the hypothesis that natural genetic transformation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis has evolved as a DNA repair system. Specifically, tests were made to determine whether transformation functions to provide DNA template for the bacterial cell to use in recombinational repair. The survivorship and the homologous transformation rate as a function of dose of ultraviolet irradiation (UV) was studied in two experimental treatments, in which cells were either transformed before (DNA-UV), or after (UV-DNA), treatment with UV. The results show that there is a qualitative difference in the relationship between the survival of transformed cells (sexual cells) and total cells (primarily asexual cells) in the two treatments. As predicted by the repair hypothesis, in the UV-DNA treatment, transformed cells had greater average survivorship than total cells, while in the DNA-UV treatment this relationship was reversed. There was also a consistent and qualitative difference between the UV-DNA and DNA-UV treatments in the relationship between the homologous transformation rate (transformed cells/total cells) and UV dosage. As predicted by the repair hypothesis, the homologous transformation rate increases with UV dose in the UV-DNA experiments but decreases with UV dose in the DNA-UV treatments. However, the transformation rate for plasmid DNA does not increase in a UV-DNA treatment. These results support the DNA repair hypothesis for the evolution of transformation in particular, and sex generally.

  16. BRCA2: One Small Step for DNA Repair, One Giant Protein Purified

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ryan B.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage, malfunctions in DNA repair, and genomic instability are processes that intersect at the crossroads of carcinogenesis. Underscoring the importance of DNA repair in breast and ovarian tumorigenesis is the familial inherited cancer predisposition gene BRCA2. The role of BRCA2 in DNA double-strand break repair was first revealed based on its interaction with RAD51, a central player in homologous recombination. The RAD51 protein forms a nucleoprotein filament on single-stranded DNA, invades a DNA duplex, and initiates a search for homology. Once a homologous DNA sequence is found, the DNA is used as a template for the high-fidelity repair of the DNA break. Many of the biochemical features that allow BRCA2 to choreograph the activities of RAD51 have been elucidated and include: targeting RAD51 to single-stranded DNA while inhibiting binding to dsDNA, reducing the ATPase activity of RAD51, and facilitating the displacement of the single-strand DNA binding protein, Replication Protein A. These reinforcing activities of BRCA2 culminate in the correct positioning of RAD51 onto a processed DNA double-strand break and initiate its faithful repair by homologous recombination. In this review, I will address current biochemical data concerning the BRCA2 protein and highlight unanswered questions regarding BRCA2 function in homologous recombination and cancer. PMID:24348212

  17. DNA Damage Response Factors from Diverse Pathways, Including DNA Crosslink Repair, Mediate Alternative End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Sean M.; Yanez, Diana A.; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative end joining (Alt-EJ) chromosomal break repair involves bypassing classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ), and such repair causes mutations often with microhomology at the repair junction. Since the mediators of Alt-EJ are not well understood, we have sought to identify DNA damage response (DDR) factors important for this repair event. Using chromosomal break reporter assays, we surveyed an RNAi library targeting known DDR factors for siRNAs that cause a specific decrease in Alt-EJ, relative to an EJ event that is a composite of Alt-EJ and c-NHEJ (Distal-EJ between two tandem breaks). From this analysis, we identified several DDR factors that are specifically important for Alt-EJ relative to Distal-EJ. While these factors are from diverse pathways, we also found that most of them also promote homologous recombination (HR), including factors important for DNA crosslink repair, such as the Fanconi Anemia factor, FANCA. Since bypass of c-NHEJ is likely important for both Alt-EJ and HR, we disrupted the c-NHEJ factor Ku70 in Fanca-deficient mouse cells and found that Ku70 loss significantly diminishes the influence of Fanca on Alt-EJ. In contrast, an inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) causes a decrease in Alt-EJ that is enhanced by Ku70 loss. Additionally, the helicase/nuclease DNA2 appears to have distinct effects from FANCA and PARP on both Alt-EJ, as well as end resection. Finally, we found that the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a cancer therapeutic that has been shown to disrupt FANC signaling, causes a significant reduction in both Alt-EJ and HR, relative to Distal-EJ, as well as a substantial loss of end resection. We suggest that several distinct DDR functions are important for Alt-EJ, which include promoting bypass of c-NHEJ and end resection. PMID:25629353

  18. A novel role for the transcriptional modulator NusA in DNA repair/damage tolerance pathways in Escherichia coli

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Susan E., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    All organisms must contend with the consequences of DNA damage, induced by a variety of both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mechanisms of DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance are crucial for cellular survival after DNA ...

  19. DNA instability (strand breakage, uracil misincorporation, and defective repair) is increased by folic acid depletion in human lymphocytes in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. DUTHIE; A. HAWDON

    Folic acid is essential for the synthesis and repair of DNA. We report the effects of folate de- pletion on DNA stability in normal human lymphocytes in vitro. DNA strand breakage, uracil misincorporation, oxidative DNA base damage, and DNA repair capability were determined using variants of the comet assay (sin- gle cell gel electrophoresis). Lymphocyte proliferation was measured as an

  20. Electrostatic interactions play an essential role in DNA repair and cold-adaptation of uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Olufsen, Magne; Smalås, Arne O; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2008-03-01

    Life has adapted to most environments on earth, including low and high temperature niches. The increased catalytic efficiency and thermoliability observed for enzymes from organisms living in constantly cold regions when compared to their mesophilic and thermophilic cousins are poorly understood at the molecular level. Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) from cod (cUNG) catalyzes removal of uracil from DNA with an increased k(cat) and reduced K(m) relative to its warm-active human (hUNG) counterpart. Specific issues related to DNA repair and substrate binding/recognition (K(m)) are here investigated by continuum electrostatics calculations, MD simulations and free energy calculations. Continuum electrostatic calculations reveal that cUNG has surface potentials that are more complementary to the DNA potential at and around the catalytic site when compared to hUNG, indicating improved substrate binding. Comparative MD simulations combined with free energy calculations using the molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method show that large opposing energies are involved when forming the enzyme-substrate complexes. Furthermore, the binding free energies obtained reveal that the Michaelis-Menten complex is more stable for cUNG, primarily due to enhanced electrostatic properties, suggesting that energetic fine-tuning of electrostatics can be utilized for enzymatic temperature adaptation. Energy decomposition pinpoints the residual determinants responsible for this adaptation. PMID:18196298

  1. Reduced DNA repair in mouse satellite DNA after treatment with methylmethanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed Central

    Bodell, W J; Banerjee, M R

    1976-01-01

    We have measured DNA repair in mouse satellite and main band DNA as resolved by Ag+-Cs2SO4 centrifugation in response to treatment with the alkylating agents, methyl methanesulfonate, and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. We find that there is a statistically significant lower incorporation of 3H-Tdr into the satellite DNA as compared to the main band at varying periods after treatment with the alkylating agents. This suggests a reduced repair activity in the satellite DNA. We have measured the extent of binding of 14C-methyl methanesulfonate to the satellite, and main band DNA, and no difference in binding was observed, indicating that the reduced repair activity of satellite DNA is not due to a difference in binding of alkylating agents. We believe that the reduced incorporation of 3H-Tdr into satellite DNA may be due to its location in the condensed chromatin fraction. PMID:184436

  2. LaserGuided Repair of Complex Bile Duct Strictures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas van Gulik; Johan Beek; Philip de Reuver; Daniel Aronson; Otto van Delden; Olivier Busch; Dirk Gouma

    2009-01-01

    Background: The repair of bile duct strictures (BDS) requires identification of healthy bile duct proximal to the stenosis. Identification may be difficult in complex bile duct injuries after cholecystectomy or partial liver resection. Aim: We describe a technique to identify the prestenotic bile duct using the sentinel light of a laser fiber passed through the catheter after percutaneous transhepatic biliary

  3. Neddylation inhibits CtIP-mediated resection and regulates DNA double strand break repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno, Sonia; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Cruz-García, Andrés; Cepeda-García, Cristina; Gómez-Cabello, Daniel; Huertas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic lesions that can occur on the DNA. They can be repaired by different mechanisms and optimal survival requires a tight control between them. Here we uncover protein deneddylation as a major controller of repair pathway choice. Neddylation inhibition changes the normal repair profile toward an increase on homologous recombination. Indeed, RNF111/UBE2M-mediated neddylation acts as an inhibitor of BRCA1 and CtIP-mediated DNA end resection, a key process in repair pathway choice. By controlling the length of ssDNA produced during DNA resection, protein neddylation not only affects the choice between NHEJ and homologous recombination but also controls the balance between different recombination subpathways. Thus, protein neddylation status has a great impact in the way cells respond to DNA breaks. PMID:25567988

  4. Understanding DNA Repair in Hyperthermophilic Archaea: Persistent Gaps and Other Reasons to Focus on the Fork

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Although hyperthermophilic archaea arguably have a great need for efficient DNA repair, they lack members of several DNA repair protein families broadly conserved among bacteria and eukaryotes. Conversely, the putative DNA repair genes that do occur in these archaea often do not generate the expected phenotype when deleted. The prospect that hyperthermophilic archaea have some unique strategies for coping with DNA damage and replication errors has intellectual and technological appeal, but resolving this question will require alternative coping mechanisms to be proposed and tested experimentally. This review evaluates a combination of four enigmatic properties that distinguishes the hyperthermophilic archaea from all other organisms: DNA polymerase stalling at dU, apparent lack of conventional NER, lack of MutSL homologs, and apparent essentiality of homologous recombination proteins. Hypothetical damage-coping strategies that could explain this set of properties may provide new starting points for efforts to define how archaea differ from conventional models of DNA repair and replication fidelity. PMID:26146487

  5. TAT-mediated delivery of a DNA repair enzyme to skin cells rapidly initiates repair of UV-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jodi L.; Lowell, Brian C.; Ryabinina, Olga P.; Lloyd, R. Stephen; McCullough, Amanda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light causes DNA damage in skin cells, leading to more than one million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer diagnosed annually in the United States. Although human cells possess a mechanism (Nucleotide Excision Repair, NER) to repair UV-induced DNA damage, mutagenesis still occurs when DNA is replicated prior to repair of these photoproducts. While human cells have all the enzymes necessary to complete an alternate repair pathway, Base Excision Repair (BER), they lack a DNA glycosylase that can initiate BER of dipyrimidine photoproducts. Certain prokaryotes and viruses produce pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA glycosylases (pdgs) that initiate BER of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), the predominant UV-induced lesions. Such a pdg was identified in the Chlorella virus PBCV-1 and termed Cv-pdg. The Cv-pdg protein was engineered to contain a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and a membrane permeabilization peptide (TAT). Here, we demonstrate that the Cv-pdg-NLS-TAT protein was delivered to repair-proficient keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and to a human skin model, where it rapidly initiated removal of CPDs. These data suggest a potential strategy for prevention of human skin cancer. PMID:20927123

  6. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme ?-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of ?-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels. PMID:26046974

  7. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A.; Yang, Eddy S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NF?B and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NF?B signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation. PMID:24202328

  8. DNA clustering and genome complexity.

    PubMed

    Dios, Francisco; Barturen, Guillermo; Lebrón, Ricardo; Rueda, Antonio; Hackenberg, Michael; Oliver, José L

    2014-12-01

    Early global measures of genome complexity (power spectra, the analysis of fluctuations in DNA walks or compositional segmentation) uncovered a high degree of complexity in eukaryotic genome sequences. The main evolutionary mechanisms leading to increases in genome complexity (i.e. gene duplication and transposon proliferation) can all potentially produce increases in DNA clustering. To quantify such clustering and provide a genome-wide description of the formed clusters, we developed GenomeCluster, an algorithm able to detect clusters of whatever genome element identified by chromosome coordinates. We obtained a detailed description of clusters for ten categories of human genome elements, including functional (genes, exons, introns), regulatory (CpG islands, TFBSs, enhancers), variant (SNPs) and repeat (Alus, LINE1) elements, as well as DNase hypersensitivity sites. For each category, we located their clusters in the human genome, then quantifying cluster length and composition, and estimated the clustering level as the proportion of clustered genome elements. In average, we found a 27% of elements in clusters, although a considerable variation occurs among different categories. Genes form the lowest number of clusters, but these are the longest ones, both in bp and the average number of components, while the shortest clusters are formed by SNPs. Functional and regulatory elements (genes, CpG islands, TFBSs, enhancers) show the highest clustering level, as compared to DNase sites, repeats (Alus, LINE1) or SNPs. Many of the genome elements we analyzed are known to be composed of clusters of low-level entities. In addition, we found here that the clusters generated by GenomeCluster can be in turn clustered into high-level super-clusters. The observation of 'clusters-within-clusters' parallels the 'domains within domains' phenomenon previously detected through global statistical methods in eukaryotic sequences, and reveals a complex human genome landscape dominated by hierarchical clustering. PMID:25182383

  9. UV-inducible DNA repair in the cyanobacteria Anabaena spp

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Thiel, T.

    1987-09-01

    Strains of the filamentous cyanobacteria Anabaena spp. were capable of very efficient photoreactivation of UV irradiation-induced damage to DNA. Cells were resistant to several hundred joules of UV irradiation per square meter under conditions that allowed photoreactivation, and they also photoreactivated UV-damaged cyanophage efficiently. Reactivation of UV-irradiated cyanophage (Weigle reactivation) also occurred; UV irradiation of host cells greatly enhanced the plaque-forming ability of irradiated phage under nonphotoreactivating conditions. Postirradiation incubation of the host cells under conditions that allowed photoreactivation abolished the ability of the cells to perform Weigle reactivation of cyanophage N-1. Mitomycin C also induced Weigle reactivation of cyanophage N-1, but nalidixic acid did not. The inducible repair system (defined as the ability to perform Weigle reactivation of cyanophages) was relatively slow and inefficient compared with photoreactivation.

  10. New Tools to Study DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Cabello, Daniel; Jimeno, Sonia; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Huertas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    A broken DNA molecule is difficult to repair, highly mutagenic, and extremely cytotoxic. Such breaks can be repaired by homology-independent or homology-directed mechanisms. Little is known about the network that controls the repair pathway choice except that a licensing step for homology-mediated repair exists, called DNA-end resection. The choice between these two repair pathways is a key event for genomic stability maintenance, and an imbalance of the ratio is directly linked with human diseases, including cancer. Here we present novel reporters to study the balance between both repair options in human cells. In these systems, a double-strand break can be alternatively repaired by homology-independent or -dependent mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of distinct fluorescent proteins. These reporters thus allow the balance between both repair pathways to be analyzed in different experimental setups. We validated the reporters by analyzing the effect of protein downregulation of the DNA end resection and non-homologous end-joining pathways. Finally, we analyzed the role of the DNA damage response on double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanism selection. Our reporters could be used in the future to understand the roles of specific factors, whole pathways, or drugs in DSB repair pathway choice, or for genome-wide screening. Moreover, our findings can be applied to increase gene-targeting efficiency, making it a beneficial tool for a broad audience in the biological sciences. PMID:24155929

  11. Genetic Interactions of DNA Repair Pathways in the Pathogen Neisseria meningitidis?

    PubMed Central

    Davidsen, Tonje; Tuven, Hanne K.; Bjørås, Magnar; Rødland, Einar A.; Tønjum, Tone

    2007-01-01

    The current increase in the incidence and severity of infectious diseases mandates improved understanding of the basic biology and DNA repair profiles of virulent microbes. In our studies of the major pathogen and model organism Neisseria meningitidis, we constructed a panel of mutants inactivating genes involved in base excision repair, mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair (NER), translesion synthesis, and recombinational repair pathways. The highest spontaneous mutation frequency among the N. meningitidis single mutants was found in the MutY-deficient strain as opposed to mutS mutants in Escherichia coli, indicating a role for meningococcal MutY in antibiotic resistance development. Recombinational repair was recognized as a major pathway counteracting methyl methanesulfonate-induced alkylation damage in the N. meningitidis. In contrast to what has been shown in other species, meningococcal NER did not contribute significantly to repair of alkylation-induced DNA damage, and meningococcal recombinational repair may thus be one of the main pathways for removal of abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic) sites and strand breaks in DNA. Conversely, NER was identified as the main meningococcal defense pathway against UV-induced DNA damage. N. meningitidis RecA single mutants exhibited only a moderate decrease in survival after UV exposure as opposed to E. coli recA strains, which are extremely UV sensitive, possibly reflecting the lack of a meningococcal SOS response. In conclusion, distinct differences between N. meningitidis and established DNA repair characteristics in E. coli and other species were identified. PMID:17513474

  12. DNA Mutation and Repair Without the Variation that Arises from Changes in DNA Sequences there would be No

    E-print Network

    Cutler, Chris

    DNA Mutation and Repair Mutations Without the Variation that Arises from Changes in DNA Sequences the Mutation and the Extent to which it Affects the Gene and its Expression #12;Mutations that Affect a DNA May in of the Bacteria Whereas in Other Cultures, Resistant Mutations Would Occur Later Due to Random Chance and So

  13. TDP1 promotes assembly of non-homologous end joining protein complexes on DNA.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinho; Li, Jing; Summerlin, Matthew; Hays, Annette; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J; Nitiss, Karin C; Nitiss, John L; Hanakahi, Leslyn A

    2015-06-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is central to the maintenance of genomic integrity. In tumor cells, the ability to repair DSBs predicts response to radiation and many cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs. DSB repair pathways include homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ is a template-independent mechanism, yet many NHEJ repair products carry limited genetic changes, which suggests that NHEJ includes mechanisms to minimize error. Proteins required for mammalian NHEJ include Ku70/80, the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), XLF/Cernunnos and the XRCC4:DNA ligase IV complex. NHEJ also utilizes accessory proteins that include DNA polymerases, nucleases, and other end-processing factors. In yeast, mutations of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP1) reduced NHEJ fidelity. TDP1 plays an important role in repair of topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage and 3'-blocking DNA lesions, and mutation of the human TDP1 gene results in an inherited human neuropathy termed SCAN1. We found that human TDP1 stimulated DNA binding by XLF and physically interacted with XLF to form TDP1:XLF:DNA complexes. TDP1:XLF interactions preferentially stimulated TDP1 activity on dsDNA as compared to ssDNA. TDP1 also promoted DNA binding by Ku70/80 and stimulated DNA-PK activity. Because Ku70/80 and XLF are the first factors recruited to the DSB at the onset of NHEJ, our data suggest a role for TDP1 during the early stages of mammalian NHEJ. PMID:25841101

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi contains a single detectable uracil-DNA glycosylase and repairs uracil exclusively via short patch base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Akbari, Mansour; Sundheim, Ottar; Farez-Vidal, M Esther; Andersen, Sonja; Sneve, Ragnhild; Gonzalez-Pacanowska, Dolores; Krokan, Hans E; Slupphaug, Geir

    2004-09-17

    Enzymes involved in genomic maintenance of human parasites are attractive targets for parasite-specific drugs. The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi contains at least two enzymes involved in the protection against potentially mutagenic uracil, a deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) and a uracil-DNA glycosylase belonging to the highly conserved UNG-family. Uracil-DNA glycosylase activities excise uracil from DNA and initiate a multistep base-excision repair (BER) pathway to restore the correct nucleotide sequence. Here we report the biochemical characterisation of T.cruzi UNG (TcUNG) and its contribution to the total uracil repair activity in T.cruzi. TcUNG is shown to be the major uracil-DNA glycosylase in T.cruzi. The purified recombinant TcUNG exhibits substrate preference for removal of uracil in the order ssU>U:G>U:A, and has no associated thymine-DNA glycosylase activity. T.cruzi apparently repairs U:G DNA substrate exclusively via short-patch BER, but the DNA polymerase involved surprisingly displays a vertebrate POLdelta-like pattern of inhibition. Back-up UDG activities such as SMUG, TDG and MBD4 were not found, underlying the importance of the TcUNG enzyme in protection against uracil in DNA and as a potential target for drug therapy. PMID:15342237

  15. DNA Mismatch Repair-Induced Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Nowosielska, Anetta; Marinus, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli dam mutants are sensitized to the cytotoxic action of base analogs, cisplatin and N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), while their mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient derivatives are tolerant to these agents. We showed previously, using pulse field gel electrophoresis, that MMR-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs) are produced by cisplatin in dam recB (Ts) cells at the non-permissive temperature. We demonstrate here that the majority of these DSBs require DNA replication for their formation, consistent with a model in which replication forks collapse at nicks or gaps formed during MMR. DSBs were also detected in dam recB(Ts) ada ogt cells exposed to MNNG in a dose- and MMR-dependent manner. In contrast to cisplatin, the formation of these DSBs was not affected by DNA replication and it is proposed that two separate mechanisms result in DSB formation. Replication-independent DSBs arise from overlapping base excision and MMR repair tracts on complementary strands and constitute the majority of detectable DSBs in dam recB(Ts) ada ogt cells exposed to MNNG. Replication-dependent DSBs result from replication fork collapse at O6-meG base pairs undergoing MMR futile cycling and are more likely to contribute to cytotoxicity. This model is consistent with the observation that fast-growing dam recB (Ts) ada ogt cells, which have more chromosome replication origins, are more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of MNNG than the same cells growing slowly. PMID:17827074

  16. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase ? (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  17. Homologous recombination is involved in repair of chromium-induced DNA damage in mammalian cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen E. Bryant; Songmin Ying; Thomas Helleday

    2006-01-01

    Chromium is a potent human carcinogen, probably because of its well-documented genotoxic effects. Chromate (Cr[VI]) causes a wide range of DNA lesions, including DNA crosslinks and strand breaks, presumably due to the direct and indirect effects of DNA oxidation. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is important for error-free repair of lesions occurring at replication forks. Here, we show that HR deficient

  18. The comet assay, DNA damage, DNA repair and cytotoxicity: hedgehogs are not always dead.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Yolanda; Costa, Solange; Collins, Andrew R; Azqueta, Amaya

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage is commonly measured at the level of individual cells using the so-called comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis). As the frequency of DNA breaks increases, so does the fraction of the DNA extending towards the anode, forming the comet tail. Comets with almost all DNA in the tail are often referred to as 'hedgehog' comets and are widely assumed to represent apoptotic cells. We review the literature and present theoretical and empirical arguments against this interpretation. The level of DNA damage in these comets is far less than the massive fragmentation that occurs in apoptosis. 'Hedgehog' comets are formed after moderate exposure of cells to, for example, H2O2, but if the cells are incubated for a short period, 'hedgehogs' are no longer seen. We confirm that this is not because DNA has degraded further and been lost from the gel, but because the DNA is repaired. The comet assay may detect the earliest stages of apoptosis, but as it proceeds, comets disappear in a smear of unattached DNA. It is clear that 'hedgehogs' can correspond to one level on a continuum of genotoxic damage, are not diagnostic of apoptosis and should not be regarded as an indicator of cytotoxicity. PMID:23630247

  19. 8-Oxoguanine causes neurodegeneration during MUTYH-mediated DNA base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zijing; Oka, Sugako; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Abolhassani, Nona; Nomaru, Hiroko; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Yamada, Hidetaka; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2012-01-01

    8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common DNA lesion caused by reactive oxygen species, is associated with carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. Although the mechanism by which 8-oxoG causes carcinogenesis is well understood, the mechanism by which it causes neurodegeneration is unknown. Here, we report that neurodegeneration is triggered by MUTYH-mediated excision repair of 8-oxoG–paired adenine. Mutant mice lacking 8-oxo–2?-deoxyguanosine triphosphate–depleting (8-oxo–dGTP–depleting) MTH1 and/or 8-oxoG–excising OGG1 exhibited severe striatal neurodegeneration, whereas mutant mice lacking MUTYH or OGG1/MUTYH were resistant to neurodegeneration under conditions of oxidative stress. These results indicate that OGG1 and MTH1 are protective, while MUTYH promotes neurodegeneration. We observed that 8-oxoG accumulated in the mitochondrial DNA of neurons and caused calpain-dependent neuronal loss, while delayed nuclear accumulation of 8-oxoG in microglia resulted in PARP-dependent activation of apoptosis-inducing factor and exacerbated microgliosis. These results revealed that neurodegeneration is a complex process caused by 8-oxoG accumulation in the genomes of neurons and microglia. Different signaling pathways were triggered by the accumulation of single-strand breaks in each type of DNA generated during base excision repair initiated by MUTYH, suggesting that suppression of MUTYH may protect the brain under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:23143307

  20. Quantifying clustered DNA damage induction and repair by gel electrophoresis, electronic imaging and number average length analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bennett, Paula V.; Laval, Jacques; Sutherland, John C.; Gewirtz, A. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Assessing DNA damage induction, repair and consequences of such damages requires measurement of specific DNA lesions by methods that are independent of biological responses to such lesions. Lesions affecting one DNA strand (altered bases, abasic sites, single strand breaks (SSB)) as well as damages affecting both strands (clustered damages, double strand breaks) can be quantified by direct measurement of DNA using gel electrophoresis, gel imaging and number average length analysis. Damage frequencies as low as a few sites per gigabase pair (10(9)bp) can be quantified by this approach in about 50ng of non-radioactive DNA, and single molecule methods may allow such measurements in DNA from single cells. This review presents the theoretical basis, biochemical requirements and practical aspects of this approach, and shows examples of their applications in identification and quantitation of complex clustered damages.

  1. ATPase-Dependent Control of the Mms21 SUMO Ligase during DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Humberto; Bueno, Andrés; Guasch, Clàudia; Almedawar, Seba; Bru-Virgili, Sergi; Garí, Eloi; Wyman, Claire; Reverter, David; Colomina, Neus; Torres-Rosell, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Modification of proteins by SUMO is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. During DNA replication, the Mms21-branch of the SUMO pathway counteracts recombination intermediates at damaged replication forks, thus facilitating sister chromatid disjunction. The Mms21 SUMO ligase docks to the arm region of the Smc5 protein in the Smc5/6 complex; together, they cooperate during recombinational DNA repair. Yet how the activity of the SUMO ligase is controlled remains unknown. Here we show that the SUMO ligase and the chromosome disjunction functions of Mms21 depend on its docking to an intact and active Smc5/6 complex, indicating that the Smc5/6-Mms21 complex operates as a large SUMO ligase in vivo. In spite of the physical distance separating the E3 and the nucleotide-binding domains in Smc5/6, Mms21-dependent sumoylation requires binding of ATP to Smc5, a step that is part of the ligase mechanism that assists Ubc9 function. The communication is enabled by the presence of a conserved disruption in the coiled coil domain of Smc5, pointing to potential conformational changes for SUMO ligase activation. In accordance, scanning force microscopy of the Smc5-Mms21 heterodimer shows that the molecule is physically remodeled in an ATP-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that the ATP-binding activity of the Smc5/6 complex is coordinated with its SUMO ligase, through the coiled coil domain of Smc5 and the physical remodeling of the molecule, to promote sumoylation and chromosome disjunction during DNA repair. PMID:25764370

  2. DNA binding, nucleotide flipping, and the helix-turn-helix motif in base repair by O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase and its implications for cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tubbs, Julie L.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Tainer, John A.

    2007-01-01

    O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a crucial target both for the prevention of cancer and for chemotherapy, since it repairs mutagenic lesions in DNA, and it limits the effectiveness of alkylating chemotherapies. AGT catalyzes the unique, single-step, direct damage reversal repair of O6-alkylguanines by selectively transferring the O6-alkyl adduct to an internal cysteine residue. Recent crystal structures of human AGT alone and in complex with substrate DNA reveal a two-domain a/? fold and a bound zinc ion. AGT uses its helix-turn-helix motif to bind substrate DNA via the minor groove. The alkylated guanine is then flipped out from the base stack into the AGT active site for repair by covalent transfer of the alkyl adduct to Cys145. An asparagine hinge (Asn137) couples the helix-turn-helix DNA binding and active site motifs. An arginine finger (Arg128) stabilizes the extrahelical DNA conformation. With this newly improved structural understanding of AGT and its interactions with biologically relevant substrates, we can now begin to unravel the role it plays in preserving genetic integrity and discover how it promotes resistance to anticancer therapies. PMID:17485252

  3. Multiple interactions among the components of the recombinational DNA repair system in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Y; Khasanov, F K; Shinagawa, H; Iwasaki, H; Bashkirov, V I

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rhp55 and Rhp57 are RecA-like proteins involved in double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here we demonstrate that Rhp55 and Rhp57 proteins strongly interact in vivo, similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad55p and Rad57p. Mutations in the conserved ATP-binding/hydrolysis folds of both the Rhp55 and Rhp57 proteins impaired their function in DNA repair but not in cell proliferation. However, when combined, ATPase fold mutations in Rhp55p and Rhp57p resulted in severe defects of both functions, characteristic of the deletion mutants. Yeast two-hybrid analysis also revealed other multiple in vivo interactions among S. pombe proteins involved in recombinational DNA repair. Similar to S. cerevisiae Rad51p-Rad54p, S. pombe Rhp51p and Rhp54p were found to interact. Both putative Rad52 homologs in S. pombe, Rad22p and Rti1p, were found to interact with the C-terminal region of Rhp51 protein. Moreover, Rad22p and Rti1p exhibited mutual, as well as self-, interactions. In contrast to the S. cerevisiae interacting pair Rad51p-Rad55p, S. pombe Rhp51 protein strongly interacted with Rhp57 but not with Rhp55 protein. In addition, the Rti1 and Rad22 proteins were found to form a complex with the large subunit of S. pombe RPA. Our data provide compelling evidence that most, but not all, of the protein-protein interactions found in S. cerevisiae DSB repair are evolutionarily conserved. PMID:11560889

  4. Photoreactivation is the main repair pathway for UV-induced DNA damage in coral planulae.

    PubMed

    Reef, Ruth; Dunn, Simon; Levy, Oren; Dove, Sophie; Shemesh, Eli; Brickner, Itzchak; Leggat, William; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2009-09-01

    The larvae of most coral species spend some time in the plankton, floating just below the surface and hence exposed to high levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The high levels of UVR are potentially stressful and damaging to DNA and other cellular components, such as proteins, reducing survivorship. Consequently, mechanisms to either shade (prevent) or repair damage potentially play an important role. In this study, the role of photoreactivation in the survival of coral planulae was examined. Photoreactivation is a light-stimulated response to UV-damaged DNA in which photolyase proteins repair damaged DNA. Photoreactivation rates, as well as the localization of photolyase, were explored in planulae under conditions where photoreactivation was or was not inhibited. The results indicate that photoreactivation is the main DNA repair pathway in coral planulae, repairing UV-induced DNA damage swiftly (K=1.75 h(-1) and a half-life of repair of 23 min), with no evidence of any light-independent DNA repair mechanisms, such as nucleotide excision repair (NER), at work. Photolyase mRNA was localized to both the ectoderm and endoderm of the larvae. The amount of cell death in the coral planulae increased significantly when photoreactivation was inhibited, by blocking photoreactivating light. We found that photoreactivation, along with additional UV shielding in the form of five mycosporine-like amino acids, are sufficient for survival in surface tropical waters and that planulae do not accumulate DNA damage despite being exposed to high UVR. PMID:19684208

  5. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6?M) for 24 or 48h. Cell viability was reduced (P<0.05) after 48h of exposure to 3 or 6?M PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24h of 6?M PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (?H2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, ?H2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. PMID:25497287

  6. Complex and elementary histological scoring systems for articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Orth, Patrick; Madry, Henning

    2015-08-01

    The repair of articular cartilage defects is increasingly moving into the focus of experimental and clinical investigations. Histological analysis is the gold standard for a valid and objective evaluation of cartilaginous repair tissue and predominantly relies on the use of established scoring systems. In the past three decades, numerous elementary and complex scoring systems have been described and modified, including those of O'Driscoll, Pineda, Wakitani, Sellers and Fortier for entire defects as well as those according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS-I/II) for osteochondral tissue biopsies. Yet, this coexistence of different grading scales inconsistently addressing diverse parameters may impede comparability between reported study outcomes. Furthermore, validation of these histological scoring systems has only seldom been performed to date. The aim of this review is (1) to give a comprehensive overview and to compare the most important established histological scoring systems for articular cartilage repair, (2) to describe their specific advantages and pitfalls, and (3) to provide valid recommendations for their use in translational and clinical studies of articular cartilage repair. PMID:25876650

  7. Homologous recombination is a primary pathway to repair DNA double-strand breaks generated during DNA rereplication.

    PubMed

    Truong, Lan N; Li, Yongjiang; Sun, Emily; Ang, Katrina; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-10-17

    Re-initiation of DNA replication at origins within a given cell cycle would result in DNA rereplication, which can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. DNA rereplication can be induced by loss of licensing control at cellular replication origins, or by viral protein-driven multiple rounds of replication initiation at viral origins. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated during rereplication, but the mechanisms of how these DSBs are repaired to maintain genome stability and cell viability are poorly understood in mammalian cells. We generated novel EGFP-based DSB repair substrates, which specifically monitor the repair of rereplication-associated DSBs. We demonstrated that homologous recombination (HR) is an important mechanism to repair rereplication-associated DSBs, and sister chromatids are used as templates for such HR-mediated DSB repair. Micro-homology-mediated non-homologous end joining (MMEJ) can also be used but to a lesser extent compared to HR, whereas Ku-dependent classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) has a minimal role to repair rereplication-associated DSBs. In addition, loss of HR activity leads to severe cell death when rereplication is induced. Therefore, our studies identify HR, the most conservative repair pathway, as the primary mechanism to repair DSBs upon rereplication. PMID:25160628

  8. DNA repair in cells sensitive and resistant to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Host cell reactivation of damaged plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheibani, N.; Jennerwein, M.M.; Eastman, A. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (USA))

    1989-04-04

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) has a broad clinical application as an effective anticancer drug. However, development of resistance to the cytotoxic effects is a limiting factor. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of resistance, the authors have employed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair using a cis-DDP-damaged plasmid vector. The efficiency of DNA repair was assayed by measuring the activity of an enzyme coded for by the plasmid vector. The plasmid expression vector pRSV cat contains the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a configuration which permits expression in mammalian cells. The plasmid was transfected into repair-proficient and -deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, and CAT activity was subsequently measured in cell lysates. In the repair-deficient cells, one cis-DDP adduct per cat gene was sufficient to eliminate expression. An equivalent inhibition of CAT expression in the repair-proficient cells did not occur until about 8 times the amount of damage was introduced into the plasmid. These results implicate DNA intrastrand cross-links as the lesions responsible for the inhibition of CAT expression. This assay was used to investigate the potential role of DNA repair in mediating cis-DDP resistance in murine leukemia L1210 cells. The assay readily detects the presence or absence of repair and confirms that these resistant L1210 cells have an enhanced capacity for repair of cis-DDP-induced intrastrand cross-links.

  9. FUS-regulated RNA metabolism and DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yueqin; Liu, Songyan; Öztürk, Arzu; Hicks, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusion of RNA binding protein FUS/TLS in neurons and glial cells is a characteristic pathology of a subgroup of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Dysregulation of RNA metabolism caused by FUS cytoplasmic inclusion emerges to be a key event in FUS-associated ALS/FTD pathogenesis. Our recent discovery of a FUS autoregulatory mechanism and its dysregulation in ALS-FUS mutants demonstrated that dysregulated alternative splicing can directly exacerbate the pathological FUS accumulation. We show here that FUS targets RNA for pre-mRNA alternative splicing and for the processing of long intron-containing transcripts, and that these targets are enriched for genes in neurogenesis and gene expression regulation. We also identify that FUS RNA targets are enriched for genes in the DNA damage response pathway. Together, the data support a model in which dysregulated RNA metabolism and DNA damage repair together may render neurons more vulnerable and accelerate neurodegeneration in ALS and FTD. PMID:25083344

  10. Histone deacetylase SIRT1 modulates and deacetylates DNA base excision repair enzyme thymine DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Madabushi, Amrita; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Jin, Jin; Lu, A-Lien

    2015-01-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) is an essential multifunctional enzyme involved in DNA base excision repair, DNA demethylation, and transcription regulation. TDG is the predominant enzyme to remove thymine from T/G mispair, which arises due to deamination of 5-methylcytosine at the CpG dinucleotide, thereby preventing C to T mutations. SIRT1 is a member of class III NAD+-dependent histone/protein deacetylases. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT1 interacts with the residues 67–110 of human TDG (hTDG). In addition, SIRT1 enhances TDG glycosylase activity and deacetylates acetylated TDG. TDG acetylation weakens its interaction with SIRT1. Although acetylated TDG has reduced glycosylase activity toward T/G, 5-formylcytosine/G, and 5-carboxylcytosine/G, it has a stronger activity toward 5-fluorouracil/G substrate as compared to unmodified TDG. SIRT1 weakly stimulates acetylated hTDG activity toward T/G, 5-formylcytosine/G, and 5-carboxylcytosine/G as compared to control hTDG. Sirt1 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast cells have higher levels of TDG expression and acetylation. The physical and functional interactions between SIRT1 and TDG may mediate DNA repair, gene expression, and FU-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:23952905

  11. Polyphenolic compounds from Salvia species protect cellular DNA from oxidation and stimulate DNA repair in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alice A; Azqueta, Amaya; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina; Collins, Andrew R

    2010-06-23

    DNA damage can lead to carcinogenesis if replication proceeds without proper repair. This study evaluated the effects of the water extracts of three Salvia sp., Salvia officinalis (SO), Salvia fruticosa (SF), and Salvia lavandulifolia (SL), and of the major phenolic constituents, rosmarinic acid (RA) and luteolin-7-glucoside (L-7-G), on DNA protection in Caco-2 and HeLa cells exposed to oxidative agents and on DNA repair in Caco-2 cells. The comet assay was used to measure DNA damage and repair capacity. The final concentration of each sage extract was 50 microg/mL, and concentrations of RA and L-7-G were 50 and 20 microM, respectively. After a short incubation (2 h), L-7-G protected DNA in Caco-2 cells from damage induced by H(2)O(2) (75 microM); also, after a long incubation (24 h), SF, RA, and L-7-G had protective effects in Caco-2 cells. In HeLa cells, SO, SF, and RA protected against damage induced by H(2)O(2) after 24 h of incubation. Assays of DNA repair show that SO, SF, and L-7-G increased the rate of DNA repair (rejoining of strand breaks) in Caco-2 cells treated with H(2)O(2). The incision activity of a Caco-2 cell extract on a DNA substrate containing specific damage (8-oxoGua) was also measured to evaluate effects on base excision repair (BER) activity. Preincubation for 24 h with SO and L-7-G had a BER inductive effect, increasing incision activity in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, SO, SF, and the isolated compounds (RA and L-7-G) demonstrated chemopreventive activity by protecting cells against oxidative DNA damage and stimulating DNA repair (SO, SF, and L-7-G). PMID:20486687

  12. RPA antagonizes microhomology-mediated repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sarah K; Gibb, Bryan; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Greene, Eric C; Symington, Lorraine S

    2014-04-01

    Microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) is a Ku- and ligase IV-independent mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks that contributes to chromosome rearrangements. Here we used a chromosomal end-joining assay to determine the genetic requirements for MMEJ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that end resection influences the ability to expose microhomologies; however, it is not rate limiting for MMEJ in wild-type cells. The frequency of MMEJ increased by up to 350-fold in rfa1 hypomorphic mutants, suggesting that replication protein A (RPA) bound to the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhangs formed by resection prevents spontaneous annealing between microhomologies. In vitro, the mutant RPA complexes were unable to fully extend ssDNA and were compromised in their ability to prevent spontaneous annealing. We propose that the helix-destabilizing activity of RPA channels ssDNA intermediates from mutagenic MMEJ to error-free homologous recombination, thus preserving genome integrity. PMID:24608368

  13. Recent progress with the DNA repair mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Salazar, E.P.; Brookman, K.W.; Collins, C.C.; Stewart, S.A.; Busch, D.B.; Weber, C.A.

    1986-04-02

    Repair deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are being used to identify human genes that correct the repair defects and to study mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Five independent tertiary DNA transformants were obtained from the EM9 mutant. In these clones a human DNA sequence was identified that correlated with the resistance of the cells to CldUrd. After Eco RI digestion, Southern transfer, and hybridization of transformant DNAs with the BLUR-8 Alu family sequence, a common fragment of 25 to 30 kb was present. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. DNA damage action spectroscopy and DNA repair in intact organisms: Alfalfa seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Quaite, F.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Understanding the effects of UV, and increased levels of UV, on DNA in living organisms requires knowledge of both the frequency of damages induced by the quantities and quality (wavelength composition) of the damaging radiation, and of the capacity of the organisms to carry out efficient and accurate repair. The major levels of uncertainty in understanding the responses of intact organisms, both plant and animal, to UV indicates that we cannot assess accurately the impact of stratospheric ozone depletion without major increases in knowledge of DNA damage and repair. What repair paths does alfalfa use for dealing with UV damages? The rate of pyrimidine dimers induced at a low exposure of 280 nm radiation to alfalfa seedlings, was observed to be about 8 dimers/million bases. After UV exposure, the seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to blue light filtered by a yellow. filter which excluded wavelengths shorter than about 405 nm. Seedlings so exposed carry out photorepair, but do not seem to remove dimers by excision.

  15. Coupling of human DNA excision repair and the DNA damage checkpoint in a defined in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Kemp, Michael G; Reardon, Joyce T; DeRocco, Vanessa; Iyer, Ravi R; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2014-02-21

    DNA repair and DNA damage checkpoints work in concert to help maintain genomic integrity. In vivo data suggest that these two global responses to DNA damage are coupled. It has been proposed that the canonical 30 nucleotide single-stranded DNA gap generated by nucleotide excision repair is the signal that activates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response and that the signal is enhanced by gap enlargement by EXO1 (exonuclease 1) 5' to 3' exonuclease activity. Here we have used purified core nucleotide excision repair factors (RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, and XPF-ERCC1), core DNA damage checkpoint proteins (ATR-ATRIP, TopBP1, RPA), and DNA damaged by a UV-mimetic agent to analyze the basic steps of DNA damage checkpoint response in a biochemically defined system. We find that checkpoint signaling as measured by phosphorylation of target proteins by the ATR kinase requires enlargement of the excision gap generated by the excision repair system by the 5' to 3' exonuclease activity of EXO1. We conclude that, in addition to damaged DNA, RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, XPF-ERCC1, ATR-ATRIP, TopBP1, and EXO1 constitute the minimum essential set of factors for ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response. PMID:24403078

  16. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Louise Prakash

    2000-01-15

    Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'-ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does not affect the AP endonuclease activity of the protein, but this protein is defective in the removal of AP sites in vivo. The carboxyl-terminus may enable Apn2 to complex with other proteins, and such a multiprotein assembly may be necessary for the efficient recognition and cleavage of AP sites in vivo. We also carried out further biochemical characterization of the yeast Apn2 protein. As mentioned above, oxidative DNA damaging agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, produce DNA strand breaks which contain 3'-phosphate or 3'-phosphoglycolate termini. Such 3' termini are inhibitory to synthesis by DNA polymerases. We found that purified yeast Apn2 protein contains 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'5' exonuclease activities, and mutation of the active site residue Glu59 to Ala in Apn2 inactivates both these activities. Consistent with these biochemical observations, our genetic studies indicate the involvement of APN2 in the repair of hydrogen peroxide induced DNA damage in a pathway alternate to APN1, and the Ala59 mutation inactivates this function of Apn2. From these results, we have concluded that the ability of Apn2 to remove 3'-end groups from DNA is paramount for the repair of strand breaks arising from the reaction of DNA with reactive oxygen species. Other studies from our laboratory indicate that the yeast APN1 and APN2 genes provide alternate pathways for the repair of abasic sites and for the repair of single strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini. The apn1 deletion apn2 deletion mutant is highly sensitive to both the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate and to the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide. While the apn1 deletion and apn2 deletion single mutants are proficient in repairing single strand breaks arising in DNA following treatment with hydrogen peroxide, the repair of abasic sites as well as of single strand DNA breaks with 3'-blocked termini is greatly reduced in the apn1 deletion.

  17. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Louisek Prakash

    2000-01-15

    OAK B202 Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does not affect the AP endonuclease activity of the protein, but this protein is defective in the removal of AP sites in vivo. The carboxyl-terminus may enable Apn2 to complex with other proteins, and such a multiprotein assembly may be necessary for the efficient recognition and cleavage of AP sites in vivo. We also carried out further biochemical characterization of the yeast Apn2 protein. As mentioned above, oxidative DNA damaging agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, produce DNA strand breaks which contain 3'-phosphate or 3'-phosphoglycolate termini. Such 3' termini are inhibitory to synthesis by DNA polymerases. We found that purified yeast Apn2 protein contains 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'5' exonuclease activities, and mutation of the active site residue Glu59 to Ala in Apn2 inactivates both these activities. Consistent with these biochemical observations, our genetic studies indicate the involvement of APN2 in the repair of hydrogen peroxide induced DNA damage in a pathway alternate to APN1, and the Ala59 mutation inactivates this function of Apn2. From these results, we have concluded that the ability of Apn2 to remove 3'-end groups from DNA is paramount for the repair of strand breaks arising from the reaction of DNA with reactive oxygen species. Other studies from our laboratory indicate that the yeast APN1 and APN2 genes provide alternate pathways for the repair of abasic sites and for the repair of single strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini. The apn1 deletion apn2 deletion mutant is highly sensitive to both the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate and to the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide. While the apn1 deletion and apn2 deletion single mutants are proficient in repairing single strand breaks arising in DNA following treatment with hydrogen peroxide, the repair of abasic sites as well as of single strand DNA breaks with 3'-blocked termini is greatly reduced in the apn1 deletion.

  18. DNA Repair Activity for Oxidative Damage and Risk of Lung Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tamar Paz-Elizur; Meir Krupsky; Sara Blumenstein; Dalia Elinger; Edna Schechtman; Zvi Livneh

    2003-01-01

    Background: Although smoking is a major cause of lung cancer, only a proportion of smokers develop lung cancer, suggesting a genetic predisposition in some individuals. Be- cause tobacco smoking is associated with the increased for- mation of DNA lesions, including those induced from oxida- tive damage, we investigated whether the activity of the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase (OGG),

  19. Statistical mechanics of topologically constrained DNA and nucleoprotein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovan, Stefan Michael

    A complex connection exists between the 3 dimensional topological state of DNA in living organisms and biological processes including gene expression, DNA replication, recombination and repair. A significant limitation in developing a detailed, quantitative understanding of this connection is due to a lack of rigorous methods to calculate statistical mechanical properties of DNA molecules with complex topologies, including supercoiling, looping and knotting. This dissertation's main focus is on developing such methods and applying them to realistic DNA and nucleoprotein models. In chapter 2, a method is presented to calculate free energies and J factors of protein mediated DNA loops by normal mode analysis (NMA). This method is similar to calculations performed previously but with several significant advances. We apply the method to the specific case of DNA looping mediated by Cre recombinase protein. J factors calculated by our method are compared to experimental measurements to extract geometric and elastic properties of the Cre-DNA synaptic complex. In particular, the results suggest the existence of a synaptic complex that is more flexible than previously expected and may be explained by a stable intermediate in the reaction pathway that deviates significantly from the planar crystal structure. Calculating free energies of DNA looping is difficult in general, especially when considering intermediate length scales such as plasmid sized DNA which may readily adopt multiple topological states. In chapter 3, a novel method is presented to obtain free energies of semiflexible biopolymers with fixed topologies and arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. High accuracy is demonstrated by calculating free energies of specific DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases.

  20. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  1. Positive Regulation of DNA Double Strand Break Repair Activity during Differentiation of Long Life Span Cells: The Example of Adipogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aline Meulle; Bernard Salles; Danièle Daviaud; Philippe Valet; Catherine Muller; Mikhail V. Blagosklonny

    2008-01-01

    Little information is available on the ability of terminally differentiated cells to efficiently repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), and one might reasonably speculate that efficient DNA repair of these threatening DNA lesions, is needed in cells of long life span with no or limited regeneration from precursor. Few tissues are available besides neurons that allow the study of DNA

  2. A cell-free system for DNA repair synthesis using purified enzymes from the Novikoff hepatoma

    SciTech Connect

    Small, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Novikoff DNA polymerase-{beta} and Novikoff DNase V have been used in a cell-free DNA excision repair system for UV-irradiated substrates to determine their DNA repair capabilities. The repair system was shown to depend upon UV-irradiated DNA, incision by phage T4 UV-endonuclease, excision by DNase V and synthesis by DNA polymerase-{beta}; ligation was not included. Highly purified calf thymus DNA was UV-irradiated at 500-750 J/m{sup 2} and incised by T4 UV-endonuclease. The repair system was used to follow the purification of DNase V and DNA polymerase-{beta}. For increased specificity, the parameters of UV-irradiation, incision, excision and synthesis were confirmed on highly supercoiled, covalently closed, phage PM2 DNA. Optimal DNA and Mg{sup 2+} concentrations were determined for the repair assay, which was shown to be linear with respect to time. Excision of the 3{prime}-apyrimidinic site and the 5{prime}-pyrimidine dimer by bidirectional DNase V, presumed to occur from the above experiments, was studied more thoroughly using lightly UV-irradiated ({sup 3}H)poly(dT)poly (dA), labeled in both the base and the sugar, and incised with T4 UV-endonuclease.

  3. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  4. The complexity of DNA double strand breaks is a critical factor enhancing end-resection.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Hirohiko; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Nakako Izumi; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Jeggo, Penelope A; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira

    2013-11-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) are deleterious damages. Two major pathways repair DSBs in human cells, DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). It has been suggested that the balance between the two repair pathways varies depending on the chromatin structure surrounding the damage site and/or the complexity of damage at the DNA break ends. Heavy ion radiation is known to induce complex-type DSBs, and the efficiency of NHEJ in repairing these DSBs was shown to be diminished. Taking advantage of the ability of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to produce complex DSBs effectively, we investigated how the complexity of DSB end structure influences DNA damage responses. An early step in HR is the generation of 3'-single strand DNA (SSD) via a process of DNA end resection that requires CtIP. To assess this process, we analyzed the level of phosphorylated CtIP, as well as RPA phosphorylation and focus formation, which occur on the exposed SSD. We show that complex DSBs efficiently activate DNA end resection. After heavy ion beam irradiation, resection signals appear both in the vicinity of heterochromatic areas, which is also observed after X-irradiation, and additionally in euchromatic areas. Consequently, ~85% of complex DSBs are subjected to resection in heavy ion particle tracks. Furthermore, around 20-40% of G1 cells exhibit resection signals. Taken together, our observations reveal that the complexity of DSB ends is a critical factor regulating the choice of DSB repair pathway and drastically alters the balance toward resection-mediated rejoining. As demonstrated here, studies on DNA damage responses induced by heavy ion radiation provide an important tool to shed light on mechanisms regulating DNA end resection. PMID:24041488

  5. RAD51 is Involved in Repair of Damage Associated with DNA Replication in Mammalian Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cecilia Lundin; Niklas Schultz; Catherine Arnaudeau; Atul Mohindra; Lasse Tengbjerg Hansen; Thomas Helleday

    2003-01-01

    The RAD51 protein, a eukaryotic homologue of the Escherichia coli RecA protein, plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) in mammalian cells. Recent findings suggest that HR may be important in repair following replication arrest in mammalian cells. Here, we have investigated the role of RAD51 in the repair of different

  6. DNA Repair and Aging in Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Molecular Epidemiology Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qingyi Wei; Genevieve M. Matanoski; Evan R. Farmer; Mohammad A. Hedayati; Lawrence Grossman

    1993-01-01

    This molecular epidemiology study examines the DNA-repair capacities (DRCs) of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) skin cancer patients (88) and their controls (135) by using a plasmid\\/host-cell reactivation assay. In this assay UV-damaged expression vector plasmid is transfected into peripheral blood T lymphocytes from the subjects. The host-cellular repair enzymes repair the photochemical damage in the plasmid, and 40 hr later

  7. Trichoderma atroviride PHR1, a Fungal Photolyase Responsible for DNA Repair, Autoregulates Its Own Photoinduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gloria M. Berrocal-Tito; Edgardo U. Esquivel-Naranjo; Benjamin A. Horwitz; Alfredo Herrera-Estrella

    2007-01-01

    The photolyases, DNA repair enzymes that use visible and long-wavelength UV light to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) created by short-wavelength UV, belong to the larger photolyase-cryptochrome gene family. Cryptochromes (UVA-blue light photoreceptors) lack repair activity, and sensory and regulatory roles have been defined for them in plants and animals. Evolutionary considerations indicate that cryptochromes diverged from CPD photolyases before

  8. The barley EST DNA Replication and Repair Database (bEST-DRRD) as a tool for the identification of the genes involved in DNA replication and repair

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The high level of conservation of genes that regulate DNA replication and repair indicates that they may serve as a source of information on the origin and evolution of the species and makes them a reliable system for the identification of cross-species homologs. Studies that had been conducted to date shed light on the processes of DNA replication and repair in bacteria, yeast and mammals. However, there is still much to be learned about the process of DNA damage repair in plants. Description These studies, which were conducted mainly using bioinformatics tools, enabled the list of genes that participate in various pathways of DNA repair in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh to be outlined; however, information regarding these mechanisms in crop plants is still very limited. A similar, functional approach is particularly difficult for a species whose complete genomic sequences are still unavailable. One of the solutions is to apply ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags) as the basis for gene identification. For the construction of the barley EST DNA Replication and Repair Database (bEST-DRRD), presented here, the Arabidopsis nucleotide and protein sequences involved in DNA replication and repair were used to browse for and retrieve the deposited sequences, derived from four barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) sequence databases, including the “Barley Genome version 0.05” database (encompassing ca. 90% of barley coding sequences) and from two databases covering the complete genomes of two monocot models: Oryza sativa L. and Brachypodium distachyon L. in order to identify homologous genes. Sequences of the categorised Arabidopsis queries are used for browsing the repositories, which are located on the ViroBLAST platform. The bEST-DRRD is currently used in our project during the identification and validation of the barley genes involved in DNA repair. Conclusions The presented database provides information about the Arabidopsis genes involved in DNA replication and repair, their expression patterns and models of protein interactions. It was designed and established to provide an open-access tool for the identification of monocot homologs of known Arabidopsis genes that are responsible for DNA-related processes. The barley genes identified in the project are currently being analysed to validate their function. PMID:22697361

  9. Chromatin dynamics during DNA repair revealed by pair correlation analysis of molecular flow in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangduo; Yokomori, Kyoko; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin dynamics modulate DNA repair factor accessibility throughout the DNA damage response. The spatiotemporal scale upon which these dynamics occur render them invisible to live cell imaging. Here we present a believed novel assay to monitor the in vivo structural rearrangements of chromatin during DNA repair. By pair correlation analysis of EGFP molecular flow into chromatin before and after damage, this assay measures millisecond variations in chromatin compaction with submicron resolution. Combined with laser microirradiation we employ this assay to monitor the real-time accessibility of DNA at the damage site. We find from comparison of EGFP molecular flow with a molecule that has an affinity toward double-strand breaks (Ku-EGFP) that DNA damage induces a transient decrease in chromatin compaction at the damage site and an increase in compaction to adjacent regions, which together facilitate DNA repair factor recruitment to the lesion with high spatiotemporal control. PMID:24988341

  10. Genotoxicity of alcohol is linked to DNA replication-associated damage and homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Kotova, Natalia; Vare, Daniel; Schultz, Niklas; Gradecka Meesters, Dobroslawa; Stepnik, Maciej; Grawé, Jan; Helleday, Thomas; Jenssen, Dag

    2013-02-01

    Although alcohol consumption is related to increased cancer risk, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that an intake of 10% alcohol for 4 weeks in rats is genotoxic due to induction of micronuclei. Acetaldehyde (AA), the first product of ethanol metabolism, is believed to be responsible for DNA damage induced by alcohol. Here, we observe that AA effectively blocks DNA replication elongation in mammalian cells, resulting in DNA double-strand breaks associated with replication. AA-induced DNA damage sites colocalize with the homologous recombination (HR) repair protein RAD51. HR measured in the hypoxhantineguaninefosforibosyltransferase (HPRT) gene is effectively induced by AA and recombination defective mammalian cells are hypersensitive to AA, clearly demonstrating that HR is essential in the repair of AA-induced DNA damage. Altogether, our data indicate that alcohol genotoxicity related to AA produces replication lesions on DNA triggering HR repair. PMID:23125219

  11. DNA damage triggers nucleotide excision repair-dependent monoubiquitylation of histone H2A

    PubMed Central

    Bergink, Steven; Salomons, Florian A.; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Groothuis, Tom A.M.; de Waard, Harm; Wu, Junxin; Yuan, Li; Citterio, Elisabetta; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Neefjes, Jacques; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Vermeulen, Wim; Dantuma, Nico P.

    2006-01-01

    Chromatin changes within the context of DNA repair remain largely obscure. Here we show that DNA damage induces monoubiquitylation of histone H2A in the vicinity of DNA lesions. Ultraviolet (UV)-induced monoubiquitylation of H2A is dependent on functional nucleotide excision repair and occurs after incision of the damaged strand. The ubiquitin ligase Ring2 is required for the DNA damage-induced H2A ubiquitylation. UV-induced ubiquitylation of H2A is dependent on the DNA damage signaling kinase ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related) but not the related kinase ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated). Although the response coincides with phosphorylation of variant histone H2AX, H2AX was not required for H2A ubiquitylation. Together our data show that monoubiquitylation of H2A forms part of the cellular response to UV damage and suggest a role of this modification in DNA repair-induced chromatin remodeling. PMID:16702407

  12. Topoisomerase II? associates with Ku70 and PARP-1 during double strand break repair of DNA in neurons.

    PubMed

    Mandraju, Rajakumar; Chekuri, Anil; Bhaskar, C; Duning, Kerstin; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Kondapi, Anand K

    2011-12-15

    In the present study, the activity of Topoisomerase II? (TopoII?) is evaluated during peroxide induced double stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) repair in primary neurons. The results showed that the TopoII? levels were enhanced during recovery from peroxide mediated damage (PED) along with Ku70, PARP-1, pol beta, and WRN helicase. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knock-down of TopoII? in primary neurons conferred enhanced susceptibility to PED in neurons. DSBs in neurons are repaired through two pathways, one promoted by Ku70, while the other is by PARP-1 dependent manner. Participation of TopoII? in both pathways was assessed by analysis of the interaction of TopoII? with Ku70 and PARP-1 using co-immunoprecipitation experiments in extracts of neurons under peroxide treatment and recovery. The results of these studies showed a strong interaction of TopoII? with Ku70 as well as PARP-1 suggesting that TopoII? is associated both in Ku70 and PARP-dependent pathways in DSBs repair in primary neurons. The study has thus established that TopoII? is an essential component in DSBs repair in primary neurons in both Ku70 and PARP-1 dependent pathways. We suppose that the interaction of TopoII? may provide stabilization of the repair complex, which may assist in maintenance of tensional integrity in genomic DNA. PMID:22019940

  13. Thrombopoietin promotes NHEJ DNA repair in hematopoietic stem cells through specific activation of Erk and NF-?B pathways and their target, IEX-1

    PubMed Central

    de Laval, Bérengère; Pawlikowska, Patrycja; Barbieri, Daniela; Besnard-Guerin, Corinne; Cico, Alba; Kumar, Rajiv; Gaudry, Murielle; Baud, Véronique; Porteu, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Loss of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function and increased risk of developing hematopoietic malignancies are severe and concerning complications of anticancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We have previously shown that thrombopoietin (TPO), a critical HSC regulator, ensures HSC chromosomal integrity and function in response to ?-irradiation by regulating their DNA-damage response. TPO directly affects the double-strand break (DSB) repair machinery through increased DNA-protein kinase (DNA-PK) phosphorylation and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair efficiency and fidelity. This effect is not shared by other HSC growth factors, suggesting that TPO triggers a specific signal in HSCs facilitating DNA-PK activation upon DNA damage. The discovery of these unique signaling pathways will provide a means of enhancing TPO-desirable effects on HSCs and improving the safety of anticancer DNA agents. We show here that TPO specifically triggers Erk and nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) pathways in mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Both of these pathways are required for a TPO-mediated increase in DSB repair. They cooperate to induce and activate the early stress-response gene, Iex-1 (ier3), upon DNA damage. Iex-1 forms a complex with pERK and the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, which is necessary and sufficient to promote TPO-increased DNA-PK activation and NHEJ DSB repair in both mouse and human HSPCs. PMID:24184684

  14. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group F Caused by a Defect in a Structure-Specific DNA Repair Endonuclease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anneke M Sijbers; Wouter L de Laat; Rafael R Ariza; Maureen Biggerstaff; Ying-Fei Wei; Jonathan G Moggs; Kenneth C Carter; Brenda K Shell; Elizabeth Evans; Mariska C de Jong; Suzanne Rademakers; Johan de Rooij; Nicolaas G. J Jaspers; Jan H. J Hoeijmakers; Richard D Wood

    1996-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair, which is defective in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), involves incision of a DNA strand on each side of a lesion. We isolated a human gene homologous to yeast Rad1 and found that it corrects the repair defects of XP group F as well as rodent groups 4 and 11. Causative mutations and strongly reduced levels of encoded protein

  15. Multiplexed DNA repair assays for multiple lesions and multiple doses via transcription inhibition and transcriptional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Zachary D.; Margulies, Carrie M.; Chaim, Isaac A.; McRee, Siobhan K.; Mazzucato, Patrizia; Ahmad, Anwaar; Abo, Ryan P.; Butty, Vincent L.; Forget, Anthony L.; Samson, Leona D.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to repair different types of DNA damage varies among individuals, making them more or less susceptible to the detrimental health consequences of damage exposures. Current methods for measuring DNA repair capacity (DRC) are relatively labor intensive, often indirect, and usually limited to a single repair pathway. Here, we describe a fluorescence-based multiplex flow-cytometric host cell reactivation assay (FM-HCR) that measures the ability of human cells to repair plasmid reporters, each bearing a different type of DNA damage or different doses of the same type of DNA damage. FM-HCR simultaneously measures repair capacity in any four of the following pathways: nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, base excision repair, nonhomologous end joining, homologous recombination, and methylguanine methyltransferase. We show that FM-HCR can measure interindividual DRC differences in a panel of 24 cell lines derived from genetically diverse, apparently healthy individuals, and we show that FM-HCR may be used to identify inhibitors or enhancers of DRC. We further develop a next-generation sequencing-based HCR assay (HCR-Seq) that detects rare transcriptional mutagenesis events due to lesion bypass by RNA polymerase, providing an added dimension to DRC measurements. FM-HCR and HCR-Seq provide powerful tools for exploring relationships among global DRC, disease susceptibility, and optimal treatment. PMID:24757057

  16. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.; Ahmed, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  17. 55K isoform of CDK9 associates with Ku70 and is involved in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongbing; Herrmann, Christine H.; Chiang, Karen; Sung, Tzu-Ling [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moon, Sung-Hwan [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Donehower, Lawrence A. [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States) [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Rice, Andrew P., E-mail: arice@bcm.edu [Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-06-25

    Positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is a cellular protein kinase that is required for RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcriptional elongation of protein coding genes. P-TEFb is a set of different molecular complexes, each containing CDK9 as the catalytic subunit. There are two isoforms of the CDK9 protein - the major 42 KDa CDK9 isoform and the minor 55KDa isoform that is translated from an in-frame mRNA that arises from an upstream transcriptional start site. We found that shRNA depletion of the 55K CDK9 protein in HeLa cells induces apoptosis and double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). The levels of apoptosis and DSBs induced by the depletion were reduced by expression of a 55K CDK9 protein variant resistant to the shRNA, indicating that these phenotypes are the consequence of depletion of the 55K protein and not off-target effects. We also found that the 55K CDK9 protein, but not the 42K CDK9 protein, specifically associates with Ku70, a protein involved in DSB repair. Our findings suggest that the 55K CDK9 protein may function in repair of DNA through an association with Ku70.

  18. The DNA Single-Strand Break Repair Machinery Facilitates CAF-1-Mediated Histone Deposition at Oxidative DNA Strand Breaks

    E-print Network

    Arman Nabatiyan; Zhihong Zeng; Keith W. Caldecott

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative DNA single strand breaks arise continuously in cells and defects in their repair have been implicated in neurological disease. While much progress has been made in understanding how chromosomal single strand breaks are repaired little is known about the changes chromatin structure that accompany this process. Here, we show that nascent recombinant histone H3.1 protein accumulates and is deposited into chromatin at sites of DNA strand breakage in quiescent human cells following oxidative stress, and that core components of the single-strand break repair machinery are required for this process. We show that the SSBR sensor and scaffold proteins poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and XRCC1 facilitate accumulation of chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) at sites of oxidative DNA strand breakage, which in turn mediates the deposition of Histone H3.1. We also demonstrate that depletion of CAF-1 slows global rates of DNA strand break repair in quiescent cells following oxidative stress, demonstrating that single-strand break repair and histone deposition are tightly coordinated processes. These data describe a novel role for the DNA singlestrand break repair machinery and implicate histone turnover as a core component of the cellular response of quiescent cells to oxidative damage.

  19. Encapsulation of the UV-DNA repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V in liposomes and delivery to human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccoli, J.; Rosales, N.; Tsimis, J.; Yarosh, D.B. (Applied Genetics Inc., Freeport, NY (USA))

    1989-08-01

    T4 endonuclease V, a pyrimidine-dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme, was encapsulated in liposomes under mild conditions. The encapsulated enzyme was active, and when applied to ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated human cells in culture, the liposomes increased incision of UV-irradiated cellular DNA, enhanced DNA repair replication, and enhanced survival of UV-irradiated cells. This method is a first step in a new approach for topical application of DNA repair enzymes to human skin to prevent skin cancer.

  20. A eukaryotic gene encoding an endonuclease that specifically repairs DNA damaged by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, H; Takao, M; Yasuhira, S; Zhao, J H; Ishii, C; Inoue, H; Yasui, A

    1995-01-01

    Many eukaryotic organisms, including humans, remove ultraviolet (UV) damage from their genomes by the nucleotide excision repair pathway, which requires more than 10 separate protein factors. However, no nucleotide excision repair pathway has been found in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We have isolated a new eukaryotic DNA repair gene from N.crassa by its ability to complement UV-sensitive Escherichia coli cells. The gene is altered in a N.crassa mus-18 mutant and responsible for the exclusive sensitivity to UV of the mutant. Introduction of the wild-type mus-18 gene complements not only the mus-18 DNA repair defect of N.crassa, but also confers UV-resistance on various DNA repair-deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a human xeroderma pigmentosum cell line. The cDNA encodes a protein of 74 kDa with no sequence similarity to other known repair enzymes. Recombinant mus-18 protein was purified from E.coli and found to be an endonuclease for UV-irradiated DNA. Both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4)photoproducts are cleaved at the sites immediately 5' to the damaged dipyrimidines in a magnesium-dependent, ATP-independent reaction. This mechanism, requiring a single polypeptide designated UV-induced dimer endonuclease for incision, is a substitute for the role of nucleotide excision repair of UV damage in N.crassa. Images PMID:7774597

  1. Interspecies comparisons of tissues DNA damage, repair, fixation, and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Slaga, T.J.

    1988-04-01

    The many anatomical, physiological, and biochemical differences among various mammalian species make it difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans. The process is further complicated by the multistep origin of most malignant tumors in animals and humans due to the interaction of target cells with both endogenous and exogenous factors. Species differences in these aspects of carcinogenesis must also be considered when attempting to evaluate the carcinogenic risks of chemicals to humans. Cancer development in animals involves at least three distinct stages: initiation, promotion, and progression. Intra- and interspecies differences in susceptibility to carcinogenesis may be related to any one or a combination of these stages. Variation in species susceptibility to tumor initiation may result from differences in the abilities of various species to metabolize a potential carcinogen to an ultimate carcinogenic form and/or to detoxify the carcinogen. Most comparative studies among species have only revealed subtle differences in metabolism. DNA adducts from several activated carcinogens have been found to be the same in a number of tissues from various species, including humans. Capacity for DNA repair is apparently a critical factor in the initiation of carcinogenesis in target cells of different species but is less critical among mice that differ in susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis of the skin and liver. Susceptibility variations among stocks and strains to such carcinogenesis appear to be related to alterations in tumor promotion. Additional comparative studies are critically needed on all aspects of carcinogenesis to permit effective extrapolation of carcinogenic potency data from animals to humans.

  2. DNA Repair Systems in Archaea: Mementos from the Last Universal Common Ancestor?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jocelyne DiRuggiero; James R. Brown; Allison P. Bogert; Frank T. Robb

    1999-01-01

    .   DNA repair in the Archaea is relevant to the consideration of genome maintenance and replication fidelity in the last universal\\u000a common ancestor (LUCA) from two perspectives. First, these prokaryotes embody a mix of bacterial and eukaryal molecular features.\\u000a Second, DNA repair proteins would have been essential in LUCA to maintain genome integrity, regardless of the environmental\\u000a temperature. Yet we

  3. The role of chromatin proteins in DNA damage recognition and repair Mini-review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piotr Widlak; Monika Pietrowska; Joanna Lanuszewska

    2006-01-01

    The structure of chromatin is the major factor determining the rate and efficiency of DNA repair. Chromatin remodeling events\\u000a such as rearrangement of nucleosomes and higher order chromatin structures are indispensable features of repair processes.\\u000a During the last decade numerous chromatin proteins have been identified that preferentially bind to different types of DNA\\u000a damage. The HMGB proteins, which preferentially interact

  4. Psoralen plus near-ultraviolet light: a possible new method for measuring DNA repair synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, Y.M. (Nuclear Research Center, Negev, Israel); Kol, R.; Shiloh, Y.; Riklis, E.

    1983-09-01

    A new method is proposed to inhibit semiconservative DNA synthesis in cultured cells while DNA repair synthesis is being measured. The cells are treated with the DNA-crosslinking agent Trioxalen (4,5,8-trimethylpsoralen) plus near-ultraviolet light, and consequently 99.5% inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis is achieved. Additional DNA-damaging agents induce thymidine incorporation into the double-stranded regions of the DNA. The new method gave results very similar to those obtained with the benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE (BND) cellulose method using three human fibroblast strains, of which one had deficient capacity for DNA repair synthesis following treatment with ..gamma.. rays and methyl methanesulfonate. The advantages of the new method are simplicity and rapidity, as well as the high extent to which replicative DNA synthesis is inhibited.

  5. Psoralen plus near-ultraviolet light: a possible new method for measuring DNA repair synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, Y.M.; Kol, R.; Shiloh, Y.; Riklis, E.

    1983-09-01

    A new method is proposed to inhibit semiconservative DNA synthesis in cultured cells while DNA repair synthesis is being measured. The cells are treated with the DNA-crosslinking agent Trioxalen (4,5,8-trimethylpsoralen) plus near-ultraviolet light, and consequently 99.5% inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis is achieved. Additional DNA-damaging agents induce thymidine incorporation into the double-stranded regions of the DNA. The new method gave results very similar to those obtained with the benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE (BND) cellulose method using three human fibroblast strains, of which one had deficient capacity for DNA repair synthesis following treatment with gamma rays and methyl methanesulfonate. The advantages of the new method are simplicity and rapidity, as well as the high extent to which replicative DNA synthesis is inhibited.

  6. Structure and cellular dynamics of Deinococcus radiodurans single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB)-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    George, Nicholas P; Ngo, Khanh V; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Norais, Cédric A; Battista, John R; Cox, Michael M; Keck, James L

    2012-06-22

    The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein from the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans (DrSSB) functions as a homodimer in which each monomer contains two oligonucleotide-binding (OB) domains. This arrangement is exceedingly rare among bacterial SSBs, which typically form homotetramers of single-OB domain subunits. To better understand how this unusual structure influences the DNA binding and biological functions of DrSSB in D. radiodurans radiation resistance, we have examined the structure of DrSSB in complex with ssDNA and the DNA damage-dependent cellular dynamics of DrSSB. The x-ray crystal structure of the DrSSB-ssDNA complex shows that ssDNA binds to surfaces of DrSSB that are analogous to those mapped in homotetrameric SSBs, although there are distinct contacts in DrSSB that mediate species-specific ssDNA binding. Observations by electron microscopy reveal two salt-dependent ssDNA-binding modes for DrSSB that strongly resemble those of the homotetrameric Escherichia coli SSB, further supporting a shared overall DNA binding mechanism between the two classes of bacterial SSBs. In vivo, DrSSB levels are heavily induced following exposure to ionizing radiation. This accumulation is accompanied by dramatic time-dependent DrSSB cellular dynamics in which a single nucleoid-centric focus of DrSSB is observed within 1 h of irradiation but is dispersed by 3 h after irradiation. These kinetics parallel those of D. radiodurans postirradiation genome reconstitution, suggesting that DrSSB dynamics could play important organizational roles in DNA repair. PMID:22570477

  7. Kaempferol Induces DNA Damage and Inhibits DNA Repair Associated Protein Expressions in Human Promyelocytic Leukemia HL-60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Bau, Da-Tian; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous evidences have shown that plant flavonoids (naturally occurring substances) have been reported to have chemopreventive activities and protect against experimental carcinogenesis. Kaempferol, one of the flavonoids, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and may have cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the precise underlying mechanism regarding induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair system are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether kaempferol induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Percentages of viable cells were measured via a flow cytometry assay. DNA damage was examined by Comet assay and DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation (ladder) was examined by DNA gel electrophoresis. The changes of protein levels associated with DNA repair were examined by Western blotting. Results showed that kaempferol dose-dependently decreased the viable cells. Comet assay indicated that kaempferol induced DNA damage (Comet tail) in a dose-dependent manner and DAPI staining also showed increased doses of kaempferol which led to increased DNA condensation, these effects are all of dose-dependent manners. Western blotting indicated that kaempferol-decreased protein expression associated with DNA repair system, such as phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (p-ATR), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3?), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53 and MDC1 protein expressions, but increased the protein expression of p-p53 and p-H2AX. Protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy, and we found that kaempferol increased the levels of p-H2AX and p-p53 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, in the present study, we found that kaempferol induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair and inhibited DNA repair associated protein expression in HL-60 cells, which may be the factors for kaempferol induced cell death in vitro. PMID:25779644

  8. Decreased repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks with cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bill, C A; Grochan, B M; Vrdoljak, E; Mendoza, E A; Tofilon, P J

    1992-11-01

    Although the majority of mammalian cells in situ are terminally differentiated, most DNA repair studies have used proliferating cells. In an attempt to understand better the relationship between differentiation and DNA repair, we have used the murine 3T3-T proadipocyte cell line. In this model system, proliferating (stem) cells undergo growth arrest (GD cells) and subsequently terminally differentiate into adipocytes when exposed to media containing platelet-depleted human plasma. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to evaluate the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) after ionizing radiation. The levels of radiation-induced DSBs in GD and terminally differentiated cells were similar, but in both cases greater than those found in stem cells at each radiation dose tested (0 to 40 Gy); these differences appear to be due to growth arrest in G1 phase. DNA DSBs were repaired with biphasic kinetics for each cell type. For terminally differentiated cells 25% of DNA DSBs remained unrejoined compared with < 10% for GD and stem cells after a repair time of 4 h. These data indicate that terminal differentiation of 3T3-T cells is associated with a reduction in the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA DSBs. PMID:1438708

  9. ELL, a novel TFIIH partner, is involved in transcription restart after DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Mourgues, Sophie; Gautier, Violette; Lagarou, Anna; Bordier, Christine; Mourcet, Amandine; Slingerland, Joris; Kaddoum, Lara; Coin, Frédéric; Vermeulen, Wim; Gonzales de Peredo, Anne; Monsarrat, Bernard; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina

    2013-10-29

    DNA lesions that block transcription may cause cell death even when repaired, if transcription does not restart to reestablish cellular metabolism. However, transcription resumption after individual DNA-lesion repair remains poorly described in mechanistic terms and its players are largely unknown. The general transcription factor II H (TFIIH) is a major actor of both nucleotide excision repair subpathways of which transcription-coupled repair highlights the interplay between DNA repair and transcription. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we have identified the protein eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia (ELL) as a TFIIH partner. Here we show that ELL is recruited to UV-damaged chromatin in a Cdk7- dependent manner (a component of the cyclin-dependent activating kinase subcomplex of TFIIH). We demonstrate that depletion of ELL strongly hinders RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II) transcription resumption after lesion removal and DNA gap filling. Lack of ELL was also observed to increase RNA Pol II retention to the chromatin during this process. Identifying ELL as an essential player for RNA Pol II restart during cellular DNA damage response opens the way to obtaining a mechanistic description of transcription resumption after DNA repair. PMID:24127601

  10. Homogenous repair of singlet oxygen-induced DNA damage in differentially transcribed regions and strands of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anson, R M; Croteau, D L; Stierum, R H; Filburn, C; Parsell, R; Bohr, V A

    1998-01-01

    Photoactivated methylene blue was used to damage purified DNA and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of human fibroblasts in culture. The primary product of this reaction is the DNA lesion 7-hydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG). The DNA damage was quantitated using Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) in a gene-specific damage and repair assay. Assay conditions were refined to give incision at all enzyme-sensitive sites with minimal non-specific cutting. Cultured fibroblasts were exposed to photoactivated methylene blue under conditions that would produce an average of three oxidative lesions per double-stranded mitochondrial genome. Within 9 h, 47% of this damage had been removed by the cells. This removal was due to repair rather than to replication, cell loss or degradation of damaged genomes. The rate of repair was measured in both DNA strands of the frequently transcribed ribosomal region of the mitochondrial genome and in both strands of the non-ribosomal region. Fpg-sensitive alkali-resistant oxidative base damage was efficiently removed from human mtDNA with no differences in the rate of repair between strands or between two different regions of the genome that differ substantially with regard to transcriptional activity. PMID:9421531

  11. DNA polymerase ? is required for efficient DNA strand break repair induced by methyl methanesulfonate but not by hydrogen peroxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paola Fortini; Barbara Pascucci; Federico Belisario; Eugenia Dogliotti

    The most frequent DNA lesions in mammalian genomes are removed by the base excision repair (BER) via multiple pathways that involve the replace- ment of one or more nucleotides at the lesion site. The biological consequences of a BER defect are at present largely unknown. We report here that mouse cells defective in the main BER DNA polymerase ? (Pol

  12. Enzymatic MPG DNA repair assays for two different oxidative DNA lesions reveal associations with increased lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Sevilya, Ziv; Pinchev, Mila; Kremer, Ran; Elinger, Dalia; Rennert, Hedy S; Schechtman, Edna; Freedman, Laurence; Rennert, Gad; Livneh, Zvi; Paz-Elizur, Tamar

    2014-12-01

    DNA repair is a major mechanism for minimizing mutations and reducing cancer risk. Here, we present the development of reproducible and specific enzymatic assays for methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG) repairing the oxidative lesions 1,N6-ethenoadenine (?A) and hypoxanthine (Hx) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells protein extracts. Association of these DNA repair activities with lung cancer was determined using conditional logistic regression with specimens from a population-based case-control study with 96 lung cancer cases and 96 matched control subjects. The mean MPG-?A in case patients was 15.8 units/?g protein (95% CI 15.3-16.3), significantly higher than in control subjects-15.1 (14.6-15.5), *P = 0.011. The adjusted odds ratio for lung cancer associated with a one SD increase in MPG-?A activity (2.48 units) was significantly bigger than 1 (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.4; *P = 0.013). When activity of OGG1, a different DNA repair enzyme for oxidative damage, was included in the model, the estimated odds ratio/SD for a combined MPG-?A-OGG1 score was 2.6 (95% CI 1.6-4.2) *P = 0.0001, higher than the odds ratio for each single assay. The MPG enzyme activity assays described provide robust functional risk biomarkers, with increased MPG-?A activity being associated with increased lung cancer risk, similar to the behavior of MPG-Hx. This underscores the notion that imbalances in DNA repair, including high DNA repair, usually perceived as beneficial, can cause cancer risk. Such DNA repair risk biomarkers may be useful for risk assessment of lung cancer and perhaps other cancer types, and for early detection techniques such as low-dose CT. PMID:25355292

  13. DSB (Im)mobility and DNA repair compartmentalization in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Charlène; Soutoglou, Evi

    2015-02-13

    Chromosomal translocations are considered as causal in approximately 20% of cancers. Therefore, understanding their mechanisms of formation is crucial in the prevention of carcinogenesis. The first step of translocation formation is the concomitant occurrence of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) in two different chromosomes. DSBs can be repaired by different repair mechanisms, including error-free homologous recombination (HR), potentially error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and the highly mutagenic alternative end joining (alt-EJ) pathways. Regulation of DNA repair pathway choice is crucial to avoid genomic instability. In yeast, DSBs are mobile and can scan the entire nucleus to be repaired in specialized DNA repair centers or if they are persistent, in order to associate with the nuclear pores or the nuclear envelope where they can be repaired by specialized repair pathways. DSB mobility is limited in mammals; therefore, raising the question of whether the position at which a DSB occurs influences its repair. Here, we review the recent literature addressing this question. We first present the reports describing the extent of DSB mobility in mammalian cells. In a second part, we discuss the consequences of non-random gene positioning on chromosomal translocations formation. In the third part, we discuss the mobility of heterochromatic DSBs in light of our recent data on DSB repair at the nuclear lamina, and finally, we show that DSB repair compartmentalization at the nuclear periphery is conserved from yeast to mammals, further pointing to a role for gene positioning in the outcome of DSB repair. When regarded as a whole, the different studies reviewed here demonstrate the importance of nuclear architecture on DSB repair and reveal gene positioning as an important parameter in the study of tumorigenesis. PMID:25463437

  14. Bacillus subtilis RecO and SsbA are crucial for RecA-mediated recombinational DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Begoña; Yadav, Tribhuwan; Serrano, Ester; Alonso, Juan C

    2015-07-13

    Genetic data have revealed that the absence of Bacillus subtilis RecO and one of the end-processing avenues (AddAB or RecJ) renders cells as sensitive to DNA damaging agents as the null recA, suggesting that both end-resection pathways require RecO for recombination. RecA, in the rATP·Mg(2+) bound form (RecA·ATP), is inactive to catalyze DNA recombination between linear double-stranded (ds) DNA and naked complementary circular single-stranded (ss) DNA. We showed that RecA·ATP could not nucleate and/or polymerize on SsbA·ssDNA or SsbB·ssDNA complexes. RecA·ATP nucleates and polymerizes on RecO·ssDNA·SsbA complexes more efficiently than on RecO·ssDNA·SsbB complexes. Limiting SsbA concentrations were sufficient to stimulate RecA·ATP assembly on the RecO·ssDNA·SsbB complexes. RecO and SsbA are necessary and sufficient to 'activate' RecA·ATP to catalyze DNA strand exchange, whereas the AddAB complex, RecO alone or in concert with SsbB was not sufficient. In presence of AddAB, RecO and SsbA are still necessary for efficient RecA·ATP-mediated three-strand exchange recombination. Based on genetic and biochemical data, we proposed that SsbA and RecO (or SsbA, RecO and RecR in vivo) are crucial for RecA activation for both, AddAB and RecJ-RecQ (RecS) recombinational repair pathways. PMID:26001966

  15. The Intertwined Roles of Transcription and Repair Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Yick W.; Cattoglio, Claudia; Tjian, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Transcription is apparently risky business. Its intrinsic mutagenic potential must be kept in check by networks of DNA repair factors that monitor the transcription process to repair DNA lesions that could otherwise compromise transcriptional fidelity and genome integrity. Intriguingly, recent studies point to an even more direct function of DNA repair complexes as co-activators of transcription and the unexpected role of “scheduled” DNA damage/repair at gene promoters. Paradoxically, spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks also induce ectopic transcription that is essential for repair. Thus, transcription, DNA damage and repair may be more physically and functionally intertwined than previously appreciated. PMID:24207023

  16. Increase in the frequency of hepadnavirus DNA integrations by oxidative DNA damage and inhibition of DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J; Dandri, M; Bürkle, A; Zhang, L; Rogler, C E

    1997-01-01

    Persistent hepadnavirus infection leads to oxidative stress and DNA damage through increased production of toxic oxygen radicals. In addition, hepadnaviral DNA integrations into chromosomal DNA can promote the process of hepatocarcinogenesis (M. Feitelson, Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 5:275-301, 1992). While previous studies have identified preferred integration sites in hepadnaviral genomes and suggested integration mechanisms (M. A. Buendia, Adv. Cancer Res. 59:167-226, 1992; C. E. Rogler, Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 168:103-141, 1991; C. Shih et al., J. Virol. 61:3491-3498, 1987), very little is known about the effects of agents which damage chromosomal DNA on the frequency of hepadnaviral DNA integrations. Using a recently developed subcloning approach to detect stable new integrations of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) (S. S. Gong, A. D. Jensen, and C. E. Rogler, J. Virol. 70:2000-2007, 1996), we tested the effects of increased chromosomal DNA damage induced by H2O2, or of the disturbance in DNA repair due to the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), on the frequency of DHBV DNA integrations. Subclones of LMH-D21-6 cells, which replicate DHBV, were grown in the presence of various H2O2 concentrations and exhibited up to a threefold increase in viral DNA integration frequency in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, inhibition of PARP, which plays a role in cellular responses to DNA breakage, by 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) resulted in a sevenfold increase in the total number of new DHBV DNA integrations into host chromosomal DNA. Removal of either H2O2 or 3-AB from the culture medium in a subsequent cycle of subcloning was accompanied by a reversion back towards the original lower frequency of stable DHBV DNA integrations for LMH-D21-6 cells. These data support the hypothesis that DNA damage sites can serve as sites for hepadnaviral DNA integration, and that increasing the number of DNA damage sites dramatically increases viral integration frequency. PMID:9188618

  17. Genetic characterization of cells of homocystinuria patients with disrupted DNA repair system

    SciTech Connect

    Sinel'shchikova, T.A.; L'vova, G.N.; Shoniya, N.N.; Zasukhina, G.D.

    1986-08-01

    Fibroblasts obtained from biopsy material and lymphocytes of patients with homocystinuria were investigated for repair activity according to the following criteria: rejoined DNA breaks, induced by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and ..gamma..-radiation; indices of reactivation and induced mutagenesis of smallpox vaccine virus treated with these mutagens. In lymphocytes a defect of DNA repair was observed according to all criteria investigated. During passage of fibroblast cultures, inhibition of repair activity of cells was preserved according to ..gamma..-type. Increase in the number of spontaneous and ..gamma..-induced mutations of virus was noted according to degree of passage of fibroblasts.

  18. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R

    2011-08-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the US Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in seven isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of ?H2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis. PMID:21538559

  19. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N.; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P.; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2012-01-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the U.S. Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in 7 isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of ?H2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis. PMID:21538559

  20. An ‘open’ structure of the RecOR complex supports ssDNA binding within the core of the complex

    PubMed Central

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Dehez, François; Round, Adam; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Efficient DNA repair is critical for cell survival and the maintenance of genome integrity. The homologous recombination pathway is responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks within cells. Initiation of this pathway in bacteria can be carried out by either the RecBCD or the RecFOR proteins. An important regulatory player within the RecFOR pathway is the RecOR complex that facilitates RecA loading onto DNA. Here we report new data regarding the assembly of Deinococcus radiodurans RecOR and its interaction with DNA, providing novel mechanistic insight into the mode of action of RecOR in homologous recombination. We present a higher resolution crystal structure of RecOR in an ‘open’ conformation in which the tetrameric RecR ring flanked by two RecO molecules is accessible for DNA binding. We show using small-angle neutron scattering and mutagenesis studies that DNA binding does indeed occur within the RecR ring. Binding of single-stranded DNA occurs without any major conformational changes of the RecOR complex while structural rearrangements are observed on double-stranded DNA binding. Finally, our molecular dynamics simulations, supported by our biochemical data, provide a detailed picture of the DNA binding motif of RecOR and reveal that single-stranded DNA is sandwiched between the two facing oligonucleotide binding domains of RecO within the RecR ring. PMID:23814185

  1. An 'open' structure of the RecOR complex supports ssDNA binding within the core of the complex.

    PubMed

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Dehez, François; Round, Adam; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Efficient DNA repair is critical for cell survival and the maintenance of genome integrity. The homologous recombination pathway is responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks within cells. Initiation of this pathway in bacteria can be carried out by either the RecBCD or the RecFOR proteins. An important regulatory player within the RecFOR pathway is the RecOR complex that facilitates RecA loading onto DNA. Here we report new data regarding the assembly of Deinococcus radiodurans RecOR and its interaction with DNA, providing novel mechanistic insight into the mode of action of RecOR in homologous recombination. We present a higher resolution crystal structure of RecOR in an 'open' conformation in which the tetrameric RecR ring flanked by two RecO molecules is accessible for DNA binding. We show using small-angle neutron scattering and mutagenesis studies that DNA binding does indeed occur within the RecR ring. Binding of single-stranded DNA occurs without any major conformational changes of the RecOR complex while structural rearrangements are observed on double-stranded DNA binding. Finally, our molecular dynamics simulations, supported by our biochemical data, provide a detailed picture of the DNA binding motif of RecOR and reveal that single-stranded DNA is sandwiched between the two facing oligonucleotide binding domains of RecO within the RecR ring. PMID:23814185

  2. DNA binding and nucleotide flipping by the human DNA repair protein AGT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas S Daniels; Tammy T Woo; Kieu X Luu; David M Noll; Neil D Clarke; Anthony E Pegg; John A Tainer

    2004-01-01

    O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), or O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), prevents mutations and apoptosis resulting from alkylation damage to guanines. AGT irreversibly transfers the alkyl lesion to an active site cysteine in a stoichiometric, direct damage reversal pathway. AGT expression therefore elicits tumor resistance to alkylating chemotherapies, and AGT inhibitors are in clinical trials. We report here structures of human AGT in complex

  3. Interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and aflatoxin B1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jin-Guang; Huang, Xiao-Ying; Long, Xi-Dai

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is an important environmental carcinogen and can induce DNA damage and involve in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The deficiency of DNA repair capacity related to the polymorphisms of DNA repair genes might play a central role in the process of HCC tumorigenesis. However, the interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and AFB1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether six polymorphisms (including rs25487, rs861539, rs7003908, rs28383151, rs13181, and rs2228001) in DNA repair genes (XPC, XRCC4, XRCC1, XRCC4, XPD, XRCC7, and XRCC3) interacted with AFB1, and the gene-environmental interactive role in the risk of HCC using hospital-based case-control study (including 1486 HCC cases and 1996 controls). Genotypes of DNA repair genes were tested using TaqMan-PCR technique. Higher AFB1 exposure was observed among HCC patients versus the control group [odds ratio (OR) = 2.08 for medium AFB1 exposure level and OR = 6.52 for high AFB1 exposure level]. Increasing risk of HCC was also observed in these with the mutants of DNA repair genes (risk values were from 1.57 to 5.86). Furthermore, these risk roles would be more noticeable under the conditions of two variables, and positive interactive effects were proved in the followed multiplicative interaction analysis. These results suggested that DNA repair risk genotypes might interact with AFB1 in the risk of HCC. PMID:25337275

  4. Interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and aflatoxin B1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jin-Guang; Huang, Xiao-Ying; Long, Xi-Dai

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is an important environmental carcinogen and can induce DNA damage and involve in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The deficiency of DNA repair capacity related to the polymorphisms of DNA repair genes might play a central role in the process of HCC tumorigenesis. However, the interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and AFB1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether six polymorphisms (including rs25487, rs861539, rs7003908, rs28383151, rs13181, and rs2228001) in DNA repair genes (XPC, XRCC4, XRCC1, XRCC4, XPD, XRCC7, and XRCC3) interacted with AFB1, and the gene-environmental interactive role in the risk of HCC using hospital-based case-control study (including 1486 HCC cases and 1996 controls). Genotypes of DNA repair genes were tested using TaqMan-PCR technique. Higher AFB1 exposure was observed among HCC patients versus the control group [odds ratio (OR) = 2.08 for medium AFB1 exposure level and OR = 6.52 for high AFB1 exposure level]. Increasing risk of HCC was also observed in these with the mutants of DNA repair genes (risk values were from 1.57 to 5.86). Furthermore, these risk roles would be more noticeable under the conditions of two variables, and positive interactive effects were proved in the followed multiplicative interaction analysis. These results suggested that DNA repair risk genotypes might interact with AFB1 in the risk of HCC. PMID:25337275

  5. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoonsung [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hyang-Min [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Hee [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Peter I. [Department of Dermatology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, 4301 West Markham, Slot 576, Little Rock, AR 72205 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Dermatology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, 4301 West Markham, Slot 576, Little Rock, AR 72205 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang-Ho [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Yong [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Jae Yeoul [Department of Physiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); You, Ho Jin, E-mail: hjyou@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  6. Role of ATP in UV-induced DNA excision repair in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dresler, S.L.

    1986-05-01

    In permeable human fibroblasts, UV-induced DNA excision repair is dependent on ATP, with a K/sub m/ of approximately 1 mM. Omission of ATP from the reaction mix completely inhibits damage-specific incision of DNA, but has little effect on repair patch synthesis proceeding from previously incised sites. UV-induced excision repair in permeable xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells complemented with T4 UV endonuclease is also totally dependent on ATP. Because the T4 enzyme is not ATP-dependent, ATP must be required for an endogenous activity other than the incision of damaged DNA. Alkaline elution reveals that, in the absence of ATP, T4 UV endonuclease does incise the DNA of permeable UV-irradiated XP cells, but that the incision rate is stimulated approximately 2-fold by the addition of ATP. This 2-fold stimulation of incision can not, however, be responsible for the absolute ATP dependence of excision repair in UV endonuclease-complemented XP cells. Apparently, although T4 UV endonuclease can incise damaged nuclear DNA in the absence of ATP, the incised sites must also be altered in an ATP-dependent reaction before subsequent steps of the repair process can proceed. This conclusion, coupled with the fact that ATP stimulates incision of damaged nuclear DNA by T4 UV endonuclease and is absolutely required for incision of damaged nuclear DNA by the endogenous human UV endonuclease, suggests that an important function of the early ATP-dependent step in UV-induced excision repair is to make damaged sites in DNA accessible to repair enzymes.

  7. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway: Repairing the Link Between DNA Damage and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E.; Lui, Vivian W. Y.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited recessive disease caused by mutations in one of fifteen genes known to encode FA pathway components. In response to DNA damage, nuclear FA proteins associate into high molecular weight complexes through a cascade of post-translational modifications and physical interactions, followed by the repair of damaged DNA. Hematopoietic cells are particularly sensitive to the loss of these interactions, and bone marrow failure occurs almost universally in FA patients. FA as a disease is further characterized by cancer susceptibility, which highlights the importance of the FA pathway in tumor suppression, and will be the focus of this review. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common cancer type, often subsequent to bone marrow failure. However, FA patients are also at an extreme risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck and gynecological tract, with an even greater incidence in those individuals who have received a bone marrow transplant and recovered from hematopoietic disease. FA tumor suppression in hematopoietic versus epithelial compartments could be mechanistically similar or distinct. Definition of compartment specific FA activities is now critical to assess the effects of today’s bone marrow failure treatments on tomorrow’s solid tumor development. It is our hope that current therapies can then be optimized to decrease the risk of malignant transformation in both hematopoietic and epithelial cells. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of action of the Fanconi anemia pathway as it contributes to stress responses, DNA repair and squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility. PMID:23333482

  8. Unraveling the Fanconi anaemia-DNA repair connection through DNA helicase and translocase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L H

    2005-08-16

    How the Fanconi anaemia (FA) chromosome stability pathway functions to cope with interstrand crosslinks and other DNA lesions has been elusive, even after FANCD1 proved to be BRCA2, a partner of Rad51 in homologous recombination. The identification and characterization of two new Fanconi proteins having helicase motifs, FANCM and FANCJ/BRIP1/BACH1, implicates the FANC nuclear core complex as a participant in recognizing or processing damaged DNA, and the BRIP1 helicase as acting independently of this complex.

  9. MAD2L2 controls DNA repair at telomeres and DNA breaks by inhibiting 5' end resection.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Vera; Moatti, Nathalie; Segura-Bayona, Sandra; Peuscher, Marieke H; van der Torre, Jaco; Wevers, Brigitte A; Orthwein, Alexandre; Durocher, Daniel; Jacobs, Jacqueline J L

    2015-05-28

    Appropriate repair of DNA lesions and the inhibition of DNA repair activities at telomeres are crucial to prevent genomic instability. By fuelling the generation of genetic alterations and by compromising cell viability, genomic instability is a driving force in cancer and ageing. Here we identify MAD2L2 (also known as MAD2B or REV7) through functional genetic screening as a novel factor controlling DNA repair activities at mammalian telomeres. We show that MAD2L2 accumulates at uncapped telomeres and promotes non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)-mediated fusion of deprotected chromosome ends and genomic instability. MAD2L2 depletion causes elongated 3' telomeric overhangs, indicating that MAD2L2 inhibits 5' end resection. End resection blocks NHEJ while committing to homology-directed repair, and is under the control of 53BP1, RIF1 and PTIP. Consistent with MAD2L2 promoting NHEJ-mediated telomere fusion by inhibiting 5' end resection, knockdown of the nucleases CTIP or EXO1 partially restores telomere-driven genomic instability in MAD2L2-depleted cells. Control of DNA repair by MAD2L2 is not limited to telomeres. MAD2L2 also accumulates and inhibits end resection at irradiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and promotes end-joining of DNA double-strand breaks in several settings, including during immunoglobulin class switch recombination. These activities of MAD2L2 depend on ATM kinase activity, RNF8, RNF168, 53BP1 and RIF1, but not on PTIP, REV1 and REV3, the latter two acting with MAD2L2 in translesion synthesis. Together, our data establish MAD2L2 as a crucial contributor to the control of DNA repair activity by 53BP1 that promotes NHEJ by inhibiting 5' end resection downstream of RIF1. PMID:25799990

  10. In vivo tumor measurement of DNA damage, DNA repair and NAD pools as indicators of radiosensitization by metoclopramide.

    PubMed

    Olsson, A; Sheng, Y; Kjellén, E; Pero, R W

    1995-05-01

    Metoclopramide (MCA), a N-substituted benzamide, causes DNA strand breaks and inhibits DNA repair in vitro and sensitizes radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs in human squamous cell carcinomas when xenographed into nude mice or in a rat glioma model. Here we report on the evaluation of the mechanism behind the radiosensitizing effects of MCA. DNA damage was measured in vivo in a CBA-mouse tumor line (A12B3, sarcoma tumor) by using both alkaline elution and nucleoid sedimentation analysis of cell suspensions prepared from either resected tumor, spleen tissues or whole blood samples. The amount of DNA damage caused by radiation alone, measured 30 min after the irradiation was started, was dose dependent up to 18 Gy in all tissues. The radiation-induced DNA damage in tumor tissue was elevated compared to radiation alone in the presence of MCA, but the level was not higher at 18 Gy compared to 6 Gy in the presence of MCA, and it was still not fully repaired 12 h after irradiation. HPLC analysis of the NAD pools in tumor tissue after DNA damage induction showed a delay in the recovery of the NAD pools (presumably due to the presence of still unrepaired DNA) after exposure to MCA (2 mg/kg) + radiation (6 Gy) compared to tumors exposed to radiation (6 Gy) only, which were fully restored after 48 h. These data confirm earlier published in vitro data on MCA as an inducer of DNA damage and an effector of DNA repair. In addition, the in vivo measurement of radiation-induced DNA damage and DNA repair using the nucleoid sedimentation and alkaline elution assays together with NAD pool determinations may prove to be effective intermediate endpoints in the evaluation of drugs as potential radiosensitizers. PMID:7767961

  11. Arabidopsis Ribonucleotide Reductases Are Critical for Cell Cycle Progression, DNA Damage Repair, and

    E-print Network

    Liu, Zhongchi

    needed for DNA replication and repair. Previous studies in yeast and mammals indicated that defective RNR target of the DNA damage checkpoint pathways in yeast, mammals, and possibly higher plants (Huang et al2 subunit houses the di-iron tyrosyl radical cofactor essential for the reduction of NDP to d

  12. APOBEC3G enhances lymphoma cell radioresistance by promoting cytidine deaminase-dependent DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Wilner, Ofer I.; Cheshin, Ori; Shahar, Or D.; Kenig, Edan; Baraz, Leah; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Arnon; Harris, Reuben S.; Goldberg, Michal; Willner, Itamar

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC3 proteins catalyze deamination of cytidines in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), providing innate protection against retroviral replication by inducing deleterious dC > dU hypermutation of replication intermediates. APOBEC3G expression is induced in mitogen-activated lymphocytes; however, no physiologic role related to lymphoid cell proliferation has yet to be determined. Moreover, whether APOBEC3G cytidine deaminase activity transcends to processing cellular genomic DNA is unknown. Here we show that lymphoma cells expressing high APOBEC3G levels display efficient repair of genomic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation and enhanced survival of irradiated cells. APOBEC3G transiently accumulated in the nucleus in response to ionizing radiation and was recruited to DSB repair foci. Consistent with a direct role in DSB repair, inhibition of APOBEC3G expression or deaminase activity resulted in deficient DSB repair, whereas reconstitution of APOBEC3G expression in leukemia cells enhanced DSB repair. APOBEC3G activity involved processing of DNA flanking a DSB in an integrated reporter cassette. Atomic force microscopy indicated that APOBEC3G multimers associate with ssDNA termini, triggering multimer disassembly to multiple catalytic units. These results identify APOBEC3G as a prosurvival factor in lymphoma cells, marking APOBEC3G as a potential target for sensitizing lymphoma to radiation therapy. PMID:22645179

  13. DNA damage and repair in mouse embryos following treatment transplacentally with methylnitrosourea and methylmethanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Jirakulsomchok, S.; Yielding, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Mouse embryos were labeled in vivo at 10 1/2-12 1/2 days of gestation with (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and subjected to DNA damage using x-ray, methylmethanesulfonate, or methylnitrosourea. DNA damage and its repair were assessed in specific cell preparations from embryos isolated at intervals thereafter using the highly sensitive method of nucleoid sedimentation, which evaluates the supercoiled state of the DNA. Repair of x-ray damage was demonstrated using trypsin-dispersed cells from whole embryos and from homogenized embryonic liver to show the validity of the analytical approach. The effects of the highly teratogenic methylnitrosourea and the much less teratogenic methylmethanesulfonate were compared in the targeted limb buds using equitoxic doses of the two alkylating agents. DNA supercoiling was fully restored after 24 hr in limb bud cells damaged with methylmethanesulfonate, while as much as 48 hr were required for full repair of methylnitrosourea damage. These results demonstrated the feasibility of studying DNA repair in embryonic tissues after damage in vivo and suggest that the potency of methylnitrosourea as a teratogen may be correlated with a prolonged period required for complete repair of DNA.

  14. Evolution of extreme resistance to ionizing radiation via genetic adaptation of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Rose T; Klingele, Audrey J; Cabot, Eric L; Schackwitz, Wendy S; Martin, Jeffrey A; Martin, Joel; Wang, Zhong; Wood, Elizabeth A; Pennacchio, Christa; Pennacchio, Len A; Perna, Nicole T; Battista, John R; Cox, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    By directed evolution in the laboratory, we previously generated populations of Escherichia coli that exhibit a complex new phenotype, extreme resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). The molecular basis of this extremophile phenotype, involving strain isolates with a 3-4 order of magnitude increase in IR resistance at 3000 Gy, is now addressed. Of 69 mutations identified in one of our most highly adapted isolates, functional experiments demonstrate that the IR resistance phenotype is almost entirely accounted for by only three of these nucleotide changes, in the DNA metabolism genes recA, dnaB, and yfjK. Four additional genetic changes make small but measurable contributions. Whereas multiple contributions to IR resistance are evident in this study, our results highlight a particular adaptation mechanism not adequately considered in studies to date: Genetic innovations involving pre-existing DNA repair functions can play a predominant role in the acquisition of an IR resistance phenotype. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01322.001 PMID:24596148

  15. Structural Basis for the Recognition of DNA Repair Proteins UNG2, XPA, and RAD52 by Replication Factor RPA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georges Mer; Alexey Bochkarev; Rajesh Gupta; Elena Bochkareva; Lori Frappier; C. James Ingles; Aled M Edwards; Walter J Chazin

    2000-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the nuclear ssDNA-binding protein in eukaryotes, is essential to DNA replication, recombination, and repair. We have shown that a globular domain at the C terminus of subunit RPA32 contains a specific surface that interacts in a similar manner with the DNA repair enzyme UNG2 and repair factors XPA and RAD52, each of which functions in a

  16. Translesion DNA synthesis-assisted non-homologous end-joining of complex double-strand breaks prevents loss of DNA sequences in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Covo, Shay; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Jeggo, Penny A; Livneh, Zvi

    2009-11-01

    Double strand breaks (DSB) are severe DNA lesions, and if not properly repaired, may lead to cell death or cancer. While there is considerable data on the repair of simple DSB (sDSB) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), little is known about the repair of complex DSBs (cDSB), namely breaks with a nearby modification, which precludes ligation without prior processing. To study the mechanism of cDSB repair we developed a plasmid-based shuttle assay for the repair of a defined site-specific cDSB in cultured mammalian cells. Using this assay we found that repair efficiency and accuracy of a cDSB with an abasic site in a 5' overhang was reduced compared with a sDSB. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) across the abasic site located at the break prevented loss of DNA sequences, but was highly mutagenic also at the template base next to the abasic site. Similar to sDSB repair, cDSB repair was totally dependent on XrccIV, and altered in the absence of Ku80. In contrast, Artemis appears to be specifically involved in cDSB repair. These results may indicate that mammalian cells have a damage control strategy, whereby severe deletions are prevented at the expense of the less deleterious point mutations during NHEJ. PMID:19762482

  17. Evidence for the involvement of human DNA polymerase N in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links

    PubMed Central

    Zietlow, Laura; Smith, Leigh Anne; Bessho, Mika; Bessho, Tadayoshi

    2009-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase N (PolN) is an A-family nuclear DNA polymerase whose function is unknown. This study examines the possible role of PolN in DNA repair in human cells treated with PolN-targeted siRNA. HeLa cells with siRNA-mediated knockdown of PolN were more sensitive than control cells to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), but were not hyper-sensitive to UV irradiation. The MMC hyper-sensitivity of PolN knockdown cells was rescued by the overexpression of DNA polymerase-proficient PolN but not by DNA polymerase-deficient PolN. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that purified PolN conducts low efficiency non-mutagenic bypass of a psoralen DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL), whose structure resembles an intermediate in the proposed pathway of ICL repair. These results suggest that PolN might play a role in translesion DNA synthesis during ICL repair in human cells. PMID:19908865

  18. Fission Yeast Pxd1 Promotes Proper DNA Repair by Activating Rad16XPF and Inhibiting Dna2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Min; Liu, Xiao-Man; Ding, Yue-He; Xiong, Liang-Yao; Ren, Jing-Yi; Zhou, Zhi-Xiong; Wang, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Mei-Jun; Yu, Yang; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Du, Li-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Structure-specific nucleases play crucial roles in many DNA repair pathways. They must be precisely controlled to ensure optimal repair outcomes; however, mechanisms of their regulation are not fully understood. Here, we report a fission yeast protein, Pxd1, that binds to and regulates two structure-specific nucleases: Rad16XPF-Swi10ERCC1 and Dna2-Cdc24. Strikingly, Pxd1 influences the activities of these two nucleases in opposite ways: It activates the 3? endonuclease activity of Rad16-Swi10 but inhibits the RPA-mediated activation of the 5? endonuclease activity of Dna2. Pxd1 is required for Rad16-Swi10 to function in single-strand annealing, mating-type switching, and the removal of Top1-DNA adducts. Meanwhile, Pxd1 attenuates DNA end resection mediated by the Rqh1-Dna2 pathway. Disabling the Dna2-inhibitory activity of Pxd1 results in enhanced use of a break-distal repeat sequence in single-strand annealing and a greater loss of genetic information. We propose that Pxd1 promotes proper DNA repair by differentially regulating two structure-specific nucleases. PMID:25203555

  19. Essential role for DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation of NR4A nuclear orphan receptors in DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Malewicz, Michal; Kadkhodaei, Banafsheh; Kee, Nigel; Volakakis, Nikolaos; Hellman, Ulf; Viktorsson, Kristina; Leung, Chuen Yan; Chen, Benjamin; Lewensohn, Rolf; van Gent, Dik C.; Chen, David J.; Perlmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a central regulator of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair; however, the identity of relevant DNA-PK substrates has remained elusive. NR4A nuclear orphan receptors function as sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors that participate in adaptive and stress-related cell responses. We show here that NR4A proteins interact with the DNA-PK catalytic subunit and, upon exposure to DNA damage, translocate to DSB foci by a mechanism requiring the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). At DNA repair foci, NR4A is phosphorylated by DNA-PK and promotes DSB repair. Notably, NR4A transcriptional activity is entirely dispensable in this function, and core components of the DNA repair machinery are not transcriptionally regulated by NR4A. Instead, NR4A functions directly at DNA repair sites by a process that requires phosphorylation by DNA-PK. Furthermore, a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-causing mutation in the human gene encoding the DNA-PK catalytic subunit impairs the interaction and phosphorylation of NR4A at DSBs. Thus, NR4As represent an entirely novel component of DNA damage response and are substrates of DNA-PK in the process of DSB repair. PMID:21979916

  20. Word-based characterization of promoters involved in human DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Jacox, Edwin; Welch, Joshua D; Kurz, Kyle; Liang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Mary Qu; Drews, Frank; Ecker, Klaus; Lee, Stephen S; Elnitski, Laura; Welch, Lonnie R

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA repair genes provide an important contribution towards the surveillance and repair of DNA damage. These genes produce a large network of interacting proteins whose mRNA expression is likely to be regulated by similar regulatory factors. Full characterization of promoters of DNA repair genes and the similarities among them will more fully elucidate the regulatory networks that activate or inhibit their expression. To address this goal, the authors introduce a technique to find regulatory genomic signatures, which represents a specific application of the genomic signature methodology to classify DNA sequences as putative functional elements within a single organism. Results The effectiveness of the regulatory genomic signatures is demonstrated via analysis of promoter sequences for genes in DNA repair pathways of humans. The promoters are divided into two classes, the bidirectional promoters and the unidirectional promoters, and distinct genomic signatures are calculated for each class. The genomic signatures include statistically overrepresented words, word clusters, and co-occurring words. The robustness of this method is confirmed by the ability to identify sequences that exist as motifs in TRANSFAC and JASPAR databases, and in overlap with verified binding sites in this set of promoter regions. Conclusion The word-based signatures are shown to be effective by finding occurrences of known regulatory sites. Moreover, the signatures of the bidirectional and unidirectional promoters of human DNA repair pathways are clearly distinct, exhibiting virtually no overlap. In addition to providing an effective characterization method for related DNA sequences, the signatures elucidate putative regulatory aspects of DNA repair pathways, which are notably under-characterized. PMID:19594877

  1. Is there evidence of involvement of DNA repair polymorphisms in human cancer?

    PubMed

    Ricceri, Fulvio; Matullo, Giuseppe; Vineis, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    DNA suffers from a wide range of damage, both from extracellular agents and via endogenous mechanisms. Damage of DNA can lead to cancer and other diseases. Therefore, it is plausible that sequence variants in DNA repair genes are involved in cancer development. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis, based on the "Venice criteria", showed that out of 241 associations investigated, only three resulted to have a strong grade of cumulative evidence. These associations were: two SNPs rs1799793 and rs13181 in the ERCC2 gene and lung cancer (recessive model) and rs1805794 in the NBN gene and bladder cancer (dominant model). An update of this meta-analysis has been performed in the present paper, and we found partially inconsistent results. Inconsistencies in the literature are thus far not easy to explain. In addition, none of the cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAs) published so far showed highly statistically significant associations for any of the common DNA repair gene variants, in such a way as to place DNA repair genes among the top 10-20 hits identified in GWAs. Though this suggests that it is unlikely that DNA repair gene polymorphisms per se play a major role, a clarification of the discrepancies in the literature is needed. Also, gene/environment and gene/lifestyle interactions for the carcinogenic mechanisms involving DNA repair should be investigated more systematically and with less classification error. Finally, the combined effect of multiple SNPs in several genes in one or more relevant DNA repair pathways could have a greater impact on pathological phenotypes than SNPs in single genes, but this has been investigated only occasionally. PMID:21864546

  2. Light-induced conformational change and product release in DNA repair by (6-4) photolyase.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Masato; Hitomi, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Junpei; Todo, Takeshi; Iwai, Shigenori; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Terazima, Masahide

    2011-02-23

    Proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family share high sequence similarities, common folds, and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, but exhibit diverse physiological functions. Mammalian cryptochromes are essential regulatory components of the 24 h circadian clock, whereas (6-4) photolyases recognize and repair UV-induced DNA damage by using light energy absorbed by FAD. Despite increasing knowledge about physiological functions from genetic analyses, the molecular mechanisms and conformational dynamics involved in clock signaling and DNA repair remain poorly understood. The (6-4) photolyase, which has strikingly high similarity to human clock cryptochromes, is a prototypic biological system to study conformational dynamics of cryptochrome/photolyase family proteins. The entire light-dependent DNA repair process for (6-4) photolyase can be reproduced in a simple in vitro system. To decipher pivotal reactions of the common FAD cofactor, we accomplished time-resolved measurements of radical formation, diffusion, and protein conformational changes during light-dependent repair by full-length (6-4) photolyase on DNA carrying a single UV-induced damage. The (6-4) photolyase by itself showed significant volume changes after blue-light activation, indicating protein conformational changes distant from the flavin cofactor. A drastic diffusion change was observed only in the presence of both (6-4) photolyase and damaged DNA, and not for (6-4) photolyase alone or with undamaged DNA. Thus, we propose that this diffusion change reflects the rapid (50 ?s time constant) dissociation of the protein from the repaired DNA product. Conformational changes with such fast turnover would likely enable DNA repair photolyases to access the entire genome in cells. PMID:21271694

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Rajesh P.; Richa; Kumar, Ashok; Tyagi, Madhu B.; Sinha, Rajeshwar P.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is one of the prime molecules, and its stability is of utmost importance for proper functioning and existence of all living systems. Genotoxic chemicals and radiations exert adverse effects on genome stability. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) (mainly UV-B: 280–315?nm) is one of the powerful agents that can alter the normal state of life by inducing a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs), and their Dewar valence isomers as well as DNA strand breaks by interfering the genome integrity. To counteract these lesions, organisms have developed a number of highly conserved repair mechanisms such as photoreactivation, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR). Additionally, double-strand break repair (by homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining), SOS response, cell-cycle checkpoints, and programmed cell death (apoptosis) are also operative in various organisms with the expense of specific gene products. This review deals with UV-induced alterations in DNA and its maintenance by various repair mechanisms. PMID:21209706

  4. Long Patch Base Excision Repair Compensates for DNA Polymerase ? Inactivation by the C4?-Oxidized Abasic Site&

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Aaron C.; Kreller, Cortney R.; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2010-01-01

    The C4?-oxidized abasic site (C4-AP), which is produced by a variety of damaging agents has significant consequences on DNA. The lesion is highly mutagenic and reactive, resulting in interstrand cross-links. The base excision repair of DNA containing independently generated C4-AP was examined. C4-AP is incised by Ape1 ~12-fold less efficiently than an apurinic/apyrimidinic lesion. DNA polymerase ? induces the ?-elimination of incised C4-AP in ternary complexes, duplexes, and single stranded substrate. However, excision from a ternary complex is most rapid. In addition, the lesion inactivates the enzyme after ~7 turnovers on average by reacting with one or more lysine residues in the lyase active site. Unlike 5?-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) which very efficiently irreversibly inhibits Pol ?, the lesion is readily removed by strand displacement synthesis carried out by the polymerase in conjunction with flap endonuclease 1. DNA repair inhibition by C4-AP may be a partial cause of the cytotoxicity of drugs that produce this lesion. PMID:21155533

  5. DNA ligase III acts as a DNA strand break sensor in the cellular orchestration of DNA strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Ismail; Poirier, Guy G.; Hendzel, Michael J.; Weinfeld, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the current model of DNA SSBR, PARP1 is regarded as the sensor of single-strand breaks (SSBs). However, biochemical studies have implicated LIG3 as another possible SSB sensor. Using a laser micro-irradiation protocol that predominantly generates SSBs, we were able to demonstrate that PARP1 is dispensable for the accumulation of different single-strand break repair (SSBR) proteins at sites of DNA damage in live cells. Furthermore, we show in live cells for the first time that LIG3 plays a role in mediating the accumulation of the SSBR proteins XRCC1 and PNKP at sites of DNA damage. Importantly, the accumulation of LIG3 at sites of DNA damage did not require the BRCT domain-mediated interaction with XRCC1. We were able to show that the N-terminal ZnF domain of LIG3 plays a key role in the enzyme's SSB sensing function. Finally, we provide cellular evidence that LIG3 and not PARP1 acts as the sensor for DNA damage caused by the topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan. Our results support the existence of a second damage-sensing mechanism in SSBR involving the detection of nicks in the genome by LIG3. PMID:25539916

  6. Role of DNA repair inhibition in lead- and cadmium-induced genotoxicity: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, A

    1994-01-01

    Compounds of lead and cadmium have been shown to be carcinogenic to humans and experimental animals. However, the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. In mammalian cells in culture, lead(II) is weakly mutagenic after long incubation times and generates DNA strand breaks only after treatment with high, toxic doses. Cadmium(II) induces DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations, but its mutagenic potential is rather weak. However, both metals exert pronounced indirect genotoxic effects. Lead(II) is comutagenic towards UV and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and enhances the number of UV-induced sister chromatid exchanges in V79 Chinese hamster cells. With regard to DNA repair, lead(II) causes an accumulation of DNA strand breaks after UV-irradiation in HeLa cells, indicating an interference with the polymerization or ligation step in excision repair. Cadmium(II) enhances the mutagenicity of UV light in V79 Chinese hamster cells and an increased sensitivity toward UV light is observed in various rodent and human cell lines. Furthermore, an inhibition of unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV-irradiation and a partial inhibition of the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions has been shown. For both metals, the indirect genotoxic effects are observed at low, nontoxic concentrations, suggesting that an interference with DNA repair processes may be predominant at biologically relevant concentrations. This might also explain the conflicting results of epidemiological studies obtained for both metals. Possible mechanisms of repair inhibition are discussed. PMID:7843136

  7. Strand-specific recognition of DNA damages by XPD provides insights into nucleotide excision repair substrate versatility.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Claudia N; Heil, Korbinian; Michels, Gudrun; Carell, Thomas; Kisker, Caroline; Tessmer, Ingrid

    2014-02-01

    Recognition and removal of DNA damages is essential for cellular and organismal viability. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism in humans for the repair of carcinogenic UV irradiation-induced photoproducts in the DNA, such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. The broad substrate versatility of NER further includes, among others, various bulky DNA adducts. It has been proposed that the 5'-3' helicase XPD (xeroderma pigmentosum group D) protein plays a decisive role in damage verification. However, despite recent advances such as the identification of a DNA-binding channel and central pore in the protein, through which the DNA is threaded, as well as a dedicated lesion recognition pocket near the pore, the exact process of target site recognition and verification in eukaryotic NER still remained elusive. Our single molecule analysis by atomic force microscopy reveals for the first time that XPD utilizes different recognition strategies to verify structurally diverse lesions. Bulky fluorescein damage is preferentially detected on the translocated strand, whereas the opposite strand preference is observed for a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion. Both states, however, lead to similar conformational changes in the resulting specific complexes, indicating a merge to a "final" verification state, which may then trigger the recruitment of further NER proteins. PMID:24338567

  8. Systems analysis of the prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1 supports roles in DNA repair and luminal cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Cheng; Chung, Alicia; Ku, Chia-Yu; Brill, Laurence M.; Williams, Roy; Wolf, Dieter A.

    2014-01-01

    NKX3.1 is a homeobox transcription factor whose function as a prostate tumor suppressor remains insufficiently understood because neither the transcriptional program governed by NKX3.1, nor its interacting proteins have been fully revealed. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we have established an extensive NKX3.1 interactome which contains the DNA repair proteins Ku70, Ku80, and PARP, thus providing a molecular underpinning to previous reports implicating NKX3.1 in DNA repair. Transcriptomic profiling of NKX3.1-negative prostate epithelial cells acutely expressing NKX3.1 revealed a rapid and complex response that is a near mirror image of the gene expression signature of human prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Pathway and network analyses suggested that NKX3.1 actuates a cellular reprogramming toward luminal cell differentiation characterized by suppression of pro-oncogenic c-MYC and interferon-STAT signaling and activation of tumor suppressor pathways. Consistently, ectopic expression of NKX3.1 conferred a growth arrest depending on TNF? and JNK signaling. We propose that the tumor suppressor function of NKX3.1 entails a transcriptional program that maintains the differentiation state of secretory luminal cells and that disruption of NKX3.1 contributes to prostate tumorigenesis by permitting luminal cell de-differentiation potentially augmented by defects in DNA repair. PMID:25177484

  9. Bcl2 inhibits recruitment of Mre11 complex to DNA double-strand breaks in response to high-linear energy transfer radiation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Maohua; Park, Dongkyoo; You, Shuo; Li, Rui; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Wang, Ya; Doetsch, Paul W.; Deng, Xingming

    2015-01-01

    High-linear energy transfer ionizing radiation, derived from high charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) particles, induces clustered/complex DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that include small DNA fragments, which are not repaired by the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway plays a major role in repairing DSBs induced by HZE particles. The Mre11 complex (Mre11/Rad50/NBS1)-mediated resection of DSB ends is a required step in preparing for DSB repair via the HR DNA repair pathway. Here we found that expression of Bcl2 results in decreased HR activity and retards the repair of DSBs induced by HZE particles (i.e. 56iron and 28silicon) by inhibiting Mre11 complex activity. Exposure of cells to 56iron or 28silicon promotes Bcl2 to interact with Mre11 via the BH1 and BH4 domains. Purified Bcl2 protein directly suppresses Mre11 complex-mediated DNA resection in vitro. Expression of Bcl2 reduces the ability of Mre11 to bind DNA following exposure of cells to HZE particles. Our findings suggest that, after cellular exposure to HZE particles, Bcl2 may inhibit Mre11 complex-mediated DNA resection leading to suppression of the HR-mediated DSB repair in surviving cells, which may potentially contribute to tumor development. PMID:25567982

  10. Structural and functional characterization of the MERIT40 to understand its role in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Vikrant; Nakhwa, Pallavi; Badgujar, Dilip C; Kumar, Rajan; Rathore, Khushboo K S; Varma, Ashok K

    2014-12-01

    MERIT40 (MEdiator of RAP80 Interaction and Targeting 40) is a novel associate of the BRCA1-complex and plays an essential role in DNA damage repair. It is the least characterized protein of BRCA1-complex and mainly responsible for maintaining the complex integrity. However, its structural and functional aspects of regulating the complex stability still remain elusive. Here, we carried out a comprehensive examination of MERIT40 biophysical properties and identified its novel interacting partner which would help to understand its role in BRCA1-complex. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography and unfolding pathway was determined using spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. Molecular model was generated using combinatorial approaches of modeling, and monomer-monomer docking was carried out to identify dimeric interface. Disordered region of MERIT40 was hatchet using trypsin and chymotrypsin to illustrate the existence of stable domain whose function was speculated through DALI search. Our findings suggest that MERIT40 forms a dimer in a concentration-independent manner. Its central region shows remarkable stability towards the protease digestion and has structural similarity with vWA-like region, a domain mainly present in complement activation factors. MERIT40 undergoes a three-state unfolding transition pathway with a dimeric intermediate. It interacts with adaptor molecule of BRCA1-complex, called ABRAXAS, thus help in extending the bridging interaction among various members which further stabilizes the whole complex. The results presented in this paper provide first-hand information on structural and folding behavior of MERIT40. These findings will help in elucidating the role of protein-protein interactions in stabilization of BRCA1-complex. PMID:24125081

  11. Screening a human population sample for DNA repair gene deficiencies utilizing the protein truncation test.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Yu, Z; Ford, B N; Brackley, M E; Haesevoets, R J; Khaidakov, M; Glickman, B W

    2000-01-01

    A significant fraction of human cancers are thought to have a genetic component and several lines of evidence suggest that deficiencies in DNA repair may be a contributing factor. Little is known, however, about the frequency and distribution of variants of DNA repair genes in the general human population. The protein truncation test (PTT) was used to screen 136 healthy volunteers for protein-truncating variants of 10 DNA repair genes: APE, CDK7, ERCC1, WAF1, HOGG1, MGMT, POLB, UNG, HAAG, and CCNH. This sample consisted of 41males (30%) and 95 females (70%) with an average age of 25.3 years, ranging from 17 to 60 years of age. No truncating mutations were found in the 10 genes examined in any of the subjects. The 95% confidence interval for a proportion of 0 over the 272 alleles examined per locus is 0-0.01. The calculated frequency of truncating mutations in each of these genes, among the general population, is thus less than 1%. Among the 10 genes tested in 136 people, a single sample had no PCR product for HAAG, even though PCR products were obtained on all other genes. Total RNA dot hybridization confirmed the presence of HAAG mRNA transcripts in this sample. Despite identification of this single DNA repair variant, these results indicate a low frequency of truncating mutations in DNA repair genes in the general population. PMID:11044904

  12. Involvement of Werner syndrome protein in MUTYH-mediated repair of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Parasuraman, Prasanna; Mihaljevic, Boris; van Loon, Barbara; Burdova, Kamila; König, Christiane; Furrer, Antonia; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Hübscher, Ulrich; Janscak, Pavel

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species constantly generated as by-products of cellular metabolism readily attack genomic DNA creating mutagenic lesions such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-guanine (8-oxo-G) that promote aging. 8-oxo-G:A mispairs arising during DNA replication are eliminated by base excision repair initiated by the MutY DNA glycosylase homologue (MUTYH). Here, by using formaldehyde crosslinking in mammalian cell extracts, we demonstrate that the WRN helicase/exonuclease defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome (WS) is recruited to DNA duplex containing an 8-oxo-G:A mispair in a manner dependent on DNA polymerase ? (Pol?) that catalyzes accurate DNA synthesis over 8-oxo-G. Similarly, by immunofluorescence, we show that Pol? is required for accumulation of WRN at sites of 8-oxo-G lesions in human cells. Moreover, we show that nuclear focus formation of WRN and Pol? induced by oxidative stress is dependent on ongoing DNA replication and on the presence of MUTYH. Cell viability assays reveal that depletion of MUTYH suppresses the hypersensitivity of cells lacking WRN and/or Pol? to oxidative stress. Biochemical studies demonstrate that WRN binds to the catalytic domain of Pol? and specifically stimulates DNA gap filling by Pol? over 8-oxo-G followed by strand displacement synthesis. Our results suggest that WRN promotes long-patch DNA repair synthesis by Pol? during MUTYH-initiated repair of 8-oxo-G:A mispairs. PMID:22753033

  13. Histone chaperone Anp32e removes H2A.Z from DNA double-strand breaks and promotes nucleosome reorganization and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Price, Brendan D

    2015-06-16

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires open, flexible chromatin domains. The NuA4-Tip60 complex creates these flexible chromatin structures by exchanging histone H2A.Z onto nucleosomes and promoting acetylation of histone H4. Here, we demonstrate that the accumulation of H2A.Z on nucleosomes at DSBs is transient, and that rapid eviction of H2A.Z is required for DSB repair. Anp32e, an H2A.Z chaperone that interacts with the C-terminal docking domain of H2A.Z, is rapidly recruited to DSBs. Anp32e functions to remove H2A.Z from nucleosomes, so that H2A.Z levels return to basal within 10 min of DNA damage. Further, H2A.Z removal by Anp32e disrupts inhibitory interactions between the histone H4 tail and the nucleosome surface, facilitating increased acetylation of histone H4 following DNA damage. When H2A.Z removal by Anp32e is blocked, nucleosomes at DSBs retain elevated levels of H2A.Z, and assume a more stable, hypoacetylated conformation. Further, loss of Anp32e leads to increased CtIP-dependent end resection, accumulation of single-stranded DNA, and an increase in repair by the alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway. Exchange of H2A.Z onto the chromatin and subsequent rapid removal by Anp32e are therefore critical for creating open, acetylated nucleosome structures and for controlling end resection by CtIP. Dynamic modulation of H2A.Z exchange and removal by Anp32e reveals the importance of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome dynamics in processing the damaged chromatin template during DSB repair. PMID:26034280

  14. Two-photon fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy as a potential tool for high-throughput screening of DNA repair activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maddalena Collini; Michele Caccia; Giuseppe Chirico; Flavia Barone; Eugenia Dogliotti; Filomena Mazzei

    2005-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that differences in DNA repair capacity are an important source of variability in cancer risk. However, traditional assays for measurement of DNA repair activity in human sam- ples are laborious and time-consuming. DNA glyc- osylases are the first step in base excision repair of a variety of modified DNA bases. Here, we describe the development

  15. Ku-Mediated Coupling of DNA Cleavage and Repair during Programmed Genome Rearrangements in the Ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marmignon, Antoine; Bischerour, Julien; Silve, Aude; Fojcik, Clémentine; Dubois, Emeline; Arnaiz, Olivier; Kapusta, Aurélie; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2014-01-01

    During somatic differentiation, physiological DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can drive programmed genome rearrangements (PGR), during which DSB repair pathways are mobilized to safeguard genome integrity. Because of their unique nuclear dimorphism, ciliates are powerful unicellular eukaryotic models to study the mechanisms involved in PGR. At each sexual cycle, the germline nucleus is transmitted to the progeny, but the somatic nucleus, essential for gene expression, is destroyed and a new somatic nucleus differentiates from a copy of the germline nucleus. In Paramecium tetraurelia, the development of the somatic nucleus involves massive PGR, including the precise elimination of at least 45,000 germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences, IES). IES excision proceeds through a cut-and-close mechanism: a domesticated transposase, PiggyMac, is essential for DNA cleavage, and DSB repair at excision sites involves the Ligase IV, a specific component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. At the genome-wide level, a huge number of programmed DSBs must be repaired during this process to allow the assembly of functional somatic chromosomes. To understand how DNA cleavage and DSB repair are coordinated during PGR, we have focused on Ku, the earliest actor of NHEJ-mediated repair. Two Ku70 and three Ku80 paralogs are encoded in the genome of P. tetraurelia: Ku70a and Ku80c are produced during sexual processes and localize specifically in the developing new somatic nucleus. Using RNA interference, we show that the development-specific Ku70/Ku80c heterodimer is essential for the recovery of a functional somatic nucleus. Strikingly, at the molecular level, PiggyMac-dependent DNA cleavage is abolished at IES boundaries in cells depleted for Ku80c, resulting in IES retention in the somatic genome. PiggyMac and Ku70a/Ku80c co-purify as a complex when overproduced in a heterologous system. We conclude that Ku has been integrated in the Paramecium DNA cleavage factory, enabling tight coupling between DSB introduction and repair during PGR. PMID:25166013

  16. The human checkpoint sensor Rad9–Rad1–Hus1 interacts with and stimulates DNA repair enzyme TDG glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xin; Madabushi, Amrita; Chang, Dau-Yin; Fitzgerald, Megan E.; Shi, Gouli; Drohat, Alexander C.; Lu, A-Lien

    2007-01-01

    Human (h) DNA repair enzyme thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) is a key DNA glycosylase in the base excision repair (BER) pathway that repairs deaminated cytosines and 5-methyl-cytosines. The cell cycle checkpoint protein Rad9–Rad1–Hus1 (the 9-1-1 complex) is the surveillance machinery involved in the preservation of genome stability. In this study, we show that hTDG interacts with hRad9, hRad1 and hHus1 as individual proteins and as a complex. The hHus1 interacting domain is mapped to residues 67–110 of hTDG, and Val74 of hTDG plays an important role in the TDG–Hus1 interaction. In contrast to the core domain of hTDG (residues 110–308), hTDG(67–308) removes U and T from U/G and T/G mispairs, respectively, with similar rates as native hTDG. Human TDG activity is significantly stimulated by hHus1, hRad1, hRad9 separately, and by the 9-1-1 complex. Interestingly, the interaction between hRad9 and hTDG, as detected by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), is enhanced following N-methyl-N?-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment. A significant fraction of the hTDG nuclear foci co-localize with hRad9 foci in cells treated with methylating agents. Thus, the 9-1-1 complex at the lesion sites serves as both a damage sensor to activate checkpoint control and a component of the BER. PMID:17855402

  17. The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex functions in resection-based DNA end joining in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Elaine M; Cecillon, Sophie M; Bonis, Antonio; Chapman, J Ross; Povirk, Lawrence F; Lindsay, Howard D

    2010-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential to maintain genomic integrity. In higher eukaryotes, DNA DSBs are predominantly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), but DNA ends can also be joined by an alternative error-prone mechanism termed microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ). In MMEJ, the repair of DNA breaks is mediated by annealing at regions of microhomology and is always associated with deletions at the break site. In budding yeast, the Mre11/Rad5/Xrs2 complex has been demonstrated to play a role in both classical NHEJ and MMEJ, but the involvement of the analogous MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex in end joining in higher eukaryotes is less certain. Here we demonstrate that in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, the MRN complex is not required for classical DNA-PK-dependent NHEJ. However, the XMRN complex is necessary for resection-based end joining of mismatched DNA ends. This XMRN-dependent end joining process is independent of the core NHEJ components Ku70 and DNA-PK, occurs with delayed kinetics relative to classical NHEJ and brings about repair at sites of microhomology. These data indicate a role for the X. laevis MRN complex in MMEJ. PMID:19892829

  18. Structure of DNA-liposome complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lasic, D.D. [MegaBios Corporation, Burlingame, CA (United States)] [MegaBios Corporation, Burlingame, CA (United States); Strey, H.; Podgornik, R. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Stuart, M.C.A.; Frederik, P.M. [Limburg Univ., Maastricht (Netherlands)] [Limburg Univ., Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1997-01-29

    Despite numerous studies and commericially available liposome kits, however, the structure of DNA-cationic liposome complexes is still not yet well understood. We have investigated the structure of these complexes using high-resolution cryo electron microscopy (EM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). 14 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Excision repair of UV radiation-induced DNA damage in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Hartman; J. Hevelone; V. Dwarakanath; D. L. Mitchell

    1989-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays were used to monitor the removal of antibody-binding sites associated with the two major UV radiation-induced DNA photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) photoproducts). Unlike with cultured human cells, where (6-4) photoproducts are removed more rapidly than cyclobutane dimers, the kinetics of repair were similar for both lesions. Repair capacity in wild type diminished throughout development. The radioimmunoassays were also

  20. Biological significance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions. Applications to T4 endonuclease V-initiated DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, D.R.; Lloyd, R.S. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-02-25

    Facilitated diffusion along nontarget DNA is employed by numerous DNA-interactive proteins to locate specific targets. Until now, the biological significance of DNA scanning has remained elusive. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA repair enzyme which scans nontarget DNA and processively incises DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers which are produced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there exists a direct correlation between the degree of processivity of wild type and mutant endonuclease V molecules and the degree of enhanced UV resistance which is conferred to repair-deficient Eshcerichia coli. This was accomplished by first creating a series of endonuclease V mutants whose in vitro catalytic activities were shown to be very similar to that of the wild type enzyme. However, when the mechanisms by which these enzymes search nontarget DNA for its substrate were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the mutants displayed varying degrees of nontarget DNA scanning ranging from being nearly as processive as wild type to randomly incising dimers within the DNA population. The ability of these altered endonuclease V molecules to enhance UV survival in DNA repair-deficient E. coli then was assessed. The degree of enhanced UV survival was directly correlated with the level of facilitated diffusion. This is the first conclusive evidence directly relating a reduction of in vivo facilitated diffusion with a change in an observed phenotype. These results support the assertion that the mechanisms which DNA-interactive proteins employ in locating their target sites are of biological significance.

  1. Both base excision repair and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protect against methylation-induced colon carcinogenesis

    E-print Network

    Samson, Leona D.

    Methylating agents are widely distributed environmental carcinogens. Moreover, they are being used in cancer chemotherapy. The primary target of methylating agents is DNA, and therefore, DNA repair is the first-line barrier ...

  2. Characterization of DNA repair deficient strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii generated by insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Plecenikova, Andrea; Slaninova, Miroslava; Riha, Karel

    2014-01-01

    While the mechanisms governing DNA damage response and repair are fundamentally conserved, cross-kingdom comparisons indicate that they differ in many aspects due to differences in life-styles and developmental strategies. In photosynthetic organisms these differences have not been fully explored because gene-discovery approaches are mainly based on homology searches with known DDR/DNA repair proteins. Here we performed a forward genetic screen in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to identify genes deficient in DDR/DNA repair. We isolated five insertional mutants that were sensitive to various genotoxic insults and two of them exhibited altered efficiency of transgene integration. To identify genomic regions disrupted in these mutants, we established a novel adaptor-ligation strategy for the efficient recovery of the insertion flanking sites. Four mutants harbored deletions that involved known DNA repair factors, DNA Pol zeta, DNA Pol theta, SAE2/COM1, and two neighbouring genes encoding ERCC1 and RAD17. Deletion in the last mutant spanned two Chlamydomonas-specific genes with unknown function, demonstrating the utility of this approach for discovering novel factors involved in genome maintenance. PMID:25144319

  3. DNA repair in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum group A fibroblasts following treatment with various methanesulfonates and the demonstration of a long-patch repair component

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.D.; Regan, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Excision repair of DNA in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A fibroblasts were examined following treatment with methyl-, ethyl-, and isopropyl methanesulfonate. Studies utilizing repair synthesis methods and inhibition with arabinofuranosyl cytosine revealed two distinct phases of repair; one commencing and terminating within the first 3-5 h after the treatment, and a second much longer phase extending from 9-35 h post-treatment. Both phases of repair have a long-patch component, which establishes for the first time the existence of this mode of repair in response to alkane sulfonate damage. While xeroderma cells display somewhat fewer alkaline labile sites in their DNA following alkylation treatment than do their normal counterparts, researchers are unable to demonstrate a deficiency of these cells in either of the two phases of repair.

  4. Human RIF1 encodes an anti-apoptotic factor required for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Zhao, Ailian; Chen, Lin; Zhong, Xueyan; Liao, Ji; Gao, Min; Cai, Minghua; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Li, Jing; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Yang, Yun-gui; Pfeifer, Gerd P.; Yen, Yun; Xu, Xingzhi

    2009-01-01

    Human Rap1-interacting protein 1 (RIF1) contributes to the ataxia telangiectasia, mutated-mediated DNA damage response against the dexterous effect of DNA lesions and plays a critical role in the S-phase checkpoint. However, the molecular mechanisms by which human RIF1 conquers DNA aberrations remain largely unknown. We here showed that inhibition of RIF1 expression by small interfering RNA led to defective homologous recombination-mediated DNA double-strand break repair and sensitized cancer cells to camptothecin or staurosporine treatment. RIF1 underwent caspase-dependent cleavage upon apoptosis. We further found that RIF1 was highly expressed in human breast tumors, and its expression status was positively correlated with differentiation degrees of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Our results suggest that RIF1 encodes an anti-apoptotic factor required for DNA repair and is a potential target for cancer treatment. PMID:19483192

  5. Beyond xeroderma pigmentosum: DNA damage and repair in an ecological context. A tribute to James E. Cleaver.

    PubMed

    Karentz, Deneb

    2015-01-01

    The ability to repair DNA is a ubiquitous characteristic of life on Earth and all organisms possess similar mechanisms for dealing with DNA damage, an indication of a very early evolutionary origin for repair processes. James E. Cleaver's career (initiated in the early 1960s) has been devoted to the study of mammalian ultraviolet radiation (UVR) photobiology, specifically the molecular genetics of xeroderma pigmentosum and other human diseases caused by defects in DNA damage recognition and repair. This work by Jim and others has influenced the study of DNA damage and repair in a variety of taxa. Today, the field of DNA repair is enhancing our understanding of not only how to treat and prevent human disease, but is providing insights on the evolutionary history of life on Earth and how natural populations are coping with UVR-induced DNA damage from anthropogenic changes in the environment such as ozone depletion. PMID:25395165

  6. Opposing ISWI- and CHD-class chromatin remodeling activities orchestrate heterochromatic DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Klement, Karolin; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; Pinder, Jordan B.; Cena, Chad S.; Del Nero, Victor; Wintersinger, Christopher M.; Dellaire, Graham; van Attikum, Haico

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is a barrier to DNA repair that correlates strongly with elevated somatic mutation in cancer. CHD class II nucleosome remodeling activity (specifically CHD3.1) retained by KAP-1 increases heterochromatin compaction and impedes DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair requiring Artemis. This obstruction is alleviated by chromatin relaxation via ATM-dependent KAP-1S824 phosphorylation (pKAP-1) and CHD3.1 dispersal from heterochromatic DSBs; however, how heterochromatin compaction is actually adjusted after CHD3.1 dispersal is unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that Artemis-dependent DSB repair in heterochromatin requires ISWI (imitation switch)-class ACF1–SNF2H nucleosome remodeling. Compacted chromatin generated by CHD3.1 after DNA replication necessitates ACF1–SNF2H–mediated relaxation for DSB repair. ACF1–SNF2H requires RNF20 to bind heterochromatic DSBs, underlies RNF20-mediated chromatin relaxation, and functions downstream of pKAP-1–mediated CHD3.1 dispersal to enable DSB repair. CHD3.1 and ACF1–SNF2H display counteractive activities but similar histone affinities (via the plant homeodomains of CHD3.1 and ACF1), which we suggest necessitates a two-step dispersal and recruitment system regulating these opposing chromatin remodeling activities during DSB repair. PMID:25533843

  7. The DNA damage/repair cascade in glioblastoma cell lines after chemotherapeutic agent treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNOVAZZI, LAURA; CALDERA, VALENTINA; MELLAI, MARTA; RIGANTI, CHIARA; BATTAGLIA, LUIGI; CHIRIO, DANIELA; MELCARNE, ANTONIO; SCHIFFER, DAVIDE

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been linked to a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties, the glioma stem cells (GSCs), responsible for cancer progression and recurrence. This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of three chemotherapeutics, temozolomide (TMZ), doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) on glioma cell lines, by analyzing the molecular mechanisms leading to DNA repair and cell resistance, or to cell death. The drugs were tested on 16 GBM cell lines, grown as neurospheres (NS) or adherent cells (AC), by studying DNA damage occurrence by Comet assay, the expression by immunofluorescence and western blotting of checkpoint/repair molecules and apoptosis. The three drugs were able to provoke a genotoxic injury and to inhibit dose- and time-dependently cell proliferation, more evidently in AC than in NS. The first cell response to DNA damage was the activation of the damage sensors (p-ATM, p-53BP1, ?-H2AX), followed by repair effectors; the expression of checkpoint/repair molecules appeared higher in NS than in AC. The non-homologous repair pathway (NHEJ) seemed more involved than the homologous one (HR). Apoptosis occurred after long treatment times, but only a small percentage of cells in NS underwent death, even at high drug concentration, whereas most cells survived in a quiescent state and resumed proliferation after drug removal. In tumor specimens, checkpoint/repair proteins were constitutively expressed in GBMs, but not in low-grade gliomas. PMID:25892134

  8. Contribution of defective mitophagy to the neurodegeneration in DNA repair-deficient disorders.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fang, Evandro Fei; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-08-01

    DNA repair is a prerequisite for life as we know it, and defects in DNA repair lead to accelerated aging. Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a classic DNA repair-deficient disorder with patients displaying sun sensitivity and cancer susceptibility. XPA patients also exhibit neurodegeneration, leading to cerebellar atrophy, neuropathy, and hearing loss, through a mechanism that has remained elusive. Using in silico, in vitro, and in vivo studies, we discovered defective mitophagy in XPA due to PARP1 hyperactivation and NAD(+) (and thus, SIRT1) depletion. This leads to mitochondrial membrane hyper-polarization, PINK1 cleavage and defective mitophagy. This study underscores the importance of mitophagy in promoting a healthy pool of mitochondria and in preventing neurodegeneration and premature aging. PMID:24991831

  9. Cell cycle regulation of human DNA repair and chromatin remodeling genes.

    PubMed

    Mjelle, Robin; Hegre, Siv Anita; Aas, Per Arne; Slupphaug, Geir; Drabløs, Finn; Sætrom, Pål; Krokan, Hans E

    2015-06-01

    Maintenance of a genome requires DNA repair integrated with chromatin remodeling. We have analyzed six transcriptome data sets and one data set on translational regulation of known DNA repair and remodeling genes in synchronized human cells. These data are available through our new database: www.dnarepairgenes.com. Genes that have similar transcription profiles in at least two of our data sets generally agree well with known protein profiles. In brief, long patch base excision repair (BER) is enriched for S phase genes, whereas short patch BER uses genes essentially equally expressed in all cell cycle phases. Furthermore, most genes related to DNA mismatch repair, Fanconi anemia and homologous recombination have their highest expression in the S phase. In contrast, genes specific for direct repair, nucleotide excision repair, as well as non-homologous end joining do not show cell cycle-related expression. Cell cycle regulated chromatin remodeling genes were most frequently confined to G1/S and S. These include e.g. genes for chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) major subunits CHAF1A and CHAF1B; the putative helicases HELLS and ATAD2 that both co-activate E2F transcription factors central in G1/S-transition and recruit DNA repair and chromatin-modifying proteins and DNA double strand break repair proteins; and RAD54L and RAD54B involved in double strand break repair. TOP2A was consistently most highly expressed in G2, but also expressed in late S phase, supporting a role in regulating entry into mitosis. Translational regulation complements transcriptional regulation and appears to be a relatively common cell cycle regulatory mechanism for DNA repair genes. Our results identify cell cycle phases in which different pathways have highest activity, and demonstrate that periodically expressed genes in a pathway are frequently co-expressed. Furthermore, the data suggest that S phase expression and over-expression of some multifunctional chromatin remodeling proteins may set up feedback loops driving cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25881042

  10. Fast repair of oxidative DNA damage by phenylpropanoid glycosides and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yimin; Wang, Wengfeng; Huang, Chungyang; Jia, Zhongjian; Yao, Side; Zheng, Rongliang

    2008-01-01

    The repair activities and reaction mechanisms of phenylpropanoid glycosides (PPGs) and their analogues, isolated from Chinese folk medicinal herbs, towards oxidative DNA damage were studied with pulse radiolytic technique. On pulse irradiation of nitrogen-saturated 4 mM poly C aqueous solution containing one of the tested polyphenols, 40 mM K2S2O8 and 200 mM t-BuOH, the transient absorption spectrum of the oxidative radical of poly C decays with the concurrent formation of the phenoxyl radical of the tested polyphenols within several tens of microseconds after the electron pulse irradiation. The result indicated that there was a repair reaction between oxidative radical of poly C and the tested polyphenols. The repair activities also were observed for the tested polyphenols towards the radical cations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The rate constants were determined to be 3.7-6.4 x 10(9), 4.8-5.5 x 10(8) and 8.8-10.3 x 10(8) M(-1).sec(-1) for the repair reactions of oxidative radical of poly C and radical cations of ssDNA and dsDNA, respectively. The result of this study together with those of our previous studies demonstrates that PPGs and their analogues can fast repair not only the damage of deoxynucleoside and deoxynucleotide but also the damage of integral DNA, with the latter being closer to a cellular condition. PMID:18003628

  11. Nonhomologous-End-Joining Factors Regulate DNA Repair Fidelity during Sleeping Beauty Element Transposition in Mammalian Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen R. Yant; Mark A. Kay

    2003-01-01

    Herein, we report that the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) regulates the DNA damage introduced during Sleeping Beauty (SB) element excision and reinsertion in mammalian cells. Using both plasmid- and chromosome-based mobility assays, we analyzed the repair of transposase-induced double-stranded DNA breaks in cells deficient in either the DNA-binding subunit of DNA-PK (Ku) or its catalytic subunit (DNA- PKcs). We found

  12. Functional and structural studies of the nucleotide excision repair helicase XPD suggest a polarity for DNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Kuper, Jochen; Wolski, Stefanie C; Michels, Gudrun; Kisker, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The XPD protein is a vital subunit of the general transcription factor TFIIH which is not only involved in transcription but is also an essential component of the eukaryotic nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) pathway. XPD is a superfamily-2 5?-3? helicase containing an iron–sulphur cluster. Its helicase activity is indispensable for NER and it plays a role in the damage verification process. Here, we report the first structure of XPD from Thermoplasma acidophilum (taXPD) in complex with a short DNA fragment, thus revealing the polarity of the translocated strand and providing insights into how the enzyme achieves its 5?-3? directionality. Accompanied by a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of taXPD, we define the path of the translocated DNA strand through the protein and identify amino acids that are critical for protein function. PMID:22081108

  13. SWI/SNF complex deficiency and mismatch repair protein expression in undifferentiated and dedifferentiated endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Colin J R; Crook, Maxine L

    2015-08-01

    Undifferentiated endometrial carcinoma (UEC) is a relatively uncommon but clinically aggressive uterine malignancy. In common with a subset of poorly differentiated carcinomas arising in other sites, UEC may exhibit rhabdoid morphology and be associated with a low-grade tumour component (dedifferentiated carcinoma). Recent studies have implicated inactivation of the SWI/SNF complex subunits in the aforementioned extrauterine tumours. Therefore we have examined INI1 (SMARCB1), BRG1 (SMARCA4), and BAF250a (ARID1A) immunostaining, and also expression of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6 in 22 UEC, seventeen of which were dedifferentiated. Abnormal SWI/SNF subunit expression was detected in four dedifferentiated carcinomas including three with loss of BRG1 staining limited to the undifferentiated tumour component and one case with loss of INI1 expression in both low- and high-grade elements; the latter case also showed BAF250a deficiency in the undifferentiated tumour cells. Abnormal MMR protein expression was identified in 13 tumours (59%) including nine with concurrent loss of MLH1 and PMS2. These findings suggest that SWI/SNF subunit alterations may play a role in the progression/ dedifferentiation of endometrial carcinoma, and that SWI/SNF and MMR protein deficiencies may act synergistically in deregulating DNA repair mechanisms in these tumours. PMID:26126041

  14. BRCA1 Silencing Is Associated with Failure of DNA Repairing in Retinal Neurocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhao; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Ying; Yu, Na; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Lei; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Retinal post-mitotic neurocytes display genomic instability after damage induced by physiological or pathological factors. The involvement of BRCA1, an important factor in development and DNA repair in mature retinal neurocytes remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the developmental expression profile of BRCA1 in the retina and defined the role of BRCA1 in DNA repair in retinal neurocytes. Our data show the expression of BRCA1 is developmentally down-regulated in the retinas of mice after birth. Similarly, BRCA1 is down-regulated after differentiation induced by TSA in retinal precursor cells. An end-joining activity assay and DNA fragmentation analysis indicated that the DNA repair capacity is significantly reduced. Moreover, DNA damage in differentiated cells or cells in which BRCA1 is silenced by siRNA interference is more extensive than that in precursor cells subjected to ionizing radiation. To further investigate non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major repair pathway in non-divided neurons, we utilized an NHEJ substrate (pEPI-NHEJ) in which double strand breaks are generated by I-SceI. Our data showed that differentiation and the down-regulation of BRCA1 respectively result in a 2.39-fold and 1.68-fold reduction in the total NHEJ frequency compared with that in cells with normal BRCA1. Furthermore, the analysis of NHEJ repair junctions of the plasmid substrate indicated that BRCA1 is involved in the fidelity of NHEJ. In addition, as expected, the down-regulation of BRCA1 significantly inhibits the viability of retina precursor cells. Therefore, our data suggest that BRCA1 plays a critical role in retinal development and repairs DNA damage of mature retina neurocytes. PMID:24919198

  15. [Role of DNA repair genes in radiation-induced changes of lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Shilova, L A; Pliusnina, E N; Zemskaia, N V; Moskalev, A A

    2014-01-01

    One of the main effects of various stress factors, including ionizing radiation, is DNA damage. Accumulation of DNA damage and somatic mutations in the somatic tissues is regarded as one of the basic mechanisms of aging. We have developed an approach to the study of molecular and genetic mechanisms of radioadaptation, which is based on the analysis of changes in the lifespan of Drosophila with a transformed genotype. In this study we investigated the radioadaptive response and hormesis by radiation-induced changed of the lifespan of different strains of Drosophila melanogaster, such as a wild type strain Canton-Sand strains with mutations in DNA damage response gene (homologue of GADD45), excision repair genes (homologues of XPF, XPC, PCNA) and double-strand breaks repair genes (homologues of RAD54, XRCC3, BLM). The exposure to irradiation at the dose rate of 40 cGy was performed chronically through the stages of fly development; an acute exposure at the dose rate of 30 Gy was applied to the adult stages of flies. Also, we investigated the resistance to acute gamma-radiation of Drosophila with conditional ubiquitous overexpression of genes that are involved in DNA damage recognition (homologues of GADD45, HUS1, CHK2), excision repair (homologues of XPF, XPC, AP-endonuclease-1) and double-strand break repair (homologues of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80, WRNexo). In the wild type strain Canton-S, manifestation of the radioadaptive response and radiation hormesis were observed. In individuals with DNA repair gene mutations, no radioadaptive response was observed, or observed to a lesser extent than in wild type flies. Mifepristone--inducible transgene activation does not lead to an increase in resistance to acute irradiation by the parameters of lifespan of Drosophila. Overexpression of DNA repair genes led to a sharp decline in lifespan also in the absence of irradiation. PMID:25775840

  16. A Base-Independent Repair Mechanism for DNA Glycosylase—No Discrimination Within the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Iris D.; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous occurrence of DNA damages renders its repair machinery a crucial requirement for the genomic stability and the survival of living organisms. Deficiencies in DNA repair can lead to carcinogenesis, Alzheimer, or Diabetes II, where increased amounts of oxidized DNA bases have been found in patients. Despite the highest mutation frequency among oxidized DNA bases, the base-excision repair process of oxidized and ring-opened guanine, FapydG (2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine), remained unclear since it is difficult to study experimentally. We use newly-developed linear-scaling quantum-chemical methods (QM) allowing us to include up to 700 QM-atoms and achieving size convergence. Instead of the widely assumed base-protonated pathway we find a ribose-protonated repair mechanism which explains experimental observations and shows strong evidence for a base-independent repair process. Our results also imply that discrimination must occur during recognition, prior to the binding within the active site. PMID:26013033

  17. Six Genes Associated with the Clinical Phenotypes of Individuals with Deficient and Proficient DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gremmel, Tobias; Wild, Susanne; Schuller, Winfried; Kürten, Viola; Dietz, Klaus; Krutmann, Jean; Berneburg, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disorder characterised by hypo-/hyperpigmentation, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV)-radiation and an up to 2000-fold increased skin cancer risk. Cells from XP-patients are defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) responsible for repair of UV-induced DNA damage. This defect accounts for their mutator phenotype but does not predict their increased skin cancer risk. Therefore, we carried out array analysis to measure the expression of more than 1000 genes after UVB-irradiation in XP cells from three complementation groups with different clinical severity (XP-A, XP-D, XP-F) as well as from patients with normal DNA repair but increased skin cancer risk (?2 basal or squamous cell carcinoma at age <40yrs). Of 144 genes investigated, 20 showed differential expression with p < 0.05 after irradiation of cells with 100 mJ/cm2 of UVB. A subset of six genes showed a direct association of expression levels with clinical severity of XP in genes affecting carcinogenesis relevant pathways. Genes identified in XP cells could be confirmed in cells from patients with no known DNA repair defects but increased skin cancer risk. Thus, it is possible to identify a small gene subset associated with clinical severity of XP patients also applicable to individuals with no known DNA repair defects. PMID:21566739

  18. A base-independent repair mechanism for DNA glycosylase-no discrimination within the active site.

    PubMed

    Blank, Iris D; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous occurrence of DNA damages renders its repair machinery a crucial requirement for the genomic stability and the survival of living organisms. Deficiencies in DNA repair can lead to carcinogenesis, Alzheimer, or Diabetes II, where increased amounts of oxidized DNA bases have been found in patients. Despite the highest mutation frequency among oxidized DNA bases, the base-excision repair process of oxidized and ring-opened guanine, FapydG (2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine), remained unclear since it is difficult to study experimentally. We use newly-developed linear-scaling quantum-chemical methods (QM) allowing us to include up to 700 QM-atoms and achieving size convergence. Instead of the widely assumed base-protonated pathway we find a ribose-protonated repair mechanism which explains experimental observations and shows strong evidence for a base-independent repair process. Our results also imply that discrimination must occur during recognition, prior to the binding within the active site. PMID:26013033

  19. Branch Migration Prevents DNA Loss during Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mawer, Julia S. P.; Leach, David R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks must be accurate to avoid genomic rearrangements that can lead to cell death and disease. This can be accomplished by promoting homologous recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes. Here, using a unique system for generating a site-specific DNA double-strand break in one copy of two replicating Escherichia coli sister chromosomes, we analyse the intermediates of sister-sister double-strand break repair. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that when double-strand breaks are formed in the absence of RuvAB, 4-way DNA (Holliday) junctions are accumulated in a RecG-dependent manner, arguing against the long-standing view that the redundancy of RuvAB and RecG is in the resolution of Holliday junctions. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we explain the redundancy by showing that branch migration catalysed by RuvAB and RecG is required for stabilising the intermediates of repair as, when branch migration cannot take place, repair is aborted and DNA is lost at the break locus. We demonstrate that in the repair of correctly aligned sister chromosomes, an unstable early intermediate is stabilised by branch migration. This reliance on branch migration may have evolved to help promote recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes to prevent genomic rearrangements. PMID:25102287

  20. Regulation of multiple DNA repair pathways by the Fanconi anemia protein SLX4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yonghwan; Spitz, Gabriella S.; Veturi, Uma; Lach, Francis P.; Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2013-01-01

    SLX4, the newly identified Fanconi anemia protein, FANCP, is implicated in repairing DNA damage induced by DNA interstrand cross-linking (ICL) agents, topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitors, and in Holliday junction resolution. It interacts with and enhances the activity of XPF-ERCC1, MUS81-EME1, and SLX1 nucleases, but the requirement for the specific nucleases in SLX4 function is unclear. Here, by complementing a null FA-P Fanconi anemia cell line with SLX4 mutants that specifically lack the interaction with each of the nucleases, we show that the SLX4-dependent XPF-ERCC1 activity is essential for ICL repair but is dispensable for repairing TOP1 inhibitor-induced DNA lesions. Conversely, MUS81-SLX4 interaction is critical for resistance to TOP1 inhibitors but is less important for ICL repair. Mutation of SLX4 that abrogates interaction with SLX1 results in partial resistance to both cross-linking agents and TOP1 inhibitors. These results demonstrate that SLX4 modulates multiple DNA repair pathways by regulating appropriate nucleases. PMID:23093618

  1. Regulation of multiple DNA repair pathways by the Fanconi anemia protein SLX4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Spitz, Gabriella S; Veturi, Uma; Lach, Francis P; Auerbach, Arleen D; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2013-01-01

    SLX4, the newly identified Fanconi anemia protein, FANCP, is implicated in repairing DNA damage induced by DNA interstrand cross-linking (ICL) agents, topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitors, and in Holliday junction resolution. It interacts with and enhances the activity of XPF-ERCC1, MUS81-EME1, and SLX1 nucleases, but the requirement for the specific nucleases in SLX4 function is unclear. Here, by complementing a null FA-P Fanconi anemia cell line with SLX4 mutants that specifically lack the interaction with each of the nucleases, we show that the SLX4-dependent XPF-ERCC1 activity is essential for ICL repair but is dispensable for repairing TOP1 inhibitor-induced DNA lesions. Conversely, MUS81-SLX4 interaction is critical for resistance to TOP1 inhibitors but is less important for ICL repair. Mutation of SLX4 that abrogates interaction with SLX1 results in partial resistance to both cross-linking agents and TOP1 inhibitors. These results demonstrate that SLX4 modulates multiple DNA repair pathways by regulating appropriate nucleases. PMID:23093618

  2. Atomic Simulation of Complex DNA DSBs and the Interactions with the Ku70/80 Heterodimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) usually contain modified bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and thymine glycol, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, 2-deoxyribonolactone, or single-strand breaks (SSBs). The presence of such lesions in close proximity to the DSB terminus makes the DNA nicks more difficult to repair and rejoin than endogenously induced simple DSBs, and as such a major determinant of the biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation as encountered in space travel. In this study we conducted molecular dynamics simulations on a series of DNA duplexes with various complex lesions of 8-oxoG and AP sites, in an effort to investigate the effects of such lesions to the structural integrity and stability of DNA after insulted by IR. We also simulated the interaction of such complex DSBs with the Ku70/80 heterodimer, the first protein in mammalian cells to embark the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway. The results indicate, compared to DNA with simple DSBs, the complex lesions can enhance the hydrogen bonds opening rate at the DNA terminus, and increase the mobility of the whole duplex, thus they present more deleterious effects to the genome integrity if not captured and repaired prom