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Sample records for complex duct simulating

  1. A Comparison of Simulation Capabilities for Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William A.; Smith, Matt K.; Gu, Lixing; New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-11-01

    Typically, the cheapest way to install a central air conditioning system in residential buildings is to place the ductwork in the attic. Energy losses due to duct-attic interactions can be great, but current whole-house models are unable to capture the dynamic multi-mode physics of the interactions. The building industry is notoriously fragmented and unable to devote adequate research resources to solve this problem. Builders are going to continue to put ducts in the attic because floor space is too expensive to closet them within living space, and there are both construction and aesthetic issues with other approaches such as dropped ceilings. Thus, there is a substantial need to publicly document duct losses and the cost of energy used by ducts in attics so that practitioners, builders, homeowners and state and federal code officials can make informed decisions leading to changes in new construction and additional retrofit actions. Thus, the goal of this study is to conduct a comparison of AtticSim and EnergyPlus simulation algorithms to identify specific features for potential inclusion in EnergyPlus that would allow higher-fidelity modeling of HVAC operation and duct transport of conditioned air. It is anticipated that the resulting analysis from these simulation tools will inform energy decisions relating to the role of ducts in future building energy codes and standards.

  2. Flow Simulation of Supersonic Inlet with Bypass Annular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, HyoungJin; Kumano, Takayasu; Liou, Meng-Sing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Conners, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    A relaxed isentropic compression supersonic inlet is a new concept that produces smaller cowl drag than a conventional inlet, but incurs lower total pressure recovery and increased flow distortion in the (radially) outer flowpath. A supersonic inlet comprising a bypass annulus to the relaxed isentropic compression inlet dumps out airflow of low quality through the bypass duct. A reliable computational fluid dynamics solution can provide considerable useful information to ascertain quantitatively relative merits of the concept, and further provide a basis for optimizing the design. For a fast and reliable performance evaluation of the inlet performance, an equivalent axisymmetric model whose area changes accounts for geometric and physical (blockage) effects resulting from the original complex three-dimensional configuration is proposed. In addition, full three-dimensional calculations are conducted for studying flow phenomena and verifying the validity of the equivalent model. The inlet-engine coupling is carried out by embedding numerical propulsion system simulation engine data into the flow solver for interactive boundary conditions at the engine fan face and exhaust plane. It was found that the blockage resulting from complex three-dimensional geometries in the bypass duct causes significant degradation of inlet performance by pushing the terminal normal shock upstream.

  3. Numerical simulation of duct flow with fog droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryan, Abhilash; Lee, J. K.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2010-12-01

    Evaporative cooling is a widely used air cooling technique. In this method, evaporation of a liquid in the surrounding air cools the air in contact with it. In the current investigation, numerical simulations are carried out to visualize the evaporation and dynamics of tiny water droplets of different diameters in a long air duct. The effect of initial droplet size on the temperature and relative humidity distribution of the air stream in the duct is investigated. Three different initial conditions of air are considered to verify the influence of ambient conditions. Droplet spray patterns are also analyzed to identify the suitable locations for the spray nozzles within the duct. The results obtained are displayed in a series of plots to provide a clear understanding of the evaporative cooling process as well as the droplet dynamics within the ducts.

  4. Simulation of turbulent heat transfer in a rotating duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sandip; Andrews, Malcolm J.; Han, Je-Chin

    1995-04-01

    The turbulent heat transfer in a rotating duct is simulated using a modified k-epsilon model. The standard k-epsilon model which includes the Coriolis and rotational buoyancy effects in the momentum equations was not used due to the fact that there are no corresponding terms in the k and epsilon transport equations. The modified model on the other hand adds turbulence production and dissipation from the Coriolis and buoyancy effects. The results show that these modifications are necessary to obtain reasonable predictions or rotational heat transfer effects in the cooling channels of a turbine blade.

  5. Numerical simulation of laminar flow in a curved duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations that were performed to study laminar flow through a square duct with a 900 bend. The purpose of this work was two fold. First, an improved understanding was desired of the flow physics involved in the generation of secondary vortical flows in three-dimensions. Second, adaptive gridding techniques for structured grids in three- dimensions were investigated for the purpose of determining their utility in low Reynolds number, incompressible flows. It was also of interest to validate the commercial computer code CFD-ACE. Velocity predictions for both non-adaptive and adaptive grids are compared with experimental data. Flow visualization was used to examine the characteristics of the flow though the curved duct in order to better understand the viscous flow physics of this problem. Generally, moderate agreement with the experimental data was found but shortcomings in the experiment were demonstrated. The adaptive grids did not produce the same level of accuracy as the non-adaptive grid with a factor of four more grid points.

  6. Simulation of acoustic wave behavior in ducts and a plenum using finite elements package ANSYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Luna, Jose de Jesus; Lopez-Cruz, Pedro; Ramirez-Valencia, Ricardo; Elizondo-Garza, Fernando J.

    2002-11-01

    This paper shows and discusses the use of the finite element software ANSYS for simulation of the behavior of sound waves in a ducts-plenum system. The modeling is intended for didactic purposes, beginning with simple three-dimensional geometries of ducts and plenum. Two conditions can be included: (1) with and without acoustical absorbent materials on the inside walls of the ducts and (2) including or not labyrinths. The analysis allows students to see the behavior of the waves inside the duct-plenum system and they can manipulate the parameters of the model to improve the attenuation characteristics of the system.

  7. Whistler propagation in ionospheric density ducts: Simulations and DEMETER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Streltsov, A. V.; Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.

    2013-11-01

    On 16 October 2009, the Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite observed VLF whistler wave activity coincident with an ionospheric heating experiment conducted at HAARP. At the same time, density measurements by DEMETER indicate the presence of multiple field-aligned enhancements. Using an electron MHD model, we show that the distribution of VLF power observed by DEMETER is consistent with the propagation of whistlers from the heating region inside the observed density enhancements. We also discuss other interesting features of this event, including coupling of the lower hybrid and whistler modes, whistler trapping in artificial density ducts, and the interference of whistlers waves from two adjacent ducts.

  8. Application of TITAN for Simulation of Particle Streaming in a Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Katherine; Haghighat, Alireza; Yi, Ce

    2016-02-01

    The TITAN hybrid deterministic transport code is applied to the simulation of particle streaming in a nuclear power plant duct. A simple model is used consisting of a concrete duct emerging from the pressure vessel with an isotropic surface source with a U-235 fission spectrum located at the pressure vessel end. Multiple methods of simulating the duct using the TITAN code are considered to demonstrate the flexibility of the code and the advantages of TITAN's algorithms. These methods include a discrete ordinates (SN) calculation, a characteristics method calculation, and the use of a fictitious quadrature set with simplified ray-tracing. The TITAN code's results are compared with MCNP5 solutions. While all TITAN solutions are obtained in a shorter computation time than the MCNP5 solution, the TITAN solution with the fictitious quadrature set shows the largest speedup.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of turbulence and heat transfer in a hexagonal shaped duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Oana; Obabko, Aleks; Schlatter, Philipp

    2014-11-01

    Flows in hexagonal shapes frequently occur in nuclear reactor applications, and are also present in honeycomb-shaped settling chambers for e.g. wind tunnels. Whereas wall-bounded turbulence has been studied comprehensively in two-dimensional channels, and to a lesser degree also in square and rectangular ducts and triangles, only very limited data for hexagonal ducts is available, including resistance correlations and mean profiles. Here, we use resolved spectral-element simulations to compute velocity and temperature in fully-developed (periodic) hexagonal duct flow. The Reynolds number, based on the fixed flow rate and the hydraulic diameter, ranges between 2000 and 20000. The temperature assumes constant wall flux or constant wall temperature. First DNS results are focused on the mean characteristics such a head loss, Nusselt number, and critical Reynolds number for sustained turbulence. Profiles, both for mean and fluctuating quantities, are extracted and discussed in the context of square ducts and pipes. Comparisons to existing experiments, RANS and empirical correlations are supplied as well. The results show a complicated and fine-scale pattern of the in-plane secondary flow, which clearly affects the momentum and temperature distribution throughout the cross section.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a rotating square duct

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Yi-Jun; Huang, Wei-Xi Xu, Chun-Xiao; Cui, Gui-Xiang

    2015-06-15

    A fully developed turbulent flow in a rotating straight square duct is simulated by direct numerical simulations at Re{sub τ} = 300 and 0 ≤ Ro{sub τ} ≤ 40. The rotating axis is parallel to two opposite walls of the duct and normal to the main flow. Variations of the turbulence statistics with the rotation rate are presented, and a comparison with the rotating turbulent channel flow is discussed. Rich secondary flow patterns in the cross section are observed by varying the rotation rate. The appearance of a pair of additional vortices above the pressure wall is carefully examined, and the underlying mechanism is explained according to the budget analysis of the mean momentum equations.

  11. Investigation of particle-laden flow in a straight duct using large eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fairweather, M.; Yao, J.

    2007-07-01

    A particle-laden turbulent flow in a square duct is predicted using large eddy simulation (LES). The simulation is performed for a Reynolds number of 35,500, and correctly predicts the existence of secondary flows and their effects on the mean flow. The results are also in good qualitative agreement with experimental data obtained at different Reynolds numbers. One-way coupling is assumed between solid particles and the fluid, and a particle equation of motion, including Stokes drag, lift, buoyancy and gravity force terms, solved using a Lagrangian particle tracking technique. Three sizes of particle (1, 50 and 100 {mu}m) are considered, and results demonstrate that size has a significant effect on particle dispersion and deposition in the duct flow. As particle size increases, therefore, they tend to settle on the floor of the duct, with less dispersion in the fluid phase. The study demonstrates the usefulness of LES for nuclear waste processing applications since secondary flows occur in many practically-relevant flows, and since it is desirable that the two-phase waste mixture is kept as homogeneous as possible to prevent, or at least discourage, the settling out of solid particles to form a bed which can promote pipe blockages. (authors)

  12. Numerical Simulation of Noise from Supersonic Jets Passing Through a Rigid Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The generation, propagation and radiation of sound from a perfectly expanded Mach 2.5 cold supersonic jet flowing through an enclosed rigid-walled duct with an upstream J-deflector have been numerically simulated with the aid of OVERFLOW Navier-Stokes CFD code. A one-equation turbulence model is considered. While the near-field sound sources are computed by the CFD code, the far-field sound is evaluated by Kirchhoff surface integral formulation. Predictions of the farfield directivity of the OASPL (Overall Sound Pressure Level) agree satisfactorily with the experimental data previously reported by the author. Calculations also suggest that there is significant entrainment of air into the duct, with the mass flow rate of entrained air being about three times the jet exit mass flow rate.

  13. Study on numerical simulation of flowfield in afterburner for ducted rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaoyu; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    Ducted rocket has been widely concerned on account of its high specific impulse, combustion stability and convenient maintenance which mixes the exhaust from a fuel gas generator with air from air inlet, and burns to produce thrust. It is necessary to establish two-dimensional or three-dimensional numerical models based on computational fluid dynamics to study on the flowfield in afterburner which is the key of ducted rocket because of expensive experiments, which is aimed at providing theoretical foundation for ducted rocket's development. In this paper, the gas-phase turbulent combustion process in afterburner with dual inlet three-dimensional mode was simulated numerically by solving Favre-averaged compressible turbulent N-S equations, the renormalization group (RNG) k-ɛ turbulence model was applied to simulate the turbulent flow, and Eddy-Dissipation Model (EDM) was applied to simulate gas combustion. Through simulation, situation analysis of flowfield in afterburner was done, and the influence of mixing combustion on afterburner was studied by taking air inlet angles and air-fuel ratio into account respectively. The results indicate that the distribution of temperature in afterburner is nonuniform, the backflow and axial swirl produced by gas mixing have an important influence on afterburner combustion. As air inlet angle is increased, the intensity of gas mixing is enhanced which is beneficial for afterburner combustion. That increasing air-fuel ratio is able to strength contact of oxygen with fuel gas, so that more fuel gas is consumed in the same location which is more beneficial for afterburner combustion.

  14. Aerodynamic analysis and simulation of a twin-tail tilt-duct unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Cyrus

    The tilt-duct vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) concept has been around since the early 1960s; however, to date the design has never passed the research phase and development phase. Nearly 50 years later, American Dynamics Flight Systems (ADFS) is developing the AD-150, a 2,250lb weight class unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) configured with rotating ducts on each wingtip. Unlike its predecessor, the Doak VZ-4, the AD-150 features a V tail and wing sweep -- both of which affect the aerodynamic behavior of the aircraft. Because no aircraft of this type has been built and tested, vital aerodynamic research was conducted on the bare airframe behavior (without wingtip ducts). Two weeks of static and dynamic testing were performed on a 3/10th scale model at the University of Maryland's 7' x 10' low speed wind tunnel to facilitate the construction of a nonlinear flight simulator. A total of 70 dynamic tests were performed to obtain damping parameter estimates using the ordinary least squares methodology. Validation, based on agreement between static and dynamic estimates of the pitch and yaw stiffness terms, showed an average percent error of 14.0% and 39.6%, respectively. These inconsistencies were attributed to: large dynamic displacements not encountered during static testing, regressor collinearity, and, while not conclusively proven, differences in static and dynamic boundary layer development. Overall, the damping estimates were consistent and repeatable, with low scatter over a 95% confidence interval. Finally, a basic open loop simulation was executed to demonstrate the instability of the aircraft. As a result, it is recommended that future work be performed to determine trim points and linear models for controls development.

  15. Computer-Simulation Surrogates for Optimization: Application to Trapezoidal Ducts and Axisymmetric Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, John C.; Paraschivoiu, Marius; Yesilyurt, Serhat; Patera, Anthony T.

    1995-01-01

    Engineering design and optimization efforts using computational systems rapidly become resource intensive. The goal of the surrogate-based approach is to perform a complete optimization with limited resources. In this paper we present a Bayesian-validated approach that informs the designer as to how well the surrogate performs; in particular, our surrogate framework provides precise (albeit probabilistic) bounds on the errors incurred in the surrogate-for-simulation substitution. The theory and algorithms of our computer{simulation surrogate framework are first described. The utility of the framework is then demonstrated through two illustrative examples: maximization of the flowrate of fully developed ow in trapezoidal ducts; and design of an axisymmetric body that achieves a target Stokes drag.

  16. Complex malformations of the urogenital tract in a female dog: Gartner duct cyst, ipsilateral renal agenesis, and ipsilateral hydrometra.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Tsuboi, Masaya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Ryohei

    2016-05-01

    A 10-month-old female toy poodle was referred to the University of Tokyo Veterinary Medical Center with a urogenital anomaly found during sterilization. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a cyst adhering to the cervix and a unilateral renal agenesis. Histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis of the cyst was consistent with remnants of the Wolffian duct or a Gartner duct cyst. This is a rare case of a canine Gartner duct cyst with renal agenesis and uterine anomaly. We discuss the similarity of this case to that of humans and introduce a classification in the literature for these complex urogenital malformations for further clinical research into the precise diagnosis and appropriate surgical planning. PMID:27506089

  17. Materials testing in simulated flue-gas-desulfurization-duct environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, G.H.; Beavers, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Corrosion of construction materials is a major cause of poor reliability and high costs associated with flue gas desulfurization systems. In particular, the outlet ducts which carry cooled scrubbed gas from the scrubber to the stack suffer severe corrosion. Accordingly, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has asked Battelle to evaluate alloys and linings in simulated outlet duct environments. Of the alloys tested, the nickel-based alloys HASTELLOY C-276, INCONEL 625, HASTELLOY G, and the iron-based alloy AL 6X, showed none or very little pitting; this resistance was attributed to their high molybdenum content. Also, titanium was found to be very resistant to the wet acidic environments. Significantly, the ferritic stainless steel Monit, which is a low cost material containing only 4.1 weight percent molybdenum, exhibited high resistance against pitting and uniform corrosion. The 300 series stainless steels showed deep pits and high corrosion rates. Generally, the linings showed good resistance under continuous exposure to the relatively low temperature wet acidic environments. However, a major shortcoming of the linings was found to be the lack of resistance to temperature upsets.

  18. [Unusual evolution of a complex bile duct injury after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hedfi; Hala, Bouhafa; Youssef, Elcadhi; Abdelhedi, Cherif; Karim, Sassi; Azza, Sridi; Adnen, Chouchene

    2016-01-01

    Since the advent of laparoscopic surgery of cholelithiasis the incidence rate of bile duct injuries has increased significantly in the literature in relation to the operators' learning curve. Unknown injuries can have dramatic, immediate consequences and progress to bile peritonitis. Moreover surgical repair of external biliary fistula at the stage of bile duct dilatation requires biliodigestive anastomosis or liver resections "réglées". PMID:27279975

  19. Effects of friction and heat conduction on sound propagation in ducts. [analyzing complex aerodynamic noise problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huerre, P.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of sound propagation is examined in a viscous, heat-conducting fluid, initially at rest and in a uniform state, and contained in a rigid, impermeable duct with isothermal walls. Topics covered include: (1) theoretical formulation of the small amplitude fluctuating motions of a viscous, heat-conducting and compressible fluid; (2) sound propagation in a two dimensional duct; and (3) perturbation study of the inplane modes.

  20. Simulations of acoustic waves in channels and phonation in glottal ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jubiao; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy

    2014-11-01

    Numerical simulations of acoustic wave propagation were performed by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equations using finite element method. To avoid numerical contamination of acoustic field induced by non-physical reflections at computational boundaries, a Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) scheme was implemented to attenuate the acoustic waves and their reflections near these boundaries. The acoustic simulation was further combined with the simulation of interaction of vocal fold vibration and glottal flow, using our fully-coupled Immersed Finite Element Method (IFEM) approach, to study phonation in the glottal channel. In order to decouple the aeroelastic and aeroacoustic aspects of phonation, the airway duct used has a uniform cross section with PML properly applied. The dynamics of phonation were then studied by computing the terms of the equations of motion for a control volume comprised of the fluid in the vicinity of the vocal folds. It is shown that the principal dynamics is comprised of the near cancellation of the pressure force driving the flow through the glottis, and the aerodynamic drag on the vocal folds. Aeroacoustic source strengths are also presented, estimated from integral quantities computed in the source region, as well as from the radiated acoustic field.

  1. Simulations of Three-dimensional Droplet Deformation in a Square-Duct at Moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Jeremy; Kumar, Purushotam; Vanka, Pratap

    2013-11-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of deformation of a confined droplet in a three-dimensional square-duct flow using a multiphase Lattice Boltzmann Method. We have studied the effects of capillary number, Reynolds number, and viscosity ratio on the droplet deformation characteristics. Unlike in the Stokes' limit where deformation is governed by a competition between viscous shear and interfacial tension, at higher Reynolds numbers, inertial effects play an increasingly important role. We observe that the deformation history is non-monotonic and contains an overshoot before relaxing to a steady deformed state. In contrast, the capillary number is seen to affect the magnitude of the deformation history and the time at which the peak deformation occurs. The viscosity ratio has a relatively modest effect on the magnitude of the deformation compared with the effects of Reynolds and capillary numbers. However, compared with the Reynolds number, the viscosity ratio and capillary number have a significant effect on the time to reach a steady state. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Center.

  2. Numerical simulation of a shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction in a duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wei-Li; Greber, Isaac

    1993-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the interaction of an incident oblique shock wave with a turbulent duct flow is presented. The investigation consists of solving the three-dimensional, unsteady, compressible, mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations, using an implicit finite volume, lower-upper time marching code and incorporates the three-dimensional Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. Computed results are obtained Mach number 2.9 for a turning angle of 13 degrees and Reynolds number based on duct width of 1.36 x 10 exp 7. Under various inlet conditions, the results clearly depict the flow characteristics, including the shock geometry, the separated flow region, the wall pressure distribution, and the skin friction distribution. The findings provide a physical understanding of the three-dimensional vortex structure of the flow in a duct in which a shock wave interacts with a turbulent boundary layer. The results show that the ratio of the boundary layer thickness to the duct width is the critical parameter in determining the separation structure.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Flow Through Equilateral Triangular Duct Under Constant Wall Heat Flux Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Kumar, Anoop; Goel, Varun

    2016-06-01

    The force convective heat transfer in an equilateral triangular duct of different wall heat flux configurations was analysed for the laminar hydro-dynamically developed and thermally developing flow by the use of finite volume method. Unstructured meshing was generated by multi-block technique and set of governing equations were discretized using second-order accurate up-wind scheme and numerically solved by SIMPLE Algorithm. For ensuring accuracy, grid independence study was also done. Numerical methodology was verified by comparing results with previous work and predicted results showed good agreement with them (within error of ±5 %). The different combinations of constant heat flux boundary condition were analysed and their effect on heat transfer and fluid flow for different Reynolds number was also studied. The results of different combinations were compared with the case of force convective heat transfer in the equilateral triangular duct with constant heat flux on all three walls.

  4. A finite element simulation of sound attenuation in a finite duct with a peripherally variable liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Using multimodal analysis, a variational finite element method is presented for analyzing sound attenuation in a three-dimensional finite duct with a peripherally variable liner in the absence of flow. A rectangular element, with cubic shaped functions, is employed. Once a small portion of a peripheral liner is removed, the attenuation rate near the frequency where maximum attenuation occurs drops significantly. The positioning of the liner segments affects the attenuation characteristics of the liner. Effects of the duct termination are important in the low frequency ranges. The main effect of peripheral variation of the liner is a broadening of the attenuation characteristics in the midfrequency range. Because of matrix size limitations of the presently available computer program, the eigenvalue equations should be solved out of core in order to handle realistic sources.

  5. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.

    1994-04-26

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding is described. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic. 3 figures.

  6. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J. , Benett

    1994-01-01

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic.

  7. Numerical simulation of flow in a circular duct fitted with air-jet vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küpper, Christoph; Henry, Frank S.

    2002-04-01

    Most of the fundamental studies of the use of air-jet vortex generators (AJVGs) have concentrated on their potential ability to inhibit boundary layer separation on aerofoils. However, AJVGs may be of use in controlling or enhancing certain features of internal duct flows. For example, they may be of use in controlling the boundary layer at the entrance to engine air intakes, or as a means of increasing mixing and heat transfer. The objective of this paper is to analyse the flow field in the proximity of an air-jet vortex generator array in a duct by using two local numerical models, i.e. a simple flat plate model and a more geometrically faithful sector model. The sector model mirrors the circular nature of the duct's cross-section and the centre line conditions on the upper boundary. The flow was assumed fully turbulent and was solved using the finite volume, Navier-Stokes Code CFX 4 (CFDS, AEA Technology, Harwell) on a non-orthogonal, body-fitted, grid using the k- turbulence model and standard wall functions. Streamwise, vertical and cross-stream velocity profiles, circulation and peak vorticity decay, peak vorticity paths in cross-stream and streamwise direction, cross-stream vorticity profiles and cross-stream wall shear stress distributions were predicted. Negligible difference in results was observed between the flat plate and the sector model, since the produced vortices were small relative to the duct diameter and close to the surface. The flow field was most enhanced, i.e. maximum thinning of the boundary layer, with a configuration of 30° pitch and 75° skew angle. No significant difference in results could be observed between co- and counter-rotating vortex arrays. Copyright

  8. Determination of the complex acoustic scattering matrix of a right-angled duct.

    PubMed

    Graf, Thomas; Pan, Jie

    2013-07-01

    A method for determining the complete higher-order scattering matrix of an acoustic discontinuity is developed. The method is demonstrated for a right-angled waveguide bend, and the magnitude and phase of the reflection and transmission coefficients are extracted precisely. The procedure is straightforward and based on the solutions to the Helmholtz equation by the finite element method (FEM). The consistency of the scattering coefficients found by this method is verified by their properties of symmetry, and their accuracy is established by the conservation of energy. The reliability of the new technique is further proved by means of an arbitrary sound source and by comparing the direct FEM response to the reflection matrix calculation. Some features of the scattering matrix as a function of frequency are surprising, such as the steps and reversion of the phase evolution or the complete loss of transmission of the incoming wave. The methodology detailed in this paper can be extended to other multiport junctions, such as T-junctions or size discontinuities in ducts. PMID:23862807

  9. Simulation Analysis of Air Flow and Turbulence Statistics in a Rib Grit Roughened Duct

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, I. I.; Denizopoulou, A. C.; Ntinas, G. K.; Fragos, V. P.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of variable artificial roughness patterns on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer to fluid flow in the ducts of solar air heaters. Different geometries of roughness elements investigated have demonstrated the pivotal role that vortices and associated turbulence have on the heat transfer characteristics of solar air heater ducts by increasing the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper we investigate the two-dimensional, turbulent, unsteady flow around rectangular ribs of variable aspect ratios by directly solving the transient Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using the finite elements method. Flow characteristics and several aspects of turbulent flow are presented and discussed including velocity components and statistics of turbulence. The results reveal the impact that different rib lengths have on the computed mean quantities and turbulence statistics of the flow. The computed turbulence parameters show a clear tendency to diminish downstream with increasing rib length. Furthermore, the applied numerical method is capable of capturing small-scale flow structures resulting from the direct solution of Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. PMID:25057511

  10. Direct numerical simulations of magnetic field effects on turbulent flow in a square duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, R.; Vanka, S. P.; Thomas, B. G.

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic fields are crucial in controlling flows in various physical processes of industrial significance. One such process is the continuous casting of steel, where different magnetic field configurations are used to control the turbulent flow of steel in the mold in order to minimize defects in the cast steel. The present study has been undertaken to understand the effects of a magnetic field on mean velocities and turbulence parameters in turbulent molten metal flow through a square duct. The coupled Navier-Stokes magnetohydrodynamic equations have been solved using a three-dimensional fractional-step numerical procedure. The Reynolds number was kept low in order to resolve all the scales in the flow without using a subgrid scale turbulence model. Computations were performed with three different grid resolutions, the finest grid having 8.4×106 cells. Because liquid metals have low magnetic Reynolds number, the induced magnetic field has been considered negligible and the electric potential method for magnetic field-flow coupling has been implemented. After validation of the computer code, computations of turbulent flow in a square duct with different Hartmann numbers were performed until complete laminarization of the flow. The time-dependent and time-averaged nature of the flow has been examined through distribution of mean velocities, turbulent fluctuations, vorticity, and turbulent kinetic energy budgets.

  11. A hybrid finite difference-boundary element procedure for the simulation of turbulent MHD duct flow at finite magnetic Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Boeck, Thomas; Krasnov, Dmitry; Schumacher, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    A conservative coupled finite difference-boundary element computational procedure for the simulation of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow in a straight rectangular duct at finite magnetic Reynolds number is presented. The flow is assumed to be periodic in the streamwise direction and is driven by a mean pressure gradient. The duct walls are considered to be electrically insulated. The co-evolution of the velocity and magnetic fields as described respectively by the Navier-Stokes and the magnetic induction equations, together with the coupling of the magnetic field between the conducting domain and the non-conducting exterior, is solved using the magnetic field formulation. The aim is to simulate localized magnetic fields interacting with turbulent duct flow. Detailed verification of the implementation of the numerical scheme is conducted in the limiting case of low magnetic Reynolds number by comparing with the results obtained using a quasistatic approach that has no coupling with the exterior. The rigorous procedure with non-local magnetic boundary conditions is compared with simplified pseudo-vacuum boundary conditions and the differences are quantified. Our first direct numerical simulations of turbulent Hartmann duct flow at moderate magnetic Reynolds numbers and a low flow Reynolds number show significant differences in the duct flow turbulence, even at low interaction level between the flow and magnetic field.

  12. A Pitfall in the Diagnosis of Unresectable Liver Metastases: Multiple Bile Duct Hamartomas (von Meyenburg Complexes)

    PubMed Central

    Fuks, David; Le Mouel, Jean-Philippe; Chatelain, Denis; Sabbagh, Charles; Demuynck, Fabien; Brevet, Marie; Brehant, Olivier; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Dumont, Frederic; Verhaeghe, Pierre; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Von Meyenburg complexes (VMC) are a cluster of benign liver malformations including biliary cystic lesions, with congenital fibrocollagenous stroma. This rare entity can mimick multiple secondary hepatic lesions. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman who had multiples liver lesions 12 years after operation for breast cancer. Biopsy of the hepatic lesion confirmed the diagnosis of VMC. Preoperative discovery of multiple gray-white nodular lesions scattered on the surface of the liver should not always contraindicate curative liver resection. The diagnosis of VMC should be known and confirmed with liver biopsy. PMID:21103275

  13. A Pitfall in the Diagnosis of Unresectable Liver Metastases: Multiple Bile Duct Hamartomas (von Meyenburg Complexes).

    PubMed

    Fuks, David; Le Mouel, Jean-Philippe; Chatelain, Denis; Sabbagh, Charles; Demuynck, Fabien; Brevet, Marie; Brehant, Olivier; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Dumont, Frederic; Verhaeghe, Pierre; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Von Meyenburg complexes (VMC) are a cluster of benign liver malformations including biliary cystic lesions, with congenital fibrocollagenous stroma. This rare entity can mimick multiple secondary hepatic lesions. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman who had multiples liver lesions 12 years after operation for breast cancer. Biopsy of the hepatic lesion confirmed the diagnosis of VMC. Preoperative discovery of multiple gray-white nodular lesions scattered on the surface of the liver should not always contraindicate curative liver resection. The diagnosis of VMC should be known and confirmed with liver biopsy. PMID:21103275

  14. Molecular simulation and modeling of complex I.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Gerhard; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-07-01

    Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations play an important role in the functional characterization of complex I. With its large size and complicated function, linking quinone reduction to proton pumping across a membrane, complex I poses unique modeling challenges. Nonetheless, simulations have already helped in the identification of possible proton transfer pathways. Simulations have also shed light on the coupling between electron and proton transfer, thus pointing the way in the search for the mechanistic principles underlying the proton pump. In addition to reviewing what has already been achieved in complex I modeling, we aim here to identify pressing issues and to provide guidance for future research to harness the power of modeling in the functional characterization of complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26780586

  15. Duct closure

    DOEpatents

    Vowell, Kennison L.

    1987-01-01

    A closure for an inclined duct having an open upper end and defining downwardly extending passageway. The closure includes a cap for sealing engagement with the open upper end of the duct. Associated with the cap are an array of vertically aligned plug members, each of which has a cross-sectional area substantially conforming to the cross-sectional area of the passageway at least adjacent the upper end of the passageway. The plug members are interconnected in a manner to provide for free movement only in the plane in which the duct is inclined. The uppermost plug member is attached to the cap means and the cap means is in turn connected to a hoist means which is located directly over the open end of the duct.

  16. Development of simulation computer complex specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Training Simulation Computer Complex Study was one of three studies contracted in support of preparations for procurement of a shuttle mission simulator for shuttle crew training. The subject study was concerned with definition of the software loads to be imposed on the computer complex to be associated with the shuttle mission simulator and the development of procurement specifications based on the resulting computer requirements. These procurement specifications cover the computer hardware and system software as well as the data conversion equipment required to interface the computer to the simulator hardware. The development of the necessary hardware and software specifications required the execution of a number of related tasks which included, (1) simulation software sizing, (2) computer requirements definition, (3) data conversion equipment requirements definition, (4) system software requirements definition, (5) a simulation management plan, (6) a background survey, and (7) preparation of the specifications.

  17. Simulation forecasts complex flow streams from Ekofisk

    SciTech Connect

    Arnes, F.C.; Lillejord, H.

    1996-10-28

    A commercial steady-state process flowsheet simulation program serves as the basis for a rigorous calculation model for predicting produced flow rates from the Ekofisk complex in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. The complex is the center of an extensive gathering system that collects oil and gas streams from several producing fields. Prior to running a production forecast, the simulation model is initiated by matching several years of production. Once the simulation model matches historical production data within acceptable limits, it then is driven by production forecasts from reservoir simulations to develop long-term forecasts of gas, NGL, and oil production. The paper describes the Ekofisk field, the process simulation, implementation of the model, and problems encountered.

  18. Improve bile duct-targeted drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for cholangiocarcinoma by cucurbitacin B loaded phospholipid complex modified with berberine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ling; Xu, Ping-hua; Shen, Bao-de; Shen, Gang; Li, Juan-juan; Qiu, Ling; Liu, Chao-yong; Yuan, Hai-long; Han, Jin

    2015-07-15

    In present study, a novel phospholipid complex loaded cucurbitacin B modified with berberine hydrochloride (CUB-PLC-BER) was prepared by a simple solvent evaporation method with the aim of improving bile duct-targeted drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy for cholangiocarcinoma (CC). The complex's physicochemical properties were systemically investigated in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared absorption spectroscopy (IR). In vivo and in vitro antitumor studies, CUB-PLC-BER and the unmodified cucurbitacin B-phospholipid complex (CUB-PLC) presented stronger antitumor efficacy against human cholangiocarcinoma cells (QBC939 cells) than free cucurbitacin B (CUB), while phospholipids (PL) itself had no significant toxicity. Besides that, CUB-PLC showed the advantage over the free CUB and CUB-PLC-BER with regard to the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo antitumor study. Failure to establish the orthotopic CC model, the study attempted to measure the level of CUB in plasma and in bile to explore bile duct-targeted effect indirectly. In the pharmacokinetics study in rats, the average values of Cmax and AUC0-8h of CUB-PLC-BER group in rat bile were higher than those of CUB-PLC, while an opposite result was found in plasma. Meanwhile, the Cmax, AUC0-8h and AUC0-24h of CUB were the least both in plasma and in bile. The results indicated that the CUB-PLC-BER tended to provide a high and prolonged drug concentration to bile duct, and PL played a central role in internalizing CUB into cells to improve the water insoluble drug's permeability, which was of great benefit to enhance the bioavailability of CUB and improve therapeutic efficacy of CC. These results elucidated the potential of CUB-PLC-BER as drug delivery system for improving bile duct-targeted and therapeutic efficacy for CC. PMID:25882012

  19. Turbofan Duct Propagation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, Justin H.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The CDUCT code utilizes a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation in order to efficiently model acoustic propagation in acoustically treated, complex shaped ducts. The parabolic approximation solves one-way wave propagation with a marching method which neglects backwards reflected waves. The derivation of the parabolic approximation is presented. Several code validation cases are given. An acoustic lining design process for an example aft fan duct is discussed. It is noted that the method can efficiently model realistic three-dimension effects, acoustic lining, and flow within the computational capabilities of a typical computer workstation.

  20. Non-linear propagation of complex sound fields in rectangular ducts. I - The self-excitation phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidya, P. G.; Wang, K. S.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustic interactions at the second order (so-called weak interactions) of the perturbation scheme have been recognized for a long time. This paper examines the possibility of stronger interactions at the first order which are found in rigid rectangular ducts and to a lesser degree in slightly soft rectangular ducts. The strong interactions occur if any two modes have identical phase speeds, the case of multimode and multifrequency input for example. An important consequence of the strong interaction is the self-generation of subharmonics. Even a small amount of subharmonic can, given the right phase conditions, grow through a strong interaction with a higher harmonic.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of large macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Perilla, Juan R.; Goh, Boon Chong; Cassidy, C. Keith; Liu, Bo; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Rudack, Till; Yu, Hang; Wu, Zhe; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Connecting dynamics to structural data from diverse experimental sources, molecular dynamics simulations permit the exploration of biological phenomena in unparalleled detail. Advances in simulations are moving the atomic resolution descriptions of biological systems into the million-to-billion atom regime, in which numerous cell functions reside. In this opinion, we review the progress, driven by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, in the study of viruses, ribosomes, bioenergetic systems, and other diverse applications. These examples highlight the utility of molecular dynamics simulations in the critical task of relating atomic detail to the function of supramolecular complexes, a task that cannot be achieved by smaller-scale simulations or existing experimental approaches alone. PMID:25845770

  2. Control of complex physically simulated robot groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogan, David C.

    2001-10-01

    Actuated systems such as robots take many forms and sizes but each requires solving the difficult task of utilizing available control inputs to accomplish desired system performance. Coordinated groups of robots provide the opportunity to accomplish more complex tasks, to adapt to changing environmental conditions, and to survive individual failures. Similarly, groups of simulated robots, represented as graphical characters, can test the design of experimental scenarios and provide autonomous interactive counterparts for video games. The complexity of writing control algorithms for these groups currently hinders their use. A combination of biologically inspired heuristics, search strategies, and optimization techniques serve to reduce the complexity of controlling these real and simulated characters and to provide computationally feasible solutions.

  3. Evaluation of panel code predictions with experimental results of inlet performance for a 17-inch ducted prop/fan simulator operating at Mach 0.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Iek, C.; Hwang, D. P.; Jeracki, R. J.; Larkin, M.

    1991-01-01

    An axisymmetric panel code was used to evaluate a series of ducted propeller inlets. The inlets were tested in the Lewis 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Three basic inlets having ratios of shroud length to propeller diameter of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.5 were tested with the Pratt and Whitney ducted prop/fan simulator. A fourth hybrid inlet consisting of the shroud from the shortest basic inlet coupled with the spinner from the largest basic inlet was also tested. This later configuration represented the shortest overall inlet. The simulator duct diameter at the propeller face was 17.25 inches. The short and long spinners provided hub-to-tip retios of 0.44 at the propeller face. The four inlets were tested at a nominal free stream Mach number of 0.2 and at angles of attack from 0 degrees to 35 degrees. The panel code method incorporated a simple two-part separation model which yielded conservative estimates of inlet separation.

  4. Evaluation of panel code predictions with experimental results of inlet performance for a 17-inch ducted prop/fab simulator operating at Mach 0.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Iek, C.; Hwang, D. P.; Jeracki, R. J.; Larkin, M.; Sorin, G.

    1991-01-01

    An axisymmetric panel code was used to evaluate a series of ducted propeller inlets. The inlets were tested in the Lewis 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Three basic inlets having ratios of shroud length to propeller diameter of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.5 were tested with the Pratt and Whitney ducted prop/fan simulator. A fourth hybrid inlet consisting of the shroud from the shortest basic inlet coupled with the spinner from the largest basic inlet was also tested. This later configuration represented the shortest overall inlet. The simulator duct diameter at the propeller face was 17.25 inches. The short and long spinners provided hub-to-tip ratios of 0.44 at the propeller face. The four inlets were tested at a nominal free stream Mach number of 0.2 and at angles of attack from 0 degrees to 35 degrees. The panel code method incorporated a simple two-part separation model which yielded conservative estimates of inlet separation.

  5. Computational Aerodynamic Simulations of an 840 ft/sec Tip Speed Advanced Ducted Propulsor Fan System Model for Acoustic Methods Assessment and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Aerodynamic simulations of an 840 ft/sec tip speed, Advanced Ducted Propulsor fan system were performed at five different operating points on the fan operating line, in order to provide detailed internal flow field information for use with fan acoustic prediction methods presently being developed, assessed and validated. The fan system is a sub-scale, lownoise research fan/nacelle model that has undergone extensive experimental testing in the 9- by 15- foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, resulting in quality, detailed aerodynamic and acoustic measurement data. Details of the fan geometry, the computational fluid dynamics methods, the computational grids, and various computational parameters relevant to the numerical simulations are discussed. Flow field results for three of the five operating conditions simulated are presented in order to provide a representative look at the computed solutions. Each of the five fan aerodynamic simulations involved the entire fan system, excluding a long core duct section downstream of the core inlet guide vane. As a result, only fan rotational speed and system bypass ratio, set by specifying static pressure downstream of the core inlet guide vane row, were adjusted in order to set the fan operating point, leading to operating points that lie on a fan operating line and making mass flow rate a fully dependent parameter. The resulting mass flow rates are in good agreement with measurement values. The computed blade row flow fields for all five fan operating points are, in general, aerodynamically healthy. Rotor blade and fan exit guide vane flow characteristics are good, including incidence and deviation angles, chordwise static pressure distributions, blade surface boundary layers, secondary flow structures, and blade wakes. Examination of the computed flow fields reveals no excessive boundary layer separations or related secondary-flow problems. A few spanwise comparisons between

  6. Simulating Vibrations in a Complex Loaded Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Tim T.

    2005-01-01

    The Dynamic Response Computation (DIRECT) computer program simulates vibrations induced in a complex structure by applied dynamic loads. Developed to enable rapid analysis of launch- and landing- induced vibrations and stresses in a space shuttle, DIRECT also can be used to analyze dynamic responses of other structures - for example, the response of a building to an earthquake, or the response of an oil-drilling platform and attached tanks to large ocean waves. For a space-shuttle simulation, the required input to DIRECT includes mathematical models of the space shuttle and its payloads, and a set of forcing functions that simulates launch and landing loads. DIRECT can accommodate multiple levels of payload attachment and substructure as well as nonlinear dynamic responses of structural interfaces. DIRECT combines the shuttle and payload models into a single structural model, to which the forcing functions are then applied. The resulting equations of motion are reduced to an optimum set and decoupled into a unique format for simulating dynamics. During the simulation, maximum vibrations, loads, and stresses are monitored and recorded for subsequent analysis to identify structural deficiencies in the shuttle and/or payloads.

  7. Software for Simulating a Complex Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. Michael

    2003-01-01

    RoboSim (Robot Simulation) is a computer program that simulates the poses and motions of the Robonaut a developmental anthropomorphic robot that has a complex system of joints with 43 degrees of freedom and multiple modes of operation and control. RoboSim performs a full kinematic simulation of all degrees of freedom. It also includes interface components that duplicate the functionality of the real Robonaut interface with control software and human operators. Basically, users see no difference between the real Robonaut and the simulation. Consequently, new control algorithms can be tested by computational simulation, without risk to the Robonaut hardware, and without using excessive Robonaut-hardware experimental time, which is always at a premium. Previously developed software incorporated into RoboSim includes Enigma (for graphical displays), OSCAR (for kinematical computations), and NDDS (for communication between the Robonaut and external software). In addition, RoboSim incorporates unique inverse-kinematical algorithms for chains of joints that have fewer than six degrees of freedom (e.g., finger joints). In comparison with the algorithms of OSCAR, these algorithms are more readily adaptable and provide better results when using equivalent sets of data.

  8. Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis without inflammatory bowel disease is genetically different from large duct disease

    PubMed Central

    Næss, Sigrid; Björnsson, Einar; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Al Mamari, Said; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Chapman, Roger; Bergquist, Annika; Melum, Espen; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Schrumpf, Erik; Lie, Benedicte A.; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Karlsen, Tom H.; Hov, Johannes R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is phenotypically a mild version of large duct PSC, but it is unknown whether these phenotypes share aetiology. We aimed to characterize their relationship by investigating genetic associations in the HLA complex, which represent the strongest genetic risk factors in large duct PSC. Methods Four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1) were genotyped in 87 small duct PSC patients, 485 large duct PSC patients and 1117 controls across three geographical regions. Results HLA-DRB1*13:01 (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.4, P=0.01) and HLA-B*08 (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4, P=0.02) were significantly associated with small duct PSC compared with healthy controls. Based on the observed frequency of HLA-B*08 in small duct PSC, the strongest risk factor in large duct PSC, an estimated 32% (95% CI 4%–65%) of this population can be hypothesized to represent early stages or mild variants of large duct PSC. This subgroup may be constituted by small duct PSC patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which greatly resembled large duct PSC in its HLA association. In contrast, small duct PSC without IBD was only associated with HLA-DRB1*13:01(P=0.03) and was otherwise distinctly dissimilar from large duct PSC. Conclusions Small duct PSC with IBD resembles large duct PSC in its HLA association and may represent early stages or mild variants of large duct disease. Different HLA associations in small duct PSC without IBD could indicate that this subgroup is a different entity. HLA-DRB1*13:01 may represent a specific risk factor for inflammatory bile duct disease. PMID:24517468

  9. Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantoglou, Maria; Jonsson, Jacob; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-06-22

    Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

  10. Minimum-complexity helicopter simulation math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, Robert K.; Mnich, Marc A.

    1988-01-01

    An example of a minimal complexity simulation helicopter math model is presented. Motivating factors are the computational delays, cost, and inflexibility of the very sophisticated math models now in common use. A helicopter model form is given which addresses each of these factors and provides better engineering understanding of the specific handling qualities features which are apparent to the simulator pilot. The technical approach begins with specification of features which are to be modeled, followed by a build up of individual vehicle components and definition of equations. Model matching and estimation procedures are given which enable the modeling of specific helicopters from basic data sources such as flight manuals. Checkout procedures are given which provide for total model validation. A number of possible model extensions and refinement are discussed. Math model computer programs are defined and listed.

  11. Simulating Complex Modulated Phases Through Spin Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinger, Jonathan V.; Lopatina, Lena M.; Geng, Jun; Selinger, Robin L. B.

    2009-03-01

    We extend the computational approach for studying striped phases on curved surfaces, presented in the previous talk, to two new problems involving complex modulated phases. First, we simulate a smectic liquid crystal on an arbitrary mesh by mapping the director field onto a vector spin and the density wave onto an Ising spin. We can thereby determine how the smectic phase responds to any geometrical constraints, including hybrid boundary conditions, patterned substrates, and disordered substrates. This method may provide a useful tool for designing ferroelectric liquid crystal cells. Second, we explore a model of vector spins on a flat two-dimensional (2D) lattice with long-range antiferromagnetic interactions. This model generates modulated phases with surprisingly complex structures, including 1D stripes and 2D periodic cells, which are independent of the underlying lattice. We speculate on the physical significance of these structures.

  12. Simulation of complex three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diewert, G. S.; Rothmund, H. J.; Nakahashi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of splitting is used extensively to simulate complex three dimensional flows on modern computer architectures. Used in all aspects, from initial grid generation to the determination of the final converged solution, splitting is used to enhance code vectorization, to permit solution driven grid adaption and grid enrichment, to permit the use of concurrent processing, and to enhance data flow through hierarchal memory systems. Three examples are used to illustrate these concepts to complex three dimensional flow fields: (1) interactive flow over a bump; (2) supersonic flow past a blunt based conical afterbody at incidence to a free stream and containing a centered propulsive jet; and (3) supersonic flow past a sharp leading edge delta wing at incidence to the free stream.

  13. Simulating Operation of a Complex Sensor Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Esther; Clare, Loren; Woo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Simulation Tool for ASCTA Microsensor Network Architecture (STAMiNA) ["ASCTA" denotes the Advanced Sensors Collaborative Technology Alliance.] is a computer program for evaluating conceptual sensor networks deployed over terrain to provide military situational awareness. This or a similar program is needed because of the complexity of interactions among such diverse phenomena as sensing and communication portions of a network, deployment of sensor nodes, effects of terrain, data-fusion algorithms, and threat characteristics. STAMiNA is built upon a commercial network-simulator engine, with extensions to include both sensing and communication models in a discrete-event simulation environment. Users can define (1) a mission environment, including terrain features; (2) objects to be sensed; (3) placements and modalities of sensors, abilities of sensors to sense objects of various types, and sensor false alarm rates; (4) trajectories of threatening objects; (5) means of dissemination and fusion of data; and (6) various network configurations. By use of STAMiNA, one can simulate detection of targets through sensing, dissemination of information by various wireless communication subsystems under various scenarios, and fusion of information, incorporating such metrics as target-detection probabilities, false-alarm rates, and communication loads, and capturing effects of terrain and threat.

  14. Reliability of Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes some of the procedure to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  15. Simulation of biomolecular diffusion and complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, S A; Northrup, S H; McCammon, J A

    1986-01-01

    Diffusion is a phenomenon of very widespread importance in molecular biophysics. Diffusion can determine the rates and character of the assembly of multisubunit structures, the binding of ligands to receptors, and the internal motions of molecules and assemblies that involve solvent surface displacements. Current computer simulation techniques provide much more detailed descriptions of diffusional processes than have been available in the past. Models can be constructed to include such realistic features as structural subunits at the submolecular level (domains, monomers, or atoms); detailed electrostatic charge distributions and corresponding solvent-screened inter- and intramolecular interactions; and hydrodynamic interactions. The trajectories can be analyzed either to provide direct information on biomolecular function (e.g., the bimolecular rate constant for formation of an electron-transfer complex between two proteins), or to provide or test models for the interpretation of experimental data (e.g., the time dependence of fluorescence depolarization for segments of DNA). Here, we first review the theory of diffusional simulations, with special emphasis on new techniques such as those for obtaining transport properties of flexible assemblies and rate constants of diffusion-controlled reactions. Then we survey a variety of recent applications, including studies of large-scale motion in DNA segments and substrate "steering" in enzyme-substrate binding. We conclude with a discussion of current work (e.g., formation of protein complexes) and possible areas for future work. PMID:3955168

  16. FDLBM simulation of double-diffusive mixed convection of shear-thinning fluids between two-square concentric duct annuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefayati, GH. R.

    2015-11-01

    Double-diffusive mixed convection of pseudoplastic fluids between two-square concentric duct annuli has been analyzed by FDLBM. Results indicate that the augmentation of Richardson number decreases heat and mass transfer. The fall of the power law index declines heat and mass transfer at Ri = 0.00062 and 0.01. The increase in the size of the adiabatic body enhances the heat and mass transfer in the lid-driven enclosure generally.

  17. Payload crew training complex simulation engineer's handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The Simulation Engineer's Handbook is a guide for new engineers assigned to Experiment Simulation and a reference for engineers previously assigned. The experiment simulation process, development of experiment simulator requirements, development of experiment simulator hardware and software, and the verification of experiment simulators are discussed. The training required for experiment simulation is extensive and is only referenced in the handbook.

  18. Analyzing Complex Metabolomic Networks: Experiments and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuer, R.; Kurths, J.; Fiehn, O.; Weckwerth, W.

    2002-03-01

    In the recent years, remarkable advances in molecular biology have enabled us to measure the behavior of complex regularity networks underlying biological systems. In particular, high throughput techniques, such as gene expression arrays, allow a fast acquisition of a large number of simultaneously measured variables. Similar to gene expression, the analysis of metabolomic datasets results in a huge number of metabolite co-regulations: Metabolites are the end products of cellular regulatory processes, their level can be regarded as the ultimate response to genetic or environmental changes. In this presentation we focus on the topological description of such networks, using both, experimental data and simulations. In particular, we discuss the possibility to deduce novel links between metabolites, using concepts from (nonlinear) time series analysis and information theory.

  19. Flue gas duct assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Montana, F.J.

    1984-08-28

    A length of longitudinally extending duct assembly for heated corrosive gases includes an outer support duct and a substantially gas-tight liner. The liner is spaced from the outer support duct by a relatively yielding spacer material that accommodates expansion of the liner in directions parallel to the inner surface of the outer support duct and in directions normal to the inner surface of the outer support duct without imposing any substantial resistance to such thermal expansion.

  20. Fully nonlinear time-domain simulation of a backward bent duct buoy floating wave energy converter using an acceleration potential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Rok; Koo, Weoncheol; Kim, Moo-Hyun

    2013-12-01

    A floating Oscillating Water Column (OWC) wave energy converter, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), was simulated using a state-of-the-art, two-dimensional, fully-nonlinear Numerical Wave Tank (NWT) technique. The hydrodynamic performance of the floating OWC device was evaluated in the time domain. The acceleration potential method, with a full-updated kernel matrix calculation associated with a mode decomposition scheme, was implemented to obtain accurate estimates of the hydrodynamic force and displacement of a freely floating BBDB. The developed NWT was based on the potential theory and the boundary element method with constant panels on the boundaries. The mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian (MEL) approach was employed to capture the nonlinear free surfaces inside the chamber that interacted with a pneumatic pressure, induced by the time-varying airflow velocity at the air duct. A special viscous damping was applied to the chamber free surface to represent the viscous energy loss due to the BBDB's shape and motions. The viscous damping coefficient was properly selected using a comparison of the experimental data. The calculated surface elevation, inside and outside the chamber, with a tuned viscous damping correlated reasonably well with the experimental data for various incident wave conditions. The conservation of the total wave energy in the computational domain was confirmed over the entire range of wave frequencies.

  1. Duct joining system

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P.; deKieffer, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  2. Duct Joining System

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P.

    2001-02-27

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  3. Optimization of the mechanical performance of a two-duct semicircular duct system--part 1: dynamics and duct dimensions.

    PubMed

    Muller, M; Verhagen, J H G

    2002-06-21

    The classical representation of the semicircular duct system consists of three separate duct circuits. The ducts are, however, in reality, hydrodynamically interconnected. Muller & Verhagen (1988a,b) derived equations for the mechanical behaviour of an interconnected system with three ducts (anterior, posterior and horizontal). An analytical solution of these equations would, however, be too complex to provide surveyable formulae. A system of two interconnected ducts avoids this complexity whilst keeping the essentials of the coupling of ducts intact. The solution of the equation of motion leads to expressions for time constants and maximal endolymph excursions which are functions of morphological parameters, viz. the ratios of radii (gamma) and lengths (lambda) of the common vestibular part (crus commune or utriculus) and the ducts. The system possesses two short time constants which are shown to have similar values. The maximum endolymph displacements in the two ducts after a steplike stimulus are the products of the respective initial velocities and combinations of time constants. The initial velocities depend strongly on the position of the labyrinth with respect to the excitating rotation vector. Measured data of gamma and lambda are compared with the theoretical results. For gamma, excellent agreement was found. lambda is treated elsewhere. PMID:12151258

  4. Rocket-in-a-Duct Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Reed, Brian D.

    1999-01-01

    An axisymmetric, 110 N class, rocket configured with a free expansion between the rocket nozzle and a surrounding duct was tested in an altitude simulation facility. The propellants were gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen and the hardware consisted of a heat sink type copper rocket firing through copper ducts of various diameters and lengths. A secondary flow of nitrogen was introduced at the blind end of the duct to mix with the primary rocket mass flow in the duct. This flow was in the range of 0 to 10% of the primary massflow and its effect on nozzle performance was measured. The random measurement errors on thrust and massflow were within +/-1%. One dimensional equilibrium calculations were used to establish the possible theoretical performance of these rocket-in-a-duct nozzles. Although the scale of these tests was small, they simulated the relevant flow expansion physics at a modest experimental cost. Test results indicated that lower performance was obtained at higher free expansion area ratios and longer ducts, while, higher performance was obtained with the addition of secondary flow. There was a discernable peak in specific impulse efficiency at 4% secondary flow. The small scale of these tests resulted in low performance efficiencies, but prior numerical modeling of larger rocket-in-a-duct engines predicted performance that was comparable to that of optimized rocket nozzles. This remains to be proven in large-scale, rocket-in-a-duct tests.

  5. Bile duct malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tucek, S; Tomasek, J; Halámkova, J; Kiss, I; Andrasina, T; Hemmelová, B; Adámková-Krákorová, D; Vyzula, R

    2010-01-01

    Bile duct malignancies include intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECC), gall bladder carcinoma (GC) and carcinoma of Vater's ampulla (ampulloma). Bile duct neoplasms are rare tumours with overall poor prognosis. The overall incidence affects up to 12.5 per 100,000 persons in the Czech Republic. The mortality rate has risen recently to 9.5 per 100,000 persons. The incidence and mortality have been remarkably stable over the past 3 decades. The survival rate of patients with these tumours is poor, usually not exceeding 12 months. The diagnostic process is complex, uneasy and usually late. Most cases are diagnosed when unresectable, and palliative treatment is the main approach of medical care for these tumours. The treatment remains very challenging. New approaches have not brought much improvement in this field. Standards of palliative care are lacking and quality of life assessments are surprisingly not common. From the scarce data it seems, however, that multimodal individually tailored treatment can prolong patients'survival and improve the health-related quality of life. The care in specialized centres offers methods of surgery, interventional radiology, clinical oncology and high quality supportive care. These methods are discussed in the article in greater detail. Improvements in this field can be sought in new diagnostic methods and new procedures in surgery and interventional radiology. Understanding the tumour biology on the molecular level could shift the strategy to a more successful one, resulting in more cured patients. Further improvements in palliative care can be sought by defining new targets and new drug development. The lack of patients with bile duct neoplasms has been the limiting factor for any improvements. A new design of larger randomized international multicentric clinical trials with prompt data sharing could help to overcome this major problem. Defining standards of palliative care is a necessity

  6. Curved Duct Noise Prediction Using the Fast Scattering Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Tinetti, Ana F.; Farassat, F.

    2007-01-01

    Results of a study to validate the Fast Scattering Code (FSC) as a duct noise predictor, including the effects of curvature, finite impedance on the walls, and uniform background flow, are presented in this paper. Infinite duct theory was used to generate the modal content of the sound propagating within the duct. Liner effects were incorporated via a sound absorbing boundary condition on the scattering surfaces. Simulations for a rectangular duct of constant cross-sectional area have been compared to analytical solutions and experimental data. Comparisons with analytical results indicate that the code can properly calculate a given dominant mode for hardwall surfaces. Simulated acoustic behavior in the presence of lined walls (using hardwall duct modes as incident sound) is consistent with expected trends. Duct curvature was found to enhance weaker modes and reduce pressure amplitude. Agreement between simulated and experimental results for a straight duct with hard walls (no flow) was excellent.

  7. Simultaneous bile duct and portal vein ligation induces faster atrophy/hypertrophy complex than portal vein ligation: role of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Weizheng; Chen, Geng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Aiqun; Li, Chonghui; Lv, Wenping; Pan, Ke; Dong, Jia-hong

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein ligation (PVL) induces atrophy/hypertrophy complex (AHC). We hypothesised that simultaneous bile duct and portal vein ligation (BPL) might induce proper bile acid (BA) retention to enhance AHC by activating BA-mediated FXR signalling in the intact liver and promoting apoptosis in the ligated liver. We established rat models of 90% BPL and 90% PVL and found that BPL was well-tolerated and significantly accelerated AHC. The enhanced BA retention in the intact liver promoted hepatocyte proliferation by promoting the activation of FXR signalling, while that in the ligated liver intensified caspase3-mediated apoptosis. Decreasing the BA pools in the rats that underwent BPL could compromise these effects, whereas increasing the bile acid pools of rats that underwent PVL could induce similar effects. Second-stage resection of posterior-caudate-lobe-spearing hepatectomy was performed 5 days after BPL (B-Hx), PVL (V-Hx) or sham (S-SHx), as well as whole-caudate-lobe-spearing hepatectomy 5 days after sham (S-Hx). The B-Hx group had the most favourable survival rate (93.3%, the S-SHx group 0%, the S-Hx group 26.7%, the V-Hx group 56.7%, P < 0.01) and the most sustained regeneration. We conclude that BPL is a safe and effective method, and the acceleration of AHC was bile acid-dependent. PMID:25678050

  8. Experimental evaluation of a pilot multinozzle-duct apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot multinozzle and duct were tested at ambient enthalpy to evaluate the suitability of such apparatus for testing thermal protection system panels mounted in the sidewalls of the duct downstream of the nozzle array. The flow field in the duct was complex: effects of wakes and shock waves from the nozzle dominated the flow field; the wakes continually mixed with the surrounding fluid; the boundary layer on the sidewalls of the duct was nonuniform; and near the exit of the duct the sidewall pressure variation was as much as 8.5 percent about the mean wall pressure. Starting loads on the duct walls were higher than those of a similar conventional nozzle and duct. It was concluded that the multinozzle-duct apparatus was not suitable for testing TPS panels, although the design and flow-field information should be of interest to designers of high-energy gasdynamic lasers.

  9. Comprehensive Report of Fan Performance From Duct Rake Instrumentation on 1.294 Pressure Ratio, 806 ft/sec Tip Speed Turbofan Simulator Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeracki, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    A large scale model representative of an advanced ducted propulsor-type, low-noise, very high bypass ratio turbofan engine was tested for acoustics, aerodynamic performance, and off-design operability in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. The test was part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. The low tip speed fan, nacelle, and un-powered core passage were simulated. As might be expected, the effect of stall management casing treatment was a performance penalty. Reducing the recirculating flow at the fan tip reduced the penalty while still providing sufficient stall margin. Two fans were tested with the same aerodynamic design; one with graphite composite material, and the other with solid titanium. There were surprising performance differences between the two fans, though both blades showed some indication of transitional flow near the tips. Though the pressure and temperature ratios were low for this fan design, the techniques used to improve thermocouple measurement accuracy gave repeatable data with adiabatic efficiencies agreeing within 1 percent. The measured fan adiabatic efficiency at simulated takeoff conditions was 93.7 percent and matched the design intent.

  10. Simulating complex intracellular processes using object-oriented computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Colin G; Goldman, Jacki P; Gullick, William J

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of computer modelling and simulation in cellular biology, in particular as applied to complex biochemical processes within the cell. This is illustrated by the use of the techniques of object-oriented modelling, where the computer is used to construct abstractions of objects in the domain being modelled, and these objects then interact within the computer to simulate the system and allow emergent properties to be observed. The paper also discusses the role of computer simulation in understanding complexity in biological systems, and the kinds of information which can be obtained about biology via simulation. PMID:15302205

  11. Steam reforming of DOE complex waste simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Kuehne, P.B.

    1995-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has worked with Synthetica Technologies and Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International (MTCl) to demonstrate the applicability of their commercial steam reforming technologies for treating DOE low-level mixed wastes. Previously, Synthetica successfully demonstrated destruction of a Sandia formulated lab trash simulant. During November 1994 Synthetica did not adequately process the aqueous halogenated organic liquid mixed waste simulant (MWTP-2110) formulated by the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Testing at MTCl is ongoing and initial results appear to be favorable. Approximately 200 lbs each of the MWIP aqueous halogenated organic liquids (MWTP-2110), and absorbed aqueous and organic liquids (MWTP-3113/3114) simulants have been processed. At 1650{degree}F, destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were obtained for tetrachloroethylene, toluene, and 1,2 dichlorobenzene. Product cases consisted primarily of H{sub 2}, C0{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4} and had higher heating values of up to 355 BTU/SCF. Conclusions concerning the suitability of the MTCI process for treating DOE mixed wastes will be drawn upon the completion of testing.

  12. Finite-difference theory for sound propagation in a lined duct with uniform flow using the wave envelope concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Finite difference equations are derived for sound propagation in a two dimensional, straight, soft wall duct with a uniform flow by using the wave envelope concept. This concept reduces the required number of finite difference grid points by one to two orders of magnitude depending on the length of the duct and the frequency of the sound. The governing acoustic difference equations in complex notation are derived. An exit condition is developed that allows a duct of finite length to simulate the wave propagation in an infinitely long duct. Sample calculations presented for a plane wave incident upon the acoustic liner show the numerical theory to be in good agreement with closed form analytical theory. Complete pressure and velocity printouts are given to some sample problems and can be used to debug and check future computer programs.

  13. Designing Better Scaffolding in Teaching Complex Systems with Graphical Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Na

    2013-01-01

    Complex systems are an important topic in science education today, but they are usually difficult for secondary-level students to learn. Although graphic simulations have many advantages in teaching complex systems, scaffolding is a critical factor for effective learning. This dissertation study was conducted around two complementary research…

  14. Lightweight Valve Closes Duct Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Walter L.; Burgy, N. Frank

    1991-01-01

    Expanding balloon serves as lightweight emergency valve to close wide duct. Uninflated balloon stored in housing of duct. Pad resting on burst diaphragm protects balloon from hot gases in duct. Once control system triggers valve, balloon inflates rapidly to block duct. Weighs much less than does conventional butterfly, hot-gas, or poppet valve capable of closing duct of equal diameter.

  15. A molecular simulation study on salt response of polyelectrolyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antila, Hanne; van Tassel, Paul; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2015-03-01

    In aqueous solutions, oppositely charged polymers, polyelectrolytes (PEs) form complexes which are known to be sensitive to added salt with responses ranging from shrinking to full destabilization of the complex. As a specific application of PE complexes, the complex formation of DNA with polycations has been demonstrated to be an effective means of transfecting genetic material in gene therapy. We use all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effect of excess salt on DNA-polycation complex stability. The detailed all-atom simulations demonstrate the mechanism of polycation and ion species specific salt-driven dissociation involving charge reversal. More generally, other possible mechanisms of salt driven dissociation exist as well. The coarse grained approach, which describes the PE complex as oppositely charged, rigid rods and ions as hard spheres, provides a more complete understanding of PE interactions in salt, and suggests possible mechanisms leading to repulsion between the oppositely charged polyelectrolytes.

  16. Simulation and display of macromolecular complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, S.; Garduno, R.; Rein, R.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    In association with an investigation of the interaction of proteins with DNA and RNA, an interactive computer program for building, manipulating, and displaying macromolecular complexes has been designed. The system provides perspective, planar, and stereoscopic views on the computer terminal display, as well as views for standard and nonstandard observer locations. The molecule or its parts may be rotated and/or translated in any direction; bond connections may be added or removed by the viewer. Molecular fragments may be juxtaposed in such a way that given bonds are aligned, and given planes and points coincide. Another subroutine provides for the duplication of a given unit such as a DNA or amino-acid base.

  17. Geomechanical numerical simulations of complex geologic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Arguello, J.G.; Stone, C.M.; Lorenz, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Ability to predict mechanical response of rock in three dimensions over the spatial and time scales of geologic interest would give the oil and gas industry the ability to reduce risk on prospects, improve pre-project initial reserve estimates, and lower operating costs. A program has recently been initiated, under the auspices of the Advanced Computational Technology Initiative (ACTI), to achieve such a computational technology breakthrough by adapting the unique advanced quasistatic finite element technology developed by Sandia to the mechanics applications important to exploration and production activities within the oil and gas industry. As a precursor to that program, in an effort to evaluate the feasibility of the approach, several complex geologic structures of interest were analyzed with the existing two-dimensional quasistatic finite element code, SANTOS, developed at Sandia. Examples are presented and discussed.

  18. Simulation of complexes between linear polyelectrolyte and charged dendrimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandav, Gunja; Ganesan, Venkat

    2014-03-01

    Complexes formed by electrostatic interactions between dendrimer having cationic terminal groups and anionic linear polyelectrolyte are studied using hybrid Monte Carlo simulations. The excluded volume interactions are modeled using a self-consistent field and the electrostatic interactions are computed by solving Poisson equation. Such framework facilitates simulating large scale three-dimensional systems. We primarily focus on the effect of dendrimer generation number, stiffness of polyelectrolyte chain and systematically study its effect on change in shape and size of complexes. Our results suggest that the dendrimer structure and charge distribution has a significant impact on the complex formation.

  19. Hybrid functionals for simulating complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, Cesare

    Hybrid functionals are a class of exchange-correlation (XC) functionals in density functional theory (DFT) that are constructed by a suitable mixing of local/semi-local XC functionals (LDA/GGA) with a certain portion of the exact Hartree-Fock exchange. After being used for years in the chemistry community for studying molecular properties, hybrid functionals are being increasingly widely used for solid state problems, for which standard LDA/GGA approximations provide a defective description. In particular, hybrid functionals appear to account well for the complicated coupling between lattice, charge and spin degrees of freedom in transition metal oxides, a class of materials that has recently attracted a lot of interest due to its technological relevance (all-oxides electronics), the large spectrum of functionalities, and the many challenging issues related to strong electronic correlation. The purpose of this talk is to present the essential ideas and physical picture of hybrid functionals and to present a map of recent applications to complex oxides aiming to cover an ample spectra of cases (sp , 3 d, 4 d and 5 d compounds) and to discuss an extended array of physical phenomena including: metal-to-insulator transitions, electron localization, bandgap prediction, polarons, multiferroism, and spin-orbit coupling.

  20. Advanced Duct Sealing Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2003-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected

  1. Numerical Simulation of Complex Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernobrovkin, A. A.; Lakshiminarayana, B.

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady, multiblock, Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes solver based on Runge-Kutta scheme and Pseudo-time step for turbo-machinery applications was developed. The code was validated and assessed against analytical and experimental data. It was used to study a variety of physical mechanisms of unsteady, three-dimensional, turbulent, transitional, and cooling flows in compressors and turbines. Flow over a cylinder has been used to study effects of numerical aspects on accuracy of prediction of wake decay and transition, and to modify K-epsilon models. The following simulations have been performed: (a) Unsteady flow in a compressor cascade: Three low Reynolds number turbulence models have been assessed and data compared with Euler/boundary layer predictions. Major flow features associated with wake induced transition were predicted and studied; (b) Nozzle wake-rotor interaction in a turbine: Results compared to LDV data in design and off-design conditions, and cause and effect of unsteady flow in turbine rotors were analyzed; (c) Flow in the low-pressure turbine: Assessed capability of the code to predict transitional, attached and separated flows at a wide range of low Reynolds numbers and inlet freestream turbulence intensity. Several turbulence and transition models have been employed and comparisons made to experiments; (d) leading edge film cooling at compound angle: Comparisons were made with experiments, and the flow physics of the associated vortical structures were studied; and (e) Tip leakage flow in a turbine. The physics of the secondary flow in a rotor was studied and sources of loss identified.

  2. Simulation of complex phenomena in optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allington-Smith, Jeremy; Murray, Graham; Lemke, Ulrike

    2012-12-01

    Optical fibres are essential for many types of highly multiplexed and precision spectroscopy. The success of the new generation of multifibre instruments under construction to investigate fundamental problems in cosmology, such as the nature of dark energy, requires accurate modellization of the fibre system to achieve their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) goals. Despite their simple construction, fibres exhibit unexpected behaviour including non-conservation of etendue (focal ratio degradation, FRD) and modal noise. Furthermore, new fibre geometries (non-circular or tapered) have become available to improve the scrambling properties that, together with modal noise, limit the achievable SNR in precision spectroscopy. These issues have often been addressed by extensive tests on candidate fibres and their terminations, but these are difficult and time-consuming. Modelling by ray tracing and wave analysis is possible with commercial software packages, but these do not address the more complex features, in particular FRD. We use a phase-tracking ray-tracing method to provide a practical description of FRD derived from our previous experimental work on circular fibres and apply it to non-standard fibres. This allows the relationship between scrambling and FRD to be quantified for the first time. We find that scrambling primarily affects the shape of the near-field pattern but has negligible effect on the barycentre. FRD helps to homogenize the near-field pattern but does not make it completely uniform. Fibres with polygonal cross-section improve scrambling without amplifying the FRD. Elliptical fibres, in conjunction with tapering, may offer an efficient means of image slicing to improve the product of resolving power and throughput, but the result is sensitive to the details of illumination. We also investigated the performance of fibres close to the limiting numerical aperture since this may affect the uniformity of the SNR for some prime focus fibre instrumentation.

  3. Complex Organics from Laboratory Simulated Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Many of the volatiles in interstellar dense clouds exist in ices surrounding dust grains. The low temperatures of these ices (T < 50 K) preclude most chemical reactions, but photolysis can drive reactions that produce a suite of new species, many of which are complex organics. We study the UV and proton radiation processing of interstellar ice analogs to explore links between interstellar chemistry, the organics in comets and meteorites, and the origin of life on Earth. The high D/H ratios in some interstellar species, and the knowledge that many of the organics in primitive meteorites are D-enriched, suggest that such links are plausible. Once identified, these species may serve as markers of interstellar heritage of cometary dust and meteorites. Of particular interest are our findings that UV photolysis of interstellar ice analogs produce molecules of importance in current living organisms, including quinones, amphiphiles, and amino acids. Quinones are essential in vital metabolic roles such as electron transport. Studies show that quinones should be made wherever polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are photolyzed in interstellar ices. In the case of anthracene-containing ices, we have observed the production of 9-anthrone and 9,10 anthraquinone, both of which have been observed in the Murchison meteorite. Amphiphiles are also made when mixed molecular ices are photolyzed. These amphiphiles self-assemble into fluorescent vesicles when placed in liquid water, as do Murchison extracts. Both have the ability to trap an ionic dye. Photolysis of plausible ices can also produce alanine, serine, and glycine as well as a number of small alcohols and amines. Flash heating of the room temperature residue generated by such experiments generates mass spectral distributions similar to those of IDPs. The detection of high D/H ratios in some interstellar molecular species, and the knowledge that many of the organics, such as hydroxy and amino acids, in primitive meteorites are D

  4. Final report [Molecular simulations of complex fluids in confined geometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, Stevin H.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2002-07-22

    This award supports collaborative research between Kansas State University and Sandia National Laboratories on the topic ''Molecular simulations of complex fluids in confined geometries.'' The objectives of this work are to develop new methodologies for fast and accurate simulations, and to apply simulations to various problems of interest to DOE. The success of this work will address several deficiencies in Sandia's capabilities in the area of molecular simulations. In addition, it provides educational opportunities for students and will enhance the science and technology capabilities at Kansas State through partnership with the national laboratories.

  5. Ducted auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1982-01-01

    Certain discrete, intense wave signals attributed to auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) were observed with ISEE-l while it was within the plasmaspheric shadow zone for direct propagation. It is believed that wave ducting by thin depletions of the plasma density aligned with the magnetic field accounts for such signals, and that their discrete nature is caused by the satellite intercepting individual ducts. These ducts, which were also observed as coincident decreases of the upper hybrid resonance frequency, appeared to be twenty-percent depletions roughly one hundred kilometers across. The AKR, which is emitted approximately perpendicular to the magnetic field, apparently entered these ducts equatorward of the source after the waves had been refracted parallel to the duct axis. A diffuse background was also observed which is consistent with the leakage from similar ducts at lower L-values. These observations establish the existence of ducted AKR, its signature on the satellite wave spectrograms, and new evidence for depletion ducts within the plasmasphere.

  6. Loft duct project report

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.R.

    1993-06-01

    On October 16, 1992, during a routine examination of the loft of Building 332, the Building Coordinator observed cracks in the welds of the duct work that services the fume hoods for Rooms 1313, 1321, and 1329. Further examination revealed cracks in the weld of the duct work that services the gloveboxes in Rooms 1321 and 1329. Upon discovery of the cracked welds, facility management immediately took the following two actions: Because one crack in the fume hood exhaust extended 70% around the duct circumference, a 1-ton chain fall was used to secure the duct to the roof support structure to prevent the duct from falling if the duct completely fractured. The Facility Manager suspended plutonium handling operations in the gloveboxes and work in the fume hoods in the affected rooms until the situation could be thoroughly investigated. Building 332 is ventilated by drawing conditioned air from the building hallways into the laboratories, hoods, and gloveboxes. This air is filtered through two sets of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters before being exhausted from the facility. Figure 1 is a schematic of the typical air flow pattern for the facility. All affected duct work is located in the loft of the facility or pressure zone 4. This ducting is fabricated from 12-, 14- and 16-gauge, 304 stainless-steel sheet stock and joined by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process.

  7. A phased approach to enable hybrid simulation of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Billie F.; Chang, Chia-Ming; Frankie, Thomas M.; Kuchma, Daniel A.; Silva, Pedro F.; Abdelnaby, Adel E.

    2014-08-01

    Hybrid simulation has been shown to be a cost-effective approach for assessing the seismic performance of structures. In hybrid simulation, critical parts of a structure are physically tested, while the remaining portions of the system are concurrently simulated computationally, typically using a finite element model. This combination is realized through a numerical time-integration scheme, which allows for investigation of full system-level responses of a structure in a cost-effective manner. However, conducting hybrid simulation of complex structures within large-scale testing facilities presents significant challenges. For example, the chosen modeling scheme may create numerical inaccuracies or even result in unstable simulations; the displacement and force capacity of the experimental system can be exceeded; and a hybrid test may be terminated due to poor communication between modules (e.g., loading controllers, data acquisition systems, simulation coordinator). These problems can cause the simulation to stop suddenly, and in some cases can even result in damage to the experimental specimens; the end result can be failure of the entire experiment. This study proposes a phased approach to hybrid simulation that can validate all of the hybrid simulation components and ensure the integrity large-scale hybrid simulation. In this approach, a series of hybrid simulations employing numerical components and small-scale experimental components are examined to establish this preparedness for the large-scale experiment. This validation program is incorporated into an existing, mature hybrid simulation framework, which is currently utilized in the Multi-Axial Full-Scale Sub-Structuring Testing and Simulation (MUST-SIM) facility of the George E. Brown Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) equipment site at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A hybrid simulation of a four-span curved bridge is presented as an example, in which three piers are

  8. Petaflop hydrokinetic simulations of complex flows on massive GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, M.; Bisson, M.; Fatica, M.; Melchionna, S.; Succi, S.

    2013-02-01

    We present recent extensions of the MUPHY computational framework for multi-scale simulation of complex bio-fluidic phenomena in real-life geometries. The new framework, which builds on concurrent advances of the computational modeling and parallelization techniques, is able to simulate suspensions with several hundreds of millions of finite-size bodies, interacting with each other and with the surrounding fluid, in geometries of realistic anatomic complexity. Blood flow through the human coronary arteries, at physiological hematocrit values, is simulated with a spatial resolution of 10 micrometers, comparable with the size of red blood cells. The simulation exhibits excellent parallel scalability on a cluster of 4000 M2050 Nvidia GPUs, with an aggregate performance close to 1 Petaflop/s.

  9. Simulating complex ion channel kinetics with IonChannelLab

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; Perez-Cornejo, Patricia; Arreola, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    In-silico simulation based on Markov chains is a powerful way to describe and predict the activity of many transport proteins including ion channels. However, modeling and simulation using realistic models of voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels exposed to a wide range of experimental conditions require building complex kinetic schemes and solving complicated differential equations. To circumvent these problems, we developed IonChannelLab a software tool that includes a user-friendly Graphical User Interface and a simulation library. This program supports channels with Ohmic or Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz behavior and can simulate the time-course of ionic and gating currents, single channel behavior and steady-state conditions. The program allows the simulation of experiments where voltage, ligand and ionic concentration are varied independently or simultaneously. PMID:20935453

  10. An analytical solution for Dean flow in curved ducts with rectangular cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, M.; Biglari, N.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a full analytical solution for incompressible flow inside the curved ducts with rectangular cross-section is presented for the first time. The perturbation method is applied to solve the governing equations and curvature ratio is considered as the perturbation parameter. The previous perturbation solutions are usually restricted to the flow in curved circular or annular pipes related to the overly complex form of solutions or singularity situation for flow in curved ducts with non-circular shapes of cross section. This issue specifies the importance of analytical studies in the field of Dean flow inside the non-circular ducts. In this study, the main flow velocity, stream function of lateral velocities (secondary flows), and flow resistance ratio in rectangular curved ducts are obtained analytically. The effect of duct curvature and aspect ratio on flow field is investigated as well. Moreover, it is important to mention that the current analytical solution is able to simulate the Taylor-Görtler and Dean vortices (vortices in stable and unstable situations) in curved channels.

  11. Quantum simulations of small electron-hole complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.A.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.D.

    1984-09-01

    The Green's Function Monte Carlo method is applied to the calculation of the binding energies of electron-hole complexes in semiconductors. The quantum simulation method allows the unambiguous determination of the ground state energy and the effects of band anisotropy on the binding energy. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Salivary duct stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands. Salivary duct stones are a type of salivary gland disorder. ... 83. Jackson NM, Mitchell JL, Walvekar RR. Inflammatory disorders of the salivary glands. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et ...

  13. Accessory Pancreatic Duct Patterns and Their Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Lokadolalu Chandracharya; Rajagopal, KV; Thomas, Huban R

    2015-01-01

    Context and Objective: Accessory pancreatic duct (APD) designed to reduce the pressure of major pancreatic duct by forming a secondary drainage channel. Few studies have mentioned the variant types of accessory ducts and their mode of formation, some of these have a clear clinical significance. Present study is aimed to evaluate the possible variations in the APD and its terminations. Materials and Methods: Forty formalin fixed adult human pancreas with duodenum in situ specimens were studied by injecting 1% aqueous eosin, followed by piece meal dissection of the head of the pancreas from posterior surface. Formation, tributaries, relations, and the termination of the accessory pancreatic duct were noted and photographed. Results: Accessory ducts revealed 50% belonged to long type, 22.5% were of short and ansa pancreatica type each, and embryonic type of duct pattern was seen in 5% specimens. 75% of long type ducts showed positive patency with eosin dye, followed by ansa type (44.4%), and least patency was found in short type (22.2%). With regard to the patency of the accessory pancreatic ducts towards their termination, we found 52.5% of the accessory ducts and 5% of the embryonic type pancreatic ducts were patent and in 42.5% of the specimen the ducts were obliterated. In 85% of specimens the minor duodenal papillae was anterosuperior to the major papilla and superior to the major papillae in 10% of the cases, and in 5% minor papillae was absent. The average distance between the two papillae was 2.35 cm. Conclusion: The knowledge of the complex anatomical relations of the gland with its duct, duodenum and bile ducts are essential for the surgeons and sinologists to plan and perform both the diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures effectively. PMID:25954609

  14. Atomistic Simulation of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Associated Cellulosomal Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Crowley, Michael F; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations have been performed to obtain an atomic-level understanding of lignocellulose structure and the assembly of its associated cellulosomal protein complexes. First, a CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived and validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this work provides the basis for full simulations of lignocellulose. Second, the underlying molecular mechanism governing the assembly of various cellulosomal modules is investigated by performing a novel free-energy calculation of the cohesin-dockerin dissociation. Our calculation indicates a free-energy barrier of ~17 kcal/mol and further reveals a stepwise dissociation pathway involving both the central -sheet interface and its adjacent solvent-exposed loop/turn regions clustered at both ends of the -barrel structure.

  15. 91. VIEW OF OBSOLETE AIRCONDITIONING DUCTS LOCATED IN NORTHWEST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW OF OBSOLETE AIR-CONDITIONING DUCTS LOCATED IN NORTHWEST CORNER OF ROOM, ABOVE SLC-3E AUTOPILOT EQUIPMENT. DIGITAL COUNTDOWN AND HOLD CLOCKS ON WALL LEFT OF DUCTS - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. Route complexity and simulated physical ageing negatively influence wayfinding.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Emma; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Krijnen, Wim P; van der Schans, Cees P; Mobach, Mark P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this age-simulation field experiment was to assess the influence of route complexity and physical ageing on wayfinding. Seventy-five people (aged 18-28) performed a total of 108 wayfinding tasks (i.e., 42 participants performed two wayfinding tasks and 33 performed one wayfinding task), of which 59 tasks were performed wearing gerontologic ageing suits. Outcome variables were wayfinding performance (i.e., efficiency and walking speed) and physiological outcomes (i.e., heart and respiratory rates). Analysis of covariance showed that persons on more complex routes (i.e., more floor and building changes) walked less efficiently than persons on less complex routes. In addition, simulated elderly participants perform worse in wayfinding than young participants in terms of speed (p < 0.001). Moreover, a linear mixed model showed that simulated elderly persons had higher heart rates and respiratory rates compared to young people during a wayfinding task, suggesting that simulated elderly consumed more energy during this task. PMID:27184311

  17. Complex molecular assemblies at hand via interactive simulations.

    PubMed

    Delalande, Olivier; Férey, Nicolas; Grasseau, Gilles; Baaden, Marc

    2009-11-30

    Studying complex molecular assemblies interactively is becoming an increasingly appealing approach to molecular modeling. Here we focus on interactive molecular dynamics (IMD) as a textbook example for interactive simulation methods. Such simulations can be useful in exploring and generating hypotheses about the structural and mechanical aspects of biomolecular interactions. For the first time, we carry out low-resolution coarse-grain IMD simulations. Such simplified modeling methods currently appear to be more suitable for interactive experiments and represent a well-balanced compromise between an important gain in computational speed versus a moderate loss in modeling accuracy compared to higher resolution all-atom simulations. This is particularly useful for initial exploration and hypothesis development for rare molecular interaction events. We evaluate which applications are currently feasible using molecular assemblies from 1900 to over 300,000 particles. Three biochemical systems are discussed: the guanylate kinase (GK) enzyme, the outer membrane protease T and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors complex involved in membrane fusion. We induce large conformational changes, carry out interactive docking experiments, probe lipid-protein interactions and are able to sense the mechanical properties of a molecular model. Furthermore, such interactive simulations facilitate exploration of modeling parameters for method improvement. For the purpose of these simulations, we have developed a freely available software library called MDDriver. It uses the IMD protocol from NAMD and facilitates the implementation and application of interactive simulations. With MDDriver it becomes very easy to render any particle-based molecular simulation engine interactive. Here we use its implementation in the Gromacs software as an example. PMID:19353597

  18. The future of simulation technologies for complex cardiovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Cates, Christopher U; Gallagher, Anthony G

    2012-09-01

    Changing work practices and the evolution of more complex interventions in cardiovascular medicine are forcing a paradigm shift in the way doctors are trained. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), carotid artery stenting (CAS), and acute stroke intervention procedures are forcing these changes at a faster pace than in other disciplines. As a consequence, cardiovascular medicine has had to develop a sophisticated understanding of precisely what is meant by 'training' and 'skill'. An evolving conclusion is that procedure training on a virtual reality (VR) simulator presents a viable current solution. These simulations should characterize the important performance characteristics of procedural skill that have metrics derived and defined from, and then benchmarked to experienced operators (i.e. level of proficiency). Simulation training is optimal with metric-based feedback, particularly formative trainee error assessments, proximate to their performance. In prospective, randomized studies, learners who trained to a benchmarked proficiency level on the simulator performed significantly better than learners who were traditionally trained. In addition, cardiovascular medicine now has available the most sophisticated virtual reality simulators in medicine and these have been used for the roll-out of interventions such as CAS in the USA and globally with cardiovascular society and industry partnered training programmes. The Food and Drug Administration has advocated the use of VR simulation as part of the approval of new devices and the American Board of Internal Medicine has adopted simulation as part of its maintenance of certification. Simulation is rapidly becoming a mainstay of cardiovascular education, training, certification, and the safe adoption of new technology. If cardiovascular medicine is to continue to lead in the adoption and integration of simulation, then, it must take a proactive position in the

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of complex plasmas: interaction of nonlinear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durniak, Celine; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2008-11-01

    Complex plasmas consist of micron sized microspheres immersed into ordinary ion-electron plasmas. They exist in solid, liquid, gaseous states and exhibit a range of dynamic phenomena such as waves, solitons, phase transitions, heat transfer. These phenomena can be modelled in complex plasmas at the microscopic or ``molecular'' scale, which is almost impossible in ordinary solids and liquids. We simulate a monolayer complex plasma consisting of 3000 negatively-charged particles (or grains) with the help of molecular dynamics computer simulations. The equations of grain motion are solved using a 5^th order Runge Kutta method taking into account interaction of every grain with each other via a Yukawa potential. The grains are confined more strongly in the vertical direction than in the horizontal. After seeding the grains randomly the code is run until the equilibrium is reached as the grain kinetics energy reduces due to damping force equal to the neutral friction in the experiments and a monolayer crystal lattice is formed. Then we investigate interactions between nonlinear waves in a monolayer strongly coupled complex plasma moving in three dimensions. Different excitations are applied during a short time symmetrically on both sides of the lattice. Structural properties and nonlinear waves characteristics are examined as the pulses propagate across the complex plasma in opposite directions.

  20. Patent arterial duct

    PubMed Central

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  1. Patent arterial duct.

    PubMed

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation

  2. Simulations of accretion disks in pseudo-complex General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, P. O.; Algalán B., M.; Schönenbach, T.; Greiner, W.

    2015-11-01

    After a summary on pseudo-complex General Relativity (pc-GR), circular orbits and stable orbits in general are discussed, including predictions compared to observations. Using a modified version of a model for accretions disks, presented by Page and Thorne in 1974, we apply the raytracing technique in order to simulate the appearance of an accretion disk as it should be observed in a detector. In pc-GR we predict a dark ring near a very massive, rapidly rotating object.

  3. The Factorization Method for Simulating Systems with a Complex Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Nishimura, J.; Verbaarschot, J. J. M.

    2004-04-01

    We propose a method for Monte Carlo simulations of systems with a complex action. The method has the advantages of being in principle applicable to any such system and provides a solution to the overlap problem. We apply it in random matrix theory of finite density QCD where we compare with analytic results. In this model we find non-commutativity of the limits μ → 0 and N → ∞ which could be of relevance in QCD at finite density.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation strategies for protein-micelle complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Kim, Yangmee; Bowie, James U; Im, Wonpil

    2016-07-01

    The structure and stability of membrane proteins can vary widely in different detergents and this variability has great practical consequences for working with membrane proteins. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that operate to alter the behavior of proteins in micelles are poorly understood and not predictable. Atomic simulations could provide considerable insight into these mechanisms. Building protein-micelle complexes for simulation is fraught with uncertainty, however, in part because it is often unknown how many detergent molecules are present in the complex. Here, we describe several convenient ways to employ Micelle Builder in CHARMM-GUI to rapidly construct protein-micelle complexes and performed simulations of the isolated voltage-sensor domain of voltage-dependent potassium-selective channel and an antimicrobial peptide papiliocin with varying numbers of detergents. We found that once the detergent number exceeds a threshold, protein-detergent interactions change very little and remain very consistent with experimental observations. Our results provide a platform for future studies of the interplays between protein structure and detergent properties at the atomic level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26679426

  5. Artificial Market Simulation with Embedded Complex Network Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Makoto; Shirayama, Susumu

    We investigate a factor of the `network effect' that affects on communication service markets by a multi-agent based simulation approach. The network effect is one of a market characteristic, whereby the benefit of a service or a product increase with use. So far, the network effect has been studied in terms of macroscopic metrics, and interaction patterns of consumers in the market were often ignored. To investigate an infulence of structures of the interaction patterns, we propose a multi-agent based model for a communication serivce market, in which embedded complex network structures are considered as an interaction pattern of agents. Using several complex network models as the interaction patterns, we study the dynamics of a market in which two providers are competing. By a series of simulations, we show that the structural properties of the complex networks, such as the clustering coefficient and degree correlations, are the major factors of the network effect. We also discuss an adequate model of the interaction pattern for reproducing the market dynamics in the real world by performing simulations exploiting with a real data of social network.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Flow-Induced Structure in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro

    2007-04-01

    It is important to investigate the flow-induced structure for the analysis of the mechanism of flow behavior of complex fluids. The present paper includes two topics in which the flow-induced structure is numerically investigated. The first topic treats the suspensions of disc-like particles under simple shear flows. Disc-like particles were modeled by oblate spheroid particles, and the Brownian dynamics simulation was performed for suspensions of the particles interacting via the Gay-Berne potential. This simulation confirmed that this model system was applicable to the analysis of flow of suspension of disc-like particles. The second one is the numerical simulation of the deformation behavior of a droplet in shear flows. The present simulation is the first step for the numerical simulation of the flow-induced structure in emulsions. This simulation can demonstrate the deformation behavior of droplet observed in experiments and predict effects of non-Newtonian property of fluids on the droplet deformation.

  7. Scale Model Experiments on Sound Propagation From a Mach 2.5 Cold Nitrogen Jet Flowing Through a Rigid-Walled Duct With a J-Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    The Launch Systems Testbed (LST) represents the evolution of vibroacoustics research and development work performed at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) over the last 15 years. The LST is located at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) in the KSC industrial complex. The LETF is operated by Sierra Lobo, Inc., as a member of University-Affiliated Technology Development Contract (USTDC) to KSC Spaceport and Engineering and Technology Directorate (YA), with ASRC Aerospace Corporation as a the prime contractor. Trajectory Simulation Mechanism (TSM) is a major component of the LST, developed specifically to simulate nonstationary acoustic loads on launch pad structures, vehicles, and payloads. TSM enhances the capabilities within LST for simulating launch environments of future vehicles. The scaled launch environments will be used to predict the full-scale launch environment via an appropriate scaling procedure. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has tasked NASA KSC to perform a basic technology test program in support of developing a low-cost clean pad (incorporating passive mitigation techniques) for future launch vehicles. The overall goal of the program is to develop innovative launch exhaust management systems, which effectively reduce launch acoustic environment with innovative duct designs, while eliminating traditional sound suppression water systems. Passive techniques, such as nontraditional duct geometries, resonators, and diffusers, etc., will be investigated. The overall goals are to advance innovative concepts for a clean pad while developing ideas to reduce transmitted sound via investigation and modeling of jet exhaust acoustic and flow field characteristics. The series of tests outlined in this report represent baseline tests and are geared towards defining the acoustic load environment on the TSM pad for open and closed duct configurations. This report summarizes the cold jet acoustic testing for Mach 2.5 supersonic nitrogen jet issuing

  8. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  9. Governance of complex systems: results of a sociological simulation experiment.

    PubMed

    Adelt, Fabian; Weyer, Johannes; Fink, Robin D

    2014-01-01

    Social sciences have discussed the governance of complex systems for a long time. The following paper tackles the issue by means of experimental sociology, in order to investigate the performance of different modes of governance empirically. The simulation framework developed is based on Esser's model of sociological explanation as well as on Kroneberg's model of frame selection. The performance of governance has been measured by means of three macro and two micro indicators. Surprisingly, central control mostly performs better than decentralised coordination. However, results not only depend on the mode of governance, but there is also a relation between performance and the composition of actor populations, which has yet not been investigated sufficiently. Practitioner Summary: Practitioners can gain insights into the functioning of complex systems and learn how to better manage them. Additionally, they are provided with indicators to measure the performance of complex systems. PMID:24456093

  10. Computer Simulations and Theoretical Studies of Complex Systems: from complex fluids to frustrated magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsong

    Computer simulations are an integral part of research in modern condensed matter physics; they serve as a direct bridge between theory and experiment by systemactically applying a microscopic model to a collection of particles that effectively imitate a macroscopic system. In this thesis, we study two very differnt condensed systems, namely complex fluids and frustrated magnets, primarily by simulating classical dynamics of each system. In the first part of the thesis, we focus on ionic liquids (ILs) and polymers--the two complementary classes of materials that can be combined to provide various unique properties. The properties of polymers/ILs systems, such as conductivity, viscosity, and miscibility, can be fine tuned by choosing an appropriate combination of cations, anions, and polymers. However, designing a system that meets a specific need requires a concrete understanding of physics and chemistry that dictates a complex interplay between polymers and ionic liquids. In this regard, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an efficient tool that provides a molecular level picture of such complex systems. We study the behavior of Poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) and the imidazolium based ionic liquids, using MD simulations and statistical mechanics. We also discuss our efforts to develop reliable and efficient classical force-fields for PEO and the ionic liquids. The second part is devoted to studies on geometrically frustrated magnets. In particular, a microscopic model, which gives rise to an incommensurate spiral magnetic ordering observed in a pyrochlore antiferromagnet is investigated. The validation of the model is made via a comparison of the spin-wave spectra with the neutron scattering data. Since the standard Holstein-Primakoff method is difficult to employ in such a complex ground state structure with a large unit cell, we carry out classical spin dynamics simulations to compute spin-wave spectra directly from the Fourier transform of spin trajectories. We

  11. Analysis of nephric duct specification in the avian embryo

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Lital; Yelin, Ronit; Schultheiss, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate kidney tissue exhibits variable morphology that in general increases in complexity when moving from anterior to posterior along the body axis. The nephric duct, a simple unbranched epithelial tube, is derived in the avian embryo from a rudiment located in the anterior intermediate mesoderm (IM) adjacent to somites 8 to 10. Using quail-chick chimeric embryos, the current study finds that competence to form nephric duct is fixed when IM precursor cells are still located in the primitive streak, significantly before the onset of duct differentiation. In the primitive streak, expression of the gene HoxB4 is associated with prospective duct IM, whereas expression of the more posterior Hox gene HoxA6 is associated with more posterior, non-duct-forming IM. Misexpression of HoxA6, but not of HoxB4, in prospective duct-forming regions of the IM resulted in repression of duct formation, suggesting a mechanism for the restriction of duct formation to the anterior-most IM. The results are discussed with respect to their implications for anterior-posterior patterning of kidney tissue and of mesoderm in general, and for the loss of duct-forming ability in more posterior regions of the IM that has occurred during vertebrate evolution. PMID:23034630

  12. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on

  13. On the propagation of long waves in acoustically treated, curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional study is presented on the behavior of long waves in lined, curved ducts. The analysis includes a comparison between the propagation in curved and straight lined ducts. A parametric study was conducted over a range of wall admittance and duct wall separation. The complex eigenvalues of the characteristic equation, which in the case of a curved duct are also the angular wavenumbers, were obtained by successive approximations.

  14. Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.

    2003-10-01

    Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of

  15. What Is Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bile duct cancer. The rest of this document refers only to cholangiocarcinomas. Benign bile duct tumors ... tumors, which aren’t discussed further in this document. Other cancers in the liver The most common ...

  16. Dynamic instability of ducts conveying fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y. Y.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element analysis was used to study dynamic instability in ducts conveying high speed fluids. Ducts examined include cantilevered curved, flexibly supported, arbitrarily shaped, and composite duct systems. Partial differential equations were used to study the duct systems.

  17. Simulating an Extreme Wind Event in a Topographically Complex Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennard, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    Complex topography modifies local weather characteristics such as air temperature, rainfall and airflow within a larger regional extent. The Cape Peninsula around Cape Town, South Africa, is a complex topographical feature responsible for the modification of rainfall and wind fields largely downstream of the Peninsula. During the passage of a cold front on 2 October 2002, an extreme wind event associated with tornado-like damage occurred in the suburb of Manenberg, however synoptic conditions did not indicate convective activity typically associated with a tornado. A numerical regional climate model was operated at very high horizontal resolution (500 m) to investigate the dynamics of the event. The model simulated an interaction between the topography of the peninsula and an airflow direction change associated with the passage of the cold front. A small region of cyclonic circulation was simulated over Manenberg that was embedded in an area of negative vorticity and a leeward gravity wave. The feature lasted 14 min and moved in a north to south direction. Vertically, it was not evident above 220 m. The model assessment describes this event as a shallow but intense cyclonic vortex generated in the lee of the peninsula through an interaction between the peninsula and a change in wind direction as the cold front made landfall. The model did not simulate wind speeds associated with the observed damage suggesting that the horizontal grid resolution ought to be at the scale of the event to more completely understand such microscale airflow phenomena.

  18. Auditory perception of note transitions in simulated complex bowing patterns.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Demoucron, Matthias; Altenmüller, Eckart; Leman, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Recent motion-capture measurements of violin bowing revealed an interesting coordination behavior in fast repetitive bowing patterns involving bow changes and string crossings; bow changes were consistently lagging behind string crossings, and the relative timing appeared to be an integral part of the bow-movement patterns. The aim of the current study was to investigate if there might be a perceptual explanation for the observed coordination behavior. For this purpose a virtual violin was used, controlled by simulated bowing gestures. A simplified coordination model is presented, which was implemented to allow real-time control of complex bowing patterns. This synthesis approach was employed in a perceptual experiment in which the participants were asked to optimize the sound by adjusting a slider controlling the main coordination parameters. It was found that the resulting coordination patterns were similar to those observed in performance, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. Further analysis of the responses shed light on temporal and spatial constraints of the simulated gestures associated with the note transitions. The results raise interesting questions with regard to auditory-motor interaction in complex instrumental control gestures. PMID:23742380

  19. 12. SANDSORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS ON RIGHT, DUCT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SAND-SORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS ON RIGHT, DUCT FOR DUST COLLECTION SYSTEM IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTH - Mill "C" Complex, Sand-Sorting Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  20. 54. DETAIL OF AIRCONDITIONING EXHAUST DUCTS ON NORTH FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. DETAIL OF AIR-CONDITIONING EXHAUST DUCTS ON NORTH FACE OF ERECT UMBILICAL MAST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  2. Size limitations in semicircular duct systems

    PubMed

    Muller

    1999-06-01

    The present article discusses mechanical requirements and limitations which are applicable to the construction of the system of semicircular ducts, especially to its size. The simplified case of a single, uniform duct system has been considered which can be described by a second order equation of motion. The principal functional quantities for this rotation-sensor are: (1) response speed; (2) sensitivity; and (3) regular flow. The response speed of a single, uniform semicircular duct is characterized by the short time constant (T2) which is dependent on the duct radius (r). Its estimated range is from 0.04 ms in the smallest to 140 ms in the largest known labyrinth. The sensitivity is characterized by the maximal endolymph displacement after a step stimulus (xmax). Its estimated range is from 0.0016 &mgr;m to 5.97 mm (6.56 decades!), assuming an input angular velocity of omega=1 rad s-1. The Reynolds number is a measure for an undisturbed laminar flow. Its estimated range varies from 7.38.10(-4)to 45.1 for omega=1 rad s-1. The above data follow from graphs in which, for a single uniform duct, circuit radius (R) is plotted against duct radius (r) for labyrinths of 233 species belonging to different vertebrate-groups. A relation R =38.9. r1.60was determined. The smallest labyrinth was found in a carp larva (Cyprinus), the largest in a whale shark (Rhincodon). Large whales possess labyrinths of average mammalian size. It is revealed that semicircular duct size is bound by requirements concerning regular flow and by a too low response speed for large labyrinths, and by a too low sensitivity for small labyrinths. Other important quantities are mechanical amplification factors which are a consequence of more complex vestibular constructions than a single uniform duct circuit. Allometric relationships are interpreted as compromises between the quantities mentioned. A hypothesis for the relatively large semicircular duct sizes of fishes, especially Elasmobranchii, compared

  3. High performance ultrasonic field simulation on complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouh, H.; Rougeron, G.; Chatillon, S.; Iehl, J. C.; Farrugia, J. P.; Ostromoukhov, V.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic field simulation is a key ingredient for the design of new testing methods as well as a crucial step for NDT inspection simulation. As presented in a previous paper [1], CEA-LIST has worked on the acceleration of these simulations focusing on simple geometries (planar interfaces, isotropic materials). In this context, significant accelerations were achieved on multicore processors and GPUs (Graphics Processing Units), bringing the execution time of realistic computations in the 0.1 s range. In this paper, we present recent works that aim at similar performances on a wider range of configurations. We adapted the physical model used by the CIVA platform to design and implement a new algorithm providing a fast ultrasonic field simulation that yields nearly interactive results for complex cases. The improvements over the CIVA pencil-tracing method include adaptive strategies for pencil subdivisions to achieve a good refinement of the sensor geometry while keeping a reasonable number of ray-tracing operations. Also, interpolation of the times of flight was used to avoid time consuming computations in the impulse response reconstruction stage. To achieve the best performance, our algorithm runs on multi-core superscalar CPUs and uses high performance specialized libraries such as Intel Embree for ray-tracing, Intel MKL for signal processing and Intel TBB for parallelization. We validated the simulation results by comparing them to the ones produced by CIVA on identical test configurations including mono-element and multiple-element transducers, homogeneous, meshed 3D CAD specimens, isotropic and anisotropic materials and wave paths that can involve several interactions with interfaces. We show performance results on complete simulations that achieve computation times in the 1s range.

  4. Effectiveness of duct sealing and duct insulation in multi-family buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karins, N.H.; Tuluca, A.; Modera, M.

    1997-07-01

    This research investigated the cost-effectiveness of sealing and insulating the accessible portions of duct systems exposed to unconditioned areas in multifamily housing. Airflow and temperature measurements were performed in 25 apartments served by 10 systems a 9 multi-family properties. The measurements were performed before and after each retrofit, and included apartment airflow (supply and return), duct system temperatures, system fan flow and duct leakage area. The costs for each retrofit were recorded. The data were analyzed and used to develop a prototypical multifamily house. This prototype was used in energy simulations (DOE-2.1E) and air infiltration simulations (COMIS 2.1). The simulations were performed for two climates: New York City and Albany. In each climate, one simulation was performed assuming the basement was tight, and another assuming the basement was leaky. Simulation results and average retrofit costs were used to calculate cost-effectiveness. The results of the analysis indicate that sealing leaks of the accessible ductwork is cost-effective under all conditions simulated (simple payback was between 3 and 4 years). Insulating the accessible ductwork, however, is only cost-effective for buildings with leaky basement, in both climates (simple paybacks were less than 5 years). The simple payback period for insulating the ducts in buildings with tight basements was greater than 10 years, the threshold of cost-effectiveness for this research. 13 refs., 5 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. Complexity analysis of simulations with analytic bond-order potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teijeiro, Carlos; Hammerschmidt, Thomas; Seiser, Bernhard; Drautz, Ralf; Sutmann, Godehard

    2016-02-01

    The modeling of materials at the atomistic level with interatomic potentials requires a reliable description of different bonding situations and relevant system properties. For this purpose, analytic bond-order potentials (BOPs) provide a systematic and robust approximation to density functional theory (DFT) and tight binding (TB) calculations at reasonable computational cost. This paper presents a formal analysis of the computational complexity of analytic BOP simulations, based on a detailed assessment of the most computationally intensive parts. Different implementation algorithms are presented alongside with optimizations for efficient numerical processing. The theoretical complexity study is complemented by systematic benchmarks of the scalability of the algorithms with increasing system size and accuracy level of the BOP approximation. Both approaches demonstrate that the computation of atomic forces in analytic BOPs can be performed with a similar scaling as the computation of atomic energies.

  6. Black-box calibration for complex-system simulation.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Alexander I J

    2010-08-13

    Predicting or measuring the output of complex systems is an important and challenging part of many areas of science. If multiple observations are required for parameter studies and optimization, accurate, computationally intensive predictions or expensive experiments are intractable. This paper looks at the use of Gaussian-process-based correlations to correct simple computer models with sparse data from physical experiments or more complex computer models. In essence, physics-based computer codes and experiments are replaced by fast problem-specific statistics-based codes. Two aerodynamic design examples are presented. First, a cheap two-dimensional potential-flow solver is calibrated to represent the flow over the wing of an unmanned air vehicle. The rear wing of a racing car is then optimized using rear-wing simulations calibrated to include the effects of the flow over the whole car. PMID:20603368

  7. Complexity of precipitation patterns: Comparison of simulation with experiment.

    PubMed

    Polezhaev, A. A.; Muller, S. C.

    1994-12-01

    Numerical simulations show that a simple model for the formation of Liesegang precipitation patterns, which takes into account the dependence of nucleation and particle growth kinetics on supersaturation, can explain not only simple patterns like parallel bands in a test tube or concentric rings in a petri dish, but also more complex structural features, such as dislocations, helices, "Saturn rings," or patterns formed in the case of equal initial concentrations of the source substances. The limits of application of the model are discussed. (c) 1994 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12780140

  8. Simulations of Instabilities in Complex Valve and Feed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Shipman, Jeremy; Cavallo, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    CFD analyses are playing an increasingly important role in identifying and characterizing flow induced instabilities in rocket engine test facilities and flight systems. In this paper, we analyze instability mechanisms that range from turbulent pressure fluctuations due to vortex shedding in structurally complex valve systems to flow resonance in plug cavities to large scale pressure fluctuations due to collapse of cavitation induced vapor clouds. Furthermore, we discuss simulations of transient behavior related to valve motion that can serve as guidelines for valve scheduling. Such predictions of valve response to varying flow conditions is of crucial importance to engine operation and testing.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-polycation complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebarth, Jesse; Wang, Yongmei

    2008-03-01

    A necessary step in the preparation of DNA for use in gene therapy is the packaging of DNA with a vector that can condense DNA and provide protection from degrading enzymes. Because of the immunoresponses caused by viral vectors, there has been interest in developing synthetic gene therapy vectors, with polycations emerging as promising candidates. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA duplex CGCGAATTCGCG in the presence of 20 monomer long sequences of the polycations, poly-L-lysine (PLL) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), with explicit counterions and TIP3P water, are performed to provide insight into the structure and formation of DNA polyplexes. After an initial separation of approximately 50 å, the DNA and polycation come together and form a stable complex within 10 ns. The DNA does not undergo any major structural changes upon complexation and remains in the B-form. In the formed complex, the charged amine groups of the polycation mainly interact with DNA phosphate groups, and rarely occupy electronegative sites in either the major or minor grooves. Differences between complexation with PEI and PLL will be discussed.

  10. Cornice Duct System

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Place; Chuck Ladd

    2004-10-29

    SYNERGETICS, INC., has designed, developed, and tested an air handling duct system that integrates the air duct with the cornice trim of interior spaces. The device has the advantage that the normal thermal losses from ducts into unconditioned attics and crawl spaces can be totally eliminated by bringing the ducts internal to the conditioned space. The following report details work conducted in the second budget period to develop the Cornice Duct System into a viable product for use in a variety of residential or small commercial building settings. A full-scale prototype has been fabricated and tested in a laboratory test building at the Daylighting Facility at North Carolina State University., Based on the results of that testing, the prototype design as been refined, fabricated, installed, and extensively tested in a residential laboratory house. The testing indicates that the device gives substantially superior performance to a standard air distribution system in terms of energy performance and thermal comfort. Patent Number US 6,511,373 B2 has been granted on the version of the device installed and tested in the laboratory house. (A copy of that patent is attached.) Refinements to the device have been carried through two additional design iterations, with a particular focus on reducing installation time and cost and refining the air control system. These new designs have been fabricated and tested and show substantial promise. Based on these design and testing iterations, a final design is proposed as part of this document. That final design is the basis for a continuation in part currently being filed with the U.5, Patent office.

  11. Effect of flow on the acoustic resonances of an open-ended duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingard, U.; Singhal, V. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of flow on the acoustic resonances of an open-ended, hard-walled duct is analyzed. The flow produces acoustic losses both in the interior of the duct and at the ends. Unless the duct is very long, typically 100 times the diameter, the losses at the ends dominate. At flow Mach numbers in excess of 0.4 the losses are so large that axial duct resonances are almost completely suppressed. The plane-wave Green's function for the duct with flow is expressed in terms of the (experimentally determined) pressure reflection coefficients at the ends of the duct, and the flow dependence of the complex eigenfrequencies of the duct is obtained. Some observations concerning the noise produced by the flow in the duct are also reported.

  12. CHALLENGES IN STUDIES OF COMPLEX PHENOMENA VIA SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    Computer codes are being developed to model many complex phenomena. Use of these models to inform a process they are meant to simulate poses many challenges, including design of computer experiments and statistical analysis of simulation results. Often these computer simulations have relatively high dimensional input or output, so one of the first goals of experimentation is to reduce to a manageable subset of inputs that have greater potential impact on some one or few output summaries deemed of interest. Variance-based methods are useful for determining variables having substantive influence on the experimental results, but any structure of underlying relationships between inputs and outputs is also of interest. Design of computer experiments from which information can be obtained with reasonable efficiency is necessary. This paper considers these Challenges via illustration. A study is considered involving the performance of a simulation of a series of actuated traffic controls and vehicle detectors. In addition to inputs associated with control of the series of traffic signals, there are inputs associated with demand. Ideally, settings are sought for the control parameters that lead to good performance of the simulation across a range of realistic demand possibilities. Good performance of the simulation is based on how realistic is the resulting traffic flow as measured by such summaries as average time stopped or average travel time by vehicles entering the control area. Although the main goal of this study is to determine an 'optimal' set of control parameter values, simulation experiments are undertaken to generate data that allow possible capture of dynamics of interest and sensitivity of outputs to sets of input parameters. In the following background section, some more details, although still a simplified description in layman terms, of the computer model evaluation project is presented. In section 3, an initial, exploratory evaluation of the simulation

  13. FDTD simulations of the losses in complex electromagnetic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglie, Franco; Bastianelli, Luca; Mariani Primiani, Valter; EMC Team

    The simulations of complex electromagnetic cavities like reverberation chambers (RC) require a massive parallel computer to accurately account the complex three dimensional geometry. A parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code optimized for a massive parallel computer could lose its efficiency if the losses are concentrated in some part of the computation volume. For example, the simulation of the finite conductivity of the cavity metallic walls requires a significant overcharge for the computer processors that handle the boundary part of the global computational domain. Our in-house parallel FDTD code replaces the volumetric losses in every cell of the grid instead of the Ohmic losses on the walls. In this contribution, we evaluate the difference in the field distribution inside the cavity due to this replacement. Moreover, we compare the common RC statistics like the number of stirrer uncorrelated positions and the field uniformity, and the resources required for the two methods are reported and discussed. Finally, the numerical results will be compared with the measurements of the RC in our laboratory with a volume of 60 m3 and plated steel walls in the frequency range 0.2-1.0 GHz, that includes the transition from the undermoded to the overmoded region. We acknowledge PRACE for awarding us access to resource FERMI based in Italy at CINECA.

  14. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations.

  15. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  16. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  17. GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations of ankyrin kinase complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Vertika; Chong, Wei Lim; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd.; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2014-10-01

    The ankyrin repeat (AR) protein can be used as a versatile scaffold for protein-protein interactions. It has been found that the heterotrimeric complex between integrin-linked kinase (ILK), PINCH, and parvin is an essential signaling platform, serving as a convergence point for integrin and growth-factor signaling and regulating cell adhesion, spreading, and migration. Using ILK-AR with high affinity for the PINCH1 as our model system, we explored a structure-based computational protocol to probe and characterize binding affinity hot spots at protein-protein interfaces. In this study, the long time scale dynamics simulations with GPU accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in AMBER12 have been performed to locate the hot spots of protein-protein interaction by the analysis of the Molecular Mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area/Generalized Born Solvent Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) of the MD trajectories. Our calculations suggest good binding affinity of the complex and also the residues critical in the binding.

  18. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  19. Complicated bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  20. Lacrimal duct cyst abscess.

    PubMed

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Sobajo, Cassandra; Irion, Luciane; Ataullah, Sajid

    2014-12-01

    Cystic dilatation within the lacrimal gland is thought to be related to chronic inflammation and scarring of the lacrimal gland ductules. We review the literature and discuss a case and of lacrimal duct cyst suppuration presenting with visual loss, external ophthalmoplegia, proptosis and ptosis. To our knowledge, only one other report of a lacrimal ductal cyst abscess has been reported in the literature so far. PMID:25208223

  1. Propagation of premixed laminar flames in 3D narrow open ducts using RBF-generated finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayona, Victor; Kindelan, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    Laminar flame propagation is an important problem in combustion modelling for which great advances have been achieved both in its theoretical understanding and in the numerical solution of the governing equations in 2D and 3D. Most of these numerical simulations use finite difference techniques on simple geometries (channels, ducts, ...) with equispaced nodes. The objective of this work is to explore the applicability of the radial basis function generated finite difference (RBF-FD) method to laminar flame propagation modelling. This method is specially well suited for the solution of problems with complex geometries and irregular boundaries. Another important advantage is that the method is independent of the dimension of the problem and, therefore, it is very easy to apply in 3D problems with complex geometries. In this work we use the RBF-FD method to compute 2D and 3D numerical results that simulate premixed laminar flames with different Lewis numbers propagating in open ducts.

  2. The Eemian climate simulated by two models of different complexities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, Irina; Yin, Qiuzhen; Berger, Andre; Singh, Umesh; Karami, Pasha

    2013-04-01

    The Eemian period, also known as MIS-5, experienced warmer than today climate, reduction in ice sheets and important sea-level rise. These interesting features have made the Eemian appropriate to evaluate climate models when forced with astronomical and greenhouse gas forcings different from today. In this work, we present the simulated Eemian climate by two climate models of different complexities, LOVECLIM (LLN Earth system model of intermediate complexity) and CCSM3 (NCAR atmosphere-ocean general circulation model). Feedbacks from sea ice, vegetation, monsoon and ENSO phenomena are discussed to explain the regional similarities/dissimilarities in both models with respect to the pre-industrial (PI) climate. Significant warming (cooling) over almost all the continents during boreal summer (winter) leads to a largely increased (reduced) seasonal contrast in the northern (southern) hemisphere, mainly due to the much higher (lower) insolation received by the whole Earth in boreal summer (winter). The arctic is warmer than at PI through the whole year, resulting from its much higher summer insolation and its remnant effect in the following fall-winter through the interactions between atmosphere, ocean and sea ice. Regional discrepancies exist in the sea-ice formation zones between the two models. Excessive sea-ice formation in CCSM3 results in intense regional cooling. In both models intensified African monsoon and vegetation feedback are responsible for the cooling during summer in North Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. Over India precipitation maximum is found further west, while in Africa the precipitation maximum migrates further north. Trees and grassland expand north in Sahel/Sahara, trees being more abundant in the results from LOVECLIM than from CCSM3. A mix of forest and grassland occupies continents and expand deep in the high northern latitudes in line with proxy records. Desert areas reduce significantly in Northern Hemisphere, but increase in North

  3. Stereoscopy for visual simulation of materials of complex appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Graça, Fernando; Paljic, Alexis; Lafon-Pham, Dominique; Callet, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    The present work studies the role of stereoscopy on perceived surface aspect of computer generated complex materials. The objective is to investigate if, and how, the additional information conveyed by the binocular vision affects the observer judgment on the evaluation of flake density in an effect paint simulation. We have set up a heuristic flake model with a Voronoi: modelization of flakes. The model was implemented in our rendering engine using global illumination, ray tracing, with an off axis-frustum method for the calculation of stereo images. We conducted a user study based on a flake density discrimination task to determine perception thresholds (JNDs). Results show that stereoscopy slightly improves density perception. We propose an analysis methodology based on granulometry. This allows for a discussion of the results on the basis of scales of observation.

  4. MOLECULAR SIMULATION OF PHASE EQUILIBRIA FOR COMPLEX FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulos

    2009-09-09

    The general area of this project was the development and application of novel molecular simulation methods for prediction of thermodynamic and structural properties of complex polymeric, surfactant and ionic fluids. Over this project period, we have made considerable progress in developing novel algorithms to meet the computational challenges presented by the strong or long-range interactions in these systems and have generated data for well-defined mod-els that can be used to test theories and compare to experimental data. Overall, 42 archival papers and many invited and contributed presentations and lectures have been based on work supported by this project. 6 PhD, 1 M.S. and 2 postdoctoral students have been associated with this work, as listed in the body of the report.

  5. Millimetre-wave propagation in the evaporation duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. F.; Craig, K. H.

    1990-03-01

    Recent developments in propagation modeling based on the Parabolic Equation Method allow the forecasting of two-dimensional antenna coverage diagrams at millimeter wavelengths, in a dispersive atmosphere with arbitrary two-dimensional variation of the refractive index. The model was applied successfully to mm-wave propagation in the evaporation duct. The evaporation duct height is not sufficient to characterize mm-wave propagation, and information on the water vapor content is essential for the correct modeling of atmospheric absorption. Turbulence simulations were carried out, showing marked scintillation, effects in the evaporation duct. The method can be applied to arbitrary refractivity spectra, and gives a complete numerical description of the field statistics.

  6. Soil signature simulation of complex mixtures and particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Tyler; Bachmann, Charles M.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Soil reflectance signatures were modeled using the digital imaging and remote sensing image generation model and Blender three-dimensional (3-D) graphic design software. Using these tools, the geometry, radiometry, and chemistry of quartz and magnetite were exploited to model the presence of particle size and porosity effects in the visible and the shortwave infrared spectrum. Using the physics engines within the Blender 3-D graphic design software, physical representations of granular soil scenes were created. Each scene characterized a specific particle distribution and density. Chemical and optical properties of pure quartz and magnetite were assigned to particles in the scene based on particle size. This work presents a model to describe an observed phase-angle dependence of beach sand density. Bidirectional reflectance signatures were simulated for targets of varying size distribution and density. This model provides validation for a phenomenological trade space between density and particle size distribution in complex, heterogeneous soil mixtures. It also confirms the suggestion that directional reflectance signatures can be defined by intimate mixtures that depend on pore spacing. The study demonstrated that by combining realistic target geometry and spectral measurements of pure quartz and magnetite, effects of soil particle size and density could be modeled without functional data fitting or rigorous analysis of material dynamics. This research does not use traditional function-based models for simulation. The combination of realistic geometry, physically viable particle structure, and first-principles ray-tracing enables the ability to represent signature changes that have been observed in experimental observations.

  7. Efficient stochastic simulations of complex reaction networks on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer

    2007-10-14

    Surfaces serve as highly efficient catalysts for a vast variety of chemical reactions. Typically, such surface reactions involve billions of molecules which diffuse and react over macroscopic areas. Therefore, stochastic fluctuations are negligible and the reaction rates can be evaluated using rate equations, which are based on the mean-field approximation. However, in case that the surface is partitioned into a large number of disconnected microscopic domains, the number of reactants in each domain becomes small and it strongly fluctuates. This is, in fact, the situation in the interstellar medium, where some crucial reactions take place on the surfaces of microscopic dust grains. In this case rate equations fail and the simulation of surface reactions requires stochastic methods such as the master equation. However, in the case of complex reaction networks, the master equation becomes infeasible because the number of equations proliferates exponentially. To solve this problem, we introduce a stochastic method based on moment equations. In this method the number of equations is dramatically reduced to just one equation for each reactive species and one equation for each reaction. Moreover, the equations can be easily constructed using a diagrammatic approach. We demonstrate the method for a set of astrophysically relevant networks of increasing complexity. It is expected to be applicable in many other contexts in which problems that exhibit analogous structure appear, such as surface catalysis in nanoscale systems, aerosol chemistry in stratospheric clouds, and genetic networks in cells. PMID:17935419

  8. Constant-complexity stochastic simulation algorithm with optimal binning

    SciTech Connect

    Sanft, Kevin R.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2015-08-21

    At the molecular level, biochemical processes are governed by random interactions between reactant molecules, and the dynamics of such systems are inherently stochastic. When the copy numbers of reactants are large, a deterministic description is adequate, but when they are small, such systems are often modeled as continuous-time Markov jump processes that can be described by the chemical master equation. Gillespie’s Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) generates exact trajectories of these systems, but the amount of computational work required for each step of the original SSA is proportional to the number of reaction channels, leading to computational complexity that scales linearly with the problem size. The original SSA is therefore inefficient for large problems, which has prompted the development of several alternative formulations with improved scaling properties. We describe an exact SSA that uses a table data structure with event time binning to achieve constant computational complexity with respect to the number of reaction channels for weakly coupled reaction networks. We present a novel adaptive binning strategy and discuss optimal algorithm parameters. We compare the computational efficiency of the algorithm to existing methods and demonstrate excellent scaling for large problems. This method is well suited for generating exact trajectories of large weakly coupled models, including those that can be described by the reaction-diffusion master equation that arises from spatially discretized reaction-diffusion processes.

  9. Global-Scale Hydrology: Simple Characterization of Complex Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMS) are unique and valuable tools for the analysis of large-scale hydrology. AGCM simulations of climate provide tremendous amounts of hydrological data with a spatial and temporal coverage unmatched by observation systems. To the extent that the AGCM behaves realistically, these data can shed light on the nature of the real world's hydrological cycle. In the first part of the seminar, I will describe the hydrological cycle in a typical AGCM, with some emphasis on the validation of simulated precipitation against observations. The second part of the seminar will focus on a key goal in large-scale hydrology studies, namely the identification of simple, overarching controls on hydrological behavior hidden amidst the tremendous amounts of data produced by the highly complex AGCM parameterizations. In particular, I will show that a simple 50-year-old climatological relation (and a recent extension we made to it) successfully predicts, to first order, both the annual mean and the interannual variability of simulated evaporation and runoff fluxes. The seminar will conclude with an example of a practical application of global hydrology studies. The accurate prediction of weather statistics several months in advance would have tremendous societal benefits, and conventional wisdom today points at the use of coupled ocean-atmosphere-land models for such seasonal-to-interannual prediction. Understanding the hydrological cycle in AGCMs is critical to establishing the potential for such prediction. Our own studies show, among other things, that soil moisture retention can lead to significant precipitation predictability in many midlatitude and tropical regions.

  10. A Simulation Trainer for Complex Articular Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yehyawi, Tameem M.; Thomas, Thaddeus P.; Ohrt, Gary T.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Karam, Matthew D.; Brown, Thomas D.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purposes of this study were (1) to develop a physical model to improve articular fracture reduction skills, (2) to develop objective assessment methods to evaluate these skills, and (3) to assess the construct validity of the simulation. Methods: A surgical simulation was staged utilizing surrogate tibial plafond fractures. Multiple three-segment radio-opacified polyurethane foam fracture models were produced from the same mold, ensuring uniform surgical complexity between trials. Using fluoroscopic guidance, five senior and seven junior orthopaedic residents reduced the fracture through a limited anterior window. The residents were assessed on the basis of time to completion, hand movements (tracked with use of a motion capture system), and quality of the obtained reduction. Results: All but three of the residents successfully reduced and fixed the fracture fragments (one senior resident and two junior residents completed the reduction but were unsuccessful in fixating all fragments). Senior residents had an average time to completion of 13.43 minutes, an average gross articular step-off of 3.00 mm, discrete hand motions of 540 actions, and a cumulative hand motion distance of 79 m. Junior residents had an average time to completion of 14.75 minutes, an average gross articular step-off of 3.09 mm, discrete hand motions of 511 actions, and a cumulative hand motion distance of 390 m. Conclusions: The large difference in cumulative hand motion distance, despite comparable numbers of discrete hand motion events, indicates that senior residents were more precise in their hand motions. The present experiment establishes the basic construct validity of the simulation trainer. Further studies are required to demonstrate that this laboratory-based model for articular fracture reduction training, along with an objective assessment of performance, can be used to improve resident surgical skills. PMID:23824397

  11. Designing Better Scaffolding in Teaching Complex Systems with Graphical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na

    Complex systems are an important topic in science education today, but they are usually difficult for secondary-level students to learn. Although graphic simulations have many advantages in teaching complex systems, scaffolding is a critical factor for effective learning. This dissertation study was conducted around two complementary research questions on scaffolding: (1) How can we chunk and sequence learning activities in teaching complex systems? (2) How can we help students make connections among system levels across learning activities (level bridging)? With a sample of 123 seventh-graders, this study employed a 3x2 experimental design that factored sequencing methods (independent variable 1; three levels) with level-bridging scaffolding (independent variable 2; two levels) and compared the effectiveness of each combination. The study measured two dependent variables: (1) knowledge integration (i.e., integrating and connecting content-specific normative concepts and providing coherent scientific explanations); (2) understanding of the deep causal structure (i.e., being able to grasp and transfer the causal knowledge of a complex system). The study used a computer-based simulation environment as the research platform to teach the ideal gas law as a system. The ideal gas law is an emergent chemical system that has three levels: (1) experiential macro level (EM) (e.g., an aerosol can explodes when it is thrown into the fire); (2) abstract macro level (AM) (i.e., the relationships among temperature, pressure and volume); (3) micro level (Mi) (i.e., molecular activity). The sequencing methods of these levels were manipulated by changing the order in which they were delivered with three possibilities: (1) EM-AM-Mi; (2) Mi-AM-EM; (3) AM-Mi-EM. The level-bridging scaffolding variable was manipulated on two aspects: (1) inserting inter-level questions among learning activities; (2) two simulations dynamically linked in the final learning activity. Addressing the first

  12. LISP based simulation generators for modeling complex space processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Fan T.; Schroer, Bernard J.; Dwan, Wen-Shing

    1987-01-01

    The development of a simulation assistant for modeling discrete event processes is presented. Included are an overview of the system, a description of the simulation generators, and a sample process generated using the simulation assistant.

  13. Simulating Ecological Complexity Using the Example of Pesticides in Ecosystems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Patricia S.; McCune, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Describes a simulation exercise developed for an introductory biology course for nonmajors. The simulation focuses on the control of western spruce budworms in forests of the western United States. A nonlinear, multivariate simulation model is used. (PR)

  14. Use of the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) to Simulate Complex Waste Treatment Processes

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, G. T.; Ho, Q. T.; Berger, S. R. K.

    2003-02-26

    The Environmental Simulation Program is a process simulator designed for aqueous based chemical processes. ESP, which is produced by OLI Systems, Inc., utilizes sophisticated activity coefficient models and predictive equations that result in the ability to simulate very complex electrolyte systems (OLI, 2002). The software comes with databanks of regressed parameters for a large number of aqueous, vapor, and solid species covering most of the elements. ESP has been used extensively at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site to predict nuclear waste slurry vapor-liquid-solid equilibrium. It has and is being used to model leaching and washing of nuclear waste sludges, evaporation of nuclear waste solutions, crystallization of salts, precipitation of plutonium and other metals from waste solutions, and other processing of dilute and concentrated aqueous solutions, sludges, and slurries. The software is also used extensively to rationalize the characterization of nuclear wastes using limited data from analyses of waste samples. The OLI provided databanks suffer from a legacy interaction model that limits the accuracy when neutral solutes are important. Also, the nitrate-nitrite systems typically found in nuclear wastes are not properly parameterized in ESP databases because of the existence of sodium nitrate and nitrite ion pairs. Properties databanks for ESP have been developed at Flour Federal Services that eliminate the legacy model and provide more accurate simulation results than the OLI supplied databases for such concentrated solutions and slurries.

  15. Intrahepatic Transposition of Bile Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Delić, Jasmin; Savković, Admedina; Isaković, Eldar; Marković, Sergije; Bajtarevic, Alma; Denjalić, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the intrahepatic bile duct transposition (anatomical variation occurring in intrahepatic ducts) and to determine the frequency of this variation. Material and Methods. The researches were performed randomly on 100 livers of adults, both sexes. Main research methods were anatomical macrodissection. As a criterion for determination of variations in some parts of bile tree, we used the classification of Segmentatio hepatis according to Couinaud (1957) according to Terminologia Anatomica, Thieme Stuugart: Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology, 1988. Results. Intrahepatic transposition of bile ducts was found in two cases (2%), out of total examined cases (100): right-left transposition (right segmental bile duct, originating from the segment VIII, joins the left liver duct-ductus hepaticus sinister) and left-right intrahepatic transposition (left segmental bile duct originating from the segment IV ends in right liver duct-ductus hepaticus dexter). Conclusion. Safety and success in liver transplantation to great extent depends on knowledge of anatomy and some common embryological anomalies in bile tree. Variations in bile tree were found in 24–43% of cases, out of which 1–22% are the variations of intrahepatic bile ducts. Therefore, good knowledge on ductal anatomy enables good planning, safe performance of therapeutic and operative procedures, and decreases the risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. PMID:22550601

  16. Ascariasis of the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Klimovskij, Michail; Dulskas, Audrius; Kraulyte, Zita; Mikalauskas, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    Ascariasis is a common helminthic disease worldwide, although Lithuania and other European countries are not considered endemic areas. The presence of the Ascaris worm in the biliary tree causes choledocholithiasis-like symptoms. We report a case of pancreatic duct ascariasis causing such symptoms. A 73-year-old Lithuanian woman underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) suspecting choledocholithiasis. Contrast injection into the common bile duct demonstrated a slightly dilated biliary tree without any filling defects, and the tail of an Ascaris worm protruding from the opening of the papilla Vater. The worm was captured by a snare but escaped deep into the duct. After a small wirsungotomy the worm was retrieved from the pancreatic duct. The patient received a 150 mg dose of levamisole orally repeated 7 days later and was discharged after complete resolution of symptoms. This first reported sporadic case of pancreatic duct ascariasis in Lithuania was successfully treated with ERCP and Levamisole. PMID:26374772

  17. HVAC pipe/duct sizing using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.J.D.; Wong, K.F.V.

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of this study is to demonstrate that artificial neural networks (ANN`s) serve as useful aids to Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system design. In the present work, the design process for sizing fluid systems in HVAC is simulated by using ANN`S. Four ANN`s have been constructed in a personal computer, one for air duct sizing and three for pipe sizing. The air duct network was trained to output the friction rate and duct size. The three pipe sizing neural networks product pressure drops and pipe diameters. By using the trained artificial neural networks, data can be obtained instantly with errors less than 3%. Thus, ANN`s have been shown to simplify traditional methods and procedures in HVAC pipe and air duct sizing.

  18. Lidar description of the evaporative duct in ocean environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willitsford, Adam; Philbrick, C. R.

    2005-08-01

    The description of radar propagation in the presence of the evaporation duct has proven to be a difficult problem in both littoral and open ocean environments. To properly characterize the propagation of a radar beam at low elevation angles, the evaporation duct must be located and scattering properties quantified. The two key elements defining an evaporation duct are the gradients in density and specific humidity. The gradients of the neutral density are determined from the rotational Raman temperature profile. The profile of water vapor is measured directly from the vibrational Raman scattered returns. High spatial resolution and high temporal resolution measurements of water vapor and temperature are required to accurately describe the evaporation duct. Raman lidar techniques can provide these measurements continuously with high accuracy and high resolution so the development of the evaporation duct can be studied. A detailed simulation of a Raman lidar has been developed and applied to a near horizontal path, to examine the expected accuracy for high vertical resolution profiles. The simulation also allows various atmospheric scenarios to be investigated and analyzed. The evaporation duct is an atmospheric phenomenon that causes radar propagation to remain trapped in the surface layer. The duct can be thought of as a waveguide that bends and reflects the radar beam along a path effectively trapping it and guiding it over long distances. This is a major problem for radar propagation paths in both littoral and open ocean environments. Moreover, ducting skews details of radar returns such that radar objects are hidden, or are detected at unexpected distances, or may appear with apparent cross-sections and speeds much different than their actual values.

  19. The impact of duct-to-duct interaction on the hex duct dilation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.; Chang, L.K.; Lahm, C.E.; Porter, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    Dilation of the hex duct is an important factor in the operational lifetime of fuel subassemblies in liquid metal fast reactors. It is caused primarily by the irradiation-enhanced creep and void swelling of the hex duct material. Excessive dilation may jeopardize subassembly removal from the core or cause a subassembly storage problem where the grid size of the storage basket is limited. Dilation of the hex duct in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) limits useful lifetime because of these storage basket limitations. It is, therefore, important to understand the hex duct dilation behavior to guide the design and in-core management of fuel subassemblies in a way that excessive duct deformation can be avoided. To investigate the dilation phenomena, finite-element models of the hex duct have been developed. The inelastic analyses were performed using the structural analysis code, ANSYS. Both Type 316 and D9 austenitic stainless steel ducts are considered. The calculated dilations are in good agreement with profilometry measurements made after irradiation. The analysis indicates that subassembly interaction is an important parameter in addition to neutron fluence and temperature in determining hex duct dilation. 5 refs.

  20. Subsonic Flows through S-Ducts with Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi

    An inlet duct of an aircraft connects the air intake mounted on the fuselage to the engine within the aircraft body. The ideal outflow quality of the duct is steady, uniform and of high total pressure. Recently compact S-shaped inlet ducts are drawing more attention in the design of UAVs with short propulsion system. Compact ducts usually involve strong streamwise adverse pressure gradient and transverse secondary flow, leading to large-scale harmful vortical structures in the outflow. To improve the outflow quality modern flow control techniques have to be applied. Before designing successful flow control methods a solid understanding of the baseline flow field with the duct is crucial. In this work the fundamental mechanism of how the three dimensional flow topology evolves when the relevant parameters such as the duct geometry and boundary layer thickness are varied, is studied carefully. Two distinct secondary-flow patterns are identified. For the first time the sensitivity of the flow topology to the inflow boundary layer thickness in long ducts is clearly addressed. The interaction between the transverse motion induced by the transverse pressure gradient and the streamwise separation is revealed as the crucial reason for the various flow patterns existing in short ducts. A non-symmetric flow pattern is identified for the first time in both experiments and simulations in short ducts in which the intensity of the streamwise separation and the transverse invasion are in the same order of magnitude. A theory of energy accumulation and solution bifurcation is used to give a reasonable explanation for this non-symmetry. After gaining the knowledge of where and how the harmful vortical structures are generated several flow control techniques are tested to achieve a better outflow quality. The analysis of the flow control cases also provides a deeper insight into the behavior of the three-dimensional flow within the ducts. The conventional separation control method

  1. A difference theory for noise propagation in an acoustically lined duct with mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for sound propagation in a two-dimensional straight soft-walled duct with uniform flow. The difference analysis is developed in terms of complex notation. The governing acoustic difference equations and the appropriate displacement boundary conditions associated with uniform flow are presented for the sound attenuation in straight hard and soft-walled ducts. At present the finite Mach number case is solved only for the one-dimensional hard walled duct.

  2. A difference theory for noise propagation in an acoustically lined duct with mean flow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for sound propagation in a two-dimensional straight soft-walled duct with uniform flow. The difference analysis is developed in terms of complex notation. The governing acoustic difference equations and the appropriate displacement boundary conditions associated with uniform flow are presented. Example calculations are presented for the sound attenuation in straight hard and soft-walled ducts. At present the finite Mach number case is solved only for the one-dimensional hard walled duct.

  3. PMR Graphite Engine Duct Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L.; Yokel, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the cost and weight advantages that could be obtained by utilizing the graphite/PMR15 material system to replace titanium in selected turbofan engine applications. The first component to be selected as a basis for evaluation was the outer bypass duct of the General Electric F404 engine. The operating environment of this duct was defined and then an extensive mechanical and physical property test program was conducted using material made by processing techniques which were also established by this program. Based on these properties, design concepts to fabricate a composite version of the duct were established and two complete ducts fabricated. One of these ducts was proof pressure tested and then run successfully on a factory test engine for over 1900 hours. The second duct was static tested to 210 percent design limit load without failure. An improved design was then developed which utilized integral composite end flanges. A complete duct was fabricated and successfully proof pressure tested. The net results of this effort showed that a composite version of the outer duct would be 14 percent lighter and 30 percent less expensive that the titanium duct. The other type of structure chosen for investigation was the F404 fan stator assembly, including the fan stator vanes. It was concluded that it was feasible to utilize composite materials for this type structure but that the requirements imposed by replacing an existing metal design resulted in an inefficient composite design. It was concluded that if composites were to be effectively used in this type structure, the design must be tailored for composite application from the outset.

  4. CFD-based Design of LOX Pump Inlet Duct for Reduced Dynamic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Dorney, Daniel J.; Dorney, Suzanne M.

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been completed for a variety of designs for a 90 deg elbow duct. The objective is to identify a design that minimizes the dynamic load entering a LOX turbopump located at the elbow exit. Designs simulated to date indicate that simpler duct geometries result in lower losses. Benchmark simulations have verified that the compressible flow code used in this study is applicable to these incompressible flow simulations.

  5. CFD-Based Design of Turbopump Inlet Duct for Reduced Dynamic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Dorney, Suzanne M.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been completed for a variety of designs for a 90 deg elbow duct. The objective is to identify a design that minimizes the dynamic load entering a LOX turbopump located at the elbow exit. Designs simulated to date indicate that simpler duct geometries result in lower losses. Benchmark simulations have verified that the compressible flow codes used in this study are applicable to these incompressible flow simulations.

  6. Examining Factors that Affect Performance in Complex Simulation Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayrath, Michael Charles

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of manipulating the modality (text-only, voice-only, voice+text) of a tutorial and restriction (restricted vs. unrestricted) of a simulation's interface on retention and transfer of tutorial content. The tutorial prepared novice students to use Packet Tracer, a simulation developed by Cisco that teaches network…

  7. Locating Anomalies in Complex Data Sets Using Visualization and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panetta, Karen

    2001-01-01

    The research goals are to create a simulation framework that can accept any combination of models written at the gate or behavioral level. The framework provides the ability to fault simulate and create scenarios of experiments using concurrent simulation. In order to meet these goals we have had to fulfill the following requirements. The ability to accept models written in VHDL, Verilog or the C languages. The ability to propagate faults through any model type. The ability to create experiment scenarios efficiently without generating every possible combination of variables. The ability to accept adversity of fault models beyond the single stuck-at model. Major development has been done to develop a parser that can accept models written in various languages. This work has generated considerable attention from other universities and industry for its flexibility and usefulness. The parser uses LEXX and YACC to parse Verilog and C. We have also utilized our industrial partnership with Alternative System's Inc. to import vhdl into our simulator. For multilevel simulation, we needed to modify the simulator architecture to accept models that contained multiple outputs. This enabled us to accept behavioral components. The next major accomplishment was the addition of "functional fault models". Functional fault models change the behavior of a gate or model. For example, a bridging fault can make an OR gate behave like an AND gate. This has applications beyond fault simulation. This modeling flexibility will make the simulator more useful for doing verification and model comparison. For instance, two or more versions of an ALU can be comparatively simulated in a single execution. The results will show where and how the models differed so that the performance and correctness of the models may be evaluated. A considerable amount of time has been dedicated to validating the simulator performance on larger models provided by industry and other universities.

  8. 14 CFR 29.1103 - Induction systems ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Induction systems ducts and air duct... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1103 Induction systems ducts and air duct systems. (a) Each induction system duct upstream of the...

  9. Wave reflections from duct terminations.

    PubMed

    Selamet, A; Ji, Z L; Kach, R A

    2001-04-01

    The reflection coefficients and inertial end corrections of several duct terminations, including finite length duct extensions perpendicular to an infinite wall, as well as at a number of angles, curved interface surfaces, and annular cavities, are determined and analyzed in the absence of flow by employing the boundary element method. Predictions for the classical unflanged and flanged circular ducts show good agreement with analytical and computational results available in the literature. The predictions for curved interface surfaces (bellmouth or horn) are also consistent with the available experimental data. In view of its high reflection coefficient, the duct termination with an annular cavity may be suggested for the suppression of noise radiation in a specific frequency band or for an effective wave reflection from the termination. PMID:11325101

  10. Articulated transition duct in turbomachine

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, James Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-29

    Turbine systems are provided. A turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion and a downstream portion. The upstream portion extends from the inlet between an inlet end and an aft end. The downstream portion extends from the outlet between an outlet end and a head end. The turbine system further includes a joint coupling the aft end of the upstream portion and the head end of the downstream portion together. The joint is configured to allow movement of the upstream portion and the downstream portion relative to each other about or along at least one axis.

  11. Sound propagation in choked ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The linearized equations describing the propagation of sound in variable area ducts containing flow are shown to be singular when the duct mean flow is sonic. The singularity is removed when previously ignored nonlinear terms are retained. The results of a numerical study, for the case of plane waves propagating in a one-dimensional converging-diverging duct, show that the sound field is adequately described by the linearized equations only when the axial mean flow Mach number at the duct throat M sub th 0.6. For M sub th 0.6, the numerical results showed that acoustic energy flux was not conserved. An attempt was made to extend the study to include the nonlinear behavior of the sound field. Meaningful results were not obtained due, primarily, to numerical difficulties.

  12. Two New Duct Leakage Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Two variations on the tests for duct leakage currently embodied in ASHRAE Standard 152P (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) are presented. Procedures are derived for calculating supply and return duct leakage to/from outside using these new variations. Results of these tests are compared with the original ones in Standard 152P on the basis of data collected in three New York State homes.

  13. TWO NEW DUCT LEAKAGE TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Two variations on the tests for duct leakage currently embodied in ASHRAE Standard 152P (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) are presented. Procedures are derived for calculating supply and return duct leakage to/from outside using these new variations. Results of these tests are compared with the original ones in Standard 152P on the basis of data collected in three New York State homes.

  14. Flow duct for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Straalsund, Jerry L.

    1978-01-01

    Improved liquid sodium flow ducts for nuclear reactors are described wherein the improvement comprises varying the wall thickness of each of the walls of a polygonal tubular duct structure so that each of the walls is of reduced cross-section along the longitudinal center line and of a greater cross-section along wall junctions with the other walls to form the polygonal tubular configuration.

  15. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  16. Challenges in Integrating a Complex Systems Computer Simulation in Class: An Educational Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loke, Swee-Kin; Al-Sallami, Hesham S.; Wright, Daniel F. B.; McDonald, Jenny; Jadhav, Sheetal; Duffull, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    Complex systems are typically difficult for students to understand and computer simulations offer a promising way forward. However, integrating such simulations into conventional classes presents numerous challenges. Framed within an educational design research, we studied the use of an in-house built simulation of the coagulation network in four…

  17. Turbofan aft duct suppressor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, A. A.; Motsinger, R. E.; Fiske, G. H.; Joshi, M. C.; Kraft, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Suppressions due to acoustic treatment in the annular exhaust duct of a model fan were theoretically predicted and compared with measured suppressions. The predictions are based on the modal analysis of sound propagation in a straight annular flow duct with segmented treatment. Modal distributions of the fan noise source (fan-stator interaction only) were measured using in-duct modal probes. The flow profiles were also measured in the vicinity of the modal probes. The acoustic impedance of the single degree of freedom treatment was measured in the presence of grazing flow. The measured values of mode distribution of the fan noise source, the flow velocity profile and the acoustic impedance of the treatment in the duct were used as input to the prediction program. The predicted suppressions, under the assumption of uniform flow in the duct, compared well with the suppressions measured in the duct for all test conditions. The interaction modes generated by the rotor-stator interaction spanned a cut-off ratio range from nearly 1 to 7.

  18. Radiation of sound from unflanged cylindrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartharan, S. L.; Bayliss, A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of sound radiated from unflanged cylindrical ducts are presented. The numerical simulation models the problem of an aero-engine inlet. The time dependent linearized Euler equations are solved from a state of rest until a harmonic solution is attained. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme is used and solutions are obtained from a fully vectorized Cyber-203 computer program. Cases of both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Spin modes model the sound generated by a turbofan engine. Boundary conditions for both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Solutions obtained are compared with experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center.

  19. Anatomy of the nipple and breast ducts.

    PubMed

    Zucca-Matthes, Gustavo; Urban, Cícero; Vallejo, André

    2016-02-01

    Over time, variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) procedures have strongly increased in frequency and have become one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer, also improving overall aesthetic outcomes and the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. The nipple areola-complex (NAC) must be considered the identity of the breast concerning self-esteem of patients. This paper will remind the main anatomical topics around the nipple and breast ducts. PMID:26855906

  20. Anatomy of the nipple and breast ducts

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Cícero; Vallejo, André

    2016-01-01

    Over time, variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) procedures have strongly increased in frequency and have become one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer, also improving overall aesthetic outcomes and the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. The nipple areola-complex (NAC) must be considered the identity of the breast concerning self-esteem of patients. This paper will remind the main anatomical topics around the nipple and breast ducts. PMID:26855906

  1. Substructure synthesis method for simulating large molecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Dengming; Kong, Yifei; Wu, Yinghao; Ma, Jianpeng

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a computational method for describing the conformational flexibility of very large biomolecular complexes using a reduced number of degrees of freedom. It is called the substructure synthesis method, and the basic concept is to treat the motions of a given structure as a collection of those of an assemblage of substructures. The choice of substructures is arbitrary and sometimes quite natural, such as domains, subunits, or even large segments of biomolecular complexes. To start, a group of low-frequency substructure modes is determined, for instance by normal mode analysis, to represent the motions of the substructure. Next, a desired number of substructures are joined together by a set of constraints to enforce geometric compatibility at the interface of adjacent substructures, and the modes for the assembled structure can then be synthesized from the substructure modes by applying the Rayleigh–Ritz principle. Such a procedure is computationally much more desirable than solving the full eigenvalue problem for the whole assembled structure. Furthermore, to show the applicability to biomolecular complexes, the method is used to study F-actin, a large filamentous molecular complex involved in many cellular functions. The results demonstrate that the method is capable of studying the motions of very large molecular complexes that are otherwise completely beyond the reach of any conventional methods. PMID:12518058

  2. A Computer Simulated Experiment in Complex Order Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, J. C.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation experiment in which physical chemistry students can determine all of the kinetic parameters of a reaction, such as order of the reaction with respect to each reagent, forward and reverse rate constants for the overall reaction, and forward and reverse activation energies. (MLH)

  3. Stress Training and Simulator Complexity: Why Sometimes More Is Less

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichon, Jennifer G.; Wallis, Guy M.

    2010-01-01

    Through repeated practice under conditions similar to those in real-world settings, simulator training prepares an individual to maintain effective performance under stressful work conditions. Interfaces offering high fidelity and immersion can more closely reproduce real-world experiences and are generally believed to result in better learning…

  4. Observations and laboratory simulations of tornadoes in complex topographical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstens, Christopher Daniel

    Aerial photos taken along the damage paths of the Joplin, MO, and Tuscaloosa-Birmingham, AL, tornadoes of 2011 captured and preserved several unique patterns of damage. In particular, a few distinct tree-fall patterns were noted along the Tuscaloosa-Birmingham tornado track that appeared highly influenced by the underlying topography. One such region was the focus of a damage survey and motivated laboratory vortex simulations with a 3-D foam representation of the underlying topography, in addition to simulations performed with idealized 2D topographic features, using Iowa State University's tornado simulator. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore various aspects related to the interaction of a tornado or a tornado-like vortex with its underlying topography. Three topics are examined: 1) Analysis of tornado-induced tree-fall using aerial photography from the Joplin, MO, and Tuscaloosa-Birmingham, AL, tornadoes of 2011, 2) Laboratory investigation of topographical influences on a simulated tornado-like vortex, and 3) On the use of non-standard EF-scale damage indicators to categorize tornadoes.

  5. Learning to manage complexity through simulation: students' challenges and possible strategies.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Gerard J; Fenwick, Tara

    2016-06-01

    Many have called for medical students to learn how to manage complexity in healthcare. This study examines the nuances of students' challenges in coping with a complex simulation learning activity, using concepts from complexity theory, and suggests strategies to help them better understand and manage complexity.Wearing video glasses, participants took part in a simulation ward-based exercise that incorporated characteristics of complexity. Video footage was used to elicit interviews, which were transcribed. Using complexity theory as a theoretical lens, an iterative approach was taken to identify the challenges that participants faced and possible coping strategies using both interview transcripts and video footage.Students' challenges in coping with clinical complexity included being: a) unprepared for 'diving in', b) caught in an escalating system, c) captured by the patient, and d) unable to assert boundaries of acceptable practice.Many characteristics of complexity can be recreated in a ward-based simulation learning activity, affording learners an embodied and immersive experience of these complexity challenges. Possible strategies for managing complexity themes include: a) taking time to size up the system, b) attuning to what emerges, c) reducing complexity, d) boundary practices, and e) working with uncertainty. This study signals pedagogical opportunities for recognizing and dealing with complexity. PMID:27246964

  6. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Rosario; MacFadyen, Bruce V

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration has become the procedure of choice in the management of choledocholithiasis in several laparoscopic centers. The increasing interest for this laparoscopic approach is due to the development of instrumentation and technique, allowing the procedure to be performed safely, and it is also the result of the revised role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which has been questioned because of its cost, risk of complications and effectiveness. Many surgeons, however, are still not familiar with this technique. In this article we discuss the technique and results of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Both the laparoscopic transcystic approach and choledochotomy are discussed, together with the results given in the literature. When one considers the costs, morbidity, mortality and the time required before the patient can return to work, it would appear that laparoscopic cholecystectomy with common bile duct exploration is more favorable than open surgery or laparoscopic cholecystectomy with preoperative or postoperative endoscopic sphincterotomy. However, the technique requires advanced laparoscopic skills, including suturing, knot tying, the use of a choledochoscope, guidewire, dilators and balloon stone extractor. Although laparoscopic common bile duct exploration appears to be the most cost-effective method to treat common bile duct stones, it should be emphasized that this procedure is very challenging, and it should be performed by well-trained laparoscopic surgeons with experience in biliary surgery. PMID:11981684

  7. SIMULATING BIOCHEMICAL SIGNALING NETWORKS IN COMPLEX MOVING GEOMETRIES.

    PubMed

    Strychalski, Wanda; Adalsteinsson, David; Elston, Timothy C

    2010-01-01

    Signaling networks regulate cellular responses to environmental stimuli through cascades of protein interactions. External signals can trigger cells to polarize and move in a specific direction. During migration, spatially localized activity of proteins is maintained. To investigate the effects of morphological changes on intracellular signaling, we developed a numerical scheme consisting of a cut cell finite volume spatial discretization coupled with level set methods to simulate the resulting advection-reaction-diffusion system. We then apply the method to several biochemical reaction networks in changing geometries. We found that a Turing instability can develop exclusively by cell deformations that maintain constant area. For a Turing system with a geometry-dependent single or double peak solution, simulations in a dynamically changing geometry suggest that a single peak solution is the only stable one, independent of the oscillation frequency. The method is also applied to a model of a signaling network in a migrating fibroblast. PMID:24086102

  8. Simulating future precipitation extremes in a complex Alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, C.; Bürger, G.; Stötter, J.

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of the present investigation are (i) to study the effects of climate change on precipitation extremes and (ii) to assess the uncertainty in the climate projections. The investigation is performed on the Lech catchment, located in the Northern Limestone Alps. In order to estimate the uncertainty in the climate projections, two statistical downscaling models as well as a number of global and regional climate models were considered. The downscaling models applied are the Expanded Downscaling (XDS) technique and the Long Ashton Research Station Weather Generator (LARS-WG). The XDS model, which is driven by analyzed or simulated large-scale synoptic fields, has been calibrated using ECMWF-interim reanalysis data and local station data. LARS-WG is controlled through stochastic parameters representing local precipitation variability, which are calibrated from station data only. Changes in precipitation mean and variability as simulated by climate models were then used to perturb the parameters of LARS-WG in order to generate climate change scenarios. In our study we use climate simulations based on the A1B emission scenario. The results show that both downscaling models perform well in reproducing observed precipitation extremes. In general, the results demonstrate that the projections are highly variable. The choice of both the GCM and the downscaling method are found to be essential sources of uncertainty. For spring and autumn, a slight tendency toward an increase in the intensity of future precipitation extremes is obtained, as a number of simulations show statistically significant increases in the intensity of 90th and 99th percentiles of precipitation on wet days as well as the 5- and 20-yr return values.

  9. Visual Analytics for Complex Engineering Systems: Hybrid Visual Steering of Simulation Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Matković, Krešimir; Gračanin, Denis; Splechtna, Rainer; Jelović, Mario; Stehno, Benedikt; Hauser, Helwig; Purgathofer, Werner

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we propose a novel approach to hybrid visual steering of simulation ensembles. A simulation ensemble is a collection of simulation runs of the same simulation model using different sets of control parameters. Complex engineering systems have very large parameter spaces so a naïve sampling can result in prohibitively large simulation ensembles. Interactive steering of simulation ensembles provides the means to select relevant points in a multi-dimensional parameter space (design of experiment). Interactive steering efficiently reduces the number of simulation runs needed by coupling simulation and visualization and allowing a user to request new simulations on the fly. As system complexity grows, a pure interactive solution is not always sufficient. The new approach of hybrid steering combines interactive visual steering with automatic optimization. Hybrid steering allows a domain expert to interactively (in a visualization) select data points in an iterative manner, approximate the values in a continuous region of the simulation space (by regression) and automatically find the "best" points in this continuous region based on the specified constraints and objectives (by optimization). We argue that with the full spectrum of optimization options, the steering process can be improved substantially. We describe an integrated system consisting of a simulation, a visualization, and an optimization component. We also describe typical tasks and propose an interactive analysis workflow for complex engineering systems. We demonstrate our approach on a case study from automotive industry, the optimization of a hydraulic circuit in a high pressure common rail Diesel injection system. PMID:26356894

  10. Fan Performance From Duct Rake Instrumentation on a 1.294 Pressure Ratio, 725 ft/sec Tip Speed Turbofan Simulator Using Vaned Passage Casing Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian

    2006-01-01

    A 1.294 pressure ratio, 725 ft/sec tip speed, variable pitch low noise fan was designed and tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Wind Tunnel. The design included a casing treatment that used recirculation to extend the fan stall line and provide an acceptable operating range. Overall aerodynamic experimental results are presented for this low tip speed, low noise fan without casing treatment as well as using several variants of the casing treatment that moved the air extraction and insertion axial locations. Measurements were made to assess effects on performance, operability, and noise. An unusual instability was discovered near the design operating line and is documented in the fan operating range. Measurements were made to compare stall margin improvements as well as measure the performance impact of the casing treatments. Experimental results in the presence of simulated inlet distortion, via screens, are presented for the baseline and recirculation casing treatment configurations. Estimates are made for the quantity of recirculation weight flow based on limited instrumentation in the recirculation system along with discussion of results and conclusions

  11. Simulating and mapping spatial complexity using multi-scale techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Cola, L.

    1994-01-01

    A central problem in spatial analysis is the mapping of data for complex spatial fields using relatively simple data structures, such as those of a conventional GIS. This complexity can be measured using such indices as multi-scale variance, which reflects spatial autocorrelation, and multi-fractal dimension, which characterizes the values of fields. These indices are computed for three spatial processes: Gaussian noise, a simple mathematical function, and data for a random walk. Fractal analysis is then used to produce a vegetation map of the central region of California based on a satellite image. This analysis suggests that real world data lie on a continuum between the simple and the random, and that a major GIS challenge is the scientific representation and understanding of rapidly changing multi-scale fields. -Author

  12. Characterization of a complex fluvial-deltaic reservoir for simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Begg, S.H.; Kay, A.; Gustason, G.

    1996-09-01

    Lithotype is shown to be the main geological control on the spatial distribution of reservoir flow properties. The distribution of lithotypes is in turn controlled by lithofacies. Using core data, assemblages of lithotypes were grouped into major facies associations (MFA`s). Log signatures were used to pick MFA`s in uncored wells to provide conditioning data for a stochastic description of their interwell distribution using the sequential indicator simulation (SIS) technique. Deterministic correlation was not enforced. Characteristic object-models of the distribution of lithotypes within each MFA were then generated and converted to fine-scale poro-perm models using core-lug data. These models were upscaled to yield characteristic poro-perm distributions at the reservoir simulation scale. Finally, the MFA model was used as a template to distribute the upscaled poro-perm within the simulation model. The model history-matched rapidly and accurately, even though the wells were conditioned only to the MFA`s and not to foot-by-foot data. Multiple MFA realizations were generated to provide some understanding of the uncertainty in thickness and other rock properties between wells.

  13. Integrating Multibody Simulation and CFD: toward Complex Multidisciplinary Design Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, Stefano; Poloni, Carlo; Mühlmeier, Martin

    This paper describes the use of integrated multidisciplinary analysis and optimization of a race car model on a predefined circuit. The objective is the definition of the most efficient geometric configuration that can guarantee the lowest lap time. In order to carry out this study it has been necessary to interface the design optimization software modeFRONTIER with the following softwares: CATIA v5, a three dimensional CAD software, used for the definition of the parametric geometry; A.D.A.M.S./Motorsport, a multi-body dynamic simulation software; IcemCFD, a mesh generator, for the automatic generation of the CFD grid; CFX, a Navier-Stokes code, for the fluid-dynamic forces prediction. The process integration gives the possibility to compute, for each geometrical configuration, a set of aerodynamic coefficients that are then used in the multiboby simulation for the computation of the lap time. Finally an automatic optimization procedure is started and the lap-time minimized. The whole process is executed on a Linux cluster running CFD simulations in parallel.

  14. A methodology towards virtualisation-based high performance simulation platform supporting multidisciplinary design of complex products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lei; Zhang, Lin; Tao, Fei; (Luke) Zhang, Xiaolong; Luo, Yongliang; Zhang, Yabin

    2012-08-01

    Multidisciplinary design of complex products leads to an increasing demand for high performance simulation (HPS) platforms. One great challenge is how to achieve high efficient utilisation of large-scale simulation resources in distributed and heterogeneous environments. This article reports a virtualisation-based methodology to realise a HPS platform. This research is driven by the issues concerning large-scale simulation resources deployment and complex simulation environment construction, efficient and transparent utilisation of fine-grained simulation resources and high reliable simulation with fault tolerance. A framework of virtualisation-based simulation platform (VSIM) is first proposed. Then the article investigates and discusses key approaches in VSIM, including simulation resources modelling, a method to automatically deploying simulation resources for dynamic construction of system environment, and a live migration mechanism in case of faults in run-time simulation. Furthermore, the proposed methodology is applied to a multidisciplinary design system for aircraft virtual prototyping and some experiments are conducted. The experimental results show that the proposed methodology can (1) significantly improve the utilisation of fine-grained simulation resources, (2) result in a great reduction in deployment time and an increased flexibility for simulation environment construction and (3)achieve fault tolerant simulation.

  15. Investigation in the 7-by-10 Foot Wind Tunnel of Ducts for Cooling Radiators within an Airplane Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A; Recant, Isidore G

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord wing model with a duct to house a simulated radiator suitable for a liquid-cooled engine. The duct was expanded to reduce the radiator losses, and the installation of the duct and radiator was made entirely within the wing to reduce form and interference drag. The tests were made using a two-dimensional-flow setup with a full-span duct and radiator. Section aerodynamic characteristics of the basic airfoil are given and also curves showing the characteristics of the various duct-radiator combinations. An expression for efficiency, the primary criterion of merit of any duct, and the effect of the several design parameters of the duct-radiator arrangement are discussed. The problem of throttling is considered and a discussion of the power required for cooling is included.

  16. Numerical simulation of flow in centrifugal pump with complex impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Bao-ling; Lin, Yong-gang; Jin, Ying-zi

    2011-03-01

    Based on the Navier-Stokes equations and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, three dimensional turbulent flow fields in centrifugal pump with long-mid-short blade complex impeller are calculated and analyzed numerically. The relative velocity and pressure distributions in the flowpart are obtained. It is found that the flow in the passage of the complex impeller is unsymmetrical due to the joint action between volute and impeller. The back-flow region is at inlet of long-blade suction side, near middle part of long-blade pressure side and outlet of short-blade suction side. The flow near volute throat is affected greatly by volute. The relative velocity is large and it is easy to bring back flow at outlet of the complex impeller near volute throat. The static and total pressure rise uniformly from inlet to outlet in the impeller. At impeller outlet, the pressure periodically decreases from pressure side to suction side, and then the static pressure sharply rise near the throat. The experimental results show that the back flow in the impeller has an important influence on the performance of pump.

  17. 29. DETAIL OF OUTLET DUCTS FOR MST AIRCONDITIONING SYSTEM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. DETAIL OF OUTLET DUCTS FOR MST AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM IN NORTHWEST CORNER OF SLC-3W MST STATION 70.5 (LOWEST PAYLOAD SERVICE STATION). NOTE RING ATTACHMENT FOR PERSONNEL SAFETY HARNESS IN LEFT FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  19. Intestinal disaccharidase activity following pancreatic duct occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hauer-Jensen, M; Christensen, K; Wilson, H D; Schedl, H P

    1987-01-01

    The influence of pancreatic secretions on growth and brush-border enzyme activity, throughout the entire small intestine, was examined in the rat. Pancreatic secretions were excluded from the gut lumen by stapling the pancreatic ducts, without interruption of bile flow. The entire small intestine was studied as four segments; the duodenum and three distal segments of equal length. Weight of intestine and mucosa, and mucosal sucrase, isomaltase, lactase, and alkaline phosphatase activity were measured 10-15 days following pancreatic duct occlusion, or sham-operation. The duodenum of pancreatic duct-occluded animals exhibited significant hypertrophy. In general, specific and total disaccharidase activities were greater in duct-occluded animals than in controls throughout the intestine. The increase was more pronounced in distal than in proximal segments. The sucrase/isomaltase ratio was significantly greater in pancreatic duct-occluded animals than in controls in the two distal segments. Alkaline phosphatase activity was not affected by pancreatic duct occlusion. The greater relative increase of disaccharidase activities and sucrase/isomaltase activity ratios in the distal segments of duct-occluded animals, indicates a more important regulatory role of pancreatic enzymes in the distal small intestine. It is concluded that regulation of intestinal brush-border enzyme activity by pancreatic secretion is selective for enzyme and site as follows: disaccharidases, but not alkaline phosphatase, are regulated; the sucrase subunit of the sucrase/isomaltase complex is most sensitive to regulation, while lactase is least sensitive; and the regulatory effect on disaccharidases is greater in distal than in proximal intestine. PMID:3114740

  20. Heuristic Identification of Biological Architectures for Simulating Complex Hierarchical Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason H; Amos, Ryan; Kiralis, Jeff; Andrews, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Simulation plays an essential role in the development of new computational and statistical methods for the genetic analysis of complex traits. Most simulations start with a statistical model using methods such as linear or logistic regression that specify the relationship between genotype and phenotype. This is appealing due to its simplicity and because these statistical methods are commonly used in genetic analysis. It is our working hypothesis that simulations need to move beyond simple statistical models to more realistically represent the biological complexity of genetic architecture. The goal of the present study was to develop a prototype genotype–phenotype simulation method and software that are capable of simulating complex genetic effects within the context of a hierarchical biology-based framework. Specifically, our goal is to simulate multilocus epistasis or gene–gene interaction where the genetic variants are organized within the framework of one or more genes, their regulatory regions and other regulatory loci. We introduce here the Heuristic Identification of Biological Architectures for simulating Complex Hierarchical Interactions (HIBACHI) method and prototype software for simulating data in this manner. This approach combines a biological hierarchy, a flexible mathematical framework, a liability threshold model for defining disease endpoints, and a heuristic search strategy for identifying high-order epistatic models of disease susceptibility. We provide several simulation examples using genetic models exhibiting independent main effects and three-way epistatic effects. PMID:25395175

  1. Evaporation duct communication: Test Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.

    1991-02-01

    The Evaporation Duct Communication (EDCOM) project is an effort to provide an alternative ship-to-ship communications channel using the natural environment. A microwave communication link can be used on an over-the-water, over-the-horizon path through the evaporation duct. This report shows how a microwave communication link, operating at a range separation of more than twice the line-of-sight range, can be constructed. This link can achieve about 80-percent availability at a transmission frequency of 14.5 GHz and can be constructed using off-the-shelf RF equipment. Operation of this link will provide the first set of measurements of channel capacity that can be critically dependent on the existence of an oceanic evaporation duct. Construction of this link presents a unique opportunity to study and evaluate an alternative communications channel that can be used to alleviate naval battlegroup communications load.

  2. Effects of mean flow on duct mode optimum suppression rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Wells, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the solution to the convected acoustic wave equation and associated boundary conditions for rectangular ducts containing uniform mean flow is examined in terms of the complex mapping between the wall admittance and characteristic mode eigenvalues. It is shown that the Cremer optimum suppression criteria must be modified to account for the effects of flow below certain critical values of the nondimensional frequency parameter of duct height divided by sound wavelength. The implications of these results on the design of low frequency suppressors are considered.

  3. New Approach to the Simulation of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Alexander; Degtyarev, Alexander; Korkhov, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The paper analyzes the problems of scalability of modern computational systems, and offers a new paradigm for solving complex problems on them. It implies (1) Creating a virtual computing cluster with shared virtual memory, (2) Selecting a representation for the problem that minimizes the interaction between computing threads and (3) Configuring the virtual computer system for optimal mapping of the pertinent algorithm on it. Arguments for optimizing virtual clusters are given and test results on them are shown. We discuss the challenges that can be addressed most effectively within the framework of the proposed approach.

  4. Computational simulations of copper complexes relevant to Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alí-Torres, Jorge; Marechal, Jean-Didier; Mirats, Andrea; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Cristina; Rodríguez-Santiago, Luis; Sodupe, Mariona

    2014-10-01

    Metal cations such as Cu2+ have been shown to induce amyloid aggregation and formation of reactive oxygen species. Elucidation of the structural features of Cu2+-Aβ is thus, essential to understand their role in the aggregation of Aβ, formation of ROS and to rationally design new chelators with potential therapeutic applications. Present contribution reviews our computational studies in this field. First, computational strategies used to determine three dimensional structures for Cu2+Aβ(1-16) and the redox properties of these complexes will be discussed and second, we will summarize our recent studies on Cu2+ chelators.

  5. Complex issues of military capability: Measurement, assessment, simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. D.; Sulcoski, M. F.; Farmer, B. A.

    1997-05-01

    The nonlinear science methodology behind the Military Capability Spectrum Project (PRISM) is presented. This project approaches assessments of military power of nations (worldwide) from the perspective that their military organizations are complex adaptive systems (CAS) locked in a threat/alliance coupled group that collectively evolves toward a self-organized critical state. Dissipative behavior can take the form of war and other forms of geopolitical instability. Measurement tools for assessing the characteristics of military organizations are presented and methodologies for displaying the resulting spectrum of worldwide military power are discussed. Tools for regional stability/instability analysis are suggested that rely upon time history data.

  6. Mouse Acetylcholinesterase Unliganded and in Complex with Huperzine A: A Comparison of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tara, Sylvia; Straatsma, TP; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-01

    A 1 ns molecular dynamics simulation of unliganded mouse acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is compared to a previous simulation of mouse AChE complexed with Huperzine A (HupA). Several common features are observed. In both simulations, the active site gorge fluctuates in size during the 1 ns trajectory, and is completely pinched off several times. Many of the residues in the gorge that formed hydrogen bonds with HupA in the simulation of the complex, now form hydrogen bonds with other protein residues and water molecules in the gorge. The opening of a "backdoor" entrance to the active site that was found in the simulation of the complex is also observed in the unliganded simulation. Differences between the two simulations include overall lower structural RMS deviations for residues in the gorge in the unliganded simulation, a smaller diameter of the gorge in the absence of HupA, and the disappearance of a side channel that was frequently present in the liganded simulation. The differences between the two simulations can be attributed, in part, to the interaction of AChE with HupA.

  7. Congenital Atresia of Wharton's Duct.

    PubMed

    Hseu, Anne; Anne, Premchand; Anne, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    This is a case report of a three-month-old male who presented to clinic with a cystic lesion under the tongue. On clinical examination, a cystic lesion was observed in the, floor-of-mouth. The patient was referred to Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology service for further management. The differential diagnoses for floor-of-mouth lesions should be reviewed with primary focus on the Wharton's duct atresia and its management. It is crucial to recognize submandibular duct atresia in the primary Paediatric clinic in order to expedite management of lesion before complications arise including infection, enlargement of cyst, and feeding and breathing difficulties. PMID:27042492

  8. Simulation of winter wheat evapotranspiration in Texas and Henan using three models of differing complexity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of simulation models with many practical applications related to the efficient management of crop water supply. The algorithms used by models to simulate ET are of various complexity and robustness, and often have to be modified for particular e...

  9. The factorization method for Monte Carlo simulations of systems with a complex with

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Nishimura, J.; Verbaarschot, J. J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We propose a method for Monte Carlo simulations of systems with a complex action. The method has the advantages of being in principle applicable to any such system and provides a solution to the overlap problem. In some cases, like in the IKKT matrix model, a finite size scaling extrapolation can provide results for systems whose size would make it prohibitive to simulate directly.

  10. Automatic Assessment of Complex Task Performance in Games and Simulations. CRESST Report 775

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iseli, Markus R.; Koenig, Alan D.; Lee, John J.; Wainess, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of complex task performance is crucial to evaluating personnel in critical job functions such as Navy damage control operations aboard ships. Games and simulations can be instrumental in this process, as they can present a broad range of complex scenarios without involving harm to people or property. However, "automatic" performance…

  11. Effect of motion cues during complex curved approach and landing tasks: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to examine the effect of motion cues using a high fidelity simulation of commercial aircraft during the performance of complex approach and landing tasks in the Microwave Landing System (MLS) signal environment. The data from these tests indicate that in a high complexity MLS approach task with moderate turbulence and wind, the pilot uses motion cues to improve path tracking performance. No significant differences in tracking accuracy were noted for the low and medium complexity tasks, regardless of the presence of motion cues. Higher control input rates were measured for all tasks when motion was used. Pilot eye scan, as measured by instrument dwell time, was faster when motion cues were used regardless of the complexity of the approach tasks. Pilot comments indicated a preference for motion. With motion cues, pilots appeared to work harder in all levels of task complexity and to improve tracking performance in the most complex approach task.

  12. Viscous flow computations for elliptical two-duct version of the SSME hot gas manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roger, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the effort was to numerically simulate viscous subsonic flow in a proposed elliptical two-duct version of the fuel side Hot Gas Manifold (HGM) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The numerical results were to complement both water flow and air flow experiments in the two-duct geometry performed at NASA-MSFC and Rocketdyne. The three-dimensional character of the HGM consists of two essentially different geometries. The first part of the construction is a concentric shell duct structure which channels the gases from a turbine exit into the second part comprised of two cylindrically shaped transfer ducts. The initial concentric shell portion can be further subdivided into a turnaround section and a bowl section. The turnaround duct (TAD) changes the direction of the mean flow by 180 degress from a smaller radius to a larger radius duct which discharges into the bowl. The cylindrical transfer ducts are attached to the bowl on one side thus providing a plane of symmetry midway between the two. Centerline flow distance from the TAD inlet to the transfer duct exit is approximately two feet. Details of the approach used to numerically simulate laminar or turbulent flow in the HGM geometry are presented. Computational results are presented and discussed.

  13. General Information about Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bile Duct Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bile Duct Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. What Are the Key Statistics about Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for bile duct cancer? What are the key statistics about bile duct cancer? Bile duct cancer is ... it is when it is found. For survival statistics, see the section “ Survival statistics for bile duct ...

  15. Numerical simulation of laminar reacting flows with complex chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

    1999-12-01

    We present an adaptive algorithm for low Mach number reacting flows with complex chemistry. Our approach uses a form of the low Mach number equations that discretely conserves both mass and energy. The discretization methodology is based on a robust projection formulation that accommodates large density contrasts. The algorithm uses an operator-split treatment of stiff reaction terms and includes effects of differential diffusion. The basic computational approach is embedded in an adaptive projection framework that uses structured hierarchical grids with subcycling in time that preserves the discrete conservation properties of the underlying single-grid algorithm. We present numerical examples illustrating the performance of the method on both premixed and non-premixed flames.

  16. Exploring complex chemical reactions by ab-initio simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, Michele

    1998-03-01

    Recent progress in the ab-initio molecular dynamics method and the power of parallel computing, allow the detailed study of complex chemical reaction of great industrial relevance. We illustrate this unprecedented capability by investigating the second generation Ziegler-Natta catalytic process. In this inhomogeneous catalyst, a polymerization reaction is induced by TiCl4 molecules deposited on an MgCl2 solid support. A density functional based ab-initio molecular dynamics calculation conducted with a minimum of initial assumption allows to understand the nature of the catalytic center and to determine the reaction path with the associated free energy barrier. Furthermore our calculation can explain in a nontrivial way the stereo-selectivity of the process.

  17. Technology Solutions Case Study: New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-01

    In this project, IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance.

  18. Common and Uncommon Anatomical Variants of Intrahepatic Bile Ducts in Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography and its Clinical Implication

    PubMed Central

    Sarawagi, Radha; Sundar, Shyam; Raghuvanshi, Sameer; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Jayaraman, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative knowledge of intrahepatic bile duct (IHD) anatomy is critical for planning liver resections, liver transplantations and complex biliary reconstructive surgery. The purpose of our study was to demonstrate the imaging features of various anatomical variants of IHD using magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) and their prevalence in our population. Material/Methods This observational clinical evaluation study included 224 patients who were referred for MRCP. MRCP was performed in a 1.5-Tesla magnet (Philips) with SSH MRCP 3DHR and SSHMRCP rad protocol. A senior radiologist assessed the biliary passage for anatomical variations. Results The branching pattern of the right hepatic duct (RHD) was typical in 55.3% of subjects. The most common variant was right posterior sectoral duct (RPSD) draining into the left hepatic duct (LHD) in 27.6% of subjects. Trifurcation pattern was noted in 9.3% of subjects. In 4% of subjects, RPSD was draining into the common hepatic duct (CHD) and in 0.8% of subjects into the cystic duct. Other variants were noted in 2.6% of subjects. In 4.9% of cases there was an accessory duct. The most common type of LHD branching pattern was a common trunk of segment 2 and 3 ducts joining the segment 4 duct in 67.8% of subjects. In 23.2% of subjects, segment 2 duct united with the common trunk of segment 3 and 4 and in 3.4% of subjects segment 2, 3, and 4 ducts united together to form LHD. Other uncommon branching patterns of LHD were seen in 4.9% of subjects. Conclusions Intrahepatic bile duct anatomy is complex with many common and uncommon variations. MRCP is a reliable non-invasive imaging method for demonstration of bile duct morphology, which is useful to plan complex surgeries and to prevent iatrogenic injuries. PMID:27298653

  19. Genetic Simulation Tools for Post-Genome Wide Association Studies of Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.; Bafna, Vineet; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Li, Chun; Liberles, David A.; McAllister, Kimberly; Moore, Jason H.; Paltoo, Dina N.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Peng, Bo; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Rosenfeld, Gabriel; Witte, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic simulation programs are used to model data under specified assumptions to facilitate the understanding and study of complex genetic systems. Standardized data sets generated using genetic simulation are essential for the development and application of novel analytical tools in genetic epidemiology studies. With continuing advances in high-throughput genomic technologies and generation and analysis of larger, more complex data sets, there is a need for updating current approaches in genetic simulation modeling. To provide a forum to address current and emerging challenges in this area, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop, entitled “Genetic Simulation Tools for Post-Genome Wide Association Studies of Complex Diseases” at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland on March 11-12, 2014. The goals of the workshop were to: (i) identify opportunities, challenges and resource needs for the development and application of genetic simulation models; (ii) improve the integration of tools for modeling and analysis of simulated data; and (iii) foster collaborations to facilitate development and applications of genetic simulation. During the course of the meeting the group identified challenges and opportunities for the science of simulation, software and methods development, and collaboration. This paper summarizes key discussions at the meeting, and highlights important challenges and opportunities to advance the field of genetic simulation. PMID:25371374

  20. Wind Turbine With Concentric Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhonen, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Wind Turbine device is relatively compact and efficient. Converging inner and outer ducts increase pressure difference across blades of wind turbine. Turbine shaft drives alternator housed inside exit cone. Suitable for installation on such existing structures as water towers, barns, houses, and commercial buildings.

  1. Vitellointestinal Duct Anomalies in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kadian, Yogender Singh; Verma, Anjali; Rattan, Kamal Nain; Kajal, Pardeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitellointestinal duct (VID) or omphalomesenteric duct anomalies are secondary to the persistence of the embryonic vitelline duct, which normally obliterates by weeks 5–9 of intrauterine life. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of a total of 16 patients of symptomatic remnants of vitellointestinal duct from period of Jan 2009 to May 2013. Results: Male to female ratio (M:F) was 4.3:1 and mean age of presentation was 2 months and their mode of presentation was: patent VID in 9 (56.25%) patients, umbilical cyst in 2(12.25%), umbilical granuloma in 2 (12.25%), and Meckel diverticulum as content of hernia sac in obstructed umbilical hernia in 1 (6.25%) patient. Two patients with umbilical fistula had severe electrolyte disturbance and died without surgical intervention. Conclusion: Persistent VID may have varied presentations in infancy. High output umbilical fistula and excessive bowel prolapse demand urgent surgical intervention to avoid morbidity and mortality. PMID:27433448

  2. Enhancing Complex System Performance Using Discrete-Event Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, Glenn O; Olama, Mohammed M; Lake, Joe E

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we utilize discrete-event simulation (DES) merged with human factors analysis to provide the venue within which the separation and deconfliction of the system/human operating principles can occur. A concrete example is presented to illustrate the performance enhancement gains for an aviation cargo flow and security inspection system achieved through the development and use of a process DES. The overall performance of the system is computed, analyzed, and optimized for the different system dynamics. Various performance measures are considered such as system capacity, residual capacity, and total number of pallets waiting for inspection in the queue. These metrics are performance indicators of the system's ability to service current needs and respond to additional requests. We studied and analyzed different scenarios by changing various model parameters such as the number of pieces per pallet ratio, number of inspectors and cargo handling personnel, number of forklifts, number and types of detection systems, inspection modality distribution, alarm rate, and cargo closeout time. The increased physical understanding resulting from execution of the queuing model utilizing these vetted performance measures identified effective ways to meet inspection requirements while maintaining or reducing overall operational cost and eliminating any shipping delays associated with any proposed changes in inspection requirements. With this understanding effective operational strategies can be developed to optimally use personnel while still maintaining plant efficiency, reducing process interruptions, and holding or reducing costs.

  3. 46 CFR 116.610 - Ventilation ducts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements relative to the passage of smoke and flame as the fire control boundary penetrated; (2) A steel duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary must be of at least 11 USSG, and a steel duct... duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary and opening into a space formed by that boundary...

  4. 46 CFR 116.610 - Ventilation ducts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements relative to the passage of smoke and flame as the fire control boundary penetrated; (2) A steel duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary must be of at least 11 USSG, and a steel duct... duct penetrating an A-Class fire control boundary and opening into a space formed by that boundary...

  5. Design and performance of duct acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motsinger, R. E.; Kraft, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The procedure for designing acoustic treatment panels used to line the walls of aircraft engine ducts and for estimating the resulting suppression of turbofan engine duct noise is discussed. This procedure is intended to be used for estimating noise suppression of existing designs or for designing new acoustic treatment panels and duct configurations to achieve desired suppression levels.

  6. Numerical and experimental analysis of a ducted propeller designed by a fully automated optimization process under open water condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Long; Druckenbrod, Markus; Greve, Martin; Wang, Ke-qi; Abdel-Maksoud, Moustafa

    2015-10-01

    A fully automated optimization process is provided for the design of ducted propellers under open water conditions, including 3D geometry modeling, meshing, optimization algorithm and CFD analysis techniques. The developed process allows the direct integration of a RANSE solver in the design stage. A practical ducted propeller design case study is carried out for validation. Numerical simulations and open water tests are fulfilled and proved that the optimum ducted propeller improves hydrodynamic performance as predicted.

  7. Qualitative and Quantitative Protein Complex Prediction Through Proteome-Wide Simulations.

    PubMed

    Rizzetto, Simone; Priami, Corrado; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent progress in proteomics most protein complexes are still unknown. Identification of these complexes will help us understand cellular regulatory mechanisms and support development of new drugs. Therefore it is really important to establish detailed information about the composition and the abundance of protein complexes but existing algorithms can only give qualitative predictions. Herein, we propose a new approach based on stochastic simulations of protein complex formation that integrates multi-source data--such as protein abundances, domain-domain interactions and functional annotations--to predict alternative forms of protein complexes together with their abundances. This method, called SiComPre (Simulation based Complex Prediction), achieves better qualitative prediction of yeast and human protein complexes than existing methods and is the first to predict protein complex abundances. Furthermore, we show that SiComPre can be used to predict complexome changes upon drug treatment with the example of bortezomib. SiComPre is the first method to produce quantitative predictions on the abundance of molecular complexes while performing the best qualitative predictions. With new data on tissue specific protein complexes becoming available SiComPre will be able to predict qualitative and quantitative differences in the complexome in various tissue types and under various conditions. PMID:26492574

  8. Promoting Conceptual Change for Complex Systems Understanding: Outcomes of an Agent-Based Participatory Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rates, Christopher A.; Mulvey, Bridget K.; Feldon, David F.

    2016-08-01

    Components of complex systems apply across multiple subject areas, and teaching these components may help students build unifying conceptual links. Students, however, often have difficulty learning these components, and limited research exists to understand what types of interventions may best help improve understanding. We investigated 32 high school students' understandings of complex systems components and whether an agent-based simulation could improve their understandings. Pretest and posttest essays were coded for changes in six components to determine whether students showed more expert thinking about the complex system of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Results showed significant improvement for the components Emergence ( r = .26, p = .03), Order ( r = .37, p = .002), and Tradeoffs ( r = .44, p = .001). Implications include that the experiential nature of the simulation has the potential to support conceptual change for some complex systems components, presenting a promising option for complex systems instruction.

  9. Promoting Conceptual Change for Complex Systems Understanding: Outcomes of an Agent-Based Participatory Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rates, Christopher A.; Mulvey, Bridget K.; Feldon, David F.

    2016-03-01

    Components of complex systems apply across multiple subject areas, and teaching these components may help students build unifying conceptual links. Students, however, often have difficulty learning these components, and limited research exists to understand what types of interventions may best help improve understanding. We investigated 32 high school students' understandings of complex systems components and whether an agent-based simulation could improve their understandings. Pretest and posttest essays were coded for changes in six components to determine whether students showed more expert thinking about the complex system of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Results showed significant improvement for the components Emergence (r = .26, p = .03), Order (r = .37, p = .002), and Tradeoffs (r = .44, p = .001). Implications include that the experiential nature of the simulation has the potential to support conceptual change for some complex systems components, presenting a promising option for complex systems instruction.

  10. Switching control of thrust regulation and inlet buzz protection for ducted rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wen; Li, Bin; Chang, Juntao; Niu, Wenyu; Yu, Daren

    2010-10-01

    The renewed interest on ducted rockets impulses their investigation. In this article, switching control in the working process of ducted rockets is focused on, in order to obtain optimal thrust control while avoiding phenomena like inlet buzz. Firstly multi-objective control problems of ducted rockets during its working process are discussed. Then the dynamic mathematical models of gas flow regulating system, thrust regulation control loop and inlet buzz protection loop are established and analyzed. Lastly, the switching strategy and PID controller are applied to the ducted rocket system, and the influence of integral limitation of controllers is analyzed. In conclusion, it is useful to introduce the multi-objective switching control to ducted rockets, and simulation results show its validity.

  11. Inference, simulation, modeling, and analysis of complex networks, with special emphasis on complex networks in systems biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Claire Petra

    Across diverse fields ranging from physics to biology, sociology, and economics, the technological advances of the past decade have engendered an unprecedented explosion of data on highly complex systems with thousands, if not millions of interacting components. These systems exist at many scales of size and complexity, and it is becoming ever-more apparent that they are, in fact, universal, arising in every field of study. Moreover, they share fundamental properties---chief among these, that the individual interactions of their constituent parts may be well-understood, but the characteristic behaviour produced by the confluence of these interactions---by these complex networks---is unpredictable; in a nutshell, the whole is more than the sum of its parts. There is, perhaps, no better illustration of this concept than the discoveries being made regarding complex networks in the biological sciences. In particular, though the sequencing of the human genome in 2003 was a remarkable feat, scientists understand that the "cellular-level blueprints" for the human being are cellular-level parts lists, but they say nothing (explicitly) about cellular-level processes. The challenge of modern molecular biology is to understand these processes in terms of the networks of parts---in terms of the interactions among proteins, enzymes, genes, and metabolites---as it is these processes that ultimately differentiate animate from inanimate, giving rise to life! It is the goal of systems biology---an umbrella field encapsulating everything from molecular biology to epidemiology in social systems---to understand processes in terms of fundamental networks of core biological parts, be they proteins or people. By virtue of the fact that there are literally countless complex systems, not to mention tools and techniques used to infer, simulate, analyze, and model these systems, it is impossible to give a truly comprehensive account of the history and study of complex systems. The author

  12. Aspect ratio effects in turbulent duct flows studied with DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, R.; Noorani, A.; Lozano-Durán, A.; Schlatter, P.; Fischer, P.; Nagib, H.

    2012-11-01

    Three-dimensional effects present in turbulent duct flows, i.e., side-wall boundary layers and secondary motions, are studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS). The spectral element code Nek5000, developed by Fischer et. al. (2008), is used to compute turbulent duct flows with aspect ratios 1 and 3 in streamwise-periodic boxes of length 25 h (long enough to capture the longest streamwise structures). The total number of grid points is 28 and 62 million respectively, and the inflow conditions were adjusted iteratively in order to keep the same bulk Reynolds number at the centerplane (Reb , c = 2800) in both cases. Spanwise variations in wall shear, mean-flow profiles and turbulence statistics were analyzed with aspect ratio, and also compared with the 2D channel. The simulations were started from a laminar duct profile, and transition to turbulence was triggered by means of trip-forcing in the wall-normal direction, applied at the two horizontal walls. In addition, we developed a convergence criterion aimed at assessing the necessary averaging time TA for converged statistics. We find that econdary motions present in duct flows require longer averaging times and the total shear-stress profile is not necessarily linear.

  13. The Detection of Radiated Modes from Ducted Fan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Nark, Douglas M.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2001-01-01

    The bypass duct of an aircraft engine is a low-pass filter allowing some spinning modes to radiate outside the duct. The knowledge of the radiated modes can help in noise reduction, as well as the diagnosis of noise generation mechanisms inside the duct. We propose a nonintrusive technique using a circular microphone array outside the engine measuring the complex noise spectrum on an arc of a circle. The array is placed at various axial distances from the inlet or the exhaust of the engine. Using a model of noise radiation from the duct, an overdetermined system of linear equations is constructed for the complex amplitudes of the radial modes for a fixed circumferential mode. This system of linear equations is generally singular, indicating that the problem is illposed. Tikhonov regularization is employed to solve this system of equations for the unknown amplitudes of the radiated modes. An application of our mode detection technique using measured acoustic data from a circular microphone array is presented. We show that this technique can reliably detect radiated modes with the possible exception of modes very close to cut-off.

  14. Performance and Flowfield Measurements on a 10-inch Ducted Rotor VTOL UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Preston; Tung, Chee

    2004-01-01

    A ducted fan VTOL UAV with a 10-inch diameter rotor was tested in the US Army 7-by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. The test conditions covered a range of angle of attack from 0 to 110 degrees to the freestream. The tunnel velocity was varied from 0 (simulating a hover condition) to 128 ft/sec in propeller mode. A six-component internal balance measured the aerodynamic loads for a range of model configurations. including the isolated rotor, the isolated duct, and the full configuration of the duct and rotor. For some conditions, hotwire velocity surveys were conducted along the inner and outer surface of the duct and across the downstream wake. In addition, fluorescent oil flow visualization allowed the flow separation patterns inside and outside of the duct to be mapped for a few test conditions. Two different duct shapes were tested to determine the performance effects of leading edge radius. For each duct, a range of rotor tip gap from 1%R to 4.5%R was tested to determine the performance penalty in hover and axial flight. Measured results are presented in terms of hover performance, hover performance in a crosswind, and high angle of attack performance in propeller mode. In each case, the effects of both tip gap and duct leading edge radius are illustrated using measurements. Some of the hover performance issues were also studied using a simple analytical method, and the results agreed with the measurements.

  15. Experimental and Numerical Study on Performance of Ducted Hydrokinetic Turbines with Pre-Swirl Stator Blades.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gish, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Ducts (also called shrouds) have been shown to improve performance of hydrokinetic turbines in some situations, bringing the power coefficient (Cp) closer to the Betz limit. Here we investigate optimization of the duct design as well as the addition of stator blades upstream of the turbine rotor to introduce pre-swirl in the flow. A small scale three-bladed turbine was tested in a towing tank. Three cases (bare turbine, with duct, and with duct and stators) were tested over a range of flow speeds. Important parameters include duct cross-sectional shape, blade-duct gap, stator cross-sectional shape, and stator angle. For each test, Cp was evaluated as a function of tip speed ratio (TSR). Experimental results were compared with numerical simulations. Results indicate that ducts and stators can improve performance at slower flow speeds and lower the stall speed compared to a bare turbine, but may degrade performance at higher speeds. Ongoing efforts to optimize duct and stator configurations will be discussed.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of Müllerian duct anomalies in children.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Phelps, Andrew; Zapala, Matthew A; MacKenzie, John D; MacKenzie, Tippi C; Courtier, Jesse

    2016-05-01

    Müllerian duct anomalies encompass a wide variety of disorders resulting from abnormalities in the embryological development of the Müllerian ducts. In the prepubertal pediatric population, Müllerian duct anomalies are often incidental findings on studies obtained for other reasons. The onset of menses can prompt more clinical symptoms. Proper characterization of Müllerian duct anomalies is important because these anomalies can affect the development of gynecological disorders as well as fertility. Müllerian duct anomalies also carry a high association with other congenital anomalies, particularly renal abnormalities. MRI is widely considered the best modality for assessing Müllerian duct anomalies; it provides multiplanar capability, clear anatomical detail and tissue characterization without ionizing radiation. MRI allows for careful description of Müllerian duct anomalies, often leading to classification into the most widely accepted classification system for Müllerian duct anomalies. This system, developed by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, includes seven subtypes: uterine agenesis/hypoplasia, unicornuate, didelphys, bicornuate, septate, arcuate, and diethylstilbestrol (DES) drug-related uterus. In cases of complex anomalies that defy classification, MRI allows detailed depiction of all components of the anatomical abnormality, allowing for proper management and surgical planning. PMID:27229498

  17. Acoustic imaging of a duct spinning mode by the use of an in-duct circular microphone array.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingkai; Huang, Xun; Peers, Edward

    2013-06-01

    An imaging method of acoustic spinning modes propagating within a circular duct simply with surface pressure information is introduced in this paper. The proposed method is developed in a theoretical way and is demonstrated by a numerical simulation case. Nowadays, the measurements within a duct have to be conducted using in-duct microphone array, which is unable to provide information of complete acoustic solutions across the test section. The proposed method can estimate immeasurable information by forming a so-called observer. The fundamental idea behind the testing method was originally developed in control theory for ordinary differential equations. Spinning mode propagation, however, is formulated in partial differential equations. A finite difference technique is used to reduce the associated partial differential equations to a classical form in control. The observer method can thereafter be applied straightforwardly. The algorithm is recursive and, thus, could be operated in real-time. A numerical simulation for a straight circular duct is conducted. The acoustic solutions on the test section can be reconstructed with good agreement to analytical solutions. The results suggest the potential and applications of the proposed method. PMID:23742352

  18. Numerical study of acoustic instability in a partly lined flow duct using the full linearized Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bo; Sun, Dakun; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Lined ducts are extensively applied to suppress noise emission from aero-engines and other turbomachines. The complex noise/flow interaction in a lined duct possibly leads to acoustic instability in certain conditions. To investigate the instability, the full linearized Navier-Stokes equations with eddy viscosity considered are solved in frequency domain using a Galerkin finite element method to compute the sound transmission in shear flow in the lined duct as well as the flow perturbation over the impedance wall. A good agreement between the numerical predictions and the published experimental results is obtained for the sound transmission, showing that a transmission peak occurs around the resonant frequency of the acoustic liner in the presence of shear flow. The eddy viscosity is an important influential factor that plays the roles of both providing destabilizing and making coupling between the acoustic and flow motions over the acoustic liner. Moreover, it is shown from the numerical investigation that the occurrence of the sound amplification and the magnitude of transmission coefficient are closely related to the realistic velocity profile, and we find it essential that the actual variation of the velocity profile in the axial direction over the liner surface be included in the computation. The simulation results of the periodic flow patterns possess the proper features of the convective instability over the liner, as observed in Marx et al.'s experiment. A quantitative comparison between numerical and experimental results of amplitude and phase of the instability is performed. The corresponding eigenvalues achieve great agreement.

  19. HAARP-Induced Ionospheric Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Milikh, Gennady; Vartanyan, Aram

    2011-01-04

    It is well known that strong electron heating by a powerful HF-facility can lead to the formation of electron and ion density perturbations that stretch along the magnetic field line. Those density perturbations can serve as ducts for ELF waves, both of natural and artificial origin. This paper presents observations of the plasma density perturbations caused by the HF-heating of the ionosphere by the HAARP facility. The low orbit satellite DEMETER was used as a diagnostic tool to measure the electron and ion temperature and density along the satellite orbit overflying close to the magnetic zenith of the HF-heater. Those observations will be then checked against the theoretical model of duct formation due to HF-heating of the ionosphere. The model is based on the modified SAMI2 code, and is validated by comparison with well documented experiments.

  20. Tear-ducts in wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John W. M.

    1999-11-01

    We examine the radial spoke pattern evident in the meniscus region in glasses of strong alcoholic beverages exhibiting the `tears-in-wine' phenomenon. We demonstrate that the pattern results from ridge-like elevations of the free surface which are supported by evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection in the meniscus region. Vortices associated with the convective motions are aligned in the radial direction by the surface tension gradient responsible for the generation of tears. The radial flow is focussed into the ridges, which thus serve as the principal conduits of fluid for the tears; consequently, we refer to the ridges as `tear-ducts'. The phenomenon is examined experimentally, and a numerical model of evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection is developed which reproduces the salient features of the tear-duct phenomenon.

  1. Designing insulation for cryogenic ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, C. C.

    1984-03-01

    It is pointed out that the great temperature difference between the outside of a cryogenic duct and the liquified gas it carries can cause a high heat input unless blocked by a high thermal resistance. High thermal resistance for lines needing maximum insulation is provided by metal vacuum jackets. Low-density foam is satisfactory in cases in which higher heat input can be tolerated. Attention is given to the heat transfer through a duct vacuum jacket, the calculation of heat input and the exterior surface's steady-state temperature for various thicknesses of insulation, the calculation of the heat transfer through gimbal jackets, and design specifications regarding the allowable pressure rise in the jacket's annular space.

  2. Applications of the COG multiparticle Monte Carlo transport code to simulated imaging of complex objects

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R M; Hall, J M

    1999-06-01

    COG is a major multiparticle simulation code in the LLNL Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit. It was designed to solve deep-penetration radiation shielding problems in arbitrarily complex 3D geometries, involving coupled transport of photons, neutrons, and electrons. COG was written to provide as much accuracy as the underlying cross-sections will allow, and has a number of variance-reduction features to speed computations. Recently COG has been applied to the simulation of high- resolution radiographs of complex objects and the evaluation of contraband detection schemes. In this paper we will give a brief description of the capabilities of the COG transport code and show several examples of neutron and gamma-ray imaging simulations. Keywords: Monte Carlo, radiation transport, simulated radiography, nonintrusive inspection, neutron imaging.

  3. Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct

  4. Complexities of a 3-D plasmoid flux rope as shown by an MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, N. L.; Baker, D. N.; Wiltberger, M.

    2008-12-01

    The results of a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a pair of magnetospheric substorms on 11 August 2002 are presented. Comparisons of data with simulation results reveal a good agreement regarding the sequence of events during substorm development. We give particular emphasis to results in the simulation of a flux rope formed during the second substorm. Unlike standard 2-D depictions of reconnection and plasmoid release during the substorm sequence, the simulation shows a highly complex structure that has considerable winding of both closed and open field lines. Additionally, the simulated flux rope does not move tailward uniformly, but rather it has asymmetric motion in which the dawn flank portion moves tailward prior to the dusk portion of the flux rope. This results in a skewed flux rope structure that runs almost parallel to the tail axis instead of perpendicular to it. The simulation compares well with both prior flux rope simulations as well as satellite observations of flux ropes. We use the global simulation to map flux tube properties to the ionosphere, which allows the complexity of the mapping of the magnetic field structure from the tail to the ionosphere to be seen in a novel manner.

  5. Clifford algebra-based spatio-temporal modelling and analysis for complex geo-simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen; Yu, Zhaoyuan; Hu, Yong; Yuan, Linwang

    2013-10-01

    The spatio-temporal data simulating Ice-Land-Ocean interaction of Antarctic are used to demonstrate the Clifford algebra-based data model construction, spatio-temporal query and data analysis. The results suggest that Clifford algebra provides a powerful mathematical tool for the whole modelling and analysis chains for complex geo-simulation data. It can also help implement spatio-temporal analysis algorithms more clearly and simply.

  6. Conformational Contribution to Thermodynamics of Binding in Protein-Peptide Complexes through Microscopic Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-01-01

    We extract the thermodynamics of conformational changes in biomacromolecular complexes from the distributions of the dihedral angles of the macromolecules. These distributions are obtained from the equilibrium configurations generated via all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational thermodynamics data we obtained for calmodulin-peptide complexes using our methodology corroborate well with the experimentally observed conformational and binding entropies. The conformational free-energy changes and their contributions for different peptide-binding regions of calmodulin are evaluated microscopically. PMID:23528087

  7. Simulating the daylight performance of fenestration systems and spaces of arbitrary complexity: The IDC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.

    1993-04-01

    A new method to simulate the daylight performance of fenestration systems and spaces is presented. This new method, named IDC (Integration of Directional Coefficients), allows the simulation of the daylight performance of fenestration systems and spaces of arbitrary complexity, under any sun, sky, and ground conditions. The IDC method is based on the combination of scale model photometry and computer-based simulation. Physical scale models are used to experimentally determine a comprehensive set of 'directional illuminance coefficients' at reference points of interest, which are then used in analytical, computer-based routines, to determine daylight factors or actual daylight illuminance values under any sun, sky, and ground conditions. The main advantage of the IDC method is its applicability to any optically complex environment. Moreover, the computer-based analytical routines are fast enough to allow for hourly simulation of the daylight performance over the course of an entire year. However, the method requires appropriate experimental facilities for the determination of the Directional Coefficients. The IDC method has been implemented and used successfully in inter-validation procedures with various daylight simulation computer programs. Currently, it is used to simulate the daylight performance of fenestration systems that incorporate optically complex components, such as Venetian blinds, optically treated light shelves and light pipes.

  8. Research on the laser transmission characteristics simulation and comprehensive test in complex channel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Xiaoman; Jiang, Huilin; Liu, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    The laser transmission characteristics affected in the complex channel environment, which limits the performance of laser equipment and engineering application severely. The article aim at the influence of laser transmission in atmospheric and seawater channels, summarizes the foreign researching work of the simulation and comprehensive test regarding to the laser transmission characteristics in complex environment. And researched the theory of atmospheric turbulence effect, water attenuation features, and put forward the corresponding theoretical model. And researched the simulate technology of atmospheric channel and sea water channel, put forward the analog device plan, adopt the similar theory of flowing to simulate the atmosphere turbulence .When the flowing has the same condition of geometric limits including the same Reynolds, they must be similar to each other in the motivation despite of the difference in the size, speed, and intrinsic quality. On this basis, set up a device for complex channel simulation and comprehensive testing, the overall design of the structure of the device, Hot and Cold Air Convection Simulation of Atmospheric Turbulence, mainly consists of cell body, heating systems, cooling systems, automatic control system. he simulator provides platform and method for the basic research of laser transmission characteristics in the domestic.

  9. To Duct or Not to Duct: Evaluating the Space Conditioning Impacts of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Peeks, B.; Sullivan, Greg; Shaffer, Scott

    2014-08-22

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWH) are a promising technology for substantially reducing water heating-related energy use in the residential sector. However, concerns have been raised regarding the impact of HPWHs on space conditioning energy when installed in conditioned space, primarily in northern climates. For example, the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA’s) Northern Climate HPWH Specification, which describes the characteristics a HPWH must have to be incentivized in cold climates in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), requires exhaust ducting for their Tier II-specified products and both supply and exhaust ducting for the Tier III-specified product (NEEA 2013). However, these concerns and installation recommendations are based on modeling and comparative field data are not available to verify modeled performance. This study examines the overall performance and operation of two GE GeoSpring HPWHs in conditioned space in the matched pair of PNNL Lab Homes with no ducting, exhaust ducting, and full ducting (supply and exhaust) and explores the interactions between the HPWH and the home’s heating/cooling system. The data collected in this field evaluation suggest that previous modeling may not completely characterize the complex interactions of HPWHs, HVAC systems, and ducting. This report discusses the impact on space conditioning and water heater energy use of configuring an HPWH with exhaust only ducting or full ducting, as compared to an unducted HPWH. Additional cost analysis is necessary to assess the cost effectiveness of ducting and to make formal recommendations regarding appropriate installation of HPWHs in more varied scenarios.

  10. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.