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Sample records for complex formation reactions

  1. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  2. Reactions of chloride complexes of ruthenium (IV) with formic acid and sodium formate in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Simanova, S.A.; Krylova, G.S.; Maslov, E.I.

    1982-04-20

    Study of the reactions of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/RuCl/sub 6/ with formic acid and sodium formate showed that, depending on the conditions, chlorocarbonyl, chloroformatocarbonyl, or chloroformato complexes of ruthenium(III) are formed.

  3. Reversible Formation and Transmetalation of Schiff-Base Complexes in Subcomponent Self-Assembly Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lewing, Dennis; Koppetz, Hannah; Hahn, F Ekkehardt

    2015-08-01

    Dinuclear complexes [Zn2(NS,NS)2] 3 and [Ni2(NS,NS)2] 6 bearing Schiff-base ligands featuring two NS donor groups were obtained in subcomponent self-assembly reactions using nickel or zinc as template metals. Several transmetalation reactions starting from 3 or 6 yielded the complexes [Pd2(NS,NS)2] 4 and [Co2(NS,NS)2] 5, and their molecular structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. Starting from the mononuclear complex [Ni(NS/NOH)2] 9 featuring a coordinated NS Schiff base and a free NOH Schiff base, completely reversible thermodynamically controlled imine bond formation was observed leading to complex [Ni2(NS,NS)2] 6 and the free Schiff -base ligand NOH,NOH 10. PMID:26161894

  4. Nucleophilicity and P-C Bond Formation Reactions of a Terminal Phosphanido Iridium Complex.

    PubMed

    Serrano, ngel L; Casado, Miguel A; Ciriano, Miguel A; de Bruin, Bas; Lpez, Jos A; Tejel, Cristina

    2016-01-19

    The diiridium complex [{Ir(ABPN2)(CO)}2(?-CO)] (1; [ABPN2](-) = [(allyl)B(Pz)2(CH2PPh2)](-)) reacts with diphenylphosphane affording [Ir(ABPN2)(CO)(H) (PPh2)] (2), the product of the oxidative addition of the P-H bond to the metal. DFT studies revealed a large contribution of the terminal phosphanido lone pair to the HOMO of 2, indicating nucleophilic character of this ligand, which is evidenced by reactions of 2 with typical electrophiles such as H(+), Me(+), and O2. Products from the reaction of 2 with methyl chloroacetate were found to be either [Ir(ABPN2)(CO)(H)(PPh2CH2CO2Me)][PF6] ([6]PF6) or [Ir(ABPN2)(CO)(Cl)(H)] (7) and the free phosphane (PPh2CH2CO2Me), both involving P-C bond formation, depending on the reaction conditions. New complexes having iridacyclophosphapentenone and iridacyclophosphapentanone moieties result from reactions of 2 with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate and dimethyl maleate, respectively, as a consequence of a further incorporation of the carbonyl ligand. In this line, the terminal alkyne methyl propiolate gave a mixture of a similar iridacyclophosphapentanone complex and [Ir(ABPN2){CH?C(CO2Me)-CO}{PPh2-CH?CH(CO2Me)}] (10), which bears the functionalized phosphane PPh2-CH?CH(CO2Me) and an iridacyclobutenone fragment. Related model reactions aimed to confirm mechanistic proposals are also studied. PMID:26695592

  5. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  6. Reaction time dependent formation of Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of bis(methyl)thiasalen podand.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Pradip Kr; Panda, Snigdha; Krishna, G Rama; Reddy, C Malla; Zade, Sanjio S

    2013-01-14

    Thiasalen podand 9 having S2N2 donor set has been synthesized by the condensation of 2-methylthiobenzaldehyde with ethylenediamine. The reaction of the thiasalen podand ligand with Pd(II) afforded two complexes depending on the reaction time. Shorter reaction time (5 min) afforded thioether complex 10; whereas with increase in reaction time (4 h) thioether-thiolate complex 11 was obtained via cleavage of one of the two S-C(Me) bonds of bis(methyl)thiasalen podand upon complexation. The reaction of 9 with Pt(II) afforded only thiolate-thioether complex 12 independent of the reaction time. The cleavage of both the S-C(Me) bonds of bis(methyl)thiasalen to afford bisthiolate complexes has never been observed. The structures of thiasalen podands and all three complexes have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All three complexes possess a square planar geometry around the metal centres. Weak van der Waals interactions through C-HF interactions are present in all three complexes leading to the formation of supramolecular synthons and the supramolecular structures are stabilized by aromatic ?? interactions, which leads to the formation of 3D pseudo-double helical network packing. Under similar conditions bis(methyl)salen did not form any complexes with Pd(II) and Pt(II). PMID:23073301

  7. Reactions of a Dinitrogen Complex of Molybdenum: Formation of a Carbon-Nitrogen Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, David C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reports a procedure for the formation of alkyldiazenido complexes of molybdenum in the absence of dioxygen, suitable for inclusion in an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. Includes background information and experimental procedures for two complexes. (SK)

  8. A complex cortical reaction leads to formation of the fertilization envelope in the lobster, Homarus.

    PubMed

    Talbot, P; Goudeau, M

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the formation of the fertilization envelope in the lobsters Homarus americanus and H gammarus. Oocytes were fixed for electron microscopy either in the ovary or following extrusion from the gonopore. Mature ovarian oocytes are surrounded by a coat (envelope 1), which is comprised of small electron-dense granules and structures resembling "bottlebrushes." At least part of this coat is synthesized by the follicle cells of the ovary. The cortex of ovarian oocytes contains four types of vesicles that we refer to as high-density vesicles (HDV), low-density vesicles (LDV), moderately dense vesicles (MDV), and ring vesicles (RV). Oocytes that were electrically extruded from the gonopore and fixed immediately had an envelope identical to that of ovarian oocytes. The cortex of gonopore oocytes contained the four types of vesicles found in ovarian oocytes. When unfertilized gonopore oocytes were allowed to incubate in sea water, the oocyte cortex appeared unaltered, but envelope 1 swelled and the bottlebrushes dispersed. When recently fertilized oocytes were fixed during natural spawning or following in-vitro fertilization, each type of vesicle was released in sequence from the cortex of the oocyte. The contents of the HDV and LDV appeared first in the perivitelline space, but their fate could not be determined at later times. The ring-shaped elements of the RV and the moderately electron-dense material of the MDV were released exocytotically somewhat later; these materials coalesced in the perivitelline space to form a new coat (envelope 2). Envelope 1 subsequently condensed to its original thickness and appeared firmly attached to envelope 2. Our results show that the fertilized lobster egg is surrounded by two discrete coats. The outer coat, which is formed in the ovary, undergoes a swelling/condensation cycle at spawning. The inner coat originates from a complex cortical reaction. Together these coats comprise the fertilization envelope of the lobster egg. PMID:3198040

  9. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  10. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  11. Immune reactions in polysaccharide media. Investigation on complex-formation between some polysaccharides, albumin and immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Hellsing, Krister

    1969-01-01

    Serum albumin and immunoglobulin G were chromatographed on columns of dextran, hyaluronate and chondroitin 4-sulphate. The partition of the two proteins between hyaluronate and buffer was also measured by equilibrium dialysis. The results accord with the view that there is no complex-formation between the polysaccharides and the proteins in 0·05m-phosphate buffer, pH7·4, containing sodium chloride (0·1m). The observations support the hypothesis that the previously described polysaccharide enhancement of the precipitin reaction is due to exclusion and not to non-specific complex-formation. PMID:5817720

  12. Formation of water soluble complexes of ?: solid-state reaction between tertiary amines and ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, H.; Priyadarsini, K. I.; Tyagi, A. K.; Mittal, J. P.

    1996-11-01

    Water soluble complexes of 0953-4075/29/21/015/img3 have been prepared on solid-state mechano-chemical reaction between 0953-4075/29/21/015/img3 and tertiary amines (hexamine, DABCO) at room temperature 0953-4075/29/21/015/img5. The product is characterized by x-ray diffraction and FTIR methods. It is presumably due to the charge transfer interactions between electron affinic 0953-4075/29/21/015/img3 and electron rich tertiary amines.

  13. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  14. Theoretical study on the transition-metal oxoboryl complex: M-BO bonding nature, mechanism of the formation reaction, and prediction of a new oxoboryl complex.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guixiang; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2012-04-16

    The Pt-BO bonding nature and the formation reaction of the experimentally reported platinum(II) oxoboryl complex, simplified to PtBr(BO)(PMe(3))(2), were theoretically investigated with the density functional theory method. The BO(-) ligand was quantitatively demonstrated to have extremely strong σ-donation but very weak d(π)-electron-accepting abilities. Therefore, it exhibits a strong trans influence. The formation reaction occurs through a four-center transition state, in which the B(δ+)-Br(δ-) polarization and the Br → Si and O p(π) → B p(π) charge-transfer interactions play key roles. The Gibbs activation energy (ΔG°(++)) and Gibbs reaction energy (ΔG°) of the formation reaction are 32.2 and -6.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The electron-donating bulky phosphine ligand is found to be favorable for lowering both ΔG°(++) and ΔG°. In addition, the metal effect is examined with the nickel and palladium analogues and MBrCl[BBr(OSiMe(3))](CO)(PR(3))(2) (M = Ir and Rh). By a comparison of the ΔG°(++) and ΔG° values, the M-BO (M = Ni, Pd, Ir, and Rh) bonding nature, and the interaction energy between [MBrCl(CO)(PR(3))(2)](+) and BO(-) with those of the platinum system, MBrCl(BO)(CO)(PR(3))(2) (M = Ir and Rh) is predicted to be a good candidate for a stable oxoboryl complex. PMID:22458310

  15. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with cysteine. Kinetics studies of the formation and reactions of DNICs in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Clayston Melo; Iretskii, Alexei V; Han, Rui-Min; Ford, Peter C

    2015-01-14

    Kinetics studies provide mechanistic insight regarding the formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) now viewed as playing important roles in the mammalian chemical biology of the ubiquitous bioregulator nitric oxide (NO). Reactions in deaerated aqueous solutions containing FeSO4, cysteine (CysSH), and NO demonstrate that both the rates and the outcomes are markedly pH dependent. The dinuclear DNIC Fe2(μ-CysS)2(NO)4, a Roussin's red salt ester (Cys-RSE), is formed at pH 5.0 as well as at lower concentrations of cysteine in neutral pH solutions. The mononuclear DNIC Fe(NO)2(CysS)2(-) (Cys-DNIC) is produced from the same three components at pH 10.0 and at higher cysteine concentrations at neutral pH. The kinetics studies suggest that both Cys-RSE and Cys-DNIC are formed via a common intermediate Fe(NO)(CysS)2(-). Cys-DNIC and Cys-RSE interconvert, and the rates of this process depend on the cysteine concentration and on the pH. Flash photolysis of the Cys-RSE formed from Fe(II)/NO/cysteine mixtures in anaerobic pH 5.0 solution led to reversible NO dissociation and a rapid, second-order back reaction with a rate constant kNO = 6.9 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). In contrast, photolysis of the mononuclear-DNIC species Cys-DNIC formed from Fe(II)/NO/cysteine mixtures in anaerobic pH 10.0 solution did not labilize NO but instead apparently led to release of the CysS(•) radical. These studies illustrate the complicated reaction dynamics interconnecting the DNIC species and offer a mechanistic model for the key steps leading to these non-heme iron nitrosyl complexes. PMID:25479566

  16. A STUDY OF FUNDAMENTAL REACTION PATHWAYS FOR TRANSITION METAL ALKYL COMPLEXES. I. THE REACTION OF A NICKEL METHYL COMPLEX WITH ALKYNES. II. THE MECHANISM OF ALDEHYDE FORMATION IN THE REACTION OF A MOLYBDENUM HYDRIDE WITH MOLYBDENUM ALKYLS

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, John Mitchell

    1980-06-01

    I. This study reports the rapid reaction under mild conditions of internal or terminal alkynes with methyl (acetyl~ acetonato) (triphenylphosphine) nickel (1) in either aromatic or ether solvents. In all cases vinylnickel products 2 are formed by insertion of the alkyne into the nickel=methyl bond. These complexes may be converted into a variety of organic products (e.g. alkenes, esters, vinyl halides) by treatment with appropriate reagents. Unsymmetrical alkynes give selectively the one regioisomer with the sterically largest substituent next to the nickel atom. In order to investigate the stereochemistry of the initial insertion, a x-ray diffraction study of the reaction of 1 with diphenylacetylene was carried out. This showed that the vinylnickel complex formed by overall trans insertion was the product of the reaction. Furthermore, subsequent slow isomerization of this complex, to a mixture of it and the corresponding cis isomer, demonstrated that this trans addition product is the kinetic product of the reaction. In studies with other alkynes, the product of trans addition was not always exclusively (or even predominantly) formed, but the ratio of the stereoisomers formed kinetically was substantially different from the thermodynamic ratio. Isotope labeling, added phosphine, and other experiments have allowed us to conclude that the mechanism of this reaction does involve initial cis addition. However, a coordinatively unsaturated vinylnickel complex is initially formed which can undergo rapid, phosphine-catalyzed cis-trans isomerization in competition with its conversion to the isolable phosphine-substituted kinetic reaction products. II. The reaction of CpMo(CO){sub 3}H (1a) with CpMo(CO){sub 3}R (2, R= CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}) at 50{degrees} C in THF gives the aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} (3a) and [CpMo(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2} (4a). Labeling one of the reactants with a methylcyclopentadienyl ligand it was possible to show that the mixed dimers MeCpMo(CO){sub 3}-(CO){sub 3}MoCp (3b) and MeCpMo(CO){sub 2}{triple_bond}(CO){sub 2}MoCp (4b) are the predominant kinetic products of the reaction. Additionally labeling the carbonyl ligands of 1a with {sup 13}CO led to the conclusion that all three of the carbonyl ligands in 1a end up in the tetracarbonyl dimers 4a if the reaction is carried out under a continuous purge of argon Trapping studies failed to find any evidence for the intermediacy of either [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sup -} or [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} in this reaction. A mechanism is proposed that involves the initial migration of the alkyl ligand in 2 to CO forming an unsaturated acyl complex which reacts with 1a to give a binuclear complex containing a three center-two electron Mo-H-Mo bond. This complex then selectively looses a carbonyl from the acyl molybdenum, migrates the hydride to that same metal, and forms a metal-metal bond. This binuclear complex with the hydride and acyl ligands on one metal reductively eliminates aldehyde, and migrates a carbonyl ligand, to give 4a directly. The other product 3a is formed by addition of two molecules of free CO to 4a.

  17. Solvation effects in complex-forming reactions. I. The effect of solvents on complex formation between seleno and thioanisoles and iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Safin, D.Kh.; Chmutova, G.A.; Solomonov, B.N.

    1986-02-10

    The enthalpies of solution of seleno- and thioanisoles in a large group of solvents, the constants and enthalpies of complex formation between both compounds and iodine, and the spectral characteristics of the complexes in the same solvents were measured and analyzed. In chemically inert solvents there are fairly clear relationships between the spectral and thermodynamic characteristics of the obtained Mulliken-type complexes, both groups of CTC (charge-transfer complex) parameters, and the universal intermolecular interaction functions of the solvent; a series of the characteristics of the complex were analyzed in relation to the behavior of the reagents. Such correlations are not observed in coordinating solvents, but the directions of the change in the enthalpies of complex formation with variation of the solvents can be predicted.

  18. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  19. The citric acid-Mn III,IVO 2(birnessite) reaction. Electron transfer, complex formation, and autocatalytic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Stone, Alan T.

    2006-09-01

    Citrate released by plants, bacteria, and fungi into soils is subject to abiotic oxidation by MnO 2(birnessite), yielding 3-ketoglutarate, acetoacetate, and Mn II. Citrate loss and generation of products as a function of time all yield S-shaped curves, indicating autocatalysis. Increasing the citrate concentration decreases the induction period. The maximum rate ( rmax) along the reaction coordinate follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on citrate concentration. Increases in pH decrease rmax and increase the induction time. Adding Mn II, Zn II, orthophosphate, or pyrophosphate at the onset of reaction decreases rmax. Mn II addition eliminates the induction period, while orthophosphate and pyrophosphate addition increase the induction period. These findings indicate that two parallel processes are responsible. The first, relatively slow process involves the oxidation of free citrate by surface-bound Mn III,IV, yielding Mn II and citrate oxidation products. The second process, which is subject to strong positive feedback, involves electron transfer from Mn II-citrate complexes to surface-bound Mn III,IV, generating Mn III-citrate and Mn II. Subsequent intramolecular electron transfer converts Mn III-citrate into Mn II and citrate oxidation products.

  20. H-atom addition and abstraction reactions in mixed CO, H2CO and CH3OH ices - an extended view on complex organic molecule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-01-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been observed not only in the hot cores surrounding low- and high-mass protostars, but also in cold dark clouds. Therefore, it is interesting to understand how such species can be formed without the presence of embedded energy sources. We present new laboratory experiments on the low-temperature solid state formation of three complex molecules - methyl formate (HC(O)OCH3), glycolaldehyde (HC(O)CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (H2C(OH)CH2OH) - through recombination of free radicals formed via H-atom addition and abstraction reactions at different stages in the CO→H2CO→CH3OH hydrogenation network at 15 K. The experiments extend previous CO hydrogenation studies and aim at resembling the physical-chemical conditions typical of the CO freeze-out stage in dark molecular clouds, when H2CO and CH3OH form by recombination of accreting CO molecules and H-atoms on ice grains. We confirm that H2CO, once formed through CO hydrogenation, not only yields CH3OH through ongoing H-atom addition reactions, but is also subject to H-atom-induced abstraction reactions, yielding CO again. In a similar way, H2CO is also formed in abstraction reactions involving CH3OH. The dominant methanol H-atom abstraction product is expected to be CH2OH, while H-atom additions to H2CO should at least partially proceed through CH3O intermediate radicals. The occurrence of H-atom abstraction reactions in ice mantles leads to more reactive intermediates (HCO, CH3O and CH2OH) than previously thought, when assuming sequential H-atom addition reactions only. This enhances the probability to form COMs through radical-radical recombination without the need of UV photolysis or cosmic rays as external triggers.

  1. Highly valence-diversified binuclear uranium complexes of a schiff-base polypyrrolic macrocycle: prediction of unusual structures, electronic properties, and formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Zheng, Xiu-Jun; Pan, Qing-Jiang; Schreckenbach, Georg

    2015-06-01

    On the basis of relativistic density functional theory calculations, homo- and heterovalent binuclear uranium complexes of a polypyrrolic macrocycle in a U-O-U bridging fashion have been investigated. These complexes show a variety of oxidation states for uranium ranging from III to VI, which have been confirmed by the calculated electron-spin density on each metal center. An equatorially 5-fold uranyl coordination mode is suitable for hexavalent uranium complexes, while silylation of the uranyl oxo is favored by pentavalent uranium. Uranyl oxo ligands are not required anymore for the coordination environment of tetra- and trivalent uranium because of their replacement by strong donors such as tetrahydrofuran and iodine. Optimization of binuclear U(VI)-U(III) complexes with various coordinating modes of U(III), donor numbers, and donor types reveals that 0.5-1.0 electron has been transferred from U(III) to U(VI). Consequently, U(V)-U(IV) complexes are more favorable. Electronic structures and formation reactions of several representative uranium complexes were calculated. For example, a 5f-based σ(U-U) bonding orbital is found in the diuranium(IV) complex, rationalizing the fact that it shows the shortest U-U distance (3.82 Å) among the studied binuclear complexes. PMID:25955709

  2. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  3. Energetics and excited state dynamics of the radical pair formation in isolated CP47-reaction center complex of photosystem II at various temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, Marie-Louise; Paa lsson, Lars-Olof; Pribic, Radmila; Stokkum, Ivo H. van; Dekker, Jan P.; Grondelle, Rienk van

    1996-04-01

    The isolated CP47-reaction center complex of spinach photosystem II has been studied with time resolved picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy between 77 K and 270 K. It was observed that these particles exhibit multi-exponential fluorescence decays of the excited state at all temperatures. The major observations are an energy transfer/trapping time of {approx}40 picoseconds and a long-lived {approx}23 nanosecond component attributed to the recombination of the radical pair. These experimentally obtained parameters were used to estimate the free energy difference for the radical pair formation.

  4. First insertion of NO into a transition-metal cluster-carbon bond: regioselective formation, structure, and reactions of the first alkanenitrile oxide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, A.; Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Walborsky, E.C.; Wolfgruber, M.

    1986-02-05

    The chemistry of NO in the presence of transition metals is receiving considerable current attention because of its role in air pollution, its potential in organic synthesis by carbon-nitrogen bond formation, and an increasing interest in its basic features. The nitrosyl cation has been reacted with many mono and polynuclear metal systems, leading mainly to substitution and reduction. Insertion into alkyl and aryl metal bonds in mono-metallic complexes is documented. The unprecedented title reaction and some preliminary chemistry of the products are reported here. 27 references, 1 figure.

  5. Metabolic-intermediate complex formation with cytochrome P450: theoretical studies in elucidating the reaction pathway for the generation of reactive nitroso intermediate.

    PubMed

    Taxak, Nikhil; Desai, Prashant V; Patel, Bhargav; Mohutsky, Michael; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Gombar, Vijay; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2012-08-01

    Mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) of cytochrome P450 (CYP) can lead to drug-drug interactions and often to toxicity. Some aliphatic and aromatic amines can undergo biotransformation reactions to form reactive metabolites such as nitrosoalkanes, leading to MBI of CYPs. It has been proposed that the nitrosoalkanes coordinate with the heme iron, forming metabolic-intermediate complex (MIC), resulting in the quasi-irreversible inhibition of CYPs. Limited mechanistic details regarding the formation of reactive nitroso intermediate and its coordination with heme-iron have been reported. A quantum chemical analysis was performed to elucidate potential reaction pathways for the generation of nitroso intermediate and the formation of MIC. Elucidation of the energy profile along the reaction path, identification of three-dimensional structures of reactive intermediates and transition states, as well as charge and spin density analyses, were performed using the density functional B3LYP method. The study was performed using Cpd I [iron (IV-oxo] heme porphine with SH(-) as the axial ligand) to represent the catalytic domain of CYP, simulating the biotransformation process. Three pathways: (i) N-oxidation followed by proton shuttle, (ii) N-oxidation followed by 1,2-H shift, and (iii) H-abstraction followed by rebound mechanism, were studied. It was observed that the proton shuttle pathway was more favorable over the whole reaction leading to reactive nitroso intermediate. This study revealed that the MIC formation from a primary amine is a favorable exothermic process, involving eight different steps and preferably takes place on the doublet spin surface of Cpd I. The rate-determining step was identified to be the first N-oxidation of primary amine. PMID:22610824

  6. Cyclopentadienyl nickel(ii) N,C-chelating benzothiazolyl NHC complexes: synthesis, characterization and application in catalytic C-C bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Teo, Wei Jie; Wang, Zhe; Xue, Fei; Andy Hor, T S; Zhao, Jin

    2016-04-25

    Cyclopentadienyl (Cp) Ni(ii) complexes [CpNiL][PF6] containing hybrid N,C chelating benzothiazolyl NHC ligands (L1 = 1-(2-benzothiazolyl)-3-methylimidazol-2-ylidene, ; L2 = 1-(2-benzothiazolyl)-3-allylimidazol-2-ylidene, ; L3 = 1-(2-benzothiazolyl)-3-benzylimidazol-2-ylidene, ) have been synthesized and fully characterized. The catalytic activity of in some C-C bond formation reactions has been examined. They are efficient catalysts for the homo-coupling of benzyl bromide in the presence of MeMgCl at r.t. with good functional group tolerance. Complex is active in the catalytic oxidative homo-coupling of Grignard reagents with 1,2-dichloroethane as an oxidant at r.t. PMID:27011227

  7. Eight steps preceding O-O bond formation in oxygenic photosynthesis--a basic reaction cycle of the Photosystem II manganese complex.

    PubMed

    Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2007-06-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, water is split at a Mn(4)Ca complex bound to the proteins of photosystem II (PSII). Powered by four quanta of visible light, four electrons and four protons are removed from two water molecules before dioxygen is released. By this process, water becomes an inexhaustible source of the protons and electrons needed for primary biomass formation. On the basis of structural and spectroscopic data, we recently have introduced a basic reaction cycle of water oxidation which extends the classical S-state cycle [B. Kok, B. Forbush, M. McGloin, Cooperation of charges in photosynthetic O2 evolution- I. A linear four-step mechanism, Photochem. Photobiol. 11 (1970) 457-475] by taking into account also the role and sequence of deprotonation events [H. Dau, M. Haumann, Reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation in plants and cyanobacteria, Science 312 (2006) 1471-1472]. We propose that the outwardly convoluted and irregular events of the classical S-state cycle are governed by a simple underlying principle: protons and electrons are removed strictly alternately from the Mn complex. Starting in I(0), eight successive steps of alternate proton and electron removal lead to I(8) and only then the O-O bond is formed. Thus not only four oxidizing equivalents, but also four bases are accumulated prior to the onset of dioxygen formation. After reviewing the kinetic properties of the individual S-state transition, we show that the proposed basic model explains a large body of experimental results straightforwardly. Furthermore we discuss how the I-cycle model addresses the redox-potential problem of PSII water oxidation and we propose that the accumulated bases facilitate dioxygen formation by acting as proton acceptors. PMID:17442260

  8. Complex format synchronization and decommutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thom, Gary A.

    Some complex telemetry formats currently used for data transmission by airborn data acquisition systems are reviewed. The formats discussed include asynchronous embedded formats, tagged data formats, IRIG 106 Chapter 8 formats, multiplexed formats, and adaptive formats. The need for designing decommutation systems characterized by extended life or capable of supporting multiple applications that are flexible enough to adapt to new formats is emphasized. It is suggested that existing complex formats be used as a guide in designing new systems with flexibility for future applications.

  9. Complexation reactions in aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Buffle, J.; Chalmers, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the properties, reactivities, and ecological implications of all chemically ill-defined natural complexants in aquatic systems. Analytical and theoretical aspects are presented simultaneously, covering speciation parameters, nature, and properties of organic and inorganic ligands in natural waters, their reactions with inorganic elements (particularly metals), and methods of measurement of speciation parameters.

  10. Ab initio study on the mechanism of C2H2++NH3 reaction: Efficient charge transfer and proton transfer processes competing with stable complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qiang; Morokuma, Keiji

    1998-03-01

    High level ab initio calculations have been performed to investigate the mechanism of the ion-molecule reaction NH3+C2H2+. Three channels, covalent complex formation (CC), proton transfer (PT), and charge transfer (CT) have been studied. Among the two pathways found for the PT channel, one leads the reactants NH3+C2H2+ to NH4++C2H(2Π) through a moderately bound complex without any barrier, and the other leads NH3++C2H2 to the H-atom transferred products NH4++C2H(2Σ+) with a modest barrier. These findings support the fast "stripping" mechanism proposed by Anderson et al. As to the CC channel, several isomers of C2H5N+ and the isomerization transition states have been located. No significant barrier relative to the reactants has been found on either the ground or the 2A″ excited state. To rationalize the experimental fact that no CC channel products have been observed, it is argued that the reactants NH3+C2H2+ correlate adiabatically to excited states of covalent C2H5N+ species, whose formation requires significant alternation of the C2H2+ geometry and electronic structure. Therefore, the system is most likely to follow the PT or the CT channel instead of visiting the CC channel. For the CT channel, limited potential energy surface scans of the three electronic states (1,2 2A'+2A″) indicate that CT at different approach angles or between electronic states of different symmetries (A'→A',A″→A') may produce final products of different characteristics, and might account for the two pathways proposed by Anderson et al.

  11. Isomer formation and other issues in the substitution reactions of oxorhenium(V) complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine and related ligands.

    PubMed

    Espenson, J H; Shan, X; Lahti, D W; Rockey, T M; Saha, B; Ellern, A

    2001-12-17

    Two new oxorhenium(V) compounds were prepared and characterized: MeReO(mtp)(Me(2)Bpy) and MeReO(mtp)(dppb), where mtpH(2) is 2-(mercaptomethyl)thiophenol, Me(2)Bpy is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, and dppb is 1,2-(Ph(2)P)(2)C(6)H(4). The more stable geometric isomer of MeReO(mtp)X forms MeReO(mtp)Y (X, Y = PR(3), NC(5)H(4)R) in two steps, both of which show a first-order dependence on [Y], proceeding through the metastable geometric isomer MeReO(mtp)Y. When Y = PR(3), no MeReO(mtp)Y was detected at equilibrium; with NC(5)H(4)R, however, both isomers were detected. The values of K(PyPy) were 8.5-9.8, largely irrespective of R; for NC(5)H(5), DeltaH degrees = -4.47 +/- 0.29 kJ and DeltaS degrees = 3.9 +/- 1.0 J K(-1). For the more symmetric edt ligand, geometric isomers do not exist, but enantiomers do. The rate of racemization of MeReO(edt)(NC(5)H(4)R) was proportional to [Py]. Values of k(rac) for 16 compounds span the range 135-370 L mol(-1) s(-1) in C(6)H(6) at 25 degrees C (rho = -0.39 +/- 0.07). In toluene-d(8), k(rac) for 4-picoline has DeltaH = 28.9 +/- 0.4 kJ, DeltaS() = -103.6 +/- 0.9 J K(-1). A common mechanism applies to ligand substitution (mtp) and racemization (edt). MeReO(dithiolate)Py complexes react with Bpy, Me(2)Bpy, Phen, and Me(2)Phen to form six-coordinate chelates, with rate constants 0.024-0.74 L mol(-1) s(-1) at 25 degrees C, some 10(3) times smaller than with pyridines, no doubt owing to the bulk of the bidentates. Values of DeltaS are -86 to -138 J K(-1), reflecting substantial orientational barriers as well as the inherent contribution of the associative mechanism. The product is MeReO(mtp)(Me(2)Bpy). The formation of the metastable isomer is consistent with the mechanism assigned to the ligand substitution and racemization reactions. Such compounds, once formed, no longer participate in ligand substitution reactions at reasonable rates. The formation of the metastable isomer is consistent with the mechanism assigned to the ligand substitution and racemization reactions. PMID:11735483

  12. Markovian dynamics on complex reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutsias, J.; Jenkinson, G.

    2013-08-01

    Complex networks, comprised of individual elements that interact with each other through reaction channels, are ubiquitous across many scientific and engineering disciplines. Examples include biochemical, pharmacokinetic, epidemiological, ecological, social, neural, and multi-agent networks. A common approach to modeling such networks is by a master equation that governs the dynamic evolution of the joint probability mass function of the underlying population process and naturally leads to Markovian dynamics for such process. Due however to the nonlinear nature of most reactions and the large size of the underlying state-spaces, computation and analysis of the resulting stochastic population dynamics is a difficult task. This review article provides a coherent and comprehensive coverage of recently developed approaches and methods to tackle this problem. After reviewing a general framework for modeling Markovian reaction networks and giving specific examples, the authors present numerical and computational techniques capable of evaluating or approximating the solution of the master equation, discuss a recently developed approach for studying the stationary behavior of Markovian reaction networks using a potential energy landscape perspective, and provide an introduction to the emerging theory of thermodynamic analysis of such networks. Three representative problems of opinion formation, transcription regulation, and neural network dynamics are used as illustrative examples.

  13. Formation, structure, and reactivity of palladium superoxo complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Talsi, E.P.; Babenko, V.P.; Shubin, A.A.; Chinakov, V.D.; Nekipelov, V.M.; Zamaraev, K.I.

    1987-11-18

    The mechanism of formation of palladium superoxo complexes, their structure, and their reactivity are discussed. The formation of the palladium superoxo complexes in the reaction of palladium(II) acetate, propionate, trifluororacetate, and bis(acetylacetonate) and palladium(0) tetrakis(triphenylphosphine) with hydrogen peroxide and potassium superoxide has been detected in solution by electron proton resonance. The oxidation of olefins and carbon monoxide by these complexes is considered. Reaction mechanisms and reaction kinetics for these oxidations are reported using the palladium superoxo complexes. 44 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Reverse hydrotropy by complex formation.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Kamil; Gutberlet, Thomas; Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Terry, Ann

    2015-01-14

    Self-aggregation of three di-N-alkylated diaza-18-crown-6 ethers (ACEs) was studied in non-polar solvents. The three ACEs differed by the length of the alkyl chain: n-decyl (ACE-10), n-hexadecyl (ACE-16) and n-tetracosane (ACE-24). From the previously reported interfacial tension isotherms, the formation of reverse micelles was expected above ACE concentrations of ∼10(-3) M. However, the water content analysis in conjunction with Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and (1)H NMR Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY) do not provide any clear proof of the existence of aggregates. Only the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) of concentrated toluene ACE solutions reveals the existence of small reverse micelles (probably ACE dimers forming small cages hosting 1-2 water molecules). On the other hand, spectrophotometric and fluorescence dye dissolution studies using eosin Y, tropaeolin OO and methyl orange suggest that ACEs can dissolve these dyes without requiring the formation of aggregates. This discrepancy was interpreted assuming the dye-ACE complexation as the driving force for dye solubilisation, providing a possible mechanism of reverse hydrotropy ("lipotropy") in non-polar solvents. This example shows that special care should be taken when dye solubilisation is used to probe self-aggregation of an amphiphile in non-polar solvents. The amphiphile-dye complex formation might be responsible for false positive results and the aggregate formation should always be confirmed with other methods. PMID:25415596

  15. Differential reaction kinetics, cleavage complex formation, and nonamer binding domain dependence dictate the structure-specific and sequence-specific nuclease activity of RAGs.

    PubMed

    Naik, Abani Kanta; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2012-01-20

    During V(D)J recombination, RAG (recombination-activating gene) complex cleaves DNA based on sequence specificity. Besides its physiological function, RAG has been shown to act as a structure-specific nuclease. Recently, we showed that the presence of cytosine within the single-stranded region of heteroduplex DNA is important when RAGs cleave on DNA structures. In the present study, we report that heteroduplex DNA containing a bubble region can be cleaved efficiently when present along with a recombination signal sequence (RSS) in cis or trans configuration. The sequence of the bubble region influences RAG cleavage at RSS when present in cis. We also find that the kinetics of RAG cleavage differs between RSS and bubble, wherein RSS cleavage reaches maximum efficiency faster than bubble cleavage. In addition, unlike RSS, RAG cleavage at bubbles does not lead to cleavage complex formation. Finally, we show that the "nonamer binding region," which regulates RAG cleavage on RSS, is not important during RAG activity in non-B DNA structures. Therefore, in the current study, we identify the possible mechanism by which RAG cleavage is regulated when it acts as a structure-specific nuclease. PMID:22119487

  16. Complex dynamics of the formation of spatially localized standing structures in the vicinity of saddle-node bifurcations of waves in the reaction-diffusion model of blood clotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanova, E. S.; Shnol, E. E.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.

    2004-09-01

    Local activation in a one-dimensional three-component reaction-diffusion model of blood clotting may lead to a formation of spatially localized standing structures (peaks) via several complex scenarios. In the first scenario, two concentration pulses first propagate from the site of activation, then stop and transform into peaks [Zarnitsina , Chaos 11, 57 (2001)]. Here, we examine this scenario, and also describe a different scenario of peak formation. In this scenario, two trigger waves propagate initially in opposite directions away from the site of activation. Then they stop and change direction of propagation toward each other to the activation site, where they interact and form a peak. Both of these scenarios of stable peak formation are observed in the vicinity of saddle-node bifurcation and may be viewed as a memory of the extinct wave modes.

  17. Audience Reactions to Two Visual Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Richard David

    One hundred undergraduate business students completed a questionnaire designed to determine their reactions to a traditional and a "flashier" textbook format. Before completing the questionnaire, subjects spent several minutes examining two business textbooks--one an older textbook with black ink on white paper, narrow margins, and few…

  18. Intramolecular cyclopropanation reactions of chromium (alkenyloxy)carbene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Soederberg, B.C.; Hegedus, L.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Chromium (aryl)(alkenyloxy)carbene complexes underwent intramolecualr cyclopropanation reactions under mild conditions. Evidence for the intervention of metathesis/readdition and for twist' addition followed by {beta}-hydride elimiantion/reductive elimination was obtained. Carbenes of this class, sufficiently stable to isolate, underwent facile photochemical intramolecualr cyclobutanone formation. Molecular structures were determined by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy.

  19. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura B.; Winstanley, Henry F.; Mitchell, Sarah L.; Fowler, Andrew C.; Sander, Graham C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front.

  20. Complex formation of metal ions with xylenol orange

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonov, V.N.

    1987-01-20

    The complex formation of metals with xylenol orange, purified by gel filtration on Molselekt G-10, was studied. The spectrophotometric characteristics of the complexes formed were refined. The chemistry of the reaction with xylenol orange was studied. A method was developed for the determination of aluminum in copper alloys.

  1. Kinetics of rouleau formation. II. Reversible reactions.

    PubMed

    Samsel, R W; Perelson, A S

    1984-04-01

    Red blood cells aggregate face-to-face to form long, cylindrical, straight chains and sometimes branched structures called rouleaux. Here we extend a kinetic model developed by R. W. Samsel and A. S. Perelson (1982, Biophys. J. 37:493-514) to include both the formation and dissociation of rouleaux. We examine thermodynamic constraints on the rate constants of the model imposed by the principle of detailed balance. Incorporation of reverse reactions allows us to compute mean sizes of rouleaux and straight chain segments within rouleaux, as functions of time and at equilibrium. Using the Flory - Stockmayer method from polymer chemistry, we obtain a closed-form solution for the size distribution of straight chain segments within rouleaux at any point in the evolution of the reaction. The predictions of our theory compare favorably with data collected by D. Kernick , A.W.L. Jay , S. Rowlands , and L. Skibo (1973, Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 51:690-699) on the kinetics of rouleau formation. When rouleaux grow large, they may contain rings or loops and take on the appearance of a network. We demonstrate the importance of including the kinetics of ring closure in the development of realistic models of rouleaux formation. PMID:6426540

  2. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes.

    PubMed

    Cribbin, Laura B; Winstanley, Henry F; Mitchell, Sarah L; Fowler, Andrew C; Sander, Graham C

    2014-12-15

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front. PMID:25461883

  3. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  4. Synthesis, DNA binding and complex formation reactions of 3-amino-5,6-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazine with Pd(II) and some selected biorelevant ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Azza A.; Alghanmi, Reem M.

    2015-03-01

    With the purpose of studying the binding behavior of Pd(II) complexes with DNA as the main biological target, and their ability to penetrate reasonably into tumour cells and destroy their replication ability, Pd(ADT)Cl2 complex was synthesized and characterized, where ADT is 3-amino-5,6-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazine. Stoichiometry and stability constants of the complexes formed between various biologically relevant ligands (amino acids, amides, DNA constituents, and dicarboxylic acids) and [Pd(ADT)(H2O)2]2+ were investigated at 25 °C and at constant 0.1 mol dm-3 ionic strength. The concentration distribution diagrams of the various species formed are evaluated. Further investigation of the binding properties of the diaqua complex [Pd(ADT)(H2O)2]2+ with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy. The intrinsic binding constants (Kb) calculated from UV-vis absorption studies was calculated to be 2.00 × 103 mol dm-3. The calculated (Kb) value was found to be of lower magnitude than that of the classical intercalator EB (Ethidium bromide) (Kb = 1.23(±0.07) × 105 mol dm-3) suggesting an electrostatic and/or groove binding mode for the interaction with CT-DNA. Thermal denaturation has been systematically studied by spectrophotometric method and the calculated ΔTm was nearly 5 °C, supporting the electrostatic and/or groove binding mode for the interaction between the complex and CT-DNA

  5. Kinetic analysis of complex reactions using FEMLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong

    2005-06-07

    A finite element method software FEMALB has been implemented to the kinetic analysis of complex reaction systems. The established protocol provides fast solutions to the coupled differential-algebraic equations. It shows significant advantages over the conventional coding process with the standard implicit Runge-Kutta (IRK) method. The accuracy and high efficiency have been demonstrated in the simulation of the reaction processes such as glucose/fructose hydrogenation and catalytic cracking of gasoil. As model validation, the numerical results showed satisfactory agreement with the exact solutions. With the powerful capability of solving large matrixes of differential equations (both ODE and PDE) with nonlinear algebraic constrains, such an algorithm has greatly reduced the coding labor in reaction mechanistic studies and provided a unique tool in reactor design and optimization.

  6. Visualization of chemical reaction dynamics: Toward understanding complex polyatomic reactions

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    Polyatomic molecules have several electronic states that have similar energies. Consequently, their chemical dynamics often involve nonadiabatic transitions between multiple potential energy surfaces. Elucidating the complex reactions of polyatomic molecules is one of the most important tasks of theoretical and experimental studies of chemical dynamics. This paper describes our recent experimental studies of the multidimensional multisurface dynamics of polyatomic molecules based on two-dimensional ion/electron imaging. It also discusses ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids for elucidating nonadiabatic electronic dynamics in aqueous solutions. PMID:23318678

  7. Photoinitiated reactions in weakly bonded complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wittig, C.

    1993-05-01

    This paper discusses photoinitiated reactions in weakly bonded binary complexes in which the constituents are only mildly perturbed by the intermolecular bond. Such complexes, with their large zero point excursions, set the stage for events that occur following electronic excitation of one of the constituents. This can take several forms, but in all cases, entrance channel specificity is imposed by the character of the complex as well as the nature of the photoinitiation process. This has enabled us to examine aspects of bimolecular processes: steric effects, chemical branching ratios, and inelastic scattering. Furthermore, monitoring reactions directly in the time domain can reveal mechanisms that cannot be inferred from measurements of nascent product excitations. Consequently, we examined several systems that had been studied previously by our group with product state resolution. With CO{sub 2}/HI, in which reaction occurs via a HOCO intermediate, the rates agree with RRKM predictions. With N{sub 2}O/HI, the gas phase single collision reaction yielding OH + N{sub 2} has been shown to proceed mainly via an HNNO intermediate that undergoes a 1,3-hydrogen shift to the OH + N{sub 2} channel. With complexes, ab initio calculations and high resolution spectroscopic studies of analogous systems suggest that the hydrogen, while highly delocalized, prefers the oxygen to the nitrogen. We observe that OH is produced with a fast risetime (< 250 fs) which can be attributed to either direct oxygen-side attack or rapid HNNO decomposition and/or a termolecular contribution involving the nearby iodine.

  8. Reaction-diffusion controlled growth of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorduin, Willem; Mahadevan, L.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how the emergence of complex forms and shapes in biominerals came about is both of fundamental and practical interest. Although biomineralization processes and organization strategies to give higher order architectures have been studied extensively, synthetic approaches to mimic these self-assembled structures are highly complex and have been difficult to emulate, let alone replicate. The emergence of solution patterns has been found in reaction-diffusion systems such as Turing patterns and the BZ reaction. Intrigued by this spontaneous formation of complexity we explored if similar processes can lead to patterns in the solid state. We here identify a reaction-diffusion system in which the shape of the solidified products is a direct readout of the environmental conditions. Based on insights in the underlying mechanism, we developed a toolbox of engineering strategies to deterministically sculpt patterns and shapes, and combine different morphologies to create a landscape of hierarchical multi scale-complex tectonic architectures with unprecedented levels of complexity. These findings may hold profound implications for understanding, mimicking and ultimately expanding upon nature's morphogenesis strategies, allowing the synthesis of advanced highly complex microscale materials and devices. WLN acknowledges the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for financial support

  9. New Pathways for the Formation of Complex Organics and Prebiotic Synthesis in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shall, M. S.

    2010-04-01

    We study the formation mechanisms of complex organics that are present in interstellar clouds. The reaction of acetylene ion with water produces vinyl alcohol while the reaction of benzene ion with acetylene produces naphthalene-type ion.

  10. C-H insertion and. pi. -complex formation reactions of (/eta//sup 5/-C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/)(PMe/sub 3/)Ir with ethylene: an intra- and intermolecular isotope effect study

    SciTech Connect

    Stoutland, P.O.; Bergman, R.G.

    1988-08-17

    Thermolysis of the iridium cyclohexyl hydride (/eta//sup 5/-Me/sub 5/C/sub 5/)(PMe/sub 3/)Ir(C/sub 6/H/sub 11/)(H) at 130-160/degrees/C in cyclohexane in the presence of ethylene results in formation of the vinyl hydride (/eta//sup 5/-Me/sub 5/C/sub 5/)(PMe/sub 3/)Ir(HC /double bond/CH/sub 2/)(H) (1) and the ..pi..-complex (/eta//sub 5/-Me/sub 5/C/sub 5/)(PMe/sub 3/)Ir(H/sub 2/C /double bond/CH/sub 2/) (2) in a ratio of 2:1. Thermolysis of 1 in cyclohexane or benzene above 180/degrees/C results in quantitative conversion to 2. Thermolysis of (/eta//sub 5/-Me/sub 5/C/sub 5/)PMe/sub 3/Ir(C/sub 6/H/sub 11/)(H) in the presence of ethylene-d/sub 2/ results in insertion into both the C-H and the C-D bonds and allows determination of an intramolecular isotope effect: k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.18 /plus minus/ 0.03. Competition experiments involving ethylene and ethylene-d/sub 4/ allow determination of an intermolecular isotope effect for insertion into a C-H(D) bond: k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.49 /plus minus/ 0.08. The intermolecular isotope effect for formation of 2 was found to be 0.82 /plus minus/ 0.05. The different intra- and intermolecular isotope effects for C-H insertion require an intermediate different from the ..pi..-complex 2 on the reaction pathway leading to 1. Possible structures for this species are discussed. 44 references, 9 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Reactions of Dinuclear Platinum(II) Complexes with Peptides.

    PubMed

    Rajković, Snežana; Živković, Marija D; Djuran, Miloš I

    2016-01-01

    The present review article highlights recent findings in the reactions between different dinuclear Pt(II) complexes with peptides containing cysteine, methionine and histidine residues. The reactions of {trans-[Pt(NH3)2Cl]2(μ-X)}(2+) and {trans-[Pt(NH3)2(H2O)]2(μ-X)}(4+) type complexes with different bridging ligands (X) (X = pyrazine, 4,4'-bipyridyl and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane) with the tripeptide glutathione proceeded in two steps. In the first step, one water or chlorido ligand of the dinuclear Pt(II) complex was substituted by the sulfhydryl group of GSH, while in the second step, the remaining water or chlorido ligand from the dinuclear Pt(II)-peptide complex was replaced by the second molecule of glutathione, finally leading to the formation of the {trans-[Pt(NH3)2(GS)]2(μ-X)}(2+) complex. It was shown that the bridging ligand had an important influence on the reactivity of these complexes with glutathione. No hydrolytic cleavage of any amide bond was observed in the reactions between these complexes and glutathione. However, in reactions performed in acidic media (2.0 < pH < 2.5) between dinuclear Pt(II) complexes with the general formulae {[Pt(L)(H2O)]2(μ-diazine)}(4+) (L is different bidentate coordinated diamine ligands and diazine is a pyrazine- or pyridazine-bridging ligand) and Nacetylated peptides containing L-methionine and L-histidine amino acids in the side chains (Ac-L-Met-Gly, Ac-L-His-Gly and Ac-L-Met-Gly-L-His-GlyNH2), regioselective cleavage of these peptides occurred. The mechanism of these hydrolytic reactions was discussed in relation to the structure of the diazine-bridged Pt(II) complex and the investigated peptides. A systematic summary of these results could contribute to the future design of new dinuclear Pt(II) complexes as potential reagents for regioselective cleavage of peptides and proteins. PMID:26521953

  12. Class pi glutathione S-transferase: Meisenheimer complex formation.

    PubMed

    Bico, P; Chen, C Y; Jones, M; Erhardt, J; Dirr, H

    1994-08-01

    The enzyme-catalysed formation of the dead-end Meisenheimer complex, 1-(S-glutathionyl)-2,4,6-trinitrocyclohexadienate, between glutathione and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene by two class pi glutathione S-transferases was studied under equilibrium conditions. The apparent formation constant of the complex at pH6.5, is 1.21 x 10(3) M-1 and 1.47 x 10(3) M-1 for isoenzyme pGSTP1-1 from porcine lung and hGSTP1-1 the human recombinant orthologue, respectively. These values are about 40- to 50-times larger than that determined for the nonenzymatic reaction in solution. Competitive inhibitors in the form of glutathione analogues that bind the G-site (glutathione sulphonate) or both the G-site and the H-site (S-hexylglutathione) regions of the active site markedly diminish complex formation. Comparison of kinetic data for glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes from the pi and mu gene classes suggests that the catalytic efficiencies for nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions correspond with the ability of the enzyme's active site to stabilise the Meisenheimer complex. Formation of the red-coloured complex in orthorhombic crystals of pGSTP1-1 demonstrated that the crystallized protein retains its catalytically functional conformation in the crystal lattice. PMID:7987257

  13. Speciation studies on the complex formation reactions of [Pd( N, N-diethyl-ethylendiamine)(H 2O) 2] 2+ with some bio-relevant ligands and displacement reaction by mercaptoethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Mohamed R.; Shoukry, Mohamed M.; Osman, Afaf A.; AbedelKarim, Abeer T.

    2011-09-01

    Pd(deen)Cl 2 and Pd(deen)(CBDCA) complexes, where deen = N, N-diethylethylenediamine and CBDCA = 1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylate, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic techniques. The stoichiometry and stability of the complexes formed between various biologically relevant ligands (amino acids, peptides, DNA constituents and dicarboxylic acids) and [Pd(deen)(H 2O) 2] 2+ were investigated at 25 °C and 0.1 M ionic strength. The speciation diagrams of the complexes formed in solutions are evaluated. The mode of coordination of glycylglycine is investigated by spectrophotometric measurements. The equilibrium constants for the displacement of coordinated ligands as inosine, glycine or methionine by mercaptoethylamine are calculated. The results are expected to contribute to the chemistry of antitumour agents.

  14. Star Formation Across the W3 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Megías, Guillermo D.; Tapia, Mauricio; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Alves, Joáo F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  15. Surface-Guided Formation of an Organocobalt Complex.

    PubMed

    Weber, Peter B; Hellwig, Raphael; Paintner, Tobias; Lattelais, Marie; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Casado Aguilar, Pablo; Deimel, Peter S; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yi-Qi; Allegretti, Francesco; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Reichert, Joachim; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Barth, Johannes V; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Klappenberger, Florian

    2016-05-01

    Organocobalt complexes represent a versatile tool in organic synthesis as they are important intermediates in Pauson-Khand, Friedel-Crafts, and Nicholas reactions. Herein, a single-molecule-level investigation addressing the formation of an organocobalt complex at a solid-vacuum interface is reported. Deposition of 4,4'-(ethyne-1,2-diyl)dibenzonitrile and Co atoms on the Ag(111) surface followed by annealing resulted in genuine complexes in which single Co atoms laterally coordinated to two carbonitrile groups undergo organometallic bonding with the internal alkyne moiety of adjacent molecules. Alternative complexation scenarios involving fragmentation of the precursor were ruled out by complementary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to density functional theory analysis, the complexation with the alkyne moiety follows the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model for a two-electron-donor ligand where an alkyne-to-Co donation occurs together with a strong metal-to-alkyne back-donation. PMID:27059261

  16. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  17. Synthesis and reaction of the first 1,2-oxaphosphetane complexes.

    PubMed

    Kyri, Andreas Wolfgang; Nesterov, Vitaly; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Streubel, Rainer

    2014-09-26

    While P(V) 1,2-oxaphosphetanes are well known from the Wittig reaction, their P(III) analogues are still unexplored. Herein, the synthesis and reactions of the first 1,2-oxaphosphetane complexes are presented, which were achieved by reaction of the phosphinidenoid complex [Li(12-crown-4)(solv)][(OC)5W{(Me3Si)2HCPCl}] with different epoxides. The title compounds appeared to be stable in toluene up to 100?C, before unselective decomposition started. Acid-induced ring expansion with benzonitrile resulted in selective formation of the first complex bearing a 1,3,4-oxazaphosphacyclohex-2-ene ligand. PMID:25164241

  18. [Formations and reactions of aromatic furazan compounds].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M; Takabatake, T; Miyazawa, T

    2001-06-01

    A reaction from various kinds of nitroquinoline with hydroxylamine in potassium hydroxide alkalinity produced a novel product, furazanoquinoline, besides the known amino derivatives. The products obtained were furazano [3,4-f] quinoline (5) from 5-nitroquinoline (1) and 6-nitroquinoline (6), and furazano [3,4-h] quinoline (10) from 7-nitroquinoline (8) and 8-nitroquinoline (11). The reaction mechanism was believed to be as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. The photoreaction of benzofuroxan (19) in acetonitrile containing a little water, under a high pressure mercury lamp, produced 1H-azepine-2,7-dione (20), while under irradiation using a low pressure lamp, 6H-furazano [4,5-c] carbazole-3-oxide (21) and compound 20 were obtained. Then the photoproduct 20 produced photodimer 22 by irradiation in acetonitrile: water (9:1, v/v) using a high or low pressure mercury lamp, while photolysis with alkali proceeded as in the photoreaction of N-alkylimide to give 7-hydroxy-1H-azepine-2-one (23). When pyrido [2,3-c] furoxan (24) was irradiated in acetonitrile containing a little water with a low pressure mercury lamp, 3-nitro-2-pyridone (25) was obtained. When compound 24 was irradiated in the presence of morpholine with a low pressure mercury lamp in an argon atmosphere, 6-morpholinopyridine 2,3-dioxime (26) was produced. Quinoxaline 1,4-dioxide derivatives (31, 33), phenazine 5,10-dioxide derivatives (36, 37) and pyrido [2,3-b] pyrazine derivatives (38, 39) were synthesized from the corresponding furoxan catalyzed by silica gel or molecular sieves, and their antibacterial properties were evaluated. The results of antibacterial screening tests in vitro, revealed strong activity against Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:11433773

  19. Understanding bond formation in polar one-step reactions. Topological analyses of the reaction between nitrones and lithium ynolates.

    PubMed

    Roca-López, David; Polo, Victor; Tejero, Tomás; Merino, Pedro

    2015-04-17

    The mechanism of the reaction between nitrones and lithium ynolates has been studied using DFT methods at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ/PCM=THF level. After the formation of a starting complex an without energy barrier, in which the lithium atom is coordinated to both nitrone and ynolate, the reaction takes place in one single kinetic step through a single transition structure. However, the formation of C-C and C-O bonds takes place sequentially through a typical two-stage, one-step process. A combined study of noncovalent interactions (NCIs) and electron localization function (ELFs) of selected points along the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) of the reaction confirmed that, in the transition structure, only the C-C bond is being formed to some extent, whereas an electrostatic interaction is present between carbon and oxygen atoms previous to the formation of the C-O bond. Indeed, the formation of the second C-O bond only begins when the first C-C bond is completely formed without formation of any intermediate. Once the C-C bond is formed and before the C-O bond formation starts the RMS gradient norm dips, approaching but not reaching 0, giving rise to a hidden intermediate. PMID:25803829

  20. Formation of a Bridging Phosphinidene Thorium Complex.

    PubMed

    Behrle, Andrew C; Castro, Ludovic; Maron, Laurent; Walensky, Justin R

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis and structural determination of the first thorium phosphinidene complex are reported. The reaction of 2 equiv of (C5Me5)2Th(CH3)2 with H2P(2,4,6-(i)Pr3C6H2) at 95 °C produces [(C5Me5)2Th]2(μ2-P[(2,6-CH2CHCH3)2-4-(i)PrC6H2] as well as 4 equiv of methane, 2 equiv from deprotonation of the phosphine and 2 equiv from C-H bond activation of one methyl group of each of the isopropyl groups at the 2- and 6-positions. Transition state calculations indicate that the steps in the mechanism are P-H, C-H, C-H, and then P-H bond activation to form the phosphinidene. PMID:26575219

  1. Vortex formation in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Osamu

    Complex plasma experiments in ground-based laboratories as well as in microgravity conditions have shown the formation of vortex structures in various conditions (e.g., 1,2,3,4). The vortex structures formed in a complex plasma are visible by naked eyes with the help of irradiating laser and the individual dust particles in the structure give us the opportunity to study detailed physics of the commonly observed natural phenomena known such as tornadoes, typhoons, hurricanes and dust devils. Based on the Navier-Stokes equation with proper complex plasma conditions we analyze as much as possible in a universal way the vortex structure and clarifies the role of the controlling parameters like flow velocity and external magnetic field. 1. G. E. Morfill,H. M. Thomas, U. Konopka,H. Rothermel, M. Zuzic, A. Ivlev, and J. Goree, Phys,. Rev. Lett. 83, 1598 (1999). 2. E. Nebbat and R. Annou, Phys. Plasmas 17, 093702 (2010). 3. Y. Saitou and O. Ishihara, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 185003 (2013). 4. V. N. Tsytovich and N. G. Gusein-zade, Plasma Phys. Rep. 39, 515 (2013).

  2. The catalytic role of uranyl in formation of polycatechol complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the association of contaminant uranium with natural organic matter (NOM) and the fate of uranium in ground water, spectroscopic studies of uranium complexation with catechol were conducted. Catechol provides a model for ubiquitous functional groups present in NOM. Liquid samples were analyzed using Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Catechol was found to polymerize in presence of uranyl ions. Polymerization in presence of uranyl was compared to reactions in the presence of molybdate, another oxyion, and self polymerization of catechol at high pH. The effect of time and dissolved oxygen were also studied. It was found that oxygen was required for self-polymerization at elevated pH. The potential formation of phenoxy radicals as well as quinones was monitored. The benzene ring was found to be intact after polymerization. No evidence for formation of ether bonds was found, suggesting polymerization was due to formation of C-C bonds between catechol ligands. Uranyl was found to form outer sphere complexes with catechol at initial stages but over time (six months) polycatechol complexes were formed and precipitated from solution (forming humic-like material) while uranyl ions remained in solution. Our studies show that uranyl acts as a catalyst in catechol-polymerization. PMID:21396112

  3. Classic reaction kinetics can explain complex patterns of antibiotic action

    PubMed Central

    zur Wiesch, P. Abel; Abel, S.; Gkotzis, S.; Ocampo, P.; Engelstädter, J.; Hinkley, T.; Magnus, C.; Waldor, M. K.; Udekwu, K.; Cohen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Finding optimal dosing strategies for treating bacterial infections is extremely difficult, and improving therapy requires costly and time-intensive experiments. To date, an incomplete mechanistic understanding of drug effects has limited our ability to make accurate quantitative predictions of drug-mediated bacterial killing and impeded the rational design of antibiotic treatment strategies. Three poorly understood phenomena complicate predictions of antibiotic activity: post-antibiotic growth suppression, density-dependent antibiotic effects, and persister cell formation. Here, we show that chemical binding kinetics alone are sufficient to explain these three phenomena, using single cell data and time-kill curves of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae exposed to a variety of antibiotics in combination with a theoretical model that links chemical reaction kinetics to bacterial population biology. Our model reproduces existing observations, has a high predictive power across different experimental setups (R2= 0.86), and makes several testable predictions, which we verified in new experiments and by analysing published data from a clinical trial on tuberculosis therapy. While a variety of biological mechanisms have previously been invoked to explain post-antibiotic growth suppression, density-dependent antibiotic effects, and especially persister cell formation, our findings reveal that a simple model which considers only binding kinetics provides a parsimonious and unifying explanation for these three complex, phenotypically distinct behaviours. Current antibiotic and other chemotherapeutic regimens are often based on trial-and-error or expert opinion. Our ‘chemical reaction kinetics’-based approach may inform new strategies, that are based on rational design. PMID:25972005

  4. Classic reaction kinetics can explain complex patterns of antibiotic action.

    PubMed

    Abel Zur Wiesch, Pia; Abel, Sören; Gkotzis, Spyridon; Ocampo, Paolo; Engelstädter, Jan; Hinkley, Trevor; Magnus, Carsten; Waldor, Matthew K; Udekwu, Klas; Cohen, Ted

    2015-05-13

    Finding optimal dosing strategies for treating bacterial infections is extremely difficult, and improving therapy requires costly and time-intensive experiments. To date, an incomplete mechanistic understanding of drug effects has limited our ability to make accurate quantitative predictions of drug-mediated bacterial killing and impeded the rational design of antibiotic treatment strategies. Three poorly understood phenomena complicate predictions of antibiotic activity: post-antibiotic growth suppression, density-dependent antibiotic effects, and persister cell formation. We show that chemical binding kinetics alone are sufficient to explain these three phenomena, using single-cell data and time-kill curves of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae exposed to a variety of antibiotics in combination with a theoretical model that links chemical reaction kinetics to bacterial population biology. Our model reproduces existing observations, has a high predictive power across different experimental setups (R(2) = 0.86), and makes several testable predictions, which we verified in new experiments and by analyzing published data from a clinical trial on tuberculosis therapy. Although a variety of biological mechanisms have previously been invoked to explain post-antibiotic growth suppression, density-dependent antibiotic effects, and especially persister cell formation, our findings reveal that a simple model that considers only binding kinetics provides a parsimonious and unifying explanation for these three complex, phenotypically distinct behaviours. Current antibiotic and other chemotherapeutic regimens are often based on trial and error or expert opinion. Our "chemical reaction kinetics"-based approach may inform new strategies, which are based on rational design. PMID:25972005

  5. Hydrophosphination reactions with transition metal ferrocenylphosphine complexes.

    PubMed

    Pritzwald-Stegmann, Julian Rodger Frederic; Lönnecke, Peter; Hey-Hawkins, Evamarie

    2016-02-01

    The group 6 metal mono-, bis- and tris-ferrocenylphosphine complexes [M(CO)5(PH2Fc)] (1a, M = Cr; 1b, M = Mo; 1c, M = W), cis-[M(CO)4(PH2Fc)2] (2a, M = Cr; 2b, M = Mo; 2c, M = W) and fac-[M(CO)3(PH2Fc)3] (3a, M = Cr; 3b, M = Mo; 3c, M = W) [Fc = Fe(η(5)-C5H4)(η(5)-C5H5)] were prepared and fully characterised. IR and NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis indicate that FcPH2 is as good a σ donor as PhPH2 but is easier to handle and furthermore has a redox-active ferrocenyl group. Complex 1c was employed in the hydrophosphination of acrylonitrile and methyl acrylate in the presence of catalytic amounts of KOtBu giving the secondary phosphine complexes [W(CO)5{PH(Fc)(CH2CH2CN)}] (4a) and [W(CO)5{PH(Fc)(CH2CH2C(O)OMe)}] (4b). In addition, FcP(CH2CH2CN)2 (5) was prepared by a similar method from FcPH2 and acrylonitrile. These hydrophosphination products represent a convenient method for the modification of phosphines. PMID:26579617

  6. Complexes of horseradish peroxidase with formate, acetate, and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Gunilla H; Nicholls, Peter; Svistunenko, Dimitri; Berglund, Gunnar I; Hajdu, Janos

    2005-01-18

    Carbon monoxide, formate, and acetate interact with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by binding to subsites within the active site. These ligands also bind to catalases, but their interactions are different in the two types of enzymes. Formate (notionally the "hydrated" form of carbon monoxide) is oxidized to carbon dioxide by compound I in catalase, while no such reaction is reported to occur in HRP, and the CO complex of ferrocatalase can only be obtained indirectly. Here we describe high-resolution crystal structures for HRP in its complexes with carbon monoxide and with formate, and compare these with the previously determined HRP-acetate structure [Berglund, G. I., et al. (2002) Nature 417, 463-468]. A multicrystal X-ray data collection strategy preserved the correct oxidation state of the iron during the experiments. Absorption spectra of the crystals and electron paramagnetic resonance data for the acetate and formate complexes in solution correlate electronic states with the structural results. Formate in ferric HRP and CO in ferrous HRP bind directly to the heme iron with iron-ligand distances of 2.3 and 1.8 A, respectively. CO does not bind to the ferric iron in the crystal. Acetate bound to ferric HRP stacks parallel with the heme plane with its carboxylate group 3.6 A from the heme iron, and without an intervening solvent molecule between the iron and acetate. The positions of the oxygen atoms in the bound ligands outline a potential access route for hydrogen peroxide to the iron. We propose that interactions in this channel ensure deprotonation of the proximal oxygen before binding to the heme iron. PMID:15641789

  7. Formation of mesic nuclei by (γ,p) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahiro, H.; Jido, D.; Hirenzaki, S.

    2005-10-01

    We present a theoretical study on formation rates of η and ω meson-nucleus systems induced by (γ,p) reactions on nuclear targets at ideal recoilless condition. We find that the smaller distortion effect in the (γ,p) reaction enables us to investigate properties of the mesons created deeply inside nucleus more clearly. We also consider excitation of scalar-isoscalar (σ) mode in nucleus in order to investigate spectral enhancement around two-pion threshold caused by partial restoration of chiral symmetry. We conclude that valuable information of meson-nucleus interactions can be extracted from global structure of the missing mass spectra in the (γ,p) reaction.

  8. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  9. Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex.

    PubMed

    Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Liddell, Paul A; Garg, Vikas; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2009-05-21

    In order to ensure efficient utilization of the solar spectrum, photosynthetic organisms use a variety of antenna chromophores to absorb light and transfer excitation to a reaction center, where photoinduced charge separation occurs. Reported here is a synthetic molecular heptad that features two bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene and two borondipyrromethene antennas linked to a hexaphenylbenzene core that also bears two zinc porphyrins. A fullerene electron acceptor self-assembles to both porhyrins via dative bonds. Excitation energy is transferred very efficiently from all four antennas to the porphyrins. Singlet-singlet energy transfer occurs both directly and by a stepwise funnel-like pathway wherein excitation moves down a thermodynamic gradient. The porphyrin excited states donate an electron to the fullerene with a time constant of 3 ps to generate a charge-separated state with a lifetime of 230 ps. The overall quantum yield is close to unity. In the absence of the fullerene, the porphyrin excited singlet state donates an electron to a borondipyrromethene on a slower time scale. This molecule demonstrates that by incorporating antennas, it is possible for a molecular system to harvest efficiently light throughout the visible from ultraviolet wavelengths out to approximately 650 nm. PMID:19438278

  10. Effect of inclusion complex on nitrous acid reaction with flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalafi, Lida; Rafiee, Mohammad; Sedaghat, Sajjad

    2011-10-01

    The kinetic of the nitrous acid reactions with quercetin and catechin has been studied using spectrophotometric method in aqueous solution. The results show that these antioxidants participate in oxidation reactions with nitrous acid which is derived from protonation of nitrite ion in mild acidic conditions. Corresponding o-quinones as relatively stable products were detected by spectrophotometric techniques. pH dependence of the reactions has been examined and the rate constants of reactions were obtained by non-linear fitting of kinetic profiles. The effect of β-cyclodextrin on the oxidation pathway was another object of this study. It is shown that β-cyclodextrin has an inhibitory effect on the oxidation reaction. The rate constants of oxidation reactions for complexed forms and their stability constants were obtained based on changes in the reaction rates as a function of β-cyclodextrin concentration.

  11. A complex reaction time study (Sternberg) in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Uri, John; Moore, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Simple and complex (Sternberg) reaction time studies were flown on three and seven day Shuttle flights in 1985. Three subjects did selftesting with an onboard handheld calculator without difficulty. There was little change in simple reaction time. One subject demonstrated a decrease in the processing rate during space motion sickness while a second exhibited an increase in complex reaction time without a change in processing rate during a period of high work load. The population was too small to demonstrate significant changes. This study demonstrates the ease and practicality of such measurements and indicates the potential value of such studies in space.

  12. Cadmium(II) complex formation with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Mah, Vicky; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2010-03-01

    Complex formation between heavy metal ions and glutathione (GSH) is considered as the initial step in many detoxification processes in living organisms. In this study the structure and coordination between the cadmium(II) ion and GSH were investigated in aqueous solutions (pH 7.5 and 11.0) and in the solid state, using a combination of spectroscopic techniques. The similarity of the Cd K-edge and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the solid compound [Cd(GS)(GSH)]ClO(4).3H(2)O, precipitating at pH 3.0, with the previously studied cysteine compound {Cd(HCys)(2).H(2)O}(2).H(3)O(+).ClO(4) (-) corresponds to Cd(S-GS)(3)O (dominating) and Cd(S-GS)(4) four-coordination within oligomeric complexes with mean bond distances of 2.51 +/- 0.02 A for Cd-S and 2.24 +/- 0.04 A for Cd-O. For cadmium(II) solutions (C (Cd(II)) approximately 0.05 M) at pH 7.5 with moderate excess of GSH (C (GSH)/C (Cd(II)) = 3.0-5.0), a mix of Cd(S-GS)(3)O (dominating) and Cd(S-GS)(4) species is consistent with the broad (113)Cd NMR resonances in the range 632-658 ppm. In alkaline solutions (pH 11.0 and C (GSH)/C (Cd(II)) = 2.0 or 3.0), two distinct peaks at 322 and 674 ppm are obtained. The first peak indicates six-coordinated mononuclear and dinuclear complexes with CdS(2)N(2)(N/O)(2) and CdSN(3)O(2) coordination in fast exchange, whereas the second corresponds to Cd(S-GS)(4) sites. At high ligand excess the tetrathiolate complex, Cd(S-GS)(4), characterized by a sharp delta((113)Cd) NMR signal at 677 ppm, predominates. The average Cd-S distance, obtained from the X-ray absorption spectra, varied within a narrow range, 2.49-2.53 A, for all solutions (pH 7.5 and 11.0) regardless of the coordination geometry. PMID:20035360

  13. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  14. Fluid pressure and reaction zone formation at a lithological interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Chemical composition variations in reaction zones between two distinct lithologies are generally interpreted in terms of chemical potential gradients and diffusion process. Concentration profiles can then be used to quantify the species diffusion coefficients or the time scale of geological events. However, chemical potential gradients are also functions of temperature and pressure and local variations of these parameters can thus potentially modify the diffusion process. In northern Corsica, a centimeter scale reaction zone formed under blueschist conditions at a serpentinite - marble contact of sedimentary origin. Three sub-zones having chemical compositions evolving from one rock end-member to another divide the reaction zone along sharp interfaces. At the reaction zone - marble interface, marble decarbonation occurs to form wollastonite and carbonaceous matter. Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction and the respective increase in density of 25 % and 7 % in the bulk rock and in the garnet minerals are interpreted as records of a pressure gradient during reaction zone formation. Moreover, the formation of a volatile-free sub-zone in the reaction zone from reaction between the H2O-bearing serpentinite and the CO2-bearing marble released fluids at the contact. The impact of such a release on the fluid pressure was modelled by considering the effects of both the rock compaction and the transport of fluid by hydraulic diffusion. Modelling results indicates that > 0.5 GPa fluid overpressure can be generated at the contact if devolatilization rates are of the order of the one experimentally measured (> 10-5 kg of fluid/m3 of rock/s). The resulting pressure gradient is of the order of magnitude of the one necessary to counter-balance the effect on chemical potential of the chemical composition variations across the contact. Finally, after the reaction has run to completion, the model predicts that fluid rapidly diffuses away from the interface which thus stops reacting and is preserved during its exhumation.

  15. Spectroscopic study of complex formation between aliphatic amines and chromogenic calix[4]arene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed-Ziegler, I.; Kubinyi, M.; Grofcsik, A.; Grün, A.; Bitter, I.

    1999-05-01

    The complexation properties of two new calix[4]arene derivatives were studied by UV/Vis spectroscopy. They have been found to bind aliphatic amines, lithium and calcium ions in equilibrium reactions, particularly in polar solvents. The reaction is indicated through the emergence of a new band. The equilibrium constants of complex formation in the case of some ligand-substrate compositions have been determined.

  16. Multistability and sustained oscillations in a model for protein complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löb, Daniel; Priester, Christopher; Drossel, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a model for the formation of protein complexes where each protein can occur at most once in a complex. The reaction rates for association and dissociation of proteins can be chosen independently for each reaction, without imposing detailed balance conditions. We show that this simple model can display multistability and periodic oscillations when it contains at least four different protein species. We prove that a system with three elementary species cannot be multistable.

  17. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Li Junqing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-10-15

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus, and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118, and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  18. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing; Jin, Gen-Ming; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-10-01

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus, and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118, and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  19. ReactionPredictor: prediction of complex chemical reactions at the mechanistic level using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-10-22

    Proposing reasonable mechanisms and predicting the course of chemical reactions is important to the practice of organic chemistry. Approaches to reaction prediction have historically used obfuscating representations and manually encoded patterns or rules. Here we present ReactionPredictor, a machine learning approach to reaction prediction that models elementary, mechanistic reactions as interactions between approximate molecular orbitals (MOs). A training data set of productive reactions known to occur at reasonable rates and yields and verified by inclusion in the literature or textbooks is derived from an existing rule-based system and expanded upon with manual curation from graduate level textbooks. Using this training data set of complex polar, hypervalent, radical, and pericyclic reactions, a two-stage machine learning prediction framework is trained and validated. In the first stage, filtering models trained at the level of individual MOs are used to reduce the space of possible reactions to consider. In the second stage, ranking models over the filtered space of possible reactions are used to order the reactions such that the productive reactions are the top ranked. The resulting model, ReactionPredictor, perfectly ranks polar reactions 78.1% of the time and recovers all productive reactions 95.7% of the time when allowing for small numbers of errors. Pericyclic and radical reactions are perfectly ranked 85.8% and 77.0% of the time, respectively, rising to >93% recovery for both reaction types with a small number of allowed errors. Decisions about which of the polar, pericyclic, or radical reaction type ranking models to use can be made with >99% accuracy. Finally, for multistep reaction pathways, we implement the first mechanistic pathway predictor using constrained tree-search to discover a set of reasonable mechanistic steps from given reactants to given products. Webserver implementations of both the single step and pathway versions of ReactionPredictor are available via the chemoinformatics portal http://cdb.ics.uci.edu/. PMID:22978639

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation from reaction of tertiary amines with nitrate radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erupe, M. E.; Price, D. J.; Silva, P. J.; Malloy, Q. G. J.; Qi, L.; Warren, B.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2008-09-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of tertiary amines with nitrate radical was investigated in an indoor environmental chamber. Particle chemistry was monitored using a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer while gas-phase species were detected using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. Trimethylamine, triethylamine and tributylamine were studied. Results indicate that tributylamine forms the most aerosol mass followed by trimethylamine and triethylamine respectively. Spectra from the aerosol mass spectrometer indicate the formation of complex non-salt aerosol products. We propose a reaction mechanism that proceeds via abstraction of a proton by nitrate radical followed by RO2 chemistry. Rearrangement of the aminyl alkoxy radical through hydrogen shift leads to the formation of hydroxylated amides, which explain most of the higher mass ions in the mass spectra. These experiments show that oxidation of tertiary amines by nitrate radical may be an important night-time source of secondary organic aerosol.

  1. Deduction of compound nucleus formation probability from the fragment angular distributions in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, C.; Thomas, R. G.; Mohanty, A. K.; Kapoor, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    The presence of various fissionlike reactions in heavy-ion induced reactions is a major hurdle in the path to laboratory synthesis of heavy and super-heavy nuclei. It is known that the cross section of forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the three factors—the capture cross section, probability of compound nucleus formation PCN, and the survival probability of the compound nucleus against fission. As the probability of compound nucleus formation, PCN is difficult to theoretically estimate because of its complex dependence on several parameters; attempts have been made in the past to deduce it from the fission fragment anisotropy data. In the present work, the fragment anisotropy data for a number of heavy-ion reactions are analyzed and it is found that deduction of PCN from the anisotropy data also requires the knowledge of the ratio of relaxation time of the K degree of freedom to pre-equilibrium fission time.

  2. Conversion Reactions of Solids: From a Surprising Three-Step Mechanism towards Directed Product Formation.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Stefan Michael; Krach, Alexander; Peter, Philipp; Weihrich, Richard

    2016-04-25

    Directed conversion reactions from binary to multinary compounds are discovered from the reaction of Bi2 S3 and Bi2 Se3 with NiCl2 ⋅6 H2 O in polyol media under basic conditions. Control of the synthesis conditions allows the preparation of NiBiSe and superconducting Ni3 Bi2 S2 and Ni3 Bi2 Se2 . The formation of Ni3 Bi2 S2 from Bi2 S3 is found from an unexpected three-step reaction path with Bi and NiBi as intermediates. In the more complex Ni/Bi/Se system, the mechanism found can be used to selectively direct the reaction between the competing ternaries and to suppress side-product formation. Contrary to solid-state reactions (500-900 °C) control of product formation is reached at reaction temperatures and times between 166-300 °C and 0.5-10 h, respectively. The formation of different phases is discussed from results of DFT calculations. PMID:26997587

  3. A new metalation complex for organic synthesis and polymerization reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirshfield, S. M.

    1971-01-01

    Organometallic complex of N,N,N',N' tetramethyl ethylene diamine /TMEDA/ and lithium acts as metalation intermediate for controlled systhesis of aromatic organic compounds and polymer formation. Complex of TMEDA and lithium aids in preparation of various organic lithium compounds.

  4. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  5. Reaction of an Iron(IV) Nitrido Complex with Cyclohexadienes: Cycloaddition and Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The iron(IV) nitrido complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe≡N reacts with 1,3-cyclohexadiene to yield the iron(II) pyrrolide complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe(η5-C4H4N) in high yield. The mechanism of product formation is proposed to involve sequential [4 + 1] cycloaddition and retro Diels–Alder reactions. Surprisingly, reaction with 1,4-cyclohexadiene yields the same iron-containing product, albeit in substantially lower yield. The proposed reaction mechanism, supported by electronic structure calculations, involves hydrogen-atom abstraction from 1,4-cyclohexadiene to provide the cyclohexadienyl radical. This radical is an intermediate in substrate isomerization to 1,3-cyclohexadiene, leading to formation of the pyrrolide product. PMID:25068927

  6. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  7. Buffering dissociation/formation reaction of biogenic calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    The oscillating stability of coral reef seawater pH has been maintained at around physiological pH values over the past 300 years (Pelejero et al., 2005). The stability mechanism of its pH has been interpreted in terms of the buffering dissolution/formation reaction of CaCO(3) as well as the proton consumption/generation reaction in CaCO(3)-saturated water. Here the pH-dependent solubility product [HCO(3)(-)][Ca(2+)] has been derived on the basis of the actual pH-dependent reactions for the atmospheric CO(2)/CO(2 (aq.))/HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-)/Ca(2+)/CaCO(3) system. Overbasic pH peaks appeared between pH approximately 8 and approximately 9.5 during sodium hydroxide titration, as a result of simultaneous CaCO(3) formation and proton generation. The spontaneous and prompt water pH recovery from the acidic to the physiological range has been confirmed by the observation of acid/base time evolution, because of simultaneous CaCO(3) dissolution and proton consumption. The dissolution/formation of CaCO(3) in water at pH 7.5-9 does not take place without a proton consumption/generation reaction, or a buffering chemical reaction of HCO(3)(-)+Ca(2+)right arrow over left arrowCaCO(3)+H(+). SEM images of the CaCO(3) fragments showed that the acid water ate away at the CaCO(3) formed at physiological pH values. Natural coral reefs can thus recover the physiological pH levels of seawater from the acidic range through partial dissolution of their own skeletons. PMID:17910015

  8. Microkinetics of oxygenate formation in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction.

    PubMed

    van Santen, Rutger A; Ghouri, Minhaj; Hensen, Emiel M J

    2014-06-01

    Microkinetics simulations are presented on the intrinsic activity and selectivity of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction with respect to the formation of long chain oxygenated hydrocarbons. Two different chain growth mechanisms are compared: the carbide chain growth mechanism and the CO insertion chain growth mechanism. The microkinetics simulations are based on quantum-chemical data on reaction rate parameters of the elementary reaction steps of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction available in the literature. Because the overall rate constant of chain growth remains too low the CO insertion chain growth mechanism is not found to produce higher hydrocarbons, except for ethylene and acetaldehyde or the corresponding hydrogenated products. According to the carbide mechanism available quantum-chemical data are consistent with high selectivity to long chain oxygenated hydrocarbon production at low temperature. The anomalous initial increase with temperature of the chain growth parameter observed under such conditions is reproduced. It arises from the competition between the apparent rate of C-O bond activation to produce "CHx" monomers to be inserted into the growing hydrocarbon chain and the rate of chain growth termination. The microkinetics simulations data enable analysis of selectivity changes as a function of critical elementary reaction rates such as the rate of activation of the C-O bond of CO, the insertion rate of CO into the growing hydrocarbon chain or the rate constant of methane formation. Simulations show that changes in catalyst site reactivity affect elementary reaction steps differently. This has opposing consequences for oxygenate production selectivity, so an optimizing compromise has to be found. The simulation results are found to be consistent with most experimental data available today. It is concluded that Fischer-Tropsch type catalysis has limited scope to produce long chain oxygenates with high yield, but there is an opportunity to improve the yield of C2 oxygenates. PMID:24509610

  9. Actinide complexation kinetics: rate and mechanism of dioxoneptunium (V) reaction with chlorophosphonazo III

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, G.; Feil-Jenkins, J.F.; Sullivan, J.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1996-12-01

    Rates of complex formation and dissociation in NpO{sub 2}{sup +}- Chlorophosphonazo III (2,7-bis(4-chloro-2-phosphonobenzeneazo)-1,8- dihydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid)(CLIII) were investigated by stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Also, limited studies were made of the rates of reaction of La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} with CLIII. Rate determining step in each system is an intramolecular process, the NpO{sub 2}{sup +}-CLIII reaction proceeding by a first order approach to equilibrium in the acid range from 0.1 to 1.0 M. Complex formation occurs independent of acidity, while both acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are observed. Activation parameters for the complex formation reaction are {Delta}H=46.2{+-}0.3 kJ/m and {Delta}S=7{+-} J/mK (I=1.0 M); these for the acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are {Delta}H=38.8{+-}0.6 kJ/m, {Delta}S=-96{+-}18 J/mK, {Delta}H=70.0{+-} kJ/m, and {Delta}S=17{+-}1 J/mK, respectively. An isokinetic relationship is observed between the activation parameters for CLIII complex formation with NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, Th{sup 4+}, and Zr{sup 4+}. Rates of CLIII complex formation reactions for Fe{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 4+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, Th{sup 4+}, La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, and Dy{sup 3+} correlate with cation radius rather than charge/radius ratio.

  10. Arene complexes of transition metals in reactions with nucleophilic reagents. XVI. Kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of the. pi. -arene complexes of chromium and iron and piperidine

    SciTech Connect

    Oleinik, I.I.; Kun, P.P.; Litvak, V.V.; Shteingarts, V.D.

    1988-05-20

    The kinetics of the reaction of ..pi..-arene complexes of the (/eta/-XC/sub 6/H/sub 4/Cl)ML type (where ML = Cr(CO)/sub 3/ (X = p-Cl), Cr/sup +/(/eta/-C/sub 6/H/sub 5/Cl) (X = H), Fe/sup +/(/eta/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/) (X = H)) with piperidine in acetone suggest that in the second and third cases the controlling stage is the transformation of the intermediate sigma complex into the reaction products almost entirely by a path with catalysis by the reagent while in the first case it is the formation of the intermediate. The marked increase in the catalytic effect of piperidine in the transition from neutral to cationic ..pi..-arene complexes show that the charge of the metal-complex fragment, coordinated with the arene, has a significant effect on the ratio of the rates of transformation of the intermediate sigma complex into the initial compounds and the final reaction products.

  11. Reaction mechanism governing formation of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane-protected gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Pettibone, John M; Senftle, Thomas P; Bratton, Ryan N

    2011-10-17

    This report outlines the determination of a reaction mechanism that can be manipulated to develop directed syntheses of gold monolayer-protected clusters (MPCs) prepared by reduction of solutions containing 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (L(3)) ligand and Au(PPh(3))Cl. Nanocluster synthesis was initiated by reduction of two-coordinate phosphine-ligated [Au(I)LL'](+) complexes (L, L' = PPh(3), L(3)), resulting in free radical complexes. The [Au(0)LL'](•) free radicals nucleated, forming a broad size distribution of ligated clusters. Timed UV-vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry monitored the ligated Au(x), 6 ≤ x ≤ 13, clusters, which comprise reaction intermediates and final products. By employing different solvents and reducing agents, reaction conditions were varied to highlight the largest portion of the reaction mechanism. We identified several solution-phase reaction classes, including dissolution of the gold precursor, reduction, continuous nucleation/core growth, ligand exchange, ion-molecule reactions, and etching of colloids and larger clusters. Simple theories can account for the reaction intermediates and final products. The initial distribution of the nucleation products contains mainly neutral clusters. However, the rate of reduction controls the amount of reaction overlap occurring in the system, allowing a clear distinction between reduction/nucleation and subsequent solution-phase processing. During solution-phase processing, the complexes undergo core etching and core growth reactions, including reactions that convert neutral clusters to cations, in a cyclic process that promotes formation of stable clusters of specific metal nuclearity. These processes comprise "size-selective" processing that can narrow a broad distribution into specific nuclearities, enabling development of tunable syntheses. PMID:21928777

  12. Effect of reaction time on the formation of disinfection byproducts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of reaction time on the trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potentials was determined by chlorinating water samples from the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers. Samples were collected for three seasons at 12 locations on the Mississippi from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to New Orleans, Louisiana, and on the Missouri and Ohio 1.6 kilometers above their confluences with the Mississippi. Both types of compounds formed rapidly during the initial stages of the reaction-time period, with formation rates decreasing with time. The ratio of the nonpurgeable total organic-halide and trihalomethane concentrations decreased with time, with the nonpurgeable total organic-halide compounds forming faster during the first stages of the time period and the trihalomethane compounds forming faster during the latter stages of the time period. Variation with distance along the Mississippi River of the formation rates approximately paralleled the variation of the dissolved organic carbon concentration, indicating that the rates of formation, as well as the concentrations of the compounds formed, depended on the dissolved organic carbon concentration.

  13. On the Formation of "Hypercoordinated" Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gibson, John K.; Rios, Daniel; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2011-09-05

    Recent gas phase experimental studies suggest the presence of hypercoordinated uranyl complexes. Coordination of acetone (Ace) to uranyl to form hypercoordinated species is examined using density functional theory (DFT) with a range of functionals and second order perturbation theory (MP2). Complexes with up to eight acetones were studied. It is shown that no more than six acetones can bind directly to uranium and that the observed uranyl complexes are not hypercoordinated.

  14. A quantitative approach to understanding amphibole reaction rims: Texture, mineralogy, and processes of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, S. H.; Larsen, J. F.; Coombs, M. L.; Dunn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Amphibole is an important mineral present in many calc-alkaline volcanic deposits. A hydrous phase, volcanic amphibole is only stable at pressures greater than 100 MPa (approx. 4 km) and in melts containing at least 4 wt % H2O. When removed from their thermal and barometric stability field, amphiboles decompose to form aggregate rims of anhydrous minerals. Reaction rim thicknesses have been used to estimate timescales and rates of magma ascent, important parameters in determining eruptive style. However, the textures and mineralogy of reaction rims are complex; multiple forcing factors, such as heating and decompression, are responsible for their formation. Few studies have performed in-depth, systematic, and quantitative investigations of reaction rim textures and mineralogy: as a result, amphibole reaction rims are poorly understood. Based on natural reaction rims from Augustine Volcano Alaska, we have developed a new crystallization kinetics model for reaction rim formation in which the differences in reaction rim textures represent different degrees of forcing away from equilibrium. We present the results of an experimental study used to test this model. We performed experiments using a sintered high-silica andesite glass from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano. The starting powder was seeded with unrimmed amphibole phenocrysts. After at least 24 hours of equilibration at Augustine storage conditions (140 MPa/ 860oC), experiments were heated or decompressed. The experimental series experiments took samples to differing degrees of thermal of barometric instability, over different time scales, ranging from 3 hours to several days. The resulting reaction rims were analyzed using a variety of analytical imaging and X-ray mapping techniques. Reaction rims thickened and became more texturally and mineralogically complex as a result of 1) greater time spent outside of stability and; 2) the magnitude of instability experienced.

  15. Reactions of organometallic compounds catalyzed by transition metal complexes. XIII. Comparison of the reactivity of organometallic compounds in aryldemetallation reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bumagin, N.A.; Ponomarev, A.B.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1987-12-10

    The effect of the nature of the metal M and the organic group R on the reaction of organometallic compounds RM (R = Ph, PhC triple bond C, C/sub 3/H/sub 7/, Allyl; M = Li, Mg, Zn, Cd, Cu Al), produced in situ from Grignard reagents or organolithium compounds and the respective salts, with p-iodoanisole in the presence of palladium complexes PdCl/sub 2/L/sub 2/ (L = PPh/sub 3/, MeCN, dppf) was studied. The organozinc and organoaluminum compounds react with a high degree of selectivity. In the reactions of C/sub 3/H/sub 7/M with p-MeOC/sub 6/H/sub 4/I the highest yield from cross-coupling is obtained with catalysis by the PdCl/sub 2/ (dppf) complex. The mechanism of the formation of the homocoupling products is discussed.

  16. Kinetics of enol formation from reaction of OH with propene.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Lam K; Zhang, Hongzhi R; Zhang, Shaowen; Eddings, Eric; Sarofim, Adel; Law, Matthew E; Westmoreland, Phillip R; Truong, Thanh N

    2009-04-01

    Kinetics of enol generation from propene has been predicted in an effort to understand the presence of enols in flames. A potential energy surface for reaction of OH with propene was computed by CCSD(T)/cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations. Rate constants of different product channels and branching ratios were then calculated using the Master Equation formulation (J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 10528). Of the two enol products, ethenol is dominant over propenol, and its pathway is also the dominant pathway for the OH + propene addition reactions to form bimolecular products. In the temperature range considered, hydrogen abstraction dominated propene + OH consumption by a branching ratio of more than 90%. Calculated rate constants of enol formation were included in the Utah Surrogate Mechanism to model the enol profile in a cyclohexane premixed flame. The extended model shows consistency with experimental data and gives 5% contribution of ethenol formation from OH + propene reaction, the rest coming from ethene + OH. PMID:19271758

  17. Tungsten oxo salicylate complexes from tungsten hexachloride reactions systems.

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, V; Mason, M H; Botts, J B; Botts, A M; Baroni, T E; Heppert, J A; Rheingold, A L; Liable-Sands, L; Yap, G P

    2001-09-10

    Tungsten hexachloride is a potent halogen-transfer agent, capable of reacting directly with salicylic acid to generate a tungsten oxo fragment and salicoyl chloride. As a result, oxo complexes dominate the chemistry of tungsten(VI) salicylates. Both mono- and disalicylate substituted tungsten oxo complexes are accessible. The Brønsted free acid W(=O)Cl(Hsal)(sal) complex is a sparingly soluble, presumably polymeric material that can be dissolved in THF. The THF adduct has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, although an X-ray crystallographic study indicates that the product cocrystallizes with a structurally analogous d(1) WCl(2)(Hsal.THF)(sal) byproduct. The remaining chloride ligand in W(=O)Cl(Hsal)(sal) is replaced by a bridging oxo unit when the reaction contains a significant excess of salicylic acid. The product "linear" oxo bridged ditungsten complex, [W(=O)(Hsal)(sal)](2)O, forms intramolecular hydrogen bonds, accounting for its high solubility in noncoordinating solvents. An X-ray study shows that the intramolecular Hsal.sal hydrogen bonding in this complex accommodates a more linear W-O-W arrangement than does a previously observed class of isostructural diolate derivatives. Tungsten oxo tetrachloride, formed in the initial reaction between salicylic acid and WCl(6), also reacts with the salicoyl chloride byproduct to generate tungsten salicoylate (OAr-2-COCl) complexes. PMID:11531451

  18. Formation of complex emulsion in microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hyung; Kim, Jongmin; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2012-02-01

    We first report a novel emulsification method using two binary mixtures that produces complex emulsion by phase separation, triggered by external diffusion of separation agent dissolved in continuous phase. A disperse phase consists of monomer and D-solvent (good solvent for disperse phase), while mixture of separation-triggering agent (SA) and C-solvent (good solvent for continuous phase) is used as a continuous phase. Individual droplet was formed by microfluidic system, allowing how the separation dynamically occurs as a function of time. This system consists of the three major steps involving the transformation of a single droplet into the complex emulsion. In the first, when two immiscible phases meet at cross-junction, droplets are generated and dispersed in continuous phase containing the SA. Since the SA is only selectively soluble in the monomer of disperse phase, external diffusion of SA into the droplets through the interface occurs which initiates phase separation. In transient state, the external diffusion of the SA generates both partial separated region and SA/monomer complex at the near interface of partial separated region. In the last step, where the phase separation fully occurs, single droplets transform into complex emulsion such as double emulsion or multiple emulsion with high order. In addition, we demonstrate a capability for generation of complex emulsions gives a great opportunity to fabricate functional materials using template synthesis.

  19. First stage of CoSi{sub 2} formation during a solid-state reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Delattre, R.; Thomas, O.; Perrin-Pellegrino, C.; Rivero, C.; Simola, R.

    2014-12-28

    The kinetics of CoSi{sub 2} formation via a solid-state reaction between CoSi and single crystal Si has been the object of many studies in the past. Because of the importance of nucleation, complex kinetics has been reported. In this work, we investigate CoSi{sub 2} formation kinetics with in-situ diffraction during isothermal annealing of CoSi films on Si (100). In-situ measurements allow capturing the initial stage of CoSi{sub 2} formation. An initial t{sup 3/2} time-dependent evolution is observed and attributed to 3D growth of individual nuclei. This first regime is followed after the coalescence of the nuclei by a classical parabolic t{sup 1/2} one-dimensional film growth. We evidence a marked influence of the initial Co thickness (50 nm vs 10 nm) on the growth kinetics. A significant slowdown of the CoSi{sub 2} formation kinetics is observed for the thinnest film, whereas the activation energy remains the same. These results shine a new light on the complex formation kinetics of CoSi{sub 2} during solid-state reaction between CoSi and single crystal silicon and bring new knowledge about what occurs in the ultra-thin film regime, which is important for nanotechnologies.

  20. Exploring complex chemical reactions by ab-initio simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, Michele

    1998-03-01

    Recent progress in the ab-initio molecular dynamics method and the power of parallel computing, allow the detailed study of complex chemical reaction of great industrial relevance. We illustrate this unprecedented capability by investigating the second generation Ziegler-Natta catalytic process. In this inhomogeneous catalyst, a polymerization reaction is induced by TiCl4 molecules deposited on an MgCl2 solid support. A density functional based ab-initio molecular dynamics calculation conducted with a minimum of initial assumption allows to understand the nature of the catalytic center and to determine the reaction path with the associated free energy barrier. Furthermore our calculation can explain in a nontrivial way the stereo-selectivity of the process.

  1. Probing simple patterns in complex nuclei with transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizewski, Jolie

    2011-04-01

    The first observation of the O(6) limit of the Interacting Boson Model provided an unexpected benchmark for nuclear structure. A shape intermediate between a spherical vibrator and deformed rotor was a new simple pattern that described the complex nucleus, 196Pt. Shortly thereafter simple patterns in odd-mass nuclei were recognized as the coupling of a fermion to O(6) structures of the core. In addition to selection rules for electromagnetic transitions, there were now selection rules for single-particle transfer. As the properties of nuclei further from stability are explored, identifying simple patterns in complex nuclei becomes even more important as benchmarks in extrapolations of nuclear models to even more exotic nuclei. Identifying such benchmarks requires a full spectrum of spectroscopic probes, including single-particle transfer reactions. The present talk will provide an overview of how transfer reactions have been used to identify simple patterns in complex nuclei, from proton transfer reactions near 196Pt to recent neutron transfer work near 132Sn, eight neutrons from stability. This work was supported in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program and the National Science Foundation.

  2. Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian Kent; Quemener, Goulven; Balakrishman, Naduvalath

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

  3. Theoretical aspects of product formation from the NCO + NO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.; He, Y. ); Melius, C.F. )

    1993-09-09

    The reaction of NCO with NO, an important elementary process involved in the reduction of NO[sub x] by HNCO, has been studied theoretically using the BAC-MP4 technique in conjunction with RRKM calculations. The computed molecular structures and thermochemical data for various intermediates and transition states suggest that the reaction takes place primarily via the singlet, ground electronic state OCNNO molecule according to the following mechanism; (step a) NCO + NO [leftrightarrow] [sup 1]OCNNO [yields] N[sub 2]O + CO; (step b) NCO + NO [leftrightarrow] [sup 1]OCNNO [yields] c-OCNNO[minus] N[sub 2] + CO[sub 2]. The formation of N[sub 2]O + CO occurs by the fragmentation of the singlet OCNNO intermediate step (a), whereas the production of N[sub 2] + CO[sub 2] by cyclization-fragmentation occurs via step b. The tight transition states leading to the formation of these products, coupled with the loose entrance channel, give rise to the experimentally observed strong negative temperature dependence which can be quantitatively accounted for by the results of RRKM calculations based on the BAC-MP4 data. The experimentally measured product branching ratio for channels a and b could be accounted for theoretically by lowering the calculated energy barrier for step a by 3.6 kcal/mol, corresponding to about 15% of the barrier height. 22 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Evolution of heliobacteria: implications for photosynthetic reaction center complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermaas, W. F.; Blankenship, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary position of the heliobacteria, a group of green photosynthetic bacteria with a photosynthetic apparatus functionally resembling Photosystem I of plants and cyanobacteria, has been investigated with respect to the evolutionary relationship to Gram-positive bacteria and cyanobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the heliobacteria appear to be most closely related to Gram-positive bacteria, but also an evolutionary link to cyanobacteria is evident. Interestingly, a 46-residue domain including the putative sixth membrane-spanning region of the heliobacterial reaction center protein show rather strong similarity (33% identity and 72% similarity) to a region including the sixth membrane-spanning region of the CP47 protein, a chlorophyll-binding core antenna polypeptide of Photosystem II. The N-terminal half of the heliobacterial reaction center polypeptide shows a moderate sequence similarity (22% identity over 232 residues) with the CP47 protein, which is significantly more than the similarity with the Photosystem I core polypeptides in this region. An evolutionary model for photosynthetic reaction center complexes is discussed, in which an ancestral homodimeric reaction center protein (possibly resembling the heliobacterial reaction center protein) with 11 membrane-spanning regions per polypeptide has diverged to give rise to the core of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and of the photosynthetic apparatus in green, purple, and heliobacteria.

  5. Lead(II) Complex Formation with Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    A structural investigation of complexes formed between the Pb2+ ion and glutathione (GSH, denoted AH3 in its triprotonated form) the most abundant non2protein thiol in biological systems, was carried out for a series of aqueous solutions at pH 8.5 and CPb2+ = 10 mM, and in the solid state. The Pb LIII-edge EXAFS oscillation for a solid compound with the empirical formula [Pb(AH2)]ClO4 was modeled with one Pb-S and two short Pb-O bond distances at 2.64 ± 0.04 Å and 2.28 ± 0.04 Å, respectively. In addition Pb···Pb interactions at 4.15 ± 0.05 Å indicate dimeric species in a network where the thiolate group forms an asymmetrical bridge between two Pb2+ ions. In aqueous solution at the mole ratio GSH / Pb(II) = 2.0 (CPb2+ = 10 mM, pH 8.5), lead(II) complexes with two thiolate ligands form, characterized by a ligand-to-metal charge transfer band (LMCT) S- → Pb2+ at 317 nm in the UV-vis spectrum and mean Pb-S and Pb-(N/O) bond distances of 2.65 ± 0.04 Å and 2.51 ± 0.04 Å, respectively, from a Pb LIII-edge EXAFS spectrum. For solutions with higher mole ratios, GSH / Pb(II) ≥ 3.0, ESI-MS spectra identified a trisglutathionyl lead(II) complex, for which Pb LIII-edge EXAFS spectroscopy shows a mean Pb-S distance of 2.65 ± 0.04 Å in PbS3 coordination, 207Pb NMR spectroscopy displays a chemical shift of 2793 ppm, and in the UV-vis spectrum an S- → Pb2+ LMCT band appears at 335 nm. The complex persists at high excess of glutathione, and also at ~25 K in frozen glycerol (33%) / water glasses for GSH / Pb(II) mole ratios from 4.0 to 10 (CPb2+ = 10 mM) measured by Pb LIII-edge EXAFS spectroscopy. PMID:22594853

  6. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Hastings, Harold M.; Testa, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Imore » mperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines), and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue) propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red); their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentially unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe 3 + with colorless SCN − to form the blood-red Fe ( SCN ) 2 + complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe ( NO 3 ) 3 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing.« less

  7. Dynamic NMR study of the oxaphosphetane complexation with lithium during the Wittig reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascariu, Aurelia; Mracec, Mircea; Berger, Stefan

    Dynamic NMR spectroscopy at very low temperatures (148-182 K) reveal the dynamic behavior of the (2-tri(3-furyl)-3-methyl-4-cyclopropenyl-oxaphosphetane) generated during a Wittig reaction between tri(3-furyl)ethylphosphonium iodine and cyclopropylaldehyde. The possibility of formation of different adducts between Li+ ions and oxaphosphetane or betainic intermediates was checked calculating the formation enthalpies using the MNDO, AM1, and PM3 semiempirical MO methods. The observed species are interpreted as oxaphosphetane complexes with lithium ions present in solution. Quantum mechanical calculations confirm the spectroscopic results.0

  8. From simple to complex reactions: Nuclear collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    Collisions between two heavy nuclei produce a diverse spectrum of reaction modes which is much wider than that observed in light ion studies. For the latter case, two processes are observed: direct reactions and compound nucleus formation. Heavy ion reaction studies on the other hand have identified additional processes such as deep-inelastic scattering, incomplete fusion and quasi-fission reactions. While the boundaries between the various processes are usually not well defined, it is generally accepted that with increasing overlap of the two nuclei the interaction evolves from distant collisions where only elastic scattering and Coulomb excitation processes occur, through grazing-type collisions associated with quasi-elastic reactions to deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes requiring a substantial nuclear overlap. Varying the bombarding energy is a convenient way to change the overlap of the two nuclei. Measurements of excitation functions can thus probe the onset and the interplay of the various reaction modes. Experiments at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are particularly suited for comparisons with theoretical predictions since the small number of degrees of freedom involved in the interaction greatly simplifies the calculations. In the first part of this contribution a short overview is given on the status of heavy ion reaction studies at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In the second part two experiments, one involving simple and the other studying complex reactions, are discussed in more detail.

  9. From simple to complex reactions: Nuclear collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1992-12-01

    Collisions between two heavy nuclei produce a diverse spectrum of reaction modes which is much wider than that observed in light ion studies. For the latter case, two processes are observed: direct reactions and compound nucleus formation. Heavy ion reaction studies on the other hand have identified additional processes such as deep-inelastic scattering, incomplete fusion and quasi-fission reactions. While the boundaries between the various processes are usually not well defined, it is generally accepted that with increasing overlap of the two nuclei the interaction evolves from distant collisions where only elastic scattering and Coulomb excitation processes occur, through grazing-type collisions associated with quasi-elastic reactions to deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes requiring a substantial nuclear overlap. Varying the bombarding energy is a convenient way to change the overlap of the two nuclei. Measurements of excitation functions can thus probe the onset and the interplay of the various reaction modes. Experiments at bombarding energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier are particularly suited for comparisons with theoretical predictions since the small number of degrees of freedom involved in the interaction greatly simplifies the calculations. In the first part of this contribution a short overview is given on the status of heavy ion reaction studies at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In the second part two experiments, one involving simple and the other studying complex reactions, are discussed in more detail.

  10. Direct electronic probing of biological complexes formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Magliulo, Maria; Manoli, Kyriaki; Giordano, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Functional bio-interlayer organic field - effect transistors (FBI-OFET), embedding streptavidin, avidin and neutravidin as bio-recognition element, have been studied to probe the electronic properties of protein complexes. The threshold voltage control has been achieved modifying the SiO2 gate diaelectric surface by means of the deposition of an interlayer of bio-recognition elements. A threshold voltage shift with respect to the unmodified dielectric surface toward more negative potential values has been found for the three different proteins, in agreement with their isoelectric points. The relative responses in terms of source - drain current, mobility and threshold voltage upon exposure to biotin of the FBI-OFET devices have been compared for the three bio-recognition elements.

  11. STEPS: Modeling and Simulating Complex Reaction-Diffusion Systems with Python

    PubMed Central

    Wils, Stefan; Schutter, Erik De

    2008-01-01

    We describe how the use of the Python language improved the user interface of the program STEPS. STEPS is a simulation platform for modeling and stochastic simulation of coupled reaction-diffusion systems with complex 3-dimensional boundary conditions. Setting up such models is a complicated process that consists of many phases. Initial versions of STEPS relied on a static input format that did not cleanly separate these phases, limiting modelers in how they could control the simulation and becoming increasingly complex as new features and new simulation algorithms were added. We solved all of these problems by tightly integrating STEPS with Python, using SWIG to expose our existing simulation code. PMID:19623245

  12. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Our work involves the study of intermediate energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions. This work has two foci. On the one hand, we desire to learn about the properties of nuclear matter under abnormal conditions, in this energy domain, predominately low densities. This purpose runs abreast of the second, which is the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. The two objectives are inexorably linked because our experimental laboratory for studying nuclear matter properties is a dynamic one. We are forced to ask how nuclear matter properties, such as phase transitions, are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. It may be that irrefutable information about nuclear matter will not be extracted from the reaction work. Nevertheless, we are compelled to undertake this effort not only because it is the only game in town and as yet we do not know that information cannot be extracted, but also because of our second objective. The process leads to an understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. Our program has been: To study energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition by studying incomplete fusion reactions. To gain confidence that we understand how highly excited systems decompose by studying all emissions from the highly excited systems. To push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain, with excitation function studies. And attempt to learn about the dynamics of the decays using particle-particle correlations. In the last effort, we have decided to focus on simple systems, where we believe, definitive statements are possible. These avenues of research share a common theme, large complex fragment production.

  13. Transition state ensemble optimization for reactions of arbitrary complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinovjev, Kirill; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we use Variational Transition State Theory (VTST) to develop a practical method for transition state ensemble optimization by looking for an optimal hyperplanar dividing surface in a space of meaningful trial collective variables. These might be interatomic distances, angles, electrostatic potentials, etc. Restrained molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain on-the-fly estimates of ensemble averages that guide the variations of the hyperplane maximizing the transmission coefficient. A central result of our work is an expression that quantitatively estimates the importance of the coordinates used for the localization of the transition state ensemble. Starting from an arbitrarily large set of trial coordinates, one can distinguish those that are indeed essential for the advance of the reaction. This facilitates the use of VTST as a practical theory to study reaction mechanisms of complex processes. The technique was applied to the reaction catalyzed by an isochorismate pyruvate lyase. This reaction involves two simultaneous chemical steps and has a shallow transition state region, making it challenging to define a good reaction coordinate. Nevertheless, the hyperplanar transition state optimized in the space of 18 geometrical coordinates provides a transmission coefficient of 0.8 and a committor histogram well-peaked about 0.5, proving the strength of the method. We have also tested the approach with the study of the NaCl dissociation in aqueous solution, a stringest test for a method based on transition state theory. We were able to find essential degrees of freedom consistent with the previous studies and to improve the transmission coefficient with respect to the value obtained using solely the NaCl distance as the reaction coordinate.

  14. Ethanol oxidation by imidorhenium(V) complexes: formation of amidorhenium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Suing, A L; Dewan, C R; White, P S; Thorp, H H

    2000-12-25

    The reaction of Re(NC6H4R)Cl3(PPh3)2 (R = H, 4-Cl, 4-OMe) with 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe) is investigated in refluxing ethanol. The reaction produces two major products, Re(NC6H4R)Cl(dppe)(2)2+ (R = H, 1-H; R = Cl, 1-Cl; R = OMe, 1-OMe) and the rhenium(III) species Re(NHC6H4R)Cl(dppe)2+ (R = H, 2-H; R = Cl, 2-Cl). Complexes 1-H (orthorhombic, Pcab, a = 22.3075(10) A, b = 23.1271(10) A, c = 23.3584(10) A, Z = 8), 1-Cl (triclinic, P1, a = 11.9403(6) A, b = 14.6673(8) A, c = 17.2664(9) A, alpha = 92.019(1) degrees, beta = 97.379(1) degrees, gamma = 90.134(1) degrees, Z = 2), and 1-OMe (triclinic, P1, a = 11.340(3) A, b = 13.134(4) A, c = 13.3796(25) A, alpha = 102.370(20) degrees, beta = 107.688(17) degrees, gamma = 114.408(20) degrees, Z = 1) are crystallographically characterized and show an average Re-N bond length (1.71 A) typical of imidorhenium(V) complexes. There is a small systematic decrease in the Re-N bond length on going from Cl to H to OMe. Complex 2-Cl (monoclinic, Cc, a = 24.2381(11) A, b = 13.4504(6) A, c = 17.466(8) A, beta = 97.06900(0) degrees, Z = 4) is also crystallographically characterized and shows a Re-N bond length (1.98 A) suggestive of amidorhenium(III). The rhenium(III) complexes exhibit unusual proton NMR spectra where all of the resonances are found at expected locations except those for the amido protons, which are at 37.8 ppm for 2-Cl and 37.3 ppm for 1-H. The phosphorus resonances are also unremarkable, but the 13C spectrum of 2-Cl shows a significantly shifted resonance at 177.3 ppm, which is assigned to the ipso carbon of the phenylamido ligand. The extraordinary shifts of the amido hydrogen and ipso carbon are attributed to second-order magnetism that is strongly focused along the axially compressed amido axis. The reducing equivalents for the formation of the Re(III) product are provided by oxidation of the ethanol solvent, which produces acetal and acetaldehyde in amounts as much as 30 equiv based on the quantity of rhenium starting material. Equal amounts of hydrogen gas are produced, suggesting that the catalyzed reaction is the dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce acetaldehyde and hydrogen gas. Metal hydrides are detected in the reaction solution, suggesting a mechanism involving beta-elimination of ethanol at the metal center. Formation of the amidorhenium(III) product possibly arises from migration of a metal hydride in the imidorhenium(V) complex. PMID:11151507

  15. Structure and kinetics of formation of catechol complexes of ferric soybean lipoxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Brennan, B.A.; Chase, D.B. |

    1995-11-21

    Ferric soybean lipoxygenase forms stable complexes with 4-substituted catechols. The structure of the complex between the enzyme and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile has been studied by resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, visible, and X-ray spectroscopies. It is a bidentate iron-catecholate complex with at least one water ligand. The kinetics of formation of complexes between lipoxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile and 3,4-dihydroxyacetophenone have been studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The data are consistent with two kinetically distinct, reversible steps. The pH dependence of the first step suggests that the substrate for the reaction is the catechol monoanion. When these results are combined, plausible mechanisms for the complexation reaction are suggested. 51 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Experimental Astrochemistry: Molecular Formation via Grain-Surface Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congiu, E.

    2007-03-01

    Central to this thesis is the chemistry occurring on dust grain surfaces leading to the formation of molecules in the ISM, and, in particular, the laboratory simulation of formation mechanisms and formation rates. Surface chemistry plays a crucial role in the ISM because it produces key species that are not formed in gas-phase reactions at an efficient rate. Among them, molecular hydrogen (H_2) is by far the most important. In this work (Chapter 3), I shall address the experimental investigation of H_2 formation on diverse samples of amorphous silicates. The experimental work was conducted in the Physics Department laboratories at Syracuse University, New York, as part of the most successful programme of experiments so far to study the processes involved in the formation of molecular hydrogen on a variety of dust analogue materials, also including poly-crystalline olivine, amorphous carbon, and ices. The experiments were carried out through mass spectrometry and TPD techniques and under conditions that come as close as technically feasible to the ones in the most relevant ISM environments, namely, under ultra high vacuum pressures (low 10e-10 torr) and at surface temperatures between 6 and 30 K. Experimental studies of H_2 formation on amorphous olivines are of major concern in grain-surface chemistry because amorphous silicates are believed, together with carbonaceous materials, to be the most realistic analogues of bare cosmic dust surfaces in diffuse clouds. In my doctorate work I carried out numerous experiments on a set of several samples of amorphous olivines of the type (Mg_x,Fe_1-x)_2SiO_4, namely, samples made up of diverse amounts of Mg and Fe. Besides, in Chapter 4, I shall address the project and the construction of a FT-RAIRS facility that is to integrate the existent research apparatus in the laboratory at Syracuse University. I shall first discuss the FT-IR spectroscopy, then I shall focus on a particular technique used in surface science called RAIRS. Its physical principle will be discussed as well. Finally, I shall describe ''piece by piece'', the design and the construction of the FT-RAIRS arrangement.

  17. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  18. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone reactions with single terpenoids and terpenoid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.; Wells, J. Raymond; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2011-08-01

    Ozone reacts with indoor-emitted terpenoids to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Most SOA research has focused on ozone reactions with single terpenoids or with consumer products, and this paper reports the results from an investigation of SOA formation from ozone reactions with both single terpenoids and mixtures of D-limonene, α-pinene, and α-terpineol. Transient experiments were conducted at low (25 ppb) and high (100 ppb) initial concentrations of ozone. The three terpenoids were tested singly and in combinations in a manner that controlled for their different reaction rates with ozone. The SOA formation was assessed by examining the evolution in time of the resulting number size-distributions and estimates of the mass concentrations. The results suggest that at higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations, SOA number formation follows a linear trend as a function of the initial rate of reaction. This finding was valid for both single terpenoids and mixtures. Generally speaking, higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations also led to larger geometric mean diameters and smaller geometric standard deviations of fitted lognormal distributions of the formed SOA. By assuming a density, mass concentrations were also assessed and did not follow as consistent of a trend. At low ozone concentration conditions, reactions with only D-limonene yielded the largest number concentrations of any experiment, even more than experiments with mixtures containing D-limonene and much higher overall terpenoid concentrations. This finding was not seen for high ozone concentrations. These experiments demonstrate quantifiable trends for SOA forming reactions of ozone and mixtures, and this work provides a framework for expanding these results to more complex mixtures and consumer products.

  19. Radionuclide reactions with groundwater and basalts from Columbia River basalt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1981-06-01

    Chemical reactions of radionuclides with geologic materials found in Columbia River basalt formations were studied. The objective was to determine the ability of these formations to retard radionuclide migration from a radioactive waste repository located in deep basalt. Reactions that can influence migration are precipitation, ion-exchange, complexation, and oxidation-reduction. These reactions were studied by measuring the effects of groundwater composition and redox potential (Eh) on radionuclide sorption on fresh basalt surfaces, a naturally altered basalt, and a sample of secondary minerals associated with a Columbia River basalt flow. In addition, radionuclide sorption isotherms were measured for these materials and reaction kinetics were determined. The radionuclides studied were /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, /sup 75/Se, /sup 95m/Tc, /sup 237/Np, /sup 241/Am, /sup 226/Ra and /sup 237/Pu. The Freundlich equation accurately describes the isotherms when precipitation of radionuclides does not occur. In general, sorption increased in the order: basalt < altered basalt < secondary minerals. This increase in sorption corresponds to increasing surface area and cation exchange capacity. The Eh of the system had a large effect on technetium, plutonium, and neptunium sorption. Technetium(VII), Pu(VI), and Np(V) are reduced to Tc(IV), Pu(IV), and Np(IV), respectively, under Eh conditions expected in deep basalt formations. The kinetics of radionuclide sorption and basalt-groundwater reactions were observed over a period of 18 weeks. Most sorption reactions stabilized after about four weeks. Groundwater composition changed the least in contact with altered basalt. Contact with secondary minerals greatly increased Ca, K, and Mg concentrations in the groundwater.

  20. Roles of acetone and diacetone alcohol in coordination and dissociation reactions of uranyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George; Van Stipdonk, Michael J; Gordon, Mark S; Windus, Theresa L; Gibson, John K; de Jong, Wibe A

    2012-12-01

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry experiments with DFT and MP2 calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structures and energetics of dissociation reactions of uranyl species containing acetone and diacetone alcohol ligands. It is shown that solutions containing diacetone alcohol ligands can produce species with more than five oxygen atoms available for coordination. Calculations confirm that complexes with up to four diacetone alcohol ligands can be energetically stable but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Water elimination reactions of diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to have two coordination-dependent reaction channels, through formation of mesityl oxide ligands or formation of alkoxide and protonated mesityl oxide species. The present results provide an explanation for the implausible observation of "[UO(2)(ACO)(6,7,8)](2+)" in and observed water-elimination reactions from purportedly uranyl-acetone complexes (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). PMID:23146003

  1. Reaction of monovalent gold complex salts with ferrocene thio derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalova, E.G.; Bavkova, T.V.; Grandberg, K.I.; Sazonenko, M.M.

    1986-02-01

    In a continuation of a study of the reactions of aurous complex salts with ferrocene thio derivatives, the authors studied the auration of 1,1-ferrocenylenedithiol (II). The auration of dithiol (II) by tris(triphenylphosphinegold)oxonium tetrafluoroborate was carried out in an argon atmosphere. Relative to the auration of ethyl cyanoacetate, the aurating capacity of the tris-(triphenylphosphinegold)sulfonium tetrafluorobroate is significantly lower than that of (Dh/sub 3/PAu)/sub 3/>0 +BF-/sub 4/ and (Ph/sub 3/PAu)/sub 4/N /SUP BF/ >-/sub 4/.

  2. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Karin I; Fayolle, Edith C; Reiter, John B; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T = 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics--CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO--in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history. PMID:25302375

  3. Surface complexation reaction for phase transfer of hydrophobic quantum dot from nonpolar to polar medium.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Satyapriya; Roy, Shilaj; Pramanik, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2014-09-01

    Chemical reaction between oleate-capped Zn(x)Cd(1-x)S quantum dots (Qdots) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) led to formation of a surface complex, which was accompanied by transfer of hydrophobic Qdots from nonpolar (hexane) to polar (water) medium with high efficiency. The stability of the complex on the surface was achieved via involvement of dangling sulfide bonds. Moreover, the transferred hydrophilic Qdots--herein called as quantum dot complex (QDC)--exhibited new and superior optical properties in comparison to bare inorganic complexes with retention of the dimension and core structure of the Qdots. Finally, the new and superior optical properties of water-soluble QDC make them potentially useful for biological--in addition to light emitting device (LED)--applications. PMID:25133937

  4. Complex reaction networks in high temperature hydrocarbon chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mutlay, İbrahim; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2015-03-28

    Complex chemical reaction mechanisms of high temperature hydrocarbon decomposition are represented as networks and their underlying graph topologies are analyzed as a dynamic system. As model reactants, 1,3-butadiene, acetylene, benzene, ethane, ethylene, methane, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and toluene are chosen in view of their importance for the global environment, energy technologies as well as their quantum chemical properties. Accurate kinetic mechanisms are computationally simulated and converted to bipartite graphs for the incremental conversion steps of the main reactant. Topological analysis of the resulting temporal networks reveals novel features unknown to classical chemical kinetics theory. The time-dependent percolation behavior of the chemical reaction networks shows infinite order phase transition and a unique correlation between the percolation thresholds and electron distribution of the reactants. These observations are expected to yield important applications in the development of a new theoretical perspective to chemical reactions and technological processes e.g. inhibition of greenhouse gases, efficient utilization of fossil fuels, and large scale carbon nanomaterial production. PMID:25720589

  5. Validated spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate based on charge transfer complexation reactions.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek S; El-Kafrawy, Dina S; Mahrous, Mohamed S; Abdel-Khalek, Magdi M; Abo-Gharam, Amira H

    2016-02-15

    This work presents the development, validation and application of four simple and direct spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate (VP) through charge transfer complexation reactions. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with p-chloranilic acid (p-CA) in acetone to give a purple colored product with maximum absorbance at 524nm. The second method depends on the reaction of VP with dichlone (DC) in dimethylformamide forming a reddish orange product measured at 490nm. The third method is based upon the interaction of VP and picric acid (PA) in chloroform resulting in the formation of a yellow complex measured at 415nm. The fourth method involves the formation of a yellow complex peaking at 361nm upon the reaction of the drug with iodine in chloroform. Experimental conditions affecting the color development were studied and optimized. Stoichiometry of the reactions was determined. The proposed spectrophotometric procedures were effectively validated with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, specificity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Calibration curves of the formed color products with p-CA, DC, PA and iodine showed good linear relationships over the concentration ranges 24-144, 40-200, 2-20 and 1-8μg/mL respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the assay of sodium valproate in tablets and oral solution dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Assay results were statistically compared to a reference pharmacopoeial HPLC method where no significant differences were observed between the proposed methods and reference method. PMID:26574649

  6. Validated spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate based on charge transfer complexation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belal, Tarek S.; El-Kafrawy, Dina S.; Mahrous, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Khalek, Magdi M.; Abo-Gharam, Amira H.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents the development, validation and application of four simple and direct spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate (VP) through charge transfer complexation reactions. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with p-chloranilic acid (p-CA) in acetone to give a purple colored product with maximum absorbance at 524 nm. The second method depends on the reaction of VP with dichlone (DC) in dimethylformamide forming a reddish orange product measured at 490 nm. The third method is based upon the interaction of VP and picric acid (PA) in chloroform resulting in the formation of a yellow complex measured at 415 nm. The fourth method involves the formation of a yellow complex peaking at 361 nm upon the reaction of the drug with iodine in chloroform. Experimental conditions affecting the color development were studied and optimized. Stoichiometry of the reactions was determined. The proposed spectrophotometric procedures were effectively validated with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, specificity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Calibration curves of the formed color products with p-CA, DC, PA and iodine showed good linear relationships over the concentration ranges 24-144, 40-200, 2-20 and 1-8 μg/mL respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the assay of sodium valproate in tablets and oral solution dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Assay results were statistically compared to a reference pharmacopoeial HPLC method where no significant differences were observed between the proposed methods and reference method.

  7. Exploring Regioselective Bond Cleavage and Cross-Coupling Reactions using a Low-Valent Nickel Complex.

    PubMed

    Desnoyer, Addison N; Friese, Florian W; Chiu, Weiling; Drover, Marcus W; Patrick, Brian O; Love, Jennifer A

    2016-03-14

    Recently, esters have received much attention as transmetalation partners for cross-coupling reactions. Herein, we report a systematic study of the reactivity of a series of esters and thioesters with [{(dtbpe)Ni}2 (μ-η(2) :η(2) -C6 H6 )] (dtbpe=1,2-bis(di-tert-butyl)phosphinoethane), which is a source of (dtbpe)nickel(0). Trifluoromethylthioesters were found to form η(2) -carbonyl complexes. In contrast, acetylthioesters underwent rapid Cacyl -S bond cleavage followed by decarbonylation to generate methylnickel complexes. This decarbonylation could be pushed backwards by the addition of CO, allowing for regeneration of the thioester. Most of the thioester complexes were found to undergo stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid to yield sulfides. While ethyl trifluoroacetate was also found to form an η(2) -carbonyl complex, phenyl esters were found to predominantly undergo Caryl -O bond cleavage to yield arylnickel complexes. These could also undergo transmetalation to yield biaryls. Attempts to render the reactions catalytic were hindered by ligand scrambling to yield nickel bis(acetate) complexes, the formation of which was supported by independent syntheses. Finally, 2-naphthyl acetate was also found to undergo clean Caryl -O bond cleavage, and although stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid proceeded with good yield, catalytic turnover has so far proven elusive. PMID:26879766

  8. Thermodynamics of the formation of copper(II) complexes with L-histidine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    The heat effects from the reaction between L-histidine solutions and Cu(NO3)2 solutions at 298.15 K in the 0.2 to 1.0 (KNO3) range of ionic strength are measured by means of direct calorimetry. The experimental data is treated with allowance for the simultaneous proceeding of several processes. The heat effects of the formation of complexes Cu(His)+, Cu(His)2, CuHHis2+, CuH(His){2/+} and CuH2(His){2/2+} are calculated from calorimetric measurements. The standard enthalpies of formation for complexes of L-histidine with Cu2+ ions are obtained via extrapolation to zero ionic strength. The relationship between the thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of complexes of copper(II) with L-histidine and their structure is determined.

  9. Chelate effect and thermodynamics of metal complex formation in solution: a quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Valérie; Wahlgren, Ulf; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2003-12-01

    The accuracy of quantum chemical predictions of structures and thermodynamic data for metal complexes depends both on the quantum chemical methods and the chemical models used. A thermodynamic analogue of the Eigen-Wilkins mechanism for ligand substitution reactions (Model A) turns out to be sufficiently simple to catch the essential chemistry of complex formation reactions and allows quantum chemical calculations at the ab initio level of thermodynamic quantities both in gas phase and solution; the latter by using the conductor-like polarizable continuum (CPCM) model. Model A describes the complex formation as a two-step reaction: 1. [M(H2O)x](aq) + L(aq) <==>[M(H2O)x], L(aq); 2. [M(H2O)x], L(aq) <==>[M(H2O)(x-1)L],(H2O)(aq). The first step, the formation of an outer-sphere complex is described using the Fuoss equation and the second, the intramolecular exchange between an entering ligand from the second and water in the first coordination shell, using quantum chemical methods. The thermodynamic quantities for this model were compared to those for the reaction: [M(H2O)x](aq) + L(aq) <==>[M(H2O)(x-1)L](aq) + (H2O)(aq) (Model B), as calculated for each reactant and product separately. The models were tested using complex formation between Zn(2+) and ammonia, methylamine, and ethylenediamine, and complex formation and chelate ring closure reactions in binary and ternary UO(2)(2+)-oxalate systems. The results show that the Gibbs energy of reaction for Model A are not strongly dependent on the number of water ligands and the structure of the second coordination sphere; it provides a much more precise estimate of the thermodynamics of complex formation reactions in solution than that obtained from Model B. The agreement between the experimental and calculated data for the formation of Zn(NH(3))(2+)(aq) and Zn(NH(3))(2)(2+)(aq) is better than 8 kJ/mol for the former, as compared to 30 kJ/mol or larger, for the latter. The Gibbs energy of reaction obtained for the UO(2)(2+) oxalate systems using model B differs between 80 and 130 kJ/mol from the experimental results, whereas the agreement with Model A is better. The errors in the quantum chemical estimates of the entropy and enthalpy of reaction are somewhat larger than those for the Gibbs energy, but still in fair agreement with experiments; adding water molecules in the second coordination sphere improves the agreement significantly. Reasons for the different performance of the two models are discussed. The quantum chemical data were used to discuss the microscopic basis of experimental enthalpy and entropy data, to determine the enthalpy and entropy contributions in chelate ring closure reactions and to discuss the origin of the so-called "chelate effect". Contrary to many earlier suggestions, this is not even in the gas phase, a result of changes in translation entropy contributions. There is no simple explanation of the high stability of chelate complexes; it is a result of both enthalpy and entropy contributions that vary from one system to the other. PMID:14640672

  10. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex regulates germinal center formation by repressing Blimp-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinwook; Jeon, Shin; Choi, Seungjin; Park, Kyungsoo; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Germinal center (GC) reaction is crucial in adaptive immune responses. The formation of GC is coordinated by the expression of specific genes including Blimp-1 and Bcl-6. Although gene expression is critically influenced by the status of chromatin structure, little is known about the role of chromatin remodeling factors for regulation of GC formation. Here, we show that the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is required for GC reactions. Mice lacking Srg3/mBaf155, a core component of the SWI/SNF complex, showed impaired differentiation of GC B and follicular helper T cells in response to T cell-dependent antigen challenge. The SWI/SNF complex regulates chromatin structure at the Blimp-1 locus and represses its expression by interacting cooperatively with Bcl-6 and corepressors. The defect in GC reactions in mice lacking Srg3 was due to the derepression of Blimp-1 as supported by genetic studies with Blimp-1–ablated mice. Hence, our study identifies the SWI/SNF complex as a key mediator in GC reactions by modulating Bcl-6–dependent Blimp-1 repression. PMID:25646472

  11. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex regulates germinal center formation by repressing Blimp-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinwook; Jeon, Shin; Choi, Seungjin; Park, Kyungsoo; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2015-02-17

    Germinal center (GC) reaction is crucial in adaptive immune responses. The formation of GC is coordinated by the expression of specific genes including Blimp-1 and Bcl-6. Although gene expression is critically influenced by the status of chromatin structure, little is known about the role of chromatin remodeling factors for regulation of GC formation. Here, we show that the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is required for GC reactions. Mice lacking Srg3/mBaf155, a core component of the SWI/SNF complex, showed impaired differentiation of GC B and follicular helper T cells in response to T cell-dependent antigen challenge. The SWI/SNF complex regulates chromatin structure at the Blimp-1 locus and represses its expression by interacting cooperatively with Bcl-6 and corepressors. The defect in GC reactions in mice lacking Srg3 was due to the derepression of Blimp-1 as supported by genetic studies with Blimp-1-ablated mice. Hence, our study identifies the SWI/SNF complex as a key mediator in GC reactions by modulating Bcl-6-dependent Blimp-1 repression. PMID:25646472

  12. Snapshot of a Reaction Intermediate: Analysis of Benzoylformate Decarboxylase in Complex with a Benzoylphosphonate Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Baykal, Ahmet T.; Nemeria, Natalia; Yep, Alejandra; Ruby, David I.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Kenyon, George L.; McLeish, Michael J.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-04-22

    Benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) is a thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent enzyme acting on aromatic substrates. In addition to its metabolic role in the mandelate pathway, BFDC shows broad substrate specificity coupled with tight stereo control in the carbon-carbon bond-forming reverse reaction, making it a useful biocatalyst for the production of chiral-hydroxy ketones. The reaction of methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP), an analogue of the natural substrate benzoylformate, with BFDC results in the formation of a stable analogue (C2{alpha}-phosphonomandelyl-ThDP) of the covalent ThDP-substrate adduct C2{alpha}-mandelyl-ThDP. Formation of the stable adduct is confirmed both by formation of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric form of ThDP (commonly observed when ThDP forms tetrahedral complexes with its substrates) and by high-resolution mass spectrometry of the reaction mixture. In addition, the structure of BFDC with the MBP inhibitor was solved by X-ray crystallography to a spatial resolution of 1.37 {angstrom} (PDB ID 3FSJ). The electron density clearly shows formation of a tetrahedral adduct between the C2 atom of ThDP and the carbonyl carbon atom of the MBP. This adduct resembles the intermediate from the penultimate step of the carboligation reaction between benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The combination of real-time kinetic information via stopped-flow circular dichroism with steady-state data from equilibrium circular dichroism measurements and X-ray crystallography reveals details of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by BFDC. The MBP-ThDP adduct on BFDC is compared to the recently solved structure of the same adduct on benzaldehyde lyase, another ThDP-dependent enzyme capable of catalyzing aldehyde condensation with high stereospecificity.

  13. Reactions of a Ruthenium Complex with Substituted N-Propargyl Pyrroles.

    PubMed

    Chia, Pi-Yeh; Huang, Shou-Ling; Liu, Yi-Hong; Lin, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    In an investigation into the chemical reactions of N-propargyl pyrroles 1 a-c, containing aldehyde, keto, and ester groups on the pyrrole ring, with [Ru]-Cl ([Ru]=Cp(PPh3 )2 Ru; Cp=C5 H5 ), an aldehyde group in the pyrrole ring is found to play a crucial role in stimulating the cyclization reaction. The reaction of 1 a, containing an aldehyde group, with [Ru]-Cl in the presence of NH4 PF6 yields the vinylidene complex 2 a, which further reacts with allyl amine to give the carbene complex 6 a with a pyrrolizine group. However, if 1 a is first reacted with allyl amine to yield the iminenyne 8 a, then the reaction of 8 a with [Ru]-Cl in the presence of NH4 PF6 yields the ruthenium complex 9 a, containing a cationic pyrrolopyrazinium group, which has been fully characterized by XRD analysis. These results can be adequately explained by coordination of the triple bond of the propargyl group to the ruthenium metal center first, followed by two processes, that is, formation of a vinylidene intermediate or direct nucleophilic attack. Additionally, the deprotonation of 2 a by R4 NOH yields the neutral acetylide complex 3 a. In the presence of NH4 PF6 , the attempted alkylation of 3 a resulted in the formation the Fischer-type amino-carbene complex 5 a as a result of the presence of NH3 , which served as a nucleophile. With KPF6 , the alkylation of 3 a with ethyl and benzyl bromoacetates afforded the disubstituted vinylidene complexes 10 a and 11 a, containing ester groups, which underwent deprotonation reactions to give the furyl complexes 12 a and 13 a, respectively. For 13 a, containing an O-benzyl group, subsequent 1,3-migration of the benzyl group was observed to yield product 14 a with a lactone unit. Similar reactivity was not observed for the corresponding N-propargyl pyrroles 1 b and 1 c, which contained keto and ester groups, respectively, on the pyrrole ring. PMID:26865008

  14. Solvation effects in complex-forming reactions. IV. Complexes of a series of donors with tetracyanoethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Safin, D.Kh.; Chmutova, G.A.

    1987-09-20

    The enthalpies of formation were measured and the positions of the charge-transfer bands in the electronic spectra were determined for the complexes of dipropyl sulfide, thioanisole, and mesitylene with tetracyanoethylene in a wide range of solvents. The relative enthalpies of solvation (interaction) of the complexes in the ground and excited states were determined with due regard to the enthalpies of solution of the reagents and the solvatochromism of the charge-transfer bands. The general relationships were investigated, and features of the effect of solvents on the complexes with iodine and tetracyanoethylene as acceptors were studied in terms of the thermodynamic approach.

  15. Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, A. C. C.; Rabello, S.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze large systems of interacting proteins, using techniques from the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of disordered many-particle systems. Apart from protein production and removal, the most relevant microscopic processes in the proteome are complex formation and dissociation, and the microscopic degrees of freedom are the evolving concentrations of unbound proteins (in multiple post-translational states) and of protein complexes. Here we only include dimer-complexes, for mathematical simplicity, and we draw the network that describes which proteins are reaction partners from an ensemble of random graphs with an arbitrary degree distribution. We show how generating functional analysis methods can be used successfully to derive closed equations for dynamical order parameters, representing an exact macroscopic description of the complex formation and dissociation dynamics in the infinite system limit. We end this paper with a discussion of the possible routes towards solving the nontrivial order parameter equations, either exactly (in specific limits) or approximately.

  16. The significance of surface complexation reactions in hydrologic systems: a geochemist's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koretsky, C.

    2000-05-01

    Complexation reactions at the mineral-water interface affect the transport and transformation of metals and organic contaminants, nutrient availability in soils, formation of ore deposits, acidification of watersheds and the global cycling of elements. Such reactions can be understood by quantifying speciation reactions in homogeneous aqueous solutions, characterizing reactive sites at mineral surfaces and developing models of the interactions between aqueous species at solid surfaces. In this paper, the application of thermodynamic principles to quantify aqueous complexation reactions is described. This is followed by a brief overview of a few of the methods that have been used to characterize reactive sites on mineral surfaces. Next, the application of empirical and semi-empirical models of adsorption at the mineral-water interface, including distribution coefficients, simple ion exchange models, and Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the limitations of such models in providing an adequate representation of adsorption in hydrological systems. These limitations arise because isotherms do not account for the structure of adsorbed species, nor do they account for the development of surface charge with adsorption. This is contrasted with more sophisticated models of adsorption, termed 'surface complexation models', which include the constant capacitance model, the diffuse layer model, the triple layer model and the MUSIC model. In these models, speciation reactions between surface functional groups and dissolved species control the variable surface charge build-up and the specific adsorption properties of minerals in aqueous solutions. Next, the influence of mineral surface speciation on the reactivity of adsorbed species and on far from equilibrium dissolution rates of minerals is discussed. Finally, the applicability of microscopic models of surface complexation to field-scale systems is explored and the need to integrate sophisticated surface chemical and hydrological modeling approaches is stressed.

  17. Complex formation in the system zirconium-diantipyrylpropylmethane-acidic dye

    SciTech Connect

    Shtokalo, M.I.; Kostenko, E.E.

    1985-05-01

    Previously, the authors used a metal indicator method to examine the formation of complexes of zirconium with diantipyrylpropylmethane (DAPM) and have shown that two complexes, Zr (DAPM)/sup 4 +/ and Zr (DAPM) /sup 4 +//sub 2/ are formed in 0.1 and 1.0 M HC1, with stability constants of 5.10.10/sup 10/ and 3.80.10/sup 14/ respectively. Now the authors combine this complex with the acidic dye 2-(4-sulfonphenylazo)-1.8-dihydroxynaphthalene-3.6-disulfonic acid (SPADNS). The optimal conditions have been found for the formation of the heteroligand complex. It is shown that Zr (IV) ions are involved in coordination, giving the compound (Zr (DAPM) (HR) 2)/sup 2 -/. A method has been developed for the photometric determination of (0.202.0).10/sup -5/ M solutions of zirconium, and this has been used for the analysis of process water from the Rovensk nuclear power station.

  18. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N.; Allwood, Daniel M.; Blakemore, David C.; Ley, Steven V.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  19. A tethering complex dimer catalyzes trans-SNARE complex formation in intracellular membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Aditya; Alpadi, Kannan; Namjoshi, Sarita; Peters, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    SNARE complexes mediate membrane fusion in the endomembrane system. They consist of coiled-coil bundles of four helices designated as Qa, Qb, Qc and R. A critical intermediate in the fusion pathway is the trans-SNARE complex generated by the assembly of SNAREs residing in opposing membranes. Mechanistic details of trans-SNARE complex formation and topology in a physiological system remain largely unresolved. Our studies on native yeast vacuoles revealed that SNAREs alone are insufficient to form trans-SNARE complexes and that additional factors, potentially tethering complexes and Rab GTPases, are required for the process. Here we report a novel finding that a HOPS tethering complex dimer catalyzes Rab GTPase-dependent formation of a topologically preferred QbQcR-Qa trans-SNARE complex. PMID:22754631

  20. Molecular Epoxidation Reactions Catalyzed by Rhenium, Molybdenum, and Iron Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kück, Jens W; Reich, Robert M; Kühn, Fritz E

    2016-02-01

    Epoxidations are of high relevance in many organic syntheses, both in industry and academia. In this personal account, the development of rhenium, molybdenum, and iron complexes in molecular epoxidation catalysis is presented. Methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) is the benchmark catalyst for these reactions, with a thoroughly investigated mechanism and reactivity profile. More recently, highly active molecular molybdenum and iron catalysts have emerged, challenging the extraordinary role of MTO in epoxidation catalysis with high turnover frequencies (TOFs). This development is highlighted in its use of cheaper, more readily available metals, and the challenges of using base metals in catalysis are discussed. These results show the promise that relatively cheap and abundant metals, such as molybdenum and iron, hold for the future of epoxidation catalysis. PMID:26776087

  1. Carbon Dioxide Influence on the Thermal Formation of Complex Organic Molecules in Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Duvernay, F.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Chiavassa, T.; Cottin, H.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H2O, NH3, CO2, H2CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  2. WATER FORMATION THROUGH A QUANTUM TUNNELING SURFACE REACTION, OH + H{sub 2}, AT 10 K

    SciTech Connect

    Oba, Y.; Watanabe, N.; Hama, T.; Kuwahata, K.; Hidaka, H.; Kouchi, A.

    2012-04-10

    The present study experimentally demonstrated that solid H{sub 2}O is formed through the surface reaction OH + H{sub 2} at 10 K. This is the first experimental evidence of solid H{sub 2}O formation using hydrogen in its molecular form at temperatures as low as 10 K. We further found that H{sub 2}O formation through the reaction OH + H{sub 2} is about one order of magnitude more effective than HDO formation through the reaction OH + D{sub 2}. This significant isotope effect results from differences in the effective mass of each reaction, indicating that the reactions proceed through quantum tunneling.

  3. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    PubMed

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. PMID:17997209

  4. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jirsa, M.A.; Miller, J.D., Jr.; Morey, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a ???1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by ???1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structurally Diverse Diazafluorene-Ligated Palladium(II) Complexes and Their Implications for Aerobic Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    White, Paul B; Jaworski, Jonathan N; Fry, Charles G; Dolinar, Brian S; Guzei, Ilia A; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-04-13

    4,5-Diazafluoren-9-one (DAF) has been identified as a highly effective ligand in a number of Pd-catalyzed oxidation reactions, but the mechanistic basis for its utility has not been elucidated. Here, we present the complex coordination chemistry of DAF and palladium(II) carboxylate salts. Multiple complexes among an equilibrating mixture of species have been characterized by (1)H and (15)N NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. These complexes include monomeric and dimeric Pd(II) species, with monodentate (κ(1)), bidentate (κ(2)), and bridging (μ:κ(1):κ(1)) DAF coordination modes. Titration studies of DAF and Pd(OAc)2 reveal the formation of two dimeric DAF/Pd(OAc)2 complexes at low [DAF] and four monomeric species at higher [DAF]. The dimeric complexes feature two bridging acetate ligands together with either a bridging or nonbridging (κ(1)) DAF ligand coordinated to each Pd(II) center. The monomeric structures consist of three isomeric Pd(κ(1)-DAF)2(OAc)2 complexes, together with Pd(κ(2)-DAF)(OAc)2 in which the DAF exhibits a traditional bidentate coordination mode. Replacing DAF with the structurally related, but more-electron-rich derivative 9,9-dimethyl-4,5-diazafluorene (Me2DAF) simplifies the equilibrium mixture to two complexes: a dimeric species in which the Me2DAF bridges the two Pd centers and a monomeric species with a traditional κ(2)-Me2DAF coordination mode. The use of DAF in combination with other carboxylate ligands (CF3CO2(-) or tBuCO2(-)) also results in a simplified collection of equilibrating Pd(II)-DAF complexes. Collectively, the results highlight the ability of DAF to equilibrate rapidly among multiple coordination modes, and provide valuable insights into the utility of DAF as a ligand in Pd-catalyzed oxidation reactions. PMID:26967703

  6. Formation of complex bacterial colonies via self-generated vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirók, András; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Vicsek, Tamás

    1996-08-01

    Depending on the environmental conditions bacterial colonies growing on agar surfaces can exhibit complex colony formation and various types of collective motion. Experimental results are presented concerning the hydrodynamics (vortices, migration of bacteria in clusters) and colony formation of a morphotype of Bacillus subtilis. Some of these features are not specific to this morphotype but also have been observed in several other bacterial strains, suggesting the presence of universal effects. A simple model of self-propelled particles is proposed, which is capable of describing the hydrodynamics on the intermediate level, including the experimentally observed rotating disks of bacteria. The colony formation is captured by a complex generic model taking into account nutrient diffusion, reproduction, and sporulation of bacteria, extracellular slime deposition, chemoregulation, and inhomogeneous population. Our model also sheds light on some possible biological benefits of this ``multicellular behavior.''

  7. Thermodynamics of formation for the 18-crown-6-triglycine molecular complex in water-dimethylsulfoxide solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usacheva, T. R.; Lan, Pham Thi; Sharnin, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of a water-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solvent on the formation of a molecular complex of 18-crown-6 (18C6) with triglycine (diglycylglycine, 3Gly) is studied via calorimetric titration. It is found that switching from water to an H2O-DMSO mixture with DMSO mole fraction of 0.30 is accompanied by a monotonic increase in the stability of [3Gly18C6] complex, from log K ∘ = 1.10 to log K ∘ = 2.44, and an increase in the exothermicity of the reaction of its formation, from -5.9 to -16.9 kJ/mol. It is shown that the [3Gly18C6] complex exhibits enthalpy stabilization with negative values of enthalpy and entropy over the investigated range of H2O-DMSO solvents. Analysis of the reagents' solvation characteristics reveals that the increase in the reaction's exothermicity of transfer is due to differences in the solvation of [3Gly18C6] and 18C6 with a small solvation contribution from 3Gly. It is concluded that the change in the Gibbs energy of the reaction 3Glysolv + 18C6solv ↔ [3Gly18C6]solv is due to differences in the change in the solvation state of the complex and the peptide (Δtr G ∘([3Gly18C6])-Δtr G ∘(3Gly)).

  8. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  9. Complexation of Al(III) with gluconate in alkaline to hyperalkaline solutions: formation, stability and structure.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Attila; Tasi, Ágost Gyula; Peintler, Gábor; Forgo, Péter; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to suggestions in the literature, it has been proven that Al(III) forms a 1 : 1 complex with gluconate (hereafter Gluc(-)) in strongly alkaline (pH > 12) aqueous solutions. The complex formation was proven via(27)Al and (1)H NMR, freezing-point depression, polarimetric measurements as well as potentiometric and conductometric titrations. This complexation is a pH independent process, i.e., a condensation reaction takes place. The stability constant of the complex formed was derived from (1)H NMR and polarimetric measurements, and was found to be log K = 2.4 ± 0.4. In the complex formed, Al(III) has a tetrahedral geometry, and the Al(OH)4(-) is most probably statistically distributed between the alcoholate groups of the Gluc(-). PMID:23897548

  10. Photochemical reactions of metal nitrosyl complexes. Mechanisms of NO reactions with biologically relevant metal centers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ford, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Tmore » he discoveries that nitric oxide (a.k.a. nitrogen monoxide) serves important roles in mammalian bioregulation and immunology have stimulated intense interest in the chemistry and biochemistry of NO and derivatives such as metal nitrosyl complexes. Also of interest are strategies to deliver NO to biological targets on demand. One such strategy would be to employ a precursor which displays relatively low thermal reactivity but is photochemically active to release NO.his proposition led us to investigate laser flash and continuous photolysis kinetics of nitrosyl complexes such as the Roussin's iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster anions Fe 2 S 2 ( NO ) 4 2 − and Fe 4 S 3 ( NO ) 7 − and several ruthenium salen and porphyrin nitrosyls.hese include studies using metal-nitrosyl photochemistry as a vehicle for delivering NO to hypoxic cell cultures in order to sensitize γ -radiation damage. Also studied were the rates and mechanisms of NO “on” reactions with model water soluble heme compounds, the ferriheme protein met-myoglobin and various ruthenium complexes using ns laser flash photolysis techniques. An overview of these studies is presented.« less

  11. Photochemical Reactions of Fluorinated Pyridines at Half-Sandwich Rhodium Complexes: Competing Pathways of Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation of CpRh(PMe3)(C2H4) (1; Cp = η5-C5H5) in the presence of pentafluoropyridine in hexane solution at low temperature yields an isolable η2-C,C-coordinated pentafluoropyridine complex, CpRh(PMe3)(η2-C,C-C5NF4) (2). The molecular structure of 2 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, showing coordination by C3–C4, unlike previous structures of pentafluoropyridine complexes that show N-coordination. Corresponding experiments with 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoropyridine yield the C–H oxidative addition product CpRh(PMe3)(C5NF4)H (3). In contrast, UV irradiation of 1 in hexane, in the presence of 4-substituted tetrafluoropyridines C5NF4X, where X = NMe2, OMe, results in elimination of C2H4 and HF to form the metallacycles CpRh(PMe3)(κ2-C,C-CH2N(CH3)C5NF3) (4) and CpRh(PMe3)(κ2-C,C-CH2OC5NF3) (5), respectively. The X-ray structure of 4 shows a planar RhCCNC-five-membered ring. Complexes 2–5 may also be formed by thermal reaction of CpRh(PMe3)(Ph)H with the respective pyridines at 50 °C. PMID:24563575

  12. Standard thermodynamic functions of complex formation between Cu2+ and glycine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    Heat effects of the interaction of copper(II) solutions with aminoacetic acid (glycine) are measured by the direct calorimetry at 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 against a background of potassium nitrate. Standard enthalpy values for reactions of the formation of aminoacetic acid copper complexes in aqueous solutions are obtained using an equation with a single individual parameter by extrapolating it to zero ionic strength. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation in the Cu2+-glycine system are calculated. It is shown that glycine-like coordination is most likely in Cu(II) complexes with L-asparagine, L-glutamine, and L-valine.

  13. a Model Study of Complex Behavior in the Belousov - Reaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, David Mark

    1988-12-01

    We have studied the complex oscillatory behavior in a model of the Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction in a continuously-fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The model consisted of a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations derived from a reduced mechanism of the chemical system. These equations were integrated numerically on a computer, which yielded the concentrations of the constituent chemicals as functions of time. In addition, solutions were tracked as functions of a single parameter, the stability of the solutions was determined, and bifurcations of the solutions were located and studied. The intent of this study was to use this BZ model to explore further a region of complex oscillatory behavior found in experimental investigations, the most thorough of which revealed an alternating periodic-chaotic (P-C) sequence of states. A P-C sequence was discovered in the model which showed the same qualitative features as the experimental sequence. In order to better understand the P-C sequence, a detailed study was conducted in the vicinity of the P-C sequence, with two experimentally accessible parameters as control variables. This study mapped out the bifurcation sets, and included examination of the dynamics of the stable periodic, unstable periodic, and chaotic oscillatory motion. Observations made from the model results revealed a rough symmetry which suggests a new way of looking at the P-C sequence. Other nonlinear phenomena uncovered in the model were boundary and interior crises, several codimension-two bifurcations, and similarities in the shapes of areas of stability for periodic orbits in two-parameter space. Each earlier model study of this complex region involved only a limited one-parameter scan and had limited success in producing agreement with experiments. In contrast, for those regions of complex behavior that have been studied experimentally, the observations agree qualitatively with our model results. Several new predictions of the model should be easily verifiable experimentally. The wealth of behavior this detailed exploration revealed invites further experimental studies and suggests that additional refinement of the model itself is in order.

  14. Positronium formation studies in crystalline molecular complexes: Triphenylphosphine oxide - Acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Guerra, L. D. L.; Fulgêncio, F. H.; Windmöller, D.; Santos, G. C.; Fernandes, N. G.; Yoshida, M. I.; Donnici, C. L.; Magalhães, W. F.; Machado, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen bond formation in the triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), acetanilide (ACN) supramolecular heterosynton system, named [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5], has been studied by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and supported by several analytical techniques. In toluene solution, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) presented a 1:1 stoichiometry and indicated that the complexation process is driven by entropy, with low enthalpy contribution. X-ray structure determination showed the existence of a three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds, allowing also the confirmation of the existence of a 1:1 crystalline molecular complex in solid state. The results of thermal analysis (TGA, DTA and DSC) and FTIR spectroscopy showed that the interactions in the complex are relatively weaker than those found in pure precursors, leading to a higher positronium formation probability at [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5]. These weak interactions in the complex enhance the possibility of the n- and π-electrons to interact with positrons and consequently, the probability of positronium formation is higher. Through the present work is shown that PALS is a sensible powerful tool to investigate intermolecular interactions in solid heterosynton supramolecular systems.

  15. Cation-induced formation of a macro-glucan synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Delmer, D.; Solomon, M.; Andrawis, A.; Amor, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    Incubation of Chaps or digitonin-solubilized membrane proteins from cotton fiber with Ca{sup 2+} in combination with Mg{sup 2+}, leads to formation of a complex which can be sedimented within 15 min at 15,000 g. The complex is enriched >10-fold in callose synthase activity and possesses a characteristic pattern of enriched polypeptides when analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Although cation dependent, formation of the complex is not dependent upon the presence of the callose synthase substrate, UDP-glc, indicating that complex formation is not due to entrapment of the enzyme by association with glucan product. The enriched polypeptides include: >200, 50, and 46 kD, all of which have been shown by direct photo-labeling to interact with {sup 92}P-UDP-glc in a Ca{sup 2+} or beta-glucoside dependent reaction are considered likely subunits of callose synthase; a 60-62 kD doublet which is recognized by our MAb 2-1 which can form an immune complex with callose synthase; 74 and 34 kD polypeptides which also interact with UDP-glc, but do not associate with callose synthase in the presence of EDTA. A similar phenomenon is also observed with solubilized membrane proteins from mung beans. Possible functions of each of the enriched polypeptides, the catalytic properties, and ultra-structure of this macro-glucan synthase complex are currently under investigation.

  16. Accelerating procelain formation by incorporating a complex additive

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikova, G.N.; Dubovitskii, S.A.; Moroz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    The authors studied the influence of a complex additive consisting of oxides of calcium, zinc, and magnesium on the formaton of porcelain. In order to achieve a more uniform distribution of the complex additive in the porcelain body it was incorporated in the form of water soluble salts-nitrates, which ensured comparability of results and excluded the effect of the different types of anions. The study of the main parameters of sintering (porosity, shrinkage, and mechanical strength) for the test bodies showed that they sinter at lower temperatures and attain zero porosity, maximum shrinkage, and mechanical strength. The most typical bodies indentified in this way were investigated by methods of complex differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. Thus, the introduction of complex additives consisting of calcium, zinc, and magnesium oxides contributes to the earlier formation of porcelain. With the reduction of firing temperatures by 100/sup 0/C the authors observe an improvement in the basic properties of porcelain.

  17. Reversible Dissociation and Ligand-Glutathione Exchange Reaction in Binuclear Cationic Tetranitrosyl Iron Complex with Penicillamine

    PubMed Central

    Syrtsova, Lidia; Sanina, Natalia; Lyssenko, Konstantin; Kabachkov, Evgeniy; Psikha, Boris; Shkondina, Natal'ja; Pokidova, Olesia; Kotelnikov, Alexander; Aldoshin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of the decomposition of two nitrosyl iron complexes (NICs) with penicillamine thiolic ligands [Fe2(SC5H11NO2)2(NO)4]SO45H2O (I) and glutathione- (GSH-) ligands [Fe2(SC10H17N3O6)2(NO)4]SO42H2O (II), which spontaneously evolve to NO in aqueous medium. NO formation was measured by a sensor electrode and by spectrophotometric methods by measuring the formation of a hemoglobin- (Hb-) NO complex. The NO evolution reaction rate from (I)??k1 = (4.6 0.1)10?3?s?1 and the elimination rate constant of the penicillamine ligand k2 = (1.8 0.2)10?3?s?1 at 25C in 0.05?M phosphate buffer, ?pH 7.0, was calculated using kinetic modeling based on the experimental data. Both reactions are reversible. Spectrophotometry and mass-spectrometry methods have firmly shown that the penicillamine ligand is exchanged for GS? during decomposition of 1.510?4?M (I) in the presence of 10?3?M GSH, with 76% yield in 24?h. As has been established, such behaviour is caused by the resistance of (II) to decomposition due to the higher affinity of iron to GSH in the complex. The discovered reaction may impede S-glutathionylation of the essential enzyme systems in the presence of (I) and is important for metabolism of NIC, connected with its antitumor activity. PMID:24790592

  18. Quantitation of the ligand effect in oxo-transfer reactions of dioxo-Mo(VI) trispyrazolyl borate complexes.

    PubMed

    Basu, Partha; Kail, Brian W; Adams, Andrew K; Nemykin, Victor N

    2013-03-01

    The oxygen atom transfer reactivity (OAT) of dioxo-Mo(VI) complexes of hydrotrispyrazolyl borate (hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate, Tp(Me2); hydrotris(3-isopropylpyrazol-1-yl)borate, Tp(iPr)) with tertiary phosphines (PMe(3), PMe(2)Ph, PEt(3), PEt(2)Ph, PBu(n)(3), PMePh(2), or PEtPh(2)) has been investigated. In acetonitrile, these reactions proceed via the formation of a phosphoryl intermediate complex that undergoes a solvolysis reaction. We report the synthesis and characterization of several phosphoryl complexes. The rates of formation of phosphoryl complexes and their solvation were determined by spectrophotometry. The rates of the reactions and the properties of the phosphoryl species were investigated using the Quantitative Analysis of Ligand Effect (QALE) methodology. The results show that, at least in this system, the first step of the reaction is controlled primarily by the steric factor, and in the second step, both electronic and steric factors are important. We also analyzed the effect of ligands on the reaction rate i.e., Tp(Me2)vs. Tp(iPr). PMID:23212540

  19. Quantitation of Ligand Effect in oxo-transfer reactions from dioxo-Mo(VI) trispyrazolyl borate complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kail, Brian W.; Adams, Andrew K.; Nemykin, Victor N.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen atom transfer reactivity (OAT) from dioxo-Mo(VI) complexes of hydrotrispyrazolyl borate (hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate, TpMe2; hydrotris(3-isopropylpyrazol-1-yl)borate, TpiPr) to tertiary phosphines (PMe3, PMe2Ph, PEt3, PEt2Ph, PBun3, PMePh2, or PEtPh2) has been investigated. In acetonitrile, these reactions proceed via the formation of a phosphoryl intermediate complex that undergoes a solvolysis reaction. We report the synthesis and characterization of several phosphoryl complexes. The rates of formation of phosphoryl complexes and their solvation were determined by spectrophotometry. The rates of the reactions and the properties of the phosphoryl species were investigated using the Quantitative Analysis of Ligand Effect (QALE) methodology. The results show that, at least in this system, the first step of the reaction is controlled primarily by the steric factor, and in the second step, both electronic and steric factors are important. We also analyzed the effect of ligands on the reaction rate e.g., TpMe2 vs. TpiPr. PMID:23212540

  20. Rosette: Understanding Star Formation in Molecular Cloud Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2010-09-01

    We propose Chandra imaging of three embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC) complex. With complementary existing Spitzer and FLAMINGOS infrared surveys, the Chandra observation is critical for us to: (1) create a complete census of the young stars in the cloud; (2) study the spatial distribution of the young stars in different evolutionary stages within the RMC and the disk frequency in the embedded clusters; (3) construct X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) and Initial Mass Function (IMF) for the clusters to examine XLF/IMF variations; (4) elucidate star formation history in this complex.

  1. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The

  2. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  3. Reactions of Co(III)–Nitrosyl Complexes with Superoxide and Their Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pankaj; Lee, Yong-Min; Park, Young Jun; Siegler, Maxime A.; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-01-01

    New CoIII-nitrosyl complexes bearing N-tetramethylated cyclam (TMC) ligands, [(12-TMC)CoIII(NO)]2+ (1) and [(13-TMC)CoIII(NO)]2+ (2), were synthesized via [(TMC)CoII(CH3CN)]2+ plus NO(g) reactions. Spectroscopic and structural characterization shows that these compounds bind the nitrosyl moiety in a bent end-on fashion. The CoIII-nitrosyl complexes, (1) and (2), reacted with KO2/2.2.2-Cryptand and produced [(12-TMC)CoII(NO2)]+ (3) and [(13-TMC)CoII(NO2)]+ (4), respectively; these possess O,O’-chelated nitrito ligands. Mechanistic studies using 18O-labeled superoxide (18O2•−) demonstrate that one oxygen atom in the nitrito ligand derives from superoxide and dioxygen produced comes from the other superoxide oxygen atom. Evidence supporting the formation of a Co-peroxynitrite intermediate is also presented. PMID:25793706

  4. Chemiluminescent reactions of the IVA elements: Dihalide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosano, W. J.; Parson, J. M.

    1986-06-01

    Earlier work on chemiluminescent beam-gas reactions of Si, Ge, and Sn with F2 [W. J. Rosano and J. M. Parson, J. Chem. Phys. 79, 2696 (1983)] is extended to reactions with Br2, I2, ClF3, SF4, and SF6. In all of these new systems electronic emission is attributable exclusively to IVA dihalide products. Reaction of Sn with the diatomics most likely procedes by a two-step mechanism involving a highly vibrationally excited Sn monohalide intermediate. The polyatomic reactants, on the other hand, yield IVA difluoride products in a single collision. Radiation of the dihalides from the 3B1 state to the ground 1A1 state is consistent with the thermochemistry of these mechanisms. The dependence of the emission on the IVA atom velocity shows that energy barriers to reaction are small or nonexistent.

  5. The Copper-nicotinamide complex: sustainable applications in coupling and cycloaddition reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crystalline copper (II)-nicotinamide complex, synthesized via simple mixing of copper chloride and nicotinamide solution at room temperature, catalyzes the C-S, C-N bond forming and cycloaddition reactions under a variety of sustainable reaction conditions.

  6. Three-Coordinate Terminal Imidoiron(III) Complexes: Structure, Spectroscopy, and Mechanism of Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Ryan E.; DeYonker, Nathan J.; Eckert, Nathan A.; Cundari, Thomas R.; DeBeer, Serena; Bill, Eckhard; Ottenwaelder, Xavier; Flaschenriem, Christine; Holland, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction of 1-adamantyl azide with iron(I) diketiminate precursors gives metastable but isolable imidoiron(III) complexes LFe=NAd (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand; Ad = 1-adamantyl). This paper addresses: (1) the spectroscopic and structural characterization of the Fe=N multiple bond in these interesting three-coordinate iron imido complexes, and (2) the mechanism through which the imido complexes form. The iron(III) imido complexes have been examined by 1H NMR and EPR spectroscopies and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility (SQUID), and structurally characterized by crystallography and/or X-ray absorption (EXAFS) measurements. These data show that the imido complexes have quartet ground states and short (1.68 ± 0.01 Å) iron-nitrogen bonds. The formation of the imido complexes proceeds through unobserved iron–RN3 intermediates, which are indicated by QM/MM computations to be best described as iron(II) with an RN3 radical anion. The radical character on the organoazide bends its NNN linkage to enable easy N2 loss and imido complex formation. The product distribution between imidoiron(III) products and hexazene-bridged diiron(II) products is solvent-dependent, and the solvent dependence can be explained by coordination of certain solvents to the iron(I) precursor prior to interaction with the organoazide. PMID:20524625

  7. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects. PMID:26303622

  8. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Auer, S; Heitzig, J; Kornek, U; Schöll, E; Kurths, J

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation ("coalitions") on an acquaintance network. We include both the network's influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects. PMID:26303622

  9. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  10. Formation mechanisms of 3,4-dinitrofuroxan via nitration reaction of furoxan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yajing; Ye, Yuqing; Liu, Jianyong; Lai, Weipeng

    2016-03-01

    A systematic investigations on the nitration of furoxan by two typical nitration reagents nitronium tetrafluoroborate (BF4NO2) and dilute nitric acid (HNO3) in chloroform (CHCl3) solvent using density functional theory (DFT) method to reveal the formation mechanism of 3,4-dinitrofuroxan (DNFO) and explore new synthesis routes. The geometry optimizations of the minima and transition states involved in the two nitration reactions are performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G** basis set level. The CCSD single-point energy corrections at the same level are carried out on top of the optimized geometries to obtain the accurate energy. Calculated results demonstrate that the electrophilic substitutions of nitronium ions from the nitration reagents and the abstractions of protons in the complex intermediates are the main formation mechanism of DNFO. BF4- is shown to be a better proton abstracter than HNO3 and H2O due to its no barrier combination with H+. The abstraction of proton by HNO3 is predicted to be more feasible than H2O because it can supply the nitration attacker (NO2+) and release more heat. Chloroform is a feasible solvent and heating properly is necessary for the two reactions due to the relatively high barrier of 37 kcal/mol. These conclusions provide some significant indications on the new experimental synthesis of DNFO.

  11. Demixing-stimulated lane formation in binary complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.-R.; Jiang, K.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Recently lane formation and phase separation have been reported for experiments with binary complex plasmas in the PK3-Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Positive non-additivity of particle interactions is known to stimulate phase separation (demixing), but its effect on lane formation is unknown. In this work, we used Langevin dynamics (LD) simulation to probe the role of non-additivity interactions on lane formation. The competition between laning and demixing leads to thicker lanes. Analysis based on anisotropic scaling indices reveals a crossover from normal laning mode to a demixing-stimulated laning mode. Extensive numerical simulations enabled us to identify a critical value of the non-additivity parameter {Delta} for the crossover.

  12. Computational Analyses of Complex Flows with Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kang-Sik

    The heat and mass transfer phenomena in micro-scale for the mass transfer phenomena on drug in cylindrical matrix system, the simulation of oxygen/drug diffusion in a three dimensional capillary network, and a reduced chemical kinetic modeling of gas turbine combustion for Jet propellant-10 have been studied numerically. For the numerical analysis of the mass transfer phenomena on drug in cylindrical matrix system, the governing equations are derived from the cylindrical matrix systems, Krogh cylinder model, which modeling system is comprised of a capillary to a surrounding cylinder tissue along with the arterial distance to veins. ADI (Alternative Direction Implicit) scheme and Thomas algorithm are applied to solve the nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). This study shows that the important factors which have an effect on the drug penetration depth to the tissue are the mass diffusivity and the consumption of relevant species during the time allowed for diffusion to the brain tissue. Also, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to simulate the blood flow and oxygen/drug diffusion in a three dimensional capillary network, which are satisfied in the physiological range of a typical capillary. A three dimensional geometry has been constructed to replicate the one studied by Secomb et al. (2000), and the computational framework features a non-Newtonian viscosity model for blood, the oxygen transport model including in oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation and wall flux due to tissue absorption, as well as an ability to study the diffusion of drugs and other materials in the capillary streams. Finally, a chemical kinetic mechanism of JP-10 has been compiled and validated for a wide range of combustion regimes, covering pressures of 1atm to 40atm with temperature ranges of 1,200 K--1,700 K, which is being studied as a possible Jet propellant for the Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) and other high-speed flight applications such as hypersonic missiles. The comprehensive skeletal mechanism consists of 58 species and 315 reactions including in CPD, Benzene formation process by the theory for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot formation process on the constant volume combustor, premixed flame characteristics.

  13. Synthesis of Cyclic Vinylidene Complexes and Azavinylidene Complexes by Formal [4+2] Cyclization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinxiang; Huang, Zi-Ao; Lu, Zhengyu; Zhang, Hong; Xia, Haiping

    2016-04-01

    Reactions of the hydrido-butenylcarbyne complex [OsHCl2 (≡CC(PPh3 )=CHEt)(PPh3 )2 ]BF4 (1) with nitriles RC≡N (R=2-cyclopropyl-2-oxopropyl, 3-amino-2-oxobutyl) lead to six-membered cyclic vinylidene complexes 3 and azavinylidene complexes 4, that is, iso-osmapyridiniums. Treatment of 1 with excess 2-formylbenzonitrile at reflux temperature in CHCl3 in the presence of air produces a fused osmapyridinium 8, which is first oxidized to the tricyclic iso-osmapyridinium derivative 7, then to iso-osmapyridinium 9, which contains a fused naphthalenone fragment. The conversion of iso-osmapyridinium 9 (with a vinylidene segment) to the iso-osmapyridinium compounds 10 and 11 (with azavinylidene segments) was achieved in the presence of a hydrogen halide, such as HCl or HI. The molecular structures of the complexes synthesized were confirmed by X-ray studies. Moreover, the aromatic stabilization energy and nucleus-independent chemical-shift values of the osmapyridiniums and the strain in the iso-osmapyridinium rings were investigated by DFT calculations. PMID:26919198

  14. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  15. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe-S Assembly Complex.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nicholas G; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A; Barondeau, David P

    2015-06-30

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe-S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe-S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe-S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe-S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe-S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe-S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe-S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  16. New fluorescence reactions in DNA cytochemistry. 2. Microscopic and spectroscopic studies on fluorescent aluminum complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Castillo, P.; Llorente, A.R.; Gomez, A.; Gosalvez, J.; Goyanes, V.J.; Stockert, J.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Metal-dye complexes are widely applied in light microscopic techniques for chromatin staining (e.g., hematoxylin and carmine), but fluorescent complexes between phosphate-binding cations and suitable ligands have been little used. Preformed and postformed Al complexes with different anionic dyes induced strong and selective fluorescence reactions in nuclei from chicken blood smears, frozen sections, paraffin-embedded sections and Epon-embedded sections of mouse and rat tissues, mitotic chromosomes, meiotic chromosomes and kinetoplasts of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. The DNA-dependent fluorescence of these structures showed a very low fading rate. The emission colors were related to the ligand. The most suitable compounds for forming fluorescent Al chelates were 8-hydroxyquinoline, morin, nuclear fast red and purpurin. Staining with diluted carmine solutions and InCl3 mordanting, followed by 8-hydroxyquinoline, also induced chromatin fluorescence. After treating isolated mouse chromosomes with the preformed complex Al-nuclear fast red, x-ray microanalysis indicated a P:Al:dye binding ratio of about 40:15:1. The selectivity, stability and easy formation of these fluorescent Al complexes are obvious advantages for their use as new cytochemical probes in cytologic studies.

  17. Complex formation between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged oligoelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiajia; Barz, Matthias; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-04-28

    We study the complex formation between one long polyanion chain and many short oligocation chains by computer simulations. We employ a coarse-grained bead-spring model for the polyelectrolyte chains and model explicitly the small salt ions. We systematically vary the concentration and the length of the oligocation and examine how the oligocations affects the chain conformation, the static structure factor, the radial and axial distribution of various charged species, and the number of bound ions in the complex. At low oligocation concentration, the polyanion has an extended structure. Upon increasing the oligocation concentration, the polyanion chain collapses and forms a compact globule, but the complex still carries a net negative charge. Once the total charge of the oligocations is equal to that of the polyanion, the collapse stops and is replaced by a slow expansion. In this regime, the net charge on the complexes is positive or neutral, depending on the microion concentration in solution. The expansion can be explained by the reduction of the oligocation bridging. We find that the behavior and the structure of the complex are largely independent of the length of oligocations, and very similar to that observed when replacing the oligocations by multivalent salt cations, and conclude that the main driving force keeping the complex together is the release of monovalent counterions and coions. We speculate on the implications of this finding for the problem of controlled oligolyte release and oligolyte substitution. PMID:27131564

  18. Complex formation between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged oligoelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiajia; Barz, Matthias; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    We study the complex formation between one long polyanion chain and many short oligocation chains by computer simulations. We employ a coarse-grained bead-spring model for the polyelectrolyte chains and model explicitly the small salt ions. We systematically vary the concentration and the length of the oligocation and examine how the oligocations affects the chain conformation, the static structure factor, the radial and axial distribution of various charged species, and the number of bound ions in the complex. At low oligocation concentration, the polyanion has an extended structure. Upon increasing the oligocation concentration, the polyanion chain collapses and forms a compact globule, but the complex still carries a net negative charge. Once the total charge of the oligocations is equal to that of the polyanion, the collapse stops and is replaced by a slow expansion. In this regime, the net charge on the complexes is positive or neutral, depending on the microion concentration in solution. The expansion can be explained by the reduction of the oligocation bridging. We find that the behavior and the structure of the complex are largely independent of the length of oligocations, and very similar to that observed when replacing the oligocations by multivalent salt cations, and conclude that the main driving force keeping the complex together is the release of monovalent counterions and coions. We speculate on the implications of this finding for the problem of controlled oligolyte release and oligolyte substitution.

  19. DNA-histidine complex formation in isoelectric histidine buffers.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, N C; Gelfi, C; Righetti, P G

    1999-04-01

    The free solution electrophoretic mobility of two DNA molecules of different molecular masses, 18 base pairs and 2686 base pairs, has been measured in isoelectric histidine buffers with and without added low-molecular-mass electrolytes. Extensive DNA-histidine complex formation is observed in isoelectric histidine buffer, as evidenced by distortion and splitting of the peaks in the electropherograms. Peak distortion and splitting can be decreased or eliminated by adding low-molecular-mass neutral salts to the solution, suggesting that the DNA-histidine complexes are stabilized by electrostatic interactions. The ability of various neutral salts to disrupt the DNA-histidine complexes depends on the molecular mass of the DNA and the concentration and type of added salt. PMID:10327637

  20. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX₃ Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. Scott; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-10-31

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H₂ gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)₂ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX₃ compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt₃. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)₂ and [HNi(dmpe)₂]+, to form B–H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔGH °) of HCo(dmpe)₂ and [HNi(dmpe)₂]+ were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX₃ compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX₃ compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)₂ was observed to transfer H to BX₃ compounds with X = H, OC₆F₅, and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)₃ is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH₃)₂ and dmpe-(BH₂(SPh))₂ products that follow from a reduction of multiple B–SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)₂ and B(SPh)₃ in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et₃N–BH₂SPh and Et₃N–BH₃ with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)₂]+ with B(SPh)₃ under analogous conditions give Et₃N–BH₂SPh as the final product along with the nickel–thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)₂(SPh)]+. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)₂ (dedpe = Et₂PCH₂CH₂PPh₂) from H₂ and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)₂Co(dedpe)₂][BF₄].

  1. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-12-05

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H{sub 2})Co(dedpe){sub 2}][BF{sub 4}].

  2. Synthesis and hydride transfer reactions of cobalt and nickel hydride complexes to BX3 compounds.

    PubMed

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; O'Hagan, Molly J; Camaioni, Donald M; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; DuBois, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)(2) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX(3) compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt(3). This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔG(H(-))°) of HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX(3) compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX(3) compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)(2) was observed to transfer H(-) to BX(3) compounds with X = H, OC(6)F(5), and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)(3) is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH(3))(2) and dmpe-(BH(2)(SPh))(2) products that follow from a reduction of multiple B-SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)(2) and B(SPh)(3) in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh and Et(3)N-BH(3) with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) with B(SPh)(3) under analogous conditions give Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)(2)(SPh)](+). The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)(2) (dedpe = Et(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) from H(2) and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)(2)Co(dedpe)(2)][BF(4)]. PMID:22040085

  3. Mercury(II) Penicillamine Complex Formation in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, B.O.; Jalilehvand, F.; Mah, V.

    2009-06-01

    The complex formation between mercury(II) and penicillamine (H{sub 2}Pen = 3,3'-dimethyl cysteine) in alkaline aqueous solutions (pH {approx}2) has been investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and {sup 199}Hg NMR spectroscopy. By varying the penicillamine concentration (C{sub H{sub 2}Pen} = 0.2--1.25 M) in {approx}0.1 M Hg(II) solutions, two coexisting major species [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} and [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sub 4-} were characterized with mean Hg-S bond distances 2.34(2) and 2.44(2) {angstrom}, respectively. The [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} complex with two deprotonated penicillamine ligands forms an almost linear S-Hg-S entity with two weak chelating Hg-N interactions at the mean Hg-N distance 2.52(2) {angstrom}. The same type of coordination is also found for the corresponding [Hg(Cys){sub 2}]{sup 2-} complex in alkaline aqueous solution with the mean bond distances Hg-S 2.34(2) {angstrom} and Hg-N 2.56(2) {angstrom}. The relative amounts of the [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} and [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sup 4-} complexes were estimated by fitting linear combinations of the EXAFS oscillations to the experimental spectra. Also their {sup 199}Hg NMR chemical shifts were used to evaluate the complex formation, showing that the [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sup 4-} complex dominates already at moderate excess of the free ligand ([Pen{sup 2-}] > {approx} 0.1 M).

  4. A DFT computational study of the bis-silylation reaction of acetylene catalyzed by palladium complexes.

    PubMed

    Bottoni, Andrea; Higueruelo, Alicia Perez; Miscione, Gian Pietro

    2002-05-15

    In this paper we have investigated at the DFT(B3LYP) level the catalytic cycle for the bis-silylation reaction of alkynes promoted by palladium complexes. A model-system formed by an acetylene molecule, a disilane molecule, and the Pd(PH(3))(2) complex has been used. The most relevant features of this catalytic cycle can be summarized as follows: (i) The first step of the cycle is an oxidative addition involving H(3)Si-SiH(3) and Pd(PH(3))(2). It occurs easily and leads to the cis (SiH(3))(2)Pd(PH(3))(2) complex that is 5.39 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy than reactants. (ii) The transfer of the two silyl groups to the C-C triple bond does not occur in a concerted way, but involves many steps. (iii) The cis (SiH(3))(2)Pd(PH(3))(2) complex, obtained from the oxidative addition, is involved in the formation of the first C-Si bond (activation barrier of 18.34 kcal mol(-1)). The two intermediates that form in this step cannot lead directly to the formation of the final bis(silyl)ethene product. However, they can isomerize rather easily (the two possible isomerizations have a barrier of 16.79 and 7.17 kcal mol(-1)) to new more stable species. In both these new intermediates the second silyl group is adjacent to the acetylene moiety and the formation of the second C-Si bond can occur rapidly leading to the (Z)-bis(silyl)ethene, as experimentally observed. (iv) The whole catalytic process is exothermic by 41.54 kcal mol(-1), in quite good agreement with the experimental estimate of this quantity (about 40 kcal mol(-1)). PMID:11996593

  5. Titanium complex formation of organic ligands in titania gels.

    PubMed

    Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Todoroki, Kenta; Setiawan, Rudi Agus; Teshima, Katsuya; Fujii, Tsuneo; Satozono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-27

    Thin films of organic ligand-dispersing titania gels were prepared from titanium alkoxide sols containing ligand molecules by steam treatment without heating. The formation of the ligand-titanium complex and the photoinduced electron transfer process in the systems were investigated by photoelectrochemical measurements. The complex was formed between the 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) and titanium species, such as the titanium ion, on the titania nanoparticle surface through the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the quinolate. A photocurrent was observed in the electrodes containing the complex due to the electron injection from the LUMO of the complex into the titania conduction band. A bidentate ligand, 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN), formed the complex on the titania surface through dehydration between its two hydroxyl groups of DHN and two TiOH groups of the titania. The electron injection from the HOMO of DHN to the titania conduction band was observed during light irradiation. This direct electron injection was more effective than the two-step electron injection. PMID:25535798

  6. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  7. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  8. "Extreme" Ugi reactions with some complex α-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Turner, Charles Dylan; Ciufolini, Marco A

    2012-09-21

    The Ti(IV)-catalyzed Ugi condensation of α-amino acids with electron-rich aromatic aldehydes performs adequately even with sterically demanding α-amino carboxylate salts. The reaction occurs diastereoselectively, in some cases with virtually complete diastereoselectivity. A stereochemical rationale for the reaction is proposed. PMID:22954286

  9. Apparent anti-Woodward-Hoffmann addition to a nickel bis(dithiolene) complex: the reaction mechanism involves reduced, dimetallic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Dang, Li; Shibl, Mohamed F; Yang, Xinzheng; Harrison, Daniel J; Alak, Aiman; Lough, Alan J; Fekl, Ulrich; Brothers, Edward N; Hall, Michael B

    2013-04-01

    Nickel dithiolene complexes have been proposed as electrocatalysts for alkene purification. Recent studies of the ligand-based reactions of Ni(tfd)2 (tfd = S2C2(CF3)2) and its anion [Ni(tfd)2](-) with alkenes (ethylene and 1-hexene) showed that in the absence of the anion, the reaction proceeds most rapidly to form the intraligand adduct, which decomposes by releasing a substituted dihydrodithiin. However, the presence of the anion increases the rate of formation of the stable cis-interligand adduct, and decreases the rate of dihydrodithiin formation and decomposition. In spite of both computational and experimental studies, the mechanism, especially the role of the anion, remained somewhat elusive. We are now providing a combined experimental and computational study that addresses the mechanism and explains the role of the anion. A kinetic study (global analysis) for the reaction of 1-hexene is reported, which supports the following mechanism: (1) reversible intraligand addition, (2) oxidation of the intraligand addition product prior to decomposition, and (3) interligand adduct formation catalyzed by Ni(tfd)2(-). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed on the Ni(tfd)2/Ni(tfd)2(-)/ethylene system to shed light on the selectivity of adduct formation in the absence of anion and on the mechanism in which Ni(tfd)2(-) shifts the reaction from intraligand addition to interligand addition. Computational results show that in the neutral system the free energy of activation for intraligand addition is lower than that for interligand addition, in agreement with the experimental results. The computations predict that the anion enhances the rate of the cis-interligand adduct formation by forming a dimetallic complex with the neutral complex. The [(Ni(tfd)2)2](-) dimetallic complex then coordinates ethylene and isomerizes to form a Ni,S-bound ethylene complex, which then rapidly isomerizes to the stable interligand adduct but not to the intraligand adduct. Thus, the anion catalyzes the formation of the interligand adduct. Significant experimental evidence for dimetallic species derived from nickel bis(dithiolene) complexes has been found. ESI-MS data indicate the presence of a [(Ni(tfd)2)2](-) dimetallic complex as the acetonitrile adduct. A charge-neutral association complex of Ni(tfd)2 with the ethylene adduct of Ni(tfd)2 has been crystallographically characterized. Despite the small driving force for the reversible association, very major structural reorganization (square-planar → octahedral) occurs. PMID:23484481

  10. Catalytic Reactions of DNT and TNT Molecules on Porphyrin Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, Keith; Wang, Bin; Pantelides, Sokrates

    2011-03-01

    Reactions of molecules with substrates can be used to identify them, as in sensor applications. Here we examine reactions of DNT and TNT molecules on porphyrin and metal-porphyrin via first-principles DFT calculations. We find that the oxidation of DNT by O2 using Fe-porphyrin as a catalyst is exothermic. The affinity of O2 to Fe-porphyrin weakens the O2 intramolecular bond, which lowers the oxidation reaction barrier is lowered by ~ 1 eV. Substrate effects on this process are accounted for. One way to use this selective oxidation reaction for DNT/TNT sensor applications is to exploit the metal-semiconductor transition in thin-film VO2 to detect the energy deposited by the exothermic reaction between the adsorbed molecules. This work was supported in part by DTRA grant HDTRA1-10-0047.

  11. Noble reactions for the actinides: safe gold-based access to organouranium and azide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Robert K; Graves, Christopher R; Scott, Brian L; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Gold has had a profound impact on organic chemistry; its compounds are spectacular catalysts for many organic transformations involving the formation of C-C, C-O, C-N and CoS bonds, and have enabled unprecedented pathways for the functionalization of C-H and C-C bonds. In general, gold complexes have not been exploited as reagents in organometallic or inorganic chemistry, although a few gold(l) aryl and alkynyl compounds have been reported to undergo transmetalation with transition metal complexes. We have been developing methods for functionalizing uranium complexes and have shown that Cu(l)-X reagents effect the oxidation of uranium with formation of U-X bonds, providing easy chemical control over uranium in oxidation states ranging from U{sup III}{yields}U{sup VI}. Although a logical approach for the direct generation of U-carbon and U-azide bonds, this Cu-based platform is limited in scope as it only works for pure and isolable copper compounds. This is problematic given the instability of organocuprates and copper azides, which can detonate violently as isolated solids. As such, this route has been confined to the synthesis of select uranium phenylacetylide complexes. Over the past few years, a variety of stable gold(l) alkyl, alkenyl, aryl, alkynyl, and azide complexes have been reported, propelling us to investigate their potential as reagents within the oxidative functionalization platform. Unlike the related CU{sup I} systems, Au{sup I} reagents are easily derivatized, and are safe to handle and isolate. Herein, we report that gold(l)-phosphine compounds can undergo a new class of reaction, and are excellent reagents for the oxidative functionalization of uranium with azide and carbon anions.

  12. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttgé, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; de Goés Brennand, E.

    2011-06-01

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions Ne22+Cf249,Mg26+Cm248, S36+U238, and Fe58+Pb208 have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs*, formed in the reaction Mg26+Cm248, is observed. In the reaction S36+U238, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the Fe58+Pb208 reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  13. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules during Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-04-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  14. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI+] prion – an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein – and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome. PMID:25739058

  15. Formation and Redox Interconversion of Niobium Methylidene and Methylidyne Complexes.

    PubMed

    Searles, Keith; Smith, Kyle T; Kurogi, Takashi; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Carroll, Patrick J; Mindiola, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    The niobium methylidene [{(Ar'O)2 Nb}2 (μ2 -Cl)2 (μ2 -CH2 )] (2) can be cleanly prepared via thermolysis or photolysis of [(Ar'O)2 Nb(CH3 )2 Cl] (1) (OAr'=2,6-bis(diphenylmethyl)-4-tert-butylphenoxide). Reduction of 2 with two equivalents of KC8 results in formation of the first niobium methylidyne [K][{(Ar'O)2 Nb}2 (μ2 -CH)(μ2 -H)(μ2 -Cl)] (3) via a binuclear α-hydrogen elimination. Oxidation of 3 with two equiv of ClCPh3 reforms 2. In addition to solid state X-ray analysis, all these complexes were elucidated via multinuclear NMR experiments and isotopic labelling studies, including a crossover experiment, support the notion for a radical mechanism as well as a binuclear α-hydrogen abstraction pathway being operative in the formation of 2 from 1. PMID:27110689

  16. Bio-Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Incorporating Reaction Center and Reaction Center Plus Light Harvesting Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoubi, Houman

    Harvesting solar energy can potentially be a promising solution to the energy crisis now and in the future. However, material and processing costs continue to be the most important limitations for the commercial devices. A key solution to these problems might lie within the development of bio-hybrid solar cells that seeks to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. The bio-photoelectrochemical cell technologies exploit biomimetic means of energy conversion by utilizing plant-derived photosystems which can be inexpensive and ultimately the most sustainable alternative. Plants and photosynthetic bacteria harvest light, through special proteins called reaction centers (RCs), with high efficiency and convert it into electrochemical energy. In theory, photosynthetic RCs can be used in a device to harvest solar energy and generate 1.1 V open circuit voltage and ~1 mA cm-2 short circuit photocurrent. Considering the nearly perfect quantum yield of photo-induced charge separation, efficiency of a protein-based solar cell might exceed 20%. In practice, the efficiency of fabricated devices has been limited mainly due to the challenges in the electron transfer between the protein complex and the device electrodes as well as limited light absorption. The overarching goal of this work is to increase the power conversion efficiency in protein-based solar cells by addressing those issues (i.e. electron transfer and light absorption). This work presents several approaches to increase the charge transfer rate between the photosynthetic RC and underlying electrode as well as increasing the light absorption to eventually enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of bio-hybrid solar cells. The first approach is to decrease the electron transfer distance between one of the redox active sites in the RC and the underlying electrode by direct attachment of the of protein complex onto Au electrodes via surface exposed cysteine residues. This resulted in photocurrent densities as large as ~600 nA cm-2 while still the incident photon to generated electron quantum efficiency was as low as %3 x 10-4. 2- The second approach is to immobilize wild type RCs of Rhodobacter sphaeroides on the surface of a Au underlying electrode using self-assembled monolayers of carboxylic acid terminated oligomers and cytochrome c charge mediating layers, with a preferential orientation from the primary electron donor site. This approach resulted in EQE of up to 0.06%, which showed 200 times efficiency improvement comparing to the first approach. In the third approach, instead of isolated protein complexes, RCs plus light harvesting (LH) complexes were employed for a better photon absorption. Direct attachment of RC-LH1 complexes on Au working electrodes, resulted in 0.21% EQE which showed 3.5 times efficiency improvement over the second approach (700 times higher than the first approach). The main impact of this work is the harnessing of biological RCs for efficient energy harvesting in man-made structures. Specifically, the results in this work will advance the application of RCs in devices for energy harvesting and will enable a better understanding of bio and nanomaterial interfaces, thereby advancing the application of biological materials in electronic devices. At the end, this work offers general guidelines that can serve to improve the performance of bio-hybrid solar cells.

  17. Electron-exciton complex formation in organic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, G.; Caron, L.; Sanche, L.

    1981-06-01

    Sharp structure in the doubly differentiated electron transmission spectra of thin (≅ 150 Å) benzene films is shown to result from electron-exciton complex formation. The large energy shift between the electronic energy levels of the molecule and the transmission maxima is related to the electron binding energy. This is due to the polarizability difference between the Frenkel exciton and the organic molecule. From a simple Wigner-Seitz model, we show that the captured electron is localized between the exciton and the sorrounding molecules.

  18. Mechanism of water splitting and oxygen-oxygen bond formation by a mononuclear ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinzheng; Hall, Michael B

    2010-01-13

    Density functional theory (DFT) predicts a detailed mechanism for the reported potential photocatalytic system for solar hydrogen production from water, (P-da-PNN)RuH(CO) (1, P-da = dearomatized at the phosphorus side arm, PNN = (2-(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)-6-diethylaminomethyl)pyridine) (Science 2009, 324, 74). In the initial thermal reaction, the coordination of a water molecule is followed by cleavage of an O-H bond and aromatization of the PNN ligand to form (PNN)RuH(CO)(OH) (3'), the most stable complex in the reaction. This low-barrier step is followed by the rate-determining dearomatization and formation of H(2). Next, a second water molecule is activated, resulting in the formation of the cis-dihydroxo complex (PNN)Ru(CO)(OH)(2) (7), which photolytically eliminates H(2)O(2). Time-dependent DFT calculations predict that the breaking of the two strong Ru-O bonds and the formation of the O-O bond in this photolytic reaction involve low-energy triplet states and singlet-triplet crossings. Rather than regeneration of initial complex 1 after the light-induced H(2)O(2) evolution in the catalytic cycle, the DFT calculations predict a new route with a lower energy barrier via the regeneration of 1', an isomer of 1 with the unsaturated carbon at the nitrogen side arm of the PNN ligand. This new route involves hydride transfer from the methylene group at the nitrogen side, rather than the previously proposed regeneration of 1 through hydride transfer from the phosphorus side arm of the PNN ligand. PMID:19957936

  19. Novel tailoring reaction for two adjacent coordinated nitriles giving platinum 1,3,5-triazapentadiene complexes.

    PubMed

    Gushchin, Pavel V; Tyan, Marina R; Bokach, Nadezhda A; Revenco, Mikhail D; Haukka, Matti; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Lai, Cheng-Hsuan; Chou, Pi-Tai; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2008-12-15

    The tailoring reaction of the two adjacent nitrile ligands in cis-[PtCl(2)(RCN)(2)] (R = Me, Et, CH(2)Ph, Ph) and [Pt(tmeda)(EtCN)(2)][SO(3)CF(3)](2) (8.(OTf)(2); tmeda = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine) upon their interplay with N,N'-diphenylguanidine (DPG; NH=C(NHPh)(2)), in a 1:2 molar ratio gives the 1,3,5-triazapentadiene complexes [PtCl(2){NHC(R)NHC(R)=NH}] (1-4) and [Pt(tmeda){NHC(Et)NHC(Et)NH}][SO(3)CF(3)](2) (10.(OTf)(2)), respectively. In contrast to the reaction of 8.(OTf)(2) with NH=C(NHPh)(2), interaction of 8.(OTf)(2) with excess gaseous NH(3) leads to formation of the platinum(II) bis(amidine) complex cis-[Pt(tmeda){NH=C(NH(2))Et}(2)][SO(3)CF(3)](2) (9.(OTf)(2)). Treatment of trans-[PtCl(2)(RCN)(2)] (R = Et, CH(2)Ph, Ph) with 2 equiv of NH=C(NHPh)(2) in EtCN (R = Et) and CH(2)Cl(2) (R = CH(2)Ph, Ph) solutions at 20-25 degrees C leads to [PtCl{NH=C(R)NC(NHPh)=NPh}(RCN)] (11-13). When any of the trans-[PtCl(2)(RCN)(2)] (R = Et, CH(2)Ph, Ph) complexes reacts in the corresponding nitrile RCN with 4 equiv of DPG at prolonged reaction time (75 degrees C, 1-2 days), complexes containing two bidentate 1,3,5-triazapentadiene ligands, i.e. [Pt{NH=C(R)NC(NHPh)=NPh}(2)] (14-16), are formed. Complexes 14-16 exhibit strong phosphorescence in the solid state, with quantum yields (peak wavelengths) of 0.39 (530 nm), 0.61 (460 nm), and 0.74 (530 nm), respectively. The formulation of the obtained complexes was supported by satisfactory C, H, and N elemental analyses, in agreement with FAB-MS, ESI-MS, IR, and (1)H and (13)C{(1)H} NMR spectra. The structures of 1, 2, 4, 11, 13, 14, 9.(picrate)(2), and 10.(picrate)(2) were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. PMID:18376821

  20. Molecular determinants of orexin receptor-arrestinubiquitin complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Werner C; Seeber, Ruth M; Eidne, Karin A; Pfleger, Kevin DG

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The orexin system regulates a multitude of key physiological processes, particularly involving maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. Consequently, there is considerable potential for pharmaceutical development for the treatment of disorders from narcolepsy to metabolic syndrome. It acts through the hormonal activity of two endogenous peptides, orexin A binding to orexin receptors 1 and 2 (OX1 and OX2) with similar affinity, and orexin B binding to OX2 with higher affinity than OX1 receptors. We have previously revealed data differentiating orexin receptor subtypes with respect to their relative stability in forming orexin receptor-arrestin-ubiquitin complexes measured by BRET. Recycling and cellular signalling distinctions were also observed. Here, we have investigated, using BRET, the molecular determinants involved in providing OX2 receptors with greater β-arrestin-ubiquitin complex stability. Experimental Approach: The contribution of the C-terminal tail of the OX receptors was investigated by bulk substitution and site-specific mutagenesis using BRET and inositol phosphate assays. Key Results: Replacement of the OX1 receptor C-terminus with that of the OX2 receptor did not result in the expected gain of function, indicating a role for intracellular domain configuration in addition to primary structure. Furthermore, two out of the three putative serine/threonine clusters in the C-terminus were found to be involved in OX2 receptor-β-arrestin-ubiquitin complex formation. Conclusions and Implications: This study provides fundamental insights into the molecular elements that influence receptor-arrestin-ubiquitin complex formation. Understanding how and why the orexin receptors can be functionally differentiated brings us closer to exploiting these receptors as drug targets. Linked Articles: This article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-2 PMID:24206104

  1. Simple and complex propagating reaction-diffusion fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, S.K.; Showalter, K.

    1992-10-29

    Chemical waves are common features of many reactions in which there is autocatalysis. These waves typically travel and a steady velocity and with a particular, constant waveform. The speed and waveform reflect the coupling of the autocatalysts reaction to diffusion. For some autocatalytic systems, waves can be initiated with ease, no matter how small the initiation stimulus. In other cases, however, depending on the exact form of the kinetics, the shape of the reaction zone, or the occurrence of competing reactions that remove the autocatalyst, waves may develop only for certain ranges of the rate constants and only when a sufficiently large initial stimulus is applied. The analogous phenomenon for flame propagation is known as quenching and gives rise to the existence of flammability limits and minimum ignition energies. Depending on relative diffusivities chemical waves propagating in two or three dimensions may spontaneously develop patterned fronts analogous to the appearance of {open_quotes}cellular{close_quotes} flames. 42 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Michael D

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  3. Mixed amido-/imido-/guanidinato niobium complexes: synthesis and the effect of ligands on insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Elorriaga, David; Carrillo-Hermosilla, Fernando; Antiñolo, Antonio; López-Solera, Isabel; Fernández-Galán, Rafael; Villaseñor, Elena

    2014-12-14

    The new monoguanidinato complexes [Nb(NMe2)2{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)}{(NR)(NR')C(NMe2)}] (R = R' = (i)Pr, 2; R = (t)Bu, R' = Et, 3) were obtained by the insertion reaction of either diisopropylcarbodiimide or 1-tert-butyl-3-ethylcarbodiimide with the triamido precursor [Nb(NMe2)3(N-2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)] (1) bearing a bulky imido moiety. The μ-oxo derivative [{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)}{(N(i)Pr)2C(NMe2)}(NMe2)Nb]2(μ-O) (2a) was formed by an unexpected hydrolysis reaction of the amido niobium compound 2. Alternatively, monoguanidinato complexes [Nb(NMe2)2{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)}{(N(i)Pr)2C(NHR)}] (R = (i)Pr, 4, (n)Bu, 5) can be obtained by protonolysis of 1 with N,N',N''-alkylguanidines [(NH(i)Pr)2C(NR)] (R = (i)Pr, (n)Bu). Compound also reacts with either tert-butylisocyanide or 2,6-xylylisocyanide to give, by a migratory insertion reaction, the corresponding iminocarbamoyl compounds [Nb(NMe2)2{(NMe2)C=NR}{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)}] (R = (t)Bu, 6, Xy, 7). Addition of the neutral alkylguanidines to complex 6 results in a facile C-N bond cleavage at room temperature in a process directed by the formation of the stable chelate complex 4 or 5. Complex reacts with heterocumulenic CS2 to produce new imido dithiocarbamato complexes [Nb(NMe2){S2C(NMe2)}2{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)}] (8) and [Nb{S2C(NMe2)}3{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)}] (9). These complexes do not react with alkylguanines, although new mixed guanidinato dithiocarbamato complexes [Nb(NMe2){S2C(NMe2)}{(N(i)Pr)2C(NHiPr)}{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)}] (10) and [Nb{(S2C(NMe2)}2{(N(i)Pr)2C(NH(i)Pr)}{N(2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)}] (11) can be obtained by reaction of complex 4 with one or two equivalents of CS2, respectively. All of the complexes were characterized spectroscopically and the dynamic behaviour of some of them was studied by variable-temperature NMR. The molecular structures of 2a, 3, 6 and 10 were also established by X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:25338231

  4. Photoinduced reactions of organic compounds with transition-metal complexes. VII. Photochemical oxidative coupling of arenes under the action of chloride complexes of Os(IV), Ir(IV), and Rh(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Shul'pin, G.B.; Nizova, G.V.; Serdobov, M.V.

    1987-08-10

    The irradiation of solutions of anisole and the complex OsCl/sub 6//sup 2 -/, IrCl/sub 6//sup 2 -/, or RhCl/sub 3/ in acetic acid leads to the formation of dimethoxybiphenyls. Reaction probably starts with the transfer of an electron from the arene to an excited species of the complex.

  5. Complex reaction dynamics in the cerium-bromate-2-methyl-1,4-hydroquinone photoreaction.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jeffrey G; Green, James R; Wang, Jichang

    2014-10-23

    Spontaneous oscillations with a long induction time were observed in the bromate-2-methyl-1,4-hydroquinone photoreaction in a batch reactor, where removal of illumination effectively quenched any reactivity. A substantial lengthening of the oscillatory window and a dramatic increase in the complexity of the reaction behavior arose upon the addition of cerium ions, in which separate bifurcation regions and mixed mode oscillations were present. The complexity has a strong dependence on the intensity of illumination supplied to the system and on the initial concentrations of the reactants. (1)H NMR spectroscopy measurements show that the photoreduction of 2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone leads to the formation of 2-methyl-1,4-hydroquinone and the compound 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. Spectroscopic investigation also indicates that the presence of methyl group hinders the bromination of the studied organic substrate 2-methyl-1,4-hydroquinone, resulting in the formation of 2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. PMID:25279948

  6. Formation of transition metal-doxorubicin complexes inside liposomes.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sheela Ann; Edwards, Katarina; Karlsson, Göran; MacIntosh, Scott; Mayer, Lawrence D; McKenzie, Cheryl; Bally, Marcel B

    2002-09-20

    Doxorubicin complexation with the transition metal manganese (Mn(2+)) has been characterized, differentiating between the formation of a doxorubicin-metal complex and doxorubicin fibrous-bundle aggregates typically generated following ion gradient-based loading procedures that rely on liposome encapsulated citrate or sulfate salts. The physical and chemical characteristics of the encapsulated drug were assessed using cryo-electron microscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and absorbance spectrophotometric analysis. In addition, in vitro and in vivo drug loading and release characteristics of the liposomal formulations were investigated. Finally, the internal pH after drug loading was measured with the aim of linking formation of the Mn(2+) complex to the presence or absence of a transmembrane pH gradient. Doxorubicin was encapsulated into either 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/cholesterol (Chol) or 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC)/Chol liposomes, where the entrapped salts were citrate, MnSO(4) or MnCl(2). In response to a pH gradient or a Mn(2+) ion gradient, doxorubicin accumulated inside to achieve a drug-to-lipid ratio of approximately 0.2:1 (wt/wt). Absorbance and CD spectra of doxorubicin in the presence of Mn(2+) suggested that there are two distinct structures captured within the liposomes. In the absence of added ionophore A23187, drug loading is initiated on the basis of an established pH gradient; however, efficient drug uptake is not dependent on maintenance of the pH gradient. Drug release from DMPC/Chol is comparable regardless of whether doxorubicin is entrapped as a citrate-based aggregate or a Mn(2+) complex. However, in vivo drug release from DSPC/Chol liposomes indicate less than 5% or greater than 50% drug loss over a 24-h time course when the drug was encapsulated as an aggregate or a Mn(2+) complex, respectively. These studies define a method for entrapping drugs possessing coordination sites capable of complexing transition metals and suggest that drug release is dependent on lipid composition, internal pH, as well as the nature of the crystalline precipitate, which forms following encapsulation. PMID:12225851

  7. Complexation reactions of phthalic acid and aluminium (III) with the surface of goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lvgren, Lars

    1991-12-01

    Complexation reactions of phthalic acid at the goethite-solution interface have been investigated in the absence and the presence of Al(III) in order to evaluate an equilibrium model applicable in chemical modelling. Phthalic acid was chosen as a model compound for natural organic substances. The study was performed as potentiometric titrations in 0.100 M NaNO 3 at 298.2 K using a glass electrode. Evaluation of experimental data was based on the constant-capacitance model ( K = 1.28 Fm-2). Complexation of phthalic acid (H 2L) at the surface of goethite is rather weak and results in the formation of mononuclear species, as described by the equilibria and intrinsic equilibrium constants (3 ?): ? FeOH + H2L ? FeLH + H2O; log?0,1,0,1( int) s = 6.68 (0.05) and ? FeOH + H2L ? FeL- + H2O + H+; log?-1,1,0,1( int) s = 0.35 (0.06). In the presence of Al(III), the adsorption behavior of phthalic acid indicated formation of ternary surface complexes in the region 4 ?- log [ H+] ?7. Additional complexes occurring in the four-component system are described by the equilibria and intrinsic equilibrium constants: ? FeOH + Al3+ + H2L ? FeOAlL + 3 H+; log?-3,1,1,1( int) s = -2.7 (0.29) and ? FeOH + Al3+ + H2L + H2O ? FeOAl( OH) L- + 4 H+; log?-4,1,1,1( int) s = -8.3 (0.16).

  8. Interference-mediated synaptonemal complex formation with embedded crossover designation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangran; Espagne, Eric; de Muyt, Arnaud; Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy E

    2014-11-25

    Biological systems exhibit complex patterns at length scales ranging from the molecular to the organismic. Along chromosomes, events often occur stochastically at different positions in different nuclei but nonetheless tend to be relatively evenly spaced. Examples include replication origin firings, formation of chromatin loops along chromosome axes and, during meiosis, localization of crossover recombination sites ("crossover interference"). We present evidence in the fungus Sordaria macrospora that crossover interference is part of a broader pattern that includes synaptonemal complex (SC) nucleation. This pattern comprises relatively evenly spaced SC nucleation sites, among which a subset are crossover sites that show a classical interference distribution. This pattern ensures that SC forms regularly along the entire length of the chromosome as required for the maintenance of homolog pairing while concomitantly having crossover interactions locally embedded within the SC structure as required for both DNA recombination and structural events of chiasma formation. This pattern can be explained by a threshold-based designation and spreading interference process. This model can be generalized to give diverse types of related and/or partially overlapping patterns, in two or more dimensions, for any type of object. PMID:25380597

  9. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation.

    PubMed

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N; Allwood, Daniel M; Blakemore, David C; Ley, Steven V

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures. PMID:27001732

  10. Pattern formation of Cu layer by photocatalytic reaction of ZnO thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiki, Hajime; Kitahara, Hiromitsu; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Fujishima, Akira

    1995-12-01

    A new, fully additive-based, electroless plating process for the formation of fine Cu patterns without using a conventional photoresist has been developed which utilizes a photocatalytic reaction of ZnO thin films prepared on ceramic substrates for printed circuit boards. The ZnO layer serves both as an adhesive layer and as a photosensitive layer. The Cu patterns could be easily fabricated in an electroless Cu plating bath after Pd nuclei, which act as catalytic sites for the electroless plating, were patterned via an area-selective photocatalytic reaction. This was achieved by adsorbing Pd(II) onto the ZnO surface and selectively exposing the surface with UV light through a photomask. The unexposed regions can be freed of Pd(II) using ethylenediamine, which can form a stable complex with Pd(II). Cu patterns 17 {micro}m wide, with adhesion strengths suitable for practical use, have been achieved on alumina substrates with this electroless plating method.

  11. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  12. Role of water complexes in the reaction of propionaldehyde with OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Vhringer-Martinez, E; Tellbach, E; Liessmann, M; Abel, B

    2010-09-16

    There has been considerable debate and speculation about the role of weakly bound complexes in radical-molecule reactions in the gas phase, especially in atmospheric chemistry. Among the significant number of potentially important molecular aggregates in chemical reactions, water complexes are of particular interest. Beyond the well-known energy transfer role of water in complex-forming reactions, it has been shown that water may also have a catalytic effect on the kinetics of radical-molecule reactions because of reduced reaction barrier heights for the complexes. Here we report studies of the reaction of OH radicals and propionaldehyde in the presence and absence of water vapor between 300 and 60 K in Laval nozzle expansions. Water accelerates the overall reaction at low temperatures but much less pronounced than for the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde reported recently. Quantum chemical calculations help us to understand this behavior, which can be rationalized in terms of the stability of intermediate reaction complexes and the effect of water aggregation on the barrier separating prereactive complexes and products. PMID:20507131

  13. Complexation reactions in aquatic systems. An analytical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Buffle, J.

    1988-01-01

    This 10-chapter book discusses components of aquatic systems, natural organic matter, aquatic organic compounds, complexation equilibria, homologous complexants, in situ distribution of chemical species, potentiometric methods, voltammetric methods, and nonelectrochemical methods. The references are from the 1970s and early 1980s. An index and an extensive reference section also are provided.

  14. Proton exchange in acid-base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    We extend previous work on nitric acid-ammonia and nitric acid-alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid-strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are <400 cm-1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm-1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  15. A Macroscopic Reaction: Direct Covalent Bond Formation between Materials Using a Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Harada, Akira

    2014-09-01

    Cross-coupling reactions are important to form C-C covalent bonds using metal catalysts. Although many different cross-coupling reactions have been developed and applied to synthesize complex molecules or polymers (macromolecules), if cross-coupling reactions are realized in the macroscopic real world, the scope of materials should be dramatically broadened. Here, Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions are realized between macroscopic objects. When acrylamide gel modified with an iodophenyl group (I-gel) reacts with a gel possessing a phenylboronic group (PB-gel) using a palladium catalyst, the gels bond to form a single object. This concept can also be adapted for bonding between soft and hard materials. I-gel or PB-gel selectively bonds to the glass substrates whose surfaces are modified with an electrophile or nucleophile, respectively.

  16. Complex behavior of self-propagating reaction waves in heterogeneous media

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Arvind; Rogachev, Alexander S.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; Hwang, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature reaction waves, leading to the synthesis of advanced materials, are investigated in a variety of heterogeneous reaction systems by using a digital high-speed microscopic video recording technique. It is shown that, although on the macroscopic length and time scales, the reaction appears to move in a steady mode, on the microscopic level it has a complex character that is related to the reaction mechanism. PMID:9736688

  17. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  18. Comprehensive Simulations of Interstellar Ice Formation and Complex Molecule Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, Robin

    Interstellar ices are present in both quiscent and star-forming regions, and contain a selection of simple organic species. These ices are widely thought to be the progenitors of the highly complex organic molecules observed in the gas phase in high-mass star- forming regions. They are also believed to be the precursors of planetary and cometary material, and may contribute important pre-biotic, and perhaps biotic, components. The formation and processing of interstellar ices is therefore of great relevance to the origins of complex biological molecules and the development of life. The upcoming James Webb Space Telescope will place an even greater focus on these topics through its unparalleled infrared spectroscopic instruments. Furthermore, the new ALMA telescope is expected in the coming years to produce discoveries of yet larger molecules, including those of biological significance, such as amino acids. However, the accurate interpretation of observational infrared ice data is severely hampered by the inadequacy of current computational models of coupled grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. Current astrochemical models either use a simplistic treatment of ice chemistry, ignoring a number of important processes and overlooking stochastic chemical kinetic behaviour; or they remove the gas-phase chemistry entirely, modeling a simple grain chemistry network. In both cases, a uniform representative dust-grain population is assumed. Typical coupled gas-phase/grain-surface chemical models deal with surface chemistry, but do not distinguish between the surface and the bulk ices beneath, or between layers within the ices; recent experimental and theoretical studies demonstrate these structural characteristics to be highly influential. These simplifications and inaccuracies make our understanding of interstellar complex-molecule and ice formation highly approximate. Observations are thus difficult to explain, and model-based predictions are imprecise. The development of a comprehensive chemical model is proposed, for the accurate simulation of coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and ice-mantle chemistry. Progressing from the PI's current code, the new model will explicitly treat chemistry within individual layers in the ices, and will adopt a range of dust-grain sizes, allowing observed ice compositions to be explained as an aggregate of layers and grain sizes with varying ice compositions. The model will adopt the PI's new computational method that allows fast, accurate simulation of stochastic surface processes, and will incorporate the most recent ice data from experimental/modeling studies, obtained in part by the PI. The current complex chemical network will be extended to include plausible biotic/pre-biotic molecules, including simple amino acids such as glycine. The model will be applied to a range of dynamically-evolving environments, and will trace a continuous timeline from the formation and processing of interstellar ices to the production of complex organic molecules, their evaporation, and their behavior in the gas phase. The use of a comprehensive coupled gas-phase/ice model will allow current observational results in both chemical phases (i.e. infra-red and mm/sub-mm data) to be understood in a complementary and quantitative way within individual astronomical objects. The proposed model will further our understanding of the genesis of biologically relevant organic molecules in space, and the role played in this process by granular ices, at each stage of molecular cloud evolution and star formation. A strong emphasis will be placed on making useful predictions of molecular abundances for observational astronomy with the upcoming JWST telescope, and with ALMA. The development of an accurate, and flexible, chemical model constitutes a key step in the preparation for these new telescopes, and will be crucial to fully exploit the new data that they produce.

  19. Evidence of reaction rate influencing cubic and hexagonal phase formation process in CdS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Kuldeep; Kalita, M. P. C.

    2016-05-01

    CdS nanocrystals are synthesized by co-precipitation method using 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as capping agent. Cubic, hexagonal and their mixture are obtained by varying the ME concentration. Lower (higher) ME concentration results in cubic (hexagonal) phase. The crystallite sizes are in the range 3-7 nm. Increase in ME concentration lead to lower reaction rate between Cd2+ and S2- of the precursors, and slower reaction rate is found to favor hexagonal phase formation over the cubic one in CdS nanocrystals. Role of reaction rate in the phase formation process provides a way to synthesize CdS nanocrystals in desired crystal phase.

  20. Nickel-Catalyzed Reactions Directed toward the Formation of Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2015-06-16

    Heterocycles have garnered significant attention because they are important functional building blocks in various useful molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals, pesticides, and materials. Several studies have been conducted regarding the preparation of heterocyclic skeletons with an emphasis on selectivity and efficiency. Three strategies are typically employed to construct cyclic molecules, namely, cyclization, cycloaddition, and ring-size alterations. Although each method has certain advantages, cycloaddition may be superior from the viewpoint of divergence. Specifically, cycloadditions enable the construction of rings from several pieces. However, the construction of heterocycles via cycloadditions is more challenging than the construction of carbocycles. For heterocycle construction, simple pericyclic reactions rarely work smoothly because of the large HOMO-LUMO gap unless well-designed combinations, such as electron-rich dienes and aldehydes, are utilized. Thus, a different approach should be employed to prepare heterocycles via cycloadditions. To this end, the use of metallacycles containing heteroatoms is expected to serve as a promising solution. In this study, we focused on the preparation of heteroatom-containing nickelacycles. Because nickel possesses a relatively high redox potential and an affinity for heteroatoms, several methods were developed to synthesize heteronickelacycles from various starting materials. The prepared nickelacycles were demonstrated to be reasonable intermediates in cycloaddition reactions, which were used to prepare various heterocycles. In this Account, we introduce the following four methods to prepare heterocycles via heteronickelacycles. (1) Direct oxidative insertion of Ni(0) to α,β-unsaturated enone derivatives: treatment of 3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one with Ni(0) afforded an oxa-nickelacycle, which reacted with alkynes to give pyrans. (2) Substitution of a part of a cyclic compound with low-valent nickel, accompanied by elimination of small molecules such as CO, CO2, and acetophenone: treatment of phthalic anhydride with Ni(0) in the presence of ZnCl2 afforded the oxanickelacycle, which was formed via decarbonylative insertion of Ni(0) and reacted with alkynes to give isocumarins. (3) Cyclization to a nickelacycle, accompanied by two C-C σ-bond activations: insertion of Ni(0) into an arylnitrile, followed by aryl cyanation of an alkyne, gave alkenylnickel as an intermediate. The alkenylnickel species subsequently underwent an intramolecular nucleophilic attack with an arylcarbonyl group to form a cyclized product with concomitant cleavage of the C-C σ-bond between the carbonyl and aryl groups. (4) Assembly of several components to form a heteroatom-containing nickelacycle via cycloaddition: a new [2 + 2 + 1] cyclization reaction was carried out using an α,β-unsaturated ester, isocyanate, and alkyne via a nickelacycle. On the basis of these four strategies, we developed new methods to prepare heterocyclic compounds using nickelacycles as the key active species. PMID:25989256

  1. Paramagnetic intermediates in reactions of the components of catalytic systems of the Ziegler type. Reactions of azo and azomethine complexes of Ni(II) with diethylaluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasov, Ya.A.; Ismailov, E.G.; Medzhidov, A.A.

    1988-04-01

    The intermediate paramagnetic particles, i.e., radical particles, complexes of Ni(I), and Ni/sub n/(O) aggregates, formed as a result of the reaction of azo and azomethine complexes of Ni(II) with Et/sub 2/AlCl in solvent media (toluene, THF, heptane) have been identified with the aid of ESR. The possibility of the stabilization of reactive intermediate complexes of Ni(I) by organophosphorus ligands (DPPE and TPP) has been demonstrated, and the magnetic-resonance parameters of their adducts have been determined. It has been postulated that the formation of radical particles occurs as a result of the coordination of the nitrogen atoms of the azo or azomethine ligands by the organoaluminum compound followed by splitting of the -N=N or -CH=N bonds.

  2. Cadmium(II) Complex Formation with Cysteine and Penicillamine

    PubMed Central

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O.; Mah, Vicky

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H2Cys) or penicillamine (H2Pen = 3, 3′-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, containing CCd(II) ∼ 0.1 mol dm-3 and CH2L = 0.2 – 2 mol dm-3, was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of 113Cd-NMR and Cd K- and L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine mole ratios the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52 – 2.54 Å and 2.27 – 2.35 Å, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50 – 2.53 Å, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28 – 2.33 Å. For the mole ratio CH2L / CCd(II) = 2, the 113Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509 – 527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS2N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (mole ratios CH2Cys / CCd(II) ≥ 10) complexes with CdS4 coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the 113Cd NMR chemical shifts, δ ∼ 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636 - 658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances of 2.53 ± 0.02 Å. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)4]n-, while at higher pH the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation, and at pH 11.0 a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)3]4- complex with CdS3N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with mole ratios CH2Pen / CCd(II) ≥ 10, the 113Cd-NMR chemical shifts, δ ∼ 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances Cd-S 2.53 ± 0.02 Å and Cd-O 2.30 – 2.33 Å, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)3]n- complexes with chelating CdS3(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5, and become mixed with CdS2N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the cadmium(II) ion that can explain why cysteine-rich metallothionines are capable of capturing cadmium(II) ions, while penicillamine, clinically useful for treating the toxic effects of mercury(II) and lead(II) exposure, is not efficient against cadmium(II) poisoning. PMID:19469490

  3. Cadmium(II) complex formation with cysteine and penicillamine.

    PubMed

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O; Mah, Vicky

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H(2)Cys) and penicillamine (H(2)Pen = 3,3'-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, having C(Cd(II)) approximately 0.1 mol dm(-3) and C(H(2)L) = 0.2-2 mol dm(-3), was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of (113)Cd NMR and Cd K- and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine molar ratios, the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52-2.54 and 2.27-2.35 A, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50-2.53 A, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28-2.33 A. For the molar ratio C(H(2)L)/C(Cd(II)) = 2, the (113)Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509-527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS(2)N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (molar ratios C(H(2)Cys)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10), complexes with CdS(4) coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636-658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances were 2.53 +/- 0.02 A. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)(4)](n-), while at higher pH, the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation. At pH 11.0, a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)(3)](4-) complex with CdS(3)N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with molar ratios C(H(2)Pen)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10, the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances, Cd-S 2.53 +/- 0.02 A and Cd-(N/O) 2.30-2.33 A, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)(3)](n-) complexes with chelating CdS(3)(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5 and become mixed with CdS(2)N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the cadmium(II) ion that can explain why cysteine-rich metallothionines are capable of capturing cadmium(II) ions, while penicillamine, clinically useful for treating the toxic effects of mercury(II) and lead(II) exposure, is not efficient against cadmium(II) poisoning. PMID:19469490

  4. The C(3P) + NH3 Reaction in Interstellar Chemistry. I. Investigation of the Product Formation Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgalais, Jérémy; Capron, Michael; Abhinavam Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar; Osborn, David L.; Hickson, Kevin M.; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Goulay, Fabien; Le Picard, Sébastien D.

    2015-10-01

    The product formation channels of ground state carbon atoms, C(3P), reacting with ammonia, NH3, have been investigated using two complementary experiments and electronic structure calculations. Reaction products are detected in a gas flow tube experiment (330 K, 4 Torr) using tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry. Temporal profiles of the species formed and photoionization spectra are used to identify primary products of the C + NH3 reaction. In addition, H-atom formation is monitored by VUV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) from room temperature to 50 K in a supersonic gas flow generated by the Laval nozzle technique. Electronic structure calculations are performed to derive intermediates, transition states, and complexes formed along the reaction coordinate. The combination of photoionization and LIF experiments supported by theoretical calculations indicate that in the temperature and pressure range investigated, the H + H2CN production channel represents 100% of the product yield for this reaction. Kinetics measurements of the title reaction down to 50 K and the effect of the new rate constants on interstellar nitrogen hydride abundances using a model of dense interstellar clouds are reported in Paper II.

  5. Pattern Formation in the Bromate-Sulfite-Ferrocyanide Reaction.

    PubMed

    Molnár, István; Szalai, István

    2015-10-01

    Mixed Landolt-type pH oscillators are versatile systems that allow the experimental study of a wide range of nonlinear phenomena including multistability, oscillations, and spatiotemporal patterns. We report on the dynamics of the bromate-sulfite-ferrocyanide reaction operated in a open one-side-fed reactor, where spatial bistability, spatiotemporal oscillations, front and Turing-type patterns have been observed. The role of different experimental parameters, like the input flow concentrations of the hydrogen and the ferrocyanide ions, the temperature and the thickness of the gel medium (which affects the rate of the diffusive feed) have been investigated. We point out that all these parameters can be efficiently used to control the spatiotemporal dynamics. We show that the increase of ionic strength stabilizes the uniform states at the expense of the patterned one. Some general aspects of the spatiotemporal dynamics of mixed Landolt type systems, which are based on the oxidation of sulfite ions by strong oxidants, are emphasized. PMID:26371068

  6. A crystallographic description of experimentally identified formation reactions of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergert, F.; Jost, S.; Hock, R.; Purwins, M.

    2006-08-01

    This work describes solid-state reactions for the formation of the chalcopyrite compounds CuInSe 2, CuGaSe 2 and Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 on atomic scale. The most important chalcopyrite formation reactions which were identified by the authors by real-time in situ X-ray diffraction in preceding experiments are (A) CuSe+InSe→CuInSe 2, (B) Cu 2Se+2 InSe+Se→2 CuInSe 2 and (C) Cu 2Se+In 2Se 3→2 CuInSe 2. During the selenistaion of a metallic precursor containing gallium a separate fourth reaction occurs: (D) Cu 2Se+Ga 2Se 3→2 CuGaSe 2. The quaternary compound is finally formed by interdiffusion of CuInSe 2 with CuGaSe 2 (E). These five reactions differ in their activation energy and reaction speed. We explain these differences qualitatively by analysing the involved crystal structures for each reaction. It turns out that all reactions involved in the formation of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 are promoted by epitaxial relations, which facilitates the formation of polycrystalline thin films at temperatures much below those necessary for single crystal growth. Recommendations for the growth of larger grains of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 containing fewer defects are given.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation from benzyl radicals: a reaction kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet

    2016-03-01

    The role of resonantly stabilized radicals such as propargyl, cyclopentadienyl and benzyl in the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in the high temperature environments has been long known. In this work, the possibility of benzyl recombination to form three-ring aromatics, phenanthrene and anthracene, is explored. A reaction mechanism for it is developed, where reaction energetics are calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set) and CBS-QB3, while temperature-dependent reaction kinetics are evaluated using transition state theory. The mechanism begins with barrierless formation of bibenzyl from two benzyl radicals with the release of 283.2 kJ mol(-1) of reaction energy. The further reactions involve H-abstraction by a H atom, H-desorption, H-migration, and ring closure to gain aromaticity. Through mechanism and rate of production analyses, the important reactions leading to phenanthrene and anthracene formation are determined. Phenanthrene is found to be the major product at high temperatures. Premixed laminar flame simulations are carried out by including the proposed reactions for phenanthrene formation from benzyl radicals and compared to experimentally observed species profiles to understand their effects on species concentrations. PMID:26923612

  8. Perfluoroalkyl Cobalt(III) Fluoride and Bis(perfluoroalkyl) Complexes: Catalytic Fluorination and Selective Difluorocarbene Formation.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Matthew C; Bayne, Julia M; Lee, Graham M; Gorelsky, Serge I; Vasiliu, Monica; Korobkov, Ilia; Harrison, Daniel J; Dixon, David A; Baker, R Tom

    2015-12-30

    Four perfluoroalkyl cobalt(III) fluoride complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and powder X-ray diffraction. The remarkable cobalt fluoride (19)F NMR chemical shifts (-716 to -759 ppm) were studied computationally, and the contributing paramagnetic and diamagnetic factors were extracted. Additionally, the complexes were shown to be active in the catalytic fluorination of p-toluoyl chloride. Furthermore, two examples of cobalt(III) bis(perfluoroalkyl)complexes were synthesized and their reactivity studied. Interestingly, abstraction of a fluoride ion from these complexes led to selective formation of cobalt difluorocarbene complexes derived from the trifluoromethyl ligand. These electrophilic difluorocarbenes were shown to undergo insertion into the remaining perfluoroalkyl fragment, demonstrating the elongation of a perfluoroalkyl chain arising from a difluorocarbene insertion on a cobalt metal center. The reactions of both the fluoride and bis(perfluoroalkyl) complexes provide insight into the potential catalytic applications of these model systems to form small fluorinated molecules as well as fluoropolymers. PMID:26674217

  9. The reaction of fluorocitrate with aconitase and the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex

    PubMed Central

    Lauble, H.; Kennedy, M. C.; Emptage, M. H.; Beinert, H.; Stout, C. D.

    1996-01-01

    It has been known for many years that fluoroacetate and fluorocitrate when metabolized are highly toxic, and that at least one effect of fluorocitrate is to inactivate aconitase. In this paper we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that the (−)-erythro diastereomer of 2-fluorocitrate acts as a mechanism based inhibitor of aconitase by first being converted to fluoro-cis-aconitate, followed by addition of hydroxide and with loss of fluoride to form 4-hydroxy-trans-aconitate (HTn), which binds very tightly, but not covalently, to the enzyme. Formation of HTn by these reactions is in accord with the working model for the enzyme mechanism. That HTn is the product of fluorocitrate inhibition is supported by the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex at 2.05-Å resolution, release of fluoride stoichiometric with total enzyme when (−)-erythro-2-fluorocitrate is added, HPLC analysis of the product, slow displacement of HTn by 106-fold excess of isocitrate, and previously published Mössbauer experiments. When (+)-erythro-2-fluorocitrate is added to aconitase, the release of fluoride is stoichiometric with total substrate added, and HPLC analysis of the products indicates the formation of oxalosuccinate, and its derivative α-ketoglutarate. This is consistent with the proposed mechanism, as is the formation of HTn from (−)-erythro-2-fluorocitrate. The structure of the inhibited complex reveals that HTn binds like the inhibitor trans-aconitate while providing all the interactions of the natural substrate, isocitrate. The structure exhibits four hydrogen bonds <2.7 Å in length involving HTn, H2O bound to the [4Fe–4S] cluster, Asp-165 and His-167, as well as low temperature factors for these moieties, consistent with the observed very tight binding of the inhibitor. PMID:8942997

  10. Sequential insertion of CO into rhodium-nitrogen. mu. -imido/amido bonds: Formation of isocyanate and dimetallocycloimide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Y.W.; Sharp, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Catalytic carbonylations of organoazides and nitroaryls are frequently postulated to proceed via metal imido intermediates. In support of this proposal imido complexes have been isolated from reactions of metal complexes with organoazides, nitroaryls, and nitrosoaryls. In the catalytic processes the formation of nitrogen-carbon bonds is a key step. In most cases, isocyanate (formed by coupling of the imido ligand and CO) is the final product or is a probable precursor to the final product. However, until recently the isolated imido complexes have given little, if any, isocyanates or products derived from isocyanates when treated with CO under mild conditions. This communication reports the facile formation of isocyanate and dimetallocycloimide complexes and free isocyanates and ureas by the formal single and double insertion of CO into the metal-nitrogen bonds of rhodium {mu}-imido/amido A-frame complexes.

  11. Module Based Complexity Formation: Periodic Patterning in Feathers and Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patterns describe order which emerges from homogeneity. Complex patterns on the integument are striking because of their visibility throughout an organism's lifespan. Periodic patterning is an effective design because the ensemble of hair or feather follicles (modules) allows the generation of complexity, including regional variations and cyclic regeneration, giving the skin appendages a new lease on life. Spatial patterns include the arrangements of feathers and hairs in specified number, size, and spacing. We explore how a field of equivalent progenitor cells can generate periodically arranged modules based on genetic information, physical-chemical rules and developmental timing. Reconstitution experiments suggest a competitive equilibrium regulated by activators / inhibitors involving Turing reaction-diffusion. Temporal patterns result from oscillating stem cell activities within each module (micro-environment regulation), reflected as growth (anagen) and resting (telogen) phases during the cycling of feather and hair follicles. Stimulating modules with activators initiates the spread of regenerative hair waves, while global inhibitors outside each module (macro-environment) prevent this. Different wave patterns can be simulated by Cellular Automata principles. Hormonal status and seasonal changes can modulate appendage phenotypes, leading to organ metamorphosis, with multiple ectodermal organ phenotypes generated from the same precursors. We discuss potential evolutionary novel steps using this module based complexity in several amniote integument organs, exemplified by the spectacular peacock feather pattern. We thus explore the application of the acquired knowledge of patterning in tissue engineering. New hair follicles can be generated after wounding. Hairs and feathers can be reconstituted through self-organization of dissociated progenitor cells. PMID:23539312

  12. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, A. J.; Meinhardt, H.

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns? Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of Drosophila and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  13. Single Nucleoprotein Residue Modulates Arenavirus Replication Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, Kristeene A.; Ngo, Tuan; Gershon, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Arenaviridae are enveloped, negative-sense RNA viruses with several family members that cause hemorrhagic fevers. This work provides immunofluorescence evidence that, unlike those of New World arenaviruses, the replication and transcription complexes (RTC) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) colocalize with eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and that eIF4E may participate in the translation of LCMV mRNA. Additionally, we identify two residues in the LCMV nucleoprotein (NP) that are conserved in every mammalian arenavirus and are required for recombinant LCMV recovery. One of these sites, Y125, was confirmed to be phosphorylated by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). NP Y125 is located in the N-terminal region of NP that is disordered when RNA is bound. The other site, NP T206, was predicted to be a phosphorylation site. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that NP T206 is required for the formation of the punctate RTC that are typically observed during LCMV infection. A minigenome reporter assay using NP mutants, as well as Northern blot analysis, demonstrated that although NP T206A does not form punctate RTC, it can transcribe and replicate a minigenome. However, in the presence of matrix protein (Z) and glycoprotein (GP), translation of the minigenome message with NP T206A was inhibited, suggesting that punctate RTC formation is required to regulate viral replication. Together, these results highlight a significant difference between New and Old World arenaviruses and demonstrate the importance of RTC formation and translation priming in RTC for Old World arenaviruses. PMID:25922393

  14. Reaction mechanism of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes: umbrella sampling QM/MM MD study.

    PubMed

    Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2014-07-15

    Biologically relevant interactions of piano-stool ruthenium(II) complexes with ds-DNA are studied in this article by hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computational technique. The whole reaction mechanism is divided into three phases: (i) hydration of the [Ru(II) (η(6) -benzene)(en)Cl](+) complex, (ii) monoadduct formation between the resulting aqua-Ru(II) complex and N7 position of one of the guanines in the ds-DNA oligomer, and (iii) formation of the intrastrand Ru(II) bridge (cross-link) between two adjacent guanines. Free energy profiles of all the reactions are explored by QM/MM MD umbrella sampling approach where the Ru(II) complex and two guanines represent a quantum core, which is described by density functional theory methods. The combined QM/MM scheme is realized by our own software, which was developed to couple several quantum chemical programs (in this study Gaussian 09) and Amber 11 package. Calculated free energy barriers of the both ruthenium hydration and Ru(II)-N7(G) DNA binding process are in good agreement with experimentally measured rate constants. Then, this method was used to study the possibility of cross-link formation. One feasible pathway leading to Ru(II) guanine-guanine cross-link with synchronous releasing of the benzene ligand is predicted. The cross-linking is an exergonic process with the energy barrier lower than for the monoadduct reaction of Ru(II) complex with ds-DNA. PMID:24865949

  15. Substitution reactions in dinuclear Ru-Hbpp complexes: an evaluation of through-space interactions.

    PubMed

    Planas, Nora; Christian, Gemma; Roeser, Stephan; Mas-Marzá, Elena; Kollipara, Mohan-Rao; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Maseras, Feliu; Llobet, Antoni

    2012-02-01

    The synthesis of new dinuclear complexes of the general formula in,in-{[Ru(II)(trpy)(L)](μ-bpp)[Ru(II)(trpy)(L')]}(3+) [bpp(-) is the bis(2-pyridyl)-3,5-pyrazolate anionic ligand; trpy is the 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine neutral meridional ligand, and L and L' are monodentate ligands; L = L' = MeCN, 3a(3+); L = L' = 3,5-lutidine (Me(2)-py), 3c(3+); L = MeCN, L' = pyridine (py), 4(3+)], have been prepared and thoroughly characterized. Further, the preparation and isolation of dinuclear complexes containing dinitrile bridging ligands of the general formula in,in-{[Ru(II)(trpy)](2)(μ-bpp)(μ-L-L)}(3+) [μ-L-L = 1,4-dicyanobutane (adiponitrile, adip), 6a(3+); 1,3-dicyanopropane (glutaronitrile, glut), 6b(3+); 1,2-dicyanoethane (succinonitrile; succ), 6c(3+)] have also been carried out. In addition, a number of homologous dinuclear complexes previously described, containing the anionic bis(pyridyl)indazolate (bid(-)) tridentate meridional ligand in lieu of trpy, have also been prepared for comparative purposes. In the solid state, six complexes have been characterized by X-ray crystallography, and in solution, all of them have been spectroscopically characterized by NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. In addition, their redox properties have also been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry and show the existence of two one-electron waves assigned to the formation of the II,III and III,III species. Dinitrile complexes 6a(3+), 6b(3+), and 6c(3+) display a dynamic behavior involving their enantiomeric interconversion. The energy barrier for this interconversion can be controlled by the number of methylenic units between the dinitrile ligand. On the other hand, pyridyl complexes in,in-{[Ru(II)(T)(py)](2)(μ-bpp)}(n+) (T = trpy, n = 3, 3b(3+); T = bid(-), n = 1, 3b'(+)) and 3c(3+) undergo two consecutive substitution reactions of their monodentate ligands by MeCN.The substitution kinetics have been monitored by (1)H NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy and follow first-order behavior with regard to the initial ruthenium complex. For the case of 3b(3+), the first-order rate constant k(1) = (2.9 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) s(-1), whereas for the second substitution, the k obtained is k(2) = (1.7 ± 0.7) × 10(-6) s(-1), both measured at 313 K. Their energies of activation at 298 K are 114.7 and 144.3 kJ mol(-1), respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed for two consecutive substitution reactions, giving insight into the nature of the intermediates. Furthermore, the energetics obtained by DFT calculations of the two consecutive substitution reactions agree with the experimental values obtained. The kinetic properties of the two consecutive substitution reactions are rationalized in terms of steric crowding and also in terms of through-space interactions. PMID:22242940

  16. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  17. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  18. Formation of an iron phosphine-borane complex by formal insertion of BH₃ into the Fe-P bond.

    PubMed

    Frank, Nicolas; Hanau, Katharina; Flosdorf, Kimon; Langer, Robert

    2013-08-21

    A unique hydrido phosphine-borane iron(II) complex [(dppa)(Ph₂P-N-P(BH₃)Ph₂)Fe(H)] (1) was obtained by the reaction of iron(II) chloride and two equivalents of bis(diphenylphosphino)amine (dppa) with an excess of sodium borohydride in acetonitrile-ethanol mixtures. Detailed investigations of the reaction revealed that a mixture of cis- and trans-[(dppa)₂Fe(NCMe)₂]²⁺ is formed prior to the reduction by sodium borohydride. Depending on the solvent, different products were obtained by the reduction: in acetonitrile-ethanol mixtures the hydrido phosphine-borane complex 1 is formed by formal insertion of BH₃, while the reduction in pure acetonitrile results in the formation of the cationic complex trans-[(dppa)₂Fe(H)(NCMe)](BH₄) (4). Complex 4 is remarkably stable in ethanol and does not undergo phosphine-borane formation, even in the presence of excess sodium borohydride. This observation suggests that the phosphine-borane complex is generated by the reaction with the first equivalent of sodium borohydride with the participation of ethanol, followed by deprotonation or dihydrogen elimination. Experiments with similar diphosphine ligands, such as bis(diphenylphosphino)methane, did not yield a phosphine-borane complex, indicating the crucial role of the amine group in the observed reactivity. PMID:23811820

  19. Structure of Soybean Serine Acetyltransferase and Formation of the Cysteine Regulatory Complex as a Molecular Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hankuil; Dey, Sanghamitra; Kumaran, Sangaralingam; Lee, Soon Goo; Krishnan, Hari B.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase. Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochemical control feature in plant sulfur metabolism. Here we present the 1.75–3.0 Å resolution x-ray crystal structures of soybean (Glycine max) SAT (GmSAT) in apoenzyme, serine-bound, and CoA-bound forms. The GmSAT-serine and GmSAT-CoA structures provide new details on substrate interactions in the active site. The crystal structures and analysis of site-directed mutants suggest that His169 and Asp154 form a catalytic dyad for general base catalysis and that His189 may stabilize the oxyanion reaction intermediate. Glu177 helps to position Arg203 and His204 and the β1c-β2c loop for serine binding. A similar role for ionic interactions formed by Lys230 is required for CoA binding. The GmSAT structures also identify Arg253 as important for the enhanced catalytic efficiency of SAT in the CRC and suggest that movement of the residue may stabilize CoA binding in the macromolecular complex. Differences in the effect of cold on GmSAT activity in the isolated enzyme versus the enzyme in the CRC were also observed. A role for CRC formation as a molecular chaperone to maintain SAT activity in response to an environmental stress is proposed for this multienzyme complex in plants. PMID:24225955

  20. Modelling formation of complex topography by the seagrass Posidonia oceanica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Gary A.; Marbà, Núria; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2005-12-01

    Posidonia oceanica is a slow growing seagrass species that extends via growing rhizomes that grow only centimetres both horizontally and vertically each year. Posidonia oceanica forms topographically complex biogenic reefs of dead rhizome and sediments that are up to 4 m in height that are called "matte". This study investigates the role of slow horizontal and vertical growth of rhizomes in the formation of topographic complexity in P. oceanica matte using agent-based modelling. The simulated infilling of landscapes by P. oceanica was run over 600 iterations (years) for 10 random starts of 150 agents each. Initial infilling rates were very slow and P. oceanica had limited cover after a century of growth. Growth accelerated after 100 years but plateaued after 400 years such that after 600 years only two-thirds of the landscape was occupied by P. oceanica. The pattern of spread of agents was initially random in direction but after larger patches were formed spread was radial from these patches. The seagrass landscape was initially highly fragmented with many small separate patches made up of a few agents each, with a Landscape Division index close to 1. Between 300 and 600 years Landscape Division declined sharply to 0.42, indicating patches had coalesced into larger more continuous meadows forming a less fragmented landscape. Perimeter to area ratio of seagrass patches declined exponentially from >1 to approximately 0.2 over 600 years of simulation. The matte developed from growth of patches and its greatest height occurred in more continuously occupied cells of the grid. The topography of the reef that occupied two-thirds of the landscape after six centuries of growth could be described as a pattern of channels between reef plateaus elevated 1-2 m above channels. These results demonstrate that development in P. oceanica meadows of three-dimensional structure, in the formation of biogenic reefs, can be explained by, and is an emergent property of, slow horizontal and vertical rhizome growth rates combined with the time it takes for the accumulation of rhizomes in any region of the landscape. As such, the model provides a parsimonious explanation for the development of complex matte topography.

  1. Cyclodextrins in pharmaceutical formulations I: structure and physicochemical properties, formation of complexes, and types of complex.

    PubMed

    Jambhekar, Sunil S; Breen, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides that have been recognized as pharmaceutical adjuvants for the past 20 years. The molecular structure of these glucose derivatives, which approximates a truncated cone, bucket, or torus, generates a hydrophilic exterior surface and a nonpolar interior cavity. Cyclodextrins can interact with appropriately sized drug molecules to yield an inclusion complex. These noncovalent inclusion complexes offer a variety of advantages over the noncomplexed form of a drug. Cyclodextrins are primarily used to enhance the aqueous solubility, physical chemical stability, and bioavailability of drugs. Their other applications include preventing drug-drug interactions, converting liquid drugs into microcrystalline powders, minimizing gastrointestinal and ocular irritation, and reducing or eliminating unpleasant taste and smell. Here, we discuss the physical chemical properties of various cyclodextrins, including the effects of substitutions on these properties. Additionally, we report on the regulatory status of their use, commercial products containing cyclodextrins, toxicological considerations, and the forces involved in complex formation. We also highlight the types of complex formed and discuss the methods used to determine the types of complex present. PMID:26686054

  2. Kinetics of formation and reactions of thiyl radicals in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Huston, P.; Espenson, J.H.; Bakac, A. )

    1992-03-04

    Very few kinetic data are available that describe reactions of sulfur-centered radicals, despite their importance in biological systems. Thiyl radicals may be produced by generating carbon-centered radicals using visible laser flash photolysis and taking advantage of the repair reaction. Thiyl radicals are difficult to detect directly and require the use of a kinetic probe such as ABTS{sup 2{minus}} or TMPD. Kinetic studies of these reactions as well as reactions of ethanethiyl radicals with hexaaqua complexes of chromium(II), vanadium(II), and iron(II) are described.

  3. Evolutionary Plasticity and Innovations in Complex Metabolic Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Matias Rodrigues, Joo F.; Wagner, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic networks are highly robust to the elimination of enzyme-coding genes. Their structure can evolve rapidly through mutations that eliminate such genes and through horizontal gene transfer that adds new enzyme-coding genes. Using flux balance analysis we study a vast space of metabolic network genotypes and their relationship to metabolic phenotypes, the ability to sustain life in an environment defined by an available spectrum of carbon sources. Two such networks typically differ in most of their reactions and have few essential reactions in common. Our observations suggest that the robustness of the Escherichia coli metabolic network to mutations is typical of networks with the same phenotype. We also demonstrate that networks with the same phenotype form large sets that can be traversed through single mutations, and that single mutations of different genotypes with the same phenotype can yield very different novel phenotypes. This means that the evolutionary plasticity and robustness of metabolic networks facilitates the evolution of new metabolic abilities. Our approach has broad implications for the evolution of metabolic networks, for our understanding of mutational robustness, for the design of antimetabolic drugs, and for metabolic engineering. PMID:20019795

  4. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1992-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  5. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X-ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  6. A General Initial Decomposition Reaction for Complex Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    WALTERS, R

    2004-11-23

    The initial thermally activated decomposition of several complex metal hydride compounds, to a binary alkali or alkaline hydride and a group IIIb metal hydride, appears to share a first step in their decomposition mechanisms. The application of this initial thermochemical decomposition step to several alanate compounds illustrates the generality of this approach. For LiAlH4, the decomposition data fall on the derived distribution plot calculated for NaAlH4.

  7. Calibration of Complex Subsurface Reaction Models Using a Surrogate-Model Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of model assessment techniques to complex subsurface reaction models involves numerous difficulties, including non-trivial model selection, parameter non-uniqueness, and excessive computational burden. To overcome these difficulties, this study introduces SAMM (Simult...

  8. Neutral and Cationic Alkyl Tantalum Imido Complexes: Synthesis and Migratory Insertion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Laura L.; Schmidt, Joseph A. R.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and reactivity of dibenzyl cationic tantalum imido complexes is described. The trialkyl tantalum imido compounds Bn3Ta=NCMe3 (1) and Np3Ta=NCMe3 (2) were synthesized as starting materials for the study of dialkyl cationic tantalum imido complexes. Compound 1 undergoes insertion reactions with diisopropylcarbodiimide and 2,6-dimethylphenylisocyanide to give (bisamidinate)imido complex 5 and (bisimino-acyl)imido complex 6, respectively. Treatment of compound 1 with B(C6F5)3 gives the zwitterionic tantalum complex [Bn2Ta=NCMe3][BnB(C6F5)3] (7) which is stabilized by η6-coordination of the benzyl triaryl borate anion. Coordination of the aryl anion can be displaced by three equivalents of pyridine to give the Lewis base complex 8. Treatment of compound 1 with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] gives the cationic tantalum imido complex [Bn2Ta=NCMe3][B(C6F5)4] (3). This salt forms insoluble aggregates unless trapped by THF coordination or an insertion reaction with an alkyne or an alkene. Cation 3 undergoes migratory insertion reactions with diphenylacetylene, phenylacetylene, norbornene, and cis-cyclooctene to give the corresponding alkenyl or modified alkyl imido complexes. The characterization of these products and the significance of these insertion reactions with respect to Ziegler-Natta polymerizations and hydroamination reactions are described. PMID:19079787

  9. Neutral and Cationic Alkyl Tantalum Imido Complexes: Synthesis and Migratory Insertion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Laura L; Schmidt, Joseph A R; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G

    2006-07-01

    The synthesis and reactivity of dibenzyl cationic tantalum imido complexes is described. The trialkyl tantalum imido compounds Bn(3)Ta=NCMe(3) (1) and Np(3)Ta=NCMe(3) (2) were synthesized as starting materials for the study of dialkyl cationic tantalum imido complexes. Compound 1 undergoes insertion reactions with diisopropylcarbodiimide and 2,6-dimethylphenylisocyanide to give (bisamidinate)imido complex 5 and (bisimino-acyl)imido complex 6, respectively. Treatment of compound 1 with B(C(6)F(5))(3) gives the zwitterionic tantalum complex [Bn(2)Ta=NCMe(3)][BnB(C(6)F(5))(3)] (7) which is stabilized by eta(6)-coordination of the benzyl triaryl borate anion. Coordination of the aryl anion can be displaced by three equivalents of pyridine to give the Lewis base complex 8. Treatment of compound 1 with [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] gives the cationic tantalum imido complex [Bn(2)Ta=NCMe(3)][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] (3). This salt forms insoluble aggregates unless trapped by THF coordination or an insertion reaction with an alkyne or an alkene. Cation 3 undergoes migratory insertion reactions with diphenylacetylene, phenylacetylene, norbornene, and cis-cyclooctene to give the corresponding alkenyl or modified alkyl imido complexes. The characterization of these products and the significance of these insertion reactions with respect to Ziegler-Natta polymerizations and hydroamination reactions are described. PMID:19079787

  10. Synthesis, structure and catalytic application of lead(II) complexes in cyanosilylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Anirban; Hazra, Susanta; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of a lead(II) salt with 3-aminopyrazine-2-carboxylic acid (HL1) gave rise to a series of lead(II) coordination compounds (1–6) having zero, one, two and three dimensional structures. X-ray diffraction structural analyses reveal that complexes [Pb(L1)2]2 (1) and [Pb(L1)(OCHNH2)(η-OCHO)]2 (2) possess dinuclear structures, containing a centre of symmetry. Complexes [Pb2(L1)4(NHMeCHO)2]n (3) and [Pb2(L1)4]n·(H2O)n·(2.5DMF)n (4) have 1D chain like structures, and [Pb5(L1)7(η-NO3)(μ-HCOO)(η-HCOO)]n·(DMF)n·(MeOH)n (5) shows a 2D sheet like structure constructed by the [Pb5O5(HCOO)] cluster and 3-aminopyrazine-2-carboxylate anions. The hydrothermal reaction of lead(II) nitrate with HL1 in DMF led to in situ formation of 3,3′-(methylenebis(azanediyl))bis(pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid) [H2L2] which produces the 3D framework [Pb2(L2)2]n·(2DMF)n·(H2O)n (6). The L1(−) and L2(2−) ligands bind the metal cations by means of a pyrazine N-atom and one, or both, carboxylate O-atoms. The carboxylate group of L1(−) presents a diversity of coordination modes, viz., monodentate (1 and 3), bridging μ2 (3) and bridging μ3 (4), monodentate bridging μ2 (1, 2, 4, 5 and 6) and bridging chelate μ2 (5). The carboxylate moiety of L2(2−) in 6 binds the metal in a bridging μ2 fashion. The Pb(II) ions display coordination numbers from 5 to 8 with hemi- or holodirected coordination environments. The Pb(II) complexes act as heterogeneous catalysts for the cyanosilylation reaction, at 15 °C, of different aldehydes with trimethylsilyl cyanide (TMSCN) and can be recycled at least three times without losing activity. PMID:25376388

  11. Modeling of the formation of complex molecules in protostellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochina, O. V.; Wiebe, D. S.; Kalenskii, S. V.; Vasyunin, A. I.

    2013-11-01

    The results of molecular composition modeling are presented for the well studied low-mass star-forming region TMC-1 and the massive star-forming region DR21(OH), which is poorly studied from a chemical point of view. The column densities of dozens of molecules, ranging from simple diatomic to complex organic molecules, are reproduced to within an order of magnitude using a one-dimensional model for the physical and chemical structure of these regions. The chemical ages of the regions are approximately 105 years in both cases. The main desorption mechanisms that are usually included in chemical models (photodesorption, thermal desorption, and cosmic-ray-induced desorption) do not provide sufficient gasphase abundances of molecules that are synthesized in surface reactions; however, this shortcoming can be removed by introducing small amount of reactive desorption into the model. It is possible to reproduce the properties of the TMC-1 chemical composition in a standard model, without requiring additional assumptions about an anomalous C/O ratio or the recent accretion of matter enriched with atomic carbon, as has been proposed by some researchers.

  12. The colorants, antioxidants, and toxicants from nonenzymatic browning reactions and the impacts of dietary polyphenols on their thermal formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinchen; Tao, Ningping; Wang, Xichang; Chen, Feng; Wang, Mingfu

    2015-02-01

    Nonenzymatic browning reactions proceed with the starting reactants of sugar and/or protein during thermal processing and storage of food. In addition to food color formation, the process also contributes to the loss of essential nutrients, generation of beneficial antioxidants, and production of toxicants, including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), reactive carbonyl species, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and heterocyclic amines (HAs). Recent research has demonstrated that dietary polyphenols can actively participate in nonenzymatic browning reactions, contributing to the generation of new colorants and antioxidants. More importantly, polyphenol addition has been found to be an effective approach to mitigate heat-induced formation of toxicants, mainly through inhibiting oxidative pathways and trapping reactive intermediates. In the matrix of polyphenol-fortified foods, a complex array of chemical interactions happen among polyphenols, traditional nutritional components, and neo-formed compounds they are thermally converted to. These reactions play a significant role in the colorants, antioxidants as well as toxicants production. Our findings support the potential of dietary polyphenols for increasing the antioxidant content and for reducing the level of toxicants when they participate in nonenzymatic browning reactions in fortified food products. PMID:25468403

  13. A new mechanism for the control of phenoloxidase activity: inhibition and complex formation with quinone isomerase.

    PubMed

    Sugumaran, M; Nellaiappan, K; Valivittan, K

    2000-07-15

    Insect phenoloxidases participate in three physiologically important processes, viz., cuticular hardening (sclerotization), defense reactions (immune reaction), and wound healing. Arrest or even delay of any of these processes compromises the survival of insects. Since the products of phenoloxidase action, viz., quinones, are cytotoxic, uncontrolled phenoloxidase action is deleterious to the insects. Therefore, the activity of this important enzyme has to be finely controlled. A novel inhibition of insect phenoloxidases, which serves as a new regulatory mechanism for control of its activity, is described. The activity of phenoloxidases isolated from both Sarcophaga bullata and Manduca sexta is drastically inhibited by quinone isomerase (isolated from Calliphora), an enzyme that utilizes the phenoloxidase-generated 4-alkylquinones. In turn, phenoloxidase reciprocated the inhibition of isomerase. By forming a complex and controlling each other's activity, these two enzymes seem to regulate the levels of endogenously quinones. In support of this contention, an endogenous complex consisting of phenoloxidase, quinone isomerase, and quinone methide isomerase was characterized from the insect, Calliphora. This sclerotinogenic complex was isolated and purified by borate extraction of the larval cuticle, ammonium sulfate precipitation, and Sepharose 6B column chromatography. The complex exhibited a molecular mass of about 620-680 kDa, as judged by size-exclusion chromatography on Sepharose 6B and HPLC and did not even enter 3% polyacrylamide gel during electrophoresis. The phenoloxidase activity of the complex exhibited a wide substrate specificity. Incubation of the complex with N-acetyldopamine rapidly generated N-acetylnorepinephrine, dehydro-N-acetyldopamine, and its dimers. In addition, transient accumulation of N-acetyldopamine quinone was also observed. These results confirm the presence of phenoloxidase, quinone isomerase, and quinone methide isomerase in the complex. Attempts to dissociate the complex with even trace amounts of SDS ended in the total loss of quinone isomerase activity. The complex does not seems to be made up of stoichiometric amounts of individual enzymes as the ratio of phenoloxidase to quinone isomerase varied from preparation to preparation. It is proposed that the complex formation between sequential enzymes of sclerotinogenic pathway is advantageous for the organism to effectively channel various reactive intermediates during cuticular hardening. PMID:10898942

  14. Zebra reaction or the recipe for the synthesis of heterodimeric zinc complexes.

    PubMed

    Jędrzkiewicz, D; Ejfler, J; John, Ł; Szafert, S

    2016-02-21

    A series of asymmetric heterodimeric zinc complexes have been synthesized in a direct reaction between conformationally flexible chiral/achiral homodimers. The cooperative activity of steric factors and coordination codes resulted in an intriguing chiral self-sorting process. Herein, we are reporting our recent exploration of the first example of such a type of reaction. PMID:26658768

  15. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Devlina; Janin, Joël; Robert, Charles H.; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-01-01

    Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U) and bound (B) forms of protein structures from the Protein–Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors) and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69%) of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered) residues in the U form which are observed (ordered) in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial. PMID:26594372

  16. Deciphering complex soil/site formation in sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Johnson, D. N.; Benn, D. W.; Bettis, E. A., III

    2008-10-01

    This paper summarizes aspects of the geoarchaeological research at two adjacent multi-component archaeological sites, 13JP86 and 13JP87, along Indian Creek in central Iowa, USA. The sites, both recently salvaged but now destroyed, formed in late Pleistocene sands reworked from glacial sediments that emanated from the wasting Des Moines Lobe glacier some 13,000-14,000 years ago. The soils contained shallowly dispersed and mixed artifacts that span the Paleoindian-to-historic cultural spectrum. In open areas, as at Indian Creek, site formation processes equate to natural soil genetic processes, plus human imprints. Cultural materials, once deposited, become part of the soil and subject to dynamic soil processes. These soils had reasonably well expressed Ap, A, and E horizons that collectively formed thick one-layered biomantles, underlain by well expressed argillic Bt horizons. The biomantles had been well bioturbated, deeply in some pedons, but still exhibited organized A and E horizons. The Bt horizons were also bioturbated, though less so, and consisted of multiple thin to thick sandy clay bands, termed illuvial clay lamellae (icl's). The icl's contained modest to appreciable amounts of illuvial clay as bridges between grains, and as diffuse splotches and blebs separated by less clayey, E horizon-like interlamellar sandy zones. Deeper and less bioturbated E-like sandy zones had accumulated so much clay that they had coalesced with icl's into thick, complexly banded argillic Bt horizons. The process histories of the sandy pedons were obviously extremely complex. The geoarchaeological aspects of the project, which were mainly complex pedologic ones, were largely interpreted by drawing on the genetic principles of dynamic denudation to explain soil/site evolution. Many questions were raised, and most were answered under these principles. New concepts and perspectives were gained in this study, and the resulting interpretive scenarios carry explanatory implications for sandy soils everywhere, whether charged with cultural materials or not.

  17. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Devlina; Janin, Joël; Robert, Charles H; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-11-01

    Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U) and bound (B) forms of protein structures from the Protein-Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors) and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69%) of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered) residues in the U form which are observed (ordered) in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial. PMID:26594372

  18. Numerical study on the impacts of heterogeneous reactions on ozone formation in the Beijing urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yuanhang; Wang, Wei

    2006-12-01

    The air quality model CMAQ-MADRID (Community Multiscale Air Quality-Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution) was employed to simulate summer O3 formation in Beijing China, in order to explore the impacts of four heterogeneous reactions on O3 formation in an urban area. The results showed that the impacts were obvious and exhibited the characteristics of a typical response of a VOC-limited regime in the urban area. For the four heterogeneous reactions considered, the NO2 and HO2 heterogeneous reactions have the most severe impacts on O3 formation. During the O3 formation period, the NO2 heterogeneous reaction increased new radical creation by 30%, raising the atmospheric activity as more NO→NO2 conversion occurred, thus causing the O3 to rise. The increase of O3 peak concentration reached a maximum value of 67 ppb in the urban area. In the morning hours, high NO titration reduced the effect of the photolysis of HONO, which was produced heterogeneously at night in the surface layer. The NO2 heterogeneous reaction in the daytime is likely one of the major reasons causing the O3 increase in the Beijing urban area. The HO2 heterogeneous reaction accelerated radical termination, resulting in a decrease of the radical concentration by 44% at the most. O3 peak concentration decreased by a maximum amount of 24 ppb in the urban area. The simulation results were improved when the heterogeneous reactions were included, with the O3 and HONO model results close to the observations.

  19. Formation spectra of light kaonic nuclei by in-flight (K¯,N) reactions with a chiral unitary amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J.; Jido, D.; Nagahiro, H.; Hirenzaki, S.

    2009-10-01

    We study theoretically the in-flight (K-,N) reactions for the formation of light kaonic nuclear systems to get deeper physical insights on the spectra and to investigate the formation spectra of the reaction that will be observed at new facilities like the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). We show the expected spectra for the formation of the K-pp, K-pn, K-nn, and K--B11 systems that are accessible by the (K-,N) experiments. By considering the conversion part of the Green’s function, we show the missing mass spectra of the (K-,N) reactions in coincident with the particle emissions due to K¯ absorption. To calculate the cross sections, we use the so-called Tρ approximation to evaluate the optical potential. As for the amplitude T, we adopt the chiral unitary amplitude of K¯N channel in vacuum for simplicity. The effects of the p-wave optical potential of Σ(1385) channel and the contributions from K¯0 mixing in He3(K-,n) reaction are also evaluated numerically. We also study the behavior of the poles of kaon Green’s function in nuclear matter. We conclude that He3(K-,n) and He3(K-,p) reaction spectra in coincident with the πΣ emission may show the structure in the kaon bound region indicating the existence of the unstable kaonic nuclear states. As for the C12(K-,p) spectra with the πΣ emission, we may also observe the structure in the bound region, however, we need to evaluate the medium effects carefully for larger nuclei.

  20. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R; Meyer, Anne S

    2014-02-19

    The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF) and/or levulinic acid, formic acid and different phenolics at elevated temperatures. Correspondingly, xylose can follow different reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of furan-2-carbaldehyde (furfural) and/or various C-1 and C-4 compounds. At least four routes for the formation of HMF from glucose and three routes for furfural formation from xylose are possible. In addition, new findings show that biomass monosaccharides themselves can react further to form pseudo-lignin and humins as well as a wide array of other compounds when exposed to high temperatures. Hence, several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes and microorganisms may be valuable biobased chemicals. Hence a new potential for industrial scale synthesis of chemicals has emerged. A better understanding of the reaction mechanisms and the impact of the reaction conditions on the product formation is thus a prerequisite for designing better biomass processing strategies and forms an important basis for the development of new biorefinery products from lignocellulosic biomass as well. PMID:24412507

  1. Spectroscopic Properties of Reaction Center Pigments in Photosystem II Core Complexes: Revision of the Multimer Model

    PubMed Central

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A.; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{P}}^{+}{\\mathrm{Pheo}}^{-},{\\mathrm{P}}^{+}{\\mathrm{Q}}_{{\\mathrm{A}}}^{-},^{3}{\\mathrm{P}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His198, the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll PD1, and D1-Thr179, an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll ChlD1, on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns ChlD1. Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of ChlD1 is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on ChlD1 rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by ∼10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls PD1 and PD2 which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for ChlD1 and PD1, reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are considerable contributions from all pigments to the equilibrated excited state P*. The contribution of ChlD1 is twice that of PD1 at ambient temperature, making it likely that the primary charge separation will be initiated by ChlD1 under these conditions. The calculations of absorbance difference spectra provide independent evidence that after primary electron transfer the hole stabilizes at PD1, and that the physiologically dangerous charge recombination triplets, which may form under light stress, equilibrate between ChlD1 and PD1. PMID:18339736

  2. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone-initiated reactions with nicotine and secondhand tobacco smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Destaillats, Hugo; Smith, Jared D.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Gundel, Lara A.

    2010-11-01

    We used controlled laboratory experiments to evaluate the aerosol-forming potential of ozone reactions with nicotine and secondhand smoke. Special attention was devoted to real-time monitoring of the particle size distribution and chemical composition of SOA as they are believed to be key factors determining the toxicity of SOA. The experimental approach was based on using a vacuum ultraviolet photon ionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (VUV-AMS), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and off-line thermal desorption coupled to mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) for gas-phase byproducts analysis. Results showed that exposure of SHS to ozone induced the formation of ultrafine particles (<100 nm) that contained high molecular weight nitrogenated species ( m/ z 400-500), which can be due to accretion/acid-base reactions and formation of oligomers. In addition, nicotine was found to contribute significantly (with yields 4-9%) to the formation of secondary organic aerosol through reaction with ozone. The main constituents of the resulting SOA were tentatively identified and a reaction mechanism was proposed to elucidate their formation. These findings identify a new component of thirdhand smoke that is associated with the formation of ultrafine particles (UFP) through oxidative aging of secondhand smoke. The significance of this chemistry for indoor exposure and health effects is highlighted.

  3. The CO formation reaction pathway in steam methane reforming by rhodium.

    PubMed

    van Grootel, Pieter W; Hensen, Emiel J M; van Santen, Rutger A

    2010-11-01

    Three different pathways toward CO formation from adsorbed CH and O are compared by quantum-chemical density functional theory (DFT) calculations for planar and stepped Rh surfaces. The conventional pathway competes with the pathway involving a formyl (CHO) species. This holds for both types of surfaces. The barrier for carbon-oxygen bond formation for the planar surface (180 kJ/mol) is substantially higher than that for the stepped surface (90 kJ/mol). The reaction path through intermediate formyl formation competes with direct formation of CO from recombination via adsorbed C and O atoms. Calculations are used as a basis for the analysis of the overall kinetics of the methane steam reforming reaction as a function of the particle size and the metal. PMID:20919687

  4. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L.; Morgan, B. Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-02-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a `multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a `split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration.

  5. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Karig, David K; Neethirajan, Suresh; Suresh, Anil K; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  6. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L.; Morgan, B. Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-01-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a ‘multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a ‘split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration. PMID:26841837

  7. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  8. How can macromolecular crowding inhibit biological reactions? The enhanced formation of DNA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sen; Trochimczyk, Piotr; Sun, Lili; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Xuzhu; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the already known effect that macromolecular crowding usually promotes biological reactions, solutions of PEG 6k at high concentrations stop the cleavage of DNA by HindIII enzyme, due to the formation of DNA nanoparticles. We characterized the DNA nanoparticles and probed the prerequisites for their formation using multiple techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence analytical ultracentrifugation etc. In >25% PEG 6k solution, macromolecular crowding promotes the formation of DNA nanoparticles with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers. The formation of DNA nanoparticles is a fast and reversible process. Both plasmid DNA (2686 bp) and double-stranded/single-stranded DNA fragment (66bp/nt) can form nanoparticles. We attribute the enhanced nanoparticle formation to the depletion effect of macromolecular crowding. This study presents our idea to enhance the formation of DNA nanoparticles by macromolecular crowding, providing the first step towards a final solution to efficient gene therapy. PMID:26903405

  9. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tapas; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film (∼ 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The nanoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  10. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Tapas; Kabiraj, D.; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film ( 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The naoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  11. Reactions of Complex Phenols on Aerosols with Gaseous Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, M. R.; Enami, S.; Colussi, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    We report that α-tocopherol (α-TOH/α-TO-), as a model of substituted phenols in atmosphere, reacts with closed shell O3(g) on the surface of inert solvent microdroplets within 1 ms to produce persistent (n = 1 - 4) adducts detectable by online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The prototype phenolate PhO- undergoes electron transfer under identical conditions. These reactions occur at the gas/liquid interface since their rates: (1) depend on pH, (2) are several orders of magnitude faster than those in the bulk of O33-saturated microdroplets, and (3) approach O3(g) mass accommodation rates. Furthermore, they fail to incorporate solvent into the products: the same species are formed on acetonitrile or nucleophilic methanol microdroplets. Signals initially evolve with the concentration of ozone as expected from first-generation species. However, α-TO- reacts further with ozone via a collision-induced dissociation into a C19H40 fragment (vs. C19H38 from α-TO-, carrying the phytyl side-chain, whereas the higher homologues (α-TO-On ≥ 2-) are not reactive with O3(g). On this basis, α-TO- is assigned to a chroman-6-ol (4a, 8a)-ene oxide (an epoxide), α-TO-O2- to an endoperoxide, and α-TO-O3- to a secondary ozonide. These products are previous unreported. The atmospheric degradation of the substituted phenols detected in forest fires and combustion emissions is therefore expected to produce related oxidants on aerosol particles.

  12. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation. PMID:15330667

  13. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format. Revision 97/1

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Center Network. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility rather than optimization of data processing in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  14. Multiple photosynthetic reaction centres of porphyrinic polypeptide-Li(+)@C60 supramolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Kei; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Rein, Régis; Solladié, Nathalie; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-12-25

    Multiple photosynthetic reaction centres have been successfully constructed using strong supramolecular complexes of free base porphyrin polypeptides with lithium ion-encapsulated C60 (Li(+)@C60) as compared with those of C60. Efficient energy migration and electron transfer occur in the supramolecular complexes. PMID:26497396

  15. Multinuclear NMR studies of the formation of platinum(II)-adenine nucleotide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, R.E.; Bose, R.N.; Cornelius, R.D.

    1986-05-01

    There has been considerable interest in the mode of interaction of the simple antitumor agent cis-platin (cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II)) with nucleic acids. The authors have recently shown that Pt(II) has a high affinity for inorganic phosphate and polyphosphate ligands, and forms a variety of species that have been characterized. Phosphorus-31, carbon-13, and proton NMR studies of the adenine nucleotide complexes of Pt(II) have shown that the phosphate groups of these ligands do play a role in metal ion binding, in contrast to previous work that had indicated no interaction of the phosphate oxygens with PT(II). Kinetic studies have indicated that Pt(II) binding is a two-step process in which the initial complex that is formed is slowly converted to the final products. NMR studies have suggested that a phosphate-bound intermediate is formed initially, since coordination shifts due to complex formation are observed in the /sup 31/P spectra at an early stage in the reaction time course, while shifts are observed considerably later in the proton spectra. At least two final products are observed in the binding of Pt(II) to either AMP, ADP, or ATP. All of the final Pt(II) nucleotide complexes appear to involve interactions with the phosphate groups.

  16. Reactivity of the uranium(IV) carbene complex [U(BIPM(TMS))(Cl)(?-Cl)?Li(THF)?] (BIPM(TMS) = {C(PPh?NSiMe?)?}) towards carbonyl and heteroallene substrates: metallo-Wittig, adduct formation, C-F bond activation, and [2 + 2]-cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Oliver J; Mills, David P; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J; Liddle, Stephen T

    2014-10-14

    The reactivity of the uranium(IV) carbene complex [U(BIPM(TMS))(Cl)(?-Cl)2Li(THF)2] (1, BIPM(TMS) = {C(PPh2NSiMe3)2}) towards carbonyl and heteroallene substrates is reported. Reaction of 1 with benzophenone proceeds to give the metallo-Wittig terminal alkene product Ph2C=C(PPh2NSiMe3)2 (2); the likely "UOCl2" byproduct could not be isolated. Addition of the bulky ketone PhCOBu(t) to 1 resulted in loss of LiCl, coordination of the ketone, and dimerisation to give [U(BIPM(TMS))(Cl)(?-Cl){OC(Ph)(Bu(t))}]2 (3). The reaction of 1 with coumarin resulted in ring opening of the cyclic ester and a metallo-Wittig-type reaction to afford [U{BIPM(TMS)[C(O)(CHCHC6H4O-2)]-?(3)-N,O,O'}(Cl)2(THF)] (4) where the enolate product remains coordinated to uranium. The reaction of PhCOF with 1 resulted in C-F bond activation and oxidation resulting in isolation of [U(O)2(Cl)2(?-Cl)2{(?-LiDME)OC(Ph)=C(PPh2NSiMe3)(PPh2NHSiMe3)}2] (5) along with [U(Cl)2(F)2(py)4] (6). The reactions of 1 with tert-butylisocyanate or dicyclohexylcarbodiimide resulted in the isolation of the [2 + 2]-cycloaddition products [U{BIPM(TMS)[C(NBu(t)){OLi(THF)2(?-Cl)Li(THF)3}]-?(4)-C,N,N',N''}(Cl)3] (7) and [U{BIPM(TMS)[C(NCy)2]-?(4)-C,N,N',N''}(Cl)(?-Cl)2Li(THF)2] (8). Complexes 2-8 have been variously characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction, multi-nuclear NMR and FTIR spectroscopies, Evans method solution magnetic moments, variable temperature SQUID magnetometry, and elemental analyses. PMID:24798878

  17. Bismuth(iii)dichalcogenones as highly active catalysts in multiple C-C bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Katam; Sathyanarayana, Arruri; Naga Babu, Chatla; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2016-03-15

    Thirteen new bismuth(iii) dichalcogenone derivatives of triflates and halides were synthesized and structurally characterized. The mono, di, tetra and heptanuclear complexes were isolated with different bismuth(iii) coordination environments. These newly isolated bismuth(iii)dichalcogenones were characterized by multinuclear NMR, FT-IR, UV-vis, TGA and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. These complexes were tested for the synthesis of symmetrical triaryl- or triheteroarylmethanes and the catalysts were found to be highly active. In particular, the selone complexes were relatively more active than thione complexes. Subsequently, the scope of the catalytic reactions was further explored with different substituents. PMID:26891252

  18. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure on phosphodiester bond formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN

    1989-01-01

    The formation of oligomers from deoxynucleotides, catalyzed by Na(+)-montmorillonite, was investigated with special attention given to the effect of the monomer structure on the phosphodiester bond formation. It was found that adenine deoxynucleotides bind more strongly to montmorillonite than do the corresponding ribonucleotides and thymidine nucleotides. Tetramers of 2-prime-dpA were detected in the reaction of 2-prime-d-5-prime-AMP with a water-soluble carbodiimide EDAC in the presence of Na(+)-montmorillonite, illustrating the possible role of minerals in the formation of biopolymers on the primitive earth.

  19. THE OZONE REACTION WITH BUTADIENE: FORMATION OF TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product ...

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation in the atmosphere via heterogeneous reaction of gaseous isoprene on acidic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbeck, Andreas; Kulmala, Markku; Puxbaum, Hans

    2003-10-01

    Water-soluble macromolecular substances with spectral properties of ``humic-like substances'' (HULIS) were recently found to form the major identified fraction of the organic aerosol at urban and rural sites in Europe. With primary sources identified so far (e.g., biomass combustion) it is not possible to explain the observed HULIS levels in Europe, therefore there is an ongoing search for other sources - which form HULIS in situ in the atmosphere. Here we show that secondary aerosol formation of atmospheric polymers occurs by heterogeneous reaction of isoprenoid or terpenoid emissions in the presence of a sulfuric acid aerosol catalyst. Competing oxidants such as ozone or the presence of humidity decreased the reaction yield, but the formation of humic-like substances was not disabled. Calculations indicate that the presented reaction pathway could be an additional source for HULIS in the continental aerosol.

  1. Aza-crown ether complex cation ionic liquids: preparation and applications in organic reactions.

    PubMed

    Song, Yingying; Cheng, Chen; Jing, Huanwang

    2014-09-26

    Aza-crown ether complex cation ionic liquids (aCECILs) were devised, fabricated, and characterized by using NMR spectroscopy, MS, thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), elemental analysis and physical properties. These new and room-temperature ILs were utilized as catalysts in various organic reactions, such as the cycloaddition reaction of CO2 to epoxides, esterification of acetic acid and alcohols, the condensation reaction of aniline and propylene carbonate, and Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indole with aldehydes were investigated carefully. In these reactions, the ionic liquid exhibited cooperative catalytic activity between the anion and cation. In addition, the aza-[18-C-6HK][HSO4]2 was the best acidic catalyst in the reactions of esterification and Friedel-Crafts alkylation under mild reaction conditions. PMID:25154312

  2. Implementation of the NCN pathway of prompt-NO formation in the detailed reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Konnov, A.A.

    2009-11-15

    This work presents revised detailed reaction mechanism for small hydrocarbons combustion with possibly full implementation of available kinetic data related to the prompt NO route via NCN. It was demonstrated that model predictions with the rate constant of reaction CH + N{sub 2} = NCN + H measured by Vasudevan and co-workers are much higher than experimental concentrations of NO in rich premixed flames at atmospheric pressure. Analysis of the correlations of NO formation with calculated concentrations of C{sub 2}O radicals strongly supports the inclusion of reaction between C{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} and reduction of the rate constant of reaction between CH and N{sub 2}. Rate constants of the reactions of NCN consumption were mostly taken from the works of Lin and co-workers. Some of these reactions affect calculated profiles of NCN in flames. Proposed modifications allow accurate prediction of NO formation in lean and rich flames of methane, ethylene, ethane and propane. Agreement of the experiments and the modeling was much improved as compared to the previous Release 0.5 of the Konnov mechanism. Satisfactory agreement with available measurements of NCN radicals in low pressure flames was also demonstrated. (author)

  3. Solid-state formation of CO2 via the H2CO + O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Loison, J.-C.; Baouche, S.; Chaabouni, H.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The formation of carbon dioxide ice in quiescent regions of molecular clouds has not yet been fully understood, even though CO2 is one the most abundant species in interstellar ices. Aims: CO2 formation was studied via oxidation of formaldehyde molecules on cold surfaces under conditions close to those encountered in quiescent molecular clouds to evaluate the efficiency and the activation barrier of the H2CO + O reaction. Methods: Formaldehyde ices were exposed to O atoms using a differentially pumped beam line. The H2CO + O reaction experiments were carried out on two different surfaces of astrophysical interest (amorphous water ice and oxidised graphite) held at 10 or 55 K. The products were probed via infrared and mass spectroscopy by using RAIRS and temperature-programmed desorption techniques. Results: In this paper we show that the H2CO + O reaction can efficiently form carbon dioxide in the solid phase. The activation barrier for the reaction, based on a model fit to the experimental data, was estimated to be 335 ± 55 K. Conclusions: The H2CO+O reaction on cold surfaces can be added to the set of pathways that lead to carbon dioxide in the interstellar ices. Astrophysically, the abundance of CO2 in quiescent molecular clouds may potentially be explained by three reactions occurring on cosmic grains: CO + OH,CO + O, and H2CO + O. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Secondary organic aerosol formation initiated from reactions between ozone and surface-sorbed squalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyi; Waring, Michael S.

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that ozone reactions on surface-sorbed D-limonene can promote gas phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation indoors. In this work, we conducted 13 steady state chamber experiments to measure the SOA formation entirely initiated by ozone reactions with squalene sorbed to glass, at chamber ozone of 57-500 ppb for two relative humidity (RH) conditions of 21% and 51%, in the absence of seed particles. Squalene is a nonvolatile compound that is a component of human skin oil and prevalent on indoor surfaces and in settled dust due to desquamation. The size distributions, mass and number secondary emission rates (SER), aerosol mass fractions (AMF), and aerosol number fractions (ANF) of formed SOA were quantified. The surface AMF and ANF are defined as the change in SOA mass or number formed, respectively, per ozone mass consumed by ozone-squalene reactions. All experiments but one exhibited nucleation and mass formation. Mass formation was relatively small in magnitude and increased with ozone, most notably for the RH = 51% experiments. The surface AMF was a function of the chamber aerosol concentration, and a multi-product model was fit using the 'volatility basis set' framework. Number formation was relatively strong at low ozone and low RH conditions. Though we cannot extrapolate our results because experiments were conducted at high air exchange rates, we speculate that this process may enhance particle number more than mass concentrations indoors.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann study of pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayodele, S. G.; Varnik, F.; Raabe, D.

    2011-01-01

    Pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems is of great importance in surface micropatterning [Grzybowski , Soft Matter1744-683X10.1039/B501769F 1, 114 (2005)], self-organization of cellular micro-organisms [Schulz , Annu. Rev. Microbiol.ARMIAZ0066-422710.1146/annurev.micro.55.1.105 55, 105 (2001)], and in developmental biology [Barkai , FEBS Journal1742-464X10.1111/j.1742-4658.2008.06854.x 276, 1196 (2009)]. In this work, we apply the lattice Boltzmann method to study pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems. As a first methodological step, we consider the case of a single species undergoing transformation reaction and diffusion. In this case, we perform a third-order Chapman-Enskog multiscale expansion and study the dependence of the lattice Boltzmann truncation error on the diffusion coefficient and the reaction rate. These findings are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Furthermore, taking the Gray-Scott model as a prominent example, we provide evidence for the maturity of the lattice Boltzmann method in studying pattern formation in nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems. For this purpose, we perform linear stability analysis of the Gray-Scott model and determine the relevant parameter range for pattern formation. Lattice Boltzmann simulations allow us not only to test the validity of the linear stability phase diagram including Turing and Hopf instabilities, but also permit going beyond the linear stability regime, where large perturbations give rise to interesting dynamical behavior such as the so-called self-replicating spots. We also show that the length scale of the patterns may be tuned by rescaling all relevant diffusion coefficients in the system with the same factor while leaving all the reaction constants unchanged.

  6. Complexation in reactions of cycloalkane solvent holes. I. reactions of Cis- and Trans-decalin{lg_bullet}+ with alcohols.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Sauer, M. C., Jr.; Tribunac, A. D.; Chemistry

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that solvent holes in cis- and trans-decalin form complexes with aliphatic alcohols that live 1-100 ns, depending on the solute and the solvent temperature. This complexation has near-zero activation energy and occurs with rate constants of (1-1.2) x 10{sup 11} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} in trans-decalin and 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} in cis-decalin. The metastable complex decays by proton transfer (for alcohols higher than ethanol); in concentrated solutions a diffusion-controlled reaction of the complex with a second alcohol molecule occurs. While the stability of the complex increases with the carbon number of the alcohol, the standard heat of the complexation decreases in the opposite direction ({Delta}H{sup o} changes from -39 kJ/mol for ethanol to -25 kJ/mol for tert-butanol). The decrease in the standard entropy is small ({Delta}S{sup o}{sub 298} > -80 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}), approaching zero for higher alcohols. We argue that this thermochemistry is due to the polaronic nature of the solvent holes.

  7. Microscopic approach to nonlinear reaction-diffusion: the case of morphogen gradient formation.

    PubMed

    Boon, Jean Pierre; Lutsko, James F; Lutsko, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    We develop a microscopic theory for reaction-diffusion (RD) processes based on a generalization of Einstein's master equation [Ann. Phys. 17, 549 (1905)] with a reactive term and show how the mean-field formulation leads to a generalized RD equation with nonclassical solutions. For the nth-order annihilation reaction A+A+A+···+A→0, we obtain a nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation for which we discuss scaling and nonscaling formulations. We find steady states with solutions either exhibiting long-range power-law behavior showing the relative dominance of subdiffusion over reaction effects in constrained systems or, conversely, solutions that go to zero a finite distance from the source, i.e., having finite support of the concentration distribution, describing situations in which diffusion is slow and extinction is fast. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data for morphogen gradient formation. PMID:22463171

  8. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  9. Complex Cure Kinetics of the Hydroxyl-Epoxide Reaction in DGEBA Epoxy Hardened with Diethanolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancipink, Windy; McCoy, John; Kropka, Jamie; Celina, Mathias

    The curing of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A Epoxy (Epon 828) with diethanolamine (DEA) involves a fast amine-epoxide reaction followed by a slower hydroxyl-epoxide reaction. At curing temperatures below 100°C, the time scales of these two reactions are well separated, and the hydroxyl addition can be studied as an ''isolated'' reaction. The hydroxyl-epoxide reaction is of great interest due to the complex kinetics involved, which are brought about by competing reactions. The reaction kinetics are believed to be tertiary amine catalyzed and are well fit to a modified form of the Kamal-type equation. Here we study the complex long term reaction kinetics at various temperatures, by using isothermal modulated differential scanning calorimetry, micro calorimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Mononuclear Phenolate Diamine Zinc Hydride Complexes and Their Reactions With CO2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and zinc coordination chemistry of the three proligands 2-tert-butyl-4-[tert-butyl (1)/methoxy (2)/nitro (3)]-6-{[(2′-dimethylaminoethyl)methylamino]methyl}phenol are described. Each of the ligands was reacted with diethylzinc to yield zinc ethyl complexes 4–6; these complexes were subsequently reacted with phenylsilanol to yield zinc siloxide complexes 7–9. Finally, the zinc siloxide complexes were reacted with phenylsilane to produce the three new zinc hydride complexes 10–12. The new complexes 4–12 have been fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and elemental analyses. The structures of the zinc hydride complexes have been probed using VT-NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments. These data indicate that the complexes exhibit mononuclear structures at 298 K, both in the solid state and in solution (d8-toluene). At 203 K, the NMR signals broaden, consistent with an equilibrium between the mononuclear and dinuclear bis(μ-hydrido) complexes. All three zinc hydride complexes react rapidly and quantitatively with carbon dioxide, at 298 K and 1 bar of pressure over 20 min, to form the new zinc formate complexes 13–15. The zinc formate complexes have been analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and VT-NMR studies, which reveal a temperature-dependent monomer–dimer equilibrium that is dominated by the mononuclear species at 298 K. PMID:24882918

  11. Carbon-bridged biphenolate lanthanide complexes: synthesis and their catalytic activity for the Diels Alder reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoping; Ma, Mengtao; Yao, Yingming; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Qi

    2005-05-01

    Reaction of anhydrous ErCl 3 with sodium salt of carbon-bridged biphenolate, MBMPNa 2 (MBMP 2-=2,2'-methylene-bis (6- tert-butyl-4-methyl-phenoxo)), in 1:2 molar ratio in THF at room temperature gave the lanthanide 'ate' complexes (THF)Er(MBMP) 2Na(THF) 2 ( 1) in high isolated yield. Similarly reaction of anhydrous SmCl 3 with 2 equiv. of MBMPNa 2 in THF, then crystallization from toluene in the presence of TMEDA, afforded the final product (THF)Sm(MBMP) 2Na(TMEDA) ( 2). Both complexes 1 and 2 were well characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, and X-ray diffraction analysis. Preliminary results revealed that these complexes are able to act as Lewis acid to catalyze the Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene with methyl acrylate in good activity and stereoselectivity.

  12. Charge-transfer complexes formed in the reaction of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane with π-electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlQaradawi, Siham Y.; Mostafa, Adel; Bazzi, Hassan S.

    2013-04-01

    The reactions of the electron donor 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (TACDD) with the π-electron acceptors 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ), 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (CHL) and 2,4,4,6-tetrabromo-2,5-cyclohexadienone (TBCHD) were studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform at room temperature. The electronic and infrared spectra of the formed molecular charge-transfer (CT) complexes were recorded. The obtained results showed that the stoichiometries of the reactions are fixed and depend on the nature of both the donor and the acceptor. Based on the obtained data, the formed charge-transfer complexes were formulated as [(Donor)(Acceptor)2] for the donor (TACDD) and the acceptors TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, CHL and TBCHD. These CT-complexes were isolated as solids and have been characterized through electronic and infrared spectra as well as elemental and thermal analysis measurements. The formation constants (KCT), charge transfer energy (ECT), molar extinction coefficients (ɛCT), free energy change ΔG0, ionization potential Ip and oscillator strength ƒ of the formed CT-complexes were obtained.

  13. Multicomponent One-pot Reactions Towards the Synthesis of Stereoisomers of Dipicolylamine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Raje, Sakthi; Gurusamy, Sureshbabu; Koner, Abhishek; Mehrotra, Sonam; Jennifer, Samson Jegan; Vasudev, Prema G; Butcher, Ray J; Angamuthu, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Reported are multi-component one-pot syntheses of chiral complexes [M(L(R) OR')Cl2 ] or [M(L(R) SR')Cl2 ] from the mixture of an N-substituted ethylenediamine, pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde, a primary alcohol or thiol and MCl2 utilizing in-situ formed cyclized Schiff bases where a C-O bond, two stereocenters, and three C-N bonds are formed (M=Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd; R=Et, Ph; R'=Me, Et, nPr, nBu). Tridentate ligands L(R) OR' and L(R) SR' comprise two chiral centers and a hemiaminal ether or hemiaminal thioether moiety on the dipicolylamine skeleton. Syn-[Zn(L(Ph) OMe)Cl2 ] precipitates out readily from the reaction mixture as a major product whereas anti-[Zn(L(Ph) OMe)Cl2 ] stays in solution as minor product. Both syn-[Zn(L(Ph) OMe)Cl2 ] and anti-[Zn(L(Ph) OMe)Cl2 ] were characterized using NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Solid-state structures revealed that syn-[Zn(L(Ph) OMe)Cl2 ] adopted a square pyramidal geometry while anti-[Zn(L(Ph) OMe)Cl2 ] possesses a trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the Zn centers. The scope of this method was shown to be wide by varying the components of the dynamic coordination assembly, and the structures of the complexes isolated were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. Syn complexes were isolated as major products with Zn(II) and Cu(II) , and anti complexes were found to be major products with Ni(II) and Cd(II) . Hemiaminals and hemiaminal ethers are known to be unstable and are seldom observed as part of cyclic organic compounds or as coordinated ligands assembled around metals. It is now shown, with the support of experimental results, that linear hemiaminal ethers or thioethers can be assembled without the assistance of Lewis acidic metals in the multi-component assembly, and a possible pathway of the formation of hemiaminal ethers has been proposed. PMID:26415522

  14. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    PubMed

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions. PMID:22339468

  15. Acrylamide formation from asparagine under low moisture Maillard reaction conditions. 2. Crystalline vs amorphous model systems.

    PubMed

    Robert, Fabien; Vuataz, Gilles; Pollien, Philippe; Saucy, Françoise; Alonso, Maria-Isabelle; Bauwens, Isabelle; Blank, Imre

    2005-06-01

    The formation of acrylamide was investigated in model systems based on asparagine and glucose under low moisture Maillard reaction conditions as a function of reaction temperature, time, physical state, water activity, and glass transition temperature. Equimolar amorphous glucose/asparagine systems with different water activities were prepared by freeze drying and were shown to quickly move to the rubbery state already at room temperature and a water activity of above 0.15. The acrylamide amounts were correlated with physical changes occurring during the reaction. Pyrolysis and kinetics of acrylamide release in amorphous and crystalline glucose/asparagine models indicated the importance of the physical state in acrylamide formation. In amorphous systems, acrylamide was generated in higher concentrations and at lower temperatures as compared to the crystalline samples. Time and temperature are covariant parameters in both systems affecting the acrylamide formation by thermal processes. On the other side, the water activity and glass transition temperature do not seem to be critical parameters for acrylamide formation in the systems studied. PMID:15913336

  16. Pattern formation on networks with reactions: A continuous-time random-walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, C. N.; Donnelly, I. C.; Henry, B. I.

    2013-03-01

    We derive the generalized master equation for reaction-diffusion on networks from an underlying stochastic process, the continuous time random walk (CTRW). The nontrivial incorporation of the reaction process into the CTRW is achieved by splitting the derivation into two stages. The reactions are treated as birth-death processes and the first stage of the derivation is at the single particle level, taking into account the death process, while the second stage considers an ensemble of these particles including the birth process. Using this model we have investigated different types of pattern formation across the vertices on a range of networks. Importantly, the CTRW defines the Laplacian operator on the network in a non-ad hoc manner and the pattern formation depends on the structure of this Laplacian. Here we focus attention on CTRWs with exponential waiting times for two cases: one in which the rate parameter is constant for all vertices and the other where the rate parameter is proportional to the vertex degree. This results in nonsymmetric and symmetric CTRW Laplacians, respectively. In the case of symmetric Laplacians, pattern formation follows from the Turing instability. However in nonsymmetric Laplacians, pattern formation may be possible with or without a Turing instability.

  17. Quantifying the ionic reaction channels in the Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxut, Aurelia; Nozière, Barbara; Rossignol, Stéphanie; George, Christian; Waxman, Eleanor Marie; Laskin, Alexander; Slowik, Jay; Dommen, Josef; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal, a common organic gas in the atmosphere, has been identified in recent years as an important Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) precursor (Volkamer et al., 2007). But, unlike with other precursors, the SOA is largely produced by particle-phase reactions (Volkamer et al., 2009) and equilibria (Kampf et al. 2013) that are still not entirely characterized. Since 2009 series of smog chamber experiments have been performed within the Eurochamp program at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, to investigate SOA formation from glyoxal. In these experiments, glyoxal was produced by the gas-phase oxidation of acetylene in the presence of seeds, the seed composition and other conditions being varied. The 2011 campaign resulted in the identification of salting processes controlling the glyoxal partitioning in the seeds (Kampf et al. 2013). This presentation will report results of the 2013 campaign focusing on the identification of the various reactions (ionic or photo-induced) contributing to the SOA mass. In particular, the contribution of the ionic reactions, i.e. mediated by NH4+, were investigated by quantifying the formation of imidazoles (imidazole, imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde, 2,2'-biimidazole) from the small condensation channel of glyoxal with ammonia. For this, the SOA produced were collected on quartz filters and analyzed by Orbitrap LC/MS (Q-Exactive Thermo Fisher). The formation of other products such as organic acids was also investigated to determine potential competing reactions. Time-resolved MOUDI sampling coupled with nano-DESY/ESI-MS/MS analysis was also used to identify nitrogen- and sulphur-containing products from all the reactions. The results obtained for a range of conditions will be presented and compared with recent mechanistic information on the ionic reaction channels (Nozière et al., in preparation, 2013). The implementation of all this new information into a glyoxal-SOA model will be discussed.

  18. The formation of the dolomite-analogue norsethite: Reaction pathway and cation ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Carlos; Pina, Carlos M.

    2014-10-01

    Reaction pathways and cation ordering mechanisms involved in the formation of the mineral dolomite in nature still remain poorly understood. This is mainly due to the experimental problems posed by the synthesis of dolomite at ambient conditions, which preclude monitoring its formation in reasonable time scales. However, processes leading to the crystallization of fully-ordered dolomite-like structures can be studied by conducting experiments with mineral analogues, which are more readily precipitated. In this paper we present a study of the formation of the dolomite-analogue norsethite [BaMg(CO3)2] from a slurry which was aged at room temperature during 14 days. We found that norsethite forms by two dissolution-crystallization reactions from an initial amorphous nano-sized precipitate. The first reaction produces a mineral assemblage composed by witherite [BaCO3], northupite [Na3Mg(CO3)2Cl] and norsethite. The second dissolution-crystallization process leads to the almost complete depletion of witherite and northupite in favor of norsethite. While the composition of norsethite crystals rapidly reaches a Ba/Mg = 1 ratio, X-ray diffraction peaks indicate an increase in the crystallinity of those crystals during the first 48 h of reaction. Simultaneously, Ba-Mg cation ordering increases, as shown by the evolution of intensity ratios of certain superstructure and structure reflections. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the formation of fully-ordered norsethite occurs by a sequence of solvent-mediated processes which involve a number of precursors. Our study also suggests that similar processes might lead to the formation of dolomite in natural environments.

  19. New platinum and ruthenium Schiff base complexes for water splitting reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanjun; Chen, Yong; Fu, Wen-Fu

    2015-08-28

    New platinum(ii) and ruthenium(ii) mononuclear complexes with naphthalene-based Schiff base ligands L1 (H2-selnaph) and L2 (H2-selnaph-COOH) were synthesized: Pt-selnaph (), Pt-selnaph-COOH (), Ru-selnaph(4-picoline)2 (), and Ru-selnaph(isoquinoline)2 (). The complexes were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight spectrometry, and elemental analysis, and their electrochemical and photophysical properties were investigated. The luminescent complexes and were used as photosensitizers for visible-light driven hydrogen production reactions in the presence of sacrificial electron donor triethylamine and cocatalyst precursor K2PtCl4 aqueous solution. When complex was attached to the surface of TiO2 by a carboxyl group, enhanced hydrogen photogeneration was achieved compared with complex alone, with turnover numbers of about 84 after 12 h irradiation. Calculations based on electrochemical and spectroscopic data also confirmed the feasibility of electron injection through the carboxyl group of complex into the conduction band of TiO2 for hydrogen production reactions. Complexes and were found to be efficient stable water oxidation (NH4)2Ce(NO3)6-driven catalysts with a first-order reaction behavior. A turnover frequency of 5.34 min(-1) was achieved for complex , while complex exhibited an enhanced turnover frequency of 11.9 min(-1) in pH 1.0 aqueous solution. Turnover numbers up to 1400 and 2060 were obtained after 6.5 h of reaction for and , respectively. Unique mechanistic information for water splitting is also presented through electrochemical, spectroscopic and ESI-MS high-valent ruthenium-oxo intermediate investigations. PMID:26205430

  20. Catalytic C-N, C-O, and C-S Bond Formation Promoted by Organoactinide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, Moris S.

    Throughout this last decade, we have witnessed impressively how the chemistry of electrophilic d0/fn actinides has been prospering either in their new synthetic approaches reaching very interesting compounds or in their use in stoichiometric and catalytic reactions leading to high levels of complexity. The unique rich and complex features of organoactinides prompted the development of this field toward catalysis in demanding chemical transformations. In this review, we present a brief and selective survey of the recent developments in homogenous catalysis of organoactinide complexes, especially toward the formation of new C-N, C-O, and C-S bonds. We start by presenting the synthesis and characterization of the corresponding organoactinide complexes, followed by the homogeneous catalytic chemical transformations that include the hydroamination of terminal alkynes, the polymerization of ɛ-caprolactone and L-lactide, the reduction of azides and hydrazines by high-valent organouranium complexes, the hydrothiolation of terminal alkynes, and the catalytic Tishchenko reaction. For each reaction, the scope and the thermodynamic, kinetic, and mechanistic aspects are presented.

  1. Reaction Intermediates Kinetics in Solution Investigated by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Diaurated Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jašíková, Lucie; Anania, Mariarosa; Hybelbauerová, Simona; Roithová, Jana

    2015-10-28

    A new method to investigate the reaction kinetics of intermediates in solution by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is presented. The method, referred to as delayed reactant labeling, allows investigation of a reaction mixture containing isotopically labeled and unlabeled reactants with different reaction times. It is shown that we can extract rate constants for the degradation of reaction intermediates and investigate the effects of various reaction conditions on their half-life. This method directly addresses the problem of the relevance of detected gaseous ions toward the investigated reaction solution. It is demonstrated for geminally diaurated intermediates formed in the gold mediated addition of methanol to alkynes. Delayed reactant labeling allows us to directly link the kinetics of the diaurated intermediates with the overall reaction kinetics determined by NMR spectroscopy. It is shown that the kinetics of protodeauration of these intermediates mirrors the kinetics of the addition of methanol demonstrating they are directly involved in the catalytic cycle. Formation as well as decomposition of diaurated intermediates can be drastically slowed down by employing bulky ancillary ligands at the gold catalyst; the catalytic cycle then proceeds via monoaurated intermediates. The reaction is investigated for 1-phenylpropyne (Ph-CC-CH3) using [AuCl(PPh3)]/AgSbF6 and [AuCl(IPr)]/AgSbF6 as model catalysts. Delayed reactant labeling is achieved by using a combination of CH3OH and CD3OH or Ph-CC-CH3 and Ph-CC-CD3. PMID:26430872

  2. Formation of cyclobutanones by the photolytic reaction of (CO)/sub 5/Cr/double bond/C(OMe)Me with electron-rich olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, M.A.; Hegedus, L.S.

    1989-03-15

    Recent research has centered on the development of useful organic synthetic methodology based on the photolytic reactions of chromium Fischer carbene complexes, particularly in regards to the development of new /beta/-lactam syntheses. In the course of these studies it became evident that photolysis of chromium-carbene complexes resulted in the reversible production of chromium-ketene complexes, by a photochemically driven CO insertion into the chromium-carbene carbon double bond and that this unstable intermediate was responsible for /beta/-lactam formation.

  3. Prediction of ring formation efficiency via diene ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions using the M06 density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Shanthi; Hillier, Ian H.; Vincent, Mark A.; Burton, Neil A.; Ashworth, Ian W.; Nelson, David J.; Percy, Jonathan M.; Rinaudo, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    Using density functional theory employing the M06 functional, we predict the reaction path energetics of ring formation via diene ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions, and thence the effective molarity (EM) for the formation of cyclohexene, which is in good accord with the experimental lower limit which we report here.

  4. Synthesis of sp(3)-rich scaffolds for molecular libraries through complexity-generating cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Flagstad, T; Min, G; Bonnet, K; Morgentin, R; Roche, D; Clausen, M H; Nielsen, T E

    2016-06-01

    An efficient strategy for the synthesis of complex small molecules from simple building blocks is presented. Key steps of the strategy include tandem Petasis and Diels-Alder reactions, and divergent complexity-generating cyclization cascades from a key dialdehyde intermediate. The methodology is validated through the synthesis of a representative compound set, which has been used in the production of 1617 molecules for the European Lead Factory. PMID:27171614

  5. Chemistry of high-oxidation-state groups V and VI complexes: Novel silyl and imido complexes and the reactions of silyl and alkyl alkylidyne complexes with oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianniu

    This dissertation describes the synthesis and characterization of the novel early transition metal (especially group VI metals) complexes free of anionic pi-ligands such as cyclopentadienyl (Cp) and studies of their reactions with oxygen and silanes. Our study of Cp-free tungsten silyl chemistry is reported. A novel d 0 tungsten silyl complex 2 [(ButCH 2)W(=CHBut)2(SiButPh2 ) (2a) ⇌ (ButCH2)2W(≡CBu t)(SiButPh2) (2b)] and an equilibrium between 2a and 2b are described in Chapter 2. The thermodynamics of this equilibrium [DeltaH° = -0.9(0.2) kcal/mol, DeltaS° = -0.6(0.8) eu] was investigated by 1H NMR. The studies of the alpha-hydrogen exchange between 2a and 2b by 2-D EXSY experiments gave kinetic parameters of the exchange: DeltaH≠ = 17.9(1.1) kcal/mol, DeltaS≠ = 1.9(5.7) eu for the forward reaction (2a → 2b) and Delta H≠ = 18.6 (1.1) kcal/mol, DeltaS ≠ = 1.9(5.7) eu for the back reaction (2b → 2a). The reaction of O2 with silyl alkylidyne 2b [(Bu tCH2)W(=CHBut)2(SiBut Ph2) (2a) ⇌ (ButCH2)2W(≡CBu t)(SiButPh2) (2b)] is described in Chapter 3. A silyl migration product (ButCH2) 2W(=O)[=C(But)(SiButPh2)] ( 5) was characterized. A siloxy analog of 2b, (Bu tCH2)2W≡CBut(OSiBu tPh2) (6), was prepared and excluded as a possible intermediate in the formation of 5. Ab initio calculations suggested a pathway involving silyl migration in 2b to give a tungsten (IV) intermediate (ButCH 2)2W=C(But)(SiButPh2) (7) prior to the reaction with O2. A crystal structure of (Me3SiCH2)2W(=O)(=CHSiMe3)(O=PMe 3)•(Me3SiCH2)3W≡CSiMe 3 (12) was obtained from the reaction of alkyl alkylidyne (Me3SiCH2)3W≡CSiMe3 with O2 in the presence of PMe3. In Chapter 4, preparation and characterization of bis(2,6-diisopropylphenylimido)molybdenum(VI) amide and silyl complexes (ArN=)2Mo(NMe2)2 (14), (ArN=)2Mo(NMe2)[Si(SiMe3) 3] (15), (ArN=)2MoCl[N(SiMe3) 2] (16), (ArN=)2Mo(NMe2)[N(SiMe 3)2] (17), and (ArN=)2Mo(NHAr) 2 (18) are reported. In addition, new bis(imido)molybdenum(VI) amine adducts (ArN=)2MoCl2(NHMe2) ( 19), (ArN=)2MoCl2(NHEt2) (20 ), (ArN=)2MoCl2(NHMe2)2 (21), and (ArN=)2MoCl2(NHMe2)•(ArN=) 2MoCl2(DME) (22) and their X-ray structures are reported. Preparation and characterization of Cp-free tantalum(V) amide silyl complexes have been investigated, as reported in Chapter 5. Thermodynamics of interesting equilibria (Me2N)3Ta[Si(SiMe3)3] 2 (25) ⇌ (Me2N)3Ta(SiButPh2)[Si(SiMe 3)3] (27) ⇌ (Me2N)3Ta(SiButPh2) 2 (26) was studied. In the equilibrium 25 + Li(THF)3SiButPh2 ⇌ 27 + Li(THF)3Si(SiMe3)3, Delta H° = -0.54(0.17) kcal/mol and DeltaS° = -0.79(0.65) eu, and in the equilibrium 27 + Li(THF) 3SiButPh2 ⇌ 26 + Li(THF)3Si(SiMe3)3, Delta H° = - 0.56(0.17) kcal/mol and DeltaS° = -1.52(0.65) eu.

  6. Secondary sup 15 N isotope effects on the reactions catalyzed by alcohol and formate dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Rotberg, N.S.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-04-23

    Secondary {sup 15}N isotope effects at the N-1 position of 3-acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide have been determined, by using the internal competition technique, for horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) with cyclohexanol as a substrate and yeast formate dehydrogenase (FDH) with formate as a substrate. On the basis of less precise previous measurements of these {sup 15}N isotope effects, the nicotinamide ring of NAD has been suggested to adopt a boat conformation with carbonium ion character at C-4 during hydride transfer. If this mechanism were valid, as N-1 becomes pyramidal an {sup 15}N isotope effect for the reaction catalyzed by LADH was measured. These values suggest that a significant {sup 15}N kinetic isotope effect is not associated with hydride transfer for LADH and FDH. Thus, in contrast with the deformation mechanism previously postulated, the pyridine ring of the nucleotide apparently remains planar during these dehydrogenase reactions.

  7. Complex formation by neptunium (V) with Citric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Sevost'yanova, E.P.

    1985-09-01

    Experimental data are presented for the reactions of Np(V) with citric acid solutions over the pH range 1-12. The investigation was conducted by spectrophotometry. It has been established that Np(V) reacts with citric acid in the stoichiometric ratio 1:1.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactions of Isolable (β-Diketiminato)Nb(III) Imido Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Tomson, Neil C.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated both the chemical reduction of (BDI)Nb(V) imido complexes (BDI = HC[C(Me)NAr]2; Ar = 2,6-iPr2-C6H3) to the formal Nb(III) oxidation state and the ability of these Nb(III) complexes to behave as two-electron reductants. The reduction of the Nb(V) species was found to depend heavily on the nature of available supporting ligands, but the chemistry of the reduced compounds proceeded cleanly with a number of unsaturated organic reagents. Accordingly, the novel Nb(V) bis(imido) complexes supported by the monoazabutadiene (mad) ligand (mad)Nb(NtBu)(NAr)(L′) (L′ = py, thf) were formed by either KC8 reduction of (BDI)Nb(NtBu)Cl2(py) in the absence of strong π-acids or by H2 reduction of the Nb(V) dimethyl complex (BDI)Nb(NtBu)Me2 in THF. These products are likely formed though an intramolecular, 2 e− reductive C–N bond cleavage, as has been observed previously for related Group 4 systems, suggesting that transient Nb(III) intermediates were present in both cases. In the presence of 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe), KC8 reduction of (BDI)Nb(NtBu)Cl2(py) was arrested at the Nb(IV) oxidation state to give (BDI)Nb(NtBu)Cl(dmpe), which was characterized by solution-state EPR spectroscopy as a Nb-centered paramagnet with strong coupling to the two equivalent phosphorus nuclei (Aiso{93Nb} = 120.5×10−4 cm−1, Aiso{31P} = 31.0×10−4 cm−1, giso = 1.9815). When strong π-acids were used to intercept the thermally unstable Nb(III) complex (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(py) prior to reductive cleavage of the ligand C–N bond, the thermally stable Nb(III) species (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CX)2(L″) (X = O, L″ = py; X = NXyl, L″ = CNXyl; Xyl = 2,6-Me2-C6H3) were obtained in good yields. The Nb(III) complexes (BDI)Nb(NtBu)py, (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2(py) and (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2 were subsequently investigated for their ability to serve as two-electron reducing reagents for both metal-ligand multiple bond formation and for the reduction of organic π-systems. The reduction of mesityl azide by (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(py) and diphenylsulfoxide by (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2 led to the monomeric bis(imido) and dimeric oxo complexes (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(NMes)(py) and [(BDI)Nb(NtBu)]2(μ2-O)2, respectively. MeLi addition to (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2(py) resulted in the formation of a Nb-acylate via methide addition to one of the carbonyl carbons. The acylate product was revealed to have a short Nb–Cacylate bond distance (2.059(4) Å), consistent with multiple Nb–C bond character resulting from Nb(III) back-bonding into the acylate carbon. The interaction of (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2 with two equivalents of 4,4′-dichlorobenzophenone resulted in the clean, quantitative formation of the corresponding pinacol coupling product, but introduction of the ketone in 1: 1 molar ratios resulted in mixtures of the pinacol product and the starting material, suggesting that ketone coordination to the Nb(III) complex may be reversible. Relatedly, addition of 1-phenyl-1-propyne to (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2 formed a thermally unstable 1: 1 Nb/alkyne complex, as characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopies; reaction of this species with HCl/MeOH yielded a 2: 1 mixture of 1-phenyl-1-propene and the free alkyne, suggesting a high degree of covalency in the Nb–C bonds. PMID:21116450

  9. Interplay of Experiment and Theory in Elucidating Mechanisms of Oxidation Reactions by a Nonheme Ru(IV)O Complex.

    PubMed

    Dhuri, Sunder N; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Shin, Sun Young; Kim, Jin Hwa; Mandal, Debasish; Shaik, Sason; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the reactivity patterns and reaction mechanisms in alkane hydroxylation, olefin epoxidation, cyclohexene oxidation, and sulfoxidation reactions by a mononuclear nonheme ruthenium(IV)-oxo complex, [Ru(IV)(O)(terpy)(bpm)](2+) (1), has been conducted. In alkane hydroxylation (i.e., oxygen rebound vs oxygen non-rebound mechanisms), both the experimental and theoretical results show that the substrate radical formed via a rate-determining H atom abstraction of alkanes by 1 prefers dissociation over oxygen rebound and desaturation processes. In the oxidation of olefins by 1, the observations of a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 1 and styrene oxide formation lead us to conclude that an epoxidation reaction via oxygen atom transfer (OAT) from the Ru(IV)O complex to the C═C double bond is the dominant pathway. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the epoxidation reaction is a two-step, two-spin-state process. In contrast, the oxidation of cyclohexene by 1 affords products derived from allylic C-H bond oxidation, with a high KIE value of 38(3). The preference for H atom abstraction over C═C double bond epoxidation in the oxidation of cyclohexene by 1 is elucidated by DFT calculations, which show that the energy barrier for C-H activation is 4.5 kcal mol(-1) lower than the energy barrier for epoxidation. In the oxidation of sulfides, sulfoxidation by the electrophilic Ru-oxo group of 1 occurs via a direct OAT mechanism, and DFT calculations show that this is a two-spin-state reaction in which the transition state is the lowest in the S = 0 state. PMID:26075466

  10. Formation of O3/+/ by the reaction of metastable O2/+/ ions with O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Pang, K. D.; Monahan, K. M.

    1974-01-01

    The high resolution of the photoionization mass spectrophotometer was utilized to resolve some doubts about the participating species in the reaction of metastable oxygen molecular ions with oxygen molecules to yield ozone ions and oxygen radicals. It is found from inspection of the appearance potential of the ozone ion that an a4 Pi-excited state is responsible for the formation of ozone near the appearance potential of these lines.

  11. Thermochemistry and Reaction Barriers for the Formation of Levoglucosenone from Cellobiose

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  12. Thermochemistry and reaction barriers for the formation of levoglucosenone from cellobiose.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  13. Thermochemistry and Reaction Barriers for the Formation of Levoglucosenone from Cellobiose

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2011-10-19

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  14. Molybdenum Hydride and Dihydride Complexes Bearing Diphosphine Ligands with a Pendant Amine: Formation of Complexes With Bound Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-07-06

    CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes (PNP = (R2PCH2)2NMe, R = Et or Ph) were synthesized by displacement of two CO ligands of CpMo(CO)3H by the PNP ligand; these complexes were characterized by IR and variable temperature 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes are formed as mixture of cis and trans-isomers. Both cis-CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and trans-CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H were analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical oxidation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H in CH3CN are both irreversible at slow scan rates and quasi-reversible at higher scan rates, with E1/2 = -0.36 V (vs. Cp2Fe+/0) for CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and E1/2 = -0.18 V for CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H. Hydride abstraction from CpMo(CO)(PNP)H with [Ph3C]+[A]- (A = B(C6F5)4 or BArF4; [ArF = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]) afforded “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes that feature the amine bound to the metal. Displacement of the κ3 Mo-N bond by CD3CN gives [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(CD3CN)]+. The kinetics of this reaction were studied by NMR spectroscopy, providing the activation parameters ΔH‡ = 22.1 kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = 1.89 cal/(mol·K), Ea = 22.7 kcal/mol. Protonation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H affords [CpMo(CO)(κ2-PEtNMePEt)(H)2]+ as a Mo dihydride complex, which loses H2 to generate [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PEtNMePEt)]+ at room temperature. CpMo(CO)(dppp)H (dppp = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) was studied as a Mo diphosphine analogue without a pendant amine, and the product of protonation of this complex gives [CpMo(CO)(dppp)(H)2]+. Our results show that the pendant amine has a strong driving force to form stable “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes, and also promotes hydrogen elimination from [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(H)2]+ complexes by formation of Mo-N dative bond. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. We thank Monte Helm, Elliott Hulley and Deanna Miller for help on the crystallography, and Ming Fang for assistance on the electrochemical experiments.

  15. Models for nicotinamide coenzymes. Isotope effect discrepancies in the reaction of dihydronicotinamides with trifluoroacetophenone are due to adduct formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.M.; Yaniv, R.; van Eikeren, P.

    1980-04-23

    Isotope effects were measured during oxidation-reduction reactions of two dihydronicotinamides. All data reported can be accounted for by the reversible formation of an adduct between the dihydronicotinamide and a ketone which is not on the pathway for the oxidation-reduction reaction. The kinetics of the redox reaction are explained by a simple hydride transfer. (BLM)

  16. Proton Mobility in b2 Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Carissa R.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Harrison, Alex G.; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting.

  17. Proton Mobility in b2 Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carissa R; Abutokaikah, Maha T; Harrison, Alex G; Bythell, Benjamin J

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting. PMID:26602904

  18. Reaction pathways towards the formation of dolomite-analogues at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Carlos; Pina, Carlos M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present results of a study of the crystallisation behaviour of the dolomite-analogues norsethite and PbMg(CO3)2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Whereas precipitation of norsethite was previously obtained by mixing solutions (Hood et al., 1974; Pimentel and Pina, 2014a,b), we report, for the first time, the synthesis of PbMg(CO3)2 by using the same method. The formation of both phases was promoted by ageing slurries for periods of time ranging from a few days (norsethite) up to 6 months (PbMg(CO3)2). The crystallisation of both norsethite and PbMg(CO3)2 occurs by sequences of dissolution-precipitation reactions involving several amorphous and crystalline precursor phases, which were identified and characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the initial composition and Ba:Mg and Pb:Mg ratios in the slurries, different precursors and reaction kinetics were observed. This demonstrates the existence of different reaction pathways towards the formation of the investigated dolomite-analogues. Our experimental results provide new insights into the possible mechanisms of formation of dolomite and other double carbonates in nature.

  19. Elucidating Latent Mechanistic Complexity in Competing Acid-Catalyzed Reactions of Salicylaldehyde-Derived Baylis-Hillman Adducts.

    PubMed

    Olomola, Temitope O; Klein, Rosalyn; Caira, Mino R; Kaye, Perry T

    2016-01-01

    (1)H NMR-based kinetic studies have revealed the latent mechanistic complexity of deceptively simple hydrochloric acid-catalyzed reactions of salicylaldehyde-derived Baylis-Hillman adducts. Reactions conducted at 0 °C afforded 2-(chloromethyl)cinnamic acid derivatives as the major products and the corresponding 3-(chloromethyl)coumarin derivatives as the minor products. In reactions conducted in refluxing acetic acid, however, the 3-(chloromethyl)coumarin derivatives are the sole products. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR analysis permitted the determination of the rate constants and kinetic parameters involved in the pseudo-first-order formation of (Z)-2-(chloromethyl)-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2-propenoic acid. The kinetic data clearly preclude the operation of classical kinetic versus thermodynamic control and indicate the operation of three independent reaction pathways. Theoretical studies of these pathways undertaken at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level permitted rationalization of the experimental data and provided insights into the possible mechanism of the enzymic E-Z isomerization and cyclization of (E)-cinnamic acid analogues to afford coumarins. PMID:26655750

  20. Increasing complexity of a diterpene synthase reaction with a single residue switch.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Dana; Xu, Meimei; Fulton, D Bruce; Determan, Mara K; Peters, Reuben J

    2008-04-23

    Terpene synthases often catalyze complex reactions involving intricate series of carbocation intermediates. The resulting, generally cyclical, structures provide initial hydrocarbon frameworks that underlie the astonishing structural diversity of the enormous class of terpenoid natural products (>50,000 known), and these enzymes often mediate the committed step in their particular biosynthetic pathway. Accordingly, how terpene synthases specify product outcome has drawn a great deal of attention. In previous work, we have shown that mutational introduction of a hydroxyl group at specific positions within diterpene synthase active sites can "short circuit" complex cyclization and/or rearrangement reactions, resulting in the production of "simpler"' diterpenes. Here we demonstrate that the converse change, substitution of an Ile for Thr at the relevant position in a native pimaradiene synthase, leads to a dramatic increase in reaction complexity. Product outcome is shifted from the tricyclic pimaradiene to a rearranged tetracycle, aphidicol-15-ene. Thus, the nature of the residue at this position acts as a true switch for product outcome. In addition, the ability of aliphatic residue substitution to enable a more complex reaction emphasizes the importance of substrate conformation imposed by a largely inert active site. Furthermore, the profound plasticity of diterpene synthases exemplified by this single residue switch for product outcome is consistent with the screening/diversity-oriented hypothesis of natural products metabolism. PMID:18366162

  1. Insight into the Reaction of a Dinuclear Phosphinidene Complex with Nitriles.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Michael; Weinzierl, Rudolf; Timoshkin, Alexey Y; Scheer, Manfred

    2016-04-11

    The phosphinidene complex [Cp*P{W(CO)5 }2 ] (1; Cp*=C5 Me5 ) reacted with malononitrile to give the 1,2-dihydro-1,3,2-diazaphosphinine derivative 2. The reaction of 1 with 1,4-benzodinitrile gave [1,4-{{W(CO)5 }2 P-N=C(Cp*)}2 (C6 H4 )] (3), the first example of a cumulene-like aminophosphinidene complex. The reaction of 1 with aniline gave the aminophosphinidene complex [(Ph)N(H)P{W(CO)5 }2 ] (4). To compare the reactivity of benzonitrile and aniline with 1, the phosphinidene complex 1 was reacted with three different isomers of aminobenzonitrile (2-, 3-, and 4-aminobenzonitrile). These reactions gave an insight into the reaction pathway of 1 with benzonitrile derivatives. Compounds 5, 6 a, 6 b, and 7, which are derivatives of 1,2-dihydro-1,3,2-diazaphosphinine or benzo-2H-1,2-azaphospholes, were, as well as all other products, characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR and IR spectroscopy, and X-ray structure analysis. PMID:26887793

  2. Placebo Effect upon Complex Reaction Time When Hypnotic Suggestibility is Controlled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskridge, Veronica L.

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of a placebo (sugar pill) accompanied by suggestions that the pill would either (1) improve performance as a stimulant or (2) cause a deterioration in performance as a depressant when the performance in question was the subjects' complex reaction time to a light stimulus. The Harvard Group Scale of…

  3. Chiral holmium complex-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of silyloxyvinylindoles: stereoselective synthesis of hydrocarbazoles.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinji; Morikawa, Takahiro; Nishida, Atsushi

    2013-10-18

    The catalytic and asymmetric cycloaddition between 3-[1-(silyloxy)vinyl]indoles and electron-deficient olefins gave substituted hydrocarbazoles in up to 99% yield and 94% ee. This reaction was catalyzed by a novel chiral holmium(III) complex. Alkylation of the cycloadduct gave a tricyclic compound with four continuous chiral centers, one of which was a quaternary carbon. PMID:24079531

  4. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  5. Recent aspects of the proton transfer reaction in H-bonded complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, Miros?aw

    1996-07-01

    Proton transfer processes cover a very wide range of situations and time scales and they are of great interest from the viewpoint of chemical reactions in solution. These processes can occur via thermally activated crossing or tunneling. This review considers various aspects of this many-faceted field. Spectroscopic, dielectric, colligative and energetic properties and structures of various species with H-bonds are examined. Proton transfer reactions in water and organic solvents, and the contribution of various H-bonded species and ions to these processes are discussed. Among other topics, this survey includes the effects of solvent, acid-base stoichiometry, concentration, temperature and impurity on proton transfer reactions in complexes of phenols and carboxylic acids with amines, pyridines and pyridine N-oxides. The contribution of the nonstoichiometric acid-base complexes and ionic species to the reversible proton transfer mechanism is discussed.

  6. Titanium oxide complexes with dinitrogen. Formation and characterization of the side-on and end-on bonded titanium oxide-dinitrogen complexes in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingfei; Zhuang, Jia; Zhou, Zijian; Li, Zhen Hua; Zhao, Yanying; Zheng, Xuming; Fan, Kangnian

    2011-06-23

    The reactions of titanium oxide molecules with dinitrogen have been studied by matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. The titanium monoxide molecule reacts with dinitrogen to form the TiO(N(2))(x) (x = 1-4) complexes spontaneously on annealing in solid neon. The TiO(η(1)-NN) complex is end-on bonded and was predicted to have a (3)A'' ground state arising from the (3)Δ ground state of TiO. Argon doping experiments indicate that TiO(η(1)-NN) is able to form complexes with one or more argon atoms. Argon atom coordination induces a large red-shift of the N-N stretching frequency. The TiO(η(2)-N(2))(2) complex was characterized to have C(2v) symmetry, in which both the N(2) ligands are side-on bonded to the titanium metal center. The tridinitrogen complex TiO(η(1)-NN)(3) most likely has C(3v) symmetry with three end-on bonded N(2) ligands. The TiO(η(1)-NN)(4) complex was determined to have a C(4v) structure with four equivalent end-on bonded N(2) ligands. In addition, evidence is also presented for the formation of the TiO(2)(η(1)-NN)(x) (x = 1-4) complexes, which were predicted to be end-on bonded. PMID:21604730

  7. Thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of Cd2+ ion-L-serine complexes in aqueous KNO3 solutions at 288-308 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochergina, L. A.; Khokhlova, E. A.; Drobilova, O. M.

    2014-06-01

    The heats of formation of complexes of L-serine and doubly charged cadmium ions are determined by calorimetry. The heat effects of the reaction between an amino acid solution and a cadmium(II) solution and the respective heats of dilution of cadmium nitrate solution are measured at temperatures of 288.15, 298.15, and 308.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 against the background of KNO3. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of complexation are calculated. Standard enthalpies of formation of mono-, bis-, and tris-coordinated complexes of cadmium(II) in an aqueous solution are found.

  8. Highly reactive nonheme iron(III) iodosylarene complexes in alkane hydroxylation and sulfoxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seungwoo; Wang, Bin; Seo, Mi Sook; Lee, Yong-Min; Kim, Myoung Jin; Kim, Hyung Rok; Ogura, Takashi; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Clmancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-06-16

    High-spin iron(III) iodosylarene complexes bearing an N-methylated cyclam ligand are synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic methods. The nonheme high-spin iron(III) iodosylarene intermediates are highly reactive oxidants capable of activating strong C-H bonds of alkanes; the reactivity of the iron(III) iodosylarene intermediates is much greater than that of the corresponding iron(IV) oxo complex. The electrophilic character of the iron(III) iodosylarene complexes is demonstrated in sulfoxidation reactions. PMID:24820976

  9. Role of weakly bound complexes in temperature-dependence and relative rates of MxOy- + H2O (M = Mo, W) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2016-02-01

    Results of a systematic comparison of the MoxOy- + H2O and WxOy- + H2O reaction rate coefficients are reported and compared to previous experimental and computational studies on these reactions. WxOy- clusters undergo more direct oxidation by water to yield WxOy+1- + H2, while for MoxOy- clusters, production of MoxOyH2- (trapped intermediates in the oxidation reaction) is comparatively more prevalent. However, MoxOy- clusters generally have higher rate coefficients than analogous WxOy- clusters if MoxOy+1H2- formation is included. Results of calculations on the M2Oy- + H2O (M = Mo, W; y = 4, 5) reaction entrance channel are reported. They include charge-dipole complexes formed from long-range interactions, and the requisite conversion to a Lewis acid-base complex that leads to MxOy+1H2- formation. The results predict that the Lewis acid-base complex is more strongly bound for MoxOy- clusters than for WxOy- clusters. The calculated free energies along this portion of the reaction path are also consistent with the modest anti-Arrhenius temperature dependence measured for most MoxOy- + H2O reactions, and the WxOy- + H2O reaction rate coefficients generally being constant over the temperature range sampled in this study. For clusters that exhibit evidence of both water addition and oxidation reactions, increasing the temperature increases the branching ratio toward oxidation for both species. A more direct reaction path to H2 production may therefore become accessible at modest temperatures for certain cluster stoichiometries and structures.

  10. Role of weakly bound complexes in temperature-dependence and relative rates of MOy (-) + H2O (M = Mo, W) reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafader, Jared O; Ray, Manisha; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2016-02-21

    Results of a systematic comparison of the MoxOy (-) + H2O and WxOy (-) + H2O reaction rate coefficients are reported and compared to previous experimental and computational studies on these reactions. WxOy (-) clusters undergo more direct oxidation by water to yield WxOy+1 (-) + H2, while for MoxOy (-) clusters, production of MoxOyH2 (-) (trapped intermediates in the oxidation reaction) is comparatively more prevalent. However, MoxOy (-) clusters generally have higher rate coefficients than analogous WxOy (-) clusters if MoxOy+1H2 (-) formation is included. Results of calculations on the M2Oy (-) + H2O (M = Mo, W; y = 4, 5) reaction entrance channel are reported. They include charge-dipole complexes formed from long-range interactions, and the requisite conversion to a Lewis acid-base complex that leads to MxOy+1H2 (-) formation. The results predict that the Lewis acid-base complex is more strongly bound for MoxOy (-) clusters than for WxOy (-) clusters. The calculated free energies along this portion of the reaction path are also consistent with the modest anti-Arrhenius temperature dependence measured for most MoxOy (-) + H2O reactions, and the WxOy (-) + H2O reaction rate coefficients generally being constant over the temperature range sampled in this study. For clusters that exhibit evidence of both water addition and oxidation reactions, increasing the temperature increases the branching ratio toward oxidation for both species. A more direct reaction path to H2 production may therefore become accessible at modest temperatures for certain cluster stoichiometries and structures. PMID:26896986

  11. A calorimetric study of the hydrolysis and peroxide complex formation of the uranyl(VI) ion.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2014-02-14

    The enthalpies of reaction for the formation of uranyl(vi) hydroxide {[(UO2)2(OH)2](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)4](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)5](+), [(UO2)3(OH)6](aq), [(UO2)3(OH)7](-), [(UO2)3(OH)8](2-), [(UO2)(OH)3](-), [(UO2)(OH)4](2-)} and peroxide complexes {[UO2(O2)(OH)](-) and [(UO2)2(O2)2(OH)](-)} have been determined from calorimetric titrations at 25 °C in a 0.100 M tetramethyl ammonium nitrate ionic medium. The hydroxide data have been used to test the consistency of the extensive thermodynamic database published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (I. Grenthe, J. Fuger, R. J. M. Konings, R. J. Lemire, A. B. Mueller, C. Nguyen-Trung and H. Wanner, Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1992 and R. Guillaumont, T. Fanghänel, J. Fuger, I. Grenthe, V. Neck, D. J. Palmer and M. R. Rand, Update on the Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Technetium, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2003). A brief discussion is given about a possible structural relationship between the trinuclear complexes [(UO2)3(OH)n](6-n), n = 4-8. PMID:24301256

  12. Zwitterion formation in titan ice analogs: reaction between HC3N and NH3.

    PubMed

    Couturier-Tamburelli, Isabelle; Sessouma, Bintou; Chiavassa, Thierry; Piétri, Nathalie

    2012-11-01

    A zwitterion is formed in the laboratory at low temperatures in the solid phase from the thermal reaction of HC(3)N and NH(3). We report for the first time its infrared spectrum. We study its reaction using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Its reaction rate is estimated to be k(T) = 2.9 × 10(5) exp(-2.3 ± 0.1 (kJ mol(-1))/RT). Calculations using density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31g**) are used to characterize all the species (complexes, zwitterions, and transition states) and are in good agreement with the infrared spectra. The structure of the zwitterion is determined planar and it is characterized by a N-C bond around 1.5 Å. PMID:23075265

  13. Bifunctional mechanism of catalysis in reactions leading to formation of /alpha/-amino ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.F.; Anikeev, A.V.

    1988-10-20

    The kinetics of the reaction of /alpha/-bromoacetophenone and benzyl bromide with aniline and pyridine in the presence of additions of acetic acid and phenol in benzene at 30/degree/C were investigated. The catalytic effects due to the activity of the uncombined forms of the catalyst, their dimers, and their 1:1 complexes with the amines were separated quantitatively. The change in the catalytic activity of the respective particles in the solutions with variation in the structure of the reagents is examined, and possible mechanisms for the catalytic reactions are discussed on this basis. It is concluded that there is a bifunctional mechanism of catalysis by acetic acid in the reaction of /alpha/-bromoacetophenone with aniline.

  14. TraML--a standard format for exchange of selected reaction monitoring transition lists.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W; Chambers, Matthew; Neumann, Steffen; Levander, Fredrik; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Shofstahl, Jim; Campbell, David S; Mendoza, Luis; Ovelleiro, David; Helsens, Kenny; Martens, Lennart; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L; Brusniak, Mi-Youn

    2012-04-01

    Targeted proteomics via selected reaction monitoring is a powerful mass spectrometric technique affording higher dynamic range, increased specificity and lower limits of detection than other shotgun mass spectrometry methods when applied to proteome analyses. However, it involves selective measurement of predetermined analytes, which requires more preparation in the form of selecting appropriate signatures for the proteins and peptides that are to be targeted. There is a growing number of software programs and resources for selecting optimal transitions and the instrument settings used for the detection and quantification of the targeted peptides, but the exchange of this information is hindered by a lack of a standard format. We have developed a new standardized format, called TraML, for encoding transition lists and associated metadata. In addition to introducing the TraML format, we demonstrate several implementations across the community, and provide semantic validators, extensive documentation, and multiple example instances to demonstrate correctly written documents. Widespread use of TraML will facilitate the exchange of transitions, reduce time spent handling incompatible list formats, increase the reusability of previously optimized transitions, and thus accelerate the widespread adoption of targeted proteomics via selected reaction monitoring. PMID:22159873

  15. Inhibitory mechanism of naringenin against carcinogenic acrylamide formation and nonenzymatic browning in Maillard model reactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ka-Wing; Zeng, Xiaohui; Tang, Yun Sang; Wu, Jia-Jun; Liu, Zhiwei; Sze, Kong-Hung; Chu, Ivan K; Chen, Feng; Wang, Mingfu

    2009-08-01

    Chemical model reactions were carried out to investigate the effect of a citrus flavonoid, naringenin, on the formation of acrylamide under mild heating conditions. Results showed that naringenin significantly and dose dependently inhibited the formation of acrylamide (20-50% relative to the control), although not in a linear manner. Moreover, the presence of naringenin in acrylamide-producing models effectively reduced the extent of browning. Careful comparison of the HPLC chromatograms of samples from the chemical model reactions revealed that naringenin likely reacted with Maillard intermediates, giving rise to new derivatives. Subsequent LC-MS analyses suggested that the proposed derivatives have a predicted molecular mass of 341 Da. Eventually, two derivatives were purified and characterized with LC-MS/MS and NMR spectroscopy as 8-C-(E-propenamide)naringenin and 6-C-(E-propenamide)naringenin, respectively. In other words, naringenin, a rather weak antioxidant, strongly inhibited acrylamide formation probably by directly reacting with acrylamide precursors, thus diverting them from the pathways that lead to acrylamide formation. PMID:19639978

  16. Formation of Chlorotriophenoxy Radicals from Complete Series Reactions of Chlorotriophenols with H and OH Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    The chlorothiophenoxy radicals (CTPRs) are key intermediate species in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes/thianthrenes (PCDT/TAs). In this work, the formation of CTPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 chlorothiophenol (CTP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution at 600–1200 K. The present study indicates that the structural parameters, thermal data, and rate constants as well as the formation potential of CTPRs from CTPs are strongly dominated by the chlorine substitution at the ortho-position of CTPs. Comparison with the study of formation of chlorophenoxy radicals (CPRs) from chlorophenols (CPs) clearly shows that the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by H is more efficient than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by H, whereas the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by OH is less impactful than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by OH. Reactions of CTPs with H can occur more readily than that of CTPs with OH, which is opposite to the reactivity comparison of CPs with H and OH. PMID:26270566

  17. Consecutive reaction mechanism for the formation of spore photoproduct in DNA photolesion.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Zhao, Hongmei; Song, Di; Liu, Kunhui; Su, Hongmei

    2012-09-13

    We have explored the potential energy profiles of TpT dinucleotides toward formation of a DNA photolesion product, spore photoproduct (SP), along the S(0), S(1), and T(1) states, by means of density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Together with the spin density analysis, the consecutive mechanism for the SP formation can be established. The detailed reaction pathways have been revealed. All the adiabatic reaction pathways proceeding though S(1), T(1), or S(0) alone are shown to be energetically infeasible, while the nonadiabatic pathway involving both the T(1) and S(0) states corresponds to the lowest-energy path and is the most favorable in energy. The nonadiabatic pathway is rate-limited by the step of the hydrogen atom transfer proceeding in the T(1) state with a barrier of 14.2 kcal mol(-1) (11.9 kcal mol(-1) in bulk solution), whereas the subsequent C5-CH(2) bond formation toward the final SP formation occurs readily in S(0) after intersystem crossing from T(1) to S(0) via the singlet-triplet interaction. The results provide a rationale for the experimentally observed kinetic isotope effect after deuterium substitution at the 3'-T methyl group of TpT. PMID:22924546

  18. Formation of Chlorotriophenoxy Radicals from Complete Series Reactions of Chlorotriophenols with H and OH Radicals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    The chlorothiophenoxy radicals (CTPRs) are key intermediate species in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes/thianthrenes (PCDT/TAs). In this work, the formation of CTPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 chlorothiophenol (CTP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution at 600-1200 K. The present study indicates that the structural parameters, thermal data, and rate constants as well as the formation potential of CTPRs from CTPs are strongly dominated by the chlorine substitution at the ortho-position of CTPs. Comparison with the study of formation of chlorophenoxy radicals (CPRs) from chlorophenols (CPs) clearly shows that the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by H is more efficient than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by H, whereas the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by OH is less impactful than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by OH. Reactions of CTPs with H can occur more readily than that of CTPs with OH, which is opposite to the reactivity comparison of CPs with H and OH. PMID:26270566

  19. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex. Reactivity of a mononuclear copper(II)-alkylperoxide complex has also been examined to get insights into the intrinsic reactivity of copper(II)-peroxide species, which is usually considered as a sluggish oxidant or just a precursor of copper-oxyl radical type reactive species. However, our studies have unambiguously demonstrated that copper(II)-alkylperoxide complex can be a direct oxidant for C-H bond activation of organic substrates, when the C-H bond activation is coupled with O-O bond cleavage (concerted mechanism). The reactivity studies of these mononuclear copper(II) active-oxygen species (superoxide and alkylperoxide) will provide significantly important insights into the catalytic mechanism of copper monooxygenases as well as copper-catalyzed oxidation reactions in synthetic organic chemistry. PMID:26086527

  20. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  1. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, E. V. Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-15

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI{sub 2} with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD{sup +}-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  2. Complex spatiotemporal behavior in the photosensitive ferroin-bromate-4-nitrophenol reaction.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jeffrey G; Wang, Jichang

    2015-04-01

    Investigation illustrates that the bromate-4-nitrophenol reaction in a stirred batch reactor undergoes spontaneous oscillations under very broad initial reactant concentrations. The addition of ferroin has subtle influences on the nonlinear behavior, in which the frequency and total number of oscillations were greatly reduced at a low or high ferroin concentration, as opposed to the significant increase at a moderate ferroin concentration. Temporal oscillations with a modulating frequency were also observed in the ferroin-bromate-4-nitrophenol system. In a capillary tube the ferroin-bromate-4-nitrophenol reaction generated propagating wave trains with various complex behaviors such as period-doubled intermittent propagation failure. Illumination was found to have a profound effect on the temporal oscillations in the bromate-4-nitrophenol reaction and on those long lasting wave activities. Spectroscopic studies were able to identify 1,4-benzoquinone, 2-bromo-1,4-benzoquinone, and 2-bromo-4-nitrophenol as major components during the reaction. PMID:25772194

  3. Complex Type 2 Reactions in Three Patients with Hansen's Disease from a Southern United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Salinas, Jorge L; McDonald, Robert W; Sheth, Anandi N; Fairley, Jessica K

    2015-11-01

    In non-endemic countries, leprosy, or Hansen's disease (HD), remains rare and is often underrecognized. Consequently, the literature is currently lacking in clinical descriptions of leprosy complications in the United States. Immune-mediated inflammatory states known as reactions are common complications of HD. Type 1 reactions are typical of borderline cases and occur in 30% of patients and present as swelling and inflammation of existing skin lesions, neuritis, and nerve dysfunction. Type 2 reactions are systemic events that occur at the lepromatous end of the disease spectrum, and typical symptoms include fever, arthralgias, neuritis, and classic painful erythematous skin nodules known as erythema nodosum leprosum. We report three patients with lepromatous leprosy seen at a U.S. HD clinic with complicated type 2 reactions. The differences in presentations and clinical courses highlight the complexity of the disease and the need for increased awareness of unique manifestations of lepromatous leprosy in non-endemic areas. PMID:26304919

  4. Metallic film formation using direct micropatterning with photoreactive metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Cordonier, Christopher E J; Nakamura, Akimasa; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Fujishima, Akira

    2012-09-18

    Palladium, cobalt, and nickel in complex with photoacid-generating ligands, 4-(2-nitrobenzyloxycarbonyl)catechol and 4-(6-nitroveratryloxycarbonyl)catechol, were prepared in solution. Films formed from the metal complex solutions perform as positive-tone, directly photopatternable palladium, cobalt, nickel oxide, or composite film precursors. After exposure, acid-bearing selectively soluble complexes could be removed to give patterned films upon developing in aqueous base, which were transformable to the corresponding pattern-preserving metal/metal oxide film. The photodynamics of photoinduced solubility and direct micropatterning of palladium, cobalt, nickel, and palladium/nickel oxide composite films were investigated. Employing palladium as the initiator for autocatalytic chemical plating, selective direct copper plating on palladium film on polyethylene naphthalate and palladium/nickel oxide composite film on glass was accomplished. PMID:22892024

  5. REACTIVE DESORPTION AND RADIATIVE ASSOCIATION AS POSSIBLE DRIVERS OF COMPLEX MOLECULE FORMATION IN THE COLD INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Vasyunin, A. I.; Herbst, Eric E-mail: eh2ef@virginia.edu

    2013-05-20

    The recent discovery of terrestrial-type organic species such as methyl formate and dimethyl ether in the cold interstellar gas has proved that the formation of organic matter in the Galaxy begins at a much earlier stage of star formation than was previously thought. This discovery represents a challenge for astrochemical modelers. The abundances of these molecules cannot be explained by the previously developed ''warm-up'' scenario, in which organic molecules are formed via diffusive chemistry on surfaces of interstellar grains starting at 30 K, and then released to the gas at higher temperatures during later stages of star formation. In this article, we investigate an alternative scenario in which complex organic species are formed via a sequence of gas-phase reactions between precursor species formed on grain surfaces and then ejected into the gas via efficient reactive desorption, a process in which non-thermal desorption occurs as a result of conversion of the exothermicity of chemical reactions into the ejection of products from the surface. The proposed scenario leads to reasonable if somewhat mixed results at temperatures as low as 10 K and may be considered as a step toward the explanation of abundances of terrestrial-like organic species observed during the earliest stages of star formation.

  6. Characterizing Pyroxene Reaction Space in Calcium-Aluminum Rich Inclusions: Oxidation During CAI Rim Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyl, K. A.; Young, E. D.

    2009-12-01

    We define the reaction space that controls changes in pyroxene composition in CAIs and Wark-Lovering (WL) rims in an oxidizing solar nebula. Ti-rich pyroxenes in CAIs record a sub-solar oxygen fugacity (Ti3+/Ti4+~1.5). WL rim pyroxenes in the CAI Leoville 144A have a distinctly lower oxidation state.This difference supports WL rim condensation in an environment of increasing O2(g) and Mg(g) (Simon et al. 2005). We used the following phase components to identify four linearly independent reactions (Thompson 1982): diopside, CaTs (Al2Mg-1Si-1), T3 (Ti3+AlMg-1Si-1), T4 (Ti4+Al2Mg-1Si-2), En (MgCa-1), perovskite, O(g), Mg(g), SiO(g), and Ca(g). Compositional variation in this system is dominated by two reactions. The first is oxidation of Ti3+ via reaction with O and Mg in the gas phase: 1.5 O(g) + Mg(g) → ¼ Di + [Ti4+Mg3/4Ti3+-1Ca-1/4Si-1/2] (1). Pyroxene is produced and En is introduced. The second reaction (2) is perovskite formation. It is observed in the WL rim of Leoville 144A, and experiments confirm that an elevated Ti component converts pyroxene to perovskite(Gupta et al. 1973). MgCa-1 is the third linearly independent reaction (3). They combine to give: ½ Di + x Ca(g)→ x Mg(g)+ Pv + [Mg1/2-xSiTi4+-1Ca-1/2+x](2,3). Unlike (1), pyroxene is consumed in this reaction. The parameter x defines the extent of Mg-Ca exchange. When x > 0.5, WL rim formation occurs in an environment where Mg is volatile and Ca condenses. The reaction space defined by reactions (1) and (2,3) describes the transition from CAI interior to WL rims. WL rim pyroxene Ti contents, [CaTs], and Ca < 1 pfu are all explained in this space. The fourth linearly independent reaction is SiO(g):1/8 Di + ¼ Mg(g)→ ¾ SiO(g) + [Mg3/8Ca1/8Ti4+Ti3+-1Si-1/2](4). Silica reduction forms Ti4+, releasing SiO(g). (4) does not describe the oxidation of Ti3+ in WL rim pyroxene, but (1) - (4) results in En formation directly from the gas phase. This may explain WL rim analyses that have Si contents in excess of those predicted from reactions (1) and (2,3). Simon et al. (2005) EPSL 41, 272-283; Thompson (1982)Rev. Min. 10, 33-52; Gupta et al. (1973) Contr. Mineral. Petrol. 41, 333-344 Reaction space for CAI pyroxene. Pyroxenes plotted using titanium contents.

  7. Complement activation in leprosy: a retrospective study shows elevated circulating terminal complement complex in reactional leprosy.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, N; Hakobyan, S; Ramaglia, V; Geluk, A; Morgan, B Paul; Das, P Kumar; Baas, F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae infection gives rise to the immunologically and histopathologically classified spectrum of leprosy. At present, several tools for the stratification of patients are based on acquired immunity markers. However, the role of innate immunity, particularly the complement system, is largely unexplored. The present retrospective study was undertaken to explore whether the systemic levels of complement activation components and regulators can stratify leprosy patients, particularly in reference to the reactional state of the disease. Serum samples from two cohorts were analysed. The cohort from Bangladesh included multi-bacillary (MB) patients with (n = 12) or without (n = 46) reaction (R) at intake and endemic controls (n = 20). The cohort from Ethiopia included pauci-bacillary (PB) (n = 7) and MB (n = 23) patients without reaction and MB (n = 15) patients with reaction. The results showed that the activation products terminal complement complex (TCC) (P ≤ 0·01), C4d (P ≤ 0·05) and iC3b (P ≤ 0·05) were specifically elevated in Bangladeshi patients with reaction at intake compared to endemic controls. In addition, levels of the regulator clusterin (P ≤ 0·001 without R; P < 0·05 with R) were also elevated in MB patients, irrespective of a reaction. Similar analysis of the Ethiopian cohort confirmed that, irrespective of a reaction, serum TCC levels were increased significantly in patients with reactions compared to patients without reactions (P ≤ 0·05). Our findings suggests that serum TCC levels may prove to be a valuable tool in diagnosing patients at risk of developing reactions. PMID:26749503

  8. Coordination chemistry of semiconductor photoelectrodes: reactions etched n-GaAs with Co(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahams, I.L.; Tufts, B.J.; Lewis, N.S.

    1987-05-27

    The authors report studies of the reactivity of n-GaAs surfaces with transition-metal complexes. Generally, adsorption of metal ions at semiconductor junctions has been observed to increase carrier trapping rates. A notable exception is the improved performance of n-GaAs interfaces after exposure to acidic aqueous solutions of Ru(III) ions and other metal cations, but little information is available regarding the chemistry of these surface treatments. Except for systems in which metal ions act as precursors for the deposition of metals or metal alloys, no information is available regarding the oxidation state or chemical environment of chemisorbed transition-metal complexes on semiconductor electrodes. Possible but undocumented mechanisms of metal ion attachment to the semiconductor surface include electrostatic binding, ligand substitution processes, and redox reactions. To explore the various possible modes of reaction, they have investigated the chemistry of n-GaAs surfaces in contact with aqueous solutions of Co(III) complexes.

  9. Dearomatization Reactions of N-Heterocycles Mediated by Group 3 Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Kevin L; Williams, Bryan N; Benitez, Diego; Carver, Colin T; Ogilby, Kevin R; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Goddard, William A; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2010-01-13

    Group 3 (Sc, Y, Lu, La) benzyl complexes supported by a ferrocene diamide ligand are reactive toward aromatic N-heterocycles by mediating their coupling and, in a few cases, the cleavage of their C-N bonds. When these complexes reacted with 2,2'-bipyridine or isoquinoline, they facilitated the alkyl migration of the benzyl ligand onto the pyridine ring, a process accompanied by the dearomatization of the N-heterocycle. The products of the alkyl-transfer reactions act as hydrogen donors in the presence of aromatic N-heterocycles, ketones, and azobenzene. Experimental and computational studies suggest that the hydrogen transfer takes place through a concerted mechanism. An interesting disproportionation reaction of the dearomatized, alkyl-substituted isoquinoline complexes is also reported.

  10. Spectrophotometric Determination of 6-Propyl-2-Thiouracil in Pharmaceutical Formulations Based on Prussian Blue Complex Formation: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakrzewski, Robert; Skowron, Monika; Ciesielski, Witold; Rembisz, Zaneta

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory experiment challenges students to determine 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) based on Prussian blue complex formation. Prussian blue is formed by ferricyanide and Fe(II) ions which are generated in situ from Fe(III) ions reduced by PTU. The absorbance of this product was measured at a wavelength of 840 nm, after a reaction time of 30

  11. Spectrophotometric Determination of 6-Propyl-2-Thiouracil in Pharmaceutical Formulations Based on Prussian Blue Complex Formation: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakrzewski, Robert; Skowron, Monika; Ciesielski, Witold; Rembisz, Zaneta

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory experiment challenges students to determine 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) based on Prussian blue complex formation. Prussian blue is formed by ferricyanide and Fe(II) ions which are generated in situ from Fe(III) ions reduced by PTU. The absorbance of this product was measured at a wavelength of 840 nm, after a reaction time of 30…

  12. A novel samarium(ii) complex bearing a dianionic bis(phenolate) cyclam ligand: synthesis, structure and electron-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Maria, Leonor; Soares, Marina; Santos, Isabel C; Sousa, Vânia R; Mora, Elsa; Marçalo, Joaquim; Luzyanin, Konstantin V

    2016-02-18

    The reaction of the hexadentate dianionic 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-based bis(phenolate) ligand, ((tBu2)ArO)2Me2-cyclam(2-), with [SmI2(thf)2] in thf resulted in the formation of the divalent samarium complex [Sm(κ(6)-{((tBu2)ArO)2Me2-cyclam})] (). X-ray diffraction studies revealed that after recrystallization from n-hexane/thf complex has a monomeric structure and does not contain thf molecules coordinated to the Sm(ii) center. However, UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy of evidenced the formation of thf-solvated complexes in neat thf. Reductive studies show that complex can act as a single electron-transfer reagent and form well-defined Sm(iii) species. The reaction of with several substrates, namely, TlBPh4, pyridine N-oxide, OPPh3, SPPh3 and bipyridines, are reported. Spectroscopy studies, including NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction data are in agreement with the formation of cationic Sm(iii) species, monochalcogenide bridged Sm(iii) complexes and Sm(iii) complexes with bipyridine radical ligand, respectively. PMID:26818107

  13. Base flipping in open complex formation at bacterial promoters.

    PubMed

    Karpen, Mary E; deHaseth, Pieter L

    2015-01-01

    In the process of transcription initiation, the bacterial RNA polymerase binds double-stranded (ds) promoter DNA and subsequently effects strand separation of 12 to 14 base pairs (bp), including the start site of transcription, to form the so-called "open complex" (also referred to as RP(o)). This complex is competent to initiate RNA synthesis. Here we will review the role of σ70 and its homologs in the strand separation process, and evidence that strand separation is initiated at the -11A (the A of the non-template strand that is 11 bp upstream from the transcription start site) of the promoter. By using the fluorescent adenine analog, 2-aminopurine, it was demonstrated that the -11A on the non-template strand flips out of the DNA helix and into a hydrophobic pocket where it stacks with tyrosine 430 of σ70. Open complexes are remarkably stable, even though in vivo, and under most experimental conditions in vitro, dsDNA is much more stable than its strand-separated form. Subsequent structural studies of other researchers have confirmed that in the open complex the -11A has flipped into a hydrophobic pocket of σ70. It was also revealed that RPo was stabilized by three additional bases of the non-template strand being flipped out of the helix and into hydrophobic pockets, further preventing re-annealing of the two complementary DNA strands. PMID:25927327

  14. Dimeric interactions and complex formation using direct coevolutionary couplings

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ricardo N.; Morcos, Faruck; Jana, Biman; Andricopulo, Adriano D.; Onuchic, José N.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a procedure to characterize the association of protein structures into homodimers using coevolutionary couplings extracted from Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) in combination with Structure Based Models (SBM). Identification of dimerization contacts using DCA is more challenging than intradomain contacts since direct couplings are mixed with monomeric contacts. Therefore a systematic way to extract dimerization signals has been elusive. We provide evidence that the prediction of homodimeric complexes is possible with high accuracy for all the cases we studied which have rich sequence information. For the most accurate conformations of the structurally diverse dimeric complexes studied the mean and interfacial RMSDs are 1.95Å and 1.44Å, respectively. This methodology is also able to identify distinct dimerization conformations as for the case of the family of response regulators, which dimerize upon activation. The identification of dimeric complexes can provide interesting molecular insights in the construction of large oligomeric complexes and be useful in the study of aggregation related diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s. PMID:26338201

  15. Dimeric interactions and complex formation using direct coevolutionary couplings.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Ricardo N; Morcos, Faruck; Jana, Biman; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Onuchic, José N

    2015-01-01

    We develop a procedure to characterize the association of protein structures into homodimers using coevolutionary couplings extracted from Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) in combination with Structure Based Models (SBM). Identification of dimerization contacts using DCA is more challenging than intradomain contacts since direct couplings are mixed with monomeric contacts. Therefore a systematic way to extract dimerization signals has been elusive. We provide evidence that the prediction of homodimeric complexes is possible with high accuracy for all the cases we studied which have rich sequence information. For the most accurate conformations of the structurally diverse dimeric complexes studied the mean and interfacial RMSDs are 1.95Å and 1.44Å, respectively. This methodology is also able to identify distinct dimerization conformations as for the case of the family of response regulators, which dimerize upon activation. The identification of dimeric complexes can provide interesting molecular insights in the construction of large oligomeric complexes and be useful in the study of aggregation related diseases like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. PMID:26338201

  16. Aqueous-Phase Reactions of Isoprene with Sulfoxy Radical Anions as a way of Wet Aerosol Formation in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietsova, I.; Rudzinski, K. J.; Szmigielski, R.; Laboratory of the Environmental Chemistry

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exhibit an important role in the environment. They have implications on human health and life, and - in the larger scale - on climate, the Earth's radiative balance and the cloud's formation. Organic matter makes up a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosols (~35% to ~90%) and may originate from direct emissions (primary organic aerosol, POA) or result from complex physico-chemical processes of volatile organic compounds (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). Isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) is one of the relevant volatile precursor of ambient SOA in the atmosphere. It is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere as a result of living vegetation. According to the recent data, the isoprene emission rate is estimated to be at the level of 500 TgC per year. While heterogeneous transformations of isoprene have been well documented, aqueous-phase reactions of this hydrocarbon with radical species that lead to the production of new class of wet SOA components such as polyols and their sulfate esters (organosulfates), are still poorly recognized. The chain reactions of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions (SRA) are one of the recently researched route leading to the formation of organosulfates in the aqueous phase. The letter radical species originate from the auto-oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the aqueous phase and are behind the phenomenon of atmospheric acid rain formation. This is a complicated chain reaction that is catalyzed by transition metal ions, such as manganese(II), iron(III) and propagated by sulfoxy radical anions . The presented work addresses the chemical interaction of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions in the water solution in the presence of nitrite ions and nitrous acid, which are important trace components of the atmosphere. We showed that nitrite ions and nitrous acid significantly altered the kinetics of the auto-oxidation of SO2 in the presence of isoprene at different solution acidity from 2 to 8.7. The presence of nitrogen-containing inorganic salts strongly impact the formation of novel organosulfur products, whereas no organonitrates were observed. A detailed characterization of these products with the triple-quadruple negative electrospray mass spectrometry (-)ESI-MS/MS revealed oxygenated polar species with C-5 skeleton bearing SO3H (MW 182, 180) and SO2H (MW 166, 164) moieties on the hydroxyl group. The structures of these products were firmly confirmed by comparison of their liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry behaviors with that corresponding to the synthesized model compounds. It is believed that newly discovered highly polar low molecular weight compounds may contribute to the growth of wet aerosol particles by the formation of higher molecular weight species.

  17. Indene formation from alkylated aromatics: kinetics and products of the fulvenallene + acetylene reaction.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2009-08-01

    A novel reaction is described for formation of the polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) indene in aromatic flames, via the reaction of fulvenallene with acetylene (C2H2). Fulvenallene has been recently identified as the major decomposition product of the benzyl radical, the dominant intermediate in the oxidation of alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons, yet it is not presently included in kinetic models for aromatic oxidation or PAH/soot formation. Ab initio calculations with the G3B3 theoretical method show that acetylene adds to fulvenallene with a barrier of around 27 kcal mol(-1). This forms an activated C9H8 adduct that can rearrange to indene and dissociate to 1-indenyl + H with energy barriers below that of the entrance channel. Master equation simulations across a range of temperature and pressure conditions demonstrate that for temperatures relevant to combustion indene is the dominant product at high pressures while 1-indenyl + H dominate at lower pressures. At low to moderate temperatures, the production of collision stabilized cyclopentadiene-fulvene intermediates is also significant. The results presented in this study provide a new pathway to cyclopenta-fused PAHs in aromatic combustion and are expected to improve modeling of PAH and soot formation. The formation of cyclopenta-fused C5-C6 structures is required to describe the flame synthesis of carbon nanoparticles like fullerenes and buckybowls (corannulene). Improved rate expressions are also reported for the 1-indenyl + H --> indene association reaction, and for the reverse dissociation, from variational transition state theory calculations. The new rate constants are significantly different than current estimates, primarily due to a re-evaluation of the indene C-H bond dissociation energy. PMID:19603772

  18. The formation of glycine and other complex organic molecules in exploding ice mantles.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, J M C; Williams, D A; Viti, S; Cecchi-Pestellini, C; Duley, W W

    2014-01-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs), such as propylene (CH3CHCH2) and the isomers of C2H4O2 are detected in cold molecular clouds (such as TMC-1) with high fractional abundances (Marcelino et al., Astrophys. J., 2007, 665, L127). The formation mechanism for these species is the subject of intense speculation, as is the possibility of the formation of simple amino acids such as glycine (NH2CH2COOH). At typical dark cloud densities, normal interstellar gas-phase chemistries are inefficient, whilst surface chemistry is at best ill defined and does not easily reproduce the abundance ratios observed in the gas phase. Whatever mechanism(s) is/are operating, it/they must be both efficient at converting a significant fraction of the available carbon budget into COMs, and capable of efficiently returning the COMs to the gas phase. In our previous studies we proposed a complementary, alternative mechanism, in which medium- and large-sized molecules are formed by three-body gas kinetic reactions in the warm high density gas phase. This environment exists, for a very short period of time, after the total sublimation of grain ice mantles in transient co-desorption events. In order to drive the process, rapid and efficient mantle sublimation is required and we have proposed that ice mantle 'explosions' can be driven by the catastrophic recombination of trapped hydrogen atoms, and other radicals, in the ice. Repeated cycles of freeze-out and explosion can thus lead to a cumulative molecular enrichment of the interstellar medium. Using existing studies we based our chemical network on simple radical addition, subject to enthalpy and valency restrictions. In this work we have extended the chemistry to include the formation pathways of glycine and other large molecular species that are detected in molecular clouds. We find that the mechanism is capable of explaining the observed molecular abundances and complexity in these sources. We find that the proposed mechanism is easily capable of explaining the large abundances of all three isomers of C2H4O2 that are observationally inferred for star-forming regions. However, the model currently does not provide an obvious explanation for the predominance of methyl formate, suggesting that some refinement to our (very simplistic) chemistry is necessary. The model also predicts the production of glycine at a (lower) abundance level, that is consistent with its marginal detection in astrophysical sources. PMID:25302390

  19. Dependence of the enthalpies of formation of glycylglycinate complexes of nickel(II) on the composition of a mixed water-dimethylsulfoxide solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, V. V.; Kovaleva, Yu. A.; Isaeva, V. A.; Usacheva, T. R.; Sharnin, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    The heat effects of the complexation reactions of nickel(II) with a glycylglycinate ion in a water-dimethylsulfoxide solvent in a range of compositions of 0.00-0.60 molar parts of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) (an ionic strength of 0.1 was maintained using sodium perchlorate) were determined by means of calorimetry at 298.15 K. It is established that the exothermicity of complexation reactions rises by the first two steps and falls upon the addition of a third glycylglycinate anion with an increase in the concentration of DMSO. It is shown that the formation of mono- and bis-glycylglycinate complexes of nickel(II) in a water-DMSO solvent is determined mostly by the enthalpic contribution. It is concluded that the formation of tris-ligand complexes is more associated with the entropic contribution.

  20. Universal reaction mechanism of boronic acids with diols in aqueous solution: kinetics and the basic concept of a conditional formation constant.

    PubMed

    Furikado, Yuki; Nagahata, Tomomi; Okamoto, Takuya; Sugaya, Tomoaki; Iwatsuki, Satoshi; Inamo, Masahiko; Takagi, Hideo D; Odani, Akira; Ishihara, Koji

    2014-10-01

    To establish a detailed reaction mechanism for the condensation between a boronic acid, RB(OH)2, and a diol, H2L, in aqueous solution, the acid dissociation constants (Ka(BL)) of boronic acid diol esters (HBLs) were determined based on the well-established concept of conditional formation constants of metal complexes. The pKa values of HBLs were 2.30, 2.77, and 2.00 for the reaction systems, 2,4-difluorophenylboronic acid and chromotropic acid, 3-nitrophenylboronic acid and alizarin red?S, and phenylboronic acid and alizarin red?S, respectively. A general and precise reaction mechanism of RB(OH)2 with H2L in aqueous solution, which can serve as a universal reaction mechanism for RB(OH)2 and H2L, was proposed on the basis of (a)?the relative kinetic reactivities of the RB(OH)2 and its conjugate base, that is, the boronate ion, toward H2L, and (b)?the determined pKa values of HBLs. The use of the conditional formation constant, K', based on the main reaction: RB(OH)2 + H2L (K1)? RB(L)(OH)(-) + H3O(+) instead of the binding constant has been proposed for the general reaction of uncomplexed boronic acid species (B') with uncomplexed diol species (L') to form boronic acid diol complex species (esters, BL') in aqueous solution at pH?5-11: B' + L' (K')? BL'. The proposed reaction mechanism explains perfectly the formation of boronic acid diol ester in aqueous solution. PMID:25169423

  1. Synthesis and reactions of dinuclear palladium complexes containing methyls and hydride on adjacent palladium centers: reductive elimination and carbonylation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.J.; Kellenberger, B.; Reibenspies, J.H.; Himmel, S.E.; Manning, M.; Anderson, O.P.; Stille, J.K.

    1988-08-17

    The transmetalation reaction of trimethylaluminum with the palladium chloride dimer Pd/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/ (1) (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane) at -78/degrees/C gave an intermediate, Pd/sub 2/ClMe(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/ (2), which disproportionated at /approximately/ 10/degrees/C to yield the trans-face-to-face palladium dimer Pd/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/Me/sub 2/(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/ (3) and a palladium dimer Pd/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/(..mu..-CH/sub 2/)(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/ (5). The use of excess trimethylaluminum at -40/degrees/C gave the dimethyl complex, Pd/sub 2/Me/sub 2/(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/ (7). When 2 and 7 were protonated, a stable A-frame chloro-bridged dimer (Pd/sub 2/HMe(..mu..-Cl)(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/)/sup +/ (6) and a hydride-bridged dimer (Pd/sub 2/Me/sub 2/(..mu..-H)(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/)/sup +/ (10) that rearranged to the acyl complex (Pd/sub 2/H(COCH/sub 3/)(..mu..-Cl)(..mu..-dppm))/sup +/ (11) and then on warming eliminated acetaldehyde. The carbonylation of 8 (1 atm) proceeded stepwise to give first the mono- and then the diacyl complexes. The diacyl complex (Pd/sub 2/(COCH/sub 3/)/sub 2/(..mu..-H)(dppm)/sub 2/)/sup +/ (13) underwent the reductive elimination of acetaldehyde at ambient temperatures. 23 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  2. Ligand substitution reactions of a phenolic quinolyl hydrazone; oxidovanadium (IV) complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Quinoline ring has therapeutic and biological activities. Quinolyl hydrazones constitute a class of excellent chelating agents. Recently, the physiological and biological activities of quinolyl hydrazones arise from their tendency to form metal chelates with transition metal ions. In this context, we have aimed to study the competency effect of a phenolic quinolyl hydrazone (H2L; primary ligand) with some auxiliary ligands (Tmen, Phen or Oxine; secondary ligands) towards oxidovanadium (IV) ions. Results Mono- and binuclear oxidovanadium (IV) - complexes were obtained from the reaction of a phenolic quinolyl hydrazone with oxidovanadium (IV)- ion in absence and presence of N,N,N',N'- tetramethylethylenediamine (Tmen), 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) or 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine). The phenolic quinolyl hydrazone ligand behaves as monobasic bidentate (NO- donor with O- bridging). All the obtained complexes have the preferable octahedral geometry except the oxinato complex (2) which has a square pyramid geometry with no axial interaction; the only homoleptic complex in this study. Conclusion The ligand exchange (substitution/replacement) reactions reflect the strong competency power of the auxiliary aromatic ligands (Phen/Oxine) compared to the phenolic quinolyl hydrazone (H2L) towards oxidovanadium (IV) ion; (complexes 2 and 3). By contrast, in case of the more flexible aliphatic competitor (Tmen), an adduct was obtained (4). The obtained complexes reflect the strength of the ligand field towards the oxidovanadium (IV)- ion; Oxine or Phen >> phenolic hydrazone (H2L) > Tmen. PMID:21846387

  3. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  4. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  5. Radical formation during autoxidation of 4-dimethylaminophenol and some properties of the reaction products.

    PubMed

    Eyer, P; Lengfelder, E

    1984-04-01

    4-Dimethylaminophenol (DMAP), after intravenous injection, rapidly forms ferrihaemoglobin and has been successfully used in the treatment of cyanide poisoning. Since DMAP produces many equivalents of ferrihaemoglobin, it was of interest to obtain further insight into this catalytic process. DMAP autoxidizes readily at pH regions above neutrality, a process which is markedly accelerated by oxyhaemoglobin. The resulting red-coloured product was identified as the 4-(N,N-dimethylamino) phenoxyl radical by EPR spectroscopy. The same radical was also produced by pulse radiolysis and oxidation with ferricyanide. The 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)phenoxyl radical is quite unstable and decays in a pseudo-first order reaction (k = 0.4 sec-1 at pH 8.5, 22 degrees) with the formation of p-benzoquinone and dimethylamine. This observed decay rate is identical with the rate of hydrolysis of N,N-dimethylquinonimine. When a solution containing the phenoxyl radical was extracted with ether, half the stoichiometric amount of DMAP was recovered. Hence it is apparent that the phenoxyl radical decays by disproportionation yielding DMAP and N,N-dimethylquinonimine. The latter product then quickly hydrolyses. The equilibrium of this disproportionation reaction is far towards the radical side, and the pseudo-first order hydrolysis controls the radical decay rate. p-Benzoquinone rapidly reacts with DMAP (k2 = 2 X 10(4) M-1 sec-1) with the formation of the 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)phenoxyl and the semiquinone radicals. This reaction explains the autocatalytic phenoxyl radical formation during autoxidation of DMAP. DMAP is not oxidized by H2O2 or O-.2 but the 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)phenoxyl radical is very rapidly reduced by O-.2 (k2 = 2 X 10(8) M-1 sec-1). In addition, the phenoxyl radical is quickly reduced by NAD(P)H or GSH with the formation of NAD(P)+ or GSSG. Since DMAP is also able to reduce two equivalents of ferrihaemoglobin (provided that the ferrohaemoglobin produced is trapped by carbon monoxide), electrophilic addition reactions of the phenoxyl radical seem unimportant in contrast to N,N-dimethylquinonimine. Hence, during the catalytic ferrihaemoglobin formation, DMAP is oxidized by oxygen which is activated by haemoglobin, and the phenoxyl radical oxidizes ferrohaemoglobin. This catalytic process is terminated by covalent binding of N,N-dimethylquinonimine to SH groups of haemoglobin (and GSH in red cells). PMID:6324808

  6. Reactivity of Ir(III) carbonyl complexes with water: alternative by-product formation pathways in catalytic methanol carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul I P; Haak, Susanne; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Sunley, Glenn J; Haynes, Anthony

    2013-12-21

    The reactions of water with a number of iridium(III) complexes relevant to the mechanism for catalytic methanol carbonylation are reported. The iridium acetyl, [Ir(CO)2I3(COMe)](-), reacts with water under mild conditions to release CO2 and CH4, rather than the expected acetic acid. Isotopic labeling and kinetic experiments are consistent with a mechanism involving nucleophilic attack by water on a terminal CO ligand of [Ir(CO)2I3(COMe)](-) to give an (undetected) hydroxycarbonyl species. Subsequent decarboxylation and elimination of methane gives [Ir(CO)2I2](-). Similar reactions with water are observed for [Ir(CO)2I3Me](-), [Ir(CO)2(NCMe)I2(COMe)] and [Ir(CO)3I2Me] with the neutral complexes exhibiting markedly higher rates. The results demonstrate that CO2 formation during methanol carbonylation is not restricted to the conventional water gas shift mechanism mediated by [Ir(CO)2I4](-) or [Ir(CO)3I3], but can arise directly from key organo-iridium(III) intermediates in the carbonylation cycle. An alternative pathway for methane formation not involving the intermediacy of H2 is also suggested. A mechanism is proposed for the conversion MeOH + CO ? CO2 + CH4, which may account for the similar rates of formation of the two gaseous by-products during iridium-catalysed methanol carbonylation. PMID:24071892

  7. 'Super Silyl' Group for Diastereoselective Sequential Reactions: Access to Complex Chiral Architecture in One Pot

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Matthew B.; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2008-04-02

    We have shown that the tris(trimethylsilyl)silyl (TTMSS) silyl enol ether of acetaldehyde undergoes aldehyde cross-aldol reactions with high selectivity and the extremely low catalyst loading (0.05 mol % of HNTf{sub 2}) allows for one-pot sequential reactions where acidic or basic nucleophiles can be subsequently added. Various ketone-derived silyl enol ethers, Grignard reagents, and dienes succeeded, generating relatively complex molecular architectures in a single step. This represents the first case where, in a single pot, highly acidic conditions followed by very basic conditions were tolerated to give products with high diastereoselectivities and good yields.

  8. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  9. Peculiarities in the formation of complex organic compounds in a nitrogen-methane atmosphere during hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, M. A.; Gerasimov, M. V.; Safonova, E. N.; Vasiljeva, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Results of the experiments on model impact vaporization of peridotite, a mineral analogue of stony asteroids, in a nitrogen-methane atmosphere are presented. Nd-glass laser (γ = 1.06 µm) was used for simulation. Pulse energy was ~600-700 J, pulse duration ~10-3 s, vaporization tempereature ~4000-5000 K. The gaseous medium (96% vol. of N2 and 4% vol. of CH4, P = 1 atm) was a possible analogue of early atmospheres of terrestrial planets and corresponded to the present-day atmosphere composition of Titan, a satellite of Saturn. By means of pyrolytic gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, it is shown that solid condensates obtained in laser experiments contain relatively complex lowand high-molecular weight (kerogen-like) organic compounds. The main products of condensate pyrolysis were benzene and alkyl benzenes (including long-chain ones), unbranched aliphatic hydrocarbons, and various nitrogen-containing compounds (aliphatic and aromatic nitriles and pyrrol). It is shown that the nitrogen-methane atmosphere favors the formation of complex organic compounds upon hypervelocity impacts with the participation of stony bodies even with a small methane content in it. In this process, falling bodies may not contain carbon, hydrogen, and other chemical elements necessary for the formation of the organic matter. In such conditions, a noticeable contribution to the impact-induced synthesis of complex organic substances is probably made by heterogeneous catalytic reactions, in particular, Fischer-Tropsch type reactions.

  10. Reaction path in the formation of titanium diboride by a magnesium thermite process

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, V.; Logan, K.V.; Speyer, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    TiB{sub 2} was formed by a thermite reaction amongst Mg, amorphous B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} powders. Mixtures consisting of 2Mg-TiO{sub 2}, 3Mg-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 5Mg-TiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} were heat treated using DTA and separately via ignition with a nichrome wire; product phases were identified using XRD. MgO and Ti were products from the first mixture reacted in argon, whereas an incomplete transformation forming Mg{sub 3}TiO{sub 4} occurred in air. For the second mixture, a reaction forming Mg{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sup 6} occurred in air, but no reaction occurred in argon due to deficiency of oxygen. Minor amounts Of Mg{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Mg{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} were detected in addition to the predicted product phases of MgO and TiB{sub 2} for the third mixture ignited both in air and argon. Based on available evidence, a path for this reaction was deduced; Mg particles in contact with TiO{sub 2} reacted to form Ti, which in turn reacted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to form TiB{sub 2}. TiB{sub 2} product particles from the reaction in argon had a more faceted appearance than those formed during the reaction in air. This was interpreted to be the result of glassy B{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface layer formation on TiB{sub 2} particles in air.

  11. Evaluation of Multi-tRNA Synthetase Complex by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Size Exclusion Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Seok; Lee, Cheolju

    2015-01-01

    Eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (M, K, Q, D, R, I, EP and LARS) and three auxiliary proteins (AIMP1, 2 and 3) are known to form a multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) in mammalian cells. We combined size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with reversed-phase liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (RPLC-MRM-MS) to characterize MSC components and free ARS proteins in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T) cells. Crude cell extract and affinity-purified proteins were fractionated by SEC in non-denaturing state and ARSs were monitored in each fraction by MRM-MS. The eleven MSC components appeared mostly in earlier SEC fractions demonstrating their participation in complex formation. TARSL2 and AIMP2-DX2, despite their low abundance, were co-purified with KARS and detected in the SEC fractions, where MSC appeared. Moreover, other large complex-forming ARS proteins, such as VARS and FARS, were detected in earlier fractions. The MRM-MS results were further confirmed by western blot analysis. Our study demonstrates usefulness of combined SEC-MRM analysis for the characterization of protein complexes and in understanding the behavior of minor isoforms or variant proteins. PMID:26544075

  12. Charge-transfer complexes formed in the reaction of 2-amino-4-ethylpyridine with π-electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlQaradawi, Siham Y.; Mostafa, Adel; Bengali, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular charge-transfer complexes (CT) of electron donor 2-amino-4-ethylpyridine (2A4EPy) with π-acceptors tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) and 2,4,4,6-tetrabromo-2,5-cyclohexadienone (TBCHD) have been studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform at 25 °C. These were investigated through electronic, infrared, mass spectra and thermal measurements as well as elemental analysis. All formed complexes exhibit well resolved charge-transfer bands in the regions where neither donor nor acceptors have any absorption. The obtained results show that the formed solid CT-complexes have the structures [(2A4EPy)(TCNE)2], [(2A4EPy)2(DDQ)] and [(2A4EPy)2(TBCHD)] for 2-amino-4-ethylpyridine in full agreement with the known reaction stoichiometries in solution as well as the elemental measurements. The formation constant KCT, molar extinction coefficient εC.T, free energy change ΔG0, CT energy ECT, ionization potential Ip and oscillator strength ƒ have been calculated for these three CT-complexes.

  13. Hard/soft selectivity in ligand substitution reactions of beta-diketonate platinum(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    De Pascali, Sandra A; Papadia, Paride; Capoccia, Serena; Marchiò, Luciano; Lanfranchi, Maurizio; Ciccarese, Antonella; Fanizzi, Francesco P

    2009-10-01

    The reactivity of platinum(II) complexes of the type [PtCl(O,O-acac)(L)] (1) and [Pt(O,O-acac)(gamma-acac)(L)] (2) (L = DMSO, a; DMS, b), with a range of hard and soft nucleophiles such as dimethylsulfide (DMS, b), triphenylphosphine, (PPh3, c), ethylene (eta2-C2H4, d), carbon monoxide (CO, e), pyridine (py, f), and guanosine (Guo, g) has been investigated. Interestingly, the complexes 1a and 1b undergo selective substitution of the chloro or sulfur ligand depending on the hard/soft character of the incoming nucleophile. The soft incoming ligand replaces the softer one and the hard ligand replaces the harder one, giving [PtCl(O,O'-acac)(L)] complexes (1b, 1c, 1d and 1e in the reaction of 1a with L = DMS, PPh3, eta2-C2H4, CO, respectively), and [Pt(O,O'-acac)(DMSO)(L')] (3f, 3g) and [Pt(O,O'-acac)(DMS)(L')] (4f, 4g) species in the reaction of 1a and 1b with L' = py and guo, respectively. In the cases of 2a and 2b complexes, where the pi-bonded acac (gamma-acac) replaces the chloro ligand, only in the presence of an incoming soft nucleophile substituting the soft sulfur ligand the reaction occurs. Equilibrium constants for the substitution reactions were measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Variable temperature 1H NMR spectroscopy studies, performed for the reaction of 1a and 2a complexes with DMS, revealed that the selective substitution of DMSO with DMS takes place in both cases, according to a second-order kinetic law. The calculated values of DeltaH++ and DeltaS++ are consistent with an associative mechanism. NMR spectroscopic characterization (1H, 13C, 195Pt, 31P) for the complexes and crystal structures of isolated complexes ([PtCl(O,O'-acac)(L)] (1) and [Pt(O,O'-acac)(gamma-acac)(L)] (2), L = DMSO, 1a and 2a; L = DMS, 1b and 2b; L = PPh3, 1c and 2c) are herein reported and discussed. PMID:19759954

  14. Charge recombination reactions in photoexcited C[sub 60]-amine complexes studied by picosecond pump probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, H.N.; Pal, H.; Sapre, A.V.; Mittal, J.P. )

    1993-12-15

    Photoexcitation of complexes between fullerence C[sub 60] and organic amines in benzene solutions is known to result in charge separation (CS) and subsequent charge recombination (CR) reactions, which lead to varying yields of fullerence triplet formation. Picosecond flash photolysis studies are carried out on C[sub 60]-diphenylamine (DPA), C[sub 60]-triethylamine (TEA), C[sub 60]-diazabicyclooctane (DABCO), and C[sub 60]-triphenylamine (TPA) systems to find out mechanistic details of the triplet formation on CR by inducing heavy atom and polarity effects by using suitable solvents. It is found that in the case of C[sub 60]-DPA, C[sub 60]-TEA, and C[sub 60]-DABCO systems proton transfer from the amine cation to the C[sub 60] anion in the ion pair state dominates, leading to poor triplet yields, which improve in heavy atom containing solvents. In TPA, proton transfer is not possible and hence fullerene triplet yields are high. Increase of solvent polarity for this system results in decreased C[sub 60] triplet yields with a consequent increase in the ion dissociation yield. A suitable reaction scheme is proposed to explain the results obtained. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Observation of 1,3-diketones formation in the reaction of bulky acyl chlorides with methyllithium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Nianfa; Yang, Liwen

    2012-01-01

    The formation of 1,3-diketones was observed in the reactions of bulky acyl chlorides with methyllithium. The reaction products depend on the steric hindrance around the carbonyl group of the acyl chloride and the electronic effect of the group(s) linked to the carbonyl. When the steric hindrance around the carbonyl group of the acyl chloride is big enough, the 1,3-diketone is the only product. In the case of the moderate hindrance around the carbonyl group of the acyl chloride, a moderate yield of 1,3-diketone is obtained and some tertiary alcohol is generated. When there is no steric hindrance around the carbonyl group of the acyl chloride, the tertiary alcohol is the only product. When the steric hindrance around the carbonyl group is moderate and an electron-donating group is connected to the carbonyl of the acyl chloride, all three products--ketone, 1,3-diketone and tertiary alcohol--can be isolated from the reaction mixture after long reaction times. PMID:22643352

  16. Pressure dependent product formation in the photochemically initiated allyl + allyl reaction.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Lars; Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Nothdurft, Jörg; Zeuch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Photochemically driven reactions involving unsaturated radicals produce a thick global layer of organic haze on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. The allyl radical self-reaction is an example for this type of chemistry and was examined at room temperature from an experimental and kinetic modelling perspective. The experiments were performed in a static reactor with a volume of 5 L under wall free conditions. The allyl radicals were produced from laser flash photolysis of three different precursors allyl bromide (C3H5Br), allyl chloride (C3H5Cl), and 1,5-hexadiene (CH2CH(CH2)2CHCH2) at 193 nm. Stable products were identified by their characteristic vibrational modes and quantified using FTIR spectroscopy. In addition to the (re-) combination pathway C3H5+C3H5 → C6H10 we found at low pressures around 1 mbar the highest final product yields for allene and propene for the precursor C3H5Br. A kinetic analysis indicates that the end product formation is influenced by specific reaction kinetics of photochemically activated allyl radicals. Above 10 mbar the (re-) combination pathway becomes dominant. These findings exemplify the specificities of reaction kinetics involving chemically activated species, which for certain conditions cannot be simply deduced from combustion kinetics or atmospheric chemistry on Earth. PMID:24192913

  17. The formation and study of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Bobby; Sarin, Sam; Smith, Laverne; Wilson, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Research involves the preparation and characterization of a series of Ti, Zr, Hf, TiO, and HfO complexes using the poly(pyrazole) borates as ligands. The study will provide increased understanding of the decomposition of these coordination compounds which may lead to the production of molecular oxygen on the Moon from lunar materials such as ilmenite and rutile. The model compounds are investigated under reducing conditions of molecular hydrogen by use of a high temperature/pressure stainless steel autoclave reactor and by thermogravimetric analysis.

  18. Synthesis, Mechanism of Formation, and Catalytic Activity of Xantphos Nickel π-Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Staudaher, Nicholas D.; Stolley, Ryan M.; Louie, Janis

    2015-01-01

    A general synthetic route to the first Xantphos nickel alkyne and alkene complexes has been discovered. Various Ni complexes were prepared and characterized. NMR experiments indicate benzonitrile undergoes ligand exchange with a Xantphos ligand of (Xant)2Ni, a compound that was previously believed to be unreactive. The Ni π-complexes were also shown to be catalytically competent in cross coupling and cycloaddition reactions. (Xant)2Ni is also catalytically active for these reactions when activated by a nitrile or coordinating solvent. PMID:25356514

  19. Regioselective Intermolecular Coupling Reaction of Arylketones and Alkenes Involving C-H Bond Activation Catalyzed by an In-Situ Formed Cationic Ruthenium-Hydride Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae S.; Lee, Do W.

    2009-01-01

    The cationic ruthenium-hydride complex, formed in-situ from the treatment of the tetranuclear ruthenium-hydride complex {[(PCy3)(CO)RuH]4(μ4-O)(μ3-OH)(μ2-OH)} with HBF4·OEt2, was found to be a highly effective catalyst for the intermolecular coupling reaction of arylketones and 1-alkenes to give the substituted indene and ortho-C–H insertion products. The formation of the indene products was resulted from the initial alkene isomerization followed by regioselective ortho-C–H insertion of 2-alkene and the dehydrative cyclization. The preliminary mechanistic studies revealed a rapid and reversible ortho-C–H bond activation followed by the rate-limiting C–C bond formation step for the coupling reaction. PMID:20161548

  20. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26731734

  1. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  2. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26731734

  3. Scale-Dependent Rates of Uranyl Surface Complexation Reaction in Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.; Zhu, Weihuang

    2013-03-15

    Scale-dependency of uranyl[U(VI)] surface complexation rates was investigated in stirred flow-cell and column systems using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment from the US Department of Energy, Hanford site, WA. The experimental results were used to estimate the apparent rate of U(VI) surface complexation at the grain-scale and in porous media. Numerical simulations using molecular, pore-scale, and continuum models were performed to provide insights into and to estimate the rate constants of U(VI) surface complexation at the different scales. The results showed that the grain-scale rate constant of U(VI) surface complexation was over 3 to 10 orders of magnitude smaller, dependent on the temporal scale, than the rate constant calculated using the molecular simulations. The grain-scale rate was faster initially and slower with time, showing the temporal scale-dependency. The largest rate constant at the grain-scale decreased additional 2 orders of magnitude when the rate was scaled to the porous media in the column. The scaling effect from the grain-scale to the porous media became less important for the slower sorption sites. Pore-scale simulations revealed the importance of coupled mass transport and reactions in both intragranular and inter-granular domains, which caused both spatial and temporal dependence of U(VI) surface complexation rates in the sediment. Pore-scale simulations also revealed a new rate-limiting mechanism in the intragranular porous domains that the rate of coupled diffusion and surface complexation reaction was slower than either process alone. The results provided important implications for developing models to scale geochemical/biogeochemical reactions.

  4. The complex interplay between semantics and grammar in impression formation.

    PubMed

    Shreves, Wyley B; Hart, William; Adams, John M; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to bridge findings showing that (a) describing a person's behavior with the perfective verb aspect (did), compared to the imperfective aspect (was doing), increases processing of semantic knowledge unrelated to the target's action such as stereotypes and (b) an increased recognition of stereotypical thoughts often promotes a judgment correction for the stereotypes. We hypothesized an interplay between grammar (verb conjugation) and semantic information (gender) in impression-formation. Participants read a resume, attributed to a male or female, for a traditionally masculine job. When the resume was written in the imperfective, people rated a male (vs. female) more positively. When the resume was in the perfective, this pattern reversed. Only these latter effects of gender were influenced by cognitive load. Further, people more quickly indicated the applicant's gender in the perfective condition, suggesting an enhanced focus on gender during processing. PMID:24950389

  5. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

  6. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmore » high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.« less

  7. The sol gel synthesis of perovskites by an EDTA/citrate complexing method involves nanoscale solid state reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhoff, A.; Arnold, M.; Martynczuk, J.; Gesing, Th. M.; Wang, H.

    2008-06-01

    Nowadays, sol-gel procedures are well established in the synthesis of complex oxides as they allow to obtain phase pure products and to control precisely their stoichiometry. This quality makes them a tool of choice for the preparation of perovskite-type oxides. To optimize the functional properties of these materials, it is essential to set accurately their possible complex stoichiometries. However, details of the formation of the perovskite crystal remain obscure. Different stages of an ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA)/citrate-gel based synthesis process for mixed conducting (Ba 0.5Sr 0.5)(Fe 0.8Zn 0.2)O 3- δ of cubic perovskite structure are elucidated. The combination of analytical transmission electron microscopy with X-ray diffraction reveals that the perovskite-type oxide is formed already at moderate temperatures at around 700 °C via nanoscale solid state reactions between finely-dispersed crystalline intermediates identified as a spinel and a carbonate. The reaction scheme, however, is intricate and includes stuffed tridymite structures as transient phases. The ultrafine intermixing of extremely small reactants makes EDTA/citrate-gel based procedures superior to classical solid state routes with respect to applications that demand phase purity and stoichiometry control.

  8. Synthesis and structures of ruthenium–NHC complexes and their catalysis in hydrogen transfer reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Lu, Chunxin; Zheng, Qing; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ruthenium complexes [Ru(L1)2(CH3CN)2](PF6)2 (1), [RuL1(CH3CN)4](PF6)2 (2) and [RuL2(CH3CN)3](PF6)2 (3) (L1= 3-methyl-1-(pyrimidine-2-yl)imidazolylidene, L2 = 1,3-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)benzimidazolylidene) were obtained through a transmetallation reaction of the corresponding nickel–NHC complexes with [Ru(p-cymene)2Cl2]2 in refluxing acetonitrile solution. The crystal structures of three complexes determined by X-ray analyses show that the central Ru(II) atoms are coordinated by pyrimidine- or pyridine-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene and acetonitrile ligands displaying the typical octahedral geometry. The reaction of [RuL1(CH3CN)4](PF6)2 with triphenylphosphine and 1,10-phenanthroline resulted in the substitution of one and two coordinated acetonitrile ligands and afforded [RuL1(PPh3)(CH3CN)3](PF6)2 (4) and [RuL1(phen)(CH3CN)2](PF6)2 (5), respectively. The molecular structures of the complexes 4 and 5 were also studied by X-ray diffraction analysis. These ruthenium complexes have proven to be efficient catalysts for transfer hydrogenation of various ketones. PMID:26664598

  9. In vitro surface reaction layer formation and dissolution of calcium phosphate cement-bioactive glass composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changsheng; Chen, Chien-Wen; Ducheyne, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Composites of hydrated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and bioactive glass (BG) containing Si were immersed in vitro to study the effect of chemical composition on surface reaction layer formation and dissolution/precipitation behavior. The solutions used were 0.05 M tris hydroxymethyl aminomethane/HCl (tris buffer), tris buffer supplemented with plasma electrolyte (TE) with pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C, and this solution complemented with 10% newborn bovine serum (TES). The post-immersion solutions were analyzed for changes in Ca, PO(4) and Si concentrations. The reacted surfaces were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The sample weight variations after immersion were also determined. The results showed that the composition of the bioactive composite CPCs greatly affected their behavior in solution and the formation of apatite bioactive surface reaction layers. After immersion in the TE solution, Ca ions were taken up by all samples during the entire immersion duration. Initially, the P ion concentration increased sharply, and then decreased. This reaction pattern reveals the formation of an amorphous calcium phosphate layer on the surface of these composite CPCs. FTIR revealed that the layer was, in fact, poorly crystallized Ca-deficient carbonate apatite. The thickness of the layer was 12-14 microm and it was composed of rod-like apatite with directional arrangement. For immersion in the TES solution, the Ca and Si ion concentrations showed a similar behavior to that in TE, but the release rate of Si ions was higher. FTIR revealed that after TES immersion, not only did the typical, poorly crystallized, Ca-deficient carbonated apatite form, as it did in TE, but also the serum proteins co-adsorbed on the surface and thereby affected the surface reaction layer formation. A thinner apatite layer was formed and was composed of a micro-porous layer comprising rounded particles in a glue-like matrix. The addition of BG to the CPCs to create composite CPCs obviously is at the basis of this altered behavior of the cements. All data combined are useful for the design and optimization of degradable implant materials for use in bone tissue repair and regeneration procedures. PMID:18689928

  10. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociation Reactions of Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.; Gibson, John K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-12-03

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass-spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structure of "hypercoordinated" species and the energetics of water-elimination reactions of uranyl acetone complexes observed in earlier work (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). It is shown that the "hypercoordinated" species contain diacetone alcohol ligands bonded in either bidentate or monodentate fashion, which are indistinguishable from (acetone)2 in mass spectrometry. Calculations confirm that four diacetone ligands can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to form mesityl oxide ligands and alkoxide species through the elimination of water, providing an explanation for the observed water-elimination reactions.

  11. Boron-selective reactions as powerful tools for modular synthesis of diverse complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Pengfei

    2015-12-21

    In the context of modular and rapid construction of molecular diversity and complexity for applications in organic synthesis, biomedical and materials sciences, a generally useful strategy has emerged based on boron-selective chemical transformations. In the last decade, these types of reactions have evolved from proof-of-concept to some advanced applications in the efficient preparation of complex natural products and even automated precise manufacturing on the molecular level. These advances have shown the great potential of boron-selective reactions in simplifying synthetic design and experimental operations, and should inspire new developments in related chemical and technological areas. This tutorial review will highlight the original contributions and representative advances in this emerging field. PMID:26393673

  12. Multiple Q-Cycle Bypass Reactions at the Qo Site of the Cytochiome bc(1) Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Florian L.; Crofts, Antony R.; Kramer, David M.

    2002-05-25

    The cytochrome (cyt) bc1 complex is central to energy transduction in many species. Most investigators now accept a modified Q-cycle as the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme. Several thermodynamically favorable side reactions must be minimized for efficient functioning of the Q-cycle. Among these, reduction of oxygen by the Qo site semiquinone to produce superoxide is of special pathobiological interest. These superoxide-producing bypass reactions are most notably observed as the antimycin A- or myxothiazol-resistant reduction of cyt c. In this work, we demonstrate that these inhibitor resistant cyt c reductase activities are largely unaffected by removal of O2 in the isolated yeast cyt bc1 complex. Further, increasing O2 tension 5-fold stimulated the antimycin A-resistant reduction by a small amount (25%), while leaving the myxothiazol-resistant reduction unchanged.

  13. Sharper Graph-Theoretical Conditions for the Stabilization of Complex Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Daniel; Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Across the landscape of all possible chemical reaction networks there is a surprising degree of stable behavior, despite what might be substantial complexity and nonlinearity in the governing differential equations. At the same time there are reaction networks, in particular those that arise in biology, for which richer behavior is exhibited. Thus, it is of interest to understand network-structural features whose presence enforces dull, stable behavior and whose absence permits the dynamical richness that might be necessary for life. We present conditions on a network’s Species-Reaction Graph that ensure a high degree of stable behavior, so long as the kinetic rate functions satisfy certain weak and natural constraints. These graph-theoretical conditions are considerably more incisive than those reported earlier. PMID:25600138

  14. Reaction between CH2 and HCCN: a theoretical approach to acrylonitrile formation in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Shivani; Misra, Alka; Tandon, Poonam

    2014-04-01

    Acrylonitrile (CH2CHCN) was first detected in dense molecular cloud SgrB2. The synthesis of this interstellar molecule is reported to be quite difficult. Therefore, in the present work an attempt has been made to explore the possibility of formation of acrylonitrile from some simple molecules and radicals detected in interstellar space by radical-radical interaction scheme, both in the gas phase and in the icy grains. All calculations are performed using quantum chemical methods with density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2/6-311G (d,p) level. In the discussed chemical pathway, the reaction is found to be totally exothermic and barrier less giving rise to a high probability of acrylonitrile formation in Interstellar space. PMID:25416678

  15. Thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of a zinc(II) tetraphenylporphyrin complex with aromatic amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, N. Sh.; Mal'kova, E. A.; Andreev, V. P.

    2015-05-01

    The processes of the formation of a molecular complex of zinc(II) tetraphenylporphyrin with amines and aniline and pyridine derivatives are studied via calorimetry and IR spectroscopy. Standard thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of zinc(II) tetraphenylporphyrin complexes with ligands are obtained, and the centers of interaction between ligands and porphyrin are determined. In the case of amino derivatives of pyridine, interaction with zinc(II) tetraphenylporphyrin proceeds on amino groups.

  16. Subcellular location for the formation of the retinol/retinol-binding protein complex in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Crumbaugh, L.M.; Green, E.L.; Smith, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Retinol complexes with retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the hepatocyte, however the subcellular location where complex formation occurs has not previously been identified. A model similar to that of lipoproteins formation has been hypothesized. The authors have identified the initial site of retinol/RBP complex formation. Furthermore, the authors have elucidated the progression of the complex through the subcellular organelles. Intravenous injections of /sup 3/H-retinol suspended in Tween 40 were administered to vitamin A depleted rats. After intervals of 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes the rat livers were removed and fractions enriched in rough and smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus were prepared. Extracts of these subcellular fractions were chromatographed on Sephadex G-100. Simultaneous elution of /sup 3/H-retinol and immunoreactive RBP indicated the presence of the complex. The retinol/RBP complex was observed in rough microsomes 2 minute after the injection of /sup 3/H-retinal. The complex appeared subsequently in smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus. The complex was first detected serum around 10 minutes after injection. Based on the data, they believe that the retinol/RBP complex formation occurs in rough microsomes.

  17. Ion wake formation with dust charge fluctuation in complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Saurav; Das, Nilakshi

    2013-11-15

    In complex plasma, the interaction mechanism among dust grains near the plasma sheath is significantly influenced by the downward ion flow towards the sheath and dust charge fluctuation over grain surface. Asymmetric ion flow towards the sheath gives rise to well known attractive wake potential in addition to repulsive Yukawa type of potential. The present work shows that the charging dynamics play a significant role in modification of plasma dielectric response function and hence the interaction mechanism among test dust particulates. The effective Debye length is found to be a characteristic of dust size and background plasma response towards the grain along with ion flow speed. The potentials thus obtained show a damping in strength of interaction in the presence of dynamical charging of dust as compared to that of constant charge dust grains. The result also shows decrease in focal length of ion lensing with increase in grain size.

  18. Synthesis of mono(dinitrogen) complexes of molybdenum. Formation of ammonia and hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.A.; Tisdale, R.C.

    1988-08-24

    The synthesis and reactivity of a series of mono-N/sub 2/ complexes of molybdenum are reported. Reduction of MoCl/sub 3/(triphos), where triphos = PhP(CH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/PPh/sub 2/)/sub 2/, with sodium amalgam in the presence of 2L or L/sub 2/ and with a regulated amount of N/sub 2/ led to the formation of Mo(N/sub 2/)(triphos)(L/sub 2/) (1-5): 1, L = PMe/sub 2/Ph; 2, L/sub 2/ = Me/sub 2/PCH/sub 2/PMe/sub 2/, dmpm; 3, L/sub 2/ = 1,2-(Me/sub 2/As)/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 4/, diars; 4, L/sub 2/ = Ph/sub 2/PCH/sub 2/PPh/sub 2/, dppm; 5, L/sub 2/ = Ph/sub 2/PCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/PPh/sub 2/, dppe. Complexes 3 and 5 were each a mixture of two isomeric mono-N/sub 2/ complexes. Complexes 1-5 reacted with excess HX (X = Br, Cl) to afford varying yields of ammonia, hydrazine, and N/sub 2/ (and some H/sub 2/). Loss of N/sub 2/ occurred readily from 1 when it was evacuate in the solid state to give 7. Five-coordinate 7 reacted with H/sub 2/, CO, and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ in the solid state to form MoH/sub 2/(triphos)(PMe/sub 2/Ph)/sub 2/ (8), Mo(CO)(triphos)(PMe/sub 2/Ph)/sub 2/ (9), and Mo(C/sub 2/H/sub 4/)(triphos)(PMe/sub 2/Ph)/sub 2/ (10), respectively. Reaction of solids 7, 8, and 10 with N/sub 2/ regenerated 1. Structural assignments of the new complexes are based upon /sup 31/P and /sup 1/H NMR spectral data. Triphos is shown to adopt both fac and mer configurations. 33 references, 1 table.

  19. Simplicity in complexity: the photosynthetic reaction center performs as a simple 0.2 V battery.

    PubMed

    van Rotterdam, Bart J; Crielaard, Wim; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2002-01-01

    The photosynthetic reaction center is one of the most complicated molecular complexes. Transducing photon energy to a transmembrane electrochemical potential difference for protons, it is the direct or indirect energy source for virtually all life. We show here that it operates in a simple, battery-like manner, with a maximum potential of 0.20 V. Intriguingly this is only one fifth of the energy of the absorbed photon. PMID:11755540

  20. Search for reaction conditions and catalyst for selective prebiotic formation of Aldopentoses from Glycolaldehyde and Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delidovich, Irina; Taran, Oxana; Parmon, Valentin; Gromov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Formation of organic compounds from simple precursors appears to have been one of the first steps from geochemistry towards modern biochemistry. The Earth lagoons, hydrothermal springs, cosmic dust, meteorites, protoplanetary disk, etc. has been considered as the possible ``reactors'' in which the prebiotic synthesis could have taken place. The finding of reactions and reaction conditions which allow to produce the high yields of the biologically relevant substances from simple compounds could help us to verify different hypothesis of plausible prebotic conditions. In this work we have studied the formation of vitally important sugars, namely aldopentoses (ribose, xylose, lyxose and arabinose), from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde over catalysts. Aldopentoses nowadays play the important roles as the components of polysaccharides, glycosides, nucleic acids and ATP. Glycolaldehyde is the simplest monosaccharide, which was found in the interstellar space [1], where it could be generated as a result of several processes, for instance, condensation of formaldehyde under UV-radiation [2]. In this work the peculiarities of interaction between glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde in the presence of soluble (phosphate and borate buffers) and solid (minerals apatite and montmorillonites) catalysts were studied. The dependences of composition of the reaction products on the catalyst nature, molar ratio of substrates, pH value of reaction mixture were revealed. The yields of aldopentoses amount to ca. 60-65% in the presence of borate catalyst under optimized reaction conditions. Borate acts not only as a catalyst, but also as the stabilizer of active intermediates and aldopentoses from side reactions [3]. Borates are present in some mineral and clays (serpentine, montmorillonite etc.) and in water of Cityhot springs (Geyser valley, placeKamchatka) in rather high concentrations. Therefore catalysis by borates could be considered as plausible prebotic condition. Acknowledgements. We thank Dr. S. Yashnik for providing the montmorillonite clays. The financial support of Program RAS (program ``Origin of biosphere and evolution biogeology systems'') is gratefully acknowledged. Hollis, J., Jewell, P., Lovas, F., et al., The Astrophysical Journal. 613, L45--L48, 2004 Pestunova, O., Simonov, A., Snytnikov, V., et al., Adv. Space Res. 36/2, 214-219, 2005. Ricardo, A., Carrigan, M.A., Olcott, A.N., Benner, S.A. Science. 303, 5655, 196, 2004.

  1. Oligomer Formation Reactions of Criegee Intermediates in the Ozonolysis of Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Inomata, S.; Hirokawa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a substantial fraction of atmospheric fine particulate matters and has an effect on visibility, climate and human health. One of the major oxidizing processes leading to SOA formation is an ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons (UHCs).[1] Despite of its importance, the contribution of the ozonolysis of UHCs to the SOA formation in the troposphere is not sufficiently understood due to a lack of information on reaction pathways to produce low volatile compounds. While many studies have previously been focused on SOA formation from the ozonolysis of large UHCs, SOA formation from the ozonolysis of UHCs with less than six carbon atoms have been rarely investigated because their products are expected to be too volatile to contribute to the SOA formation. Very recently, a few studies have reported the SOA formation from the ozonolysis of such small UHCs but chemical mechanisms are still unclear. [2-4] In order to understand SOA formation from the ozonolysis of the small UHCs, this study investigated gas- and particle-phase products in laboratory experiments with a Teflon bag using a negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) with chloride ion transfer for chemical ionization. This technique is suitable for analysis of compounds such as carboxylic acids and hydroperoxides expected to be produced in the ozonolysis of UHCs with less fragmentation, high selectivity, and high sensitivity. In the particle-phase analysis, SOAs collected on a PTFE filter were heated, and thermally desorbed compounds were analyzed. In the gas-phase analysis, series of peaks with an interval of a mass-to-charge ratio equal to the molecular weight of a Criegee intermediate formed in their ozonolysis were observed. These peaks were attributed to oligomeric hydroperoxides composed of Criegee intermediates as a chain unit. These oligomeric hydroperoxides were also observed in the particle-phase analysis, indicating that the oligomeric hydroperoxides of low volatility formed in the gas phase are partitioned into the particle phase to contribute to the SOA formation. Here, we propose a new oligomer formation mechanism including sequential addition of Criegee intermediates to hydroperoxides. REFERENCE: (1)Kroll, J. H.; Seinfeld, J. H. Chemistry of Secondary Organic Aerosol: Formation and Evolution of Low-Volatility Organics in the Atmosphere. Atmos. Environ. 2008, 42, 3593-3624. (2)Sadezky, A.; Chaimbault, P.; Mellouki, A.; Roempp, A.; Winterhalter, R.; Le Bras, G.; Moortgat, G. K. Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol and Oligomers from the Ozonolysis of Enol Ethers. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2006, 6, 5009-5024. (3)Sadezky, A.; Winterhalter, R.; Kanawati, B.; Roempp, A.; Spengler, B.; Mellouki, A.; Le Bras, G.; Chaimbault, P.; Moortgat, G. K. Oligomer Formation during Gas-Phase Ozonolysis of Small Alkenes and Enol Ethers: New Evidence for the Central Role of the Criegee Intermediate as Oligomer Chain Unit. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2008, 8, 2667-2699. (4)Klotz, B.; Barnes, I.; Imamura, T. Product Study of the Gas-Phase Reactions of O3, OH and NO3 Radicals with Methyl Vinyl Ether. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2004, 6, 1725-1734.

  2. LBGK method coupled to time splitting technique for solving reaction-diffusion processes in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Alemani, Davide; Chopard, Bastien; Galceran, Josep; Buffle, Jacques

    2005-09-21

    A new approach to numerically solve a reaction-diffusion system is given, specifically developed for complex systems including many reacting/diffusing species with broad ranges of rate constants and diffusion coefficients, as well as complicated geometry of reacting interfaces. The approach combines a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method with a splitting time technique. In the present work, the proposed approach is tested by focusing on the typical reaction process between a metal ion M and a ligand L, to form a complex ML with M being consumed at an electrode. The aim of the paper is to systematically study the convergence conditions of the associated numerical scheme. We find that the combination of LB with the time splitting method allows us to solve the problem for any value of association and dissociation rate constant of the reaction process. Also, the method can be extended to a mixture of ligands. We stress two main points: (1) the LB approach is particularly convenient for the flux computation of M and (2) the splitting time procedure is very well suited for reaction processes involving association-dissociation rate constants varying on many orders of magnitude. PMID:16240048

  3. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au-CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, John T

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au-CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au-CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10(-8) to 10(-4) Torr (dosage up to 10(6) langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au-CO complex formation and diffusion, and Au adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au-CO complex result from the reduced Au-Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au-CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO(δ+)) on Au. Our studies indicate that the mobile Au-CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers. PMID:26754257

  4. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, Jr, John T.

    2016-01-12

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Aumore » adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.« less

  5. Heterogeneous reactions of glyoxal on mineral particles: A new avenue for oligomers and organosulfate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Wu, Huihui; Zhao, Yue; Huang, Dao; Huang, Liubin; Chen, Zhongming

    2016-04-01

    Glyoxal (GL) plays a crucial role in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), because it is highly water soluble and capable of oligomerization. This is the first study to describe irreversible heterogeneous reactions of GL on clean and acidic gas-aged SiO2, α-Al2O3, and CaCO3 particles, as models of real mineral particles, at various relative humidity and without irradiation and gas phase oxidants. A series of products, including oligomers, organosulfates, and organic acids, which contribute to SOA formation, were produced. GL uptake on SO2-aged α-Al2O3 enabled the oxidation of surface S(IV) to S(VI). The presence of adsorbed water on particles favored GL uptake and the formation of oligomers and organosulfate, but it suppressed organic acid formation. In addition, the aging process enhanced the positive effect of adsorbed water on GL uptake. These findings will further our understanding of the GL sink and SOA sources in the atmosphere.

  6. Secondary Reaction Zone Formations in coated Ni-base Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Rae, C. M. F.

    2009-05-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) has been added to the latest 4th Generation Ni-base superalloys to improve phase stability and modify creep life. Various coatings are routinely applied to these advanced alloys to protect the turbine blade at elevated temperature, however, this creates several problems such as the precipitation of brittle Topologically Close-Packed (TCP) phases and the formation of Secondary Reaction Zones (SRZ). The SRZ forms under the plat-aluminized coating of turbine blades and consists of γ, γ and TCP phases growing into substrate by the migration of high-angle grain boundaries. Surface residual stress and chemical super-saturation of alloying elements are associated to SRZ formation. In the thin sections of high-pressure turbine blades this is critical in determining blade performance and longevity. It is essential to know how Ru additions affect coating and SRZ morphologies during exposure. In this study, we focus on the effects of three variables on the SRZ formation: Ru concentration, alloy composition in Ru-containing alloys and surface finish. A series of Platinum-Aluminised superalloys containing 2-5wt% Ru and having various surface finishes was studied after isothermal exposure at 1100°C for up to 500h. The alloys were classified into two groups by their distinctive SRZ morphology. At the lowest Ru levels sporadic formation of SRZ was observed, whilst a continuous SRZ was formed in the higher Ru alloys. EBSD analysis revealed that the latter group have a higher nucleation rate of individual SRZ grains and also showed more rapid SRZ growth. The precipitation of TCPs in the substrate also inhibited the growth of the SRZ towards the end of the exposure further reducing the penetration of the SRZ into the substrate. It is concluded that Ru-additions to Ni-base superalloys are effective in impeding TCP phase formation in the substrate, but increase both the extent and the rate of SRZ formation beneath coating.

  7. Complex Formation History of Highly Evolved Basaltic Shergottite, Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Hirata, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zagami, a basaltic shergottite, contains several kinds of lithologies such as Normal Zagami consisting of Fine-grained (FG) and Coarse-grained (CG), Dark Mottled lithology (DML), and Olivine-rich late-stage melt pocket (DN). Treiman and Sutton concluded that Zagami (Normal Zagami) is a fractional crystallization product from a single magma. It has been suggested that there were two igneous stages (deep magma chamber and shallow magma chamber or surface lava flow) on the basis of chemical zoning features of pyroxenes which have homogeneous Mg-rich cores and FeO, CaO zoning at the rims. Nyquist et al. reported that FG has a different initial Sr isotopic ratio than CG and DML, and suggested the possibility of magma mixing on Mars. Here we report new results of petrology and mineralogy for DML and the Olivine-rich lithology (we do not use DN here), the most evolved lithology in this rock, to understand the relationship among lithologies and reveal Zagami s formation history

  8. Substrate Binding Promotes Formation of the Skp1-Cul1-Fbxl3 (SCFFbxl3) Protein Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Yumimoto, Kanae; Muneoka, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Keiichi I.

    2013-01-01

    The Skp1–Cul1–F-box protein (SCF) complex is one of the most well characterized types of ubiquitin ligase (E3), with the E3 activity of the complex being regulated in part at the level of complex formation. Fbxl3 is an F-box protein that is responsible for the ubiquitylation and consequent degradation of cryptochromes (Crys) and thus regulates oscillation of the circadian clock. Here we show that formation of the SCFFbxl3 complex is regulated by substrate binding in vivo. Fbxl3 did not associate with Skp1 and Cul1 to a substantial extent in transfected mammalian cells. Unexpectedly, however, formation of the SCFFbxl3 complex was markedly promoted by forced expression of its substrate Cry1 in these cells. A mutant form of Fbxl3 that does not bind to Cry1 was unable to form an SCF complex, suggesting that interaction of Cry1 with Fbxl3 is essential for formation of SCFFbxl3. In contrast, recombinant Fbxl3 associated with recombinant Skp1 and Cul1 in vitro even in the absence of recombinant Cry1. Domain-swap analysis revealed that the COOH-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain of Fbxl3 attenuates the interaction of Skp1, suggesting that a yet unknown protein associated with the COOH-terminal domain of Fbxl3 and inhibited SCF complex formation. Our results thus provide important insight into the regulation of both SCF ubiquitin ligase activity and circadian rhythmicity. PMID:24085301

  9. Photocatalytic CO2 reduction with high turnover frequency and selectivity of formic acid formation using Ru(II) multinuclear complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Yusuke; Morimoto, Tatsuki; Koike, Kazuhide; Ishitani, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Previously undescribed supramolecules constructed with various ratios of two kinds of Ru(II) complexes—a photosensitizer and a catalyst—were synthesized. These complexes can photocatalyze the reduction of CO2 to formic acid with high selectivity and durability using a wide range of wavelengths of visible light and NADH model compounds as electron donors in a mixed solution of dimethylformamide–triethanolamine. Using a higher ratio of the photosensitizer unit to the catalyst unit led to a higher yield of formic acid. In particular, of the reported photocatalysts, a trinuclear complex with two photosensitizer units and one catalyst unit photocatalyzed CO2 reduction (ΦHCOOH = 0.061, TONHCOOH = 671) with the fastest reaction rate (TOFHCOOH = 11.6 min-1). On the other hand, photocatalyses of a mixed system containing two kinds of model mononuclear Ru(II) complexes, and supramolecules with a higher ratio of the catalyst unit were much less efficient, and black oligomers and polymers were produced from the Ru complexes during photocatalytic reactions, which reduced the yield of formic acid. The photocatalytic formation of formic acid using the supramolecules described herein proceeds via two sequential processes: the photochemical reduction of the photosensitizer unit by NADH model compounds and intramolecular electron transfer to the catalyst unit. PMID:22908243

  10. A cyclo-P6 Ligand Complex for the Formation of Planar 2D Layers.

    PubMed

    Heindl, Claudia; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Lüdeker, David; Brunklaus, Gunther; Virovets, Alexander V; Scheer, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    The all-phosphorus analogue of benzene, stabilized as middle deck in triple-decker complexes, is a promising building block for the formation of graphene-like sheet structures. The reaction of [(CpMo)2 (μ,η(6) :η(6) -P6 )] (1) with CuX (X=Br, I) leads to self-assembly into unprecedented 2D networks of [{(CpMo)2 P6 }(CuBr)4 ]n (2) and [{(CpMo)2 P6 }(CuI)2 ]n (3). X-ray structural analyses show a unique deformation of the previously planar cyclo-P6 ligand. This includes bending of one P atom in an envelope conformation as well as a bisallylic distortion. Despite this, 2 and 3 form planar layers. Both polymers were furthermore analyzed by (31) P{(1) H} magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, revealing signals corresponding to six non-equivalent phosphorus sites. A peak assignment is achieved by 2D correlation spectra as well as by DFT chemical shift computations. PMID:26711699

  11. A cyclo‐P6 Ligand Complex for the Formation of Planar 2D Layers

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Claudia; Peresypkina, Eugenia V.; Lüdeker, David; Brunklaus, Gunther; Virovets, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The all‐phosphorus analogue of benzene, stabilized as middle deck in triple‐decker complexes, is a promising building block for the formation of graphene‐like sheet structures. The reaction of [(CpMo)2(μ,η6:η6‐P6)] (1) with CuX (X=Br, I) leads to self‐assembly into unprecedented 2D networks of [{(CpMo)2P6}(CuBr)4]n (2) and [{(CpMo)2P6}(CuI)2]n (3). X‐ray structural analyses show a unique deformation of the previously planar cyclo‐P6 ligand. This includes bending of one P atom in an envelope conformation as well as a bisallylic distortion. Despite this, 2 and 3 form planar layers. Both polymers were furthermore analyzed by 31P{1H} magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, revealing signals corresponding to six non‐equivalent phosphorus sites. A peak assignment is achieved by 2D correlation spectra as well as by DFT chemical shift computations. PMID:26711699

  12. Oxidative peptide /and amide/ formation from Schiff base complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehler, B. L.; Li, M. P.; Martin, K.; Fliss, H.; Schmid, P.

    1982-01-01

    One hypothesis of the origin of pre-modern forms of life is that the original replicating molecules were specific polypeptides which acted as templates for the assembly of poly-Schiff bases complementary to the template, and that these polymers were then oxidized to peptide linkages, probably by photo-produced oxidants. A double cycle of such anti-parallel complementary replication would yield the original peptide polymer. If this model were valid, the Schiff base between an N-acyl alpha mino aldehyde and an amino acid should yield a dipeptide in aqueous solution in the presence of an appropriate oxidant. In the present study it is shown that the substituted dipeptide, N-acetyl-tyrosyl-tyrosine, is produced in high yield in aqueous solution at pH 9 through the action of H2O2 on the Schiff-base complex between N-acetyl-tyrosinal and tyrosine and that a great variety of N-acyl amino acids are formed from amino acids and aliphatic aldehydes under similar conditions.

  13. An illustration of the complexity of continent formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    It was pointed out that a consensus may be emerging in crustal growth models, considering the clustering of most growth curves and their uncertainties. Curves most distant from this clustering represent models involving extensive recycling of continental material back into the mantle, but the author wondered if geochemical signatures for this would be recognizable considering the lack of evidence from seismic tomography for discrete mantle reservoirs, and the likelihood of core-mantle interaction based on recent high pressure experiments. Unreactivated Archean rocks represent only 2 percent of present continental area, and the author was uncomfortable about basing inferences on what the early Earth was like on such a small amount of information. He feels that the hypothesis of continental assembly that needs testing is that of banging together of island arcs, such as in Indonesia today. As an example of how complex this process can be, the author described the geology of the Caribbean arc system, which shows evidence for reversals of subduction polarity, numerous collisional events, and substantial strike-slip movements. It seemed unlikely to the author that Archean examples would have been less complicated.

  14. Factors leading to the formation of arc cloud complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welshinger, Mark John; Brundidge, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 12 mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were investigated. The duration of the gust front, produced by each MCS, was used to classify the MCSs. Category 1 MCSs were defined as ones that produced a gust front and the gust front lasted for more than 6 h. There were 7 category 1 MCSs in the sample. Category 2 MCSs were defined as ones that produced a gust front and the gust front lasted for 6 h or less. There were 4 category 2 MCSs. The MCS of Case 12 was not categorized because the precipitation characteristics were similar to a squall line, rather than an MCS. All of the category 1 MCSs produced arc cloud complexes (ACCs), while only one of the category 2 MCSs produced an ACC. To determine if there were any differences in the characteristics between the MCSs of the two categories, composite analyses were accomplished. The analyses showed that there were significant differences in the characteristics of category 1 and 2 MCSs. Category 1 MCSs, on average, had higher thunderstorm heights, greater precipitation intensities, colder cloud top temperatures and produced larger magnitudes of surface divergence than category 2 MCSs.

  15. Interferogram formation in the presence of complex and large deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yun, S.-H.; Zebker, H.; Segall, P.; Hooper, A.; Poland, M.

    2007-01-01

    Sierra Negra volcano in Isabela island, Gala??pagos, erupted from October 22 to October 30 in 2005. During the 8 days of eruption, the center of Sierra Negra's caldera subsided about 5.4 meters. Three hours prior to the onset of the eruption, an earthquake (Mw 5.4) occurred, near the caldera. Because of the large and complex phase gradient due to the huge subsidence and the earthquake, it is difficult to form an interferogram inside the caldera that spans the eruption. The deformation is so large and spatially variable that the approximations used in existing InSAR software (ROI, ROI_PAC, DORIS, GAMMA) cannot properly coregister SAR image pairs spanning the eruption. We have developed here a two-step algorithm that can form intra-caldera interferograms from these data. The first step involves a "rubber-sheeting" SAR image coregistration. In the second step we use range offset estimates to mitigate the steep phase gradient. Using this new algorithm, we retrieve an interferogram with the best coverage to date inside the caldera of Sierra Negra. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Peptide Bond Formation through Gas-phase Reactions in the Interstellar Medium: Formamide and Acetamide as Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH_4+ with formaldehyde and CH_5+ with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  17. Peptide bond formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium: formamide and acetamide as prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-09-20

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH{sub 4}{sup +} with formaldehyde and CH{sub 5}{sup +} with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  18. Formation rates of complex organics in UV irradiated CH_3OH-rich ices. I. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, K. I.; Garrod, R. T.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2009-09-01

    Context: Gas-phase complex organic molecules are commonly detected in the warm inner regions of protostellar envelopes, so-called hot cores. Recent models show that photochemistry in ices followed by desorption may explain the observed abundances. There is, however, a general lack of quantitative data on UV-induced complex chemistry in ices. Aims: This study aims to experimentally quantify the UV-induced production rates of complex organics in CH3OH-rich ices under a variety of astrophysically relevant conditions. Methods: The ices are irradiated with a broad-band UV hydrogen microwave-discharge lamp under ultra-high vacuum conditions, at 20-70 K, and then heated to 200 K. The reaction products are identified by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), through comparison with RAIRS and TPD curves of pure complex species, and through the observed effects of isotopic substitution and enhancement of specific functional groups, such as CH3, in the ice. Results: Complex organics are readily formed in all experiments, both during irradiation and during the slow warm-up of the ices after the UV lamp is turned off. The relative abundances of photoproducts depend on the UV fluence, the ice temperature, and whether pure CH3OH ice or CH3OH:CH4/CO ice mixtures are used. C2H6, CH3CHO, CH3CH2OH, CH3OCH3, HCOOCH3, HOCH2CHO and (CH2OH)2 are all detected in at least one experiment. Varying the ice thickness and the UV flux does not affect the chemistry. The derived product-formation yields and their dependences on different experimental parameters, such as the initial ice composition, are used to estimate the CH3OH photodissociation branching ratios in ice and the relative diffusion barriers of the formed radicals. At 20 K, the pure CH3OH photodesorption yield is 2.1(±1.0)×10-3 per incident UV photon, the photo-destruction cross section 2.6(±0.9)×10-18 cm^2. Conclusions: Photochemistry in CH3OH ices is efficient enough to explain the observed abundances of complex organics around protostars. Some complex molecules, such as CH3CH2OH and CH3OCH3, form with a constant ratio in our ices and this can can be used to test whether complex gas-phase molecules in astrophysical settings have an ice-photochemistry origin. Other molecular ratios, e.g. HCO-bearing molecules versus (CH2OH)2, depend on the initial ice composition and temperature and can thus be used to investigate when and where complex ice molecules form. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions for constructing diverse scaffolds and complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Lu, Hong; Xu, Peng-Fei

    2015-07-21

    With the increasing concerns about chemical pollution and sustainability of resources, among the significant challenges facing synthetic chemists are the development and application of elegant and efficient methods that enable the concise synthesis of natural products, drugs, and related compounds in a step-, atom- and redox-economic manner. One of the most effective ways to reach this goal is to implement reaction cascades that allow multiple bond-forming events to occur in a single vessel. This Account documents our progress on the rational design and strategic application of asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions in constructing diverse scaffolds and synthesizing complex chiral molecules. Our research is aimed at developing robust cascade reactions for the systematic synthesis of a range of interesting molecules that contain structural motifs prevalent in natural products, pharmaceuticals, and biological probes. The strategies employed to achieve this goal can be classified into three categories: bifunctional base/Brønsted acid catalysis, covalent aminocatalysis/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis, and asymmetric organocatalytic relay cascades. By the use of rationally designed substrates with properly reactive sites, chiral oxindole, chroman, tetrahydroquinoline, tetrahydrothiophene, and cyclohexane scaffolds were successfully assembled under bifunctional base/Brønsted acid catalysis from simple and readily available substances such as imines and nitroolefins. We found that some of these reactions are highly efficient since catalyst loadings as low as 1 mol % can promote the multistep sequences affording complex architectures with high stereoselectivities and yields. Furthermore, one of the bifunctional base/Brønsted acid-catalyzed cascade reactions for the synthesis of chiral cyclohexanes has been used as a key step in the construction of the tetracyclic core of lycorine-type alkaloids and the formal synthesis of α-lycorane. Guided by the principles of covalent aminocatalysis and N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis, we synthesized chiral piperidine, indole, and cyclobutane derivatives. The synthesis of chiral cyclobutanes and pyrroloindolones showed unprecedented reactivity of substrates and catalysts. The development of the strategy of asymmetric organocatalytic relay cascades has provided a useful tool for the controlled synthesis of specific diastereomers in complex molecules. This Account gives a panoramic view and the logic of our research on the design, development, and applications of asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions that will potentially provide useful insights into exploring new reactions. PMID:26099943

  20. Chemical reaction mediated by excited states of Si nanocrystals—Singlet oxygen formation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Minoru; Usui, Motofumi; Hayashi, Shinji; Gross, Egon; Kovalev, Dmitri; Künzner, Nicolei; Diener, Joachim; Timoshenko, Victor Yu.

    2004-04-01

    Formation of singlet oxygen in solution by using Si nanocrystals as photosensitizers has been demonstrated. It has been shown that the absorption band of 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF) in benzene centered at 416 nm decreases by irradiating green (514.5 nm) or red (632.8 nm) light if fresh porous Si powder is dispersed in the solution. The decomposition of DPBF was observed only when fresh porous Si was irradiated by light, i.e., without light irradiation no effects were observed. Furthermore, the effect was drastically suppressed if porous Si powder was annealed and a monolayer of oxide was formed on the surface of nanocrystals. The rate of the decomposition of DPBF was accelerated when the solution was bubbled by oxygen gas. These results indicate that electronic excitation of Si nanocrystals is transferred to molecular oxygen dissolved in solution, resulting in the formation of singlet oxygen. Generated singlet oxygen reacts with DPBF (1,4-cycloaddition reaction), forming endoperoxides, which in turn decompose to yield irreversible products. In addition to the singlet-oxygen-mediated decomposition of DPBF, the possibility of direct reaction between triplet excited states of Si nanocrystals and DPBF is discussed.

  1. Photo-induced reactions in the ion-molecule complex Mg+-OCNC2H5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ju-Long; Liu, Haichuan; Han, Ke-Li; Yang, Shihe

    2003-06-01

    Ion-molecule complexes of magnesium cation with ethyl isocyanate were produced in a laser-ablation supersonic expansion nozzle source. Photo-induced reactions in the 1:1 complexes have been studied in the spectral range of 230-410 nm. Photodissociation mass spectrometry revealed the persistent product Mg+ from nonreactive quenching throughout the entire wavelength range. As for the reactive channels, the photoproducts, Mg+OCN and C2H5+, were produced only in the blue absorption band of the complex with low yields. The action spectrum of Mg+(OCNC2H5) consists of two pronounced peaks on the red and blue sides of the Mg+ 32P←32S atomic transition. The ground state geometry of Mg+-OCNC2H5 was fully optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G** level by using GAUSSIAN 98 package. The calculated absorption spectrum of the complex using the optimized structure of its ground state agrees well with the observed action spectrum. Photofragment branching fractions of the products are almost independent of the photolysis photon energy for the 3Px,y,z excitations. The very low branching ratio of reactive products to nonreactive fragment suggests that evaporation is the main relaxation pathway in the photo-induced reactions of Mg+(OCNC2H5).

  2. Coke formation and carbon atom economy of methanol-to-olefins reaction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingxu; Yuan, Cuiyu; Li, Jinzhe; Xu, Shutao; Zhou, You; Chen, Jingrun; Wang, Quanyi; Xu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhongmin

    2012-05-01

    The methanol-to-olefins (MTO) process is becoming the most important non-petrochemical route for the production of light olefins from coal or natural gas. Maximizing the generation of the target products, ethene and propene, and minimizing the production of byproducts and coke, are major considerations in the efficient utilization of the carbon resource of methanol. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol was evaluated by performing simultaneous measurements of the volatile products generated in the gas phase and the confined coke deposition in the catalyst phase. Real-time and complete reaction profiles were plotted to allow the comparison of carbon atom economy of methanol conversion over the catalyst SAPO-34 at varied reaction temperatures. The difference in carbon atom economy was closely related with the coke formation in the SAPO-34 catalyst. The confined coke compounds were determined. A new type of confined organics was found, and these accounted for the quick deactivation and low carbon atom economy under low-reaction-temperature conditions. Based on the carbon atom economy evaluation and coke species determination, optimized operating conditions for the MTO process are suggested; these conditions guarantee high conversion efficiency of methanol. PMID:22359363

  3. Reaction of Sb on In/Si(111) surfaces: Heteroepitaxial InSb(111) formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.; Nakaguchi, A.; Guo, F.-Z.; Ueda, M.; Yasue, T.; Matsushita, T.; Kinoshita, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Oura, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Saito, Y.; Shin, S.; Koshikawa, T.

    2015-11-01

    Sb deposition and reaction on In/Si(111) were investigated by low-energy electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, synchrotron radiation micro X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray photo-emission electron microscopy. The Sb deposition process strongly depends on the initial In/Si(111) phases such as √3 × √3, √31 × √31 and 4 × 1. On the In/Si(111) surface where two phases co-exist, the diffusion of In atoms, which are released by the attack of Sb, modifies the deposition and reaction process of Sb. On a mixed In/Si(111) √31 × √31 + 4 × 1 surface, an InSb(111) 2 × 2 structure with elongated domains initially forms along steps. Then In atoms are replaced by Sb atoms and InSb(111) 2 × 2 transforms into Sb/Si(111) 2 × 1 by further reaction with Sb atoms. Here, the existence of the 4 × 1 phase promotes the formation of larger InSb(111) 2 × 2 domains.

  4. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation During Formation of Macromolecular Organic Grain Coatings via FTT Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Johnson, N. M.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Kopstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of carbon isotopic fractionation of various organic compounds found in meteorites may provide useful diagnostic information concerning the environments and mechanisms that were responsible for their formation. Unfortunately, carbon has only two stable isotopes, making interpretation of such observations quite problematic. Chemical reactions can increase or decrease the C-13/C-12 ratio by various amounts, but the final ratio will depend on the total reaction pathway followed from the source carbon to the final product, a path not readily discernable after 4.5 billion years. In 1970 Libby showed that the C-13/C-12 ratios of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon were similar by comparing carbon from the Murchison meteorite to that of terrestrial sediments. More recent studies have shown that the C-13/C-12 ratio of the Earth and meteorites may be considerably enriched in C-13 compared to the ratio observed in the solar wind [2], possibly suggesting that carbon produced via ion-molecule reactions in cold dark clouds could be an important source of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon. However, meteoritic carbon has been subjected to parent body processing that could have resulted in significant changes to the C-13/C-12 ratio originally present while significant variation has been observed in the C-13/C-12 ratio of the same molecule extracted from different terrestrial sources. Again we must conclude that understanding the ratio found in meteorites may be difficult.

  5. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) bothmore » significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.« less

  6. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.

  7. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang; Liu, Yangang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60-80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.

  8. Effect of OH radical scavengers on secondary organic aerosol formation from reactions of isoprene with ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kei; Inomata, Satoshi; Xing, Jia-Hua; Imamura, Takashi; Uchida, Risa; Fukuda, Sayaka; Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Hirokawa, Jun; Okumura, Motonori; Tohno, Susumu

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the effect of OH radical scavengers on secondary organic aerosol formation, aerosol yields from the isoprene ozonolysis were measured in the presence of sufficient amounts of OH radical scavengers. Cyclohexane, CO, n-hexane, and diethyl ether were used as the OH radical scavengers. The aerosol yield was determined to be 0.002-0.023 for experiments without OH radical scavengers in the aerosol mass range 2-120 μg m-3. Similar aerosol yields were observed in experiments using cyclohexane. The aerosol yield observed with n-hexane was close to that observed without scavengers at 120 μg m-3, but this aerosol yield was slightly lower than those observed in reactions without scavengers in the range 3-83 μg m-3. The offline aerosol samples obtained in experiments with cyclohexane or n-hexane contained oxygenated hydrocarbons with six or more carbon atoms. Aerosol formation in experiments that used cyclohexane or n-hexane as the scavenger was enhanced. This was caused by the oxidation products of the OH radical scavengers, although the increase in the yield could not be quantified. The aerosol yields were 0.002-0.014 for experiments with CO and diethyl ether in the aerosol mass range 4-120 μg m-3. The reaction of CO with OH radicals forms HO2 radicals, whereas the reactions of cyclohexane, n-hexane, and diethyl ether, respectively, with OH radicals form organic peroxy (RO2) radicals. Present results show that the aerosol yield is independent of the HO2/RO2 ratio or that it decreases with increasing HO2/RO2 ratio. Since the HO2 concentration is much higher than the RO2 concentration in the atmosphere, the results obtained using CO in this study will be a good approximation of the aerosol yield from the ozonolysis of isoprene in the atmosphere.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism for formation of enols in reaction of hydroxide radical with propene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Li, Ze-Rong; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2009-03-19

    Recently, enols have been found to be the common intermediates in hydrocarbon combustion flames (Taatjes et al. Science 2005, 308, 1887), but the knowledge of kinetic properties for such species in combustion flames is rare. Therefore in this work, particular attention is paid to the formation of enols in combustion flames. Starting with HO and propene (CH(3)CH=CH(2)), the reaction mechanism involving eight product channels has been investigated systematically. It is revealed that the electrophilic addition of OH to the double bond of CH(3)CH=CH(2) is unselective and the chemically activated adducts, CH(3)CHOH=CH(2) and CH(3)CH=CH(2)OH, may undergo dissociation in competition with H-abstractions. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HO and propene reaction have been evaluated in the temperature range of 200-3000 K by Variflex code, based on the weak collision master equation/microcanonical variational RRKM theory. Available experimental kinetic data can be quantitatively reproduced by this study, with a minor adjustment (1.0 kcal/mol) of the OH central addition barrier. From the theoretical calculations with multiple reflection correction included, the total rate constant is fitted to k(t) = 6.07 x 10(-5)T(-2.54) exp(108/T) cm(3) x molecule(-1) x s(-1) in the range of 200-800 K and k(t) = 7.11 x 10(-23)T(3.38) exp(-1097/T) cm(3) x molecule(-1) x s(-1) in the range of 800-3000 K, which are in close agreement with experimental data. The branching ratios of enol channels are consistent with the observation in low-pressure flames and hence the reaction mechanisms presented here provide valuable descriptions of enol formations in hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. PMID:19231829

  10. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  11. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ˙CH2OO˙) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ˙CH2OO˙ and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ˙CH2OO˙ across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO < CH3CHO < CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10(-4) times lower than the initial ˙CH2OO˙ concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield. PMID:23958859

  12. Sn(IV) Schiff base complexes: triplet photosensitizers for photoredox reactions.

    PubMed

    Grusenmeyer, Tod A; King, Albert W; Mague, Joel T; Rack, Jeffrey J; Schmehl, Russell H

    2014-12-21

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a series of four fluorescent Sn(iv) Schiff base complexes, which also possess long-lived triplet excited states. The complexes absorb visible light (λmax = 420 to 462 nm) and the optical properties are easily tunable without laborious synthetic elaboration. The triplet excited states are not luminescent, but can be observed and followed using nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The lifetimes of the triplet excited states are on the order of 500 μs-10 ms in PMMA matrices. The triplet state energies were estimated via energy transfer reactions with a series of organic triplet acceptors. In addition, the photoexcited complexes react with electron donors and acceptors in solution. These results demonstrate the potential for the development of photosensitizers based on main group elements with high spin orbit coupling constants. PMID:25043697

  13. Ligand Exchange Reaction of Au(I) R-N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes with Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, H F; Vieira, M A; Sánchez Delgado, G Y; Paschoal, D

    2016-04-14

    The chemotherapy with gold complexes has been attempted since the 90s after the clinical success of auranofin, a gold(I) coordination complex. Currently, the organometallics compounds have shown promise in cancer therapy, mainly in those complexes containing N-heterocylic carbenes (NHC) as a ligand. The present study shows a kinetic analysis of the reaction of six alkyl-substituted NHC with cysteine (Cys), which is taken as an important bionucleophile representative. The first and second ligand exchange processes were analyzed with the complete description of the mechanism and energy profiles. For the first reaction step, which is the rate-limiting step of the whole substitution reaction, the activation enthalpy follows the order 1/Me2 < 2/Me,Et < 4/n-Bu2 < 3/i-Pr2 < 6/Cy2 < 5/t-Bu2, which is fully explained by steric and electronic features. From a steric point of view, the previous reactivity order is correlated with the r(Au-S) calculated for the transition state structures where S is the sulfur ligand from the Cys entering group. This means that longer r(Au-S) leads to higher activation enthalpy and is consistent with the effectiveness of gold shielding from nucleophile attack by bulkier alkyl-substituted NHC ligand. When electronic effect was addressed we found that higher activation barrier was predicted for strongly electron-donating NHC ligand, represented by the eigenvalue of σ-HOMO orbital of the free ligands. The molecular interpretation of the electronic effects is that strong donating NHC forms strong metal-ligand bond. For the second reaction step, similar structure-reactivity relationships were obtained, however the activation energies are less sensitive to the structure. PMID:27010796

  14. The reaction of the electrostatic cytochrome c-cytochrome oxidase complex with oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hill, B C

    1991-02-01

    The reaction of the electrostatic cytochrome c-cytochrome oxidase complex with oxygen is measured by transient absorption spectroscopy. The oxygen reaction is initiated by photolytic removal of CO from cytochrome oxidase, using a flash-pumped dye laser. The subsequent reaction of the cytochrome c-cytochrome oxidase complex with oxygen is reported at 550, 605, 744, and 830 nm at different cytochrome c:cytochrome oxidase ratios and different oxygen concentrations. In the absence of cytochrome c the time course of the reaction of the oxidase is well described by a triple exponential process at any of the measured wavelengths. The three processes are well resolved at high O2 levels (i.e. greater than 200 microM), where they reach first-order rate limits of 2.4 x 10(4), 7.5 x 10(3), and 650 s-1. When cytochrome c is added the oxidation of cytochrome a and one of the redox active cooper centers (CuA) are interrupted. The maximal effect of cytochrome c on the oxidation of the oxidase occurs at a c:aa3 ratio of 1. Cytochrome c reacts in a biphasic process with rates of up to 7 x 10(3) and 550 s-1 at high oxygen. The fast phase takes up 60% of the process, and this is independent of the cytochrome c:cytochrome oxidase ratio. The results are discussed in the context of a model in which electron entry into cytochrome oxidase from cytochrome c is via CuA, and cytochrome a functions to mediate electron transfer from CuA to the oxygen binding site. The role of CuA as initial electron acceptor in cytochrome c oxidase is related to its physical proximity to cytochrome c is the cytochrome c-cytochrome oxidase complex. PMID:1846619

  15. DHA- Rich Fish Oil Improves Complex Reaction Time in Female Elite Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, José F.; Esteve, Hector; Pablos, Carlos; Pablos, Ana; Blasco, Cristina; Villegas, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) has shown to improve neuromotor function. This study examined the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on complex reaction time, precision and efficiency, in female elite soccer players. 24 players from two Spanish female soccer Super League teams were randomly selected and assigned to two experimental groups, then administered, in a double-blind manner, 3.5 g·day-1 of either DHA-rich fish oil (FO =12) or olive oil (OO = 12) over 4 weeks of training. Two measurements (pre- and post-treatment) of complex reaction time and precision were taken. Participants had to press different buttons and pedals with left and right hands and feet, or stop responding, according to visual and auditory stimuli. Multivariate analysis of variance displayed an interaction between supplement administration (pre/post) and experimental group (FO/OO) on complex reaction time (FO pre = 0.713 ± 0.142 ms, FO post = 0.623 ± 0.109 ms, OO pre = 0.682 ± 1.132 ms, OO post = 0.715 ± 0.159 ms; p = 0.004) and efficiency (FO pre = 40.88 ± 17.41, FO post = 57.12 ± 11.05, OO pre = 49.52 ± 14.63, OO post = 49. 50 ± 11.01; p = 0.003). It was concluded that after 4 weeks of supplementation with FO, there was a significant improvement in the neuromotor function of female elite soccer players. Key points The results obtained from the study suggest that supplementation with DHA produced perceptual-motor benefits in female elite athletes. DHA could be a beneficial supplement in sports where decision making and reaction time efficiency are of importance. PMID:24149875

  16. O2 reduction reaction by biologically relevant anionic ligand bound iron porphyrin complexes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhra; Das, Pradip Kumar; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Sengupta, Kushal; Mondal, Biswajit; Dey, Abhishek

    2013-11-18

    Iron porphyrin complex with a covalently attached thiolate ligand and another with a covalently attached phenolate ligand has been synthesized. The thiolate bound complex shows spectroscopic features characteristic of P450, including the hallmark absorption spectrum of the CO adduct. Electrocatalytic O2 reduction by this complex, which bears a terminal alkyne group, is investigated by both physiabsorbing on graphite surfaces (fast electron transfer rates) and covalent attachment to azide terminated self-assembled monolayer (physiologically relevant electron transfer rates) using the terminal alkyne group. Analysis of the steady state electrochemical kinetics reveals that this catalyst can selectively reduce O2 to H2O with a second-order k(cat.) ~10(7) M(-1 )s(-1) at pH 7. The analogous phenolate bound iron porphyrin complex reduces O2 with a second-order rate constant of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) under the same conditions. The anionic ligand bound iron porphyrin complexes catalyze oxygen reduction reactions faster than any known synthetic heme porphyrin analogues. The kinetic parameters of O2 reduction of the synthetic thiolate bound complex, which is devoid of any second sphere effects present in protein active sites, provide fundamental insight into the role of the protein environment in tuning the reactivity of thiolate bound iron porphyrin containing metalloenzymes. PMID:24171513

  17. Copper complexes as catalyst precursors in the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Merle; Scholz, Julius; Kronz, Andreas; Siewert, Inke

    2016-04-19

    Herein, we report the synthesis and species distribution of copper(ii) complexes based on two different ligand scaffolds and the application of the two complexes in the electrochemical proton reduction catalysis. The ligands bind to one or two copper(ii) ions and the pH-dependent mono/dinuclear equilibrium depends on the steric bulk of the ligands. The two water soluble copper(ii) complexes were investigated for their activities in the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In both complexes the copper(ii) ions have a N4-coordination environment composed of N-heterocycles, although in different coordination geometries (SPY-5 and TBPY-5). The solutions of the complexes were highly active catalysts in water at acidic pH but the complexes decompose under catalytic conditions. They act as precursors for highly active copper(0) and Cu2O deposits at the electrode surface, which are in turn the active catalysts. The absence or presence of the ligands has neither an influence on the catalytic activity of the solutions nor an influence on the activity of the deposit formed during controlled potential electrolysis. Finally, we can draw some conclusions on the stability of copper catalysts in the aqueous electrochemical HER. PMID:26986849

  18. Positronium formation studies in solid molecular complexes: Triphenylphosphine oxide-triphenylmethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Fulgêncio, F. H.; Magalhães, W. F.; Alcântara, A. F. C.; Windmöller, D.; Machado, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    Positronium formation in triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), triphenylmethanol (TPM), and systems [TPPO(1-X)ṡTPMX] has been studied. The low probability of positronium formation in complex [TPPO0.5ṡTPM0.5] was attributed to strong hydrogen bond and sixfold phenyl embrace interactions. These strong interactions in complex reduce the possibility of the n- and π-electrons to interact with positrons on the spur and consequently, the probability of positronium formation is lower. The τ3 parameter and free volume (correlated to τ3) were also sensitive to the formation of hydrogen bonds and sixfold phenyl embrace interactions within the complex. For physical mixture the positron annihilation parameters remained unchanged throughout the composition range.

  19. ESI-MS and theoretical study on the coordination structures and reaction modes of the diperoxovanadate complexes containing histidine-like ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xian-Yong; Xu, Xin; Chen, Zhong

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the coordination structures and the reaction modes of diperoxovanadate complexes in the gas phase, the interaction between K3[OV(O2)2(C2O4)]·H2O and a series of histidine-like ligands has been investigated by the combination of the electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experimental results proved the formation of both [OV(O2)2L]- (L = all histidine-like ligands) and [OV(O2)2L'2]- (L' = histidine and carnosine only) species. DFT calculations at the level of B3LYP/6-31+G* showed that [OV(O2)2L'2]- is a hexa-coordinated complex, instead of a hepta-coordinated complex as proposed before. The unique coordination mode in the gas phase is for one ligand to bind to the oxygen atoms via hydrogen binding, rather than both ligands to the metal center. The L'2 dimer formation and the maintenance of the hydrogen bonding within the dimer during the complex formation are two important factors that enhance the abundance of the [OV(O2)2L'2]- species. The calculated bonding enthalpy and free energy changes provided an explanation on the reaction modes of the interaction systems, in agreement with the observations of the ESI-MS experiments.

  20. Supramolecular hydrogel formation based on inclusion complexation between poly(ethylene glycol)-modified chitosan and alpha-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Huh, Kang Moo; Cho, Yong Woo; Chung, Hesson; Kwon, Ick Chan; Jeong, Seo Young; Ooya, Tooru; Lee, Won Kyu; Sasaki, Shintaro; Yui, Nobuhiko

    2004-02-20

    Supramolecular hydrogels have been prepared on the basis of polymer inclusion complex (PIC) formation between poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified chitosans and alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CD). A series of PEG-modified chitosans were synthesized by coupling reactions between chitosan and monocarboxylated PEG using water-soluble carbodiimide (EDC) as coupling agent. With simple mixing, the resultant supramolecular assembly of the polymers and alpha-CD molecules led to hydrogel formation in aqueous media. The supramolecular structure of the PIC hydrogels was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, and (13)C cross-polarized/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR characterization. The PEG side-chains on the chitosan backbones were found to form inclusion complexes (ICs) with alpha-CD molecules, resulting in the formation of channel-type crystalline micro-domains. The IC domains play an important role in holding together hydrated chitosan chains as physical junctions. The gelation property was affected by several factors including the PEG content in the polymers, the solution concentration, the mixing ratio of host and guest molecules, temperature, pH, etc. All the hydrogels in acidic conditions exhibited thermo-reversible gel-sol transitions under appropriate conditions of mixing ratio and PEG content in the mixing process. The transitions were induced by supramolecular association and dissociation. These supramolecular hydrogels were found to have phase-separated structures that consist of hydrophobic crystalline PIC domains, which were formed by the host-guest interaction between alpha-CD and PEG, and hydrated chitosan matrices below the pK(a).The formation of inclusion complexes between alpha-cyclodextrin and PEG-modified chitosan leads to the formation of hydrogels that can undergo thermo-reversible supramolecular dissociation. PMID:15468199

  1. Photoinduced electron-transfer reactions of poly(pyridine)ruthenium(II) complexes with europium(III/II) cryptates

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbatini, N.; Dellonte, S.; Bonazzi, A.; Ciano, M.; Balzani, V.

    1986-05-21

    Rate constants for electron-transfer reactions between poly(pyridine)ruthenium(II) (RuL/sub 3//sup 2 +/) excited states and the europium cryptates (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 3 +/ and (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 2 +/ have been measured in aqueous solution by luminescence quenching techniques. The rate constants for a few electron-transfer back-reactions between the photogenerated RuL/sub 3//sup 3 +/ and (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 2 +/ or RuL/sub 3//sup +/ and (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 3 +/ species have also been measured by flash photolysis experiments. The results obtained have been elaborated and discussed on the basis of current electron-transfer theories. Comparison of the results obtained with those previously available for the Eu/sub aq//sup 3 +/ and Eu/sub aq//sup 2 +/ ions shows that cryptation decreases the intrinsic barrier and/or increases the adiabaticity coefficient of the electron-transfer reaction. A plot of the rate constants vs. the free energy changes of the electron-transfer processes shows that the data concerning (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 3 +/ reduction do not correlate with those concerning (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 2 +/ oxidation. Possible reasons for this asymmetric behavior include (i) different shapes of the potential energy wells for (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 3 +/ and (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 2 +/, (ii) different work terms for the formation of the precursor complex, and (iii) different distances of closest approach of (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 3 +/ and (Eu contains 2.2.1)/sup 2 +/ with the hydrophobic RuL/sub 3//sup n+/ reaction partners.

  2. Cellular consequences of copper complexes used to catalyze bioorthogonal click reactions.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David C; McKay, Craig S; Legault, Marc C B; Danielson, Dana C; Blake, Jessie A; Pegoraro, Adrian F; Stolow, Albert; Mester, Zoltan; Pezacki, John Paul

    2011-11-01

    Copper toxicity is a critical issue in the development of copper-based catalysts for copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reactions for applications in living systems. The effects and related toxicity of copper on mammalian cells are dependent on the ligand environment. Copper complexes can be highly toxic, can induce changes in cellular metabolism, and can be rapidly taken up by cells, all of which can affect their ability to function as catalysts for CuAAC in living systems. Herein, we have evaluated the effects of a number of copper complexes that are typically used to catalyze CuAAC reactions on four human cell lines by measuring mitochondrial activity based on the metabolism of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) to study toxicity, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to study cellular uptake, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to study effects on lipid metabolism. We find that ligand environment around copper influences all three parameters. Interestingly, for the Cu(II)-bis-L-histidine complex (Cu(his)(2)), cellular uptake and metabolic changes are observed with no toxicity after 72 h at micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, we show that under conditions where other copper complexes kill human hepatoma cells, Cu(I)-L-histidine is an effective catalyst for CuAAC labeling of live cells following metabolic incorporation of an alkyne-labeled sugar (Ac(4)ManNAl) into glycosylated proteins expressed on the cell surface. This result suggests that Cu(his)(2) or derivatives thereof have potential for in vivo applications where toxicity as well as catalytic activity are critical factors for successful bioconjugation reactions. PMID:21970470

  3. The chitosan-gelatin (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation in an acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Kuchina, Yuliya A; Sokolan, Nina I

    2016-03-15

    The interaction of cationic polysaccharide chitosan and gelatin accompanied by the stoichiometric (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation has been studied by the methods of capillary viscometry, UV and FTIR spectroscopy and dispersion of light scattering. Complexes were formed in the aqueous phase, with pH being less than the isoelectric point of gelatin (pIgel). The particle size of the disperse phase increases along with the growth of the relative viscosity in comparison with sols of the individual components-polysaccharide and gelatin. Possible models and mechanism of (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation have been discussed. It was shown that the complex formation takes place not only due to the hydrogen bonds, but also due to the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged amino-groups of chitosan and negatively charged amino acid residues (glutamic Glu and aspartic Asp acids) of gelatin. PMID:26794762

  4. Kinetics and Thermochemistry of ClCO Formation from the Cl + CO Association Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Kreutter, K. D.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis of Cl2/CO/M mixtures (M = N2, CO, Ar, CO2) has been employed in conjunction with Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) detection by time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate equilibration kinetics in the reactions Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) + CO ClCO as a function of temperature (185-260 K) and pressure (14-200 Torr). The association and dissociation reactions are found to be in the low-pressure limit over the range of experimental conditions investigated. In N2 and/or CO buffer gases, the temperature dependences of the ClCO formation and dissociation reaction rate constants are described by the Arrhenius expressions k(sub 1) = (1.05 +/- 0.36) x 10(exp -34) exp[(810 +/- 70)/T] cm(exp 6)/molecules(exp 2).s and k(sub -1) = (4.1 +/- 3.1) x 10(exp -10) exp[(-2960 +/- 60)/T]cu cm/(molecule.s) (errors are 2 sigma). Second- and third-law analyses of the temperature dependence of the equilbrium constant (k/k-1) lead to the following thermodynamic parameters for the association reaction: Delta-H(sub 298) = -7.7 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol, Delta-H(sub 0) = -6.9 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol, Delta-S(sub 298) = -23.8 +/- 2.0 cal/mole.K, Delta-H(sub f,298)(ClCO) = 5.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol (errors are 2 sigma). The results repported in this study significantly reduce the uncertainties in all reported kinetic and thermodynamic parameters.

  5. Role of load in regulating eIF-4F complex formation in adult feline cardiocytes.

    PubMed

    Tuxworth, W J; Wada, H; Ishibashi, Y; McDermott, P J

    1999-10-01

    This study examined whether cardiocyte load increases eIF-4F complex formation. To increase load in vitro, adult feline cardiocytes were electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulses). eIF-4F complex formation, measured by eIF-4G association with eIF-4E, increased 57 +/- 16% after 4 h of contraction compared with controls. eIF-4F complex formation did not increase on electrical stimulation with 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), an inhibitor of active tension. Both insulin and phorbol ester increased eIF-4F complex formation, but these increases were unaffected by BDM. Insulin caused a shift of eIF-4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) into their hyperphosphorylated gamma-isoforms and dissociation of 4E-BPs from eIF-4E. Rapamycin inhibited 4E-BP phosphorylation in response to insulin but had no effect on eIF-4F complex formation. Electrically stimulated contraction caused a partial shift of 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 into the gamma-isoforms, but it had no effect on 4E-BP association with eIF-4E. Rapamycin blocked the increase in eIF-4F complex formation in electrically stimulated cardiocytes and depressed contractility. These data indicate that cardiocyte load causes a tension-dependent increase in eIF-4F complex formation that does not require dissociation of 4E-BPs from eIF-4E. PMID:10516161

  6. Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from the gas-phase reaction of catechol with ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeur-Tourneur, C.; Tomas, A.; Guilloteau, A.; Henry, F.; Ledoux, F.; Visez, N.; Riffault, V.; Wenger, J. C.; Bedjanian, Y.; Foulon, V.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers (at the LPCA in France and at the CRAC in Ireland). Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer. The overall organic aerosol yield (Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The aerosol yields determined in the LPCA and CRAC smog chambers were comparable and were also in accordance with those determined in a previous study performed in EUPHORE (EUropean PHOto REactor, Spain).

  7. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to determine if the formation of the generally observed layer of large porosity adjacent to the as-nitride surfaces of reaction bonded silicon nitrides could be prevented during processing. Isostatically pressed test bars were prepared from wet vibratory milled Si powder. Sintering and nitriding were each done under three different conditions:(1) bars directly exposed to the furnance atmosphere; (2) bars packed in Si powder; (3) bars packed in Si3N4 powder. Packing the bars in either Si of Si3N4 powder during sintering retarded formation of the layer of large porosity. Only packing the bars in Si prevented formation of the layer during nitridation. The strongest bars (316 MPa) were those sintered in Si and nitrided in Si3N4 despite their having a layer of large surface porosity; failure initiated at very large pores and inclusions. The alpha/beta ratio was found to be directly proportional to the oxygen content; a possible explanation for this relationship is discussed.

  8. Formation of shellac succinate having improved enteric film properties through dry media reaction.

    PubMed

    Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Panchapornpon, Danuch; Limmatvapirat, Chutima; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Luangtana-Anan, Manee; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to improve enteric properties of shellac by the formation of succinate derivative through dry media reaction. Shellac and succinic anhydride were mixed and then co-ground by planetary ball mill. The ground mixture was then activated by heating for various times and washed for removal of excess succinic anhydride. The ground mixtures and the heat-activated mixtures were characterized by physical and chemical tests, including acid value, FTIR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and film properties. The results demonstrated that acid values of heat-activated shellac mixtures increased with the increase of annealing time, suggesting the presence of carboxylic acid moieties of succinate at shellac molecules. The results were in good agreement with the DSC thermograms. The melting peak of shellac disappeared after heating, while melting peak of succinic anhydride gradually decreased, suggesting the utilization of succinic anhydride for the esterification. The shellac succinate formation was also confirmed by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopies. Film prepared from shellac succinate showed improved solubility, especially at the pH of small intestine (5.8-6.7), as compared to native shellac. The shellac succinate film also demonstrated better mechanical property, in terms of increased flexibility. In conclusion, solid-state formation of shellac succinate ester, which had improved enteric properties, was easily accomplished under the concept of "green approach". PMID:18430548

  9. Reactions between vanadium ions and biogenic reductants of tunicates: Spectroscopic probing for complexation and redox products in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.E.; Grant, K.B.; Nakanishi, K.

    1996-07-02

    Several species of marine tunicates store oxygen-sensitive V{sup III} in blood cells. A sensitive colorimetric V{sup III} assay was used t survey the leading candidates for the native reducing agent of vanadate in tunicates (i.e., An-type tunichromes, glutathione, NADPH, and H{sub 2}S) in reactions with V{sup V} or V{sup IV} ions under anaerobic, aqueous conditions at acidic or neutral pH. Except for the case of An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, the assay results for the biogenic reducing agents clearly showed that appreciable quantities of V{sup III} products were not generated under the conditions tested. Therefore, the assay results place new limits on hypothetical mechanisms of V{sup III} formation in vivo. For reactions between An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, low levels of V{sup III} products could not be ruled out because of an interfering peak in the colorimetric assays. For similar reactions between V{sup V} ions and An-1, or an An-1,2 mixture, in mildly to moderately basic media, the product mixtures precipitated as greenish black solids. Analyses of the precipitated V/An mixtures using vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the major products were tris(catecholate)-type V{sup IV} complexes (65 {plus_minus} 6%) and bis(catecholate)-type V{sup IV}O complexes (20 {plus_minus} 4%). XAS analysis of the V/An-1 product mixture also provided evidence of a minor V{sup III} component (9 {plus_minus} 5% of total V), notable for possible relevance to tunicate biochemistry. The combined results of XAS studies, spectrophotometric studies, and EPR studies consistently establish that reactions between tunichromes (Mm-1 or An-1) and V{sup V} ions generate predominantly V{sup IV}-tunichrome complexes in neutral to moderately basic aqueous media. 53 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. FLUID EVOLUTION AND MINERAL REACTIONS DURING SHEAR ZONE FORMATION AT NUSFJORD, LOFOTEN, NORWAY (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullerud, K.

    2009-12-01

    At Nusfjord in Lofoten, Norway, three 0.3 - 3 m thick shear zones occur in a gabbro-anorthosite. During deformation, the shear zones were infiltrated by a hydrous fluid enriched in Cl. In the central parts of the shear zones, fluid-rock interaction resulted in complete break-down of the primary mafic silicates. Complete hydration of these minerals to Cl-free amphibole and biotite suggests that the hydrous fluid was present in excess during deformation in these parts of the shear zones. Along the margins of the shear zones, however, the igneous mafic silicates (Cpx, Bt, Opx) were only partly overgrown by hydrous minerals. Here, Cl-enriched minerals (Amph, Bt, Scp, Ap) can be observed. Amphibole shows compositions covering the range 0.1 - 4.0 wt % Cl within single thin sections. Mineral textures and extreme compositional variations of the Cl-bearing minerals indicate large chemical gradients of the fluid phase. Relics of primary mafic silicates and compositionally zoned reaction coronas around primary mafic silicates suggest that the free fluid was totally consumed before the alteration of the primary phases were completed. The extreme variations in the Cl-content of amphibole are inferred to monitor a gradual desiccation of the Cl-bearing grain-boundary fluid during fluid-mineral reactions accordingly: 1) The first amphibole that formed during the reactions principally extracted water from the fluid, resulting in a slight increase in the Cl content of the fluid. 2) Continued amphibole-forming reactions resulted in gradual consumption of the free fluid phase, principally by extracting water from the fluid, resulting in an increase in its Cl-content. Higher Cl-content of the fluid resulted in higher Cl-content of the equilibrium amphibole. 3) The most Cl-enriched amphibole (4 wt % Cl) formed in equilibrium with the last volumes of the grain-boundary fluid, which had evolved to a highly saline solution. Mineral reactions within a 1-2 thick zone of the host rock along the contact to the shear zones indicate a more complicated involvement of fluids during shear zone formation than described above. Apparently, fluids have been transported laterally from the outer parts of the shear zones into the gabbro-anorthosite along thin recrystallized zones of plagioclase. The fluid that infiltrated the undeformed host rock of the shear zones resulted in formation of Cl-free amphibole and garnet between the primary mafic minerals and plagioclase. A working hypothesis is that narrow fractures formed within the host rock, outside the sheared rock during shear zone formation. During shear zone formation, the central parts of the shear zones were completely hydrated by an externally derived Cl-bearing hydrous fluid. Some of the fluid migrated to the marginal parts of the shear zones and evolved to a highly saline solution. However, during desiccation of the fluid along the marginal parts of the shear zones, some of the fluid escaped along narrow fractures into the host rock of the shear zones. The Cl-free amphibole that formed from this fluid suggests that the narrow pathways of the fluid provided a path for water transport, but acted as a filter for the much larger ions of Cl.

  11. Unraveling organocuprate complexity: fundamental insights into intrinsic group transfer selectivity in alkylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Rijs, Nicole J; Yoshikai, Naohiko; Nakamura, Eiichi; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2014-02-01

    The near thermal conditions of an ion-trap mass spectrometer were used to examine the intrinsic gas-phase reactivity and selectivity of nucleophilic substitution reactions. The well-defined organocuprate anions [CH3CuR](-) (R = CH3CH2, CH3CH2CH2, (CH3)2CH, PhCH2CH2, PhCH2, Ph, C3H5, and H) were reacted with CH3I. The rates (reaction efficiencies, ϕ) and selectivities (the product ion branching ratios) were compared with those of [CH3CuCH3](-) reacting with CH3I. Alkyl R groups yielded similar efficiencies, with selectivity for C-C bond formation at the coordinated R group. Inclusion of unsaturated R groups curbed the overall reactivity (ϕ = 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower). With the exception of R = PhCH2CH2, these switched their selectivity to C-C bond formation at the CH3 group. Replacing an organyl ligand with R = H significantly enhanced the reactivity (8-fold), resulting in the selective formation of methane. Unique decomposition and side-reactions observed include: (1) spontaneous β-hydride elimination from [RCuI](-) byproducts; and (2) homocoupling of the pre-existing organocuprate ligands in [CH3CuC3H5](-), as shown by deuterium labeling. DFT (B3LYP-D/Def2-QZVP//B3LYP/SDD:6-31+G(d)) predicts that the alkylation mechanism for all species is via oxidative addition/reductive elimination (OA/RE). OA is the rate-limiting step, while RE determines selectivity: the effects of R on each were examined. PMID:24422793

  12. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 M(I) compounds often disproportionate into M(0) and M(III). Here, however, we show that the reaction of the M(I) salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [Ga(I)(C6H5F)2](+)[Al(OR(F))4](-) (R(F)=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3](2+)(•){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a Ga(II) compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [Ga(III){(bipy)3}(•)](2+) radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [(I)n(I)(C6H5F)2](+)[Al(OR(F))4](-) leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6](3+), [In3(bipy)5](3+) and [In4(bipy)6](4+) metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In-In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3](3+){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}3 and [M4](4+){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  13. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R.; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 MI compounds often disproportionate into M0 and MIII. Here, however, we show that the reaction of the MI salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [GaI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]− (RF=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3]2+•{[Al(ORF)4]−}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a GaII compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [GaIII{(bipy)3}•]2+ radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [InI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]− leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6]3+, [In3(bipy)5]3+ and [In4(bipy)6]4+ metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In−In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3]3+{[Al(ORF)4]−}3 and [M4]4+{[Al(ORF)4]−}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  14. Synthesis and Characterisation of Pd(II) Complexes with a Derivative of Aminoazobenzene - Dynamic H-1-NMR Study of Cyclopalladation Reactions in DMF

    SciTech Connect

    Curic, M; Babic, D; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Butkovic, V; Plavec, J; Tusek-Bozic, L

    2003-12-01

    Three new Pd(II) complexes, i.e. [PdCl{sub 2}L]{sub 2} (A), PdCl{sub 2}L{sub 2} (B) and [Pd({mu}-Cl)(L-H)]{sub 2} (C), each with two diethyl [{alpha}-(4-benzenazoanilino)-2-hydroxybenzyl]phosphonates (L) bound to either one or two palladium atoms, are synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, by IR, UV-vis and solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR spectra. Complexes B and C are additionally characterized by {sup 1}H-, {sup 13}C- and {sup 31}P-NMR and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS) studies using dimethylformamide (DMF) as a solvent. In DMF solution adducts A and B undergo spontaneous rearrangement into the cyclopalladated complex C. Dynamic {sup 1}H-NMR study of this rearrangement as well as of the reactions of L with PdCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} revealed a complex equilibrium in DMF solutions and enabled the formation mechanism of all involved species to be resolved. The complex A is immediately solvolyzed producing two molecules of intermediate M [PdCl{sub 2}(L)(DMF)]. Complex M was also the first intermediate in the reaction of L with PdCl{sub 2}. Once present in concentration above 10{sup -5} mol{sup -3} M dimerizes very fast into chloro-bridged dimer [PdCl({mu}-Cl)(L)]{sub 2} (D) which undergoes cyclopalladation and converts into the complex C. The formation of C from the intermediate D is clearly demonstrated by the concentration dependence of the cyclopalladation reaction which has order greater than one. Chloride ions, released by cyclopalladation, react with D by splitting chloro-bridge and binding to metal atoms to produce byproduct [PdCl{sub 3}(L)]{sup -} (T). The same species T are formed in the reaction of L with Na{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} whereby a chloride ion is replaced by the ligand L. The complex B undergoes similar, but slower, solvolytic reaction producing M and L while further reaction steps are identical as in the solvolysis of A.

  15. Indene formation under single-collision conditions from the reaction of phenyl radicals with allene and methylacetylene--a crossed molecular beam and ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dorian S N; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I; Kislov, Vadim V; Mebel, Alexander M

    2011-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are regarded as key intermediates in the molecular growth process that forms soot from incomplete fossil fuel combustion. Although heavily researched, the reaction mechanisms for PAH formation have only been investigated through bulk experiments; therefore, current models remain conjectural. We report the first observation of a directed synthesis of a PAH under single-collision conditions. By using a crossed-molecular-beam apparatus, phenyl radicals react with C(3)H(4) isomers, methylacetylene and allene, to form indene at collision energies of 45 kJ mol(-1). The reaction dynamics supported by theoretical calculations show that both isomers decay through the same collision complex, are indirect, have long lifetimes, and form indene in high yields. Through the use of deuterium-substituted reactants, we were able to identify the reaction pathway to indene. PMID:21956874

  16. Formation of nitroanthracene and anthraquinone from the heterogeneous reaction between NO2 and anthracene adsorbed on NaCl particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenyuan; Zhu, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), that is, nitro-PAHs and quinones, are classed as hazardous semivolatile organic compounds but their formation mechanism from the heterogeneous reactions of PAHs adsorbed on atmospheric particles is not well understood. The heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with anthracene adsorbed on NaCl particles under different relative humidity (RH 0-60%) was investigated under dark conditions at 298 K. The formation of the major products, 9,10-anthraquinone (9,10-AQ) and 9-nitroanthracene (9-NANT), were determined to be second-order reactions with respect to NO2 concentration. The rate of formation of 9,10-AQ under low RH (0-20%) increased as the RH increased but decreased when the RH was further increased in high RH (40-60%). In contrast, the rate of formation of 9-NANT across the whole RH range (0-60%) decreased significantly with increasing RH. Two different reaction pathways are discussed for the formation of 9,10-AQ and 9-NANT, respectively, and both are considered to be coupled to the predominant reaction of NO2 with the NaCl substrate. These results suggest that relative humidity, which controls the amount of surface adsorbed water on NaCl particles, plays an important role in the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with adsorbed PAHs. PMID:24950458

  17. Reactivity of Cys4 zinc finger domains with gold(III) complexes: insights into the formation of "gold fingers".

    PubMed

    Jacques, Aurlie; Lebrun, Colette; Casini, Angela; Kieffer, Isabelle; Proux, Olivier; Latour, Jean-Marc; Snque, Olivier

    2015-04-20

    Gold(I) complexes such as auranofin or aurothiomalate have been used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis for several decades. Several gold(I) and gold(III) complexes have also shown in vitro anticancer properties against human cancer cell lines, including cell lines resistant to cisplatin. Because of the thiophilicity of gold, cysteine-containing proteins appear as likely targets for gold complexes. Among them, zinc finger proteins have attracted attention and, recently, gold(I) and gold(III) complexes have been shown to inhibit poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which is an essential protein involved in DNA repair and in cancer resistance to chemotherapies. In this Article, we characterize the reactivity of the gold(III) complex [Au(III)(terpy)Cl]Cl2 (Auterpy) with a model of Zn(Cys)4 "zinc ribbon" zinc finger by a combination of absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism, mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We show that the Zn(Cys)4 site of ZnLZR is rapidly oxidized by Auterpy to form a disulfide bond. The Zn(2+) ion is released, and the two remaining cysteines coordinate the Au(+) ion that is produced during the redox reaction. Subsequent oxidation of these cysteines can take place in conditions of excess gold(III) complex. In the presence of excess free thiols mimicking the presence of glutathione in cells, mixing of the zinc finger model and gold(III) complex yields a different product: complex (Au(I))2LZR with two Au(+) ions bound to cysteines is formed. Thus, on the basis of detailed speciation and kinetic measurements, we demonstrate herein that the destruction of Zn(Cys)4 zinc fingers by gold(III) complexes to achieve the formation of "gold fingers" is worth consideration, either directly or mediated by reducing agents. PMID:25839236

  18. Trichloramine reactions with nitrogenous and carbonaceous compounds: kinetics, products and chloroform formation.

    PubMed

    Soltermann, Fabian; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-03-15

    Trichloramine is a hazardous disinfection by-product that is of particular relevance in indoor swimming pools. To better understand its fate in pool waters, apparent second order rate constants (kapp) at pH 7 for its reaction with several model compounds were determined. kapp values at pH 7 for nitrogenous compounds were found to increase in the following order: ammonia?amides (?10(-2)-10(-1)M(-1)s(-1))reaction of trichloramine with Suwannee River and Pony Lake fulvic acid standards showed a decrease of their reactivity upon chlorination, which can be related to the electron donating capacity and the SUVA254. Chlorinated nitrogenous compounds (e.g. uric acid) also have a reduced reactivity with trichloramine. Hence, the residual chlorine in pool water hinders a fast consumption of trichloramine. This explains why trichloramine degradation in pool water is lower than expected from the reactivity with the estimated bather input. Trichloramine also has the potential to form secondary disinfection by-products such as chlorinated aromatic compounds or chloroform by electron transfer or Cl(+)-transfer reactions. The chloroform formation from the reaction of trichloramine with resorcinol occurs with a similar yield and rate as for chlorination of resorcinol. Since the trichloramine concentration in pool water is commonly about one order of magnitude lower than the free chlorine concentration, its contribution to the disinfection by-product formation is assumed to be minor in most cases but might be relevant for few precursors (e.g. phenols) that react faster with trichloramine than with free chlorine. PMID:25655201

  19. Diffusive leakage of carbon, variable migration rates of solutes, multiple reaction fronts: what happens when CO2 is injected into geologic formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    A complex set processes occur when CO2-charged water resulting from CO2 injection into a geologic formation interacts with the resident formation water and sediment. First, the sequestration efficiency depends on the rate of CO2 injection and sediment texture (porosity and permeability). Second, acid and bicarbonates resulting from the hydration of CO2 interact with the resident water to create multiple solute migration fronts, and also simultaneously induce complex interactions with the resident minerals. All of these features, and accurate mass-balancing, can be achieved using a new water-rock interaction and reactive-transport simulator Sym.CS. Water-rock interaction and reactive transport modeling is an important tool for deciphering chemical and physical reactions occurring in sediments and rocks that are not accessible for monitoring. Traditional models solve a large set of conservation of mass equations written for aqueous solute species. Typically, reactions are solved separately from mass-transfer equations through loosely coupled sequentially iterated numerical algorithms. Resulting simulators therefore fall short of achieving the full extent of the theoretical accuracy and the nonlinearly of the reactive-transport and water-rock interaction phenomena. A new method is presented that uses conservation equations written for chemical elements, and tight coupling between mass-transfer and reactions. Derivation of the elemental conservation equation from the theoretically correct solute conservation equation involves one parametric conversion. The tight coupling between mass-transfer and reactions entails using explicitly discretized form of mass-transfer terms of the conservation equation when solving for the reactions. This explicitly coupled iteration method allows accurate solution of the conservation equations to be achieved. More importantly, this method allows (1) accurate bookkeeping of mass as effluents are injected and reactions progress among various phases, and (2) capturing the flow-reaction feedback that determines the efficiency of injection practice and reservoir capacity usage. The third component of the model is a composite media petrophysical model that allows the monitoring of changing reservoir characteristics as chemical and textural compositions evolve. The simulator Sym.CS, which includes all of above processes, is used to model interaction between CO2-charged water with formation water in sandstone reservoirs. Results demonstrate the utility of the model that preserves the nonlinearity of mass-transfer and reaction processes. Accurate mass-balance is also achieved and demonstrated. The results also show the importance of diffusive properties of highly reactive solutes, as they form one or more reaction fronts ahead of sweep fronts, as well as significant quantity of carbon to leak out of the reservoir.

  20. Accelerating the Computation of Detailed Chemical Reaction Kinetics for Simulating Combustion of Complex Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, R.; Grout, R.

    2012-01-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels has been a very challenging scientific and engineering problem due to the complexity of turbulent flows and hydrocarbon reaction kinetics. There is an urgent need to develop an efficient modeling capability to accurately predict the combustion of complex fuels. Detailed chemical kinetic models for the surrogates of fuels such as gasoline, diesel and JP-8 consist of thousands of chemical species and Arrhenius reaction steps. Oxygenated fuels such as bio-fuels and heavier hydrocarbons, such as from newer fossil fuel sources, are expected to have a much more complex chemistry requiring increasingly larger chemical kinetic models. Such models are beyond current computational capability, except for homogeneous or partially stirred reactor type calculations. The advent of highly parallel multi-core processors and graphical processing units (GPUs) promises a steep increase in computational performance in the coming years. This paper will present a software framework that translates the detailed chemical kinetic models to high-performance code targeted for GPU accelerators.

  1. Insertion Reactions of Neutral Phosphidozirconocene Complexes as a Convenient Entry into Frustrated Lewis Pair Territory.

    PubMed

    Normand, Adrien T; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Wibbeling, Birgit; Kehr, Gerald; Le Gendre, Pierre; Erker, Gerhard

    2016-03-14

    Neutral phosphidozirconocene complexes [Cp2 Zr(PR2 )Me] (Cp=cyclopentadienyl; 1a: R=cyclohexyl (Cy); 1b: R=mesityl (Mes); 1c: R=tBu) undergo insertion into the Zr-P bond by non-enolisable carbonyl building blocks (O=CR'R''), such as benzophenone, aldehydes, paraformaldehyde or CO2 , to give [Cp2 Zr(OCR'R''PR2 )Me] (3-7). Depending on the steric bulk around P, complexes 3-7 react with B(C6 F5 )3 to give O-bridged cationic zirconocene dimers that display typical frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)/ambiphilic ligand behaviour. Thus, the reaction of {[Cp2 Zr(μ-OCHPhPCy2 )][MeB(C6 F5 )3 ]}2 (10a) with chalcone results in 1,4 addition of the Zr(+) /P FLP, whereas the reaction of {[Cp2 Zr(μ-OCHFcPCy2 )][MeB(C6 F5 )3 ]}2 (11a; Fc=(C5 H4 )CpFe) with [Pd(η(3) -C3 H5 )Cl]2 yields the unique Zr-Fe-Pd trimetallic complex 13a, which has been characterised by XRD analysis. PMID:26864796

  2. Accelerating the Computation of Detailed Chemical Reaction Kinetics for Simulating Combustion of Complex Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W

    2012-01-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels has been a very challenging scientific and engineering problem due to the complexity of turbulent flows and hydrocarbon reaction kinetics. There is an urgent need to develop an efficient modeling capability to accurately predict the combustion of complex fuels. Detailed chemical kinetic models for the surrogates of fuels such as gasoline, diesel and JP-8 consist of thousands of chemical species and Arrhenius reaction steps. Oxygenated fuels such as bio-fuels and heavier hydrocarbons, such as from newer fossil fuel sources, are expected to have a much more complex chemistry requiring increasingly larger chemical kinetic models. Such models are beyond current computational capability, except for homogeneous or partially stirred reactor type calculations. The advent of highly parallel multi-core processors and graphical processing units (GPUs) promises a steep increase in computational performance in the coming years. This paper will present a software framework that translates the detailed chemical kinetic models to high- performance code targeted for GPU accelerators.

  3. Low-valent iron(i) amido olefin complexes as promotors for dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Crispin; Viciu, Liliana; Adelhardt, Mario; Sutter, Jrg; Meyer, Karsten; de Bruin, Bas; Grtzmacher, Hansjrg

    2015-05-01

    Fe(I) compounds including hydrogenases show remarkable properties and reactivities. Several iron(I) complexes have been established in stoichiometric reactions as model compounds for N2 or CO2 activation. The development of well-defined iron(I) complexes for catalytic transformations remains a challenge. The few examples include cross-coupling reactions, hydrogenations of terminal olefins, and azide functionalizations. Here the syntheses and properties of bimetallic complexes [MFe(I) (trop2 dae)(solv)] (M=Na, solv=3?thf; M=Li, solv=2?Et2 O; trop=5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclo-hepten-5-yl, dae=(N-CH2 -CH2 -N) with a d(7) Fe low-spin valence-electron configuration are reported. Both compounds promote the dehydrogenation of N,N-dimethylaminoborane, and the former is a precatalyst for the dehydrogenative alcoholysis of silanes. No indications for heterogeneous catalyses were found. High activities and complete conversions were observed particularly with [NaFe(I) (trop2 dae)(thf)3 ]. PMID:25765487

  4. Growth dynamics and intracluster reactions in Ni+(CO2)n complexes via infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, N. R.; Walters, R. S.; Grieves, G. A.; Duncan, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    Ni+(CO2)n, Ni+(CO2)nAr, Ni+(CO2)nNe, and Ni+(O2)(CO2)n complexes are generated by laser vaporization in a pulsed supersonic expansion. The complexes are mass-selected in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and studied by infrared resonance-enhanced photodissociation (IR-REPD) spectroscopy. Photofragmentation proceeds exclusively through the loss of intact CO2 molecules from Ni+(CO2)n and Ni+(O2)(CO2)n complexes, and by elimination of the noble gas atom from Ni+(CO2)nAr and Ni+(CO2)nNe. Vibrational resonances are identified and assigned in the region of the asymmetric stretch of CO2. Small complexes have resonances that are blueshifted from the asymmetric stretch of free CO2, consistent with structures having linear Ni+-O=C=O configurations. Fragmentation of larger Ni+(CO2)n clusters terminates at the size of n=4, and new vibrational bands assigned to external ligands are observed for n⩾5. These combined observations indicate that the coordination number for CO2 molecules around Ni+ is exactly four. Trends in the loss channels and spectra of Ni+(O2)(CO2)n clusters suggest that each oxygen atom occupies a different coordination site around a four-coordinate metal ion in these complexes. The spectra of larger Ni+(CO2)n clusters provide evidence for an intracluster insertion reaction assisted by solvation, producing a metal oxide-carbonyl species as the reaction product.

  5. Inhibitory effects of NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes on prion neuropeptide fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; He, Lei; Du, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    Prion diseases are a group of infectious and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by the conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP) into its abnormal isoform PrP(Sc). PrP106-126 resembles PrP(Sc) in terms of physicochemical and biological characteristics and is used as a common model for the treatment of prion diseases. Inhibitory effects on fibril formation and neurotoxicity of the prion neuropeptide PrP106-126 have been investigated using metal complexes as potential inhibitors. Nevertheless, the binding mechanism between metal complexes and the peptide remains unclear. The present study is focused on the interaction of PrP106-126 with NAMI-A and NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes, including KP418, KP1019, and KP1019-2. Results demonstrated that these ruthenium complexes could bind to PrP106-126 in a distinctive binding mode through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes can also effectively inhibit the aggregation and fibril formation of PrP106-126. The complex KP1019 demonstrated the optimal inhibitory ability upon peptide aggregation, and cytotoxicity because of its large aromatic ligand contribution. The studied complexes could also regulate the copper redox chemistry of PrP106-126 and effectually inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species. Given these findings, ruthenium complexes with relatively low cellular toxicity may be used to develop potential pharmaceutical products against prion diseases. PMID:25856332

  6. Formation of Complex Organic molecules from Formaldehyde Chemistry in Cometary Ice Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvernay, fabrice; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Danger, Grégoire; Theulé, Patrice; Chiavassa, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    There is convincing evidence that the formation of complex organic molecules occurred in a variety of astrophysical environments. Among them, precursors of biomolecules are of particular significance due to their exobiological implications. Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4) and the polyoxymethylene (POM, -(CH2-O)n-) are of prime interest since they are supposed to be present in cometary environments. They are also ones of the main components of the organic residue formed from the warming of photolysed interstellar/cometary ice analogs. In this work, we study the warming of water-dominated cometary ice analogs containing formaldehyde (H2CO). Based on infrared and mass spectrometry measurements, and complemented by quantum chemical calculations, we report that NH2CH2OH, HOCH2OH, and POM are the only reaction products when the ice also contains NH3. The branching ratio between the three products strongly depends on the initial H2CO/NH3 concentration ratio. Moreover, the influence of the initial ice composition on the formation of POM oligomers (HO-(CH2O)n-H, n<5) as well as their thermal instability between 200 and 320 K are investigated. Finally, the implications of these results with respect to cometary nucleus chemistry and their impact on POM detection by the Rosetta mission are discussed. In addition, the mechanism for HMT formation in interstellar or cometary ice analogs containing H2CO, NH3, and HCOOH has been determined by combining laboratory experiments and DFT calculations. We show that HMT is thermally formed from H2CO and NH3 activated by HCOOH. Two intermediates has been unambiguously detected: NH2CH2OH and the trimer of CH2NH (1,3,5-triazinane, TMT). Unlike to what it was previously thought, HMT is not an indicator of ice photochemistry, but an indicator of thermal processing of ice. These results strengthen the hypothesis that HMT and its intermediates should be present in comets, where they may be detected with the COSAC or COSIMA instrument of the Rosetta mission.

  7. Simplified Representation of Partial and Total Rate Constants of Complex-Forming Bimolecular Reactions.

    PubMed

    Troe, J

    2015-12-17

    The temperature and pressure dependence of partial and total rate constants of complex-forming bimolecular reactions are investigated with the goal to obtain simplified and compact rate constant expressions suitable for data compilations. The transition of the reactions from low pressure chemical activation to high pressure association character is analyzed. The two processes are modeled separately first by solving master equations, leading to "inverse" and "normal" falloff curves, respectively, and allowing for a compact representation of the separated rate constants. It is shown that broadening factors of the two falloff curves are different, and those of chemical activation often approaching unity. Coupling of the two separate processes then is modeled in a simplified manner. Finally, thermal redissociation of the adducts formed by association is accounted for. PMID:26334454

  8. Probing Complex Free-Radical Reaction Pathways of Fuel Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan III, A C; Kidder, Michelle; Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F

    2012-01-01

    Fossil (e.g. coal) and renewable (e.g. woody biomass) organic energy resources have received considerable attention as possible sources of liquid transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Knowledge of the reactivity of these complex materials has been advanced through fundamental studies of organic compounds that model constituent substructures. In particular, an improved understanding of thermochemical reaction pathways involving free-radical intermediates has arisen from detailed experimental kinetic studies and, more recently, advanced computational investigations. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent investigations of the fundamental pyrolysis pathways of model compounds that represent key substructures in the lignin component of woody biomass with a focus on molecules representative of the dominant beta-O-4 aryl ether linkages. Additional mechanistic insights gleaned from DFT calculations on the kinetics of key elementary reaction steps will also be presented, as well as a few thoughts on the significant contributions of Jim Franz to this area of free radical chemistry.

  9. Primary stages of photochemical reactions in complexes based on aromatic amines: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Vannikov, A.V.; Grishina, A.D.; Mal`tsev, E.I.

    1995-07-01

    Primary stages of the photochemical reactions of electron donor-acceptor complexes formed by aromatic amine donors (diphenylamine, diphenylbenzylamine, dibenzylaniline, p-dibenzyltoluidine, and triphenylamine) and halogen-containing acceptors are considered. A series of experimental results is explained in terms of the concept that an excited state of complexes resulted from mixing two components: a charge-transfer state and a local excitation of the donor. Using chemically similar amines as an example (namely, diphenylamine and diphenylbenzylamine), it was demonstrated that minor variations in the relative arrangement of energy levels of these components change radically the mechanism of initial stages and can determine the composition of end products under conditions of mixing of the states. The broadening of the absorption spectra of the electron donor-acceptor complexes based on aromatic amines and the change in the direction of photo-chemical processes in going from liquid media to polymeric matrices were explained by {open_quotes}freezing in{close_quotes} amine conformation isomers, which differ in the angle of rotation between the aromatic-ring plane and the orbital of the lone electron pair of the nitrogen atom (twist angles) and, hence, in {open_quotes}ionization potential{close_quotes} with respect to the acceptor coordinated to both the aromatic ring (a {pi},{sigma}{sup *} complex) and the nitrogen atom (a n, {sigma}{sup *} complex).

  10. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage and formation reactions in drug metabolism and the role of metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bolleddula, Jayaprakasam; Chowdhury, Swapan K

    2015-11-01

    Elimination of xenobiotics from the human body is often facilitated by a transformation to highly water soluble and more ionizable molecules. In general, oxidation-reduction, hydrolysis, and conjugation reactions are common biotransformation reactions that are catalyzed by various metabolic enzymes including cytochrome P450s (CYPs), non-CYPs, and conjugative enzymes. Although carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation and cleavage reactions are known to exist in plant secondary metabolism, these reactions are relatively rare in mammalian metabolism and are considered exceptions. However, various reactions such as demethylation, dealkylation, dearylation, reduction of alkyl chain, ring expansion, ring contraction, oxidative elimination of a nitrile through C-C bond cleavage, and dimerization, and glucuronidation through C-C bond formation have been reported for drug molecules. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions for drug molecules are primarily catalyzed by CYP enzymes, dimerization is mediated by peroxidases, and C-glucuronidation is catalyzed by UGT1A9. This review provides an overview of C-C bond cleavage and formation reactions in drug metabolism and the metabolic enzymes associated with these reactions. PMID:26390887

  11. The α-Effect and Competing Mechanisms: The Gas-Phase Reactions of Microsolvated Anions with Methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Ditte L.; Nichols, Charles M.; Reece, Jennifer N.; Hammerum, Steen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2013-12-01

    The enhanced reactivity of α-nucleophiles, which contain an electron lone pair adjacent to the reactive site, has been demonstrated in solution and in the gas phase and, recently, for the gas-phase SN2 reactions of the microsolvated HOO-(H2O) ion with methyl chloride. In the present work, we continue to explore the significance of microsolvation on the α-effect as we compare the gas-phase reactivity of the microsolvated α-nucleophile HOO-(H2O) with that of microsolvated normal alkoxy nucleophiles, RO-(H2O), in reactions with methyl formate, where three competing reactions are possible. The results reveal enhanced reactivity of HOO-(H2O) towards methyl formate, and clearly demonstrate the presence of an overall α-effect for the reactions of the microsolvated α-nucleophile. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water molecule significantly lowers the degree of proton abstraction and increases the SN2 and BAC2 reactivity compared with the unsolvated analogs. HOO-(H2O) reacts with methyl formate exclusively via the BAC2 channel. While microsolvation lowers the overall reaction efficiency, it enhances the BAC2 reaction efficiency for all anions compared with the unsolvated analogs. This may be explained by participation of the solvent water molecule in the BAC2 reaction in a way that continuously stabilizes the negative charge throughout the reaction.

  12. SEPALLATA3: the 'glue' for MADS box transcription factor complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Immink, Richard GH; Tonaco, Isabella AN; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna; van Dijk, Aalt DJ; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Borst, Jan W; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant MADS box proteins play important roles in a plethora of developmental processes. In order to regulate specific sets of target genes, MADS box proteins dimerize and are thought to assemble into multimeric complexes. In this study a large-scale yeast three-hybrid screen is utilized to provide insight into the higher-order complex formation capacity of the Arabidopsis MADS box family. SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) has been shown to mediate complex formation and, therefore, special attention is paid to this factor in this study. Results In total, 106 multimeric complexes were identified; in more than half of these at least one SEP protein was present. Besides the known complexes involved in determining floral organ identity, various complexes consisting of combinations of proteins known to play a role in floral organ identity specification, and flowering time determination were discovered. The capacity to form this latter type of complex suggests that homeotic factors play essential roles in down-regulation of the MADS box genes involved in floral timing in the flower via negative auto-regulatory loops. Furthermore, various novel complexes were identified that may be important for the direct regulation of the floral transition process. A subsequent detailed analysis of the APETALA3, PISTILLATA, and SEP3 proteins in living plant cells suggests the formation of a multimeric complex in vivo. Conclusions Overall, these results provide strong indications that higher-order complex formation is a general and essential molecular mechanism for plant MADS box protein functioning and attribute a pivotal role to the SEP3 'glue' protein in mediating multimerization. PMID:19243611

  13. Concurrent Formation of Carbon-Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative C-H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C-C bond formation via C-H transformation and production of functionalized graphene. PMID:27181191

  14. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N≡N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. PMID:25214300

  15. '(eta(6)-arene)Ru(bis-NHC)' complexes for the reduction of CO(2) to formate with hydrogen and by transfer hydrogenation with iPrOH.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Sergio; Azua, Arturo; Peris, Eduardo

    2010-07-21

    A series of bis-NHC-complexes of Ru and Ir have been tested in the reduction of carbon dioxide to formate. The use of one of the '(eta(6)-arene)Ru(bis-NHC)' complexes (labeled as 1 in the text) in the reduction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen affords a maximum TON value of 23000 at 200 degrees C. The same complexes were used in the reduction of carbon dioxide with iPrOH by the transfer hydrogenation methodology. For this reaction, a maximum TON value of 874 was achieved, the highest reported to date for this type of process. The activity of the catalyst is highly dependent on its stability because the complex has to stand the severe reaction conditions used in the process (200 degrees C). PMID:20520869

  16. Understanding the Mechanism of the Divergent Reactivity of Non-Heteroatom-Stabilized Chromium Carbene Complexes with Furfural Imines: Formation of Benzofurans and Azetines.

    PubMed

    Funes-Ardoiz, Ignacio; González, Jairo; Santamaría, Javier; Sampedro, Diego

    2016-02-19

    The mechanisms of the reaction between non-heteroatom-stabilized alkynyl chromium carbene complexes prepared in situ and furfural imines to yield benzofurans and/or azetines have been explored by means of density functional theory method calculations. The reaction proceeds through a complex cascade of steps triggered by a nucleophilic addition of the imine nitrogen atom. The formation of two benzofuran regioisomers has been explained in terms of competitive nucleophilic attacks to different positions of the carbene complex. Each of these regioisomers can be obtained as the major product depending on the starting materials. The overall sequence could be controlled to yield benzofurans or azetines by adjusting the substituents present in the initial carbene complex. This mechanistic information allowed for the preparation of new benzofurans and azetinylcarbenes in good yields. PMID:26799934

  17. Uranyl triazolate formation via an in situ Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Knope, Karah E.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2010-08-27

    A two dimensional UO22+ coordination polymer, (UO2)3(C10H5N3O4)2(OH)2(H2O)2, has been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. The triazolate ligand, 1-(4-carboxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylic acid (CPTAZ) has been generated via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of 4-azidobenzoic acid and propiolic acid. Reactions of the UO22+ cation with both the in situ generated triazolate ligand and the presynthesized ligand have been explored. The structure, fluorescent and thermal behaviour of this material are presented, as is a discussion of the utility of in situ ligand formation versus direct assembly.

  18. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Microstructural examination of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has shown that there is often a region adjacent to the as-nitrided surfaces that is even more porous than the interior of this already quite porous material. Because this layer of large porosity is considered detrimental to both the strength and oxidation resistance of RBSN, a study was undertaken to determine if its formation could be prevented during processing. All test bars studied were made from a single batch of Si powder which was milled for 4 hours in heptane in a vibratory mill using high density alumina cylinders as the grinding media. After air drying the powder, bars were compacted in a single acting die and hydropressed.

  19. Phosphonato complexes of platinum(II): kinetics of formation and phosphorus-31 NMR characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, L.L.; Bose, R.N. )

    1990-12-01

    Reactions of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) with phosphonoformic acid (PFA), phosphonoacetic acid (PAA), and methylenediphosphonic acid (MDP) yield various phosphonatoplatinum(II) chelates which were characterized by phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy. The P-31 resonances for the chelates appear at 6-12 ppm downfield as compared to the uncomplexed ligands. All complexes exhibit monoprotic acidic behavior in the pH range 2-10. The chemical shift-pH profiles yielded acidity constants, 1.0 x 10(-4), 1.5 x 10(-4), and 1.3 x 10(-6) M-1, for the PFA, PAA, and MDP chelates. In addition to the monomeric chelate, MDP formed a bridged diplatinum(II,II) complex when it reacted with cis-Pt (NH3)2(H2O)2(2)+. The P-31 resonance for this binuclear complex appears at 22 ppm downfield from the unreacted ligand. Rate data for the complexation reactions of the phosphonate ligands with the dichloroplatinum complex are consistent with a mechanism in which a monodentate complex is formed initially through rate-limiting aquation process of the platinum complex, followed by a rapid chelation. For the PFA and PAA complexes, initial binding sites are the carboxylato oxygens. Implications of the various binding modes of the phosphonates in relationship to their antiviral activities are discussed.

  20. Direct observation of R-loop formation by single RNA-guided Cas9 and Cascade effector complexes

    PubMed Central

    Szczelkun, Mark D.; Tikhomirova, Maria S.; Sinkunas, Tomas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Karvelis, Tautvydas; Pschera, Patrizia; Siksnys, Virginijus; Seidel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems protect bacteria and archaea from infection by viruses and plasmids. Central to this defense is a ribonucleoprotein complex that produces RNA-guided cleavage of foreign nucleic acids. In DNA-targeting CRISPR-Cas systems, the RNA component of the complex encodes target recognition by forming a site-specific hybrid (R-loop) with its complement (protospacer) on an invading DNA while displacing the noncomplementary strand. Subsequently, the R-loop structure triggers DNA degradation. Although these reactions have been reconstituted, the exact mechanism of R-loop formation has not been fully resolved. Here, we use single-molecule DNA supercoiling to directly observe and quantify the dynamics of torque-dependent R-loop formation and dissociation for both Cascade- and Cas9-based CRISPR-Cas systems. We find that the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) affects primarily the R-loop association rates, whereas protospacer elements distal to the PAM affect primarily R-loop stability. Furthermore, Cascade has higher torque stability than Cas9 by using a conformational locking step. Our data provide direct evidence for directional R-loop formation, starting from PAM recognition and expanding toward the distal protospacer end. Moreover, we introduce DNA supercoiling as a quantitative tool to explore the sequence requirements and promiscuities of orthogonal CRISPR-Cas systems in rapidly emerging gene-targeting applications. PMID:24912165

  1. Complex formation of cadmium with sugar residues, nucleobases, phosphates, nucleotides, and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Sigel, Roland K O; Skilandat, Miriam; Sigel, Astrid; Operschall, Bert P; Sigel, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium(II), commonly classified as a relatively soft metal ion, prefers indeed aromatic-nitrogen sites (e.g., N7 of purines) over oxygen sites (like sugar-hydroxyl groups). However, matters are not that simple, though it is true that the affinity of Cd(2+) towards ribose-hydroxyl groups is very small; yet, a correct orientation brought about by a suitable primary binding site and a reduced solvent polarity, as it is expected to occur in a folded nucleic acid, may facilitate metal ion-hydroxyl group binding very effectively. Cd(2+) prefers the guanine(N7) over the adenine(N7), mainly because of the steric hindrance of the (C6)NH(2) group in the adenine residue. This Cd(2+)-(N7) interaction in a guanine moiety leads to a significant acidification of the (N1)H meaning that the deprotonation reaction occurs now in the physiological pH range. N3 of the cytosine residue, together with the neighboring (C2)O, is also a remarkable Cd(2+) binding site, though replacement of (C2)O by (C2)S enhances the affinity towards Cd(2+) dramatically, giving in addition rise to the deprotonation of the (C4)NH(2) group. The phosphodiester bridge is only a weak binding site but the affinity increases further from the mono- to the di- and the triphosphate. The same also holds for the corresponding nucleotides. Complex stability of the pyrimidine-nucleotides is solely determined by the coordination tendency of the phosphate group(s), whereas in the case of purine-nucleotides macrochelate formation takes place by the interaction of the phosphate-coordinated Cd(2+) with N7. The extents of the formation degrees of these chelates are summarized and the effect of a non-bridging sulfur atom in a thiophosphate group (versus a normal phosphate group) is considered. Mixed ligand complexes containing a nucleotide and a further mono- or bidentate ligand are covered and it is concluded that in these species N7 is released from the coordination sphere of Cd(2+). In the case that the other ligand contains an aromatic residue (e.g., 2,2'-bipyridine or the indole ring of tryptophanate) intramolecular stack formation takes place. With buffers like Tris or Bistris mixed ligand complexes are formed. Cd(2+) coordination to dinucleotides and to dinucleoside monophosphates provides some insights regarding the interaction between Cd(2+) and nucleic acids. Cd(2+) binding to oligonucleotides follows the principles of coordination to its units. The available crystal studies reveal that N7 of purines is the prominent binding site followed by phosphate oxygens and other heteroatoms in nucleic acids. Due to its high thiophilicity, Cd(2+) is regularly used in so-called thiorescue experiments, which lead to the identification of a direct involvement of divalent metal ions in ribozyme catalysis. PMID:23430775

  2. Sodium salts of anionic chiral cobalt(III) complexes as catalysts of the enantioselective Povarov reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Jiang, Hua-Jie; Zhou, Ya; Luo, Shi-Wei; Gong, Liu-Zhu

    2015-09-14

    The sodium salts of anionic chiral cobalt(III) complexes (CCC(-) Na(+) ) have been found to be efficient catalysts of the asymmetric Povarov reaction of easily accessible dienophiles, such as 2,3-dihydrofuran, ethyl vinyl ether, and an N-protected 2,3-dihydropyrrole, with 2-azadienes. Ring-fused tetrahydroquinolines with up to three contiguous stereogenic centers were thus obtained in high yields, excellent diastereoselectivities (endo/exo up to >20:1), and high enantioselectivities (up to 95:5 e.r.). PMID:26230676

  3. URDME: a modular framework for stochastic simulation of reaction-transport processes in complex geometries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Experiments in silico using stochastic reaction-diffusion models have emerged as an important tool in molecular systems biology. Designing computational software for such applications poses several challenges. Firstly, realistic lattice-based modeling for biological applications requires a consistent way of handling complex geometries, including curved inner- and outer boundaries. Secondly, spatiotemporal stochastic simulations are computationally expensive due to the fast time scales of individual reaction- and diffusion events when compared to the biological phenomena of actual interest. We therefore argue that simulation software needs to be both computationally efficient, employing sophisticated algorithms, yet in the same time flexible in order to meet present and future needs of increasingly complex biological modeling. Results We have developed URDME, a flexible software framework for general stochastic reaction-transport modeling and simulation. URDME uses Unstructured triangular and tetrahedral meshes to resolve general geometries, and relies on the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation formalism to model the processes under study. An interface to a mature geometry and mesh handling external software (Comsol Multiphysics) provides for a stable and interactive environment for model construction. The core simulation routines are logically separated from the model building interface and written in a low-level language for computational efficiency. The connection to the geometry handling software is realized via a Matlab interface which facilitates script computing, data management, and post-processing. For practitioners, the software therefore behaves much as an interactive Matlab toolbox. At the same time, it is possible to modify and extend URDME with newly developed simulation routines. Since the overall design effectively hides the complexity of managing the geometry and meshes, this means that newly developed methods may be tested in a realistic setting already at an early stage of development. Conclusions In this paper we demonstrate, in a series of examples with high relevance to the molecular systems biology community, that the proposed software framework is a useful tool for both practitioners and developers of spatial stochastic simulation algorithms. Through the combined efforts of algorithm development and improved modeling accuracy, increasingly complex biological models become feasible to study through computational methods. URDME is freely available at http://www.urdme.org. PMID:22727185

  4. A common intermediate for N2 formation in enzymes and zeolites: side-on Cu-nitrosyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Burton, Sarah D.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2013-09-16

    Understanding the mechanisms of catalytic processes requires the identification of reaction centers and key intermediates, both of which are often achieved by the use of spectroscopic characterization tools. Due to the heterogeneity of active centers in heterogeneous catalysts, it is frequently difficult to identify the specific sites that are responsible for the overall activity. Furthermore, the simultaneous presence of a large number of surface species on the catalyst surface often poses a great challenge for the unambiguous determination of the relevant species in the reaction mechanism. In contras