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Sample records for complex formation reactions

  1. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  2. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas phase reactions

    E-print Network

    Balucani, Nadia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm (>30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain surface and gas phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthetized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairy well the observations towards L1544. It also...

  3. Reactions of a Dinitrogen Complex of Molybdenum: Formation of a Carbon-Nitrogen Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, David C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reports a procedure for the formation of alkyldiazenido complexes of molybdenum in the absence of dioxygen, suitable for inclusion in an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. Includes background information and experimental procedures for two complexes. (SK)

  4. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  5. Formation of mono(dithiolene)-thiocarboxamido complexes in reactions of thio(dithiocarbamato)-Mo/W complexes and dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate.

    PubMed

    Lim, Patrick J; Slizys, Damian A; Tiekink, Edward R T; Young, Charles G

    2005-01-10

    Reactions of TpMS(S(2)CNEt(2)) with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate in dichloromethane produce olive green/black TpM{S(2)C(2)(CO(2)Me)(2)}(SCNEt(2)-kappa(2)S,C) (M = Mo (1), W (2); Tp = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)borate). The seven-coordinate complexes exhibit pseudo-octahedral (1) and distorted pentagonal bipyramidal (2) coordination spheres comprised of tridentate fac-Tp, bidentate dithiolene, and thiocarboxamido-kappa(2)S,C ligands. In the solid state, molecules of 1 exhibit pseudo-C(s)() symmetry, with the thiocarboxamide NEt(2) group in a cleft in the Tp ligand. Molecules of 2 have C(1) symmetry in the solid state; here, the thiocarboxamide unit is orientated along one of the W-S(dithiolene) bonds with its NEt(2) group projecting away from the Tp ligand. Both complexes possess effective C(s)() symmetry in solution. Reaction of TpMoI(CO)(3) with AgS(2)CNEt(2) affords olive green TpMo(S(2)CNEt(2))(CO)(2) (3), which reacts with propylene sulfide in a new synthesis for TpMoS(S(2)CNEt(2)), the starting material for 1. Complex 3 exhibits a distorted pentagonal bipyramidal structure, the axial sites being defined by a Tp nitrogen atom and a carbonyl ligand, the pentagonal plane by the remaining nitrogen and carbonyl donors and the two sulfur atoms of the bidentate dithiocarbamate ligand. PMID:15627367

  6. Heterogenised N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: synthesis, characterisation and application for hydroformylation and C-C bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Dastgir, Sarim; Coleman, Karl S; Green, Malcolm L H

    2011-01-21

    The imidazolium salts: 1-mesityl-3-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium iodide and 1-tert-butyl-3-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium iodide, abbreviated as (tmpMes)HI (3a) and (tmp(t)Bu)HI (3b), respectively, have been synthesised. The palladium(ii) complexes (?(3)-C(3)H(5)) (tmpMes)PdCl (5a) and (?(3)-C(3)H(5))(tmp(t)Bu)PdCl (5b), rhodium(i) and iridium(i) complexes (?(4)-1,5-COD) (tmpMes)MCl, M = Rh (6a), Ir (7a) and (?(4)-1,5-COD)(tmp(t)Bu)MCl, where M = Rh (6b), Ir (7b), were synthesised by silver transmetallation reactions using the silver(i) complexes (tmpMes)AgI (4a) and (tmp(t)Bu)AgI (4b). The iridium complex 7b has been structurally characterised. The Pd(ii) and Rh(i) complexes have been immobilised by attachment to chemically modified MCM-41. The immobilised palladium(ii) materials have been tested as recyclable catalysts for Suzuki type C-C bond formation reactions in water and the immobilised rhodium(i) materials have been examined for their catalytic ability for the hydroformylation of 1-octene. PMID:21116572

  7. Reactions of sulfur-nitrosyl iron complexes of "g=2.03" family with hemoglobin (Hb): kinetics of Hb-NO formation in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Sanina, N A; Syrtsova, L A; Shkondina, N I; Rudneva, T N; Malkova, E S; Bazanov, T A; Kotel'nikov, A I; Aldoshin, S M

    2007-03-01

    NO-donating ability of nitrosyl [Fe-S] complexes, namely, mononuclear dinitrosyl complexes of anionic type [Fe(S2O3)2(NO)2]-(I) and neutral [Fe2(SL1)2(NO)2] with L1=1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-yl (II); tetranitrosyl binuclear neutral complexes [Fe2(SL2)2(NO)4] with L2=5-amino-1,2,4-triazole-3-yl (III); 1-methyl-1H-tetrazole-5-yl (IV); imidazole-2-yl (V) and 1-methyl-imidazole-2-yl (VI) has been studied. In addition, Roussin's "red salt" Na2[Fe2S2(NO)4] x 8H2O (VII) and Na2[Fe(CN)5NO] x H2O (VIII) have been investigated. The method for research has been based on the formation of Hb-NO adduct upon the interaction of hemoglobin with NO generated by complexes I-VIII in aqueous solutions. Kinetics of NO formation was studied by registration of absorption spectra of the reaction systems containing Hb and the complex under study. For determination of HbNO concentration, the experimental absorption spectra were processed during the reaction using standard program MATHCAD to determine the contribution of individual Hb and HbNO spectra in each spectrum. The reaction rate constants were obtained by analyzing kinetic dependence of Hb interaction with NO donors under study. All kinetic dependences for complexes I-VI were shown to be described well in the frame of formalism of pseudo first-order reactions. The effective first-order rate constants for the studied reactions have been determined. As follows from the values of rate constants, the rate of interaction of sulfur-nitrosyl iron complexes (I-VI) with Hb is limited by the stage of NO release in the solution. PMID:17140821

  8. A STUDY OF FUNDAMENTAL REACTION PATHWAYS FOR TRANSITION METAL ALKYL COMPLEXES. I. THE REACTION OF A NICKEL METHYL COMPLEX WITH ALKYNES. II. THE MECHANISM OF ALDEHYDE FORMATION IN THE REACTION OF A MOLYBDENUM HYDRIDE WITH MOLYBDENUM ALKYLS

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, John Mitchell

    1980-06-01

    I. This study reports the rapid reaction under mild conditions of internal or terminal alkynes with methyl (acetyl~ acetonato) (triphenylphosphine) nickel (1) in either aromatic or ether solvents. In all cases vinylnickel products 2 are formed by insertion of the alkyne into the nickel=methyl bond. These complexes may be converted into a variety of organic products (e.g. alkenes, esters, vinyl halides) by treatment with appropriate reagents. Unsymmetrical alkynes give selectively the one regioisomer with the sterically largest substituent next to the nickel atom. In order to investigate the stereochemistry of the initial insertion, a x-ray diffraction study of the reaction of 1 with diphenylacetylene was carried out. This showed that the vinylnickel complex formed by overall trans insertion was the product of the reaction. Furthermore, subsequent slow isomerization of this complex, to a mixture of it and the corresponding cis isomer, demonstrated that this trans addition product is the kinetic product of the reaction. In studies with other alkynes, the product of trans addition was not always exclusively (or even predominantly) formed, but the ratio of the stereoisomers formed kinetically was substantially different from the thermodynamic ratio. Isotope labeling, added phosphine, and other experiments have allowed us to conclude that the mechanism of this reaction does involve initial cis addition. However, a coordinatively unsaturated vinylnickel complex is initially formed which can undergo rapid, phosphine-catalyzed cis-trans isomerization in competition with its conversion to the isolable phosphine-substituted kinetic reaction products. II. The reaction of CpMo(CO){sub 3}H (1a) with CpMo(CO){sub 3}R (2, R= CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}) at 50{degrees} C in THF gives the aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} (3a) and [CpMo(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2} (4a). Labeling one of the reactants with a methylcyclopentadienyl ligand it was possible to show that the mixed dimers MeCpMo(CO){sub 3}-(CO){sub 3}MoCp (3b) and MeCpMo(CO){sub 2}{triple_bond}(CO){sub 2}MoCp (4b) are the predominant kinetic products of the reaction. Additionally labeling the carbonyl ligands of 1a with {sup 13}CO led to the conclusion that all three of the carbonyl ligands in 1a end up in the tetracarbonyl dimers 4a if the reaction is carried out under a continuous purge of argon Trapping studies failed to find any evidence for the intermediacy of either [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sup -} or [CpMo(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} in this reaction. A mechanism is proposed that involves the initial migration of the alkyl ligand in 2 to CO forming an unsaturated acyl complex which reacts with 1a to give a binuclear complex containing a three center-two electron Mo-H-Mo bond. This complex then selectively looses a carbonyl from the acyl molybdenum, migrates the hydride to that same metal, and forms a metal-metal bond. This binuclear complex with the hydride and acyl ligands on one metal reductively eliminates aldehyde, and migrates a carbonyl ligand, to give 4a directly. The other product 3a is formed by addition of two molecules of free CO to 4a.

  9. Determination of Complex Reaction Mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Steinbock, Oliver

    can be derived. This interesting chapter starts with the analysis of simple unbranched chain reactionsDetermination of Complex Reaction Mechanisms Analysis of Chemi- cal, Biological, and Genetic in the field of chemical kinetics. The book Determination of Complex Reaction Mechanisms, by Ross, Schreiber

  10. Oxide formation: reaction details studied,

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Oxide formation: reaction details studied, reported in brief Sir -- Nineteen years ago, I published-nitrosohydroxylamines undergo an alternative decomposition under very similar reaction conditions to liberate nitrous oxide, N2O (refs 4,5). Moreover, this alternative reaction involves highly electrophilic intermediates analogous

  11. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  12. H-atom addition and abstraction reactions in mixed CO, H2CO and CH3OH ices - an extended view on complex organic molecule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-01-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been observed not only in the hot cores surrounding low- and high-mass protostars, but also in cold dark clouds. Therefore, it is interesting to understand how such species can be formed without the presence of embedded energy sources. We present new laboratory experiments on the low-temperature solid state formation of three complex molecules - methyl formate (HC(O)OCH3), glycolaldehyde (HC(O)CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (H2C(OH)CH2OH) - through recombination of free radicals formed via H-atom addition and abstraction reactions at different stages in the CO?H2CO?CH3OH hydrogenation network at 15 K. The experiments extend previous CO hydrogenation studies and aim at resembling the physical-chemical conditions typical of the CO freeze-out stage in dark molecular clouds, when H2CO and CH3OH form by recombination of accreting CO molecules and H-atoms on ice grains. We confirm that H2CO, once formed through CO hydrogenation, not only yields CH3OH through ongoing H-atom addition reactions, but is also subject to H-atom-induced abstraction reactions, yielding CO again. In a similar way, H2CO is also formed in abstraction reactions involving CH3OH. The dominant methanol H-atom abstraction product is expected to be CH2OH, while H-atom additions to H2CO should at least partially proceed through CH3O intermediate radicals. The occurrence of H-atom abstraction reactions in ice mantles leads to more reactive intermediates (HCO, CH3O and CH2OH) than previously thought, when assuming sequential H-atom addition reactions only. This enhances the probability to form COMs through radical-radical recombination without the need of UV photolysis or cosmic rays as external triggers.

  13. The citric acid-Mn III,IVO 2(birnessite) reaction. Electron transfer, complex formation, and autocatalytic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Stone, Alan T.

    2006-09-01

    Citrate released by plants, bacteria, and fungi into soils is subject to abiotic oxidation by MnO 2(birnessite), yielding 3-ketoglutarate, acetoacetate, and Mn II. Citrate loss and generation of products as a function of time all yield S-shaped curves, indicating autocatalysis. Increasing the citrate concentration decreases the induction period. The maximum rate ( rmax) along the reaction coordinate follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on citrate concentration. Increases in pH decrease rmax and increase the induction time. Adding Mn II, Zn II, orthophosphate, or pyrophosphate at the onset of reaction decreases rmax. Mn II addition eliminates the induction period, while orthophosphate and pyrophosphate addition increase the induction period. These findings indicate that two parallel processes are responsible. The first, relatively slow process involves the oxidation of free citrate by surface-bound Mn III,IV, yielding Mn II and citrate oxidation products. The second process, which is subject to strong positive feedback, involves electron transfer from Mn II-citrate complexes to surface-bound Mn III,IV, generating Mn III-citrate and Mn II. Subsequent intramolecular electron transfer converts Mn III-citrate into Mn II and citrate oxidation products.

  14. Energetics and excited state dynamics of the radical pair formation in isolated CP47-reaction center complex of photosystem II at various temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, Marie-Louise; Paa lsson, Lars-Olof; Pribic, Radmila; Stokkum, Ivo H. van; Dekker, Jan P.; Grondelle, Rienk van

    1996-04-01

    The isolated CP47-reaction center complex of spinach photosystem II has been studied with time resolved picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy between 77 K and 270 K. It was observed that these particles exhibit multi-exponential fluorescence decays of the excited state at all temperatures. The major observations are an energy transfer/trapping time of {approx}40 picoseconds and a long-lived {approx}23 nanosecond component attributed to the recombination of the radical pair. These experimentally obtained parameters were used to estimate the free energy difference for the radical pair formation.

  15. Reactions of Phenylhydrosilanes with Pincer-Nickel Complexes: Evidence for New Si-O and Si-C Bond Formation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jingjun; Vabre, Boris; Zargarian, Davit

    2015-12-01

    This contribution presents evidence for new pathways manifested in the reactions of the phenylhydrosilanes PhnSiH4-n with the pincer complexes (POCsp(2)OP)Ni(OSiMe3), 1-OSiMe3, and (POCsp(3)OP)Ni(OSiMe3), 2-OSiMe3 (POCsp(2)OP = 2,6-(i-Pr2PO)2C6H3; POCsp(3)OP = (i-Pr2POCH2)2CH). Excess PhSiH3 or Ph2SiH2 reacted with 1-OSiMe3 to eliminate the disilyl ethers PhnH3-nSiOSiMe3 (n = 1 or 2) and generate the nickel hydride species 1-H. Subsequent reaction of the latter with more substrate formed corresponding nickel silyl species 1-SiPhH2 or 1-SiPh2H and generated multiple Si-containing products, including disilanes and redistribution products. The reaction of 1-OSiMe3 with excess Ph2SiH2/Ph2SiD2 revealed a net KIE of ca. 1.3-1.4 at room temperature. Treating 1-OSiMe3 with excess Ph3SiH also gave 1-H and the corresponding disilyl ether Ph3SiOSiMe3, but this reaction also generated the new siloxide 1-OSiPh3 apparently via an unconventional ?-bond metathesis pathway in which the Ni center is not involved directly. The reaction of excess PhSiH3 and 2-OSiMe3 gave polysilanes of varying solubilities and molecular weights; NMR investigations showed that these polymers arise from Ni(0) species generated in situ from the reductive elimination of the highly reactive hydride intermediate, 2-H. The stoichiometric reactions of 2-OSiMe3 with Ph2SiH2 and Ph3SiH gave, respectively, siloxides 2-OSiPh2(OSiMe3) and 2-OSiPh3. Together, these results demonstrate the strong influence of pincer backbone and hydrosilane sterics on the different reactivities of 1-OSiMe3 and 2-OSiMe3 toward PhnSiH4-n (dimerization, polymerization, and redistribution vs formation of new siloxides). The mechanisms of the reactions that lead to the observed Si-O, Si-C, and Si-Si bond formations are discussed in terms of classical and unconventional ?-bond metathesis pathways. PMID:26562478

  16. Nanocrystalline Complex Oxides Prepared by Mechanochemical Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sepelak, V.; Bergmann, I.; Indris, S.; Subrt, J.; Heitjans, P.; Becker, K.-D.

    2010-07-13

    The preparation of complex oxides by the conventional solid-state (ceramic) route requires a number of stages, including homogenization of the powder precursors, compaction of the reactants, and finally prolonged heat treatment at considerably elevated temperatures under controlled oxygen fugacity. One goal of modern materials research and development has been to identify simpler processing schemes that do not rely upon high-temperature treatments for inducing solid-state reactions. At present, mechanochemical methods become widely used for the preparation of nanocrystalline materials due to their relative simplicity and availability. In this work, selected examples of the preparation of nanoscale complex oxides via single-step mechanochemical routes are presented. Nuclear spectroscopic methods are employed to follow the mechanically induced formation of nanooxides and to characterize the nonequilibrium structural state of the resulting nanophases at the atomic level.

  17. Pericyclic reactions involving catalytic metal-vinylidene complexes.

    PubMed

    Varela, Jesús A; Saá, Carlos

    2006-08-25

    The formation of complex polycyclic systems from terminal alkynes based on the concept of pericyclic reactions of catalytic metal-vinylidenes is presented. Metal-vinylidenes, easily formed from terminal alkynes with catalytic amounts of several metal complexes, can be used in electrocyclizations, cycloadditions or sigmatropic rearrangements to afford valuable compounds. PMID:16841349

  18. Modeling the complex bromate-iodine reaction.

    PubMed

    Machado, Priscilla B; Faria, Roberto B

    2009-05-01

    In this article, it is shown that the FLEK model (ref 5 ) is able to model the experimental results of the bromate-iodine clock reaction. Five different complex chemical systems, the bromate-iodide clock and oscillating reactions, the bromite-iodide clock and oscillating reactions, and now the bromate-iodine clock reaction are adequately accounted for by the FLEK model. PMID:19361181

  19. Complex dynamics of the formation of spatially localized standing structures in the vicinity of saddle-node bifurcations of waves in the reaction-diffusion model of blood clotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanova, E. S.; Shnol, E. E.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.

    2004-09-01

    Local activation in a one-dimensional three-component reaction-diffusion model of blood clotting may lead to a formation of spatially localized standing structures (peaks) via several complex scenarios. In the first scenario, two concentration pulses first propagate from the site of activation, then stop and transform into peaks [Zarnitsina , Chaos 11, 57 (2001)]. Here, we examine this scenario, and also describe a different scenario of peak formation. In this scenario, two trigger waves propagate initially in opposite directions away from the site of activation. Then they stop and change direction of propagation toward each other to the activation site, where they interact and form a peak. Both of these scenarios of stable peak formation are observed in the vicinity of saddle-node bifurcation and may be viewed as a memory of the extinct wave modes.

  20. In-Situ Formation of Cobalt-Phosphate Oxygen-Evolving Complex-Anchored Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanosheets for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yinyin; Lv, Hong; Tian, Yuyu; Wu, Dan; Li, Qing-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen conversion process between O2 and H2O by means of electrochemistry or photochemistry has lately received a great deal of attention. Cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) catalyst is a new type of cost-effective artificial oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) with amorphous features during photosynthesis. However, can such Co-Pi OEC also act as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst in electrochemical processes? The question remains unanswered. Here for the first time we demonstrate that Co-Pi OEC does be rather active for the ORR. Particularly, Co-Pi OEC anchoring on reduced graphite oxide (rGO) nanosheet is shown to possess dramatically improved electrocatalytic activities. Differing from the generally accepted role of rGO as an “electron reservoir”, we suggest that rGO serves as “peroxide cleaner” in enhancing the electrocatalytic behaviors. The present study may bridge the gap between photochemistry and electrochemistry towards oxygen conversion. PMID:23877331

  1. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus of this project is the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms known as Heliobacteria. These organisms are the only known photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reaction centers suggest that they might be the decendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes have been isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii. The absorption and fluorescence properties of membranes and reaction centers are almost identical, suggesting that a single pigment-protein complex serves as both antenna and reaction center. Experiments in progress include sequence determination of the 48,000 Mr reaction center protein, and evolutionary comparisons with other reaction center proteins.

  2. Complexity from precipitation reactions Oliver Steinbock1

    E-print Network

    Steinbock, Oliver

    are known as chemical or silica "gardens" and are common demonstration experiments in school and introductory college classes. A chemical garden is typically grown by placing a macroscopic salt particle is whether one can control chemical reactions to produce di- rectly macroscopic complexity, hierarchical

  3. New Pathways for the Formation of Complex Organics and Prebiotic Synthesis in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shall, M. S.

    2010-04-01

    We study the formation mechanisms of complex organics that are present in interstellar clouds. The reaction of acetylene ion with water produces vinyl alcohol while the reaction of benzene ion with acetylene produces naphthalene-type ion.

  4. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  5. Formation of Phenylene Oligomers Using Platinum-Phosphine Complexes

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Formation of Phenylene Oligomers Using Platinum-Phosphine Complexes Nira Simhai, Carl N. Iverson, New York 14627 Received February 12, 2001 The reaction of biphenylene with a series of platinum bis to tetraphenylene using a platinum phos- phine catalyst (eq 2),8 and Ni(COD)(PMe3)2 has also (1) Topics

  6. Kinetic analysis of complex reactions using FEMLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong

    2005-06-07

    A finite element method software FEMALB has been implemented to the kinetic analysis of complex reaction systems. The established protocol provides fast solutions to the coupled differential-algebraic equations. It shows significant advantages over the conventional coding process with the standard implicit Runge-Kutta (IRK) method. The accuracy and high efficiency have been demonstrated in the simulation of the reaction processes such as glucose/fructose hydrogenation and catalytic cracking of gasoil. As model validation, the numerical results showed satisfactory agreement with the exact solutions. With the powerful capability of solving large matrixes of differential equations (both ODE and PDE) with nonlinear algebraic constrains, such an algorithm has greatly reduced the coding labor in reaction mechanistic studies and provided a unique tool in reactor design and optimization.

  7. Synthesis, DNA binding and complex formation reactions of 3-amino-5,6-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazine with Pd(II) and some selected biorelevant ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Azza A.; Alghanmi, Reem M.

    2015-03-01

    With the purpose of studying the binding behavior of Pd(II) complexes with DNA as the main biological target, and their ability to penetrate reasonably into tumour cells and destroy their replication ability, Pd(ADT)Cl2 complex was synthesized and characterized, where ADT is 3-amino-5,6-dimethyl-1,2,4-triazine. Stoichiometry and stability constants of the complexes formed between various biologically relevant ligands (amino acids, amides, DNA constituents, and dicarboxylic acids) and [Pd(ADT)(H2O)2]2+ were investigated at 25 °C and at constant 0.1 mol dm-3 ionic strength. The concentration distribution diagrams of the various species formed are evaluated. Further investigation of the binding properties of the diaqua complex [Pd(ADT)(H2O)2]2+ with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy. The intrinsic binding constants (Kb) calculated from UV-vis absorption studies was calculated to be 2.00 × 103 mol dm-3. The calculated (Kb) value was found to be of lower magnitude than that of the classical intercalator EB (Ethidium bromide) (Kb = 1.23(±0.07) × 105 mol dm-3) suggesting an electrostatic and/or groove binding mode for the interaction with CT-DNA. Thermal denaturation has been systematically studied by spectrophotometric method and the calculated ?Tm was nearly 5 °C, supporting the electrostatic and/or groove binding mode for the interaction between the complex and CT-DNA

  8. Visualization of chemical reaction dynamics: Toward understanding complex polyatomic reactions

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    Polyatomic molecules have several electronic states that have similar energies. Consequently, their chemical dynamics often involve nonadiabatic transitions between multiple potential energy surfaces. Elucidating the complex reactions of polyatomic molecules is one of the most important tasks of theoretical and experimental studies of chemical dynamics. This paper describes our recent experimental studies of the multidimensional multisurface dynamics of polyatomic molecules based on two-dimensional ion/electron imaging. It also discusses ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids for elucidating nonadiabatic electronic dynamics in aqueous solutions. PMID:23318678

  9. Factors Controlling ?-Elimination Reactions in Group?10 Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sosa Carrizo, E Daiann; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Fernández, Israel

    2015-10-01

    Trends in reactivity of ?-chloride and ?-hydride elimination reactions involving Group?10 transition-metal complexes have been computationally explored and analyzed in detail by DFT. These reactions do not require the initial formation of a vacant coordination site; they proceed concertedly without a prior ligand-dissociation step. Whereas ?-chloride elimination is associated with relatively moderate activation barriers, the high barriers calculated for analogous ?-hydride eliminations suggest that the latter process is unfeasible for this type of compounds. This differential behavior is analyzed within the activation strain model, which provides quantitative insight into the physical factors controlling these ?-elimination reactions. The effects of the nature of the Group?10 transition metal (Ni, Pd, Pt), as well as the substituents attached to the ?-eliminating fragment (R2 C?CR2 X; R, X=H, Cl) on the transformation have also been considered and are rationalized herein. PMID:26382722

  10. Ligand substitution reactions of a dinuclear platinum(I) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shimura, M.; Espenson, J.H.

    1984-11-21

    The complex Pt/sub 2/Br/sub 2/(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/ when dppm = bis(diphenylphosphio)methane reacts with Et/sub 4/NCl in dichloromethane and dichloroethane to form Pt/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/(..mu..-dppm)/sub 2/. The reaction is reversible and proceeds via stepwise formation of the mixed-ligand (Br, Cl) complex. The reaction follows biphasic kinetics, and each step shows a linear dependence on (Et/sub 4/NCl), with rate constants 93 +/- 20 and 19.4 +/- 1.2 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ for the respective steps (10.0/sup 0/C in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/). The identification of a rate constant with an individual step is a process that inherently admits of dual solutions; the assignment of values of h's was made on the basis that only this model gave a consistent and reasonable value for the molar absorptivity of the mixed-halide intermediate. The reaction in 1,2-dichloroethane shows a quite different kinetic pattern, with a single pseudo-first-order rate law and a more complex variation of the observed reaction constituent with (Et/sub 4/NCl).

  11. Activation of C-O and C-C bonds and formation of novel HAlOH-ether complexes: an EPR study of the reaction of ground-state Al atoms with methylethyl ether and diethyl ether.

    PubMed

    Brunet, François D; Feola, Julie C; Joly, Helen A

    2012-03-15

    Reaction mixtures, containing Al atoms and methylethyl ether (MEE) or diethyl ether (DEE) in an adamantane matrix, were prepared with the aid of a metal-atom reactor known as a rotating cryostat. The EPR spectra of the resulting products were recorded from 77-260 K, at 10 K intervals. Al atoms were found to insert into methyl-O, ethyl-O, and C-C bonds to form CH(3)AlOCH(2)CH(3), CH(3)OAlCH(2)CH(3), and CH(3)OCH(2)AlCH(3), respectively, in the case of MEE while DEE produced CH(3)CH(2)AlOCH(2)CH(3) and CH(3)AlCH(2)OCH(2)CH(3), respectively. From the intensity of the transition lines attributed to the Al atom C-O insertion products of MEE, insertion into the methyl-O bond is preferred. The Al hyperfine interaction (hfi) extracted from the EPR spectra of the C-O insertion products was greater than that of the C-C insertion products, that is, 5.4% greater for the DEE system and 7% greater for the MEE system. The increase in Al hfi is thought to arise from the increased electron-withdrawing ability of the substituents bonded to Al. Besides HAlOH, resulting from the reaction of Al atoms with adventitious water, novel mixed HAlOH:MEE and HAlOH:DEE complexes were identified with the aid of isotopic studies involving H(2)(17)O and D(2)O. The Al and H hfi of HAlOH were found to decrease upon complex formation. These findings are consistent with the nuclear hfi calculated using a density functional theory (DFT) method with close agreement between theory and experiment occurring at the B3LYP level using a 6-311+G(2df,p) basis set. PMID:22299675

  12. Evidence for Oligomer Formation in Clouds: Reactions of Isoprene

    E-print Network

    Seitzinger, Sybil

    formation. In addition to the monomers predicted by the reaction scheme, products consistent (e.g., organics not eluted from the GC column; ref 13). In addition to homogeneous reactionsEvidence for Oligomer Formation in Clouds: Reactions of Isoprene Oxidation Products K A T Y E E

  13. Reaction Dynamics of the Bromine-Bromoform Complex in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Thomas J.; Dutta, Maitreya; Crim, F. Fleming

    2010-06-01

    We have followed the evolution of the bromine species that arise from the photolysis of bromoform in the condensed phase. Solvent caging promotes the formation of iso-bromoform (CHBr_2-Br), which can then release a Br atom by breaking the newly formed Br-Br bond. This ejected Br can form a van der Waals complex (Br-CHBr_3) with a nearby un-photolyzed bromoform molecule, which is stable during our 1 ns time-window. Using the van der Waals complex as a reservoir for Br atoms, we now proceed to drive hydrogen abstraction from CHBr_3 by Br. Estimates indicate that the barrier to this reaction is a few thousand wavenumbers. Our goal is to introduce excitation into the C-H stretching motion of a nearby solvent CHBr_3 to access the activated complex region of the bimolecular potential energy surface.

  14. Disulfirm-ethanol reaction: a complex mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, J.J.; Faiman, M.D.

    1986-03-01

    Hypothermia has previously been shown to be a component of the disulfiram-ethanol reaction (DER). In rats, hypothermia correlated with the hypotension and tachycardia observed when ethanol was administered 8 hours after disfulfiram treatment. These studies have now been extended, and in addition, the role of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) and diethyldithiocarbamate-methyl ester (DDTC-MF) in the DER have been examined. In rats challenged with ethanol (1g/kg, i.p.) 4 and 24 hours after disulfiram (75 mg/kg, i.p.) no hypothermia was observed, but was found when ethanol was given 8, 12 and 16 hours after disulfiram. Hypotension and tachycardia were found at all time periods studied. Low Km ALDH also was inhibited at the 4, 8, 16 and 24 hour time periods. Although pretreatment with DDTC and DDTC-ME failed to produce hypothermia, hypotension and tachycardia were observed in rats challenged with ethanol. As with disulfiram administration, hypothermia did not correlate with ALDH inhibition in the DDTC and DDTC-ME studies. These studies support the known myriad of effects produced during the DER, and provide additional evidence that difference mechanisms contribute to the complexity of the disulfiram-ethanol reaction.

  15. A physical organic mechanistic approach to understanding the complex reaction

    E-print Network

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Review A physical organic mechanistic approach to understanding the complex reaction network biochemical networks. The dynamics of biochemical reaction networks is difficult to describe by considering their individual reactions, just as the dynamics of organic reactions is difficult to describe by considering

  16. Nitrene transfer reactions by late transition metal complexes

    E-print Network

    Hamilton, Charles W., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents nitrene transfer reactions that are catalyzed or mediated by late transition metal complexes. Sterically large, fluorinated supporting ligands are used to minimize potential side reactions. A new ...

  17. Star Formation Across the W3 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Megías, Guillermo D.; Tapia, Mauricio; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Alves, Joáo F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  18. Reactions of Pd and Pt complexes with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Margaret L; Goldberg, Karen I

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge of exactly how metal complexes react with molecular oxygen is still limited and this has hampered efforts to develop catalysts for oxidation reactions using O2 as the oxidant and/or oxygen-atom source. A better understanding of the reactions of different types of metal complexes with O2 will be of great utility in rational catalyst development. Reactions between molecular oxygen and Pd(0-II) and Pt(0-IV) complexes are reviewed here. PMID:25303084

  19. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  20. Pattern Formation with Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    E-print Network

    Timmer, Jens

    Embryo: Mesenchymal stem cells develop into patterned tissues Adult diseases (atherosclerosis, aortic. Turing (1952): reaction-diffusion theory of morphogenesis Self-organization of adult stem cells #12 Mesenchymal Cells Garfinkel et al. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 101, 9247 (2004) Part II #12;Mesenchymal Stem Cells

  1. Formation mechanism of complex pattern on fishes' skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Liu, Shuhua

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, the formation mechanism of the complex patterns observed on the skin of fishes has been investigated by a two-coupled reaction diffusion model. The effects of coupling strength between two layers play an important role in the pattern-forming process. It is found that only the epidermis layer can produce complicated patterns that have structures on more than one length scale. These complicated patterns including super-stripe pattern, mixture of spots and stripe, and white-eye pattern are similar to the pigmentation patterns on fishes' skin.

  2. Star Formation Across the W3 Complex

    E-print Network

    Román-Zúñiga, C G; Megias, G; Tapia, M; Lada, E A; Alves, J F

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images, combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex, and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters, and constructed K-band luminosity functions (KLF) that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients ...

  3. The catalytic role of uranyl in formation of polycatechol complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the association of contaminant uranium with natural organic matter (NOM) and the fate of uranium in ground water, spectroscopic studies of uranium complexation with catechol were conducted. Catechol provides a model for ubiquitous functional groups present in NOM. Liquid samples were analyzed using Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Catechol was found to polymerize in presence of uranyl ions. Polymerization in presence of uranyl was compared to reactions in the presence of molybdate, another oxyion, and self polymerization of catechol at high pH. The effect of time and dissolved oxygen were also studied. It was found that oxygen was required for self-polymerization at elevated pH. The potential formation of phenoxy radicals as well as quinones was monitored. The benzene ring was found to be intact after polymerization. No evidence for formation of ether bonds was found, suggesting polymerization was due to formation of C-C bonds between catechol ligands. Uranyl was found to form outer sphere complexes with catechol at initial stages but over time (six months) polycatechol complexes were formed and precipitated from solution (forming humic-like material) while uranyl ions remained in solution. Our studies show that uranyl acts as a catalyst in catechol-polymerization. PMID:21396112

  4. Characterizing the dynamics of functionally relevant complexes of formate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Bandaria, Jigar N.; Dutta, Samrat; Nydegger, Michael W.; Rock, William; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    The potential for femtosecond to picosecond time-scale motions to influence the rate of the intrinsic chemical step in enzyme-catalyzed reactions is a source of significant controversy. Among the central challenges in resolving this controversy is the difficulty of experimentally characterizing thermally activated motions at this time scale in functionally relevant enzyme complexes. We report a series of measurements to address this problem using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to characterize the time scales of active-site motions in complexes of formate dehydrogenase with the transition-state-analog inhibitor azide (). We observe that the frequency–frequency time correlation functions (FFCF) for the ternary complexes with NAD+ and NADH decay completely with slow time constants of 3.2 ps and 4.6 ps, respectively. This result suggests that in the vicinity of the transition state, the active-site enzyme structure samples a narrow and relatively rigid conformational distribution indicating that the transition-state structure is well organized for the reaction. In contrast, for the binary complex, we observe a significant static contribution to the FFCF similar to what is seen in other enzymes, indicating the presence of the slow motions that occur on time scales longer than our measurement window. PMID:20876138

  5. Classic reaction kinetics can explain complex patterns of antibiotic action

    PubMed Central

    zur Wiesch, P. Abel; Abel, S.; Gkotzis, S.; Ocampo, P.; Engelstädter, J.; Hinkley, T.; Magnus, C.; Waldor, M. K.; Udekwu, K.; Cohen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Finding optimal dosing strategies for treating bacterial infections is extremely difficult, and improving therapy requires costly and time-intensive experiments. To date, an incomplete mechanistic understanding of drug effects has limited our ability to make accurate quantitative predictions of drug-mediated bacterial killing and impeded the rational design of antibiotic treatment strategies. Three poorly understood phenomena complicate predictions of antibiotic activity: post-antibiotic growth suppression, density-dependent antibiotic effects, and persister cell formation. Here, we show that chemical binding kinetics alone are sufficient to explain these three phenomena, using single cell data and time-kill curves of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae exposed to a variety of antibiotics in combination with a theoretical model that links chemical reaction kinetics to bacterial population biology. Our model reproduces existing observations, has a high predictive power across different experimental setups (R2= 0.86), and makes several testable predictions, which we verified in new experiments and by analysing published data from a clinical trial on tuberculosis therapy. While a variety of biological mechanisms have previously been invoked to explain post-antibiotic growth suppression, density-dependent antibiotic effects, and especially persister cell formation, our findings reveal that a simple model which considers only binding kinetics provides a parsimonious and unifying explanation for these three complex, phenotypically distinct behaviours. Current antibiotic and other chemotherapeutic regimens are often based on trial-and-error or expert opinion. Our ‘chemical reaction kinetics’-based approach may inform new strategies, that are based on rational design. PMID:25972005

  6. Multistability and sustained oscillations in a model for protein complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löb, Daniel; Priester, Christopher; Drossel, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a model for the formation of protein complexes where each protein can occur at most once in a complex. The reaction rates for association and dissociation of proteins can be chosen independently for each reaction, without imposing detailed balance conditions. We show that this simple model can display multistability and periodic oscillations when it contains at least four different protein species. We prove that a system with three elementary species cannot be multistable.

  7. Formation of categories for complex novel auditory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirman, Daniel; Holt, Lori L.; McClelland, James L.

    2002-05-01

    Categorization of complex sounds with multiple, imperfectly valid cues is fundamental to phonetic perception. To study the general perceptual and cognitive processes that support complex sound categories, a novel stimulus set was created that allows tight control of category structure and input distributions. Stimuli were created from 300-ms noise bursts by applying bandstop filters at varying center frequencies and manipulating rise/fall time of stimulus onset and offset. Stimuli were assigned to one of two categories and presented to participants in a category identification and an AX discrimination task. Feedback was provided during identification trials, but not during discrimination tasks. Participants quickly learned to apply the category labels with high accuracy. Identification reaction times followed a pattern typical of speech stimuli with an apex in reaction time at category boundary. These results are consistent with formation of new auditory categories. Preliminary results indicate that discrimination performance is not tightly coupled with development of sharp identification functions and response-time peaks at category boundaries. Implications for mechanisms of speech categorization and category formation will be discussed. [Work supported by CNBC, NIH, and NSF.

  8. Understanding bistability in complex enzyme-driven reaction networks

    E-print Network

    Craciun, Gheorghe

    to variations in enzyme transcription activity (or even to enzyme malformation) when, in fact, those changesUnderstanding bistability in complex enzyme-driven reaction networks Gheorghe Craciun* , Yangzhong for enzyme catalysis of a single overall reaction. We present a theorem that distinguishes between those mass

  9. Interactive Formation Control in Complex Environments.

    PubMed

    Henry, Joseph; Shum, Hubert P H; Komura, Taku

    2013-08-13

    The degrees of freedom of a crowd is much higher than that provided by a standard user input device. Typically, crowd control systems require multiple passes to design crowd movements by specifying waypoints, and then defining character trajectories and crowd formation. Such multi-pass control would spoil the responsiveness and excitement of real-time control systems. In this paper, we propose a single-pass algorithm to control a crowd in complex environments. We observe that low level details in crowd movement are related to interactions between characters and the environment, such as diverging/merging at cross points, or climbing over obstacles. Therefore, we simplify the problem by representing the crowd with a deformable mesh, and allow the user, via multi-touch input, to specify high level movements and formations that are important for context delivery. To help prevent congestion, our system dynamically reassigns characters in the formation by employing a mass transport solver to minimise their overall movement. The solver uses a cost function to evaluate the impact from the environment, including obstacles and areas affecting movement speed. Experimental results show realistic crowd movement created with minimal high-level user inputs. Our algorithm is particularly useful for real-time applications including strategy games and interactive animation creation. PMID:23959626

  10. Interactive formation control in complex environments.

    PubMed

    Henry, Joseph; Shum, Hubert P H; Komura, Taku

    2014-02-01

    The degrees of freedom of a crowd is much higher than that provided by a standard user input device. Typically, crowd-control systems require multiple passes to design crowd movements by specifying waypoints, and then defining character trajectories and crowd formation. Such multi-pass control would spoil the responsiveness and excitement of real-time control systems. In this paper, we propose a single-pass algorithm to control a crowd in complex environments. We observe that low-level details in crowd movement are related to interactions between characters and the environment, such as diverging/merging at cross points, or climbing over obstacles. Therefore, we simplify the problem by representing the crowd with a deformable mesh, and allow the user, via multitouch input, to specify high-level movements and formations that are important for context delivery. To help prevent congestion, our system dynamically reassigns characters in the formation by employing a mass transport solver to minimize their overall movement. The solver uses a cost function to evaluate the impact from the environment, including obstacles and areas affecting movement speed. Experimental results show realistic crowd movement created with minimal high-level user inputs. Our algorithm is particularly useful for real-time applications including strategy games and interactive animation creation. PMID:24356364

  11. Formation of a Bridging Phosphinidene Thorium Complex.

    PubMed

    Behrle, Andrew C; Castro, Ludovic; Maron, Laurent; Walensky, Justin R

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis and structural determination of the first thorium phosphinidene complex are reported. The reaction of 2 equiv of (C5Me5)2Th(CH3)2 with H2P(2,4,6-(i)Pr3C6H2) at 95 °C produces [(C5Me5)2Th]2(?2-P[(2,6-CH2CHCH3)2-4-(i)PrC6H2] as well as 4 equiv of methane, 2 equiv from deprotonation of the phosphine and 2 equiv from C-H bond activation of one methyl group of each of the isopropyl groups at the 2- and 6-positions. Transition state calculations indicate that the steps in the mechanism are P-H, C-H, C-H, and then P-H bond activation to form the phosphinidene. PMID:26575219

  12. Vortex formation in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Osamu

    Complex plasma experiments in ground-based laboratories as well as in microgravity conditions have shown the formation of vortex structures in various conditions (e.g., 1,2,3,4). The vortex structures formed in a complex plasma are visible by naked eyes with the help of irradiating laser and the individual dust particles in the structure give us the opportunity to study detailed physics of the commonly observed natural phenomena known such as tornadoes, typhoons, hurricanes and dust devils. Based on the Navier-Stokes equation with proper complex plasma conditions we analyze as much as possible in a universal way the vortex structure and clarifies the role of the controlling parameters like flow velocity and external magnetic field. 1. G. E. Morfill,H. M. Thomas, U. Konopka,H. Rothermel, M. Zuzic, A. Ivlev, and J. Goree, Phys,. Rev. Lett. 83, 1598 (1999). 2. E. Nebbat and R. Annou, Phys. Plasmas 17, 093702 (2010). 3. Y. Saitou and O. Ishihara, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 185003 (2013). 4. V. N. Tsytovich and N. G. Gusein-zade, Plasma Phys. Rep. 39, 515 (2013).

  13. Effect of inclusion complex on nitrous acid reaction with flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalafi, Lida; Rafiee, Mohammad; Sedaghat, Sajjad

    2011-10-01

    The kinetic of the nitrous acid reactions with quercetin and catechin has been studied using spectrophotometric method in aqueous solution. The results show that these antioxidants participate in oxidation reactions with nitrous acid which is derived from protonation of nitrite ion in mild acidic conditions. Corresponding o-quinones as relatively stable products were detected by spectrophotometric techniques. pH dependence of the reactions has been examined and the rate constants of reactions were obtained by non-linear fitting of kinetic profiles. The effect of ?-cyclodextrin on the oxidation pathway was another object of this study. It is shown that ?-cyclodextrin has an inhibitory effect on the oxidation reaction. The rate constants of oxidation reactions for complexed forms and their stability constants were obtained based on changes in the reaction rates as a function of ?-cyclodextrin concentration.

  14. Using Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) to study complex liquid-phase Belinda Slakman

    E-print Network

    Using Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) to study complex liquid-phase systems, these reaction systems of interest can be extremely complex. For example, the reactions the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of these reaction systems manually is tedious

  15. Deduction of compound nucleus formation probability from the fragment angular distributions in heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, C.; Thomas, R. G.; Mohanty, A. K.; Kapoor, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    The presence of various fissionlike reactions in heavy-ion induced reactions is a major hurdle in the path to laboratory synthesis of heavy and super-heavy nuclei. It is known that the cross section of forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the three factors—the capture cross section, probability of compound nucleus formation PCN, and the survival probability of the compound nucleus against fission. As the probability of compound nucleus formation, PCN is difficult to theoretically estimate because of its complex dependence on several parameters; attempts have been made in the past to deduce it from the fission fragment anisotropy data. In the present work, the fragment anisotropy data for a number of heavy-ion reactions are analyzed and it is found that deduction of PCN from the anisotropy data also requires the knowledge of the ratio of relaxation time of the K degree of freedom to pre-equilibrium fission time.

  16. A complex reaction time study (Sternberg) in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Uri, John; Moore, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Simple and complex (Sternberg) reaction time studies were flown on three and seven day Shuttle flights in 1985. Three subjects did selftesting with an onboard handheld calculator without difficulty. There was little change in simple reaction time. One subject demonstrated a decrease in the processing rate during space motion sickness while a second exhibited an increase in complex reaction time without a change in processing rate during a period of high work load. The population was too small to demonstrate significant changes. This study demonstrates the ease and practicality of such measurements and indicates the potential value of such studies in space.

  17. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  18. Reaction of an Iron(IV) Nitrido Complex with Cyclohexadienes: Cycloaddition and Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The iron(IV) nitrido complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe?N reacts with 1,3-cyclohexadiene to yield the iron(II) pyrrolide complex PhB(MesIm)3Fe(?5-C4H4N) in high yield. The mechanism of product formation is proposed to involve sequential [4 + 1] cycloaddition and retro Diels–Alder reactions. Surprisingly, reaction with 1,4-cyclohexadiene yields the same iron-containing product, albeit in substantially lower yield. The proposed reaction mechanism, supported by electronic structure calculations, involves hydrogen-atom abstraction from 1,4-cyclohexadiene to provide the cyclohexadienyl radical. This radical is an intermediate in substrate isomerization to 1,3-cyclohexadiene, leading to formation of the pyrrolide product. PMID:25068927

  19. Fluid pressure and reaction zone formation at a lithological interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Chemical composition variations in reaction zones between two distinct lithologies are generally interpreted in terms of chemical potential gradients and diffusion process. Concentration profiles can then be used to quantify the species diffusion coefficients or the time scale of geological events. However, chemical potential gradients are also functions of temperature and pressure and local variations of these parameters can thus potentially modify the diffusion process. In northern Corsica, a centimeter scale reaction zone formed under blueschist conditions at a serpentinite - marble contact of sedimentary origin. Three sub-zones having chemical compositions evolving from one rock end-member to another divide the reaction zone along sharp interfaces. At the reaction zone - marble interface, marble decarbonation occurs to form wollastonite and carbonaceous matter. Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction and the respective increase in density of 25 % and 7 % in the bulk rock and in the garnet minerals are interpreted as records of a pressure gradient during reaction zone formation. Moreover, the formation of a volatile-free sub-zone in the reaction zone from reaction between the H2O-bearing serpentinite and the CO2-bearing marble released fluids at the contact. The impact of such a release on the fluid pressure was modelled by considering the effects of both the rock compaction and the transport of fluid by hydraulic diffusion. Modelling results indicates that > 0.5 GPa fluid overpressure can be generated at the contact if devolatilization rates are of the order of the one experimentally measured (> 10-5 kg of fluid/m3 of rock/s). The resulting pressure gradient is of the order of magnitude of the one necessary to counter-balance the effect on chemical potential of the chemical composition variations across the contact. Finally, after the reaction has run to completion, the model predicts that fluid rapidly diffuses away from the interface which thus stops reacting and is preserved during its exhumation.

  20. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    E-print Network

    Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li; Werner Scheid

    2007-10-17

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  1. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    E-print Network

    Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  2. Actinide complexation kinetics: rate and mechanism of dioxoneptunium (V) reaction with chlorophosphonazo III

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, G.; Feil-Jenkins, J.F.; Sullivan, J.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1996-12-01

    Rates of complex formation and dissociation in NpO{sub 2}{sup +}- Chlorophosphonazo III (2,7-bis(4-chloro-2-phosphonobenzeneazo)-1,8- dihydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid)(CLIII) were investigated by stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Also, limited studies were made of the rates of reaction of La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} with CLIII. Rate determining step in each system is an intramolecular process, the NpO{sub 2}{sup +}-CLIII reaction proceeding by a first order approach to equilibrium in the acid range from 0.1 to 1.0 M. Complex formation occurs independent of acidity, while both acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are observed. Activation parameters for the complex formation reaction are {Delta}H=46.2{+-}0.3 kJ/m and {Delta}S=7{+-} J/mK (I=1.0 M); these for the acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are {Delta}H=38.8{+-}0.6 kJ/m, {Delta}S=-96{+-}18 J/mK, {Delta}H=70.0{+-} kJ/m, and {Delta}S=17{+-}1 J/mK, respectively. An isokinetic relationship is observed between the activation parameters for CLIII complex formation with NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, Th{sup 4+}, and Zr{sup 4+}. Rates of CLIII complex formation reactions for Fe{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 4+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, Th{sup 4+}, La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, and Dy{sup 3+} correlate with cation radius rather than charge/radius ratio.

  3. A new metalation complex for organic synthesis and polymerization reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirshfield, S. M.

    1971-01-01

    Organometallic complex of N,N,N',N' tetramethyl ethylene diamine /TMEDA/ and lithium acts as metalation intermediate for controlled systhesis of aromatic organic compounds and polymer formation. Complex of TMEDA and lithium aids in preparation of various organic lithium compounds.

  4. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes in Reactions Involving Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeletic, Matthew; Veige, Adam

    This chapter focuses on carbon monoxide as a reagent in M-NHC catalysed reactions. The most important and popular of these reactions is hydroformylation. Unfortunately, uncertainty exists as to the identity of the active catalyst and whether the NHC is bound to the catalyst in a number of the reported reactions. Mixed bidentate NHC complexes and cobalt-based complexes provide for better stability of the catalyst. Catalysts used for hydroaminomethylation and carbonylation reactions show promise to rival traditional phosphine-based catalysts. Reports of decarbonylation are scarce, but the potential strength of the M-NHC bond is conducive to the harsh conditions required. This report will highlight, where appropriate, the potential benefits of exchanging traditional phosphorous ligands with N-heterocyclic carbenes as well as cases where the role of the NHC might need re-evaluation. A review by the author on this topic has recently appeared [1].

  5. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  6. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  7. Effect of reaction time on the formation of disinfection byproducts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of reaction time on the trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potentials was determined by chlorinating water samples from the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers. Samples were collected for three seasons at 12 locations on the Mississippi from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to New Orleans, Louisiana, and on the Missouri and Ohio 1.6 kilometers above their confluences with the Mississippi. Both types of compounds formed rapidly during the initial stages of the reaction-time period, with formation rates decreasing with time. The ratio of the nonpurgeable total organic-halide and trihalomethane concentrations decreased with time, with the nonpurgeable total organic-halide compounds forming faster during the first stages of the time period and the trihalomethane compounds forming faster during the latter stages of the time period. Variation with distance along the Mississippi River of the formation rates approximately paralleled the variation of the dissolved organic carbon concentration, indicating that the rates of formation, as well as the concentrations of the compounds formed, depended on the dissolved organic carbon concentration.

  8. First stage of CoSi{sub 2} formation during a solid-state reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Delattre, R.; Thomas, O.; Perrin-Pellegrino, C.; Rivero, C.; Simola, R.

    2014-12-28

    The kinetics of CoSi{sub 2} formation via a solid-state reaction between CoSi and single crystal Si has been the object of many studies in the past. Because of the importance of nucleation, complex kinetics has been reported. In this work, we investigate CoSi{sub 2} formation kinetics with in-situ diffraction during isothermal annealing of CoSi films on Si (100). In-situ measurements allow capturing the initial stage of CoSi{sub 2} formation. An initial t{sup 3/2} time-dependent evolution is observed and attributed to 3D growth of individual nuclei. This first regime is followed after the coalescence of the nuclei by a classical parabolic t{sup 1/2} one-dimensional film growth. We evidence a marked influence of the initial Co thickness (50?nm vs 10?nm) on the growth kinetics. A significant slowdown of the CoSi{sub 2} formation kinetics is observed for the thinnest film, whereas the activation energy remains the same. These results shine a new light on the complex formation kinetics of CoSi{sub 2} during solid-state reaction between CoSi and single crystal silicon and bring new knowledge about what occurs in the ultra-thin film regime, which is important for nanotechnologies.

  9. Tungsten oxo salicylate complexes from tungsten hexachloride reactions systems.

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, V; Mason, M H; Botts, J B; Botts, A M; Baroni, T E; Heppert, J A; Rheingold, A L; Liable-Sands, L; Yap, G P

    2001-09-10

    Tungsten hexachloride is a potent halogen-transfer agent, capable of reacting directly with salicylic acid to generate a tungsten oxo fragment and salicoyl chloride. As a result, oxo complexes dominate the chemistry of tungsten(VI) salicylates. Both mono- and disalicylate substituted tungsten oxo complexes are accessible. The Brønsted free acid W(=O)Cl(Hsal)(sal) complex is a sparingly soluble, presumably polymeric material that can be dissolved in THF. The THF adduct has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, although an X-ray crystallographic study indicates that the product cocrystallizes with a structurally analogous d(1) WCl(2)(Hsal.THF)(sal) byproduct. The remaining chloride ligand in W(=O)Cl(Hsal)(sal) is replaced by a bridging oxo unit when the reaction contains a significant excess of salicylic acid. The product "linear" oxo bridged ditungsten complex, [W(=O)(Hsal)(sal)](2)O, forms intramolecular hydrogen bonds, accounting for its high solubility in noncoordinating solvents. An X-ray study shows that the intramolecular Hsal.sal hydrogen bonding in this complex accommodates a more linear W-O-W arrangement than does a previously observed class of isostructural diolate derivatives. Tungsten oxo tetrachloride, formed in the initial reaction between salicylic acid and WCl(6), also reacts with the salicoyl chloride byproduct to generate tungsten salicoylate (OAr-2-COCl) complexes. PMID:11531451

  10. Equilibrium and Kinetic Investigations of the Interaction of Model Platinum(II) Complex with DNA Constituents in Reference to the Antitumour Activity: Complex-Formation Reactions of [Pd(N,N-diethylethylenediamine)(H2O)2]2+ with Ligands of Biological Significance and Displacement Reactions of DNA Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Shoukry, Eman Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    The [Pd(DEEN)Cl2] and [Pt(DEEN)Cl2] complexes were synthesized and characterized where DEEN = N,N-diethylethylenediamine. The stoichiometry and stability of the complexes formed between various biologically relevant ligands (amino acids, peptides, DNA constituents and dicarboxylic acids) and [Pd(DEEN)(H2O)2]2+ were investigated at 37°C and 0.16 M ionic strength. The stability constant of the complexes formed in solution were determined and the binding centres of the ligands were assigned. The concentration distribution diagrams of the complexes were evaluated The equilibrium constants for the displacement of representative coordinated ligands such as inosine, glycine or methionine by cysteine were calculated and the concentration distribution diagrams of the various species were evaluated. The kinetics of base hydrolysis of free and coordinated S-methylcysteine methyl ester was investigated. The mechanism of hydrolysis was discussed. PMID:19696935

  11. DNA Branch Migration Reactions Through Photocontrollable Toehold Formation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fujian; You, Mingxu; Han, Da; Xiong, Xiangling

    2013-01-01

    Strand displacement cascades are commonly used to make dynamically assembled structures. Particularly, the concept of “toehold-mediated DNA branch migration reactions” has attracted considerable attention in relation to dynamic DNA nanostructures. However, it is a challenge to obtain and control the formation of pure 1:1 ratio DNA duplexes with toehold structures. Here, for the first time, we report a photocontrolled toehold formation method, which is based on the photocleavage of 2-nitrobenzyl linker-embedded DNA hairpin precursor structures. UV light irradiation (??365 nm) of solutions containing these DNA hairpin structures causes the complete cleavage of the nitrobenzyl linker, and pure 1:1 DNA duplexes with toehold structures are easily formed. Our experimental results indicate that the amount of toehold can be controlled by simply changing the dose of UV irradiation and that the resulting toehold structures can be used for subsequent toehold-mediated DNA branch migration reactions, e.g., DNA hybridization chain reactions. This newly established method will find broad application in the construction of light-powered, controllable and dynamic DNA nanostructures or large-scale DNA circuits. PMID:23642046

  12. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Hastings, Harold M.; Testa, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Imperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines), and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue) propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red); their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentiallymore »unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe 3 + with colorless SCN ? to form the blood-red Fe ( SCN ) 2 + complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe ( NO 3 ) 3 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing. « less

  13. Structure and kinetics of formation of catechol complexes of ferric soybean lipoxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Brennan, B.A.; Chase, D.B. |

    1995-11-21

    Ferric soybean lipoxygenase forms stable complexes with 4-substituted catechols. The structure of the complex between the enzyme and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile has been studied by resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, visible, and X-ray spectroscopies. It is a bidentate iron-catecholate complex with at least one water ligand. The kinetics of formation of complexes between lipoxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile and 3,4-dihydroxyacetophenone have been studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The data are consistent with two kinetically distinct, reversible steps. The pH dependence of the first step suggests that the substrate for the reaction is the catechol monoanion. When these results are combined, plausible mechanisms for the complexation reaction are suggested. 51 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Complex signal amplitude analysis for complete fusion nuclear reaction products

    E-print Network

    Yu. S. Tsyganov

    2015-06-07

    A complex analysis has been performed on the energy amplitude signals corresponding to events of Z=117 element measured in the 249Bk+48Ca complete fusion nuclear reaction. These signals were detected with PIPS position sensitive detector. The significant values of pulse height defect both for recoils (ER) and fission fragments (FF) were measured. Comparison with the computer simulations and empirical formulae has been performed both for ER and FF signals.

  15. Complex signal amplitude analysis for complete fusion nuclear reaction products

    E-print Network

    Tsyganov, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    A complex analysis has been performed on the energy amplitude signals corresponding to events of Z=117 element measured in the 249Bk+48Ca complete fusion nuclear reaction. These signals were detected with PIPS position sensitive detector. The significant values of pulse height defect both for recoils (ER) and fission fragments (FF) were measured. Comparison with the computer simulations and empirical formulae has been performed both for ER and FF signals.

  16. Evolution of heliobacteria: implications for photosynthetic reaction center complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermaas, W. F.; Blankenship, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary position of the heliobacteria, a group of green photosynthetic bacteria with a photosynthetic apparatus functionally resembling Photosystem I of plants and cyanobacteria, has been investigated with respect to the evolutionary relationship to Gram-positive bacteria and cyanobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the heliobacteria appear to be most closely related to Gram-positive bacteria, but also an evolutionary link to cyanobacteria is evident. Interestingly, a 46-residue domain including the putative sixth membrane-spanning region of the heliobacterial reaction center protein show rather strong similarity (33% identity and 72% similarity) to a region including the sixth membrane-spanning region of the CP47 protein, a chlorophyll-binding core antenna polypeptide of Photosystem II. The N-terminal half of the heliobacterial reaction center polypeptide shows a moderate sequence similarity (22% identity over 232 residues) with the CP47 protein, which is significantly more than the similarity with the Photosystem I core polypeptides in this region. An evolutionary model for photosynthetic reaction center complexes is discussed, in which an ancestral homodimeric reaction center protein (possibly resembling the heliobacterial reaction center protein) with 11 membrane-spanning regions per polypeptide has diverged to give rise to the core of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and of the photosynthetic apparatus in green, purple, and heliobacteria.

  17. Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian Kent; Quemener, Goulven; Balakrishman, Naduvalath

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

  18. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Our work involves the study of intermediate energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions. This work has two foci. On the one hand, we desire to learn about the properties of nuclear matter under abnormal conditions, in this energy domain, predominately low densities. This purpose runs abreast of the second, which is the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. The two objectives are inexorably linked because our experimental laboratory for studying nuclear matter properties is a dynamic one. We are forced to ask how nuclear matter properties, such as phase transitions, are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. It may be that irrefutable information about nuclear matter will not be extracted from the reaction work. Nevertheless, we are compelled to undertake this effort not only because it is the only game in town and as yet we do not know that information cannot be extracted, but also because of our second objective. The process leads to an understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. Our program has been: To study energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition by studying incomplete fusion reactions. To gain confidence that we understand how highly excited systems decompose by studying all emissions from the highly excited systems. To push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain, with excitation function studies. And attempt to learn about the dynamics of the decays using particle-particle correlations. In the last effort, we have decided to focus on simple systems, where we believe, definitive statements are possible. These avenues of research share a common theme, large complex fragment production.

  19. Transition state ensemble optimization for reactions of arbitrary complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinovjev, Kirill; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we use Variational Transition State Theory (VTST) to develop a practical method for transition state ensemble optimization by looking for an optimal hyperplanar dividing surface in a space of meaningful trial collective variables. These might be interatomic distances, angles, electrostatic potentials, etc. Restrained molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain on-the-fly estimates of ensemble averages that guide the variations of the hyperplane maximizing the transmission coefficient. A central result of our work is an expression that quantitatively estimates the importance of the coordinates used for the localization of the transition state ensemble. Starting from an arbitrarily large set of trial coordinates, one can distinguish those that are indeed essential for the advance of the reaction. This facilitates the use of VTST as a practical theory to study reaction mechanisms of complex processes. The technique was applied to the reaction catalyzed by an isochorismate pyruvate lyase. This reaction involves two simultaneous chemical steps and has a shallow transition state region, making it challenging to define a good reaction coordinate. Nevertheless, the hyperplanar transition state optimized in the space of 18 geometrical coordinates provides a transmission coefficient of 0.8 and a committor histogram well-peaked about 0.5, proving the strength of the method. We have also tested the approach with the study of the NaCl dissociation in aqueous solution, a stringest test for a method based on transition state theory. We were able to find essential degrees of freedom consistent with the previous studies and to improve the transmission coefficient with respect to the value obtained using solely the NaCl distance as the reaction coordinate.

  20. Dynamics of Lane Formation in Driven Binary Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Raeth, C.; Thomas, H. M.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Morfill, G. E.; Wysocki, A.; Loewen, H.; Goedheer, W. J.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.

    2009-02-27

    The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane-formation process is in good agreement with computer simulations of a binary Yukawa model with Langevin dynamics. The laning is quantified in terms of the anisotropic scaling index, leading to a universal order parameter for driven systems.

  1. Validated spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate based on charge transfer complexation reactions.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek S; El-Kafrawy, Dina S; Mahrous, Mohamed S; Abdel-Khalek, Magdi M; Abo-Gharam, Amira H

    2016-02-15

    This work presents the development, validation and application of four simple and direct spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate (VP) through charge transfer complexation reactions. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with p-chloranilic acid (p-CA) in acetone to give a purple colored product with maximum absorbance at 524nm. The second method depends on the reaction of VP with dichlone (DC) in dimethylformamide forming a reddish orange product measured at 490nm. The third method is based upon the interaction of VP and picric acid (PA) in chloroform resulting in the formation of a yellow complex measured at 415nm. The fourth method involves the formation of a yellow complex peaking at 361nm upon the reaction of the drug with iodine in chloroform. Experimental conditions affecting the color development were studied and optimized. Stoichiometry of the reactions was determined. The proposed spectrophotometric procedures were effectively validated with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, specificity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Calibration curves of the formed color products with p-CA, DC, PA and iodine showed good linear relationships over the concentration ranges 24-144, 40-200, 2-20 and 1-8?g/mL respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the assay of sodium valproate in tablets and oral solution dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Assay results were statistically compared to a reference pharmacopoeial HPLC method where no significant differences were observed between the proposed methods and reference method. PMID:26574649

  2. Snapshot of a Reaction Intermediate: Analysis of Benzoylformate Decarboxylase in Complex with a Benzoylphosphonate Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Baykal, Ahmet T.; Nemeria, Natalia; Yep, Alejandra; Ruby, David I.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Kenyon, George L.; McLeish, Michael J.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-04-22

    Benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) is a thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent enzyme acting on aromatic substrates. In addition to its metabolic role in the mandelate pathway, BFDC shows broad substrate specificity coupled with tight stereo control in the carbon-carbon bond-forming reverse reaction, making it a useful biocatalyst for the production of chiral-hydroxy ketones. The reaction of methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP), an analogue of the natural substrate benzoylformate, with BFDC results in the formation of a stable analogue (C2{alpha}-phosphonomandelyl-ThDP) of the covalent ThDP-substrate adduct C2{alpha}-mandelyl-ThDP. Formation of the stable adduct is confirmed both by formation of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric form of ThDP (commonly observed when ThDP forms tetrahedral complexes with its substrates) and by high-resolution mass spectrometry of the reaction mixture. In addition, the structure of BFDC with the MBP inhibitor was solved by X-ray crystallography to a spatial resolution of 1.37 {angstrom} (PDB ID 3FSJ). The electron density clearly shows formation of a tetrahedral adduct between the C2 atom of ThDP and the carbonyl carbon atom of the MBP. This adduct resembles the intermediate from the penultimate step of the carboligation reaction between benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The combination of real-time kinetic information via stopped-flow circular dichroism with steady-state data from equilibrium circular dichroism measurements and X-ray crystallography reveals details of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by BFDC. The MBP-ThDP adduct on BFDC is compared to the recently solved structure of the same adduct on benzaldehyde lyase, another ThDP-dependent enzyme capable of catalyzing aldehyde condensation with high stereospecificity.

  3. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Karin I; Fayolle, Edith C; Reiter, John B; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T = 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics--CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO--in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history. PMID:25302375

  4. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  5. The significance of surface complexation reactions in hydrologic systems: a geochemist's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koretsky, C.

    2000-05-01

    Complexation reactions at the mineral-water interface affect the transport and transformation of metals and organic contaminants, nutrient availability in soils, formation of ore deposits, acidification of watersheds and the global cycling of elements. Such reactions can be understood by quantifying speciation reactions in homogeneous aqueous solutions, characterizing reactive sites at mineral surfaces and developing models of the interactions between aqueous species at solid surfaces. In this paper, the application of thermodynamic principles to quantify aqueous complexation reactions is described. This is followed by a brief overview of a few of the methods that have been used to characterize reactive sites on mineral surfaces. Next, the application of empirical and semi-empirical models of adsorption at the mineral-water interface, including distribution coefficients, simple ion exchange models, and Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the limitations of such models in providing an adequate representation of adsorption in hydrological systems. These limitations arise because isotherms do not account for the structure of adsorbed species, nor do they account for the development of surface charge with adsorption. This is contrasted with more sophisticated models of adsorption, termed 'surface complexation models', which include the constant capacitance model, the diffuse layer model, the triple layer model and the MUSIC model. In these models, speciation reactions between surface functional groups and dissolved species control the variable surface charge build-up and the specific adsorption properties of minerals in aqueous solutions. Next, the influence of mineral surface speciation on the reactivity of adsorbed species and on far from equilibrium dissolution rates of minerals is discussed. Finally, the applicability of microscopic models of surface complexation to field-scale systems is explored and the need to integrate sophisticated surface chemical and hydrological modeling approaches is stressed.

  6. Direct electronic probing of biological complexes formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Magliulo, Maria; Manoli, Kyriaki; Giordano, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Functional bio-interlayer organic field - effect transistors (FBI-OFET), embedding streptavidin, avidin and neutravidin as bio-recognition element, have been studied to probe the electronic properties of protein complexes. The threshold voltage control has been achieved modifying the SiO2 gate diaelectric surface by means of the deposition of an interlayer of bio-recognition elements. A threshold voltage shift with respect to the unmodified dielectric surface toward more negative potential values has been found for the three different proteins, in agreement with their isoelectric points. The relative responses in terms of source - drain current, mobility and threshold voltage upon exposure to biotin of the FBI-OFET devices have been compared for the three bio-recognition elements.

  7. Kuiper-belt Binary Formation through Exchange Reactions

    E-print Network

    Yoko Funato; Junichiro Makino; Piet Hut; Eiichiro Kokubo; Daisuke Kinoshita

    2003-03-28

    Recent observations (Burnes et al 2002,Veillet et al 2002, Margot et al 2002a) have revealed an unexpectedly high binary fraction among the Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) that populate the Kuiper Belt. The TNO binaries are strikingly different from asteroid binaries in four respects (Veillet et al 2002): their frequency is an order of magnitude larger, the mass ratio of their components is closer to unity, and their orbits are wider and highly eccentric. Two explanations have been proposed for their formation, one assuming large numbers of massive bodies (Weidenschilling 2002), and one assuming large numbers of light bodies (Goldreich et al 2002). We argue that both assumptions are unwarranted, and we show how TNO binaries can be produced from a modest number of intermediate-mass bodies of the type predicted by the gravitational instability theory for the formation of planetesimals (Goldreich and Ward 1973). We start with a TNO binary population similar to the asteroid binary population, but subsequently modified by three-body exchange reactions, a process that is far more efficient in the Kuiper belt, because of the much smaller tidal perturbations by the Sun. Our mechanism can naturally account for all four characteristics that distinguish TNO binaries from main-belt asteroid binaries.

  8. The formation of Kuiper-belt binaries through exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Funato, Yoko; Makino, Junichiro; Hut, Piet; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Kinoshita, Daisuke

    2004-02-01

    Recent observations have revealed that an unexpectedly high fraction--a few per cent--of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) that inhabit the Kuiper belt are binaries. The components have roughly equal masses, with very eccentric orbits that are wider than a hundred times the radius of the primary. Standard theories of binary asteroid formation tend to produce close binaries with circular orbits, so two models have been proposed to explain the unique characteristics of the TNOs. Both models, however, require extreme assumptions regarding the size distribution of the TNOs. Here we report a mechanism that is capable of producing binary TNOs with the observed properties during the early stages of their formation and growth. The only required assumption is that the TNOs were initially formed through gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary dust disk. The basis of the mechanism is an exchange reaction in which a binary whose primary component is much more massive than the secondary interacts with a third body, whose mass is comparable to that of the primary. The low-mass secondary component is ejected and replaced by the third body in a wide but eccentric orbit. PMID:14765188

  9. Complex reaction networks in high temperature hydrocarbon chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mutlay, ?brahim; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2015-03-28

    Complex chemical reaction mechanisms of high temperature hydrocarbon decomposition are represented as networks and their underlying graph topologies are analyzed as a dynamic system. As model reactants, 1,3-butadiene, acetylene, benzene, ethane, ethylene, methane, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and toluene are chosen in view of their importance for the global environment, energy technologies as well as their quantum chemical properties. Accurate kinetic mechanisms are computationally simulated and converted to bipartite graphs for the incremental conversion steps of the main reactant. Topological analysis of the resulting temporal networks reveals novel features unknown to classical chemical kinetics theory. The time-dependent percolation behavior of the chemical reaction networks shows infinite order phase transition and a unique correlation between the percolation thresholds and electron distribution of the reactants. These observations are expected to yield important applications in the development of a new theoretical perspective to chemical reactions and technological processes e.g. inhibition of greenhouse gases, efficient utilization of fossil fuels, and large scale carbon nanomaterial production. PMID:25720589

  10. In vivo formation of Maillard reaction free radicals in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, R V; Fong, A J; Sayre, R M

    2001-09-01

    The Maillard browning reaction between carbohydrates and amines is part of an extensive series of reactions that is the basis for the brown color caused by the "sunless tanning" agent dihydroxyacetone in self-tanning products. The initial stages of the reaction are quite complex, but the ultimate products are brown polymers known collectively as melanoidins. We have now used electron spin resonance to show that radicals are produced in vivo by the Maillard reaction, initiated by treating the skin of hairless mice with a solution of dihydroxyacetone in buffer. Dihydroxyacetone was used as the carbohydrate because it is simple but highly reactive and is the only USFDA approved color additive for the production of a sunless tanning response on skin. Treated skin turned brown within 24 h and showed an electron spin resonance signal after sacrifice of the animal. The control sample, consisting of untreated skin from the same animal, remained its original pink color and had no electron spin resonance signal. In corresponding ex vivo experiments in which mouse skin was soaked in dihydroxyacetone solutions, it was conclusively demonstrated that the presence of the dihydroxyacetone was required for radical formation in skin. In both the in vivo and ex vivo reactions the electron spin resonance signal consists of a broad single line with a peak-to-peak linewidth of 15 Gauss and a g value of 2.0035. We suggest that dihydroxyacetone interacts on skin through a free radical mediated reaction similar to its in vitro reactions with amines and amino acids. PMID:11564185

  11. Mössbauer study of peroxynitrito complex formation with FeIII-chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homonnay, Zoltan; Buszlai, Peter; Nádor, Judit; Sharma, Virender K.; Kuzmann, Erno; Vértes, Attila

    2012-03-01

    The reaction of the ?-oxo-diiron(III)-L complex (L = EDTA, ethylene diamine tetraacetate, HEDTA, hydroxyethyl ethylene diamine triacetate, and CyDTA, cyclohexane diamine tetraacetate) with peroxynitrite in alkaline solution was studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy using rapid-freezing technique. These complexes yield an (L)FeIII( ? 2-O2)^{3-} complex ion when they react with hydrogen peroxide and the formation of the peroxide adduct results in a deep purple coloration of the solution. The same color appears when the reaction occurs with peroxinitrite. Although spectrophotometry indicated some difference between the molar extinction coefficients of the peroxo and the peroxinitrito adducts, the Mössbauer parameters proved to be the same within experimental error. It is concluded that the peroxynitrite ion decomposes when reacting with FeIII(L) and the peroxo adduct forms.

  12. Complexation of Al(III) with gluconate in alkaline to hyperalkaline solutions: formation, stability and structure.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Attila; Tasi, Ágost Gyula; Peintler, Gábor; Forgo, Péter; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to suggestions in the literature, it has been proven that Al(III) forms a 1?:?1 complex with gluconate (hereafter Gluc(-)) in strongly alkaline (pH > 12) aqueous solutions. The complex formation was proven via(27)Al and (1)H NMR, freezing-point depression, polarimetric measurements as well as potentiometric and conductometric titrations. This complexation is a pH independent process, i.e., a condensation reaction takes place. The stability constant of the complex formed was derived from (1)H NMR and polarimetric measurements, and was found to be log K = 2.4 ± 0.4. In the complex formed, Al(III) has a tetrahedral geometry, and the Al(OH)4(-) is most probably statistically distributed between the alcoholate groups of the Gluc(-). PMID:23897548

  13. The formation of iron complexes with bile and bile constituents

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, A.; Miles, P. M.

    1970-01-01

    Inorganic iron is able to form complexes with whole bile and with some bile constituents and these remain soluble at neutral pH. Ascorbic acid does not appear to play a part in this process. The formation of soluble complexes in vivo is an important factor in maintaining intraluminal iron in a form available for absorption, and bile may have some importance in this respect. PMID:5473602

  14. Complex fragment emission in low energy light-ion reactions

    E-print Network

    S. Kundu; C. Bhattacharya; K. Banerjee; T. K. Rana; S. Bhattacharya; A. Dey; T. K. Ghosh; G. Mukherjee; J. K. Meena; P. Mali; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Pandit; H. Pai; S. R. Banerjee; D. Gupta; P. Banerjee; Suresh Kumar; A. Shrivastava; A. Chatterjee; K. Ramachandran; K. Mahata; S. K. Pandit; S. Santra

    2013-02-05

    Inclusive energy spectra of the complex fragments (3 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 5) emitted in the reactions $^{12}$C (77 MeV)+ $^{28}$Si, $^{11}$B (64 MeV)+ $^{28}$Si and $^{12}$C (73 MeV)+ $^{27}$Al (all having the same excitation energy of $ \\sim$ 67 MeV), have been measured in the angular range of 10$^\\circ$ $\\lesssim \\theta_{lab} \\lesssim$ 60$^\\circ$. The fully energy damped (fusion-fission) and the partially energy damped (deep inelastic) components of the fragment energy spectra have been extracted. It has been found that the yields of the fully energy damped fragments for all the above reactions are in conformity with the respective statistical model predictions. The time scales of various deep inelastic fragment emissions have been extracted from the angular distribution data. The angular momentum dissipation in deep inelastic collisions has been estimated from the data and it has been found to be close to the corresponding sticking limit value.

  15. Cation-induced formation of a macro-glucan synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Delmer, D.; Solomon, M.; Andrawis, A.; Amor, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    Incubation of Chaps or digitonin-solubilized membrane proteins from cotton fiber with Ca{sup 2+} in combination with Mg{sup 2+}, leads to formation of a complex which can be sedimented within 15 min at 15,000 g. The complex is enriched >10-fold in callose synthase activity and possesses a characteristic pattern of enriched polypeptides when analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Although cation dependent, formation of the complex is not dependent upon the presence of the callose synthase substrate, UDP-glc, indicating that complex formation is not due to entrapment of the enzyme by association with glucan product. The enriched polypeptides include: >200, 50, and 46 kD, all of which have been shown by direct photo-labeling to interact with {sup 92}P-UDP-glc in a Ca{sup 2+} or beta-glucoside dependent reaction are considered likely subunits of callose synthase; a 60-62 kD doublet which is recognized by our MAb 2-1 which can form an immune complex with callose synthase; 74 and 34 kD polypeptides which also interact with UDP-glc, but do not associate with callose synthase in the presence of EDTA. A similar phenomenon is also observed with solubilized membrane proteins from mung beans. Possible functions of each of the enriched polypeptides, the catalytic properties, and ultra-structure of this macro-glucan synthase complex are currently under investigation.

  16. Multiple equilibria in complex chemical reaction networks: extensions to entrapped species models

    E-print Network

    Craciun, Gheorghe

    Multiple equilibria in complex chemical reaction networks: extensions to entrapped species models G of complex chemical reaction networks, taken with mass-action kinetics, to admit multiple equilibria.) In both papers, it was understood that the reactions were taking place in the context of what chemical

  17. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  18. Reversible Dissociation and Ligand-Glutathione Exchange Reaction in Binuclear Cationic Tetranitrosyl Iron Complex with Penicillamine

    PubMed Central

    Syrtsova, Lidia; Sanina, Natalia; Lyssenko, Konstantin; Kabachkov, Evgeniy; Psikha, Boris; Shkondina, Natal'ja; Pokidova, Olesia; Kotelnikov, Alexander; Aldoshin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of the decomposition of two nitrosyl iron complexes (NICs) with penicillamine thiolic ligands [Fe2(SC5H11NO2)2(NO)4]SO4·5H2O (I) and glutathione- (GSH-) ligands [Fe2(SC10H17N3O6)2(NO)4]SO4·2H2O (II), which spontaneously evolve to NO in aqueous medium. NO formation was measured by a sensor electrode and by spectrophotometric methods by measuring the formation of a hemoglobin- (Hb-) NO complex. The NO evolution reaction rate from (I)??k1 = (4.6 ± 0.1)·10?3?s?1 and the elimination rate constant of the penicillamine ligand k2 = (1.8 ± 0.2)·10?3?s?1 at 25°C in 0.05?M phosphate buffer, ?pH 7.0, was calculated using kinetic modeling based on the experimental data. Both reactions are reversible. Spectrophotometry and mass-spectrometry methods have firmly shown that the penicillamine ligand is exchanged for GS? during decomposition of 1.5·10?4?M (I) in the presence of 10?3?M GSH, with 76% yield in 24?h. As has been established, such behaviour is caused by the resistance of (II) to decomposition due to the higher affinity of iron to GSH in the complex. The discovered reaction may impede S-glutathionylation of the essential enzyme systems in the presence of (I) and is important for metabolism of NIC, connected with its antitumor activity. PMID:24790592

  19. Complex patterns in patricle aggregation models of biological formation

    E-print Network

    Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    Complex patterns in patricle aggregation models of biological formation Theodore Kolokolnikov Joint/attraction, the steady state typically consists of a bounded "particle cloud" whose diameter and is independent of N)dy. · Questions 1. Describe the equilibrium cloud shape in the limit t 2. What about dynamics? #12;Morse force

  20. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jirsa, M.A.; Miller, J.D., Jr.; Morey, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a ???1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by ???1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    PubMed

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. PMID:17997209

  2. Dissection and engineering of the Escherichia coli formate hydrogenlyase complex.

    PubMed

    McDowall, Jennifer S; Hjersing, M Charlotte; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The Escherichia coli formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex is produced under fermentative conditions and couples formate oxidation to hydrogen production. In this work, the architecture of FHL has been probed by analysing affinity-tagged complexes from various genetic backgrounds. In a successful attempt to stabilize the complex, a strain encoding a fusion between FdhF and HycB has been engineered and characterised. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of the hycG gene was performed, which is predicted to encode a hydrogenase subunit important for regulating sensitivity to oxygen. This work helps to define the core components of FHL and provides solutions to improving the stability of the enzyme. PMID:26358294

  3. Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion

    E-print Network

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    the approach of a combustion front. Analysis of gases produced from the reaction cell revealed that pyrolysisPaper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion Authors Abu believed to cause fuel formation for in-situ combustion have been studied and modeled. A thin, packed bed

  4. Three-Coordinate Terminal Imidoiron(III) Complexes: Structure, Spectroscopy, and Mechanism of Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Ryan E.; DeYonker, Nathan J.; Eckert, Nathan A.; Cundari, Thomas R.; DeBeer, Serena; Bill, Eckhard; Ottenwaelder, Xavier; Flaschenriem, Christine; Holland, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction of 1-adamantyl azide with iron(I) diketiminate precursors gives metastable but isolable imidoiron(III) complexes LFe=NAd (L = bulky ?-diketiminate ligand; Ad = 1-adamantyl). This paper addresses: (1) the spectroscopic and structural characterization of the Fe=N multiple bond in these interesting three-coordinate iron imido complexes, and (2) the mechanism through which the imido complexes form. The iron(III) imido complexes have been examined by 1H NMR and EPR spectroscopies and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility (SQUID), and structurally characterized by crystallography and/or X-ray absorption (EXAFS) measurements. These data show that the imido complexes have quartet ground states and short (1.68 ± 0.01 Å) iron-nitrogen bonds. The formation of the imido complexes proceeds through unobserved iron–RN3 intermediates, which are indicated by QM/MM computations to be best described as iron(II) with an RN3 radical anion. The radical character on the organoazide bends its NNN linkage to enable easy N2 loss and imido complex formation. The product distribution between imidoiron(III) products and hexazene-bridged diiron(II) products is solvent-dependent, and the solvent dependence can be explained by coordination of certain solvents to the iron(I) precursor prior to interaction with the organoazide. PMID:20524625

  5. Photochemical reactions of metal nitrosyl complexes. Mechanisms of NO reactions with biologically relevant metal centers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ford, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    The discoveries that nitric oxide (a.k.a. nitrogen monoxide) serves important roles in mammalian bioregulation and immunology have stimulated intense interest in the chemistry and biochemistry of NO and derivatives such as metal nitrosyl complexes. Also of interest are strategies to deliver NO to biological targets on demand. One such strategy would be to employ a precursor which displays relatively low thermal reactivity but is photochemically active to release NO. This proposition led us to investigate laser flash and continuous photolysis kinetics of nitrosyl complexes such as the Roussin's iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster anions more »$' id='E1'> Fe 2 S 2 ( NO ) 4 2 ? and Fe 4 S 3 ( NO ) 7 ? and several ruthenium salen and porphyrin nitrosyls. These include studies using metal-nitrosyl photochemistry as a vehicle for delivering NO to hypoxic cell cultures in order to sensitize ? -radiation damage. Also studied were the rates and mechanisms of NO “on” reactions with model water soluble heme compounds, the ferriheme protein met-myoglobin and various ruthenium complexes using ns laser flash photolysis techniques. An overview of these studies is presented. « less

  6. The Copper-nicotinamide complex: sustainable applications in coupling and cycloaddition reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crystalline copper (II)-nicotinamide complex, synthesized via simple mixing of copper chloride and nicotinamide solution at room temperature, catalyzes the C-S, C-N bond forming and cycloaddition reactions under a variety of sustainable reaction conditions.

  7. Chiral symmetry breaking in complex chemical systems during formation of life on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, A. F.; Konstantinov, K. K.

    2015-09-01

    The chiral symmetry in complex chemical systems containing many amino acids and characterized by many similar chemical reactions (a situation corresponding to the formation of life on Earth) is considered. It is shown that effective averaging over similar reaction channels may lead to very weak effective enantioselectivity, which does not allow for chiral symmetry breaking in most known models. A class of models with simple and catalytic synthesis of one amino acid, the formation of peptides with a length reaching three, and the precipitation of one insoluble pair of materials is analyzed. It is proven that chiral symmetry breaking may occur in one possible version from an insoluble pair of materials even in the complete absence of catalytic synthesis of amino acid. It is shown that the presence of weakly enantioselective catalytic synthesis in a model significantly increases the number of possible versions in which chiral symmetry breaks.

  8. Oxidation Reactions of Dithiocarbamate Complexes of Ruthenium(II).

    PubMed

    Leung, Wa-Hung; Chim, Joyce L. C.; Hou, Hongwei; Hun, Tom S. M.; Williams, Ian D.; Wong, Wing-Tak

    1997-09-24

    The reaction of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2) (Et(2)dtc = N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate; DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) with t-BuNC gave trans-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CN-t-Bu)(2), 1. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n with a = 9.753(2) Å, b = 11.583(2) Å, c = 12.974(2) Å, and beta = 91.8(2) degrees for Z = 2. The crystal structure of 1 shows the trans disposition of the two isocyanides; the mean Ru-S and Ru-C distances are 2.409 and 1.977(2) Å, respectively. Treatment of [Ru(diene)Cl(2)](n)() with Na(Et(2)dtc) afforded Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(diene) (diene = bicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene (NBD), 2, 1,5-cyclooctadiene (COD), 3). Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 7.316(1) Å, b = 10.346(1) Å, c = 15.123(2) Å, alpha = 103.69(2) degrees, beta = 93.54(2) degrees, and gamma = 100.61(2) degrees for Z = 2. The mean Ru-S and Ru-C distances in 2 are 2.416 and 2.137 Å, respectively. The reaction of cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CO)(2) with iodine gave the 2:1 molecular iodine complex cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CO)(2).(1)/(2)I(2) 4, which crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 7.347(2), b = 22.227(2) Å, c = 12.891(2) Å, and beta =95.98 (2) degrees for Z = 4. The mean Ru-S and Ru-C and the I-I distances in complex 4 are 2.427, 1.903, and 2.745(1) Å, respectively. Treatment of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2) with I(2) gave the linear Ru(II)-Ru(III)-Ru(III) trimer [Ru(3)(Et(2)dtc)(6)(DMSO)(2)](I(3))(2), 5, which crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 14.125(3) Å, b = 20.829(6) Å, c = 13.658(3) Å, alpha = 97.57(2) degrees, beta = 110.01(2) degrees, and gamma = 71.25(2) degrees for Z = 2. The structure of complex 6 can be viewed as consisting of a {Ru(2)(III)(Et(2)dtc)(4)}(2+) core and a {Ru(II)(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2)} moiety, which are linked together via the two dithiocarbamate sulfurs of the latter. While the two Ru(III) centers are connected by a Ru-Ru single bond (Ru-Ru = 2.826(2) Å), there is no direct interaction between the Ru(III) and Ru(II) centers. Oxidation of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)L(2) (L = PPh(3), t-BuNC) by I(2) gave the respective [Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)L(2)](+) cations. The reaction of cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(PPh(3))(2) with excess tosyl azide gave the diamagnetic Ru(IV) tetrazene complex Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(Ts(2)N(4)), 7. Complex 7 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 10.380(1) Å, b = 11.322(1) Å, c = 15.310(1) Å, alpha = 106.84(2) degrees, beta = 106.87(2) degrees, and gamma = 92.63(2) degrees for Z = 2. The Ru-S and Ru-N(alpha) distances in 7 are 2.385 and 1.98 Å, respectively. The formal potentials of the Ru dithiocarbamate complexes were determined by cyclic voltammetry. PMID:11670104

  9. Synthetic Reactions of MTC and MTN Bonds: Ylide Formation, Rearrangement, and 1,3-Dipolar

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jianbo

    rearrangements) and related reactions 166 11.05.3.1.3 Addition to CTO and CTN bonds 166 11.05.3.2 Thiocarbonyl simple starting materials. In addition, some of these reactions show excellent chemo-, regio11.05 Synthetic Reactions of MTC and MTN Bonds: Ylide Formation, Rearrangement, and 1,3-Dipolar

  10. The role of the Maillard reaction in the formation of flavour compounds in dairy products--not only a deleterious reaction but also a rich source of flavour compounds.

    PubMed

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2012-12-01

    Dairy products are heated both during processing and by consumers during food preparation; consumers place a high level of importance on flavour when assessing product acceptability. Of particular importance to the flavour of heated dairy products is the highly complex network of Maillard reactions. Much focus has been placed on the undesirable flavours generated through the Maillard reaction and how to minimise the formation of these flavours. However, beneficial flavours can also be formed by the Maillard reaction; dairy products, such as ghee, are formed by heating and are characterised by the unique flavour generated by this chemistry. This review looks at the Maillard reaction as a source of beneficial flavours for cooked dairy products and the application of models to the study of flavour formation in food systems. Models are typically used to study complex reactions in a simplified way; however, they are not always applicable to food systems. PMID:22948260

  11. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  12. New fluorescence reactions in DNA cytochemistry. 2. Microscopic and spectroscopic studies on fluorescent aluminum complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Castillo, P.; Llorente, A.R.; Gomez, A.; Gosalvez, J.; Goyanes, V.J.; Stockert, J.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Metal-dye complexes are widely applied in light microscopic techniques for chromatin staining (e.g., hematoxylin and carmine), but fluorescent complexes between phosphate-binding cations and suitable ligands have been little used. Preformed and postformed Al complexes with different anionic dyes induced strong and selective fluorescence reactions in nuclei from chicken blood smears, frozen sections, paraffin-embedded sections and Epon-embedded sections of mouse and rat tissues, mitotic chromosomes, meiotic chromosomes and kinetoplasts of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. The DNA-dependent fluorescence of these structures showed a very low fading rate. The emission colors were related to the ligand. The most suitable compounds for forming fluorescent Al chelates were 8-hydroxyquinoline, morin, nuclear fast red and purpurin. Staining with diluted carmine solutions and InCl3 mordanting, followed by 8-hydroxyquinoline, also induced chromatin fluorescence. After treating isolated mouse chromosomes with the preformed complex Al-nuclear fast red, x-ray microanalysis indicated a P:Al:dye binding ratio of about 40:15:1. The selectivity, stability and easy formation of these fluorescent Al complexes are obvious advantages for their use as new cytochemical probes in cytologic studies.

  13. Accelerating procelain formation by incorporating a complex additive

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikova, G.N.; Dubovitskii, S.A.; Moroz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    The authors studied the influence of a complex additive consisting of oxides of calcium, zinc, and magnesium on the formaton of porcelain. In order to achieve a more uniform distribution of the complex additive in the porcelain body it was incorporated in the form of water soluble salts-nitrates, which ensured comparability of results and excluded the effect of the different types of anions. The study of the main parameters of sintering (porosity, shrinkage, and mechanical strength) for the test bodies showed that they sinter at lower temperatures and attain zero porosity, maximum shrinkage, and mechanical strength. The most typical bodies indentified in this way were investigated by methods of complex differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. Thus, the introduction of complex additives consisting of calcium, zinc, and magnesium oxides contributes to the earlier formation of porcelain. With the reduction of firing temperatures by 100/sup 0/C the authors observe an improvement in the basic properties of porcelain.

  14. Redox Reactions of the ?-Synuclein-Cu2+ Complex and Their Effects on Neuronal Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengshan; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Lin; Peng, Yong; Zhou, Feimeng

    2010-01-01

    ?-Synuclein (?-syn), a presynaptic protein believed to play an important role in neuropathology in Parkinson’s disease (PD), is known to bind Cu2+. Cu2+ has been shown to accelerate the aggregation of ?-syn to form various toxic aggregates in vitro. Copper is also a redox active metal whose complexes with amyloidogenic proteins/peptides have been linked to oxidative stress in major neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, the formation of Cu2+ complex with ?-syn or with an N-terminus peptide, ?-syn(1–19), was confirmed with electrospray-mass spectrometry (ES–MS). The redox potentials of Cu2+ complex with ?-syn (?-syn-Cu2+) and ?-syn(1–19) were determined to be 0.018 and 0.053 V, respectively. Furthermore, the Cu2+ center(s) can be readily reduced to Cu+ and possible reactions of ?-syn-Cu2+ with cellular species (e.g., O2, ascorbic acid, and dopamine) were investigated. The occurrence of a redox reaction can be rationalized by comparing the redox potential of the ?-syn-Cu2+ complex to that of the specific cellular species. For example, ascorbic acid can directly reduce ?-syn-Cu2+ to ?-syn-Cu+, setting up a redox cycle in which O2 is reduced to H2O2 and cellular redox species is continuously exhausted. In addition, the H2O2 generated was demonstrated to reduce viability of the neuroblastoma SY-HY5Y cells. Although our results ruled out the direct oxidation of dopamine by ?-syn-Cu2+, the H2O2 generated in the presence of ?-syn-Cu2+ can oxidize dopamine. Our results suggest that oxidative stress is at least partially responsible for the loss of dopaminergic cells in PD brain and reveal the multifaceted role of the ?-syn-Cu2+ complex in oxidative stress associated with PD symptoms. PMID:20701279

  15. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  16. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4.

    PubMed

    Jaax, Miriam E; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T; Greinacher, Andreas

    2013-07-11

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human-PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer-DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti-PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  17. The cytoprotective effect of nitrite is based on the formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Dungel, Peter; Perlinger, Martin; Weidinger, Adelheid; Redl, Heinz; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite protects various organs from ischemia-reperfusion injury by ameliorating mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we provide evidence that this protection is due to the inhibition of iron-mediated oxidative reactions caused by the release of iron ions upon hypoxia. We show in a model of isolated rat liver mitochondria that upon hypoxia, mitochondria reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) in amounts sufficient to inactivate redox-active iron ions by formation of inactive dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC). The scavenging of iron ions in turn prevents the oxidative modification of the outer mitochondrial membrane and the release of cytochrome c during reoxygenation. This action of nitrite protects mitochondrial function. The formation of DNIC with nitrite-derived NO could also be confirmed in an ischemia-reperfusion model in liver tissue. Our data suggest that the formation of DNIC is a key mechanism of nitrite-mediated cytoprotection. PMID:26415027

  18. Dynamics and rate of complex ions formation in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoyoqubov, Shoayub; Shoyoqubov, Shohrukh; Ibrohimov, Alisher

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to create a laboratory model of comet phenomenon and perform mass spectral analysis of the dynamics and rate of formation of complex ions by bombarding the solid mixture of H2O and CO2 with positive Cs ions with energy of 1.5 keV. Results of previous mass spectral studies of laboratory modeled comet phenomena and emission coefficient proportionality method were used in calculations.

  19. Noble reactions for the actinides: safe gold-based access to organouranium and azide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Robert K; Graves, Christopher R; Scott, Brian L; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Gold has had a profound impact on organic chemistry; its compounds are spectacular catalysts for many organic transformations involving the formation of C-C, C-O, C-N and CoS bonds, and have enabled unprecedented pathways for the functionalization of C-H and C-C bonds. In general, gold complexes have not been exploited as reagents in organometallic or inorganic chemistry, although a few gold(l) aryl and alkynyl compounds have been reported to undergo transmetalation with transition metal complexes. We have been developing methods for functionalizing uranium complexes and have shown that Cu(l)-X reagents effect the oxidation of uranium with formation of U-X bonds, providing easy chemical control over uranium in oxidation states ranging from U{sup III}{yields}U{sup VI}. Although a logical approach for the direct generation of U-carbon and U-azide bonds, this Cu-based platform is limited in scope as it only works for pure and isolable copper compounds. This is problematic given the instability of organocuprates and copper azides, which can detonate violently as isolated solids. As such, this route has been confined to the synthesis of select uranium phenylacetylide complexes. Over the past few years, a variety of stable gold(l) alkyl, alkenyl, aryl, alkynyl, and azide complexes have been reported, propelling us to investigate their potential as reagents within the oxidative functionalization platform. Unlike the related CU{sup I} systems, Au{sup I} reagents are easily derivatized, and are safe to handle and isolate. Herein, we report that gold(l)-phosphine compounds can undergo a new class of reaction, and are excellent reagents for the oxidative functionalization of uranium with azide and carbon anions.

  20. Characterization of a paramagnetic, mononuclear Pt(III)-alkyl complex intermediate in carbon-halogen bond coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Rivada-Wheelaghan, Orestes; Ortuño, Manuel A; Díez, Josefina; García-Garrido, Sergio E; Maya, Celia; Lledós, Agustí; Conejero, Salvador

    2012-09-19

    Addition of Br(2) or I(2) to 14-electron, cationic Pt(II)-alkyl complexes led to the formation of the corresponding carbon-halogen Pt(II) coupling products. Low temperature experiments with Br(2) allowed us to isolate and characterize crystallographically a very unusual mononuclear, paramagnetic Pt(III)-alkyl intermediate with a seesaw structure that can be further oxidized to a transient Pt(IV) species before reductive carbon-halogen coupling reaction takes place. PMID:22934962

  1. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects. PMID:26303622

  2. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  3. Demixing-stimulated lane formation in binary complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.-R.; Jiang, K.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Recently lane formation and phase separation have been reported for experiments with binary complex plasmas in the PK3-Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Positive non-additivity of particle interactions is known to stimulate phase separation (demixing), but its effect on lane formation is unknown. In this work, we used Langevin dynamics (LD) simulation to probe the role of non-additivity interactions on lane formation. The competition between laning and demixing leads to thicker lanes. Analysis based on anisotropic scaling indices reveals a crossover from normal laning mode to a demixing-stimulated laning mode. Extensive numerical simulations enabled us to identify a critical value of the non-additivity parameter {Delta} for the crossover.

  4. Heat capacity contributions to the formation of inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Angeles; Pérez-Casas, Silvia; Costas, Miguel

    2007-10-01

    An analysis scheme for the formation of the inclusion complexes in water is presented. It is exemplified for the case where the host is alpha-cyclodextrin and the guest is a linear alcohol (1-propanol to 1-octanol) or the isomers of 1-pentanol. Eight transfer isobaric heat capacities, DeltatCp, involving different initial and final states are evaluated at infinite dilution of the guest using both data determined in this work and from the literature. Apart from the usual definition for the inclusion heat capacity change, three inclusion transfers are used. The sign of each DeltatCp indicates if the transfer is an order-formation or an order-destruction process. From the DeltatCp data, the main contributions to the heat capacity of cyclodextrin complexation, namely, those due to dehydration of the hydrophobic section of the guest molecule, H-bond formation, formation of hydrophobic interactions, and release of water molecules from the cyclodextrin cavity, are estimated. The relative weight of each of these contributions to the DeltatCp values is discussed, providing a better characterization of the molecular recognition process involved in the inclusion phenomena. PMID:17850130

  5. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  6. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  7. Mechanism of acyl-enzyme complex formation from the Henry-Michaelis complex of class C ?-lactamases with ?-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ravi; Nair, Nisanth N

    2013-10-01

    Bacteria that cause most of the hospital-acquired infections make use of class C ?-lactamase (CBL) among other enzymes to resist a wide spectrum of modern antibiotics and pose a major public health concern. Other than the general features, details of the defensive mechanism by CBL, leading to the hydrolysis of drug molecules, remain a matter of debate, in particular the identification of the general base and role of the active site residues and substrate. In an attempt to unravel the detailed molecular mechanism, we carried out extensive hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of the reaction with the aid of the metadynamics technique. On this basis, we report here the mechanism of the formation of the acyl-enzyme complex from the Henry-Michaelis complex formed by ?-lactam antibiotics and CBL. We considered two ?-lactam antibiotics, namely, cephalothin and aztreonam, belonging to two different subfamilies. A general mechanism for the formation of a ?-lactam antibiotic-CBL acyl-enzyme complex is elicited, and the individual roles of the active site residues and substrate are probed. The general base in the acylation step has been identified as Lys67, while Tyr150 aids the protonation of the ?-lactam nitrogen through either the substrate carboxylate group or a water molecule. PMID:24010547

  8. Evaluation of maillard reaction variables and their effect on heterocyclic amine formation in chemical model systems.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cara; Karim, Faris; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs), highly mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic by-products, form during Maillard browning reactions, specifically in muscle-rich foods. Chemical model systems allow examination of in vitro formation of HCAs while eliminating complex matrices of meat. Limited research has evaluated the effects of Maillard reaction parameters on HCA formation. Therefore, 4 essential Maillard variables (precursors molar concentrations, water amount, sugar type, and sugar amounts) were evaluated to optimize a model system for the study of 4 HCAs: 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline. Model systems were dissolved in diethylene glycol, heated at 175 °C for 40 min, and separated using reversed-phase liquid chromatography. To define the model system, precursor amounts (threonine and creatinine) were adjusted in molar increments (0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.6/0.6, and 0.8/0.8 mmol) and water amounts by percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). Sugars (lactose, glucose, galactose, and fructose) were evaluated in several molar amounts proportional to threonine and creatinine (quarter, half, equi, and double). The precursor levels and amounts of sugar were significantly different (P < 0.05) in regards to total HCA formation, with 0.6/0.6/1.2 mmol producing higher levels. Water concentration and sugar type also had a significant effect (P < 0.05), with 5% water and lactose producing higher total HCA amounts. A model system containing threonine (0.6 mmol), creatinine (0.6 mmol), and glucose (1.2 mmol), with 15% water was determined to be the optimal model system with glucose and 15% water being a better representation of meat systems. PMID:25597341

  9. Mercury(II) Penicillamine Complex Formation in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, B.O.; Jalilehvand, F.; Mah, V.

    2009-06-01

    The complex formation between mercury(II) and penicillamine (H{sub 2}Pen = 3,3'-dimethyl cysteine) in alkaline aqueous solutions (pH {approx}2) has been investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and {sup 199}Hg NMR spectroscopy. By varying the penicillamine concentration (C{sub H{sub 2}Pen} = 0.2--1.25 M) in {approx}0.1 M Hg(II) solutions, two coexisting major species [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} and [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sub 4-} were characterized with mean Hg-S bond distances 2.34(2) and 2.44(2) {angstrom}, respectively. The [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} complex with two deprotonated penicillamine ligands forms an almost linear S-Hg-S entity with two weak chelating Hg-N interactions at the mean Hg-N distance 2.52(2) {angstrom}. The same type of coordination is also found for the corresponding [Hg(Cys){sub 2}]{sup 2-} complex in alkaline aqueous solution with the mean bond distances Hg-S 2.34(2) {angstrom} and Hg-N 2.56(2) {angstrom}. The relative amounts of the [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} and [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sup 4-} complexes were estimated by fitting linear combinations of the EXAFS oscillations to the experimental spectra. Also their {sup 199}Hg NMR chemical shifts were used to evaluate the complex formation, showing that the [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sup 4-} complex dominates already at moderate excess of the free ligand ([Pen{sup 2-}] > {approx} 0.1 M).

  10. A metabolism is a complex chemical reaction system, whose metabolic genotype the DNA encoding the

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Andreas

    A metabolism is a complex chemical reaction system, whose metabolic genotype ­ the DNA encoding the enzymes catalyzing these reactions ­ can be compactly represented by its complement of metabolic reactions. Here, we analyze a space of such metabolic genotypes. Specifically, we study nitrogen metabolism

  11. Novel Intramolecular Nucleophilic Addition Reactions: Formation of Unusual N-O-Heterocyclic Enones

    E-print Network

    Ranade, Adwait

    2008-09-04

    Novel Intramolecular Nucleophilic Addition Reactions: Formation of unusual N-O-Heterocyclic Enones Adwait R. Ranade, B. Tech. The University of Kansas, 2008 Cyclic enaminones, which possess vinylogous amide functionality in a closed ring structure...

  12. 2. Spatial Pattern Formation with Reaction Diffusion Systems

    E-print Network

    Li, Tiejun

    Embryology is that part of biology which is concerned with the formation and devel- opment of the embryo from of development from egg to embryo. Morphogenesis, the part of embryology with which we are mainly concerned

  13. Complex behavior of self-propagating reaction waves in heterogeneous media

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Arvind; Rogachev, Alexander S.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; Hwang, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature reaction waves, leading to the synthesis of advanced materials, are investigated in a variety of heterogeneous reaction systems by using a digital high-speed microscopic video recording technique. It is shown that, although on the macroscopic length and time scales, the reaction appears to move in a steady mode, on the microscopic level it has a complex character that is related to the reaction mechanism. PMID:9736688

  14. Bio-Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Incorporating Reaction Center and Reaction Center Plus Light Harvesting Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoubi, Houman

    Harvesting solar energy can potentially be a promising solution to the energy crisis now and in the future. However, material and processing costs continue to be the most important limitations for the commercial devices. A key solution to these problems might lie within the development of bio-hybrid solar cells that seeks to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. The bio-photoelectrochemical cell technologies exploit biomimetic means of energy conversion by utilizing plant-derived photosystems which can be inexpensive and ultimately the most sustainable alternative. Plants and photosynthetic bacteria harvest light, through special proteins called reaction centers (RCs), with high efficiency and convert it into electrochemical energy. In theory, photosynthetic RCs can be used in a device to harvest solar energy and generate 1.1 V open circuit voltage and ~1 mA cm-2 short circuit photocurrent. Considering the nearly perfect quantum yield of photo-induced charge separation, efficiency of a protein-based solar cell might exceed 20%. In practice, the efficiency of fabricated devices has been limited mainly due to the challenges in the electron transfer between the protein complex and the device electrodes as well as limited light absorption. The overarching goal of this work is to increase the power conversion efficiency in protein-based solar cells by addressing those issues (i.e. electron transfer and light absorption). This work presents several approaches to increase the charge transfer rate between the photosynthetic RC and underlying electrode as well as increasing the light absorption to eventually enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of bio-hybrid solar cells. The first approach is to decrease the electron transfer distance between one of the redox active sites in the RC and the underlying electrode by direct attachment of the of protein complex onto Au electrodes via surface exposed cysteine residues. This resulted in photocurrent densities as large as ~600 nA cm-2 while still the incident photon to generated electron quantum efficiency was as low as %3 x 10-4. 2- The second approach is to immobilize wild type RCs of Rhodobacter sphaeroides on the surface of a Au underlying electrode using self-assembled monolayers of carboxylic acid terminated oligomers and cytochrome c charge mediating layers, with a preferential orientation from the primary electron donor site. This approach resulted in EQE of up to 0.06%, which showed 200 times efficiency improvement comparing to the first approach. In the third approach, instead of isolated protein complexes, RCs plus light harvesting (LH) complexes were employed for a better photon absorption. Direct attachment of RC-LH1 complexes on Au working electrodes, resulted in 0.21% EQE which showed 3.5 times efficiency improvement over the second approach (700 times higher than the first approach). The main impact of this work is the harnessing of biological RCs for efficient energy harvesting in man-made structures. Specifically, the results in this work will advance the application of RCs in devices for energy harvesting and will enable a better understanding of bio and nanomaterial interfaces, thereby advancing the application of biological materials in electronic devices. At the end, this work offers general guidelines that can serve to improve the performance of bio-hybrid solar cells.

  15. The C(3P) + NH3 Reaction in Interstellar Chemistry. I. Investigation of the Product Formation Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgalais, Jérémy; Capron, Michael; Abhinavam Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar; Osborn, David L.; Hickson, Kevin M.; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Goulay, Fabien; Le Picard, Sébastien D.

    2015-10-01

    The product formation channels of ground state carbon atoms, C(3P), reacting with ammonia, NH3, have been investigated using two complementary experiments and electronic structure calculations. Reaction products are detected in a gas flow tube experiment (330 K, 4 Torr) using tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry. Temporal profiles of the species formed and photoionization spectra are used to identify primary products of the C + NH3 reaction. In addition, H-atom formation is monitored by VUV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) from room temperature to 50 K in a supersonic gas flow generated by the Laval nozzle technique. Electronic structure calculations are performed to derive intermediates, transition states, and complexes formed along the reaction coordinate. The combination of photoionization and LIF experiments supported by theoretical calculations indicate that in the temperature and pressure range investigated, the H + H2CN production channel represents 100% of the product yield for this reaction. Kinetics measurements of the title reaction down to 50 K and the effect of the new rate constants on interstellar nitrogen hydride abundances using a model of dense interstellar clouds are reported in Paper II.

  16. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in ?zuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, ?zuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome. PMID:25739058

  17. Complex interactions between formative assessment, technology, and classroom practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Edward

    2012-02-01

    Interactive engagement (IE) methods provide instructors with evidence of student thinking that can guide instructional decisions across a range of timescales: facilitating an activity, determining the flow of activities, or modifying the curriculum. Thus, from the instructor's perspective, IE activities can function as formative assessments. As a practical matter, the ability to utilize this potential depends on how the activities are implemented. This paper describes different tools for small group problem solving, including whiteboards, Tablet PCs, digital cameras, and photo-sharing websites. These tools provide the instructor with varying levels of access to student work during and after class, and therefore provide a range of support for formative assessment. Furthermore, the tools differ in physical size, ease of use, and the roles for students and instructor. These differences lead to complex, often surprising interactions with classroom practices.

  18. The Effects of Reaction-Product Formation on the Reductive

    E-print Network

    Saiers, James

    Manganese oxides occur ubiquitously in geologic environ- ments as coatings on rocks, soils, and sediments aqueoussolubilityandadsorbsweaklytomostgeologicsolids (2, 3). Manganese minerals also oxidize arsenic, transforming highly toxic As(III) to less toxic the notion that solid-phase reaction products affect the electrochemical reduction of Mn(IV) minerals is well

  19. Vinylogous Nicholas reactions in the synthesis of bi- and tricyclic cycloheptynedicobalt complexes.

    PubMed

    Kolodziej, Izabela; Green, James R

    2015-11-28

    The Lewis acid mediated intramolecular Nicholas reactions of allylic acetate enyne-Co2(CO)6 complexes afford cycloheptenyne-Co2(CO)6 complexes in three manifestations. Electron rich aryl substituted alkyne complexes give tricyclic 6,7,x-benzocycloheptenyne complexes, with x = 5, 6, or 7. Allylsilane substituted complexes afford exo methylene bicyclic x,7-cycloheptenyne complexes (x = 6,7). The allyl acetate function may also be replaced by a benzylic acetate, to afford dibenzocycloheptyne-Co2(CO)6 complexes. Following reductive complexation, the methodology may be applied to the synthesis of the icetexane diterpene carbon framework. PMID:26365914

  20. Pattern formation of a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow in the amoeboid organism Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyasu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Ito, Masami

    1999-01-01

    The amoeboid organism, the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, moves by forming a spatiotemporal pattern of contraction oscillators. This biological system can be regarded as a reaction-diffusion system with spatial interaction via active flow of protoplasmic sol in the cell. We present a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow on the basis of the physiological evidence that the flow is determined by contraction patterns in the plasmodium. Such a coupling of reaction, diffusion, and advection is characteristic of biological systems, and is expected to be related to control mechanisms of amoeboid behavior. Using weakly nonlinear analysis, we show that the envelope dynamics obeys the complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation when a bifurcation occurs at finite wave number. The flow term affects the nonlinear term of the CGL equation through the critical wave number squared. A physiological role of pattern formation with the flow is discussed.

  1. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  2. Complex formation between uranyl and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between hexavalent uranium and salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L), salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q), S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide(H/sub 2/Z), and thiosemicarbazidodiacetic acid (H/sub 2/R) has been studied spectrophotometrically in solution. Stability constants for complexes having the composition UO/sub 2/A have been calculated. Solid uranyl derivatives having the composition UO/sub 2/L x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Q x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Z x 2H/sub 2/O, and UO/sub 2/R x 2H/sub 2/O have been obtained. These derivatives were isolated and their IR spectroscopic behavior and thermal properties were investigated.

  3. Formation of CO in the Reaction of O Atom With CH3: Reaction Over a Barrier but Not Through a Saddle Point

    E-print Network

    Knyazev, Vadim D.

    1 Formation of CO in the Reaction of O Atom With CH3: Reaction Over a Barrier but Not Through Division, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 Traditionally, the exploration of mechanisms of reactions and of the minimum energy path connecting the reactants and the products of a particular reaction channel

  4. Formation of native hepatitis C virus glycoprotein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Deleersnyder, V; Pillez, A; Wychowski, C; Blight, K; Xu, J; Hahn, Y S; Rice, C M; Dubuisson, J

    1997-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) glycoproteins (E1 and E2) interact to form a heterodimeric complex, which has been proposed as a functional subunit of the HCV virion envelope. As examined in cell culture transient-expression assays, the formation of properly folded, noncovalently associated E1E2 complexes is a slow and inefficient process. Due to lack of appropriate immunological reagents, it has been difficult to distinguish between glycoprotein molecules that undergo productive folding and assembly from those which follow a nonproductive pathway leading to misfolding and aggregation. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a conformation-sensitive E2-reactive monoclonal antibody (H2). The H2 monoclonal antibody selectively recognizes slowly maturing E1E2 heterodimers which are noncovalently linked, protease resistant, and no longer associated with the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calnexin. This complex probably represents the native prebudding form of the HCV glycoprotein heterodimer. Besides providing a novel reagent for basic studies on HCV virion assembly and entry, this monoclonal antibody should be useful for optimizing production and isolation of native HCV glycoprotein complexes for serodiagnostic and vaccine applications. PMID:8985401

  5. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Michael D.

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55?m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  6. Perfluoroalkyl Cobalt(III) Fluoride and Bis(perfluoroalkyl) Complexes: Catalytic Fluorination and Selective Difluorocarbene Formation.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Matthew C; Bayne, Julia M; Lee, Graham M; Gorelsky, Serge I; Vasiliu, Monica; Korobkov, Ilia; Harrison, Daniel J; Dixon, David A; Baker, R Tom

    2015-12-30

    Four perfluoroalkyl cobalt(III) fluoride complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and powder X-ray diffraction. The remarkable cobalt fluoride (19)F NMR chemical shifts (-716 to -759 ppm) were studied computationally, and the contributing paramagnetic and diamagnetic factors were extracted. Additionally, the complexes were shown to be active in the catalytic fluorination of p-toluoyl chloride. Furthermore, two examples of cobalt(III) bis(perfluoroalkyl)complexes were synthesized and their reactivity studied. Interestingly, abstraction of a fluoride ion from these complexes led to selective formation of cobalt difluorocarbene complexes derived from the trifluoromethyl ligand. These electrophilic difluorocarbenes were shown to undergo insertion into the remaining perfluoroalkyl fragment, demonstrating the elongation of a perfluoroalkyl chain arising from a difluorocarbene insertion on a cobalt metal center. The reactions of both the fluoride and bis(perfluoroalkyl) complexes provide insight into the potential catalytic applications of these model systems to form small fluorinated molecules as well as fluoropolymers. PMID:26674217

  7. Molybdenum alkylidene complexes : syntheses and applications to olefin metathesis reactions

    E-print Network

    Pilyugina, Tatiana

    2007-01-01

    Chapter 1. Alkylimido Molybdenum Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization and Activity as Chiral Olefin Metathesis Catalysts. Molybdenum olefin metathesis catalysts that contain previously unexplored aliphatic 1- ...

  8. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaisi, D.P.; Eberl, D.D.; Dong, H.; Kim, J.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65??C) were the most favorable conditions forthe formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  9. The ?-Effect and Competing Mechanisms: The Gas-Phase Reactions of Microsolvated Anions with Methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Ditte L.; Nichols, Charles M.; Reece, Jennifer N.; Hammerum, Steen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2013-12-01

    The enhanced reactivity of ?-nucleophiles, which contain an electron lone pair adjacent to the reactive site, has been demonstrated in solution and in the gas phase and, recently, for the gas-phase SN2 reactions of the microsolvated HOO-(H2O) ion with methyl chloride. In the present work, we continue to explore the significance of microsolvation on the ?-effect as we compare the gas-phase reactivity of the microsolvated ?-nucleophile HOO-(H2O) with that of microsolvated normal alkoxy nucleophiles, RO-(H2O), in reactions with methyl formate, where three competing reactions are possible. The results reveal enhanced reactivity of HOO-(H2O) towards methyl formate, and clearly demonstrate the presence of an overall ?-effect for the reactions of the microsolvated ?-nucleophile. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water molecule significantly lowers the degree of proton abstraction and increases the SN2 and BAC2 reactivity compared with the unsolvated analogs. HOO-(H2O) reacts with methyl formate exclusively via the BAC2 channel. While microsolvation lowers the overall reaction efficiency, it enhances the BAC2 reaction efficiency for all anions compared with the unsolvated analogs. This may be explained by participation of the solvent water molecule in the BAC2 reaction in a way that continuously stabilizes the negative charge throughout the reaction.

  10. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from bimolecular reactions of phenyl radicals at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Constantinidis, P; Schmitt, H-C; Fischer, I; Yan, B; Rijs, A M

    2015-10-28

    The self-reaction of the phenyl radical is one of the key reactions in combustion chemistry. Here we study this reaction in a high-temperature flow reactor by IR/UV ion dip spectroscopy, using free electron laser radiation as mid-infrared source. We identified several major reaction products based on their infrared spectra, among them indene, 1,2-dihydronaphthalene, naphthalene, biphenyl and para-terphenyl. Due to the structural sensitivity of the method, the reaction products were identified isomer-selectively. The work shows that the formation of indene and naphthalene, which was previously considered to be evidence for the HACA (hydrogen abstraction C2H2 addition) mechanism in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot can also be understood in a phenyl addition model. PMID:26457393

  11. Structure of Soybean Serine Acetyltransferase and Formation of the Cysteine Regulatory Complex as a Molecular Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hankuil; Dey, Sanghamitra; Kumaran, Sangaralingam; Lee, Soon Goo; Krishnan, Hari B.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase. Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochemical control feature in plant sulfur metabolism. Here we present the 1.75–3.0 ? resolution x-ray crystal structures of soybean (Glycine max) SAT (GmSAT) in apoenzyme, serine-bound, and CoA-bound forms. The GmSAT-serine and GmSAT-CoA structures provide new details on substrate interactions in the active site. The crystal structures and analysis of site-directed mutants suggest that His169 and Asp154 form a catalytic dyad for general base catalysis and that His189 may stabilize the oxyanion reaction intermediate. Glu177 helps to position Arg203 and His204 and the ?1c-?2c loop for serine binding. A similar role for ionic interactions formed by Lys230 is required for CoA binding. The GmSAT structures also identify Arg253 as important for the enhanced catalytic efficiency of SAT in the CRC and suggest that movement of the residue may stabilize CoA binding in the macromolecular complex. Differences in the effect of cold on GmSAT activity in the isolated enzyme versus the enzyme in the CRC were also observed. A role for CRC formation as a molecular chaperone to maintain SAT activity in response to an environmental stress is proposed for this multienzyme complex in plants. PMID:24225955

  12. Point defect formation by dislocation reactions in TiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D. S.; Wang, H.; Yang, R.; Veyssière, P.

    2009-07-01

    Point defect formation in ?-TiAl deformed in single slip is investigated by MD simulations. Dislocations gliding on nearby planes react to form vacancies, interstitials and clusters of these, including planar arrays of crowdions and dissociated prismatic loops. The motion of these defects and their interaction with mobile dislocations are analysed. These point defects can interact with others or with dislocations forming jogs hindering dislocation motion.

  13. Theory of diffusion-influenced reactions in complex geometries

    E-print Network

    Galanti, Marta; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reactions involving diffusion of reactants and subsequent chemical fixation steps are generally termed "diffusion-influenced" (DI). Virtually all biochemical processes in living media can be counted among them, together with those occurring in an ever-growing number of emerging nano-technologies. The role of the environment's geometry (obstacles, compartmentalization) and distributed reactivity (competitive reactants, traps) is key in modulating the rate constants of DI reactions, and is therefore a prime design parameter. Yet, it is a formidable challenge to build a comprehensive theory able to describe the environment's "reactive geometry". Here we show that such a theory can be built by unfolding this many-body problem through addition theorems for special functions. Our method is powerful and general and allows one to study a given DI reaction occurring in arbitrary "reactive landscapes", made of multiple spherical boundaries of given size and reactivity. Importantly, ready-to-use analytical form...

  14. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  15. Nickel-Catalyzed Reactions Directed toward the Formation of Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2015-06-16

    Heterocycles have garnered significant attention because they are important functional building blocks in various useful molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals, pesticides, and materials. Several studies have been conducted regarding the preparation of heterocyclic skeletons with an emphasis on selectivity and efficiency. Three strategies are typically employed to construct cyclic molecules, namely, cyclization, cycloaddition, and ring-size alterations. Although each method has certain advantages, cycloaddition may be superior from the viewpoint of divergence. Specifically, cycloadditions enable the construction of rings from several pieces. However, the construction of heterocycles via cycloadditions is more challenging than the construction of carbocycles. For heterocycle construction, simple pericyclic reactions rarely work smoothly because of the large HOMO-LUMO gap unless well-designed combinations, such as electron-rich dienes and aldehydes, are utilized. Thus, a different approach should be employed to prepare heterocycles via cycloadditions. To this end, the use of metallacycles containing heteroatoms is expected to serve as a promising solution. In this study, we focused on the preparation of heteroatom-containing nickelacycles. Because nickel possesses a relatively high redox potential and an affinity for heteroatoms, several methods were developed to synthesize heteronickelacycles from various starting materials. The prepared nickelacycles were demonstrated to be reasonable intermediates in cycloaddition reactions, which were used to prepare various heterocycles. In this Account, we introduce the following four methods to prepare heterocycles via heteronickelacycles. (1) Direct oxidative insertion of Ni(0) to ?,?-unsaturated enone derivatives: treatment of 3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one with Ni(0) afforded an oxa-nickelacycle, which reacted with alkynes to give pyrans. (2) Substitution of a part of a cyclic compound with low-valent nickel, accompanied by elimination of small molecules such as CO, CO2, and acetophenone: treatment of phthalic anhydride with Ni(0) in the presence of ZnCl2 afforded the oxanickelacycle, which was formed via decarbonylative insertion of Ni(0) and reacted with alkynes to give isocumarins. (3) Cyclization to a nickelacycle, accompanied by two C-C ?-bond activations: insertion of Ni(0) into an arylnitrile, followed by aryl cyanation of an alkyne, gave alkenylnickel as an intermediate. The alkenylnickel species subsequently underwent an intramolecular nucleophilic attack with an arylcarbonyl group to form a cyclized product with concomitant cleavage of the C-C ?-bond between the carbonyl and aryl groups. (4) Assembly of several components to form a heteroatom-containing nickelacycle via cycloaddition: a new [2 + 2 + 1] cyclization reaction was carried out using an ?,?-unsaturated ester, isocyanate, and alkyne via a nickelacycle. On the basis of these four strategies, we developed new methods to prepare heterocyclic compounds using nickelacycles as the key active species. PMID:25989256

  16. New cofacial binuclear complexes for the oxygen reduction reaction and selective anion binding 

    E-print Network

    Devoille, Aline M. J.

    2011-11-23

    This thesis describes the design, synthesis and reactivity of bimetallic complexes of doubly-pillared Schiff-base calixpyrrole ligands. Chapter One introduces the oxygen reduction reaction in light of the global ...

  17. Calibration of Complex Subsurface Reaction Models Using a Surrogate-Model Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of model assessment techniques to complex subsurface reaction models involves numerous difficulties, including non-trivial model selection, parameter non-uniqueness, and excessive computational burden. To overcome these difficulties, this study introduces SAMM (Simult...

  18. Neutral and Cationic Alkyl Tantalum Imido Complexes: Synthesis and Migratory Insertion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Laura L.; Schmidt, Joseph A. R.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and reactivity of dibenzyl cationic tantalum imido complexes is described. The trialkyl tantalum imido compounds Bn3Ta=NCMe3 (1) and Np3Ta=NCMe3 (2) were synthesized as starting materials for the study of dialkyl cationic tantalum imido complexes. Compound 1 undergoes insertion reactions with diisopropylcarbodiimide and 2,6-dimethylphenylisocyanide to give (bisamidinate)imido complex 5 and (bisimino-acyl)imido complex 6, respectively. Treatment of compound 1 with B(C6F5)3 gives the zwitterionic tantalum complex [Bn2Ta=NCMe3][BnB(C6F5)3] (7) which is stabilized by ?6-coordination of the benzyl triaryl borate anion. Coordination of the aryl anion can be displaced by three equivalents of pyridine to give the Lewis base complex 8. Treatment of compound 1 with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] gives the cationic tantalum imido complex [Bn2Ta=NCMe3][B(C6F5)4] (3). This salt forms insoluble aggregates unless trapped by THF coordination or an insertion reaction with an alkyne or an alkene. Cation 3 undergoes migratory insertion reactions with diphenylacetylene, phenylacetylene, norbornene, and cis-cyclooctene to give the corresponding alkenyl or modified alkyl imido complexes. The characterization of these products and the significance of these insertion reactions with respect to Ziegler-Natta polymerizations and hydroamination reactions are described. PMID:19079787

  19. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X-ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  20. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1992-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  1. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.J.; Meinhardt, H. )

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of [ital Drosophila] and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  2. Module Based Complexity Formation: Periodic Patterning in Feathers and Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patterns describe order which emerges from homogeneity. Complex patterns on the integument are striking because of their visibility throughout an organism's lifespan. Periodic patterning is an effective design because the ensemble of hair or feather follicles (modules) allows the generation of complexity, including regional variations and cyclic regeneration, giving the skin appendages a new lease on life. Spatial patterns include the arrangements of feathers and hairs in specified number, size, and spacing. We explore how a field of equivalent progenitor cells can generate periodically arranged modules based on genetic information, physical-chemical rules and developmental timing. Reconstitution experiments suggest a competitive equilibrium regulated by activators / inhibitors involving Turing reaction-diffusion. Temporal patterns result from oscillating stem cell activities within each module (micro-environment regulation), reflected as growth (anagen) and resting (telogen) phases during the cycling of feather and hair follicles. Stimulating modules with activators initiates the spread of regenerative hair waves, while global inhibitors outside each module (macro-environment) prevent this. Different wave patterns can be simulated by Cellular Automata principles. Hormonal status and seasonal changes can modulate appendage phenotypes, leading to “organ metamorphosis”, with multiple ectodermal organ phenotypes generated from the same precursors. We discuss potential evolutionary novel steps using this module based complexity in several amniote integument organs, exemplified by the spectacular peacock feather pattern. We thus explore the application of the acquired knowledge of patterning in tissue engineering. New hair follicles can be generated after wounding. Hairs and feathers can be reconstituted through self-organization of dissociated progenitor cells. PMID:23539312

  3. Automatic Method for Identifying Reaction Coordinates in Complex Systems Ao Ma and Aaron R. Dinner*

    E-print Network

    Dinner, Aaron

    Automatic Method for Identifying Reaction Coordinates in Complex Systems Ao Ma and Aaron R. Dinner-derived electrostatic torque around one of the main-chain bonds, and the collective, long-ranged nature of this interaction accounts for previous failures to characterize this reaction. 1. Introduction Simulations

  4. Exploration Into Copper Catalyzed and Copper-less Click Reactions with Re(CO)3 Complexes

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Exploration Into Copper Catalyzed and Copper-less Click Reactions with Re(CO)3 Complexes Nicholas that combines a alkyne and an oxime to generate a isoxazole cycloaddtion product. Compared to the copper and then proceeding with the typical copper(I) catalyzed "click" reaction procedure, while the other approach involves

  5. Physical volcanology of the Gubisa Formation, Kone Volcanic Complex, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampey, Michael L.; Oppenheimer, Clive; Pyle, David M.; Yirgu, Gezahegn

    2014-08-01

    Despite their significance for understanding the potential environmental factors involved in hominin evolution in Ethiopia, very few modern volcanologic studies have been carried out on the Quaternary calderas and associated silicic tephra deposits of the Ethiopian Rift. We present here the second of a set of papers reporting the findings of fieldwork and laboratory analyses of one of the largest of these structures, Kone Caldera, located within the Kone Volcanic Complex in the northern Main Ethiopian Rift. The most recent major episode of explosive eruptive activity at Kone Caldera was apparently associated with formation of part of the overall 8-km-diameter collapse area, and deposited a widely-dispersed alkali rhyolite tephra that reaches a thickness of up to 60 m in vent-proximal deposits. We report here the physical characteristics of this unit in order to constrain eruptive conditions. The pumice fall deposit suggests that an abrupt decrease in magma discharge rate occurred part way through the eruption.

  6. Cleavage of Ni-(?2-S)-Ni Bridges in Dinuclear Nickel(II) Dithiolate Pincer Complexes and Related Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Deguang; Deng, Liang; Sun, Jibin; Holm, R. H.

    2009-01-01

    Pyridine-2,6-dimethanethiolate and pyridine-2,6-dithiocarboxylate form sparingly soluble NiII pincer complexes formulated as [Ni(pdmt)]2 and [Ni(pdtc)]2, respectively, with two Ni-(?2-S)-Ni bridges. In acetonitrile reaction systems, the latter undergoes the facile bridge cleavage reactions [Ni(pdtc)]2 + 2L0,? ? 2[Ni(pdtc)L]0,? with an extensive set of nucleophiles to afford planar mononuclear products with L? = halide, CN, Me3SiO?, RS? and L0 = Et3P and a N-heterocyclic carbene. [Ni(pdmt)]2 is considerably less reactive toward bridge disruption. Cleavage products support several reactions of interest leading to other mononuclear species and to di- and trinuclear complexes. [Ni(pdtc)(OSiMe3)]1? deprotonates acetonitrile and acetone to form [Ni(pdtc)(CH2R)]1? (R = CN, COMe). Reaction of [Ni(pdtc)SEt]1? with FeII yields the thiolate-bridged dimer {[Ni(pdtc)]2(SEt)}1?. Refluxing an acetonitrile solution of [Ni(pdtc)SH]1? in air results in formation of trinuclear {[Ni(pdtc)]3S]2? containing the rare unsupported Ni3(?3-S) bridge core. Reaction of [Ni(pdtc)CN]1? with [Fe(Me6tren)(OTf)]1+ forms the complex [Ni(pdtc)CNFe(Me6tren)]1+, the only example of a single Ni-C?N-Fe bridge within a molecule. Structures of the various types of reaction products are presented. This work demonstrates the potential utility of bridge cleavage of polynuclear NiII thiolates, an extensive family of compounds, to produce mononuclear products. PMID:19459662

  7. Pattern Formation in the Bromate-Sulfite-Ferrocyanide Reaction.

    PubMed

    Molnár, István; Szalai, István

    2015-10-01

    Mixed Landolt-type pH oscillators are versatile systems that allow the experimental study of a wide range of nonlinear phenomena including multistability, oscillations, and spatiotemporal patterns. We report on the dynamics of the bromate-sulfite-ferrocyanide reaction operated in a open one-side-fed reactor, where spatial bistability, spatiotemporal oscillations, front and Turing-type patterns have been observed. The role of different experimental parameters, like the input flow concentrations of the hydrogen and the ferrocyanide ions, the temperature and the thickness of the gel medium (which affects the rate of the diffusive feed) have been investigated. We point out that all these parameters can be efficiently used to control the spatiotemporal dynamics. We show that the increase of ionic strength stabilizes the uniform states at the expense of the patterned one. Some general aspects of the spatiotemporal dynamics of mixed Landolt type systems, which are based on the oxidation of sulfite ions by strong oxidants, are emphasized. PMID:26371068

  8. Single Nucleoprotein Residue Modulates Arenavirus Replication Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, Kristeene A.; Ngo, Tuan; Gershon, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Arenaviridae are enveloped, negative-sense RNA viruses with several family members that cause hemorrhagic fevers. This work provides immunofluorescence evidence that, unlike those of New World arenaviruses, the replication and transcription complexes (RTC) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) colocalize with eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and that eIF4E may participate in the translation of LCMV mRNA. Additionally, we identify two residues in the LCMV nucleoprotein (NP) that are conserved in every mammalian arenavirus and are required for recombinant LCMV recovery. One of these sites, Y125, was confirmed to be phosphorylated by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). NP Y125 is located in the N-terminal region of NP that is disordered when RNA is bound. The other site, NP T206, was predicted to be a phosphorylation site. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that NP T206 is required for the formation of the punctate RTC that are typically observed during LCMV infection. A minigenome reporter assay using NP mutants, as well as Northern blot analysis, demonstrated that although NP T206A does not form punctate RTC, it can transcribe and replicate a minigenome. However, in the presence of matrix protein (Z) and glycoprotein (GP), translation of the minigenome message with NP T206A was inhibited, suggesting that punctate RTC formation is required to regulate viral replication. Together, these results highlight a significant difference between New and Old World arenaviruses and demonstrate the importance of RTC formation and translation priming in RTC for Old World arenaviruses. PMID:25922393

  9. COPPER-CATALYZED CROSS-COUPLING REACTIONS: THE FORMATION OF CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-SULFUR BONDS

    E-print Network

    Venkataraman, Dhandapani "DV"

    COPPER-CATALYZED CROSS-COUPLING REACTIONS: THE FORMATION OF CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-SULFUR BONDS-COUPLING REACTIONS: THE FORMATION OF CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-SULFUR BONDS A Dissertation Presented by CRAIG G. BATES: THE FORMATION OF CARBON-CARBON AND CARBON-SULFUR BONDS MAY 2005 CRAIG G BATES, B.S., ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERISTY

  10. H2O3 as a reactive oxygen species: formation of 8-oxoguanine from its reaction with guanine.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K; Mishra, P C

    2007-05-01

    Reaction of guanine with H2O3 in the absence and presence of a water molecule leading to the formation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) was investigated. Initial calculations were performed using imidazole (Im) as a model for the five-membered ring of guanine. The reactant, intermediate, and product complexes as well as transition states were obtained in gas phase at the B3LYP/6-31+G* and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. In all the cases, except for the reactions involving imidazole, single-point energy calculations were performed in gas phase at the MP2/AUG-cc-pVDZ level of theory. Solvation calculations in aqueous media were carried out using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) of the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) theory. Vibrational frequency analysis and intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) calculations were performed to ensure that the transition states connected the reactant and product complexes properly. Zero-point energy (ZPE)-corrected total energies and Gibbs free energies at 298.15 K in gas phase and aqueous media were obtained. When a reaction of H2O3 in place of H2O2 with guanine is considered, the major barrier energy which is encountered at the first step is almost halved showing that H2O3 would be much more reactive than H2O2. Considering the reaction schemes investigated here and the observed fact that H2O3 is dissociated easily under ambient conditions, it appears that H2O3 would serve as an effective reactive oxygen species. PMID:17417902

  11. Aminomethylation reaction of ortho-pyridyl C-H bonds catalyzed by group 3 metal triamido complexes.

    PubMed

    Nagae, Haruki; Shibata, Yu; Tsurugi, Hayato; Mashima, Kazushi

    2015-01-21

    Tris[N,N-bis(trimethylsilyl)amido] complexes of group 3 metals, especially yttrium and gadolinium, served as catalysts for ortho-C-H bond addition of pyridine derivatives and N-heteroaromatics into the C?N double bond of nonactivated imines to afford the corresponding aminomethylated products. Addition of catalytic amounts of secondary amines, such as dibenzylamine, dramatically improved the catalytic activity through the formation of a mixed ligated complex such as [(Me3Si)2N]2Y(NBn2)(THF) (4). Furthermore, kinetic studies using the isolated complex 4 provided a plausible reaction mechanism by which coordination of two pyridine derivatives afforded a penta-coordinated species as a key step. PMID:25543453

  12. Image formation in the eye: very specified complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzmann, David E.

    2005-08-01

    The formation of an image, and its correct interpretation by sighted living creatures, is a unique example of specified complexity unlike anything else in nature. While many of the functional aspects of living organisms are extremely complex, only an image requires a unique mapping process by the eye-brain system to be useful to the organism. The transfer of light from an object scene to a visual detection system (eye + brain) conveys an enormous amount of information. But unless that information is correctly organized into a useful image, the exchange of information is degraded and of questionable use. This paper examines the "connections" necessary for images to be interpreted correctly, as well as addressing the additional complexity requirement of dual-image mapping for stereovision capabilities. Statistics are presented for "simple eyes" consisting of a few pixels to illustrate the daunting task that random chance has to produce any form of a functional eye. For example, a 12-pixel eye (or camera) has 12! (479,001,600) possible pixel-to-brain (computer) wiring combinations, which can then be compared to the 126 million rods/cones of the actual human eye. If one tries to "connect the wires" (correctly interpret the information contained) in a 12-pixel image by random processes, by the time 6 pixels become correctly connected, over 99.9% of all the trials are incorrect, producing "noise" rather than a recognizable image. Higher numbers of pixels quickly make the problem astronomically worse for achieving any kind of useful image. This paper concludes that random-chance purposeless undirected processes cannot account for how images are perceived by living organisms.

  13. Major kinetic features of the formation of the. pi. -complex of cobalt hydrocarbonyl with olefin and its conversion to R'Co(CO)/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Kardashina, L.F.; Sapunov, V.N.

    1986-09-01

    The major kinetic features were studied for the formation of the ..pi..-complex of cobalt hydrocarbonyl with 1-hexene and its conversion to R'Co(CO)/sub 4/. The composition of the catalytically active ..pi..-complex with the olefin was established. The slow steps of the hydroformylation reaction were determined. A procedure was proposed for the preparation of solutions of cobalt hydrocarbonyl containing a ..pi..-complex with an olefin or R'Co(CO)/sub 4/.

  14. Numerical study on the impacts of heterogeneous reactions on ozone formation in the Beijing urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yuanhang; Wang, Wei

    2006-12-01

    The air quality model CMAQ-MADRID (Community Multiscale Air Quality-Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution) was employed to simulate summer O3 formation in Beijing China, in order to explore the impacts of four heterogeneous reactions on O3 formation in an urban area. The results showed that the impacts were obvious and exhibited the characteristics of a typical response of a VOC-limited regime in the urban area. For the four heterogeneous reactions considered, the NO2 and HO2 heterogeneous reactions have the most severe impacts on O3 formation. During the O3 formation period, the NO2 heterogeneous reaction increased new radical creation by 30%, raising the atmospheric activity as more NO?NO2 conversion occurred, thus causing the O3 to rise. The increase of O3 peak concentration reached a maximum value of 67 ppb in the urban area. In the morning hours, high NO titration reduced the effect of the photolysis of HONO, which was produced heterogeneously at night in the surface layer. The NO2 heterogeneous reaction in the daytime is likely one of the major reasons causing the O3 increase in the Beijing urban area. The HO2 heterogeneous reaction accelerated radical termination, resulting in a decrease of the radical concentration by 44% at the most. O3 peak concentration decreased by a maximum amount of 24 ppb in the urban area. The simulation results were improved when the heterogeneous reactions were included, with the O3 and HONO model results close to the observations.

  15. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R; Meyer, Anne S

    2014-02-19

    The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF) and/or levulinic acid, formic acid and different phenolics at elevated temperatures. Correspondingly, xylose can follow different reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of furan-2-carbaldehyde (furfural) and/or various C-1 and C-4 compounds. At least four routes for the formation of HMF from glucose and three routes for furfural formation from xylose are possible. In addition, new findings show that biomass monosaccharides themselves can react further to form pseudo-lignin and humins as well as a wide array of other compounds when exposed to high temperatures. Hence, several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes and microorganisms may be valuable biobased chemicals. Hence a new potential for industrial scale synthesis of chemicals has emerged. A better understanding of the reaction mechanisms and the impact of the reaction conditions on the product formation is thus a prerequisite for designing better biomass processing strategies and forms an important basis for the development of new biorefinery products from lignocellulosic biomass as well. PMID:24412507

  16. Terminal Vanadium-Neopentylidyne Complexes and Intramolecular Cross-Metathesis Reactions to Generate Azametalacyclohexatrienes

    E-print Network

    Baik, Mu-Hyun

    Terminal Vanadium-Neopentylidyne Complexes and Intramolecular Cross-Metathesis Reactions-carbon multiple bonds5 triggered the pursuit for the thus far unknown vanadium- alkylidyne functionality. Herein by this observation and realizing that vanadium- alkylidyne complexes are unknown, we alkylated (Nacnac)Vd CHt

  17. Multiple photosynthetic reaction centres of porphyrinic polypeptide-Li(+)@C60 supramolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Kei; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Rein, Régis; Solladié, Nathalie; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-12-01

    Multiple photosynthetic reaction centres have been successfully constructed using strong supramolecular complexes of free base porphyrin polypeptides with lithium ion-encapsulated C60 (Li(+)@C60) as compared with those of C60. Efficient energy migration and electron transfer occur in the supramolecular complexes. PMID:26497396

  18. Gas phase reactions of trimethyl borate with phosphates and their non-covalent complexes.

    PubMed

    Gronert, Scott; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2002-09-01

    Using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, trimethyl borate was allowed to react with dihydrogen phosphate, deprotonated O-phosphoserine, and a set of hydrogen bonded complexes involving dihydrogen phosphate and neutral acids (phosphoric acid, acetic acid, serine, and O-phosphoserine). The reactions show a consistent pattern in which the initial attack leads to addition with the loss of one or two CH3OH molecules. Collision-activated dissociation (CAD) experiments on the reaction products generally lead to the loss of an additional CH3OH molecule. In no case is a partner from the original hydrogen-bonded complex lost. The results indicate that the reactions lead to structures where the phosphate and its complex partner are covalently bound to the boron. For each of the reactions, rate constants were determined. In the course of CAD experiments (up to MS5), several novel borophosphate structures were identified. The work is supported by ab initio calculations on selected species. PMID:12322956

  19. Experimental and computational investigation on the gas phase reaction of ethyl formate with Cl atoms.

    PubMed

    Balaganesh, M; Dash, Manas Ranjan; Rajakumar, B

    2014-07-17

    The rate coefficient for the gas-phase reaction of Cl atoms with ethyl formate was measured over the temperature range of 268-343 K using relative rate methods, with ethyl chloride as a reference compound. The temperature dependent relative rate coefficients for the ethyl formate + Cl reaction were measured, and the modified Arrhenius expression kethyl formate(268-343) = (2.54 ± 0.57) × 10(-23) T(4.1) exp {-(981 ± 102)/T} cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained with 2? error limits. The room temperature rate coefficient for the title reaction is (9.84 ± 0.79) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), which is in good agreement with reported values. To complement the experimental measurement, computational methods were used to calculate the rate coefficient for the ethyl formate + Cl reaction atoms using canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with small curvature tunneling (SCT) and the CCSD (T)/cc-pVDZ//M062X/6-31+g(d,p) level of theory. The temperature dependent Arrhenius expression was obtained to be 2.97 × 10(-18) T(2.4) exp[-(390/T)] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) over the temperature range of 200-400 K. The thermodynamic parameters and branching ratio were calculated. Also, the atmospheric lifetime and global warming potentials (GWPs) were calculated for ethyl formate. PMID:24945822

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone-initiated reactions with nicotine and secondhand tobacco smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Destaillats, Hugo; Smith, Jared D.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Gundel, Lara A.

    2010-11-01

    We used controlled laboratory experiments to evaluate the aerosol-forming potential of ozone reactions with nicotine and secondhand smoke. Special attention was devoted to real-time monitoring of the particle size distribution and chemical composition of SOA as they are believed to be key factors determining the toxicity of SOA. The experimental approach was based on using a vacuum ultraviolet photon ionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (VUV-AMS), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and off-line thermal desorption coupled to mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) for gas-phase byproducts analysis. Results showed that exposure of SHS to ozone induced the formation of ultrafine particles (<100 nm) that contained high molecular weight nitrogenated species ( m/ z 400-500), which can be due to accretion/acid-base reactions and formation of oligomers. In addition, nicotine was found to contribute significantly (with yields 4-9%) to the formation of secondary organic aerosol through reaction with ozone. The main constituents of the resulting SOA were tentatively identified and a reaction mechanism was proposed to elucidate their formation. These findings identify a new component of thirdhand smoke that is associated with the formation of ultrafine particles (UFP) through oxidative aging of secondhand smoke. The significance of this chemistry for indoor exposure and health effects is highlighted.

  1. Phase formation sequence for the reaction of multilayer thin films of Nb/Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, K.; Coffey, K. R.; Rudman, D. A.; Foner, S.

    1990-06-01

    We have investigated the phase formation sequence for the reaction of Nb and Al in multilayer films using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. NbAl3 is the first intermetallic phase to form. Contrary to previous reports, we find evidence from cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy that the sigma phase, Nb2Al, is not bypassed in the reaction sequence. Instead, its formation is concurrent with the formation of the superconducting A15 phase, Nb3Al. However, depending on the periodicity and the composition of the film, the Nb2Al phase can be consumed by the Nb3Al phase for long annealing times. The significance of this phase formation sequence to powder metallurgically processed magnet wire is discussed.

  2. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions Catalysed by 3?d Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Inke

    2015-10-19

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions are essential for a wide range of natural energy-conversion reactions and recently, the impact of PCET pathways has been exploited in artificial systems, too. The Minireview highlights PCET reactions catalysed by first-row transition-metal complexes, with a focus on the water oxidation, the oxygen reduction, the hydrogen evolution, and the CO2 reduction reaction. Special attention will be paid to systems in which the impact of such pathways is deduced by comparison to systems with "electron-only"-transfer pathways. PMID:26249557

  3. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation. PMID:15330667

  4. Synthesis, characterization and thermodynamics of complex formation of some new Schiff base ligands with some transition metal ions and the adduct formation of zinc Schiff base complexes with some organotin chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Mozaffar; Asadi, Zahra; Torabi, Susan; Lotfi, Najmeh

    Four new complexes, [M(Salpyr)] where Salpyr = N,N'-bis(Salicylidene)-2,3- and 3,4-diiminopyridine and M = Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and UV-vis spectrophotometry. UV-vis spectrophotometric study of the adduct formation of the zinc(II) complexes, [Zn(2,3-Salpyr)] and [Zn(3,4-Salpyr)], as donor with R2SnCl2 (R = methyl, phenyl, n-butyl), PhSnCl3 and Bu3SnCl as acceptors has been investigated in methanol, as solvent. The formation constants and the thermodynamic free energies were measured using UV-vis spectrophotometry. Titration of the organotin chlorides with Zn(II) complexes at various temperatures (T = 283-313 K) leads to 1:1 adduct formation. The results show that the formation constants were decreased by increasing the temperature. The trend of the reaction of RnSnCl4-n as acceptors toward given zinc complexes was as follows: PhSnCl3 > Me2SnCl2 > Ph2SnCl2 > Bu2SnCl2 > Bu3SnCl By considering the formation constants and the ?G° of the complex formation for the Schiff base as donor and the M(II) as acceptor, the following conclusion was drawn: the formation constant for a given Schiff base changes according to the following trend: Ni > Cu > Co > Zn > Mn

  5. Silver(I) Complex formation with Cysteine, Penicillamine and Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Bonnie O.; Jalilehvand, Farideh; Mah, Vicky; Parvez, Masood; Wu, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The complex formation between silver(I) and cysteine (H2Cys), penicillamine (H2Pen) or glutathione (H3Glu) in alkaline aqueous solution was examined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and 109Ag NMR spectroscopic techniques. The complexes formed in 0.1 mol·dm?3 Ag(I) solutions with cysteine and penicillamine were investigated for ligand/Ag(I) (L/Ag) mole ratios increasing from 2.0 to 10.0. For the series of cysteine solutions (pH 10 - 11) a mean Ag-S bond distance 2.45 ± 0.02 Å consistently emerged, while for penicillamine (pH 9) the average Ag-S bond distance gradually increased from 2.40 to 2.44 ± 0.02 Å. EXAFS and 109Ag NMR spectra of a concentrated Ag(I)-cysteine solution (CAg(I) = 0.8 mol·dm?3, L/Ag = 2.2) showed the mean Ag-S bond distance 2.47 ± 0.02 Å and ?(109Ag) = 1103 ppm, consistent with prevailing, partially oligomeric AgS3 coordinated species, while for penicillamine (CAg(I) = 0.5 mol·dm?3, L/Ag = 2.0) the mean Ag-S bond distance 2.40 ± 0.02 Å and ?(109Ag) = 922 ppm indicate that mononuclear AgS2 coordinated complexes dominate. For Ag(I)-glutathione solutions (CAg(I) = 0.01 mol·dm?3, pH ~ 11), mononuclear AgS2 coordinated species with the mean Ag-S bond distance 2.36 ± 0.02 Å dominate for L/Ag mole ratios from 2.0 to 10.0. The crystal structure of the silver(I)-cysteine compound (NH4)Ag2(HCys)(Cys)·H2O (1) precipitating at pH ~ 10 was solved and showed a layer structure with both AgS3 and AgS3N coordination to the cysteinate ligands. A redetermination of the crystal structure of Ag(HPen)·H2O (2) confirmed the proposed digonal AgS2 coordination environment to bridging thiolate sulfur atoms in polymeric intertwining chains forming a double helix. A survey of Ag-S bond distances for crystalline Ag(I) complexes with S-donor ligands in different AgS2, AgS2(O/N) and AgS3 coordination environments was used, together with a survey of 109Ag NMR chemical shifts, to assist assignments of the Ag(I) coordination in solution. PMID:23556419

  6. An isoelectronic NO dioxygenase reaction using a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex and nitrosonium ion†

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Atsutoshi; Han, Jung Eun; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-01-01

    Reaction of a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex, [FeIII(14-TMC)(O2)]+, with NO+, a transformation which is essentially isoelectronic with that for nitric oxide dioxygenases [Fe(III)(O2•?) + NO], affords an iron(IV)-oxo complex, [FeIV(14-TMC)(O)]2+, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), followed by conversion to an iron(III)-nitrato complex, [FeIII(14-TMC)(NO3)(F)]+. PMID:24394960

  7. Use of an osmium complex as a universal luminescent probe for enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Virel, Ana; Sanchez-Lopez, Jose; Saa, Laura; García, Ana Carla; Pavlov, Valeri

    2009-06-15

    The water-soluble bis(bipyridine)chloro(4-picolinic acid) osmium complex, [Os(III)(bpy)2Cl(PyCOOH)]2+ (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, Py=pyridine), is fluorescent in aqueous solution, whereas the reduced form of the complex, [Os(II)(bpy)2Cl(PyCOOH)]+, shows no significant fluorescence under the same conditions. Such reversible redox control of the fluorescence of the complex can be easily adapted to follow any enzymatic reaction to yield oxidising or reducing products that are capable of interacting with [Os(III)(bpy)2Cl(PyCOOH)]2+ or [Os(II)(bpy)2Cl(PyCOOH)]+. Based on the redox reaction between products of biocatalytic reactions and the osmium complex, we have designed a simple bioanalytical assay for the detection of nerve gases, alpha-ketoglutarate, hydrogen peroxide and glucose. PMID:19444825

  8. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format. Revision 97/1

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Center Network. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility rather than optimization of data processing in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  9. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Devlina; Janin, Joël; Robert, Charles H.; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-01-01

    Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U) and bound (B) forms of protein structures from the Protein–Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors) and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69%) of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered) residues in the U form which are observed (ordered) in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial. PMID:26594372

  10. Aza-crown ether complex cation ionic liquids: preparation and applications in organic reactions.

    PubMed

    Song, Yingying; Cheng, Chen; Jing, Huanwang

    2014-09-26

    Aza-crown ether complex cation ionic liquids (aCECILs) were devised, fabricated, and characterized by using NMR spectroscopy, MS, thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), elemental analysis and physical properties. These new and room-temperature ILs were utilized as catalysts in various organic reactions, such as the cycloaddition reaction of CO2 to epoxides, esterification of acetic acid and alcohols, the condensation reaction of aniline and propylene carbonate, and Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indole with aldehydes were investigated carefully. In these reactions, the ionic liquid exhibited cooperative catalytic activity between the anion and cation. In addition, the aza-[18-C-6HK][HSO4]2 was the best acidic catalyst in the reactions of esterification and Friedel-Crafts alkylation under mild reaction conditions. PMID:25154312

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of some pharmaceutical piperazine derivatives through charge-transfer and ion-pair complexation reactions.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, F M

    1997-07-01

    Simple and sensitive spectrophotometric methods are described for the assay of three piperazine derivatives; ketoconazole, piribedil and prazosin hydrochloride based on charge-transfer and ion-pair complexation reactions. The first method is based on the reaction of the basic drug with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) in acetonitrile. The orange-red colour formed due to the formation of charge-transfer complex showed maximum absorbance at 460 nm. The second method is based upon the interaction of the basic drug in dry chloroform with bromophenol blue (BPB) in the same solvent to produce a stable yellow ion-pair complex which absorbs at 410 nm. Beer's law was obeyed for both methods and the relative standard deviations were found to be less than 1%. The two methods can be applied to the analysis of tablets, with no evidence of interference from excipients. A more detailed investigation of the complex was made with respect to its composition, association constant and free energy change. PMID:9260663

  12. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure on phosphodiester bond formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN

    1989-01-01

    The formation of oligomers from deoxynucleotides, catalyzed by Na(+)-montmorillonite, was investigated with special attention given to the effect of the monomer structure on the phosphodiester bond formation. It was found that adenine deoxynucleotides bind more strongly to montmorillonite than do the corresponding ribonucleotides and thymidine nucleotides. Tetramers of 2-prime-dpA were detected in the reaction of 2-prime-d-5-prime-AMP with a water-soluble carbodiimide EDAC in the presence of Na(+)-montmorillonite, illustrating the possible role of minerals in the formation of biopolymers on the primitive earth.

  13. Elementary Reactions of Boron Atoms with HydrocarbonssToward the Formation of Organo-Boron Compounds

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    Elementary Reactions of Boron Atoms with HydrocarbonssToward the Formation of Organo-Boron 96822 Received December 16, 2009 Contents 1. Introduction 5107 1.1. Organo-Boron Molecules in Combustion Systems 5107 1.2. Organo-Boron Molecules on Chemical Vapor Deposition and Material Sciences 5108 1

  14. THE OZONE REACTION WITH BUTADIENE: FORMATION OF TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product ...

  15. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Karig, David K; Neethirajan, Suresh; Suresh, Anil K; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  16. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  17. Short communication: Study on the formation of 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole in the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinlan; Huang, Minghui; Kong, Fansheng; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-12-01

    2-Methylimidazole (2-MI) and 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) can be formed via the Maillard reaction during dairy thermal treatment. In this study, different reactions between ?-dicarbonyl compounds (methylglyoxal, glyoxal) and aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde) in the presence of ammonium sulfate were performed to investigate the formation of 2-MI and 4-MI. Two formation pathways of 2-MI and 4-MI were proposed. One pathway is that ?-dicarbonyl compound reacts with equivalent ammonia to form an intermediate, while aldehyde reacts with equivalent ammonia to form another intermediate, then the 2 intermediates react together to generate 2-MI or 4-MI. Alternatively, ?-dicarbonyl compound can react with double ammonia to form an intermediate, and subsequently reacts with aldehyde to form 2-MI or 4-MI. Additionally, possible mechanisms were also proposed to explain the phenomenon that the 2-MI content was much lower than 4-MI in Maillard reaction. PMID:26409957

  18. Formation of unsaturated vicinal Zr(+)/P frustrated Lewis pairs by the unique 1,1-carbozirconation reactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Kehr, Gerald; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Erker, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of the metallocene cation complexes [Cp*2MCH3](+)[B(C6F5)4](-) (M = Zr or Hf) with trimethylsilyl(diarylphosphino)acetylenes Ar2P-C?C-SiMe3 (Ar = Ph or p-tolyl) resulted in the formation of internal phosphane stabilized cations [Cp*2M-C(CH3)?C(SiMe3)PAr2](+) 4 through the unique 1,1-carbometalation reaction under mild conditions. In contrast, when the low Lewis basicity phosphane containing alkyne (C6F5)2P-C?C-SiMe3 was used, normal 1,2-carbometalation occurred to produce complexes 5, which show agostic coordination of a Me-Si group to the metal center. Complex 4a reacts with n-butyl isocyanide to give the coordination product 6, which has the Zr-P bond retained. Treatment of 4a with N2O gave the five-membered metallaheterocycle 7 by oxidation of the phosphane. The vicinal M(+)/P complexes 4 also show some typical FLP reactivity. They add to cinnamaldehyde or paraformaldehyde, for example, to produce carbonyl addition products 8 and 9, respectively. Complex 4a adds to the N?O functionality of nitrosobenzene with formation of 10. The vicinal M(+)/P systems 4 behave as reactive frustrated Lewis pairs toward hetercumulenes, undergoing 1,2-addition to the C?O bond of CO2 and the S?O bond of SO2 to form the respective adducts 11 and 12. The Zr(+)/P FLP 4a reacts with PhN?S?O to give the addition product 13, in which the phosphane Lewis base has added to the nitrogen atom and the Zr(+) Lewis acid to both atoms of the S?O unit. The reaction of complex 4a with the metal complex [Ir(COD)Cl]2 affords a heterobimetallic Zr/Ir product 14. The vicinal M(+)/P complexes 4 can be also used as efficient catalysts for the regioselective dimerization of phenyl acetylene. PMID:25089591

  19. Solid-state formation of CO2 via the H2CO + O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Loison, J.-C.; Baouche, S.; Chaabouni, H.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The formation of carbon dioxide ice in quiescent regions of molecular clouds has not yet been fully understood, even though CO2 is one the most abundant species in interstellar ices. Aims: CO2 formation was studied via oxidation of formaldehyde molecules on cold surfaces under conditions close to those encountered in quiescent molecular clouds to evaluate the efficiency and the activation barrier of the H2CO + O reaction. Methods: Formaldehyde ices were exposed to O atoms using a differentially pumped beam line. The H2CO + O reaction experiments were carried out on two different surfaces of astrophysical interest (amorphous water ice and oxidised graphite) held at 10 or 55 K. The products were probed via infrared and mass spectroscopy by using RAIRS and temperature-programmed desorption techniques. Results: In this paper we show that the H2CO + O reaction can efficiently form carbon dioxide in the solid phase. The activation barrier for the reaction, based on a model fit to the experimental data, was estimated to be 335 ± 55 K. Conclusions: The H2CO+O reaction on cold surfaces can be added to the set of pathways that lead to carbon dioxide in the interstellar ices. Astrophysically, the abundance of CO2 in quiescent molecular clouds may potentially be explained by three reactions occurring on cosmic grains: CO + OH,CO + O, and H2CO + O. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Mononuclear Phenolate Diamine Zinc Hydride Complexes and Their Reactions With CO2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and zinc coordination chemistry of the three proligands 2-tert-butyl-4-[tert-butyl (1)/methoxy (2)/nitro (3)]-6-{[(2?-dimethylaminoethyl)methylamino]methyl}phenol are described. Each of the ligands was reacted with diethylzinc to yield zinc ethyl complexes 4–6; these complexes were subsequently reacted with phenylsilanol to yield zinc siloxide complexes 7–9. Finally, the zinc siloxide complexes were reacted with phenylsilane to produce the three new zinc hydride complexes 10–12. The new complexes 4–12 have been fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and elemental analyses. The structures of the zinc hydride complexes have been probed using VT-NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments. These data indicate that the complexes exhibit mononuclear structures at 298 K, both in the solid state and in solution (d8-toluene). At 203 K, the NMR signals broaden, consistent with an equilibrium between the mononuclear and dinuclear bis(?-hydrido) complexes. All three zinc hydride complexes react rapidly and quantitatively with carbon dioxide, at 298 K and 1 bar of pressure over 20 min, to form the new zinc formate complexes 13–15. The zinc formate complexes have been analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and VT-NMR studies, which reveal a temperature-dependent monomer–dimer equilibrium that is dominated by the mononuclear species at 298 K. PMID:24882918

  1. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Rh: Reaction With Dioxygen Without Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Praetorius, J.M.; Allen, D.P.; Wang, R.; Webb, J.D.; Grein, F.; Kennepohl, P.; Crudden, C.M.

    2009-05-21

    The reaction of oxygen with rhodium complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbenes was found to give dioxygen complexes with rare square planar geometries and unusually short O-O bond lengths. Analysis of the bonding in these complexes by Rh L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Raman spectroscopy, and DFT calculations provides evidence for a bonding model in which singlet oxygen is bound to a Rh(I) d{sup 8} metal complex, rather than the more common Rh(III) d{sup 6} peroxo species with octahedral geometry and O-O bond lengths in the 1.4-1.5 {angstrom} range.

  2. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  3. Reactions of group 4 metallocenes with monosubstituted acetonitriles: keteniminate formation versus C-C coupling.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lisanne; Haehnel, Martin; Spannenberg, Anke; Arndt, Perdita; Rosenthal, Uwe

    2015-02-16

    The reactions of the Group?4 metallocene dichlorides [Cp'2 MCl2 ] (1?a: M=Ti, Cp'=Cp*=?(5) -pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, 1?b: M=Zr, Cp'=Cp=?(5) -cyclopentadienyl) with lithiated MesCH2-C?N gave [Cp*2 TiCl(N=C=C(HMes))] (3; Mes=mesityl) in the case of 1?a. For compound 1?b, a nitrile-nitrile coupling resulted in a five-membered bridge in 4. The reaction of the metallocene alkyne complex [Cp*2 Zr(?(2) -Me3 SiC2 SiMe3 )] (2) with PhCH2 ?C?N led in the first step to the unstable product [Cp*2 Zr(?(2) -Me3 SiC2 SiMe3 )(NC=CH2 Ph)] (5). After the elimination of the alkyne, a mixture of products was formed. By variation of the solvent and the reaction temperature, three compounds were isolated: a diazadiene complex 6, a bis(keteniminate) complex 7, and 8 with a keteniminate ligand and a five-membered metallacycle. Subsequent variation of the Cp ligand and the metal center by using [Cp2 Zr] and [Cp*2 Ti] with Me3 SiC2 SiMe3 in the reactions with PhCH2-C?N gave complex mixtures. PMID:25641093

  4. Hair dye-incorporated poly-?-glutamic acid/glycol chitosan nanoparticles based on ion-complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Young; Jeong, Young-IL; Choi, Ki-Choon

    2011-01-01

    Background p-Phenylenediamine (PDA) or its related chemicals are used more extensively than oxidative hair dyes. However, permanent hair dyes such as PDA are known to have potent contact allergy reactions in humans, and severe allergic reactions are problematic. Methods PDA-incorporated nanoparticles were prepared based on ion-complex formation between the cationic groups of PDA and the anionic groups of poly(?-glutamic acid) (PGA). To reinforce PDA/PGA ion complexes, glycol chitosan (GC) was added. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier- transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Results Nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation between the amine groups of PDA and the carboxyl groups of PGA. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles are small in size (<100 nm), and morphological observations showed spherical shapes. FT-IR spectra results showed that the carboxylic acid peak of PGA decreased with increasing PDA content, indicating that the ion complexes were formed between the carboxyl groups of PGA and the amine groups of PDA. Furthermore, the intrinsic peak of the carboxyl groups of PGA was also decreased by the addition of GC. Intrinsic crystalline peaks of PDA were observed by XRD. This crystalline peak of PDA was completely nonexistent when nanoparticles were formed by ion complex between PDA, PGA, and GC, indicating that PDA was complexed with PGA and no free drug existed in the formulation. During the drug-release experiment, an initial burst release of PDA was observed, and then PDA was continuously released over 1 week. Cytotoxicity testing against HaCaT human skin keratinocyte cells showed PDA-incorporated nanoparticles had lower toxicity than PDA itself. Furthermore, PDA-incorporated nanoparticles showed reduced apoptosis and necrosis reaction at HaCaT cells. Conclusion The authors suggest that these microparticles are ideal candidates for a vehicle for decreasing side effects of hair dye. PMID:22131834

  5. New platinum and ruthenium Schiff base complexes for water splitting reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanjun; Chen, Yong; Fu, Wen-Fu

    2015-08-28

    New platinum(ii) and ruthenium(ii) mononuclear complexes with naphthalene-based Schiff base ligands L1 (H2-selnaph) and L2 (H2-selnaph-COOH) were synthesized: Pt-selnaph (), Pt-selnaph-COOH (), Ru-selnaph(4-picoline)2 (), and Ru-selnaph(isoquinoline)2 (). The complexes were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight spectrometry, and elemental analysis, and their electrochemical and photophysical properties were investigated. The luminescent complexes and were used as photosensitizers for visible-light driven hydrogen production reactions in the presence of sacrificial electron donor triethylamine and cocatalyst precursor K2PtCl4 aqueous solution. When complex was attached to the surface of TiO2 by a carboxyl group, enhanced hydrogen photogeneration was achieved compared with complex alone, with turnover numbers of about 84 after 12 h irradiation. Calculations based on electrochemical and spectroscopic data also confirmed the feasibility of electron injection through the carboxyl group of complex into the conduction band of TiO2 for hydrogen production reactions. Complexes and were found to be efficient stable water oxidation (NH4)2Ce(NO3)6-driven catalysts with a first-order reaction behavior. A turnover frequency of 5.34 min(-1) was achieved for complex , while complex exhibited an enhanced turnover frequency of 11.9 min(-1) in pH 1.0 aqueous solution. Turnover numbers up to 1400 and 2060 were obtained after 6.5 h of reaction for and , respectively. Unique mechanistic information for water splitting is also presented through electrochemical, spectroscopic and ESI-MS high-valent ruthenium-oxo intermediate investigations. PMID:26205430

  6. Interplay of Experiment and Theory in Elucidating Mechanisms of Oxidation Reactions by a Nonheme Ru(IV)O Complex.

    PubMed

    Dhuri, Sunder N; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Shin, Sun Young; Kim, Jin Hwa; Mandal, Debasish; Shaik, Sason; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the reactivity patterns and reaction mechanisms in alkane hydroxylation, olefin epoxidation, cyclohexene oxidation, and sulfoxidation reactions by a mononuclear nonheme ruthenium(IV)-oxo complex, [Ru(IV)(O)(terpy)(bpm)](2+) (1), has been conducted. In alkane hydroxylation (i.e., oxygen rebound vs oxygen non-rebound mechanisms), both the experimental and theoretical results show that the substrate radical formed via a rate-determining H atom abstraction of alkanes by 1 prefers dissociation over oxygen rebound and desaturation processes. In the oxidation of olefins by 1, the observations of a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 1 and styrene oxide formation lead us to conclude that an epoxidation reaction via oxygen atom transfer (OAT) from the Ru(IV)O complex to the C?C double bond is the dominant pathway. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the epoxidation reaction is a two-step, two-spin-state process. In contrast, the oxidation of cyclohexene by 1 affords products derived from allylic C-H bond oxidation, with a high KIE value of 38(3). The preference for H atom abstraction over C?C double bond epoxidation in the oxidation of cyclohexene by 1 is elucidated by DFT calculations, which show that the energy barrier for C-H activation is 4.5 kcal mol(-1) lower than the energy barrier for epoxidation. In the oxidation of sulfides, sulfoxidation by the electrophilic Ru-oxo group of 1 occurs via a direct OAT mechanism, and DFT calculations show that this is a two-spin-state reaction in which the transition state is the lowest in the S = 0 state. PMID:26075466

  7. Mechanism of production of light complex particles in nucleon-induced reactions

    E-print Network

    Dexian Wei; Ning Wang; Li Ou

    2014-02-10

    The Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamics (ImQMD) model incorporated with the statistical decay model is successful in describing emission of nucleons in the intermediate energy spallation reactions, but not good enough in describing productions of light complex particles, i.e. $d$, $t$, $^3$He and $^4$He. To improve the description on emission of light complex particles, a phenomenological mechanism called surface coalescence and emission is introduced into ImQMD model: nucleon ready to escape from the compound nuclei can coalesce with the other nucleon(s) to form light complex particle and be emitted. With updated ImQMD model, the description on the experimental data of light complex particles produced in nucleon-induced reactions are great improved.

  8. Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction networks

    E-print Network

    Coolen, ACC "Ton"

    Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction proteins, using techniques from the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of disordered many in the proteome are complex formation and dissociation, and the microscopic degrees of freedom are the evolving

  9. Elucidating Latent Mechanistic Complexity in Competing Acid-Catalyzed Reactions of Salicylaldehyde-Derived Baylis-Hillman Adducts.

    PubMed

    Olomola, Temitope O; Klein, Rosalyn; Caira, Mino R; Kaye, Perry T

    2016-01-01

    (1)H NMR-based kinetic studies have revealed the latent mechanistic complexity of deceptively simple hydrochloric acid-catalyzed reactions of salicylaldehyde-derived Baylis-Hillman adducts. Reactions conducted at 0 °C afforded 2-(chloromethyl)cinnamic acid derivatives as the major products and the corresponding 3-(chloromethyl)coumarin derivatives as the minor products. In reactions conducted in refluxing acetic acid, however, the 3-(chloromethyl)coumarin derivatives are the sole products. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR analysis permitted the determination of the rate constants and kinetic parameters involved in the pseudo-first-order formation of (Z)-2-(chloromethyl)-3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2-propenoic acid. The kinetic data clearly preclude the operation of classical kinetic versus thermodynamic control and indicate the operation of three independent reaction pathways. Theoretical studies of these pathways undertaken at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level permitted rationalization of the experimental data and provided insights into the possible mechanism of the enzymic E-Z isomerization and cyclization of (E)-cinnamic acid analogues to afford coumarins. PMID:26655750

  10. Quantifying the ionic reaction channels in the Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxut, Aurelia; Nozière, Barbara; Rossignol, Stéphanie; George, Christian; Waxman, Eleanor Marie; Laskin, Alexander; Slowik, Jay; Dommen, Josef; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal, a common organic gas in the atmosphere, has been identified in recent years as an important Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) precursor (Volkamer et al., 2007). But, unlike with other precursors, the SOA is largely produced by particle-phase reactions (Volkamer et al., 2009) and equilibria (Kampf et al. 2013) that are still not entirely characterized. Since 2009 series of smog chamber experiments have been performed within the Eurochamp program at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, to investigate SOA formation from glyoxal. In these experiments, glyoxal was produced by the gas-phase oxidation of acetylene in the presence of seeds, the seed composition and other conditions being varied. The 2011 campaign resulted in the identification of salting processes controlling the glyoxal partitioning in the seeds (Kampf et al. 2013). This presentation will report results of the 2013 campaign focusing on the identification of the various reactions (ionic or photo-induced) contributing to the SOA mass. In particular, the contribution of the ionic reactions, i.e. mediated by NH4+, were investigated by quantifying the formation of imidazoles (imidazole, imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde, 2,2'-biimidazole) from the small condensation channel of glyoxal with ammonia. For this, the SOA produced were collected on quartz filters and analyzed by Orbitrap LC/MS (Q-Exactive Thermo Fisher). The formation of other products such as organic acids was also investigated to determine potential competing reactions. Time-resolved MOUDI sampling coupled with nano-DESY/ESI-MS/MS analysis was also used to identify nitrogen- and sulphur-containing products from all the reactions. The results obtained for a range of conditions will be presented and compared with recent mechanistic information on the ionic reaction channels (Nozière et al., in preparation, 2013). The implementation of all this new information into a glyoxal-SOA model will be discussed.

  11. Positronium formation studies in solid molecular complexes: Triphenylphosphine oxide-triphenylmethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Fulgêncio, F. H.; Magalhães, W. F.; Alcântara, A. F. C.; Windmöller, D.; Machado, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    Positronium formation in triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), triphenylmethanol (TPM), and systems [TPPO(1-X)?TPMX] has been studied. The low probability of positronium formation in complex [TPPO0.5?TPM0.5] was attributed to strong hydrogen bond and sixfold phenyl embrace interactions. These strong interactions in complex reduce the possibility of the n- and ?-electrons to interact with positrons on the spur and consequently, the probability of positronium formation is lower. The ?3 parameter and free volume (correlated to ?3) were also sensitive to the formation of hydrogen bonds and sixfold phenyl embrace interactions within the complex. For physical mixture the positron annihilation parameters remained unchanged throughout the composition range.

  12. Scale-dependent rates of uranyl surface complexation reaction in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Kerisit, Sebastien; Zachara, John M.; Zhu, Weihuang

    2013-03-01

    Scale-dependency of uranyl[U(VI)] surface complexation rates was investigated in stirred flow-cell and column systems using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment from the US Department of Energy, Hanford site, WA. The experimental results were used to estimate the apparent rate of U(VI) surface complexation at the grain-scale and in porous media. Numerical simulations using molecular, pore-scale, and continuum models were performed to provide insights into and to estimate the rate constants of U(VI) surface complexation at the different scales. The results show that the grain-scale rate constant of U(VI) surface complexation was over 3-10 orders of magnitude smaller than the rate constant calculated using the molecular simulations. The largest rate constant at the grain-scale decreased additional 2 orders of magnitude when the rate was scaled to the porous media in the column. The scaling effect from the grain-scale to the porous media became less important for the slower sorption sites. Pore-scale simulations revealed the importance of coupled mass transport and reactions in both intragranular and inter-granular domains, which caused both spatial and temporal dependence of U(VI) surface complexation rates in the sediment. Pore-scale simulations also revealed that the rate of coupled diffusion and molecular surface complexation reaction in the intragranular porous domains was slower than either individual process alone. The results provide important implications for developing models to scale geochemical/biogeochemical reactions.

  13. Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactions of Isolable (?-Diketiminato)Nb(III) Imido Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Tomson, Neil C.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated both the chemical reduction of (BDI)Nb(V) imido complexes (BDI = HC[C(Me)NAr]2; Ar = 2,6-iPr2-C6H3) to the formal Nb(III) oxidation state and the ability of these Nb(III) complexes to behave as two-electron reductants. The reduction of the Nb(V) species was found to depend heavily on the nature of available supporting ligands, but the chemistry of the reduced compounds proceeded cleanly with a number of unsaturated organic reagents. Accordingly, the novel Nb(V) bis(imido) complexes supported by the monoazabutadiene (mad) ligand (mad)Nb(NtBu)(NAr)(L?) (L? = py, thf) were formed by either KC8 reduction of (BDI)Nb(NtBu)Cl2(py) in the absence of strong ?-acids or by H2 reduction of the Nb(V) dimethyl complex (BDI)Nb(NtBu)Me2 in THF. These products are likely formed though an intramolecular, 2 e? reductive C–N bond cleavage, as has been observed previously for related Group 4 systems, suggesting that transient Nb(III) intermediates were present in both cases. In the presence of 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe), KC8 reduction of (BDI)Nb(NtBu)Cl2(py) was arrested at the Nb(IV) oxidation state to give (BDI)Nb(NtBu)Cl(dmpe), which was characterized by solution-state EPR spectroscopy as a Nb-centered paramagnet with strong coupling to the two equivalent phosphorus nuclei (Aiso{93Nb} = 120.5×10?4 cm?1, Aiso{31P} = 31.0×10?4 cm?1, giso = 1.9815). When strong ?-acids were used to intercept the thermally unstable Nb(III) complex (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(py) prior to reductive cleavage of the ligand C–N bond, the thermally stable Nb(III) species (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CX)2(L?) (X = O, L? = py; X = NXyl, L? = CNXyl; Xyl = 2,6-Me2-C6H3) were obtained in good yields. The Nb(III) complexes (BDI)Nb(NtBu)py, (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2(py) and (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2 were subsequently investigated for their ability to serve as two-electron reducing reagents for both metal-ligand multiple bond formation and for the reduction of organic ?-systems. The reduction of mesityl azide by (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(py) and diphenylsulfoxide by (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2 led to the monomeric bis(imido) and dimeric oxo complexes (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(NMes)(py) and [(BDI)Nb(NtBu)]2(?2-O)2, respectively. MeLi addition to (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2(py) resulted in the formation of a Nb-acylate via methide addition to one of the carbonyl carbons. The acylate product was revealed to have a short Nb–Cacylate bond distance (2.059(4) Å), consistent with multiple Nb–C bond character resulting from Nb(III) back-bonding into the acylate carbon. The interaction of (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2 with two equivalents of 4,4?-dichlorobenzophenone resulted in the clean, quantitative formation of the corresponding pinacol coupling product, but introduction of the ketone in 1: 1 molar ratios resulted in mixtures of the pinacol product and the starting material, suggesting that ketone coordination to the Nb(III) complex may be reversible. Relatedly, addition of 1-phenyl-1-propyne to (BDI)Nb(NtBu)(CO)2 formed a thermally unstable 1: 1 Nb/alkyne complex, as characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopies; reaction of this species with HCl/MeOH yielded a 2: 1 mixture of 1-phenyl-1-propene and the free alkyne, suggesting a high degree of covalency in the Nb–C bonds. PMID:21116450

  14. Structural investigation of trifuoromethyl substituted bis(?-diketonato)-dichlorotitanium(IV) complexes displaying a mono-dinuclear equilibrium hydrolysis reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Annemarie; Conradie, Jeanet

    2015-10-01

    Mononuclear Ti(?-diketonato)2Cl2 complexes with CF3-containing ?-diketonato ligands, exhibit a monomer-hydrolysed dinuclear complex equilibrium when dissolved in CDCl3 containing trace amounts of water. This result is in contrast to the more electron rich derivatives with non CF3-containing ?-diketonato ligands, for example, Ti(acac)2Cl2, which exsists only as the monomer in CDCl3 solution. The X-ray structure of the ?-oxo bridged hydrolysed dinuclear complex {Ti(CF3COCHCOCH3)2Cl}2(?-O) reveals that the two mononuclear Ti units forming the dinuclear structure, both adopt a cis-trans-cis configuration with the CF3 groups of the trifluoroacetylacetonate ligands in trans positions. In solution both mononuclear Ti(?-diketonato)2Cl2 and hydrolysed dinuclear {Ti(?-diketonato)2Cl}2(?-O) complexes exist as equilibrium mixtures of isomers. DFT calculations, used to determine the stability of the isomers, showed that for monomeric bis(?-diketonato)-titanium(IV) complexes, there is agreement with experimental solid state structures, in that the most stable DFT calculated isomer, of a specific complex, formed in the solid state. However for the dinuclear {Ti(CF3COCHCOCH3)2Cl}2(?-O) complex, DFT calculations revealed that although most of the 10 isomers are experimentally possible due to the small energy difference obtained between the isomers, an isomer of higher energy formed in the solid state, suggesting that the equilibrium reaction between the monomer and hydrolysed dinuclear complex may contribute to the formation of the less stable dinuclear isomer {Ti(CF3COCHCOCH3)2Cl}2(?-O) (1111).

  15. Molybdenum Hydride and Dihydride Complexes Bearing Diphosphine Ligands with a Pendant Amine: Formation of Complexes With Bound Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-07-06

    CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes (PNP = (R2PCH2)2NMe, R = Et or Ph) were synthesized by displacement of two CO ligands of CpMo(CO)3H by the PNP ligand; these complexes were characterized by IR and variable temperature 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes are formed as mixture of cis and trans-isomers. Both cis-CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and trans-CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H were analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical oxidation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H in CH3CN are both irreversible at slow scan rates and quasi-reversible at higher scan rates, with E1/2 = -0.36 V (vs. Cp2Fe+/0) for CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and E1/2 = -0.18 V for CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H. Hydride abstraction from CpMo(CO)(PNP)H with [Ph3C]+[A]- (A = B(C6F5)4 or BArF4; [ArF = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]) afforded “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(?3-PNP)]+ complexes that feature the amine bound to the metal. Displacement of the ?3 Mo-N bond by CD3CN gives [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(CD3CN)]+. The kinetics of this reaction were studied by NMR spectroscopy, providing the activation parameters ?H‡ = 22.1 kcal/mol, ?S‡ = 1.89 cal/(mol·K), Ea = 22.7 kcal/mol. Protonation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H affords [CpMo(CO)(?2-PEtNMePEt)(H)2]+ as a Mo dihydride complex, which loses H2 to generate [CpMo(CO)(?3-PEtNMePEt)]+ at room temperature. CpMo(CO)(dppp)H (dppp = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) was studied as a Mo diphosphine analogue without a pendant amine, and the product of protonation of this complex gives [CpMo(CO)(dppp)(H)2]+. Our results show that the pendant amine has a strong driving force to form stable “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(?3-PNP)]+ complexes, and also promotes hydrogen elimination from [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(H)2]+ complexes by formation of Mo-N dative bond. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. We thank Monte Helm, Elliott Hulley and Deanna Miller for help on the crystallography, and Ming Fang for assistance on the electrochemical experiments.

  16. The human SepSecS-tRNASec complex reveals the mechanism of selenocysteine formation.

    PubMed

    Palioura, Sotiria; Sherrer, R Lynn; Steitz, Thomas A; Söll, Dieter; Simonovic, Miljan

    2009-07-17

    Selenocysteine is the only genetically encoded amino acid in humans whose biosynthesis occurs on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA). O-Phosphoseryl-tRNA:selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS) catalyzes the final step of selenocysteine formation by a poorly understood tRNA-dependent mechanism. The crystal structure of human tRNA(Sec) in complex with SepSecS, phosphoserine, and thiophosphate, together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays, supports a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent mechanism of Sec-tRNA(Sec) formation. Two tRNA(Sec) molecules, with a fold distinct from other canonical tRNAs, bind to each SepSecS tetramer through their 13-base pair acceptor-TPsiC arm (where Psi indicates pseudouridine). The tRNA binding is likely to induce a conformational change in the enzyme's active site that allows a phosphoserine covalently attached to tRNA(Sec), but not free phosphoserine, to be oriented properly for the reaction to occur. PMID:19608919

  17. The Human SepSecS-tRNASec Complex Reveals the Mechanism of Selenocysteine Formation

    PubMed Central

    Palioura, Sotiria; Sherrer, R. Lynn; Steitz, Thomas A.; Söll, Dieter; Simonovi?, Miljan

    2010-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the only genetically encoded amino acid in humans whose biosynthesis occurs on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA). O-Phosphoseryl-tRNA:selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS) catalyzes the final step of selenocysteine formation by a poorly understood tRNA-dependent mechanism. The crystal structure of human tRNASec in complex with SepSecS, phosphoserine, and thiophosphate, together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays, supports a pyridoxal phosphate–dependent mechanism of Sec-tRNASec formation. Two tRNASec molecules, with a fold distinct from other canonical tRNAs, bind to each SepSecS tetramer through their 13–base pair acceptor-T?C arm (where ? indicates pseudouridine). The tRNA binding is likely to induce a conformational change in the enzyme’s active site that allows a phosphoserine covalently attached to tRNASec, but not free phosphoserine, to be oriented properly for the reaction to occur. PMID:19608919

  18. Simplicity in complexity: the photosynthetic reaction center performs as a simple 0.2 V battery

    E-print Network

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Simplicity in complexity: the photosynthetic reaction center performs as a simple 0.2 V battery life. We show here that it operates in a simple, battery-like manner, with a maximum potential of 0 battery' cannot generate more than a 1.5 V potential, which is its electron motive force O0 e3 . Only when

  19. Olefin Metathesis Reactions Initiated by d2 Molybdenum or Tungsten Complexes

    E-print Network

    Müller, Peter

    Olefin Metathesis Reactions Initiated by d2 Molybdenum or Tungsten Complexes Richard R. Schrock,6-diisopropylphenyl; WdW ) 2.4445(3) Å).9 The molybdenum analogue, [Mo(NAr)(CH2-t-Bu)(OC6F5)]2, has been shown

  20. Placebo Effect upon Complex Reaction Time When Hypnotic Suggestibility is Controlled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskridge, Veronica L.

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of a placebo (sugar pill) accompanied by suggestions that the pill would either (1) improve performance as a stimulant or (2) cause a deterioration in performance as a depressant when the performance in question was the subjects' complex reaction time to a light stimulus. The Harvard Group Scale of…

  1. Computational insights into carbon-carbon homocoupling reactions mediated by organolanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kefalidis, Christos E; Perrin, Lionel; Maron, Laurent

    2014-03-21

    Homocoupling of terminal alkynes into trienediyl complexes by alkyl samarocenes is known experimentally. By means of computational techniques, we investigated the mechanism of this reaction in detail. The overall reaction sequence is: ?-bond metathesis, dimerisation of metallocenes, and homocoupling of two acetylides into trienediyl. We show that the rate-determining step corresponds to the homocoupling of two anionic acetylides. This coupling takes place at a bis-samarocene dimer complex in which the bridging mode of the two acetylide moieties is critical for the reaction to proceed. The limited energy barrier for the homocoupling of the carbanions originates from a synergistic effect of the two samarium centres within the dimer. Variation of the steric demand of both substrates and lanthanocenes allowed rationalising all the experimental data available for these systems. PMID:24429590

  2. Catalytic C-N and C-F bond formation by organometallic group 11 complexes

    E-print Network

    Akana, Jennifer Anne

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of the reaction between an (NHC)gold(I) fluoride complex (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) and alkynes (Chapter 1). Gold(I) and fluoride add trans across the triple bond of 3-hexyne and ...

  3. Some new reaction pathways for the formation of cytosine in interstellar space - A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. P.; Tandon, Poonam; Mishra, Priti

    2013-03-01

    The detection of nucleic acid bases in carbonaceous meteorites suggests that their formation and survival is possible outside of the Earth. Small N-heterocycles, including pyrimidine, purines and nucleobases, have been extensively sought in the interstellar medium. It has been suggested theoretically that reactions between some interstellar molecules may lead to the formation of cytosine, uracil and thymine though these processes involve significantly high potential barriers. We attempted therefore to use quantum chemical techniques to explore if cytosine can possibly form in the interstellar space by radical-radical and radical-molecule interaction schemes, both in the gas phase and in the grains, through barrier-less or low barrier pathways. Results of DFT calculations for the formation of cytosine starting from some of the simple molecules and radicals detected in the interstellar space are being reported. Global and local descriptors such as molecular hardness, softness and electrophilicity, and condensed Fukui functions and local philicity indices were used to understand the mechanistic aspects of chemical reaction. The presence and nature of weak bonds in the molecules and transition states formed during the reaction process have been ascertained using Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIMs). Two exothermic reaction pathways starting from propynylidyne (CCCH) and cyanoacetylene (HCCCN), respectively, have been identified. While the first reaction path is found to be totally exothermic, it involves a barrier of 12.5 kcal/mol in the gas phase against the lowest value of about 32 kcal/mol reported in the literature. The second path is both exothermic and barrier-less. The later has, therefore, a greater probability of occurrence in the cold interstellar clouds (10-50 K).

  4. A calorimetric study of the hydrolysis and peroxide complex formation of the uranyl(VI) ion.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2014-02-14

    The enthalpies of reaction for the formation of uranyl(vi) hydroxide {[(UO2)2(OH)2](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)4](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)5](+), [(UO2)3(OH)6](aq), [(UO2)3(OH)7](-), [(UO2)3(OH)8](2-), [(UO2)(OH)3](-), [(UO2)(OH)4](2-)} and peroxide complexes {[UO2(O2)(OH)](-) and [(UO2)2(O2)2(OH)](-)} have been determined from calorimetric titrations at 25 °C in a 0.100 M tetramethyl ammonium nitrate ionic medium. The hydroxide data have been used to test the consistency of the extensive thermodynamic database published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (I. Grenthe, J. Fuger, R. J. M. Konings, R. J. Lemire, A. B. Mueller, C. Nguyen-Trung and H. Wanner, Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1992 and R. Guillaumont, T. Fanghänel, J. Fuger, I. Grenthe, V. Neck, D. J. Palmer and M. R. Rand, Update on the Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Technetium, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2003). A brief discussion is given about a possible structural relationship between the trinuclear complexes [(UO2)3(OH)n](6-n), n = 4-8. PMID:24301256

  5. Thermochemistry and Reaction Barriers for the Formation of Levoglucosenone from Cellobiose

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  6. Thermochemistry and reaction barriers for the formation of levoglucosenone from cellobiose.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  7. Predicted formation of localized superlattices in spatially distributed reaction-diffusion solutions.

    PubMed

    Tlidi, M; Sonnino, G; Bachir, M

    2012-10-01

    We study numerically the formation of localized superlattices in spatially distributed systems. We predict that in wide regions of the parameter space, stable localized, either bright or dark, superlattices may form in reaction-diffusion systems. Localized superlattices are patterns which consist of a piece of superlattice. Each single ring is surrounded by spots. The number of rings and their spatial distribution are determined by the initial conditions. The peak concentration remains unaltered for fixed values of the parameters. PMID:23214638

  8. Photocatalytic CO2 reduction with high turnover frequency and selectivity of formic acid formation using Ru(II) multinuclear complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Yusuke; Morimoto, Tatsuki; Koike, Kazuhide; Ishitani, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Previously undescribed supramolecules constructed with various ratios of two kinds of Ru(II) complexes—a photosensitizer and a catalyst—were synthesized. These complexes can photocatalyze the reduction of CO2 to formic acid with high selectivity and durability using a wide range of wavelengths of visible light and NADH model compounds as electron donors in a mixed solution of dimethylformamide–triethanolamine. Using a higher ratio of the photosensitizer unit to the catalyst unit led to a higher yield of formic acid. In particular, of the reported photocatalysts, a trinuclear complex with two photosensitizer units and one catalyst unit photocatalyzed CO2 reduction (?HCOOH = 0.061, TONHCOOH = 671) with the fastest reaction rate (TOFHCOOH = 11.6 min-1). On the other hand, photocatalyses of a mixed system containing two kinds of model mononuclear Ru(II) complexes, and supramolecules with a higher ratio of the catalyst unit were much less efficient, and black oligomers and polymers were produced from the Ru complexes during photocatalytic reactions, which reduced the yield of formic acid. The photocatalytic formation of formic acid using the supramolecules described herein proceeds via two sequential processes: the photochemical reduction of the photosensitizer unit by NADH model compounds and intramolecular electron transfer to the catalyst unit. PMID:22908243

  9. Aqueous-Phase Reactions of Isoprene with Sulfoxy Radical Anions as a way of Wet Aerosol Formation in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietsova, I.; Rudzinski, K. J.; Szmigielski, R.; Laboratory of the Environmental Chemistry

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exhibit an important role in the environment. They have implications on human health and life, and - in the larger scale - on climate, the Earth's radiative balance and the cloud's formation. Organic matter makes up a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosols (~35% to ~90%) and may originate from direct emissions (primary organic aerosol, POA) or result from complex physico-chemical processes of volatile organic compounds (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). Isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) is one of the relevant volatile precursor of ambient SOA in the atmosphere. It is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere as a result of living vegetation. According to the recent data, the isoprene emission rate is estimated to be at the level of 500 TgC per year. While heterogeneous transformations of isoprene have been well documented, aqueous-phase reactions of this hydrocarbon with radical species that lead to the production of new class of wet SOA components such as polyols and their sulfate esters (organosulfates), are still poorly recognized. The chain reactions of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions (SRA) are one of the recently researched route leading to the formation of organosulfates in the aqueous phase. The letter radical species originate from the auto-oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the aqueous phase and are behind the phenomenon of atmospheric acid rain formation. This is a complicated chain reaction that is catalyzed by transition metal ions, such as manganese(II), iron(III) and propagated by sulfoxy radical anions . The presented work addresses the chemical interaction of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions in the water solution in the presence of nitrite ions and nitrous acid, which are important trace components of the atmosphere. We showed that nitrite ions and nitrous acid significantly altered the kinetics of the auto-oxidation of SO2 in the presence of isoprene at different solution acidity from 2 to 8.7. The presence of nitrogen-containing inorganic salts strongly impact the formation of novel organosulfur products, whereas no organonitrates were observed. A detailed characterization of these products with the triple-quadruple negative electrospray mass spectrometry (-)ESI-MS/MS revealed oxygenated polar species with C-5 skeleton bearing SO3H (MW 182, 180) and SO2H (MW 166, 164) moieties on the hydroxyl group. The structures of these products were firmly confirmed by comparison of their liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry behaviors with that corresponding to the synthesized model compounds. It is believed that newly discovered highly polar low molecular weight compounds may contribute to the growth of wet aerosol particles by the formation of higher molecular weight species.

  10. Complex Type 2 Reactions in Three Patients with Hansen's Disease from a Southern United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Salinas, Jorge L; McDonald, Robert W; Sheth, Anandi N; Fairley, Jessica K

    2015-11-01

    In non-endemic countries, leprosy, or Hansen's disease (HD), remains rare and is often underrecognized. Consequently, the literature is currently lacking in clinical descriptions of leprosy complications in the United States. Immune-mediated inflammatory states known as reactions are common complications of HD. Type 1 reactions are typical of borderline cases and occur in 30% of patients and present as swelling and inflammation of existing skin lesions, neuritis, and nerve dysfunction. Type 2 reactions are systemic events that occur at the lepromatous end of the disease spectrum, and typical symptoms include fever, arthralgias, neuritis, and classic painful erythematous skin nodules known as erythema nodosum leprosum. We report three patients with lepromatous leprosy seen at a U.S. HD clinic with complicated type 2 reactions. The differences in presentations and clinical courses highlight the complexity of the disease and the need for increased awareness of unique manifestations of lepromatous leprosy in non-endemic areas. PMID:26304919

  11. Dearomatization Reactions of N-Heterocycles Mediated by Group 3 Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Kevin L; Williams, Bryan N; Benitez, Diego; Carver, Colin T; Ogilby, Kevin R; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Goddard, William A; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2010-01-13

    Group 3 (Sc, Y, Lu, La) benzyl complexes supported by a ferrocene diamide ligand are reactive toward aromatic N-heterocycles by mediating their coupling and, in a few cases, the cleavage of their C-N bonds. When these complexes reacted with 2,2'-bipyridine or isoquinoline, they facilitated the alkyl migration of the benzyl ligand onto the pyridine ring, a process accompanied by the dearomatization of the N-heterocycle. The products of the alkyl-transfer reactions act as hydrogen donors in the presence of aromatic N-heterocycles, ketones, and azobenzene. Experimental and computational studies suggest that the hydrogen transfer takes place through a concerted mechanism. An interesting disproportionation reaction of the dearomatized, alkyl-substituted isoquinoline complexes is also reported.

  12. Double layer formation at the interface of complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Thoma, M. H.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-08-15

    Necessary conditions are formulated for the generation of a double layer at the interface of a complex plasma and a particle-free electron-ion plasma in a weakly collisional discharge. Examples are calculated for realistic observed complex plasmas, and it is shown that situations of both ''smooth'' transitions and 'sharp' transitions can exist. The model can explain the abrupt boundaries observed.

  13. Complex mineral zoning patterns caused by ultra-local equilibrium at reaction interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark; Liu, Weihua; Borg, Stacey; Cleverley, James

    2014-05-01

    Chemical compositions of zoned minerals record a time-series of conditions experienced by the rock. They are a function of the prevailing pressure, temperature and effective bulk chemical composition as well as any post-growth modification processes e.g. volume diffusion and deformation. In fluid-buffered systems, zoned mineral compositions should be expected to reflect directly the evolution of fluid composition. Here we show that during rapid fluid-rock reactions, ultra-local equilibrium can form complex mineral zoning patterns, even when the overall system is highly fluid buffered. We reacted calcite single crystals with arsenate-phosphate solutions with molar ratios of As/(As+P) between 0.011 - 0.145 at 250°C and water-saturated pressure with fluid-rock mass ratios in excess of 2500%. Porous, fine-grained apatite polycrystals with varying arsenic contents replaced the calcite by an interface-coupled dissolution reprecipitation mechanism. During the first few hours of the reaction, complex zoning patterns of arsenic content within the apatite formed. The scale of the arsenic variations corresponds with the scale of corrugations of the reaction interface. The variations in arsenic content of the apatite result from spatially and temporally varying increases in the arsenic content of the reaction interface fluid. Since phosphate diffusion cannot keep pace with the reaction rate arsenic becomes enriched in the reaction interface fluid as phosphate is preferentially used in the reaction. The most arsenic rich parts of the apatite crystal show an 8-fold enrichment in arsenic with respect to the bulk fluid composition but only at an ultra-local scale. Once the calcite is completely consumed, the porous crystal equilibrates with the bulk fluid over a few days because the grain size is much finer and diffusion can keep pace with the equilibration reaction. This study highlights the complexity that can arise from ultra-local fluid composition variations due to rapid fluid-rock interaction in a short-lived fluid flow event, such as that can occur during a seismic cycle. Subsequent interpretation of the complex zoning patterns to reflect the evolution of bulk fluid would not only be extremely complex but also erroneous.

  14. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, E. V. Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-15

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI{sub 2} with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD{sup +}-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  15. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, E. V.; Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI2 with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD+-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 Å resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  16. Zwitterion formation in titan ice analogs: reaction between HC3N and NH3.

    PubMed

    Couturier-Tamburelli, Isabelle; Sessouma, Bintou; Chiavassa, Thierry; Piétri, Nathalie

    2012-11-01

    A zwitterion is formed in the laboratory at low temperatures in the solid phase from the thermal reaction of HC(3)N and NH(3). We report for the first time its infrared spectrum. We study its reaction using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Its reaction rate is estimated to be k(T) = 2.9 × 10(5) exp(-2.3 ± 0.1 (kJ mol(-1))/RT). Calculations using density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31g**) are used to characterize all the species (complexes, zwitterions, and transition states) and are in good agreement with the infrared spectra. The structure of the zwitterion is determined planar and it is characterized by a N-C bond around 1.5 Å. PMID:23075265

  17. Disulfide bond formation involves a quinhydrone-type chargetransfer complex

    E-print Network

    Bardwell, James

    in a stacked configuration. We conclude that disulfide bond formation involves a stacked hydro- quinone­benzoquinone. To function as a cata- lyst, DsbA must be reoxidized. This reoxidation is accomplished by its partner protein

  18. Topology and Complexity of Formations Abubakr Muhammad1

    E-print Network

    Egerstedt, Magnus

    , animal herds, bacterial colonies, schools of fish, formations of flying birds, and so on. These group colonies and fish schools provide a lot of insight into the study and design of artificial multi

  19. Formation of Chlorotriophenoxy Radicals from Complete Series Reactions of Chlorotriophenols with H and OH Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    The chlorothiophenoxy radicals (CTPRs) are key intermediate species in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes/thianthrenes (PCDT/TAs). In this work, the formation of CTPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 chlorothiophenol (CTP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution at 600–1200 K. The present study indicates that the structural parameters, thermal data, and rate constants as well as the formation potential of CTPRs from CTPs are strongly dominated by the chlorine substitution at the ortho-position of CTPs. Comparison with the study of formation of chlorophenoxy radicals (CPRs) from chlorophenols (CPs) clearly shows that the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by H is more efficient than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by H, whereas the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by OH is less impactful than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by OH. Reactions of CTPs with H can occur more readily than that of CTPs with OH, which is opposite to the reactivity comparison of CPs with H and OH. PMID:26270566

  20. Evaluation of Multi-tRNA Synthetase Complex by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Size Exclusion Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Seok; Lee, Cheolju

    2015-01-01

    Eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (M, K, Q, D, R, I, EP and LARS) and three auxiliary proteins (AIMP1, 2 and 3) are known to form a multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) in mammalian cells. We combined size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with reversed-phase liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (RPLC-MRM-MS) to characterize MSC components and free ARS proteins in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T) cells. Crude cell extract and affinity-purified proteins were fractionated by SEC in non-denaturing state and ARSs were monitored in each fraction by MRM-MS. The eleven MSC components appeared mostly in earlier SEC fractions demonstrating their participation in complex formation. TARSL2 and AIMP2-DX2, despite their low abundance, were co-purified with KARS and detected in the SEC fractions, where MSC appeared. Moreover, other large complex-forming ARS proteins, such as VARS and FARS, were detected in earlier fractions. The MRM-MS results were further confirmed by western blot analysis. Our study demonstrates usefulness of combined SEC-MRM analysis for the characterization of protein complexes and in understanding the behavior of minor isoforms or variant proteins. PMID:26544075

  1. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  2. Asymmetric 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions Catalyzed by Heterocycle-Based Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Hiroyuki

    Highly enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of several 1,3-dipoles, such as nitrones, nitrile oxides, nitrile imines, diazoalkanes, azomethine imines and carbonyl ylides, catalyzed by heterocyclic supramolecular type of metal complexes consisting of chiral heterocyclic compounds and metal salts were described in terms of their ability of asymmetric induction and enantioface differentiation. The scope and limitations of each cycloaddition reactions were also briefly described. Of the chiral hererocycle-based ligands, chiral bisoxazoline, 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl)pyridine, and related oxazoline ligands are shown to be quite effective in obtaining high levels of asymmtric induction. The combination of the bisoxazoline ligand derived from (1S,2R)-cis-1-amino-2-indanol and metal salts was especially efficient for asymmetric cycloaddition reactions of a number of 1,3-dipoles, such as nitrones, nitrile oxide, nitrile imines, diazoacetates and azomethine imines. The metals utilized for the heterocycle-based complexes show a crucial role for degree of asymmetric induction depending upon the 1,3-dipole used. High levels of enantioselectivity were achieved in 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of unstable carbonyl ylides with benzyloxyacetaldehyde derivatives, ?-keto esters, 3-(2-alkenoyl)-2-oxazolidinones, and even vinyl ethers, which were catalyzed by Pybox-lanthanoid metal complexes.

  3. Ligand substitution reactions of a phenolic quinolyl hydrazone; oxidovanadium (IV) complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Quinoline ring has therapeutic and biological activities. Quinolyl hydrazones constitute a class of excellent chelating agents. Recently, the physiological and biological activities of quinolyl hydrazones arise from their tendency to form metal chelates with transition metal ions. In this context, we have aimed to study the competency effect of a phenolic quinolyl hydrazone (H2L; primary ligand) with some auxiliary ligands (Tmen, Phen or Oxine; secondary ligands) towards oxidovanadium (IV) ions. Results Mono- and binuclear oxidovanadium (IV) - complexes were obtained from the reaction of a phenolic quinolyl hydrazone with oxidovanadium (IV)- ion in absence and presence of N,N,N',N'- tetramethylethylenediamine (Tmen), 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) or 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine). The phenolic quinolyl hydrazone ligand behaves as monobasic bidentate (NO- donor with O- bridging). All the obtained complexes have the preferable octahedral geometry except the oxinato complex (2) which has a square pyramid geometry with no axial interaction; the only homoleptic complex in this study. Conclusion The ligand exchange (substitution/replacement) reactions reflect the strong competency power of the auxiliary aromatic ligands (Phen/Oxine) compared to the phenolic quinolyl hydrazone (H2L) towards oxidovanadium (IV) ion; (complexes 2 and 3). By contrast, in case of the more flexible aliphatic competitor (Tmen), an adduct was obtained (4). The obtained complexes reflect the strength of the ligand field towards the oxidovanadium (IV)- ion; Oxine or Phen >> phenolic hydrazone (H2L) > Tmen. PMID:21846387

  4. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs{sup *}

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; Goes Brennand, E. de

    2011-06-15

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs{sup *}, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  5. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and water from the reaction of cold hydrogen atoms with solid oxygen at 10K

    E-print Network

    Miyauchi, N; Chigai, T; Nagaoka, A; Watanabe, N; Kouchi, A

    2008-01-01

    The reactions of cold H atoms with solid O2 molecules were investigated at 10 K. The formation of H2O2 and H2O has been confirmed by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. We found that the reaction proceeds very efficiently and obtained the effective reaction rates. This is the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of water molecules under conditions mimicking those found in cold interstellar molecular clouds. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the reaction mechanism and astrophysical implications.

  6. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and water from the reaction of cold hydrogen atoms with solid oxygen at 10K

    E-print Network

    N. Miyauchi; H. Hidaka; T. Chigai; A. Nagaoka; N. Watanabe; A. Kouchi

    2008-05-01

    The reactions of cold H atoms with solid O2 molecules were investigated at 10 K. The formation of H2O2 and H2O has been confirmed by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. We found that the reaction proceeds very efficiently and obtained the effective reaction rates. This is the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of water molecules under conditions mimicking those found in cold interstellar molecular clouds. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the reaction mechanism and astrophysical implications.

  7. A two-color fluorogenic carbene complex for tagging olefins via metathesis reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Marcel; Grüter, Andreas; Heib, Florian; Huch, Volker; Zapp, Josef; Herten, Dirk-Peter; Schmitt, Michael; Jung, Gregor

    2015-12-01

    We describe a fluorogenic ruthenium (II) carbene complex in which the chromophore is directly connected to the metal center. The compound introduces a boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) moiety into target double bonds by metathesis. Tagging of terminal double bonds is demonstrated on immobilized styrene units on a glass surface. We also show that two compounds with distinguishable fluorescence properties are formed in the model reaction with styrene. The outcome of the metathesis reaction is characterized by 19F-NMR, optical spectroscopy, and, finally, single-molecule trajectories. This labeling scheme, in our perception, is of particular interest in the fields of interfacial science and biorthogonal ligation in combination with super-resolution imaging.

  8. Reactions of the OOH radical with guanine: Mechanisms of formation of 8-oxoguanine and other products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    2010-09-01

    The mutagenic product 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is formed due to intermediacy of peroxyl (OOR) radicals in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation-induced DNA damage. The mechanisms of these reactions are not yet understood properly. Therefore, in the present study, the mechanisms of formation of 8-oxoGua and other related products due to the reaction of the guanine base of DNA with the hydroperoxyl radical (OOH) were investigated theoretically employing the B3LYP and BHandHLYP hybrid functionals of density functional theory and the polarizable continuum model for solvation. It is found that the reaction of the OOH radical with guanine can occur following seven different mechanisms leading to the formation of various products including 8-oxoGua, its radicals, 5-hydroxy-8-oxoguanine and CO 2. The mechanism that yields 8-oxoGua as an intermediate and 5-hydroxy-8-oxoGua as the final product was found to be energetically most favorable.

  9. ESI-MS and theoretical study on the coordination structures and reaction modes of the diperoxovanadate complexes containing histidine-like ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xian-Yong; Xu, Xin; Chen, Zhong

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the coordination structures and the reaction modes of diperoxovanadate complexes in the gas phase, the interaction between K3[OV(O2)2(C2O4)]·H2O and a series of histidine-like ligands has been investigated by the combination of the electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experimental results proved the formation of both [OV(O2)2L]- (L = all histidine-like ligands) and [OV(O2)2L'2]- (L' = histidine and carnosine only) species. DFT calculations at the level of B3LYP/6-31+G* showed that [OV(O2)2L'2]- is a hexa-coordinated complex, instead of a hepta-coordinated complex as proposed before. The unique coordination mode in the gas phase is for one ligand to bind to the oxygen atoms via hydrogen binding, rather than both ligands to the metal center. The L'2 dimer formation and the maintenance of the hydrogen bonding within the dimer during the complex formation are two important factors that enhance the abundance of the [OV(O2)2L'2]- species. The calculated bonding enthalpy and free energy changes provided an explanation on the reaction modes of the interaction systems, in agreement with the observations of the ESI-MS experiments.

  10. Density functional theory calculations on the complexation of p-arsanilic acid with hydrated iron oxide clusters: structures, reaction energies, and transition states.

    PubMed

    Adamescu, Adrian; Hamilton, Ian P; Al-Abadleh, Hind A

    2014-07-31

    Aromatic organoarsenicals, such as p-arsanilic acid (pAsA), are still used today as feed additives in the poultry and swine industries in developing countries. Through the application of contaminated litter as a fertilizer, these compounds enter the environment and interact with reactive soil components such as iron and aluminum oxides. Little is known about these surface interactions at the molecular level. We report density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the energies, optimal geometries, and vibrational frequencies for hydrated pAsA/iron oxide complexes, as well as changes in Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for various types of ligand exchange reactions leading to both inner- and outer-sphere complexes. Similar calculations using arsenate are also shown for comparison, along with activation barriers and transition state geometries between inner-sphere complexes. Minimum energy calculations show that the formation of inner- and outer-sphere pAsA/iron oxide complexes is thermodynamically favorable, with the monodentate mononuclear complexes being the most favorable. Interatomic As-Fe distances are calculated to be between 3.3 and 3.5 Å for inner-sphere complexes and between 5.2 and 5.6 Å for outer-sphere complexes. In addition, transition state calculations show that activation energies greater than 23 kJ/mol are required to form the bidentate binuclear pAsA/iron oxide complexes, and that formation of arsenate bidentate binuclear complexes is thermodynamically -rather than kinetically- driven. Desorption thermodynamics using phosphate ions show that reactions are most favorable using HPO4(2-) species. The significance of our results for the overall surface complexation mechanism of pAsA and arsenate is discussed. PMID:25007345

  11. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmore »high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.« less

  12. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  13. Interpretation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements in Formations with Complex Pore Structure 

    E-print Network

    Chi, Lu

    2015-08-10

    enable us to model the NMR relaxometry in porous rock samples, and to improve interpretation of NMR relaxometry in complex formations. Based on pore-scale simulations and theoretical analysis of NMR relaxometry, this research estimated petrophysical...

  14. Possibility of DCC formation in pp collisions at LHC energy via reaction-diffusion equation

    E-print Network

    Partha Bagchi; Arpan Das; Srikumar Sengupta; Ajit M. Srivastava

    2015-08-31

    There are indications of formation of a thermalized medium in high multiplicity pp collisions at LHC energy. It is possible that such a medium may reach high enough energy density/temperature so that a transient stage of quark-gluon plasma, where chiral symmetry is restored, may be achieved. Due to rapid 3-dimensional expansion, the system will quickly cool undergoing spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking transition. We study the dynamics of chiral field, after the symmetry breaking transition, for such an event using reaction-diffusion equation approach which we have recently applied for studying QCD transitions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We show that the interior of such a rapidly expanding system is likely to lead to the formation of a single large domain of disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) which has been a subject of intensive search in earlier experiments. We argue that large multiplicity pp collisions naturally give rise to required boundary conditions for the existence of slowly propagating front solutions of reaction-diffusion equation with resulting dynamics of chiral field leading to the formation of a large DCC domain.

  15. Reaction path in the formation of titanium diboride by a magnesium thermite process

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, V.; Logan, K.V.; Speyer, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    TiB{sub 2} was formed by a thermite reaction amongst Mg, amorphous B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} powders. Mixtures consisting of 2Mg-TiO{sub 2}, 3Mg-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 5Mg-TiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} were heat treated using DTA and separately via ignition with a nichrome wire; product phases were identified using XRD. MgO and Ti were products from the first mixture reacted in argon, whereas an incomplete transformation forming Mg{sub 3}TiO{sub 4} occurred in air. For the second mixture, a reaction forming Mg{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sup 6} occurred in air, but no reaction occurred in argon due to deficiency of oxygen. Minor amounts Of Mg{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Mg{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} were detected in addition to the predicted product phases of MgO and TiB{sub 2} for the third mixture ignited both in air and argon. Based on available evidence, a path for this reaction was deduced; Mg particles in contact with TiO{sub 2} reacted to form Ti, which in turn reacted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to form TiB{sub 2}. TiB{sub 2} product particles from the reaction in argon had a more faceted appearance than those formed during the reaction in air. This was interpreted to be the result of glassy B{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface layer formation on TiB{sub 2} particles in air.

  16. Synthesis and structures of ruthenium–NHC complexes and their catalysis in hydrogen transfer reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Lu, Chunxin; Zheng, Qing; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ruthenium complexes [Ru(L1)2(CH3CN)2](PF6)2 (1), [RuL1(CH3CN)4](PF6)2 (2) and [RuL2(CH3CN)3](PF6)2 (3) (L1= 3-methyl-1-(pyrimidine-2-yl)imidazolylidene, L2 = 1,3-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)benzimidazolylidene) were obtained through a transmetallation reaction of the corresponding nickel–NHC complexes with [Ru(p-cymene)2Cl2]2 in refluxing acetonitrile solution. The crystal structures of three complexes determined by X-ray analyses show that the central Ru(II) atoms are coordinated by pyrimidine- or pyridine-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene and acetonitrile ligands displaying the typical octahedral geometry. The reaction of [RuL1(CH3CN)4](PF6)2 with triphenylphosphine and 1,10-phenanthroline resulted in the substitution of one and two coordinated acetonitrile ligands and afforded [RuL1(PPh3)(CH3CN)3](PF6)2 (4) and [RuL1(phen)(CH3CN)2](PF6)2 (5), respectively. The molecular structures of the complexes 4 and 5 were also studied by X-ray diffraction analysis. These ruthenium complexes have proven to be efficient catalysts for transfer hydrogenation of various ketones.

  17. Boron-selective reactions as powerful tools for modular synthesis of diverse complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Pengfei

    2015-12-21

    In the context of modular and rapid construction of molecular diversity and complexity for applications in organic synthesis, biomedical and materials sciences, a generally useful strategy has emerged based on boron-selective chemical transformations. In the last decade, these types of reactions have evolved from proof-of-concept to some advanced applications in the efficient preparation of complex natural products and even automated precise manufacturing on the molecular level. These advances have shown the great potential of boron-selective reactions in simplifying synthetic design and experimental operations, and should inspire new developments in related chemical and technological areas. This tutorial review will highlight the original contributions and representative advances in this emerging field. PMID:26393673

  18. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociation Reactions of Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.; Gibson, John K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-12-03

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass-spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structure of "hypercoordinated" species and the energetics of water-elimination reactions of uranyl acetone complexes observed in earlier work (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). It is shown that the "hypercoordinated" species contain diacetone alcohol ligands bonded in either bidentate or monodentate fashion, which are indistinguishable from (acetone)2 in mass spectrometry. Calculations confirm that four diacetone ligands can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to form mesityl oxide ligands and alkoxide species through the elimination of water, providing an explanation for the observed water-elimination reactions.

  19. Complexes of HNO? and NO?¯ with NO? and N?O?, and their potential role in atmospheric HONO formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboures, Michael A.; Raff, Jonathan D.; Miller, Y.; Phillips, Leon F.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.; Gerber, Robert B.

    2008-08-11

    Calculations were performed to determine the structures, energetics, and spectroscopy of the atmospherically relevant complexes (HNO?)•(NO?), (HNO?)•(N?O?), (NO?¯)•(NO?), and (NO?¯)•(N?O?). The binding energies indicate that three of the four complexes are quite stable, with the most stable (NO?¯)•(N?O?) possessing binding energy of almost -14 kcal mol¯¹. Vibrational frequencies were calculated for use in detecting the complexes by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. An ATR-FTIR experiment showed features at 1632 and 1602 cm¯¹ that are attributed to NO? complexed to NO?¯ and HNO?, respectively. The electronic states of (HNO?)•(N?O?) and (NO?¯)•( N?O?) were investigated using an excited state method and it was determined that both complexes possess one low-lying excited state that is accessible through absorption of visible radiation. Evidence for the existence of (NO?¯)•( N?O?) was obtained from UV/vis absorption spectra of N?O? in concentrated HNO?, which show a band at 320 nm that is blue shifted by 20 nm relative to what is observed for N?O? dissolved in organic solvents. Finally, hydrogen transfer reactions within the (HNO?)•(NO?) and (HNO?)•( N?O?) complexes leading to the formation of HONO, were investigated. In both systems the calculated potential profiles rule out a thermal mechanism, but indicate the reaction could take place following the absorption of visible radiation. We propose that these complexes are potentially important in the thermal and photochemical production of HONO observed in previous laboratory and field studies.

  20. Synthetic and Mechanistic Studies of Strained Heterocycle Opening Reactions Mediated by Zirconium(IV) Imido Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Suzanne A.; Rivera, Vicki A.; Ruck, Rebecca T.; Michael, Forrest E.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The reactions of the bis(cyclopentadienyl)(tert-butylimido)zirconium complex (Cp2Zr=N-t-Bu)(THF) (1) with epoxides, aziridines, and episulfides were investigated. Heterocycles without accessible ?-hydrogens undergo insertion/protonation of the C–X bond to produce 1,2-amino alcohols (X = O) and 1,2-diamines (X = NR), whereas heterocycles with accessible ?-hydrogens undergo elimination/protonation to produce allylic alcohols (X = O) and allylic sulfides (X = S). Mechanistic investigations support a stepwise pathway with zwitterionic intermediates for the first reaction class and a concerted pathway for the second reaction class. Additionally, the feasibility of chirality transfer from the planar-chiral ebthi (ebthi = ethylenebis(tetrahydroindenyl)) ligand was demonstrated with a chiral analogue, (ebthi)-Zr=NAr(THF) (Ar = 2,6-dimethylphenyl), 2, through the diastereoselective ring opening of meso epoxides. PMID:16508693

  1. Quasifission and difference in formation of evaporation residues in the $^{16}$O+$^{184}$W and $^{19}$F+$^{181}$Ta reactions

    E-print Network

    A. K. Nasirov; G. Mandaglio; M. Manganaro; A. I. Muminov; G. Fazio; G. Giardina

    2009-08-23

    The excitation functions of capture, complete fusion, and evaporation residue formation in the $^{16}$O+$^{184}$W and $^{19}$F+$^{181}$Ta reactions leading to the same $^{200}$Pb compound nucleus has been studied theoretically to explain the experimental data showing more intense yield of evaporation residue in the former reaction in comparison with that in the latter reaction. The observed difference is explained by large capture cross section in the former and by increase of the quasifission contribution to the yield of fission-like fragments in the $^{19}$F+$^{181}$Ta reaction at large excitation energies. The probability of compound nucleus formation in the $^{16}$O+$^{184}$W reaction is larger but compound nuclei formed in both reactions have similar angular momentum ranges at the same excitation energy. The observed decrease of evaporation residue cross section normalized to the fusion cross section in the $^{19}$F+$^{181}$Ta reaction in comparison with the one in the $^{16}$O+$^{184}$W reaction at high excitation energies is explained by the increase of hindrance in the formation of compound nucleus connected with more quick increase of the quasifission contribution in the $^{19}$F induced reaction. The spin distributions of the evaporation residue cross sections for the two reactions are also presented.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO{sub 2} FORMATION BY SURFACE REACTIONS OF NON-ENERGETIC OH RADICALS WITH CO MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira; Hama, Tetsuya; Pirronello, Valerio

    2010-04-01

    Surface reactions between carbon monoxide and non-energetic hydroxyl radicals were carried out at 10 K and 20 K in order to investigate possible reaction pathways to yield carbon dioxide in dense molecular clouds. Hydroxyl radicals, produced by dissociating water molecules in microwave-induced plasma, were cooled down to 100 K prior to the introduction of CO. The abundances of species were monitored in situ using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Formation of CO{sub 2} was clearly observed, even at 10 K, suggesting that reactions of CO with OH proceed with little or no activation barrier. The present results indicate that CO{sub 2} formation, due to reactions between CO and OH, occurs in tandem with H{sub 2}O formation, and this may lead to the formation of CO{sub 2} ice in polar environments, as typically observed in molecular clouds.

  3. In--Flight ($K^-,p$) Reactions for the Formation of Kaonic Atoms and Kaonic Nuclei in Green function method

    E-print Network

    J. Yamagata; H. Nagahiro; S. Hirenzaki

    2006-06-01

    We study theoretically the kaonic atom and kaonic nucleus formations in the in--flight ($K^-,p$) reactions using the Green function method, which is suited to evaluate formation rates both of stable and unstable bound systems. We consider $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O as the targets and calculate the spectra of the ($K^-,p$) reactions. We conclude that a no peak structure due to kaonic nucleus formation is expected in the reaction spectra calculated with the chiral unitary kaon--nucleus optical potential. In the spectra with the phenomenological deep kaon--nucleus potential, we may have possibilities to observe some structures due to kaonic nucleus states. For all cases, we have peaks due to the kaonic atom formations in the reaction spectra.

  4. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  5. Formation of brown carbon via reactions of ammonia with secondary organic aerosols from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Formation of brown carbon via reactions of ammonia with secondary organic aerosols from biogenic t ammonia. 2012 Accepted 9 September 2012 Keywords: Brown carbon Secondary organic aerosol Ammonia Mass absorption

  6. Pressure dependent product formation in the photochemically initiated allyl + allyl reaction.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Lars; Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Nothdurft, Jörg; Zeuch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Photochemically driven reactions involving unsaturated radicals produce a thick global layer of organic haze on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. The allyl radical self-reaction is an example for this type of chemistry and was examined at room temperature from an experimental and kinetic modelling perspective. The experiments were performed in a static reactor with a volume of 5 L under wall free conditions. The allyl radicals were produced from laser flash photolysis of three different precursors allyl bromide (C3H5Br), allyl chloride (C3H5Cl), and 1,5-hexadiene (CH2CH(CH2)2CHCH2) at 193 nm. Stable products were identified by their characteristic vibrational modes and quantified using FTIR spectroscopy. In addition to the (re-) combination pathway C3H5+C3H5 ? C6H10 we found at low pressures around 1 mbar the highest final product yields for allene and propene for the precursor C3H5Br. A kinetic analysis indicates that the end product formation is influenced by specific reaction kinetics of photochemically activated allyl radicals. Above 10 mbar the (re-) combination pathway becomes dominant. These findings exemplify the specificities of reaction kinetics involving chemically activated species, which for certain conditions cannot be simply deduced from combustion kinetics or atmospheric chemistry on Earth. PMID:24192913

  7. Effects of salt on intermolecular polyelectrolyte complexes formation between cationic microgel and polyanion.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    The study of interpolyelectrolyte complex (IPEC) formation between cationic microgel and polyanion was presented. The size and molecular weight of cationic microgel are much larger than those of linear anionic polyelectrolyte. The resulting IPEC was divided by dynamic light scattering (DLS), static light scattering (SLS), and turbidity or spectrometry; (i) water-soluble intra-particle complexes consisting of one microgel to which linear polyelectrolytes bind; (ii) complex coacervates (inter-particle complexes composed of aggregated intra-particle complexes); and (iii) insoluble amorphous precipitates. These types depended on not only the mixing ratio of polyanion to cationic microgel but also salt concentration. This trend was discussed from IPEC's composition, thermodynamics of IPEC formation and the salt effect on intermolecular interactions which were expected in IPEC formation. The results obtained from the use of microgel in IPEC's study suggested that not only electrostatic interaction but also hydrophobic interaction play an important role in the aggregation or association of IPEC. PMID:26472211

  8. Dimeric interactions and complex formation using direct coevolutionary couplings

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ricardo N.; Morcos, Faruck; Jana, Biman; Andricopulo, Adriano D.; Onuchic, José N.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a procedure to characterize the association of protein structures into homodimers using coevolutionary couplings extracted from Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) in combination with Structure Based Models (SBM). Identification of dimerization contacts using DCA is more challenging than intradomain contacts since direct couplings are mixed with monomeric contacts. Therefore a systematic way to extract dimerization signals has been elusive. We provide evidence that the prediction of homodimeric complexes is possible with high accuracy for all the cases we studied which have rich sequence information. For the most accurate conformations of the structurally diverse dimeric complexes studied the mean and interfacial RMSDs are 1.95Å and 1.44Å, respectively. This methodology is also able to identify distinct dimerization conformations as for the case of the family of response regulators, which dimerize upon activation. The identification of dimeric complexes can provide interesting molecular insights in the construction of large oligomeric complexes and be useful in the study of aggregation related diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s. PMID:26338201

  9. Interferogram formation in the presence of complex and large deformation

    E-print Network

    's caldera subsided about 5.4 meters. Three hours prior to the onset of the eruption, an earthquake (Mw 5.4) occurred, near the caldera. Because of the large and complex phase gradient due to the huge subsidence and the earthquake, it is difficult to form an interferogram inside the caldera that spans the eruption

  10. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  11. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

  12. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) bothmore »significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH ratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than 3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.« less

  13. Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces R. G. Ford Metal sorption to clay minerals may lead to the formation of secondary precipitates, by enhanced dissolution of the clay mineral structure as indicated by enhanced levels of dissolved silica

  14. Formation en rsolution de problmes complexes aide par le Serious Game Rex Machine

    E-print Network

    Bordenave, Charles

    Formation en résolution de problèmes complexes aidée par le Serious Game « Rex Machine » Elisabeth Serious Game dédié expérimenter et évaluer plusieurs scénarios pédagogiques Processus de résolution de, L. Geneste Formation ResPro 19/05/2015 3 / 3 Aspects liés au Serious Game #12;

  15. The gas-phase reaction between hydroxide ion and methyl formate: a theoretical analysis of the energy surface and product distribution.

    PubMed

    Pliego, J R; Riveros, J M

    2001-01-01

    The potential energy surface for the prototype solvent-free ester hydrolysis reaction: OH- +HCOOCH3 --> products has been characterized by high level ab initio calculations of MP4/6-311 + G(2df,2p)//MP2/6-31 + G(d) quality. These calculations reveal that the approach of an OH- ion leads to the formation of two distinct ion-molecule complexes: 1) the MS1 species with the hydroxide ion hydrogen bonded to the methyl group of the ester, and 2) the MS4 moiety resulting from proton abstraction of the formyl hydrogen by the hydroxide ion and formation of a three-body complex of water, methoxide ion and carbon monoxide. The first complex reacts to generate formate anion and methanol products through the well known B(AC)2 and S(N)2 mechanisms. RRKM calculations predict that these pathways will occur with a relative contribution of 85% and 15% at 298.15 K, in excellent agreement with experimentally measured values of 87% and 13%, respectively. The second complex reacts by loss of carbon monoxide to yield the water-methoxide complex through a single minimum potential surface and is the preferred pathway in the gas-phase. This water-methoxide adduct can further dissociate if the reactants have excess energy. These results provide clear evidence that the preferred pathways for ester hydrolysis in solution are dictated by solvation of the hydroxide ion. PMID:11205008

  16. Formation of hypernuclei in high energy reactions within a covariant transport model

    E-print Network

    T. Gaitanos; H. Lenske; U. Mosel

    2009-04-14

    We investigate the formation of fragments with strangeness degrees of freedom in proton- and heavy-ion-induced reactions at high relativistic energies. The model used is a combination of a dynamical transport model and a statistical approach of fragment formation. We discuss in detail the applicability and limitations of such a hybrid model by comparing data on spectator fragmentation at relativistic $SIS/GSI$-energies. The theoretical results are analyzed in terms of spectator fragmentation with strangeness degrees of freedom such as the production of single-$\\Lambda-{}^{3,4,5}He$ hypernuclei. We provide theoretical estimates on the spectra and on inclusive cross sections of light hypernuclei, which could be helpful for future experiments on hypernuclear physics at the new GSI- and J-PARC-facilities.

  17. Reaction Between CH2 and HCCN: A Theoretical Approach to Acrylonitrile Formation in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivani; Misra, Alka; Tandon, Poonam

    2014-04-01

    Acrylonitrile (CH2CHCN) was first detected in dense molecular cloud SgrB2. The synthesis of this interstellar molecule is reported to be quite difficult. Therefore, in the present work an attempt has been made to explore the possibility of formation of acrylonitrile from some simple molecules and radicals detected in interstellar space by radical-radical interaction scheme, both in the gas phase and in the icy grains. All calculations are performed using quantum chemical methods with density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2/6-311G (d,p) level. In the discussed chemical pathway, the reaction is found to be totally exothermic and barrier less giving rise to a high probability of acrylonitrile formation in Interstellar space.

  18. Formation of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by mechanochemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Huaming; Zhang Xiangchao; Ao Weiqin; Qiu Guanzhou

    2004-05-05

    Preparation of nanosized NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles by mechanochemical reaction(NiO+{alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and subsequent thermal treatment was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermal treatment of the as-milled powder at 700 deg. C for 1 h led to the formation of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with an average crystal size of about 23 nm. Effect of thermal treatment temperature on the crystal size of the nanoparticles was studied. The mechanism of nanoparticles growth was primarily discussed. The activation energy of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle formation during calcination was calculated to be 16.6 kJ/mol.

  19. Reaction between CH2 and HCCN: a theoretical approach to acrylonitrile formation in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Shivani; Misra, Alka; Tandon, Poonam

    2014-04-01

    Acrylonitrile (CH2CHCN) was first detected in dense molecular cloud SgrB2. The synthesis of this interstellar molecule is reported to be quite difficult. Therefore, in the present work an attempt has been made to explore the possibility of formation of acrylonitrile from some simple molecules and radicals detected in interstellar space by radical-radical interaction scheme, both in the gas phase and in the icy grains. All calculations are performed using quantum chemical methods with density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2/6-311G (d,p) level. In the discussed chemical pathway, the reaction is found to be totally exothermic and barrier less giving rise to a high probability of acrylonitrile formation in Interstellar space. PMID:25416678

  20. Gas-Phase Molecular Halogen Formation from NaCl and NaBr Aerosols: When Are Interface Reactions Important?

    E-print Network

    Dabdub, Donald

    Gas-Phase Molecular Halogen Formation from NaCl and NaBr Aerosols: When Are Interface Reactions at the surface of sea-salt particles have been suggested as an important source of photolyzable gas-phase halogen the influence of interface reactions on gas-phase molecular halogen production from pure NaCl and NaBr aerosols

  1. Search for reaction conditions and catalyst for selective prebiotic formation of Aldopentoses from Glycolaldehyde and Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delidovich, Irina; Taran, Oxana; Parmon, Valentin; Gromov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Formation of organic compounds from simple precursors appears to have been one of the first steps from geochemistry towards modern biochemistry. The Earth lagoons, hydrothermal springs, cosmic dust, meteorites, protoplanetary disk, etc. has been considered as the possible ``reactors'' in which the prebiotic synthesis could have taken place. The finding of reactions and reaction conditions which allow to produce the high yields of the biologically relevant substances from simple compounds could help us to verify different hypothesis of plausible prebotic conditions. In this work we have studied the formation of vitally important sugars, namely aldopentoses (ribose, xylose, lyxose and arabinose), from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde over catalysts. Aldopentoses nowadays play the important roles as the components of polysaccharides, glycosides, nucleic acids and ATP. Glycolaldehyde is the simplest monosaccharide, which was found in the interstellar space [1], where it could be generated as a result of several processes, for instance, condensation of formaldehyde under UV-radiation [2]. In this work the peculiarities of interaction between glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde in the presence of soluble (phosphate and borate buffers) and solid (minerals apatite and montmorillonites) catalysts were studied. The dependences of composition of the reaction products on the catalyst nature, molar ratio of substrates, pH value of reaction mixture were revealed. The yields of aldopentoses amount to ca. 60-65% in the presence of borate catalyst under optimized reaction conditions. Borate acts not only as a catalyst, but also as the stabilizer of active intermediates and aldopentoses from side reactions [3]. Borates are present in some mineral and clays (serpentine, montmorillonite etc.) and in water of Cityhot springs (Geyser valley, placeKamchatka) in rather high concentrations. Therefore catalysis by borates could be considered as plausible prebotic condition. Acknowledgements. We thank Dr. S. Yashnik for providing the montmorillonite clays. The financial support of Program RAS (program ``Origin of biosphere and evolution biogeology systems'') is gratefully acknowledged. Hollis, J., Jewell, P., Lovas, F., et al., The Astrophysical Journal. 613, L45--L48, 2004 Pestunova, O., Simonov, A., Snytnikov, V., et al., Adv. Space Res. 36/2, 214-219, 2005. Ricardo, A., Carrigan, M.A., Olcott, A.N., Benner, S.A. Science. 303, 5655, 196, 2004.

  2. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  3. Oligomer Formation Reactions of Criegee Intermediates in the Ozonolysis of Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Inomata, S.; Hirokawa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a substantial fraction of atmospheric fine particulate matters and has an effect on visibility, climate and human health. One of the major oxidizing processes leading to SOA formation is an ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons (UHCs).[1] Despite of its importance, the contribution of the ozonolysis of UHCs to the SOA formation in the troposphere is not sufficiently understood due to a lack of information on reaction pathways to produce low volatile compounds. While many studies have previously been focused on SOA formation from the ozonolysis of large UHCs, SOA formation from the ozonolysis of UHCs with less than six carbon atoms have been rarely investigated because their products are expected to be too volatile to contribute to the SOA formation. Very recently, a few studies have reported the SOA formation from the ozonolysis of such small UHCs but chemical mechanisms are still unclear. [2-4] In order to understand SOA formation from the ozonolysis of the small UHCs, this study investigated gas- and particle-phase products in laboratory experiments with a Teflon bag using a negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) with chloride ion transfer for chemical ionization. This technique is suitable for analysis of compounds such as carboxylic acids and hydroperoxides expected to be produced in the ozonolysis of UHCs with less fragmentation, high selectivity, and high sensitivity. In the particle-phase analysis, SOAs collected on a PTFE filter were heated, and thermally desorbed compounds were analyzed. In the gas-phase analysis, series of peaks with an interval of a mass-to-charge ratio equal to the molecular weight of a Criegee intermediate formed in their ozonolysis were observed. These peaks were attributed to oligomeric hydroperoxides composed of Criegee intermediates as a chain unit. These oligomeric hydroperoxides were also observed in the particle-phase analysis, indicating that the oligomeric hydroperoxides of low volatility formed in the gas phase are partitioned into the particle phase to contribute to the SOA formation. Here, we propose a new oligomer formation mechanism including sequential addition of Criegee intermediates to hydroperoxides. REFERENCE: (1)Kroll, J. H.; Seinfeld, J. H. Chemistry of Secondary Organic Aerosol: Formation and Evolution of Low-Volatility Organics in the Atmosphere. Atmos. Environ. 2008, 42, 3593-3624. (2)Sadezky, A.; Chaimbault, P.; Mellouki, A.; Roempp, A.; Winterhalter, R.; Le Bras, G.; Moortgat, G. K. Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol and Oligomers from the Ozonolysis of Enol Ethers. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2006, 6, 5009-5024. (3)Sadezky, A.; Winterhalter, R.; Kanawati, B.; Roempp, A.; Spengler, B.; Mellouki, A.; Le Bras, G.; Chaimbault, P.; Moortgat, G. K. Oligomer Formation during Gas-Phase Ozonolysis of Small Alkenes and Enol Ethers: New Evidence for the Central Role of the Criegee Intermediate as Oligomer Chain Unit. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2008, 8, 2667-2699. (4)Klotz, B.; Barnes, I.; Imamura, T. Product Study of the Gas-Phase Reactions of O3, OH and NO3 Radicals with Methyl Vinyl Ether. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2004, 6, 1725-1734.

  4. Reactions between vanadium ions and biogenic reductants of tunicates: Spectroscopic probing for complexation and redox products in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.E.; Grant, K.B.; Nakanishi, K.

    1996-07-02

    Several species of marine tunicates store oxygen-sensitive V{sup III} in blood cells. A sensitive colorimetric V{sup III} assay was used t survey the leading candidates for the native reducing agent of vanadate in tunicates (i.e., An-type tunichromes, glutathione, NADPH, and H{sub 2}S) in reactions with V{sup V} or V{sup IV} ions under anaerobic, aqueous conditions at acidic or neutral pH. Except for the case of An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, the assay results for the biogenic reducing agents clearly showed that appreciable quantities of V{sup III} products were not generated under the conditions tested. Therefore, the assay results place new limits on hypothetical mechanisms of V{sup III} formation in vivo. For reactions between An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, low levels of V{sup III} products could not be ruled out because of an interfering peak in the colorimetric assays. For similar reactions between V{sup V} ions and An-1, or an An-1,2 mixture, in mildly to moderately basic media, the product mixtures precipitated as greenish black solids. Analyses of the precipitated V/An mixtures using vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the major products were tris(catecholate)-type V{sup IV} complexes (65 {plus_minus} 6%) and bis(catecholate)-type V{sup IV}O complexes (20 {plus_minus} 4%). XAS analysis of the V/An-1 product mixture also provided evidence of a minor V{sup III} component (9 {plus_minus} 5% of total V), notable for possible relevance to tunicate biochemistry. The combined results of XAS studies, spectrophotometric studies, and EPR studies consistently establish that reactions between tunichromes (Mm-1 or An-1) and V{sup V} ions generate predominantly V{sup IV}-tunichrome complexes in neutral to moderately basic aqueous media. 53 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Secondary Reaction Zone Formations in coated Ni-base Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Rae, C. M. F.

    2009-05-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) has been added to the latest 4th Generation Ni-base superalloys to improve phase stability and modify creep life. Various coatings are routinely applied to these advanced alloys to protect the turbine blade at elevated temperature, however, this creates several problems such as the precipitation of brittle Topologically Close-Packed (TCP) phases and the formation of Secondary Reaction Zones (SRZ). The SRZ forms under the plat-aluminized coating of turbine blades and consists of ?, ? and TCP phases growing into substrate by the migration of high-angle grain boundaries. Surface residual stress and chemical super-saturation of alloying elements are associated to SRZ formation. In the thin sections of high-pressure turbine blades this is critical in determining blade performance and longevity. It is essential to know how Ru additions affect coating and SRZ morphologies during exposure. In this study, we focus on the effects of three variables on the SRZ formation: Ru concentration, alloy composition in Ru-containing alloys and surface finish. A series of Platinum-Aluminised superalloys containing 2-5wt% Ru and having various surface finishes was studied after isothermal exposure at 1100°C for up to 500h. The alloys were classified into two groups by their distinctive SRZ morphology. At the lowest Ru levels sporadic formation of SRZ was observed, whilst a continuous SRZ was formed in the higher Ru alloys. EBSD analysis revealed that the latter group have a higher nucleation rate of individual SRZ grains and also showed more rapid SRZ growth. The precipitation of TCPs in the substrate also inhibited the growth of the SRZ towards the end of the exposure further reducing the penetration of the SRZ into the substrate. It is concluded that Ru-additions to Ni-base superalloys are effective in impeding TCP phase formation in the substrate, but increase both the extent and the rate of SRZ formation beneath coating.

  6. Photo-induced reactions in the ion-molecule complex Mg+-OCNC2H5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ju-Long; Liu, Haichuan; Han, Ke-Li; Yang, Shihe

    2003-06-01

    Ion-molecule complexes of magnesium cation with ethyl isocyanate were produced in a laser-ablation supersonic expansion nozzle source. Photo-induced reactions in the 1:1 complexes have been studied in the spectral range of 230-410 nm. Photodissociation mass spectrometry revealed the persistent product Mg+ from nonreactive quenching throughout the entire wavelength range. As for the reactive channels, the photoproducts, Mg+OCN and C2H5+, were produced only in the blue absorption band of the complex with low yields. The action spectrum of Mg+(OCNC2H5) consists of two pronounced peaks on the red and blue sides of the Mg+ 32P?32S atomic transition. The ground state geometry of Mg+-OCNC2H5 was fully optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G** level by using GAUSSIAN 98 package. The calculated absorption spectrum of the complex using the optimized structure of its ground state agrees well with the observed action spectrum. Photofragment branching fractions of the products are almost independent of the photolysis photon energy for the 3Px,y,z excitations. The very low branching ratio of reactive products to nonreactive fragment suggests that evaporation is the main relaxation pathway in the photo-induced reactions of Mg+(OCNC2H5).

  7. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 M(I) compounds often disproportionate into M(0) and M(III). Here, however, we show that the reaction of the M(I) salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [Ga(I)(C6H5F)2](+)[Al(OR(F))4](-) (R(F)=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3](2+)(•){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a Ga(II) compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [Ga(III){(bipy)3}(•)](2+) radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [(I)n(I)(C6H5F)2](+)[Al(OR(F))4](-) leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6](3+), [In3(bipy)5](3+) and [In4(bipy)6](4+) metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In-In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3](3+){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}3 and [M4](4+){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  8. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R.; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 MI compounds often disproportionate into M0 and MIII. Here, however, we show that the reaction of the MI salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [GaI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]? (RF=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3]2+•{[Al(ORF)4]?}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a GaII compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [GaIII{(bipy)3}•]2+ radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [InI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]? leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6]3+, [In3(bipy)5]3+ and [In4(bipy)6]4+ metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In?In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3]3+{[Al(ORF)4]?}3 and [M4]4+{[Al(ORF)4]?}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  9. Reactivity of Cys4 zinc finger domains with gold(III) complexes: insights into the formation of "gold fingers".

    PubMed

    Jacques, Aurélie; Lebrun, Colette; Casini, Angela; Kieffer, Isabelle; Proux, Olivier; Latour, Jean-Marc; Sénèque, Olivier

    2015-04-20

    Gold(I) complexes such as auranofin or aurothiomalate have been used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis for several decades. Several gold(I) and gold(III) complexes have also shown in vitro anticancer properties against human cancer cell lines, including cell lines resistant to cisplatin. Because of the thiophilicity of gold, cysteine-containing proteins appear as likely targets for gold complexes. Among them, zinc finger proteins have attracted attention and, recently, gold(I) and gold(III) complexes have been shown to inhibit poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which is an essential protein involved in DNA repair and in cancer resistance to chemotherapies. In this Article, we characterize the reactivity of the gold(III) complex [Au(III)(terpy)Cl]Cl2 (Auterpy) with a model of Zn(Cys)4 "zinc ribbon" zinc finger by a combination of absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism, mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We show that the Zn(Cys)4 site of Zn·LZR is rapidly oxidized by Auterpy to form a disulfide bond. The Zn(2+) ion is released, and the two remaining cysteines coordinate the Au(+) ion that is produced during the redox reaction. Subsequent oxidation of these cysteines can take place in conditions of excess gold(III) complex. In the presence of excess free thiols mimicking the presence of glutathione in cells, mixing of the zinc finger model and gold(III) complex yields a different product: complex (Au(I))2·LZR with two Au(+) ions bound to cysteines is formed. Thus, on the basis of detailed speciation and kinetic measurements, we demonstrate herein that the destruction of Zn(Cys)4 zinc fingers by gold(III) complexes to achieve the formation of "gold fingers" is worth consideration, either directly or mediated by reducing agents. PMID:25839236

  10. Further study on mechanism of production of light complex particles in nucleon-induced reactions

    E-print Network

    Dexian Wei; Lihua Mao; Ning Wang; Min Liu; Li Ou

    2015-09-11

    The Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamics (ImQMD) model incorporated with the statistical decay model is used to investigate the intermediate energy nucleon-induced reactions. In our last work, the description on light complex particle emission has been great improved with a phenomenological mechanism called surface coalescence and emission introduced into ImQMD model. In this work, taking account of different specific binding energies and separation energies for various light complex particles, the phase space parameters in surface coalescence model are readjusted. By using the new phase space parameters set with better physical fundament, the double differential cross sections of emitted light complex particles are found to be in better agreement with experimental data.

  11. The central chirality of the metal atom and configurational relations in asymmetric reactions catalysed by metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Valerii A.

    2004-12-01

    The recently published data on the dependence of the configuration of the reaction product on the structure of a catalytic metal complex (or an intermediate determining the asymmetric induction) in asymmetric catalytic reactions of hydrogen-transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone, hydroformylation of styrene, allylic alkylation of 1,3-diphenylprop-2-enyl acetate and alkylation of benzaldehyde with dialkylzinc are systematised. The applicabilities of octant and quadrant projections of the complexes are compared in order to establish the relationships between their structures and the enantioselectivities of the reactions. The known mechanisms of asymmetric induction in these reactions are discussed with regard to the C1 or C2 symmetry of the catalytic complex. The reasons for a decrease in the enantioselectivities of hydrogen-transfer hydrogenation, hydroformylation and alkylation by dialkylzinc [in the absence of Ti(OPri)4] when performed with complexes with chiral C2-symmetric ligands (as compared with complexes with asymmetric ligands) are considered.

  12. Aerobic oxidation reactions catalyzed by vanadium complexes of bis(phenolate) ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqi; Scott, Brian L; Wu, Ruilian; Silks, L A Pete; Hanson, Susan K

    2012-07-01

    Vanadium(V) complexes of the tridentate bis(phenolate)pyridine ligand H(2)BPP (H(2)BPP = 2,6-(HOC(6)H(2)-2,4-(t)Bu(2))(2)NC(5)H(3)) and the bis(phenolate)amine ligand H(2)BPA (H(2)BPA = N,N-bis(2-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylbenzyl)propylamine) have been synthesized and characterized. The ability of the complexes to mediate the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of pinacol was tested. Reaction of the complex (BPP)V(V)(O)(O(i)Pr) (4) with pinacol afforded the monomeric vanadium(IV) product (BPP)V(IV)(O)(HO(i)Pr) (6) and acetone. Vanadium(IV) complex 6 was oxidized rapidly by air at room temperature in the presence of NEt(3), yielding the vanadium(V) cis-dioxo complex [(BPP)V(V)(O)(2)]HNEt(3). Complex (BPA)V(V)(O)(O(i)Pr) (5) reacted with pinacol at room temperature, to afford acetone and the vanadium(IV) dimer [(BPA)V(IV)(O)(HO(i)Pr)](2). Complexes 4 and 5 were evaluated as catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol and arylglycerol ?-aryl ether lignin model compounds. Although both 4 and 5 catalyzed the aerobic oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol, complex 4 was found to be a more active and robust catalyst for oxidation of the lignin model compounds. The catalytic activities and selectivities of the bis(phenolate) complexes are compared to previously reported catalysts. PMID:22708725

  13. Ganymede and Callisto - Complex crater formation and planetary crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements of crater depths and other morphological parameters (such as central peak and terrace frequency) of fresh craters on Ganymede and Callisto, two geophysically very similar but geologically divergent large icy satellites of Jupiter. These data were used to investigate the crater mechanics on icy satellites and the intersatellite crater scaling and crustal properties. The morphological transition diameters of and complex crater depths on Ganymede and Callisto were found to be similar, indicating that the crusts of both satellites are dominated by water ice with only a minor rocky component.

  14. The formation and study of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Bobby; Sarin, Sam; Smith, Laverne; Wilson, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Research involves the preparation and characterization of a series of Ti, Zr, Hf, TiO, and HfO complexes using the poly(pyrazole) borates as ligands. The study will provide increased understanding of the decomposition of these coordination compounds which may lead to the production of molecular oxygen on the Moon from lunar materials such as ilmenite and rutile. The model compounds are investigated under reducing conditions of molecular hydrogen by use of a high temperature/pressure stainless steel autoclave reactor and by thermogravimetric analysis.

  15. Formation of Molecular Bromine from the Reaction of Ozone with Deliquesced NaBr Aerosol: Evidence for Interface Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Dabdub, Donald

    Formation of Molecular Bromine from the Reaction of Ozone with Deliquesced NaBr Aerosol: Evidence modeling, and molecular dynamics simulations. The molecular bromine production in the chamber experiments on bromine formation in the marine boundary layer shows that several ppt of bromine could potentially

  16. Stereoselective formation and catalytic activity of hydrido(acylphosphane)(chlorido)(pyrazole)rhodium(III) complexes. Experimental and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    San Nacianceno, Virginia; Azpeitia, Susan; Ibarlucea, Lourdes; Mendicute-Fierro, Claudio; Rodríguez-Diéguez, Antonio; Seco, José M; San Sebastian, Eider; Garralda, María A

    2015-08-01

    The reaction of [{RhCl(COD)}2] (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) with L = pyrazole (Hpz), 3(5)-methylpyrazole (Hmpz) or 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (Hdmpz) and PPh2(o-C6H4CHO) (Rh?:?L?:?P = 1?:?2?:?1) gives hydridoacyl complexes [RhHCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}(L)2] (). Stereoselective formation of and with pyrazoles trans to hydrido and phosphorus and hydrogen bond formation with O-acyl and chlorido occur. is a mixture of two linkage isomers in a 9?:?1 ratio, with two 5-methylpyrazole ligands or with one 3- and one 5-methylpyrazole ligand, respectively. Fluxional undergoes metallotropic tautomerization and is a mixture of equal amounts of and , with hydrido trans to pyrazole or chlorido, respectively. Complexes readily exchange hydrido by chlorido to afford [RhCl2{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}(L)2] (, and ) as single isomers with cis chloridos and two N-HCl hydrogen bonds. The reaction of with PPh3 or PPh2OH affords static [RhHCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}(PPh3)L] () or [RhHCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}(PPh2OH)L] () respectively with trans P-atoms and pyrazoles forming N-HCl hydrogen bonds. and contain single species with hydrido cis to chlorido, while is a mixture of equal amounts of and . Complexes , with an additional O-HO hydrogen bond, selectively contain only the cis-H,Cl species with all the three ligands. The reaction of [{RhCl(COD)}2] with L and PPh2(o-C6H4CHO) (Rh?:?L?:?P = 1?:?1?:?2) led to complexes with trans P-atoms, [RhHCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}{PPh2(o-C6H4CHO)-?P}L] (, and ), at room temperature, and to [RhCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}{PPh2(o-C6H4CHOH)}(Hmpz)] () or [RhCl{PPh2(o-C6H4CO)}2L] () with hydrogen evolution in refluxing benzene. DFT calculations were used to predict the correct isomers, their ratios and the particular intramolecular hydrogen bonds in these complexes. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was performed on , and . Complexes are efficient homogeneous catalysts (0.5 mol% loading) in the hydrolysis of amine- or ammonia-borane (AB) to generate up to 3 equivalents of hydrogen in the presence of air. PMID:26107554

  17. Formation of octahedral iridium(III) dihydrides from the reaction of ortho-chelated aryliridium(I) compounds with dihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    van der Zeijden, A.A.H.; van Koten, G.; Lujik, R.; Grove, D.M.

    1988-07-01

    The reaction of Ir/sup I/(CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/)-2-R/sup 1/-4-R/sup 2/-6)(COD) (COD = cyclooacta-1,5-diene) with dihydrogen in CD/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ was monitored by /sup 1/H NMR. At -20/sup 0/C quantitative formation of the novel dihydride complexes Ir/sup III/H/sub 2/(C/sub 6/H/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/)-2-R/sup 1/-4-R/sup 2/-6)(COD) (R/sup 1/ = H, R/sup 2/ = CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/ (10), Me (11); R/sup 2/ = H, R/sup 1/ = H (12), Me (13), CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/ (14); R/sup 1/ = R/sup 2/ = CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/ (15)) occurs. Further reactions, the type of which depends on the bulkiness of the R/sup 1/ and R/sup 2/ groups, occur when these solutions are warmed to 0/sup 0/C. Complexes 12-14 (R/sup 2/ = H) lose H/sub 2/ to re-form Ir/sup I/(C/sub 6/H/sub 3/(CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/)-2-R/sup 1/-4)(COD). In contrast, complexes 10, 11, and 15 (R/sup 2/ = alkyl) react further by means of C(aryl)-H reductive elimination. For complex 15 (R/sup 1/ = CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/) this results in quantitative formation of 1,3,5-(Me/sub 2/NCH/sub 2/)/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 3/ and IrH(COD). In Ir/sup III/H/sub 2/(C/sub 6/H/sub 3/(CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/)-2-R-6)(COD) (R = alkyl (10 and 11)), C(aryl)-H reductive elimination is followed by re-addition of another C(aryl)-H bond, which upon subsequent reductive elimination of H/sub 2/, yields the rearranged iridium(I) complexes Ir/sup I/(C/sub 6/H/sub 3/(CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/)-2-R-4)(COD). Since the rearrangement of Ir/sup I/(C/sub 6/H/sub 3/-(CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/)-2-R-6)(COD) to Ir/sup I/(C/sub 6/H/sub 3/(CH/sub 2/NMe/sub 2/)-2-R-4)(COD) can also be induced thermally at 60/sup 0/C, it is therefore being catalyzed by dihydrogen at 0/sup 0/C. None of these reactions with dihydrogen is attended by hydrogenation of the COD ligand.

  18. Cellular consequences of copper complexes used to catalyze bioorthogonal click reactions.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David C; McKay, Craig S; Legault, Marc C B; Danielson, Dana C; Blake, Jessie A; Pegoraro, Adrian F; Stolow, Albert; Mester, Zoltan; Pezacki, John Paul

    2011-11-01

    Copper toxicity is a critical issue in the development of copper-based catalysts for copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reactions for applications in living systems. The effects and related toxicity of copper on mammalian cells are dependent on the ligand environment. Copper complexes can be highly toxic, can induce changes in cellular metabolism, and can be rapidly taken up by cells, all of which can affect their ability to function as catalysts for CuAAC in living systems. Herein, we have evaluated the effects of a number of copper complexes that are typically used to catalyze CuAAC reactions on four human cell lines by measuring mitochondrial activity based on the metabolism of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) to study toxicity, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to study cellular uptake, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to study effects on lipid metabolism. We find that ligand environment around copper influences all three parameters. Interestingly, for the Cu(II)-bis-L-histidine complex (Cu(his)(2)), cellular uptake and metabolic changes are observed with no toxicity after 72 h at micromolar concentrations. Furthermore, we show that under conditions where other copper complexes kill human hepatoma cells, Cu(I)-L-histidine is an effective catalyst for CuAAC labeling of live cells following metabolic incorporation of an alkyne-labeled sugar (Ac(4)ManNAl) into glycosylated proteins expressed on the cell surface. This result suggests that Cu(his)(2) or derivatives thereof have potential for in vivo applications where toxicity as well as catalytic activity are critical factors for successful bioconjugation reactions. PMID:21970470

  19. Impacts of diffusive transport on carbonate mineral formation from magnesium silicate-CO2-water reactions.

    PubMed

    Giammar, Daniel E; Wang, Fei; Guo, Bin; Surface, J Andrew; Peters, Catherine A; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2014-12-16

    Reactions of CO2 with magnesium silicate minerals to precipitate magnesium carbonates can result in stable carbon sequestration. This process can be employed in ex situ reactors or during geologic carbon sequestration in magnesium-rich formations. The reaction of aqueous CO2 with the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite was studied in systems with transport controlled by diffusion. The approach integrated bench-scale experiments, an in situ spectroscopic technique, and reactive transport modeling. Experiments were performed using a tube packed with forsterite and open at one end to a CO2-rich solution. The location and amounts of carbonate minerals that formed were determined by postexperiment characterization of the solids. Complementing this ex situ characterization, (13)C NMR spectroscopy tracked the inorganic carbon transport and speciation in situ. The data were compared with the output of reactive transport simulations that accounted for diffusive transport processes, aqueous speciation, and the forsterite dissolution rate. All three approaches found that the onset of magnesium carbonate precipitation was spatially localized about 1 cm from the opening of the forsterite bed. Magnesite was the dominant reaction product. Geochemical gradients that developed in the diffusion-limited zones led to locally supersaturated conditions at specific locations even while the volume-averaged properties of the system remained undersaturated. PMID:25420634

  20. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation During Formation of Macromolecular Organic Grain Coatings via FTT Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Johnson, N. M.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Kopstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of carbon isotopic fractionation of various organic compounds found in meteorites may provide useful diagnostic information concerning the environments and mechanisms that were responsible for their formation. Unfortunately, carbon has only two stable isotopes, making interpretation of such observations quite problematic. Chemical reactions can increase or decrease the C-13/C-12 ratio by various amounts, but the final ratio will depend on the total reaction pathway followed from the source carbon to the final product, a path not readily discernable after 4.5 billion years. In 1970 Libby showed that the C-13/C-12 ratios of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon were similar by comparing carbon from the Murchison meteorite to that of terrestrial sediments. More recent studies have shown that the C-13/C-12 ratio of the Earth and meteorites may be considerably enriched in C-13 compared to the ratio observed in the solar wind [2], possibly suggesting that carbon produced via ion-molecule reactions in cold dark clouds could be an important source of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon. However, meteoritic carbon has been subjected to parent body processing that could have resulted in significant changes to the C-13/C-12 ratio originally present while significant variation has been observed in the C-13/C-12 ratio of the same molecule extracted from different terrestrial sources. Again we must conclude that understanding the ratio found in meteorites may be difficult.

  1. Reaction of Sb on In/Si(111) surfaces: Heteroepitaxial InSb(111) formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.; Nakaguchi, A.; Guo, F.-Z.; Ueda, M.; Yasue, T.; Matsushita, T.; Kinoshita, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Oura, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Saito, Y.; Shin, S.; Koshikawa, T.

    2015-11-01

    Sb deposition and reaction on In/Si(111) were investigated by low-energy electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, synchrotron radiation micro X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray photo-emission electron microscopy. The Sb deposition process strongly depends on the initial In/Si(111) phases such as ?3 × ?3, ?31 × ?31 and 4 × 1. On the In/Si(111) surface where two phases co-exist, the diffusion of In atoms, which are released by the attack of Sb, modifies the deposition and reaction process of Sb. On a mixed In/Si(111) ?31 × ?31 + 4 × 1 surface, an InSb(111) 2 × 2 structure with elongated domains initially forms along steps. Then In atoms are replaced by Sb atoms and InSb(111) 2 × 2 transforms into Sb/Si(111) 2 × 1 by further reaction with Sb atoms. Here, the existence of the 4 × 1 phase promotes the formation of larger InSb(111) 2 × 2 domains.

  2. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang; Liu, Yangang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60-80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.

  3. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.

  4. Photochemical Formation of Water-Aerosol/Droplet in Air: Optical Manipulation and Reaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, K.; Kato, S.; Miyazaki, K.; Takatori, Y.; Kajii, Y. J.

    2010-12-01

    Photo-induced nucleation of water vapor in air was reported many years ago [1], but did not draw much attentions by the atmospheric scientists. We report a photochemical formation of water droplet/aerosol in wet air at different conditions, its optical manipulation, and we propose a comprehensive reaction mechanism by observing reaction intermediates in combination with theoretical simulations. Since aerosol/droplet formation is induced by photons, it can be manipulated by changing of wavelengths, duration of irradiations, light intensities, pulse repetition rates, etc. The wavelengths of light applied were 185 nm (Hg lamp), 193 nm (ArF laser), and 248 nm (KrF laser). Water aerosol/droplets were produced in air-filled 1 atm-reaction vessels with different temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions and were observed by light scattering, mass spectrometry, and photographic recording. Particle sizes were heavily dependent on humidity from 50nm to ca.0.1mm. At the sub-micron levels the number of particles produced increased significantly (two orders of magnitude) by manipulating durations of irradiation-intermission cycles of Hg lamp. The growth of particle sizes was also observed by sequential irradiations. The mechanism of the reaction is proposed with experimental confirmation and theoretical simulations as follows. Photo-dissociation of oxygen produces ozone and the latter is photo-dissociated by a second photon to an active singlet-oxygen (1D). It reacts with a water molecule and produces OH radicals and further dark reactions give a final stable molecule of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This works as a seeding nucleus since the vapor pressure of hydrogen peroxide is ca. two orders of magnitude smaller than water. The experimental observation of HO2 as a reaction intermediate was made in situ by chemical amplification method combined with laser-induced fluorescence [2]. The experimental observation was successfully simulated by solving differential equations with 30 related elementary reactions [3]. Interesting dependence of laser intensity and repetition rates was simulated on the amounts of intermediates and the final product. Particle formation and their dynamics were recognized almost at any temperature and humidity conditions. For example, even under very hot and dry conditions, like 50 degree centigrade and RH 10%, a large amount (>1,000,000/ml) of particles were formed by a KrF laser. This laser could be important due to its high transmittance in the air. Reference [1] C.T.B. Wilson, Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 9, 392 (1987). More recently, F.C. Wen, T. McLaughlin, J.J. Katz, Science, 200, 769 (1978). [2] Y. Sadanaga, J. Matsumoto, K. Sakurai, R. Isozaki, S. Kato, T. Nomaguchi, H. Bandow, Y. Kajii, Rev. Sci. Instr., 75, 864 (2004). [3] K. Yoshihara, Y. Takatori, K. Miyazaki, Y. Kajii, Proc. Jpn. Acad, B83, 320 (2007).

  5. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ?CH2OO?) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ?CH2OO? and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ?CH2OO? across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO < CH3CHO < CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10(-4) times lower than the initial ?CH2OO? concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield. PMID:23958859

  6. Capture and dissociation in the complex-forming CH + H2 ? CH2 + H, CH + H2 reactions.

    PubMed

    González, Miguel; Saracibar, Amaia; Garcia, Ernesto

    2011-02-28

    The rate coefficients for the capture process CH + H(2)? CH(3) and the reactions CH + H(2)? CH(2) + H (abstraction), CH + H(2) (exchange) have been calculated in the 200-800 K temperature range, using the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) method and the most recent global potential energy surface. The reactions, which are of interest in combustion and in astrochemistry, proceed via the formation of long-lived CH(3) collision complexes, and the three H atoms become equivalent. QCT rate coefficients for capture are in quite good agreement with experiments. However, an important zero point energy (ZPE) leakage problem occurs in the QCT calculations for the abstraction, exchange and inelastic exit channels. To account for this issue, a pragmatic but accurate approach has been applied, leading to a good agreement with experimental abstraction rate coefficients. Exchange rate coefficients have also been calculated using this approach. Finally, calculations employing QCT capture/phase space theory (PST) models have been carried out, leading to similar values for the abstraction rate coefficients as the QCT and previous quantum mechanical capture/PST methods. This suggests that QCT capture/PST models are a good alternative to the QCT method for this and similar systems. PMID:21212873

  7. Hydrolysis of Guanosine Triphosphate (GTP) by the Ras·GAP Protein Complex: Reaction Mechanism and Kinetic Scheme.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) by the Ras·GAP protein complex are fully investigated by using modern modeling tools. The previously hypothesized stages of the cleavage of the phosphorus-oxygen bond in GTP and the formation of the imide form of catalytic Gln61 from Ras upon creation of Pi are confirmed by using the higher-level quantum-based calculations. The steps of the enzyme regeneration are modeled for the first time, providing a comprehensive description of the catalytic cycle. It is found that for the reaction Ras·GAP·GTP·H2O ? Ras·GAP·GDP·Pi, the highest barriers correspond to the process of regeneration of the active site but not to the process of substrate cleavage. The specific shape of the energy profile is responsible for an interesting kinetic mechanism of the GTP hydrolysis. The analysis of the process using the first-passage approach and consideration of kinetic equations suggest that the overall reaction rate is a result of the balance between relatively fast transitions and low probability of states from which these transitions are taking place. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with available experimental observations on GTP hydrolysis rates. PMID:26374425

  8. Ion wake formation with dust charge fluctuation in complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Saurav; Das, Nilakshi

    2013-11-15

    In complex plasma, the interaction mechanism among dust grains near the plasma sheath is significantly influenced by the downward ion flow towards the sheath and dust charge fluctuation over grain surface. Asymmetric ion flow towards the sheath gives rise to well known attractive wake potential in addition to repulsive Yukawa type of potential. The present work shows that the charging dynamics play a significant role in modification of plasma dielectric response function and hence the interaction mechanism among test dust particulates. The effective Debye length is found to be a characteristic of dust size and background plasma response towards the grain along with ion flow speed. The potentials thus obtained show a damping in strength of interaction in the presence of dynamical charging of dust as compared to that of constant charge dust grains. The result also shows decrease in focal length of ion lensing with increase in grain size.

  9. A common intermediate for N2 formation in enzymes and zeolites: side-on Cu-nitrosyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Burton, Sarah D.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2013-09-16

    Understanding the mechanisms of catalytic processes requires the identification of reaction centers and key intermediates, both of which are often achieved by the use of spectroscopic characterization tools. Due to the heterogeneity of active centers in heterogeneous catalysts, it is frequently difficult to identify the specific sites that are responsible for the overall activity. Furthermore, the simultaneous presence of a large number of surface species on the catalyst surface often poses a great challenge for the unambiguous determination of the relevant species in the reaction mechanism. In contrast, enzymes possess catalytically active centers with precisely defined coordination environments that are only able to accommodate intermediates relevant to the specific catalytic process. Here we show that side-on Cu+-NO+ complexes characterized by high magnetic field solid state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies are the key intermediates in the selective catalytic reduction of NO over Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite catalysts. Analogous intermediates have been observed and characterized in nitrite reductase enzymes, and shown to be the critical intermediates in the formation of N2 for anaerobic ammonium oxidation reactions.[1] The identification of this key reaction intermediate, combined with the results of our prior kinetic studies, allows us to propose a new reaction mechanism for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 under oxygen-rich environments over Cu-SSZ-13 zeolites, a key reaction in automotive emission control. The authors acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute.

  10. Nearside-farside, local angular momentum and resummation theories: Useful tools for understanding the dynamics of complex-mode reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankel, Marlies; Connor, J. N. L.

    2015-07-01

    A valuable tool for understanding the dynamics of direct reactions is Nearside-Farside (NF) scattering theory. It makes a decomposition of the (resummed) partial wave series for the scattering amplitude, both for the differential cross section (DCS) and the Local Angular Momentum (LAM). This paper makes the first combined application of these techniques to complex-mode reactions. We ask if NF theory is a useful tool for their identification, in particular, can it distinguish complex-mode from direct-mode reactions? We also ask whether NF theory can identify NF interference oscillations in the full DCSs of complex-mode reactions. Our investigation exploits the fact that accurate quantum scattering matrix elements have recently become available for complex-mode reactions. We first apply NF theory to two simple models for the scattering amplitude of a complex-mode reaction: One involves a single Legendre polynomial; the other involves a single Legendre function of the first kind, whose form is suggested by complex angular momentum theory. We then study, at fixed translational energies, four state-to-state complex-mode reactions. They are: S(1D) + HD ? SH + D, S(1D) + DH ? SD + H, N(2D) +H2 ? NH + H, and H+ + D2 ? HD + D+. We compare the NF results for the DCSs and LAMs with those for a state-to-state direct reaction, namely, F + H2 ? FH + H. We demonstrate that NF theory is a valuable tool for identifying and analyzing the dynamics of complex-mode reactions.

  11. DNA Polymerase ? Subunit Residues and Interactions Required for Efficient Initiation Complex Formation Identified by a Genetic Selection.

    PubMed

    Lindow, Janet C; Dohrmann, Paul R; McHenry, Charles S

    2015-07-01

    Biophysical and structural studies have defined many of the interactions that occur between individual components or subassemblies of the bacterial replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE). Here, we extended our knowledge of residues and interactions that are important for the first step of the replicase reaction: the ATP-dependent formation of an initiation complex between the Pol III HE and primed DNA. We exploited a genetic selection using a dominant negative variant of the polymerase catalytic subunit that can effectively compete with wild-type Pol III ? and form initiation complexes, but cannot elongate. Suppression of the dominant negative phenotype was achieved by secondary mutations that were ineffective in initiation complex formation. The corresponding proteins were purified and characterized. One class of mutant mapped to the PHP domain of Pol III ?, ablating interaction with the ? proofreading subunit and distorting the polymerase active site in the adjacent polymerase domain. Another class of mutation, found near the C terminus, interfered with ? binding. A third class mapped within the known ?-binding domain, decreasing interaction with the ?2 processivity factor. Surprisingly, mutations within the ? binding domain also ablated interaction with ?, suggesting a larger ? binding site than previously recognized. PMID:25987558

  12. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Aerosol Water by Photochemical Reactions of Gaseous Mixture of Monoterpene and Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.; Yi, S.; Park, J.; Cho, H.; Jung, K.

    2011-12-01

    There exist large uncertainties in model predictions for climate change and regional air quality. It could be caused by incomplete integration of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in atmospheric chemical models. Recent laboratory studies have found SOA formation through chemical reactions on aerosol surface and in aerosol water. Water soluble organics formed by photochemical degradation of biogenic organics including isoprene and anthropogenic aromatics are predicted to form substantial amount of SOA through the newly found pathways. Although SOA formation in bulk aqueous solution was reported for laboratory experiments of various precursors (e.g., water soluble carbonyls and phenols), little is known for SOA formation in real aerosol water. In this study, photochemical reactions of the gaseous mixture of monoterpene and hydrogen peroxide were examined to investigate SOA formation through reactions in real aerosol phase water. SOA formation was conducted using a flow tube reactor (ID 30 cm x L 150 cm, FEP) and a smog chamber using FEP film in the presence of dry and wet seed particles. Acidity and chemical composition of seed aerosol were also controlled as important parameters influencing SOA formation. Particle size distribution and aerosol composition were analyzed to account for differences in SOA formation mechanisms and yields for dry and wet particles. The differences might be mainly associated with SOA formation in aerosol phase water. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2011-0000221).

  13. Formation of the diphenyl molecule in the crossed beam reaction of phenyl radicals with benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fangtong; Gu Xibin; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2008-02-28

    The chemical dynamics to form the D5-diphenyl molecule, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 5}, via the neutral-neutral reaction of phenyl radicals (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) with D6-benzene (C{sub 6}D{sub 6}), was investigated in a crossed molecular beams experiment at a collision energy of 185 kJ mol{sup -1}. The laboratory angular distribution and time-of-flight spectra of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 5} product were recorded at mass to charge m/z of 159. Forward-convolution fitting of our data reveals that the reaction dynamics are governed by an initial addition of the phenyl radical to the {pi} electron density of the D6-benzene molecule yielding a short-lived C{sub 6}H{sub 5}C{sub 6}D{sub 6} collision complex. The latter undergoes atomic deuterium elimination via a tight exit transition state located about 30 kJ mol{sup -1} above the separated reactants; the overall reaction to form D5-diphenyl from phenyl and D6-benzene was found to be weakly exoergic. The explicit identification of the D5-biphenyl molecules suggests that in high temperature combustion flames, a diphenyl molecule can be formed via a single collision event between a phenyl radical and a benzene molecule.

  14. Kinetics and Thermochemistry of ClCO Formation from the Cl + CO Association Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Kreutter, K. D.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis of Cl2/CO/M mixtures (M = N2, CO, Ar, CO2) has been employed in conjunction with Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) detection by time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate equilibration kinetics in the reactions Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) + CO ClCO as a function of temperature (185-260 K) and pressure (14-200 Torr). The association and dissociation reactions are found to be in the low-pressure limit over the range of experimental conditions investigated. In N2 and/or CO buffer gases, the temperature dependences of the ClCO formation and dissociation reaction rate constants are described by the Arrhenius expressions k(sub 1) = (1.05 +/- 0.36) x 10(exp -34) exp[(810 +/- 70)/T] cm(exp 6)/molecules(exp 2).s and k(sub -1) = (4.1 +/- 3.1) x 10(exp -10) exp[(-2960 +/- 60)/T]cu cm/(molecule.s) (errors are 2 sigma). Second- and third-law analyses of the temperature dependence of the equilbrium constant (k/k-1) lead to the following thermodynamic parameters for the association reaction: Delta-H(sub 298) = -7.7 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol, Delta-H(sub 0) = -6.9 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol, Delta-S(sub 298) = -23.8 +/- 2.0 cal/mole.K, Delta-H(sub f,298)(ClCO) = 5.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol (errors are 2 sigma). The results repported in this study significantly reduce the uncertainties in all reported kinetic and thermodynamic parameters.

  15. Accelerating the Computation of Detailed Chemical Reaction Kinetics for Simulating Combustion of Complex Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, R.; Grout, R.

    2012-01-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels has been a very challenging scientific and engineering problem due to the complexity of turbulent flows and hydrocarbon reaction kinetics. There is an urgent need to develop an efficient modeling capability to accurately predict the combustion of complex fuels. Detailed chemical kinetic models for the surrogates of fuels such as gasoline, diesel and JP-8 consist of thousands of chemical species and Arrhenius reaction steps. Oxygenated fuels such as bio-fuels and heavier hydrocarbons, such as from newer fossil fuel sources, are expected to have a much more complex chemistry requiring increasingly larger chemical kinetic models. Such models are beyond current computational capability, except for homogeneous or partially stirred reactor type calculations. The advent of highly parallel multi-core processors and graphical processing units (GPUs) promises a steep increase in computational performance in the coming years. This paper will present a software framework that translates the detailed chemical kinetic models to high-performance code targeted for GPU accelerators.

  16. Accelerating the Computation of Detailed Chemical Reaction Kinetics for Simulating Combustion of Complex Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W

    2012-01-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels has been a very challenging scientific and engineering problem due to the complexity of turbulent flows and hydrocarbon reaction kinetics. There is an urgent need to develop an efficient modeling capability to accurately predict the combustion of complex fuels. Detailed chemical kinetic models for the surrogates of fuels such as gasoline, diesel and JP-8 consist of thousands of chemical species and Arrhenius reaction steps. Oxygenated fuels such as bio-fuels and heavier hydrocarbons, such as from newer fossil fuel sources, are expected to have a much more complex chemistry requiring increasingly larger chemical kinetic models. Such models are beyond current computational capability, except for homogeneous or partially stirred reactor type calculations. The advent of highly parallel multi-core processors and graphical processing units (GPUs) promises a steep increase in computational performance in the coming years. This paper will present a software framework that translates the detailed chemical kinetic models to high- performance code targeted for GPU accelerators.

  17. Growth dynamics and intracluster reactions in Ni+(CO2)n complexes via infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walker, N R; Walters, R S; Grieves, G A; Duncan, M A

    2004-12-01

    Ni(+)(CO(2))(n), Ni(+)(CO(2))(n)Ar, Ni(+)(CO(2))(n)Ne, and Ni(+)(O(2))(CO(2))(n) complexes are generated by laser vaporization in a pulsed supersonic expansion. The complexes are mass-selected in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and studied by infrared resonance-enhanced photodissociation (IR-REPD) spectroscopy. Photofragmentation proceeds exclusively through the loss of intact CO(2) molecules from Ni(+)(CO(2))(n) and Ni(+)(O(2))(CO(2))(n) complexes, and by elimination of the noble gas atom from Ni(+)(CO(2))(n)Ar and Ni(+)(CO(2))(n)Ne. Vibrational resonances are identified and assigned in the region of the asymmetric stretch of CO(2). Small complexes have resonances that are blueshifted from the asymmetric stretch of free CO(2), consistent with structures having linear Ni(+)-O=C=O configurations. Fragmentation of larger Ni(+)(CO(2))(n) clusters terminates at the size of n=4, and new vibrational bands assigned to external ligands are observed for n> or =5. These combined observations indicate that the coordination number for CO(2) molecules around Ni(+) is exactly four. Trends in the loss channels and spectra of Ni(+)(O(2))(CO(2))(n) clusters suggest that each oxygen atom occupies a different coordination site around a four-coordinate metal ion in these complexes. The spectra of larger Ni(+)(CO(2))(n) clusters provide evidence for an intracluster insertion reaction assisted by solvation, producing a metal oxide-carbonyl species as the reaction product. PMID:15549932

  18. Growth dynamics and intracluster reactions in Ni+(CO2)n complexes via infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, N. R.; Walters, R. S.; Grieves, G. A.; Duncan, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    Ni+(CO2)n, Ni+(CO2)nAr, Ni+(CO2)nNe, and Ni+(O2)(CO2)n complexes are generated by laser vaporization in a pulsed supersonic expansion. The complexes are mass-selected in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and studied by infrared resonance-enhanced photodissociation (IR-REPD) spectroscopy. Photofragmentation proceeds exclusively through the loss of intact CO2 molecules from Ni+(CO2)n and Ni+(O2)(CO2)n complexes, and by elimination of the noble gas atom from Ni+(CO2)nAr and Ni+(CO2)nNe. Vibrational resonances are identified and assigned in the region of the asymmetric stretch of CO2. Small complexes have resonances that are blueshifted from the asymmetric stretch of free CO2, consistent with structures having linear Ni+-O=C=O configurations. Fragmentation of larger Ni+(CO2)n clusters terminates at the size of n=4, and new vibrational bands assigned to external ligands are observed for n?5. These combined observations indicate that the coordination number for CO2 molecules around Ni+ is exactly four. Trends in the loss channels and spectra of Ni+(O2)(CO2)n clusters suggest that each oxygen atom occupies a different coordination site around a four-coordinate metal ion in these complexes. The spectra of larger Ni+(CO2)n clusters provide evidence for an intracluster insertion reaction assisted by solvation, producing a metal oxide-carbonyl species as the reaction product.

  19. Complex Formation History of Highly Evolved Basaltic Shergottite, Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Hirata, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zagami, a basaltic shergottite, contains several kinds of lithologies such as Normal Zagami consisting of Fine-grained (FG) and Coarse-grained (CG), Dark Mottled lithology (DML), and Olivine-rich late-stage melt pocket (DN). Treiman and Sutton concluded that Zagami (Normal Zagami) is a fractional crystallization product from a single magma. It has been suggested that there were two igneous stages (deep magma chamber and shallow magma chamber or surface lava flow) on the basis of chemical zoning features of pyroxenes which have homogeneous Mg-rich cores and FeO, CaO zoning at the rims. Nyquist et al. reported that FG has a different initial Sr isotopic ratio than CG and DML, and suggested the possibility of magma mixing on Mars. Here we report new results of petrology and mineralogy for DML and the Olivine-rich lithology (we do not use DN here), the most evolved lithology in this rock, to understand the relationship among lithologies and reveal Zagami s formation history

  20. Formation of bromophenoxy radicals from complete series reactions of bromophenols with H and OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Xu, Fei; Li, Shanqing; Hu, Jingtian; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2013-07-01

    The bromophenoxy radicals (BPRs) are key intermediate species involved in the formation of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs). In this work, the formation of BPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 bromophenol (BP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method and the direct dynamics method. The geometries and frequencies of the reactants, transition states, and products were calculated at the MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level, and the energetic parameters were further refined by the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p) method. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution over a wide temperature range of 600-1200K. The present study indicates that the reactivity of the O-H bonds in BPs as well as the formation potential of BPRs from BPs is strongly related to the bromine substitution pattern. The obtained results can be used for future estimates of PBDD/F emissions quantity based on the well estimated PCDD/F inventory. PMID:23402922

  1. Formation of Complex Organic molecules from Formaldehyde Chemistry in Cometary Ice Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvernay, fabrice; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Danger, Grégoire; Theulé, Patrice; Chiavassa, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    There is convincing evidence that the formation of complex organic molecules occurred in a variety of astrophysical environments. Among them, precursors of biomolecules are of particular significance due to their exobiological implications. Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4) and the polyoxymethylene (POM, -(CH2-O)n-) are of prime interest since they are supposed to be present in cometary environments. They are also ones of the main components of the organic residue formed from the warming of photolysed interstellar/cometary ice analogs. In this work, we study the warming of water-dominated cometary ice analogs containing formaldehyde (H2CO). Based on infrared and mass spectrometry measurements, and complemented by quantum chemical calculations, we report that NH2CH2OH, HOCH2OH, and POM are the only reaction products when the ice also contains NH3. The branching ratio between the three products strongly depends on the initial H2CO/NH3 concentration ratio. Moreover, the influence of the initial ice composition on the formation of POM oligomers (HO-(CH2O)n-H, n<5) as well as their thermal instability between 200 and 320 K are investigated. Finally, the implications of these results with respect to cometary nucleus chemistry and their impact on POM detection by the Rosetta mission are discussed. In addition, the mechanism for HMT formation in interstellar or cometary ice analogs containing H2CO, NH3, and HCOOH has been determined by combining laboratory experiments and DFT calculations. We show that HMT is thermally formed from H2CO and NH3 activated by HCOOH. Two intermediates has been unambiguously detected: NH2CH2OH and the trimer of CH2NH (1,3,5-triazinane, TMT). Unlike to what it was previously thought, HMT is not an indicator of ice photochemistry, but an indicator of thermal processing of ice. These results strengthen the hypothesis that HMT and its intermediates should be present in comets, where they may be detected with the COSAC or COSIMA instrument of the Rosetta mission.

  2. Cyclotriphosphazene appended porphyrins and fulleropyrrolidine complexes as supramolecular multiple photosynthetic reaction centers: steady and excited states photophysical investigation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vishnu Sukumaran; Pareek, Yogita; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2014-06-01

    New multiple photosynthetic reaction centers were constructed from cyclophosphazene decorated multiporphyrin chromophores and a fulleropyrrolidine having a pyridine ligand (FPY). The excited state electron transfer in the self-assembled donor-acceptor assembly was investigated by using steady state absorption and emission, time-resolved emission spectroscopy and nanosecond laser flash photolysis. The effect of metal (Zn(2+)) coordination to porphyrin units in the multiporphyrin arrays on cyclophosphazine scaffold (P3N3Zn) was studied by comparing with metal free porphyrin assembly on a cyclophosphazene scaffold (P3N3). In P3N3Zn, the decrease of absorption and fluorescence intensity and the lowering of the amplitude of longer fluorescence lifetime with increase of FPY concentration reflect the formation of a ground state complex with an association constant of ?14,910 M(-1). When compared to the metal-free complex P3N3, the metal-coordinated derivative P3N3Zn exhibited shortening of the singlet and triplet state lifetimes and lowering of the singlet and triplet quantum yields. The cause of the decrease of the triplet quantum yields by insertion of zinc metal is discussed along with the possible non-planarity of the porphyrin ring. From the fluorescence lifetime measurements for the P3N3Zn-FPY mixture, it is proposed that self-assembly of the donor-acceptor complex leads to charge separated species with a rate constant of 7.1 × 10(9) s(-1). The decrease of triplet state intensity and lifetime of the P3N3Zn in the P3N3Zn-FPY complex from the nanosecond transient absorption studies support the occurrence of intermolecular electron transfer in the triplet state. PMID:24584716

  3. Stereoelectronic effects in C-H bond oxidation reactions of Ni(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Poulten, Rebecca C; López, Isidoro; Llobet, Antoni; Mahon, Mary F; Whittlesey, Michael K

    2014-07-21

    Activation of O2 by the three-coordinate Ni(I) ring-expanded N-heterocyclic carbene complexes Ni(RE-NHC)(PPh3)Br (RE-NHC = 6-Mes, 1; 7-Mes, 2) produced the structurally characterized dimeric Ni(II) complexes Ni(6-Mes)(Br)(?-OH)(?-O-6-Mes')NiBr (3) and Ni(7-Mes)(Br)(?-OH)(?-O-7-Mes')NiBr (4) containing oxidized ortho-mesityl groups from one of the carbene ligands. NMR and mass spectrometry provided evidence for further oxidation in solution to afford bis-?-aryloxy compounds; the 6-Mes derivative was isolated, and its structure was verified. Low-temperature UV-visible spectroscopy showed that the reaction between 1 and O2 was too fast even at ca. -80 °C to yield any observable intermediates and also supported the formation of more than one oxidation product. Addition of O2 to Ni(I) precursors containing a less electron-donating diamidocarbene (6-MesDAC, 7) or less bulky 6- or 7-membered ring diaminocarbene ligands (6- or 7-o-Tol; 8 and 9) proceeded quite differently, affording phosphine and carbene oxidation products (Ni(O?PPh3)2Br2 and (6-MesDAC)?O) and the mononuclear Ni(II) dibromide complexes (Ni(6-o-Tol)(PPh3)Br2 (10) and (Ni(7-o-Tol)(PPh3)Br2 (11)) respectively. Electrochemical measurements on the five Ni(I) precursors show significantly higher redox potentials for 1 and 2, the complexes that undergo oxygen atom transfer from O2. PMID:24972307

  4. Probing Complex Free-Radical Reaction Pathways of Fuel Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan III, A C; Kidder, Michelle; Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F

    2012-01-01

    Fossil (e.g. coal) and renewable (e.g. woody biomass) organic energy resources have received considerable attention as possible sources of liquid transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Knowledge of the reactivity of these complex materials has been advanced through fundamental studies of organic compounds that model constituent substructures. In particular, an improved understanding of thermochemical reaction pathways involving free-radical intermediates has arisen from detailed experimental kinetic studies and, more recently, advanced computational investigations. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent investigations of the fundamental pyrolysis pathways of model compounds that represent key substructures in the lignin component of woody biomass with a focus on molecules representative of the dominant beta-O-4 aryl ether linkages. Additional mechanistic insights gleaned from DFT calculations on the kinetics of key elementary reaction steps will also be presented, as well as a few thoughts on the significant contributions of Jim Franz to this area of free radical chemistry.

  5. Reactions of heteroatom and carbon nucleophiles with the cationic bridging methylidyne complex

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.; Crocker, M.; Vosejpka, P.C.; Fagan, P.J.; Marder, S.R.; Gohdes, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    The reaction of the ..mu..-methylidyne complex /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CH)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (1) with NMe/sub 3/ and (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/C=NH gave the cationic 1:1 adducts /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHNMe/sub 3/)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (3) and /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CHNH=C(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (9), respectively, arising from attack of nitrogen on the methylidyne carbon. The reaction of 1 with KOC(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/ gave the neutral ..mu..-carbene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHOC(CH/sub 3/)P/sub 3/) (4). Reaction of 1 with water afforded a 1:1 mixture of ..mu..methylene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CH/sub 2/) (2) and ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)/sub 2/; these products are proposed to arise from disproportionation of an initially formed hydroxy carbene species. Reaction of 1 with Et/sub 4/N/sup +/Br/sup -/ gave the unstable /sup +/-carbene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHBr) (6). Reaction of 1 with the carbon nucleophiles CH/sub 3/Li and Li(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CuCN) gave the ..mu..-carbene complexes ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHCH/sub 3/) (11) and ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHC/sub 6/H/sub 5/ (12), while reaction of 1 with HFe(CO)/sub 4//sup -/ afforded 2. 1 reacted with acetone via nucleophilic addition of the enol affording the neutral ..mu..-carbene complex (C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)-(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHCH/sub 2/COCH/sub 3/)) (13). 1 also reacted with cyclohexanone, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2,4-pentanedione, 5,5-dimethyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione, ethyl acetoacetate, and the sodium salt of diethyl malonate to give similar ..mu..-carbene products.

  6. Oxidative peptide /and amide/ formation from Schiff base complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehler, B. L.; Li, M. P.; Martin, K.; Fliss, H.; Schmid, P.

    1982-01-01

    One hypothesis of the origin of pre-modern forms of life is that the original replicating molecules were specific polypeptides which acted as templates for the assembly of poly-Schiff bases complementary to the template, and that these polymers were then oxidized to peptide linkages, probably by photo-produced oxidants. A double cycle of such anti-parallel complementary replication would yield the original peptide polymer. If this model were valid, the Schiff base between an N-acyl alpha mino aldehyde and an amino acid should yield a dipeptide in aqueous solution in the presence of an appropriate oxidant. In the present study it is shown that the substituted dipeptide, N-acetyl-tyrosyl-tyrosine, is produced in high yield in aqueous solution at pH 9 through the action of H2O2 on the Schiff-base complex between N-acetyl-tyrosinal and tyrosine and that a great variety of N-acyl amino acids are formed from amino acids and aliphatic aldehydes under similar conditions.

  7. Factors leading to the formation of arc cloud complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welshinger, Mark John; Brundidge, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 12 mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were investigated. The duration of the gust front, produced by each MCS, was used to classify the MCSs. Category 1 MCSs were defined as ones that produced a gust front and the gust front lasted for more than 6 h. There were 7 category 1 MCSs in the sample. Category 2 MCSs were defined as ones that produced a gust front and the gust front lasted for 6 h or less. There were 4 category 2 MCSs. The MCS of Case 12 was not categorized because the precipitation characteristics were similar to a squall line, rather than an MCS. All of the category 1 MCSs produced arc cloud complexes (ACCs), while only one of the category 2 MCSs produced an ACC. To determine if there were any differences in the characteristics between the MCSs of the two categories, composite analyses were accomplished. The analyses showed that there were significant differences in the characteristics of category 1 and 2 MCSs. Category 1 MCSs, on average, had higher thunderstorm heights, greater precipitation intensities, colder cloud top temperatures and produced larger magnitudes of surface divergence than category 2 MCSs.

  8. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N?N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. PMID:25214300

  9. Reaction of Elemental Sulfur with a Copper(I) Complex Forming a trans--1,2 End-On Disulfide Complex: New Directions in Copper-Sulfur Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Chen, Peng

    Reaction of Elemental Sulfur with a Copper(I) Complex Forming a trans-µ-1,2 End-On Disulfide Complex: New Directions in Copper-Sulfur Chemistry Matthew E. Helton, Peng Chen, Partha P. Paul, Zolta, investigations into copper-sulfur interactions have been of marked interest in the research fields of copper

  10. Synthesis, Properties, and Reactions of Trinuclear Macrocyclic Nickel(II) and Nickel(I) Complexes: Electrocatalytic Reduction of CO2 by Nickel(II) Complex

    E-print Network

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    FULL PAPER Synthesis, Properties, and Reactions of Trinuclear Macrocyclic Nickel(II) and Nickel(I) Complexes: Electrocatalytic Reduction of CO2 by Nickel(II) Complex Eun Young Lee,[a] Daewon Hong,[a] Han Woong Park,[a] and Myunghyun Paik Suh*[a] Keywords: Nickel / Macrocyclic compounds / Carbon dioxide

  11. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) in high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.

  12. Sodium salts of anionic chiral cobalt(III) complexes as catalysts of the enantioselective Povarov reaction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Jiang, Hua-Jie; Zhou, Ya; Luo, Shi-Wei; Gong, Liu-Zhu

    2015-09-14

    The sodium salts of anionic chiral cobalt(III) complexes (CCC(-) Na(+) ) have been found to be efficient catalysts of the asymmetric Povarov reaction of easily accessible dienophiles, such as 2,3-dihydrofuran, ethyl vinyl ether, and an N-protected 2,3-dihydropyrrole, with 2-azadienes. Ring-fused tetrahydroquinolines with up to three contiguous stereogenic centers were thus obtained in high yields, excellent diastereoselectivities (endo/exo up to >20:1), and high enantioselectivities (up to 95:5 e.r.). PMID:26230676

  13. H2SO4 and SO3 Transfer Reactions in a Sulfopeptide-Basic Peptide Complex.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Amanda L; Polfer, Nicolas C

    2015-10-01

    We report on the intermolecular transfer of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) from an acidic sulfopeptide (sSE) to a basic peptide (R3); this is achieved by subjecting a noncovalent complex of sSE + R3 to collisional activation in a quadrupole ion trap. The product ions resulting from the sulfo-group transfers were characterized by MS(3) experiments. Peak assignments were additionally supported by isotope-labeling and energy-resolved collision induced dissiciation (CID) experiments. The observed reactions and their potential implications for proteomics and post-translational modification discovery experiments are discussed. PMID:26335182

  14. In situ investigations of bromine-storing complex formation in a zinc-flow battery at gold electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kautek, W.; Conradi, A.; Sahre, M.; Fabjan, C.; Drobits, J.; Bauer, G.; Schuster, P.

    1999-09-01

    One of the most promising candidates for affordable energy storage systems for electric vehicles is the zinc/bromine battery. The reversible cell voltage of 1.82 V, a theoretical specific energy of 430 Wh kg{sup {minus}1}, robustness, high cycle life, unlimited standby periods in the charged or discharged state, low self-discharge rates, and operation at ambient temperature explain the scientific and industrial interest in this system. The storage reactions of the zinc/bromine battery are the cathodic deposition of zinc and the anodic formation of a nonaqueous polybromide phase. Quaternary ammonium cations, N-methylethylpyrrolidinium (MEP{sup +}) and N-methylethylmorpholinium (MEM{sup +}), store the bromine as polybromide complexes. The mechanism of this complicated reaction determines the polarization and self-discharge rate of the bromine electrode. Electrochemical in situ techniques, phase-stabilized electrochemical quartz microbalance, and in situ reflection-absorption Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were employed for the first time to investigate these electrode processes. It was shown that specifically adsorbed polybromide anions (Br{sub n}{minus}) formed MEM-Br{sub n}. Therefore, a homogeneous chemical reaction of the dissolved MEP{sup +} cation with electrochemically generated bromine leads to the storage complex MEP-Br{sub n} much more rapidly than the heterogeneous electrochemical reaction of the strongly adsorbed MEM{sup +} to MEM-Br{sub n}. These results demonstrate that in situ techniques not only support the evaluation of the mechanism but also provide key information for battery development.

  15. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-oleic acid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2015-04-29

    The solubility of starch-inclusion complexes affects the digestibility and bioavailability of the included molecules. Acetylation with two degrees of substitution, 0.041 (low) and 0.091 (high), combined without or with a ?-amylase treatment was employed to improve the yield and solubility of the inclusion complex between debranched potato starch and oleic acid. Both soluble and insoluble complexes were recovered and analyzed for their degree of acetylation, complexation yields, molecular size distributions, X-ray diffraction patterns, and thermal properties. Acetylation significantly increased the amount of recovered soluble complexes as well as the complexed oleic acid in both soluble and insoluble complexes. High-acetylated debranched-only starch complexed the highest amount of oleic acid (38.0 mg/g) in the soluble complexes; low-acetylated starch with or without the ?-amylase treatment resulted in the highest complexed oleic acid in the insoluble complexes (37.6-42.9 mg/g). All acetylated starches displayed the V-type X-ray pattern, and the melting temperature generally decreased with acetylation. The results indicate that starch acetylation with or without the ?-amylase treatment can improve the formation and solubility of the starch-oleic acid complex. PMID:25877005

  16. Reversible carbon-carbon bond formation between carbonyl compounds and a ruthenium pincer complex.

    PubMed

    Huff, Chelsea A; Kampf, Jeff W; Sanford, Melanie S

    2013-08-18

    This communication describes the reversible reaction of a ruthenium pincer complex with a variety of carbonyl compounds. Both NMR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic characterization of isomeric carbonyl adducts are reported, and the equilibrium constants for carbonyl binding have been determined. PMID:23832007

  17. (Phenoxyimidazolyl-salicylaldimine)iron complexes: synthesis, properties and iron catalysed ethylene reactions.

    PubMed

    Yankey, Margaret; Obuah, Collins; Guzei, Ilia A; Osei-Twum, Emmanuel; Hearne, Giovanni; Darkwa, James

    2014-10-01

    The reaction of 2-{[2-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-ethylimino]-methyl}-phenol (L1), 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-{[2-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-ethylimino]-methyl}-phenol (L2) or 4-tert-butyl-2-{[2-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-ethylimino]-methyl}-phenol (L3) with iron(ii) precursors produced either iron(ii) or iron(iii) complexes, depending on the nature of the anions in the iron(ii) precursor and the ligand. When the anion is chloride and the ligand L1, the product is [(L1)2Fe][FeCl4] (1), but when the anion is triflate (OTf(-)) and the ligand is L2, the product is [(L2)2Fe][OTf]2 (2). With iron(ii) halides and tert-butyl groups on the phenoxy ligands L2 and L3, the iron(iii) complexes [(L2)FeX2] {where X = Cl (3), Br (4) and I = (5)} and [(L3)FeCl2] (6) were formed. Complexes 1-6 were characterised by a combination of elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry; and in selected cases (3 and 4) by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures of 3 and 4 indicated that the iron(ii) precursors oxidised to iron(iii) in forming complexes 3-6; an observation that was corroborated by the magnetic properties and the (57)Fe Mössbauer spectra of 3 and 4. The iron(iii) complexes 3-6 were used as pre-catalysts for the oligomerisation and polymerisation of ethylene. Products of these ethylene reactions depended on the solvent used. In toluene ethylene oligomerised mainly to 1-butene and was followed by the 1-butene alkylating the solvent to form butyl-toluenes via a Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. In chlorobenzene, ethylene oligomerised mainly to a mixture of C4-C12 alkenes. Interestingly small amounts of butyl-chlorobenzenes and hexyl-chlorobenzenes were also formed via a Friedel-Crafts alkylation with butenes and hexenes from the oligomerisation of ethylene. PMID:25111396

  18. Zirconium complexes stabilized by amine-bridged bis(phenolato) ligands as precatalysts for intermolecular hydroamination reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiu; Wang, Yaorong; Yuan, Dan; Yao, Yingming; Shen, Qi

    2015-12-21

    A series of zirconium complexes bearing amine-bridged bis(phenolato) ligands of different steric and electronic properties have been synthesized, and their activities in catalyzing intermolecular hydroamination reactions have been studied and compared. In general, hexacoordinate zirconium dibenzyl complexes 1-4 stabilized by [ONNO]- or [ONOO]-type ligands were found to be less active than pentacoordinate complexes 5 and 7 that carry [ONO]-type ligands, which clearly imply that amine-bridged bis(phenolato) ligands play crucial roles in influencing catalytic activities. Complex 5 showed good activities and regioselectivities in catalysing reactions of various primary amines and alkynes. Moreover, reactions of challenging substrates, including secondary amines, internal alkynes, and hydrazines, were achieved with in situ generated cationic species from complex 5 and [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4]. PMID:26459787

  19. Diastereoselection in the Formation of Contiguous Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters by the Intramolecular Heck Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Larry E.; Watson, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    The second in a series of two papers, this study examines the origins of diastereoselection in the second ring closure of the highly diastereoselective double Heck cyclization of cyclohexenes 1 and 3 that form contiguous quaternary stereocenters. Seven model substrates were synthesized and cyclized to examine the structural features responsible for imparting diastereoselection in the second intramolecular Heck reaction. These studies demonstrate that stereoselection in the formation of the second spirooxindole ring results from the avoidance of steric interactions in the insertion step with the spirooxindole formed in the first Heck cyclization. An axial substituent (carbonyl or arene) is required at the allylic position for high levels of diastereoselection to be realized. PMID:16555810

  20. Quantitative NMR spectroscopy of complex technical mixtures using a virtual reference: chemical equilibria and reaction kinetics of formaldehyde-water-1,3,5-trioxane.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Michael; Grützner, Thomas; Ströfer, Eckhard; Hasse, Hans

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to study chemical equilibria and reaction kinetics of both the formation and decomposition of 1,3,5-trioxane in aqueous formaldehyde solutions. The reaction was homogeneously catalyzed with up to 0.10 g g(-1) sulfuric acid at temperatures between 360 and 383 K so that most of the experiments had to be carried out pressurized. The studied mixtures were complex due to the formation of methylene glycol and poly(oxymethylene) glycols in aqueous formaldehyde and the presence of considerable amounts of ionized species. Most common internal standards are decomposed by the hot sulfuric acid and external standards were not applicable using the flow NMR probe or pressurizable NMR sample tubes. Therefore, for the quantification of the small trioxane signals, a novel procedure was applied, in which electronically generated NMR signals were used as highly stable Virtual References (VR). The NMR decoupler channel with wave-form generator was used as the source of the reference signal, which was irradiated into the probe using the lock coil. Details on the experimental procedure are presented. It is shown that the presented method yields reliable quantitative reaction data for the complex studied mixtures. PMID:16773212

  1. Efficient and Selective Formation of Macrocyclic Disubstituted Z Alkenes by Ring-Closing Metathesis (RCM) Reactions Catalyzed by Mo- or W-Based Monoaryloxide Pyrrolide (MAP) Complexes: Applications to Total Syntheses of Epilachnene, Yuzu Lactone, Ambrettolide, Epothilone C, and Nakadomarin A

    E-print Network

    Wang, Chenbo

    The first broadly applicable set of protocols for efficient Z-selective formation of macrocyclic disubstituted alkenes through catalytic ring-closing metathesis (RCM) is described. Cyclizations are performed with 1.2–7.5?mol?% ...

  2. Computational Investigation of the Competition between the Concerted Diels-Alder Reaction and Formation of Diradicals in Reactions of Acrylonitrile with Non-Polar Dienes

    PubMed Central

    James, Natalie C.; Um, Joann M.; Padias, Anne B.; Hall, H. K.; Houk, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    The energetics of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions of several 1,3-dienes with acrylonitrile, and the energetics of formation of diradicals, were investigated with density functional theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and compared to experimental data. For the reaction of 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene with acrylonitrile, the concerted reaction is favored over the diradical pathway by 2.5 kcal/mol using B3LYP/6-31G(d); experimentally this reaction gives both cycloadduct and copolymer. The concerted cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene with acrylonitrile is preferred computationally over the stepwise pathway by 5.9 kcal/mol; experimentally, only the Diels-Alder adduct is formed. For the reactions of (E)-1,3-pentadiene and acrylonitrile, both cycloaddition and copolymerization were observed experimentally; these trends were mimicked by the computational results, which showed only a 1.2 kcal/mol preference for the concerted pathway. For the reactions of (Z)-1,3-pentadiene and acrylonitrile, the stepwise pathway is preferred by 3.9 kcal/mol, in agreement with previous experimental findings that only polymerization occurs. M06-2X is known to give more accurate activation and reaction energetics but the energies of diradicals are too high. PMID:23758325

  3. Computational investigation of the competition between the concerted Diels-Alder reaction and formation of diradicals in reactions of acrylonitrile with nonpolar dienes.

    PubMed

    James, Natalie C; Um, Joann M; Padias, Anne B; Hall, H K; Houk, K N

    2013-07-01

    The energetics of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions of several 1,3-dienes with acrylonitrile, and the energetics of formation of diradicals, were investigated with density functional theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and compared to experimental data (Hall et al., J. Org. Chem.1993, 58, 7049-7058). For the reaction of 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene with acrylonitrile, the concerted reaction is favored over the diradical pathway by 2.5 kcal/mol using B3LYP/6-31G(d); experimentally, this reaction gives both cycloadduct and copolymer. The concerted cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene with acrylonitrile is preferred computationally over the stepwise pathway by 5.9 kcal/mol; experimentally, only the Diels-Alder adduct is formed. For the reactions of (E)-1,3-pentadiene and acrylonitrile, both cycloaddition and copolymerization were observed experimentally; these trends were mimicked by the computational results, which showed only a 1.2 kcal/mol preference for the concerted pathway. For the reactions of (Z)-1,3-pentadiene and acrylonitrile, the stepwise pathway is preferred by 3.9 kcal/mol, in agreement with previous experimental findings that only polymerization occurs. M06-2X is known to give more accurate activation and reaction energetics (Pieniazek, et al., Angew. Chem. Int.2008, 47, 7746-7749), but the energies of diradicals are too high. PMID:23758325

  4. The Aqueous Thermodynamics and Complexation Reactions of Anionic Silica and Uranium Species to High Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.

    2004-06-01

    Highly basic tank wastes contain several important radionuclides, including 90Sr, 99Tc, and 60Co, as well as actinide elements (i.e., isotopes of U, Pu, and Am). These highly basic tank wastes are known to have leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Upon entering the sediments in the vadose zone, the highly basic solutions dissolve large concentrations of silica from the silica and aluminosilicate minerals present in the subsurface. These dissolution reactions alter the chemical composition of the leaking solutions, transforming them from a highly basic (as high 2M NaOH) solution into a pore solution with a very high concentration of dissolved silica and a significantly reduced pH. This moderately basic (pH 9 to 11), high-silica solution has the potential to complex radionuclides and move through the subsurface. Such strong radionuclide complexation is a currently unconsidered transport vector that has the potential to expedite radionuclide transport through the vad ose zone. These strong complexation effects have the ability to significantly alter current conceptual models of contaminant migration beneath leaking tanks. In this project, we are determining the aqueous thermodynamics and speciation of dissolved silica and silica-radionuclide complexes to high silica concentration. We are also initiating studies of U(VI) speciation under strongly basic conditions.

  5. Complexes in the Photocatalytic Reaction of CO2 and H2O: Theoretical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dongmei; Zhang, Ning; Hong, Sanguo; Wu, Huanwen; Liu, Zhihua

    2010-01-01

    Complexes (H2O/CO2, e–(H2O/CO2) and h+–(H2O/CO2)) in the reaction system of CO2 photoreduction with H2O were researched by B3LYP and MP2 methods along with natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Geometries of these complexes were optimized and frequencies analysis performed. H2O/CO2 captured photo-induced electron and hole produced e–(H2O/CO2) and h+–(H2O/CO2), respectively. The results revealed that CO2 and H2O molecules could be activated by the photo-induced electrons and holes, and each of these complexes possessed two isomers. Due to the effect of photo-induced electrons, the bond length of C=O and H-O were lengthened, while H-O bonds were shortened, influenced by holes. The infrared (IR) adsorption frequencies of these complexes were different from that of CO2 and H2O, which might be attributed to the synergistic effect and which could not be captured experimentally. PMID:21152274

  6. Gating of single molecule junction conductance by charge transfer complex formation.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain; Brooke, Carly; Wang, Kun; Lambert, Colin J; Xu, Bingqian; Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-12-01

    The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference. PMID:26510687

  7. Kinetics and mechanisms of the reactions of alkyl radicals with oxygen and with complexes of Co(III), Ru(III), and Ni(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, D.

    1990-10-08

    The kinetics of the reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 5} radical with Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}X{sup 2+}, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}X{sup 2+}, and Co(dmgH){sub 2} (X) (Y) (X = Br, Cl, N{sub 3}, SCN; Y = H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}CN) complexes were studied using laser flash photolysis of ethylcobalt complexes. The kinetics were obtained by the kinetic probe method. Some relative rate constants were also determined by a competition method based on ethyl halide product ratios. The kinetics of colligation reactions of a series of alkyl radicals with {beta}-Ni(cyclam){sup 2+} were studied using flaser flash photolysis of alkylcobalt complexes. Again, the kinetics were obtained by employing the kinetic probe competition method. The kinetics of the unimolecular homolysis of a series of RNi(cyclam)H{sub 2}O{sup 2+} were studied. Activation parameters were obtained for the unimolecular homolysis of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Ni(cyclam)H{sub 2}O{sup 2+}. Kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained from these reactions were compared with those for the {sigma}-bonded organometallic complexes. The kinetics of the unimolecular homolysis of a series of RNi(cyclam)H{sub 2}O{sup 2+} complexes were studied by monitoring the formation of the oxygen insertion product RO{sub 2}Ni(cyclam)H{sub 2}O{sup 2+}. The higher rate constants for the reactions of alkyl radicals with oxygen in solution, as compared with those measured in the gas phase, were discussed. 30 refs.

  8. Synergistic effect of ATP for RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Takuma; Han, Yong-Woon; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Yokota, Hiroaki; Nakao, Kimiko; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Ono, Teruo; Harada, Yoshie

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RuvB hexameric ring motor proteins, together with RuvAs, promote branch migration of Holliday junction DNA. Zero mode waveguides (ZMWs) constitute of nanosized holes and enable the visualization of a single fluorescent molecule under micromolar order of the molecules, which is applicable to characterize the formation of RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex. In this study, we used ZMWs and counted the number of RuvBs binding to RuvA–Holliday junction DNA complex. Our data demonstrated that different nucleotide analogs increased the amount of Cy5-RuvBs binding to RuvA–Holliday junction DNA complex in the following order: no nucleotide, ADP, ATP?S, and mixture of ADP and ATP?S. These results suggest that not only ATP binding to RuvB but also ATP hydrolysis by RuvB facilitates a stable RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex formation. PMID:26658024

  9. Petrological and geochemical constraints on granitoid formation: The Waldoboro Pluton Complex, Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M. . Dept. of Geological Science); Sidle, W.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The Waldoboro Pluton Complex (WPC) comprises seven units ranging from qtz-diorite to aplite. The country rocks are biotite-rich metagraywackes with minor shales mostly belonging to the Proterozoic Z-Ordovician Bucksport Formation. Field evidence strongly suggests that the WPC formed in-situ: contacts with the country rock are cryptic, transitional and concordant; restitic minerals in the granitoids are identical to those in the country rocks; prolific metasedimentary enclaves in the WPC are locally derived. Major and trace element data for country rock and the most voluminous units of the WPC define consistent linear trends suggesting limited melt segregation and retention of a high proportion of restite. Mixing models and partial melting models require 54--76% melting for generation of the gneissic granites and two-mica granites. Garnet-biotite geothermometry and garnet-Al[sub 2]SiO[sub 5]-SiO[sub 2]-plagioclase geobarometry indicate that the WPC formed at T = 740--780 C and P = 0.4--0.7 GPa. Published experimental data show that < 50% melting is likely under these conditions if melting is controlled by dehydration reactions. Bucksport lithologies contain < 20% biotite, suggesting that the maximum amount of melt that could have formed by dehydration melting is < 20%, even if all biotite was consumed during melting. It seems probable that a free fluid phase was required to generate the WPC. Migmatization is apparent in all lithologies (including amphibolites) in the vicinity of the WPC, consistent with fluid-present melting. Fluid may have ingressed along the St. George thrust, but the source of the fluid is unknown.

  10. Formation of Pd/Au Nanostructures from Pd Nanowires via Galvanic Replacement Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Teng,X.; Wang, Q.; Liu, P.; Han, W.; Frenkel, A.; Wen, W.; Marinkovic, N.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bimetallic nanostructures with non-random metal atoms distribution are very important for various applications. To synthesize such structures via benign wet chemistry approach remains challenging. This paper reports a synthesis of a Au/Pd alloy nanostructure through the galvanic replacement reaction between Pd ultrathin nanowires (2.4 {+-} 0.2 nm in width, over 30 nm in length) and AuCl3 in toluene. Both morphological and structural changes were monitored during the reaction up to 10 h. Continuous changes of chemical composition and crystalline structure from Pd nanowires to Pd68Au32 and Pd45Au55 alloys, and to Au nanoparticles were observed. More interestingly, by using combined techniques such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), UV-vis absorption, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we found the formation of Pd68Au32 non-random alloy with Au-rich core and Pd-rich shell, and random Pd45Au55 alloy with uniformly mixed Pd and Au atom inside the nanoparticles, respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicated that alkylamine will strongly stabilize Pd to the surface, resulting in diffusion of Au atoms into the core region to form a non-random alloy. We believe such benign synthetic techniques can also enable the large scale preparation of various types of non-random alloys for several technically important catalysis applications.

  11. Formation of Pd/Au nanostructures from Pd nanowires via galvanic replacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Teng, Xiaowei; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ping; Han, Weiqiang; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Wen, Wen; Marinkovic, Nebojsa; Hanson, Jonathan C; Rodriguez, Jose A

    2008-01-23

    Bimetallic nanostructures with non-random metal atoms distribution are very important for various applications. To synthesize such structures via benign wet chemistry approach remains challenging. This paper reports a synthesis of a Au/Pd alloy nanostructure through the galvanic replacement reaction between Pd ultrathin nanowires (2.4 +/- 0.2 nm in width, over 30 nm in length) and AuCl3 in toluene. Both morphological and structural changes were monitored during the reaction up to 10 h. Continuous changes of chemical composition and crystalline structure from Pd nanowires to Pd68Au32 and Pd45Au55 alloys, and to Au nanoparticles were observed. More interestingly, by using combined techniques such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), UV-vis absorption, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we found the formation of Pd68Au32 non-random alloy with Au-rich core and Pd-rich shell, and random Pd45Au55 alloy with uniformly mixed Pd and Au atom inside the nanoparticles, respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicated that alkylamine will strongly stabilize Pd to the surface, resulting in diffusion of Au atoms into the core region to form a non-random alloy. We believe such benign synthetic techniques can also enable the large scale preparation of various types of non-random alloys for several technically important catalysis applications. PMID:18161978

  12. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by ?-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by ? -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively. PMID:23790889

  13. Preparation, spectroscopic and thermal characterization of charge-transfer molecular complexes formed in the reaction of 4-dimethylaminopyridine with ?-electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Adel; Benjamin Cieslinski, G.; Bazzi, Hassan S.

    2015-02-01

    The interactions of the electron donor 4-dimethylaminopyridine (4DMAP) with the ?-acceptors tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and 2,4,4,6-tetrabromo-2,5-cyclohexadienone (TBCHD) were studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform at room temperature. The electronic and infrared spectra of the formed molecular charge-transfer (CT) complexes were recorded. Photometric titration showed that the stoichiometries of the reactions were not fixed and depended on the nature of both the donor and the acceptor. The molecular structures of the CT-complexes were, however, affected by the amino group in 4-dimethylaminopyridine and the two methyl groups and were formulated as [(4DMAP)(TCNE)2], [(4DMAP)(TCNQ)2] and [(4DMAP)(TBCHD)]. The formation constant (KCT), charge transfer energy (ECT), molar extinction coefficients (?CT) and free energy change of the formed CT-complexes were obtained.

  14. Crystal Structure of an EAL Domain in Complex with Reaction Product 5?-pGpG

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Paganin, Julien; Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Réty, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438–686): one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5?-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5?-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains. PMID:23285035

  15. Systematics of complex fragment emission from La induced reactions at E/A = 47 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, W.L.; Mignerey, A.C.; Bradley, S.; Marchetti, A.; Bowman, D.R.; Charity, R.J.; Colonna, N.; Han, H.; Jing, K.; McDonald, R.J.

    1989-03-01

    Complex fragment (Z > 2) emission was studied in the reverse kinematics reactions of /sup 139/La on /sup 27/Al and /sup nat./Cu at a bombarding energy of E/A = 47 MeV. Experimental results from inclusive and coincidence measurements for two- and three-fold complex fragments events are presented. Measured cross sections and Z/sub 1/-Z/sub 2/ correlations show a predominately binary-decay process for the La + Al reaction, while the La + Cu reaction is dominated by multi-body decay. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Formation of Stable Cationic Lipid/DNA Complexes for Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofland, Hans E. J.; Shephard, Lee; Sullivan, Sean M.

    1996-07-01

    Stable cationic lipid/DNA complexes were formed by solubilizing cationic liposomes with 1% octylglucoside and complexing a DNA plasmid with the lipid in the presence of detergent. Removal of the detergent by dialysis yielded a lipid/DNA suspension that was able to transfect tissue culture cells up to 90 days after formation with no loss in activity. Similar levels of gene transfer were obtained by mixing the cationic lipid in a liposome form with DNA just prior to cell addition. However, expression was completely lost 24 hr after mixing. The transfection efficiency of the stable complex in 15% fetal calf serum was 30% of that obtained in the absence of serum, whereas the transient complex was completely inactivated with 2% fetal calf serum. A 90-day stability study comparing various storage conditions showed that the stable complex could be stored frozen or as a suspension at 4 degrees C with no loss in transfection efficiency. Centrifugation of the stable complex produced a pellet that contained approximately 90% of the DNA and 10% of the lipid. Transfection of cells with the resuspended pellet and the supernatant showed that the majority of the transfection activity was in the pellet and all the toxicity was in the supernatant. Formation of a stable cationic lipid/DNA complex has produced a transfection vehicle that can be stored indefinitely, can be concentrated with no loss in transfection efficiency, and the toxicity levels can be greatly reduced when the active complex is isolated from the uncomplexed lipid.

  17. Americium(iii) and europium(iii) complex formation with lactate at elevated temperatures studied by spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Barkleit, Astrid; Kretzschmar, Jerome; Tsushima, Satoru; Acker, Margret

    2014-08-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the complex formation of Am(iii) and Eu(iii) with lactate were determined with UV-vis and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) in a temperature range between 25 and 70 °C. The reaction enthalpy decreased with increasing ionic strength. ATR FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed structural details of the Eu(iii) lactate 1?:?1 complex: a chelating coordination mode of the lactate with a monodentate binding carboxylate group and the hydroxyl group being deprotonated. PMID:24828353

  18. Formation of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films by substitution reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Wei, Y. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    2012-02-15

    Conductive Ti-oxide thin films are produced using a reactive sputtering and post-annealing process. The lowest resistivity of Ti-oxide thin films (2.30 x 10{sup -2}{Omega}-cm) can be achieved after annealing for 1 h at 400 deg. C in ambient O{sub 2}. Additionally, the Hall measurement results indicate that the carrier concentration increases during the initial 1-h annealing process before decreasing during subsequent annealing. By curve fitting the O{sub ls} core-level peaks in the x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectrum of the annealed Ti-oxide thin films, we found that the oxygen (O) vacancy concentration monotonically increases with annealing time, which differs from the behavior of the carrier concentration regarding annealing time. This means that the O-vacancy mechanism alone cannot explain the formation of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films. By curve-fitting core-level Ti peaks in the XPS spectrum of annealed Ti-oxide thin films, a Ti{sup 3+}-to-Ti{sup 4+} substitution reaction in the TiO{sub 2} phase of the Ti-oxide thin film after annealing plays the dominant role in the formation of conduction carriers. Instead of the O-vacancy mechanism, the Ti{sup 3+}-to-Ti{sup 4+} substitution mechanism can explain the concentration of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films following annealing.

  19. A Study of Acrylonitrile Poisoning in Relation to Methaemoglobin-CN Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Magos, Ladislaus

    1962-01-01

    Observations are recorded on methaemoglobin-CN complex formation in rats poisoned with acrylonitrile, potassium cyanide, and acetone cyanohydrin. For information on methaemoglobin-CN formation, the methaemoglobin level was increased by sodium nitrite. The results show that the rate of methaemoglobin-CN formation in rats killed by acrylonitrile is lower than in animals surviving potassium cyanide or acetone cyanohydrin poisoning, and much lower than in animals killed by potassium cyanide. These findings indicate that the toxicity of acrylonitrile cannot be solely due to the liberation of cyanide.

  20. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-? (A?) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and A?1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on A?1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  1. Formation and alteration of complex amino acid precursors in cosmic dusts and their relevance to origins of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Kaneko, Takeo; Mita, Hajime; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kawamoto, Yukinori; Kanda, Kazuhiro; Takayama, Ken; Shibata, Hiromi

    A wide variety of organic compounds including many kinds of amino acids have been detected in carbonaceous chondrites. It has been known that comets also bring complex organic compounds. The relevance of extraterrestrial organics to the origin of life is extensively discussed. There have been many scenarios of the origin of amino acids found in meteorites or comets, including the Strecker synthesis in the parent bodies of meteorites, the Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the solar nebula and reactions in cosmic dusts. We examined possible formation of amino acids or their precursors in interstellar dust environments. When possible interstellar media (a mixture of carbon monoxide, ammonia and water) was irradiated with high energy protons, complex organic compounds whose molecular weights are thousands were formed [1], which gave amino acids after acid hydrolysis: Hereafter we will refer them simulated interstellar organics. It was suggested that complex amino acid precursors could be formed in ice mantles of interstellar dust particles in prior to the formation of the solar system. We are planning to irradiate simulated interstellar ices with high-energy heavy ions from the Digital Accelerator (KEK) to confirm the scenario. The simulated interstellar oraganics were so hydrophilic that they were easy to dissolve in water. Complex organics found in meteorites are generally so hydrophobic and are insoluble to water. Organics found in cometary dusts sampled by the Stardust Mission contains organics with various hydrophobicity. We irradiated the simulated interstellar organics with UV and/or soft X-rays. Soft X-rays irradiation of the simulated interstellar organics resulted in the formation of more hydrophobic compounds as seen in some of cometary dusts. It was suggested that organics of interstellar origin on dusts were altered when the solar system was being formed with soft X-rays from the young Sun in prior to the incorporation to planetesimals or comets. Dusts have another important role: Delivery of extraterrestrial organics to the primitive Earth. We are planning a novel astrobiology mission named Tanpopo by utilizing the Exposed Facility of Japan Experimental Module (JEM/EF) of the International Space Station (ISS). We will collect cosmic dusts by using ultra-low density silica gel (aerogel), and will analyze them after returning them to the Earth. Details will be presented in the other session of COSPAR 2014 [2]. [1] Y. Takano et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 84 (2004) 1410-1412. [2] K. Kobayashi et al., COSPAR 2014, Session F31, #14256, Moscow, Russia.

  2. The dimeric structure of the cytochrome bc1 complex prevents center P inhibition by reverse reactions at center N

    E-print Network

    Trumpower, Bernard L.

    School, 7200 Vail Building, Hanover, NH 03755, USA A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history April 2008 Keywords: bc1 complex Electron transfer Quinone Semiquinone Energy transduction in the cytochrome bc1 complex is achieved by catalyzing opposite oxido-reduction reactions at two different quinone

  3. Crystallographic snapshots of the reaction of aromatic C-H with O2 catalysed by a protein-bound iron complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavazza, Christine; Bochot, Constance; Rousselot-Pailley, Pierre; Carpentier, Philippe; Cherrier, Mickaël V.; Martin, Lydie; Marchi-Delapierre, Caroline; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Ménage, Stéphane

    2010-12-01

    Chemical reactions inside single crystals are quite rare because crystallinity is difficult to retain owing to atomic rearrangements. Protein crystals in general have a high solvent content. This allows for some molecular flexibility, which makes it possible to trap reaction intermediates of enzymatic reactions without disrupting the crystal lattice. A similar approach has not yet been fully implemented in the field of inorganic chemistry. Here, we have combined model chemistry and protein X-ray crystallography to study the intramolecular aromatic dihydroxylation by an arene-containing protein-bound iron complex. The bound complex was able to activate dioxygen in the presence of a reductant, leading to the formation of catechol as the sole product. The structure determination of four of the catalytic cycle intermediates and the end product showed that the hydroxylation reaction implicates an iron peroxo, generated by reductive O2 activation, an intermediate already observed in iron monooxygenases. This strategy also provided unexpected mechanistic details such as the rearrangement of the iron coordination sphere on metal reduction.

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of some pharmaceutical amides through charge-transfer complexation reactions.

    PubMed

    Saleh, G A; Askal, H F

    1991-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method is described for the assay of fenpipramide hydrochloride, isopropamide iodide, trimethobenzamide hydrochloride, morphazinamide hydrochloride and tolazamide. The method is based on the formation of a charge-transfer complex between the drug as n-donor and iodine, a sigma-acceptor. The product exhibits absorption maxima at 295 and 365 nm; measurements are made at 365 nm for fenpipramide and at 295 nm for the other compounds. Beer's law is obeyed in a concentration range of 1-120 micrograms ml-1. The method is rapid, simple and sensitive and can be applied to the analysis of some commercial and laboratory prepared tablets without interference. A more detailed investigation of the complex was made with respect to its composition, association constant and free energy change. PMID:1678622

  5. Spectroscopic Analyses on Reaction Intermediates Formed during Chlorination of Alkanes with NaOCl Catalyzed by a Nickel Complex.

    PubMed

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Codolà, Zoel; Gómez, Laura; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Browne, Wesley R; Costas, Miquel

    2015-11-16

    The spectroscopic, electrochemical, and crystallographic characterization of [((Me,H)PyTACN)Ni(II)(CH3CN)2](OTf)2 (1) ((Me,H)PyTACN = 1-(2-pyridylmethyl)-4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, OTf = CF3SO3) is described together with its reactivity with NaOCl. 1 catalyzes the chlorination of alkanes with NaOCl, producing only a trace amount of oxygenated byproducts. The reaction was monitored spectroscopically and by high resolution electrospray-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with the aim to elucidate mechanistic aspects. NaOCl reacts with 1 in acetonitrile to form the transient species [(L)Ni(II)-OCl(S)](+) (A) (L = (Me,H)PyTACN, S = solvent), which was identified by ESI-MS. UV/vis absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, and resonance Raman spectroscopy indicate that intermediate A decays to the complex [(L)Ni(III)-OH(S)](2+) (B) presumably through homolytic cleavage of the O-Cl bond, which liberates a Cl(•) atom. Hydrolysis of acetonitrile to acetic acid under the applied conditions results in the formation of [(L)Ni(III)-OOCCH3(S)](2+) (C), which undergoes subsequent reduction to [(L)Ni(II)-OOCCH3(S)](2+) (D), presumably via reaction with OCl(-) or ClO2(-). Subsequent addition of NaOCl to [(L)Ni(II)-OOCCH3(S)](+) (D) regenerates [(L)Ni(III)-OH(S)](2+) (B) to a much greater extent and at a faster rate. Addition of acids such as acetic and triflic acid enhances the rate and extent of formation of [(L)Ni(III)-OH(S)](2+) (B) from 1, suggesting that O-Cl homolytic cleavage is accelerated by protonation. Overall, these reactions generate Cl(•) atoms and ClO2 in a catalytic cycle where the nickel center alternates between Ni(II) and Ni(III). Chlorine atoms in turn react with the C-H bonds of alkanes, forming alkyl radicals that are trapped by Cl(•) to form alkyl chlorides. PMID:26540133

  6. The significance of ACTH for the process of formation of complex heparin compounds in the blood during immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, B. A.; Shapiro, F. B.; Lomovskaya, F. B.; Lyapina, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) was administered to rats at different times following adrenalectomy. Adrenocorticotropin caused a significant increase in the formation of heparin complexes even in the absence of stress factor. When ACTH secretion is blocked, immobilization stress is not accompanied by an increase in the process of complex formation. The effect of ACTH on the formation of heparin complexes was mediated through its stimulation of the adrenal cortex.

  7. Formation of copper complexes in landfill leachate and their toxicity to zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, J.K.; Butler, C.A.; Timperley, M.H.; Evans, C.W.

    2000-05-01

    Toxic metal organic complexes have not been found in natural waters, although some organic acids form bioavailable lipophilic and metabolite-type metal complexes. Landfill leachates usually contain organic acids and in the urban environment these leachates, when mixed with storm waters containing Cu, could be a source of toxic Cu organic complexes in streams and estuaries. The authors investigated the formation of Cu complexes in the leachate from an active urban landfill and found that some of the complexes formed were toxic to zebrafish embryos. High and low nominal molecular weight (NMWT) fractions; >5,000 Da and <700 Da, of leachate both formed Cu complexes with almost identical Cu complexing characteristics but the toxicity was due solely to the low NMWT complexes formed in the <700 Da fraction. Chemical equilibrium modeling with MINTEQA2 and H and Cu complex conditional association constants and ligand concentrations obtained from pH and Cu titrations with a Cu ion-selective electrode and van den Berg-Ruzic analyses of the titration data was used to calculate the copper speciation in the embryo test solutions. This calculated speciation, which was confirmed by measurements of Cu{sup 2+} in the test solutions, enabled the toxicity due to the free Cu ion and to the Cu complexes to be distinguished.

  8. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  9. Reversibility of the inhibitory effect of atrazine and lindane on cytosol 5. alpha. -dihydrotestosterone receptor complex formation in rat prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Simic, B.; Kniewald, Z.; Kniewald, J. ); Davies, J.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Once entering the bloodstream, most toxic substances, including pesticides, can reach organs involved in the reproductive system. They can cross the placenta, as well as the brain barrier, posing various risks to the reproductive processes. The organochlorine insecticide lindane and the s-triazine herbicide atrazine produce changes in hormone-dependent reactions in the rat hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, and prostate. Lindane also causes histological and biochemical alterations in the rat testis. In vivo treatment with atrazine produces a markedly inhibitory influence of 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone - receptor complex formation in rat prostate cytosol. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether such changes in the crucial step in the reproductive process are reversible. A parallel investigation using lindane was also undertaken.

  10. Mechanistic elucidation of linker and ancillary ligand substitution reactions in Pt(II) dinuclear complexes.

    PubMed

    Ongoma, Peter O; Jaganyi, Deogratius

    2013-02-28

    The rate of substitution of aqua ligands by three nucleophiles, thiourea (TU), N,N-dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and N,N,N,N-tetramethylthiourea (TMTU), for the complexes [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-?-pyrazine](ClO4)2 (pzn), [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-?-2,3-dimethylpyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,3pzn), [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-?-2,5-pyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,5pzn) and [cis-{PtOH2(NH3)2}2-?-2,6-dimethylpyrazine](ClO4)2 (2,6pzn) was investigated under pseudo first-order conditions as a function of concentration and temperature by stopped-flow and UV-Visible spectrophotometry. The reaction proceeded in three consecutive steps; each step follows first order kinetics with respect to each complex and nucleophile. The pseudo first-order rate constants, k(obs(1/2/3)), for sequential substitution of the aqua ligands and subsequent displacement of the linker obeyed the rate law: k(obs(1/2/3)) = k((1/2/3))[nucleophile]. The steric hindrance properties of the pyrazine-bridging ligand control the overall reaction pattern. The order of reactivity of the complexes is 2,3pzn ? 2,5pzn < 2,6pzn < pzn. The difference in reactivity attributed to the steric crowding at the Pt(II) centre imposed by the methyl groups reduces the lability of the aqua complexes. The order of reactivity of the nucleophiles decreases with the increase in steric demand TU > DMTU > TMTU. 1H and 195Pt NMR spectroscopic results confirmed the observed dissociation of the bridging ligand from the metal centre of the cis-dinuclear complexes and its derivatives in the third step. The dissociation process is accelerated by the introduction of the steric effect on the linker in conjunction with the increased ligand field strength imparted by additional thiourea ligands at each metal centre. The large negative entropy of activation ?S(?) values in all cases support an associative substitution mechanism. PMID:23223554

  11. The reaction mechanism of formation of chemically synthesized Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B hard magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Deheri, P.K.; Shukla, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2012-02-15

    Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B based magnetic materials exhibit excellent magnetic properties and are widely used in many engineering applications. However, chemical synthesis of this compound is challenging. In this work, the formation mechanism of chemically synthesized Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnetic nanoparticles was studied. Nd, Fe and B precursors were converted to Nd-Fe-B oxide by the sol-gel method, reduction of these oxides by CaH{sub 2} resulted in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles. Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation resulted from two competing reactions: (a) Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation by direct combination of NdH{sub 2}, Fe and B, (b) Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} phase formation from NdH{sub 2} and Fe, followed by Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation by the reaction of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and B. Addition of boron to Nd-Fe-B oxide during reduction resulted in improved magnetic properties. The activation energy for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation was found to be 365 kJ mol{sup -1}. The optimum heat treatment temperature and time for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation were found to be 800 Degree-Sign C and 90 min, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The kinetics, reaction mechanism and morphology of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel followed by reduction-diffusion at 800 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation mechanism of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnetic nanoparticles was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation occurs by two parallel competing reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction of NdH{sub 2}, Fe and B resulted in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase can also be formed by the reaction of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum wt% of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase was obtained at 800 Degree-Sign C and 90 min annealing.

  12. Cluster formation in complex multi-scale BY J. D. GIBBON

    E-print Network

    Gibbon, J. D.

    Cluster formation in complex multi-scale systems BY J. D. GIBBON 1 AND E. S. TITI 2,3 1 Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK (j.d.gibbon@ic.ac.uk) 2 Department of Computer

  13. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline cobalt tetrakis(4-metoxyphenyl)porphin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, R. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Bazanov, M. I.; Semeikin, A. S.

    2009-05-01

    The energy of combustion of cobalt tetrakis(4-metoxyphenyl)porphin was determined in an isothermic-shell liquid calorimeter with a stationary calorimetric bomb. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of the complex were calculated, -? c H o = 27334.06 ± 50.98 kJ/mol and ?f H o = 3062.90 ± 50.97 kJ/mol.

  14. STUDY USING A THREE-DIMENSIONAL SMOG FORMATION MODEL UNDER CONDITIONS OF COMPLEX FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    To clarify the photochemical smog formation mechanisms under conditions of complex flow, the SAI Urban Airshed Model was evaluated using a 1981 field observed data base. In the Tokyo Metropolitan Area higher O3 concentrations are usually observed near the shore in the morning. As...

  15. Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction networks

    E-print Network

    Coolen, ACC "Ton"

    Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction, Sep 13-16, Kyoto ACC Coolen (KCL) Dynamics of protein interaction networks IWSMI-2009 1 / 31 #12 of the macroscopic equations Remaining problem Solution in simplifying limits Ideas that don't work Alternative

  16. Alloy Design of Intermetallics for Protective Scale Formation and for Use as Precursors for Complex Ceramic Phase Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Tortorelli, Peter F

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights some evolving new design approaches to developing intermetallic alloys capable of protective scale formation and/or for their use as precursors for functional complex ceramic phase surface synthesis. The unique characteristics of intermetallics present challenges to achieving protective scale formation, but also offer the potential for leveraging novel phenomena not generally observed in conventional alloys. Examples will be drawn from the oxidation of aluminides (Fe{sub 3}Al, Nb{sub 2}Al, NbAl{sub 3}, Ti{sub 3}Al, TiAl), silicides (MoSi{sub 2}, Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Mo-Si-B, Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}), and Laves phases (Cr{sub 2}Nb, Cr{sub 2}Ta, Nb(Cr,Al){sub 2}, Ti(Cr,Al){sub 2}). Recent work also suggests that intermetallics can be used as precursors for the synthesis of functional complex ceramic phase surfaces by gas-metal reactions (oxidation, nitridation, carburization, etc.). The potential for using such reaction phenomena to synthesize layered or composite surfaces of ternary nitrides (carbides, borides, etc.) of technological interest such as Ti{sub 3}AlC{sub 2}, bimetallic nitride and carbide catalysts (e.g. Co{sub 3}Mo{sub 3}N or Co{sub 3}Mo{sub 3}C), and magnetic rare earth nitrides (Fe{sub 17}Sm{sub 2}N{sub x} or Fe{sub 17}Nd{sub 2}N{sub x}), from intermetallic precursors is discussed.

  17. Formation of complex impact craters - Evidence from Mars and other planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the depth vs diameter data of Arthur (1980), is given along with geomorphic data for 73 Martian craters. The implications for the formation of complex impact craters on solid planets is discussed. The analysis integrates detailed morphological observations on planetary craters with geologic data from terrestrial meteorite and explosion craters. The simple to complex transition for impact craters on Mars appears at diameters in the range of 3 to 8 km. Five features appear sequentially with increasing crater size, flat floors, central peaks and shallower depths, scalloped rims, and terraced walls. This order suggests that a shallow depth of excavation and a rebound mechanism have produced the central peaks, not centripetal collapse and deep sliding. Simple craters are relatively uniform in shape from planet to planet, but complex craters vary considerably. Both the average onset diameter for complex impact craters on Mars and the average depth of complex craters vary inversely with gravitational acceleration on four planets.

  18. Effect of entropy-packing fraction relation on the formation of complex metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourki Samaei, Arash; Mohammadi, Ehsan

    2015-09-01

    By combining a number of elements to form complex metallic materials without a base element, it was recently shown that one can obtain rather complex structures, including random solute solutions, multi-phased mixtures and amorphous structures with/without nano-precipitations. Compared to conventional metallic materials, these complex ones could show excellent mechanical and physical properties across a wide range of temperatures, therefore being a promising advanced material for high-temperature applications; however, designing these complex materials, at present, still lacks a unified physical approach but relies on the choice of a few metallurgical parameters, such as atomic size mismatch, heat of mixing and valence electron concentration. Here, we identify a physical mechanism through the optimization of the excess configurational entropy of mixing in the control of phase formation in these metallic materials. The theoretical framework herein established is expected to provide a new paradigm in pursuit of complex metallic materials with superior properties.

  19. 2-Formylcinnamaldehyde formation yield from the OH radical-initiated reaction of naphthalene: effect of NO(2) concentration.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Noriko; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    2012-08-01

    Naphthalene, typically the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in the atmosphere, reacts with OH radicals by addition to form OH-naphthalene adducts. These OH-naphthalene adducts react with O(2) and NO(2), with the two reactions being of equal importance in air at an NO(2) mixing ratio of ?60 ppbv. 2-Formylcinnamaldehyde [o-HC(O)C(6)H(4)CH?CHCHO] is a major product of the OH radical-initiated reaction of naphthalene, with a yield from the reaction of OH-naphthalene adducts with NO(2) of ?56%. We have measured, on a relative basis, the formation yield of 2-formylcinnamaldehyde from the OH radical-initiated reaction of naphthalene in air at average NO(2) concentrations of 1.2 × 10(11), 1.44 × 10(12), and 1.44 × 10(13) molecules cm(-3) (mixing ratios of 0.005, 0.06, and 0.6 ppmv, respectively). These NO(2) concentrations cover the range of conditions corresponding to the OH-naphthalene adducts reacting ?90% of the time with O(2) to ?90% of the time with NO(2). The 2-formylcinnamaldehyde formation yield decreased with decreasing NO(2) concentration, and a yield from the OH-naphthalene adducts + O(2) reaction of 14% is obtained based on a 56% yield from the OH-naphthalene adducts + NO(2) reaction. Based on previous measurements of glyoxal and phthaldialdehyde from the naphthalene + OH reaction and literature data for the OH radical-initiated reactions of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the reactions of OH-naphthalene adducts with O(2) appear to differ significantly from the OH-monocyclic adduct + O(2) reactions. PMID:22809095

  20. Recrystallized Impact Glasses of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Sudbury Structure, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Weiser, T.; Brockmeyer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The origin of the Sudbury Structure and of the associated heterolithic breccias of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex have been controversial. While an impact origin of the structure has gained wide acceptance over the last 15 years, the origin of the recrystallized Onaping Formation glasses and of the igneous complex is still being debated. Recently the interpretation of the breccias of the Onaping Formation as suevitic fall-back impact breccias has been challenged. The igneous complex is interpreted either as a differentiated impact melt sheet or as a combination of an upper impact melt represented by the granophyre, and a lower, impact-triggered magmatic body consisting of the norite-sublayer formations. The Onaping Formation contains glasses as fluidal and nonfluidal fragments of various shapes and sizes. They are recrystallized, and our research indicates that they are petrographically heterogeneous and span a wide range of chemical compositions. These characteristics are not known from glasses of volcanic deposits. This suggests an origin by shock vitrification, an interpretation consistent with their association with numerous and varied country rock clasts that exhibit microscopic shock metamorphic features. The recrystallized glass fragments represent individual solid-state and liquid-state vitrified rocks or relatively small melt pods. The basal member lies beneath the Gray and Black members of the Onaping Formation and, where not metamorphic, has an igneous matrix. Igneous-textured melt bodies occur in the upper two members and above the Basal Member. A comparison of the chemical compositions of recrystallized glasses and of the matrices of the Basal Member and the melt bodies with the components and the bulk composition of the igneous complex is inconclusive as to the origin of the igneous complex. Basal Member matrix and Melt Bodies, on average, are chemically similar to the granophyre of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, suggesting that they are genetically related. Our chemical results allow interpretation of the entire igneous complex as a differentiated impact melt. However, they are also consistent with the granophyre alone being the impact melt and the nofite and quartz gabbro beneath it representing an impact-triggered magmatic body. This interpretation is preferred, as it is consistent with a number of field observations. A re-evaluation and extension of structural field studies and of geochemical data, as well as a systematic study of the contact relationships of the various igneous phases of the igneous complex, are needed to establish a Sudbury impact model consistent with all data and observations

  1. [Preparation, formation mechanism and preliminary evaluation of oral absorption of a Bicyclol-phospholipid complex].

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Dong, Wu-Jun; Sheng, Li; Xia, Xue-Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Yu-Ling

    2014-11-01

    Bicyclol with benzyl alcohol structure, is a poorly water-soluble drug, used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. To increase the drug solubility and oral bioavailability, a Bicyclol-phospholipid complex was studied on its preparation, formation mechanism, and the influence on drug physicochemical properties and oral absorption. The complex was prepared by a solvent evaporation method. The optimal formulation was selected by orthogonal experimental design, and a reasonable evaluating method of the complexation rate was established. Various methods, such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR), were used to explore the phase state and formation mechanism of the complex. The solubility of drug in complex was investigated in water/n-octanol. Preliminary study of its absorption and liver tissue distribution in rats was also carried out. The results showed that Bicyclol and phosphatidylcholine can be complexed entirely in the molar ratio 1 : 2. Bicyclol was dispersed in phospholipids as amorphous state. They were combined by intermolecular hydrogen bond due to charge transfer effect which occurred between the two polarities of the double bond between phosphorus and oxygen (P=O) of phosphatidylcholine and benzalcohol group of Bicyclol. The solubility of the complex compared to the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was effectively enhanced 5.75 times in water and 7.72 times in n-octanol, separately. In addition, drug concentrations were also enhanced 43 times in plasma and 13 times in liver with one hour after administering the complex to rats via oral gavage. All of these indicated that Bicyclol with benzalcohol group can interact with phospholipids to form complex, improving drug's physicochemical properties, thus further increasing its absorption and target tissue distribution. This study also provided theoretical reference for the research of other benzalcohol derivatives complexed with phospholipids. PMID:25757289

  2. The thermodynamic characteristics of step complex formation in the (5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinato)(chloro)indium(III)-pyridine-toluene system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomova, T. N.; Malov, M. E.; Klyuev, M. V.

    2009-06-01

    The thermodynamic characteristics, step mechanism, and spectral manifestations of step reactions between (5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinato)(chloro)indium(III) ((Cl)InTPP) and organic base pyridine (Py) in inert toluene were studied using spectrophotometric titration and physicochemical analysis of intermediate forms. The coordination of Py molecule ( K 1 = 9.45 × 102 l/mol at 298 K) with the formation of (Cl)(Py)InTPP, the substitution of Cl- in (Cl)(Py)InTPP with the second Py molecule ( K 2 = 2.3 × 102 l/mol), and the coordination of the third Py molecule to produce [(Py)3 InTPP]+ · Cl- ( K 3 = 8.7 l/mol) were observed at the first, second, and third steps, respectively. The fourth reaction stage most likely corresponds to ?-? complex formation equilibrium between the aromatic complex and pyridine with a 1: 2 stoichiometry. The thermodynamic parameters of step reactions ? H ? and ? S ? well correspond to the stoichiometric mechanism of the reaction. Prospects for the use of the metalloporphyrin as a receptor of organic N-bases are considered.

  3. Gating of single molecule junction conductance by charge transfer complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain; Brooke, Carly; Wang, Kun; Lambert, Colin J.; Xu, Bingqian; Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-11-01

    The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference.The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis of 1c; experimental details of conductance measurements, formation of charge transfer complexes of 1c and 2 in solution; further details of theoretical methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04420k

  4. Enhanced CO2 hydrate formation kinetic under organo-mineral complex environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, D.; Lee, W.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 hydrate formation under marine sediments can be one of the feasible options to mitigate atmospheric concentration of CO2, main source of global warming. For the better application of CO2 sequestration via hydrate form under ocean, it is indispensable to understand the effects of marine environmental factors on hydrate formation kinetic and equilibrium. In this study, we investigated the effect of organo-mineral complex (i.e., Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and glycine complex) on hydrate formation kinetic both experimentally and computationally. Organo-mineral complex suspension showed much more favorable hydrate formation kinetic (2-6 min) than pure water control (48-80 min). TEM image showed that glycine are well distributed and strongly adsorbed on Na-MMT surface and FT/IR results (i.e., increased frequency of N-H stretch) also proved that amine part of glycine can make strong hydrogen bonding with silicon atoms of Na-MMT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to fully understand the CO2 hydrate nucleation on the organo-mineral complex and its result showed that high concentration of CO2 molecules are located near Na-MMT surface and glycine attached on Na-MMT can attract water molecules to form intermediate hydrate structure. This one plays a key role in complete hydrate formation as nucleation seeds and can significantly enhance the hydrate formation kinetic. This fundamental knowledge could provide idea to select proper CO2 storage site under marine sediments and be applied to in-situ swapping technology to recover CH4 from deep sea gas hydrate deposits and sequester the CO2 to CH4 hydrate layer.

  5. Formation and stability of lanthanide complexes and their encapsulation into polymeric microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Mumper, R.J.; Jay, M.

    1992-10-15

    The complexation of lanthanides (Ln) with dicarbonyl compounds (acetylacetone, acac; ethyl acetoacetate; 3-ethyl-2,4-pentanedione; 2,4-hexanedione; 3-methyl-2,4-pentanedione; and diethyl malonate) was investigated using a potentiometric titration technique. The ability of a dicarbonyl compound to complex with the lanthanide elements was greatly dependent on its pK{sub a} and on the pH of the titrated solution. Selected lanthanide complexes (Ln complexes) were incorporated into spherical poly(L-lactic acid)(PLA) matrices and irradiated in a nuclear reactor with neutrons to produce short-lived high-energy {Beta}-particle-emitting radioisotopes. The lanthanides investigated (Ho, Dy, Sm, and La) were chosen on the basis of their physical and nuclear properties. A transition element (Re) was also studied. The small decrease in the ionic radii of the lanthanides with increasing atomic number led to (a) greater ability to extract and complex from an aqueous solution with complexing agents, (b) larger formation and stability constants for the Ln complexes, (c) increased solubility of the Ln complexes in chloroform, and (d) increase in the maximum percent incorporation of the stable lanthanides in PLA spheres. Ho(aca) was found to be the most promising candidate of the complexes studied on the basis of the above observations and due to the favorable physical properties of {sup 165}Ho and nuclear properties of {sup 166}Ho. 21 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Organic photolysis reactions in tropospheric aerosols: effect on secondary organic aerosol formation and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Tyndall, G.; Aumont, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Orlando, J.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the first modeling estimates of the potential effect of gas- and particle-phase organic photolysis reactions on the formation and lifetime of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typically only photolysis of smaller organic molecules (e.g., formaldehyde) for which explicit data exist is included in chemistry-climate models. Here, we specifically examine the photolysis of larger molecules that actively partition between the gas and particle phases. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A is used to explicitly model SOA formation from ?-pinene, toluene, and C12 and C16 n-alkane reactions with OH at low and high NOx. Simulations are conducted for typical mid-latitude conditions and a solar zenith angle of 45° (permanent daylight). The results show that after 4 days of chemical aging under those conditions (equivalent to 8 days in the summer mid-latitudes), gas-phase photolysis leads to a moderate decrease in SOA yields, i.e., ~15 % (low NOx) to ~45 % (high NOx) for ?-pinene, ~15 % for toluene, ~25 % for C12 n-alkane, and ~10 % for C16 n-alkane. The small effect of gas-phase photolysis on low-volatility n-alkanes such as C16 n-alkane is due to the rapid partitioning of early-generation products to the particle phase, where they are protected from gas-phase photolysis. Minor changes are found in the volatility distribution of organic products and in oxygen to carbon ratios. The decrease in SOA mass is increasingly more important after a day of chemical processing, suggesting that most laboratory experiments are likely too short to quantify the effect of gas-phase photolysis on SOA yields. Our results also suggest that many molecules containing chromophores are preferentially partitioned into the particle phase before they can be photolyzed in the gas phase. Given the growing experimental evidence that these molecules can undergo in-particle photolysis, we performed sensitivity simulations using an empirically estimated SOA photolysis rate of JSOA = 4 × 10-4 JNO2. Modeling results indicate that this photolytic loss rate would decrease SOA mass by 40-60 % for most species after 10 days of equivalent atmospheric aging at mid-latitudes in the summer. It should be noted that in our simulations we do not consider in-particle or aqueous-phase reactions which could modify the chemical composition of the particle and thus the quantity of photolabile species. The atmospheric implications of our results are significant for both the SOA global distribution and lifetime. GEOS-Chem global model results suggest that particle-phase photolytic reactions could be an important loss process for SOA in the atmosphere, removing aerosols from the troposphere on timescales of less than 7 days that are comparable to wet deposition.

  7. Organic photolysis reactions in tropospheric aerosols: effect on secondary organic aerosol formation and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Tyndall, G.; Aumont, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Orlando, J.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the first modeling estimates of the potential effect of gas- and particle-phase organic photolysis reactions on the formation and lifetime of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Typically only photolysis of smaller organic molecules (e.g. formaldehyde) for which explicit data exist is included in chemistry-climate models. Here, we specifically examine the photolysis of larger molecules that actively partition between the gas and particle phases. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A is used to explicitly model SOA formation from ?-pinene, toluene, and C12 and C16 n-alkane reactions with OH at low- and high-NOx. Simulations are conducted for typical mid-latitude conditions and a solar zenith angle of 45° (permanent daylight). The results show that after four days of chemical aging under those conditions (equivalent to eight days in the summer mid-latitudes), gas-phase photolysis leads to a moderate decrease in SOA yields i.e ~15% (low-NOx) to ~45% (high-NOx) for ?-pinene, ~15% for toluene, ~25% for C12-alkane, and ~10% for C16-alkane. The small effect on low volatility n-alkanes such as C16-alkane is due to the rapid partitioning of early-generation products to the particle phase where they are assumed to be protected from gas-phase photolysis. Minor changes are found in the volatility distribution of organic products and in oxygen to carbon ratios. The decrease in SOA mass seems increasingly more important after a day of chemical processing, suggesting that most laboratory experiments are likely too short to quantify the effect of gas-phase photolysis on SOA yields. Our results also suggest that many molecules containing chromophores are preferentially partitioned into the particle phase before they can be photolyzed in the gas-phase. Given the growing experimental evidence that these molecules can undergo in-particle photolysis, we performed sensitivity simulations using an estimated SOA photolysis rate of JSOA=4 x 10-4JNO2. Modeling results indicate that this photolytic loss rate would decrease SOA mass by 40-60% for most species after ten days of equivalent atmospheric aging at mid-latitudes in the summer. It should be noted that in our simulations we do not consider in-particle or aqueous-phase reactions which could modify the chemical composition of the particle, and thus the amount of photolabile species. The atmospheric implications of our results are significant for both the SOA global distribution and lifetime. GEOS-Chem global model results suggest that particle-phase photolytic reactions could be an important loss process for SOA in the atmosphere, removing aerosols from the troposphere on timescales (less than 7 days) that are comparable to wet deposition.

  8. Specific antagonist of platelet-activating factor suppresses edema formation in an Arthus reaction but not edema induced by leukocyte chemoattractants in rabbit skin

    SciTech Connect

    Hellewell, P.G.; Williams, T.J.

    1986-07-15

    The properties of a novel platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist, L-652731, on edema responses in rabbit skin induced by exogenous inflammatory mediators and by mediators generated endogenously in a reversed passive Arthus reaction have been investigated. Edema responses in the skin were measured by using the local accumulation of i.v. injected /sup 125/I-albumin. The antagonist, mixed with mediators before intradermal injection, caused a dose-dependent suppression of edema responses to PAF. In contrast, responses induced by other directly acting mediators (bradykinin and histamine) and responses induced by PMN leukocyte-dependent mediators (C5a des Arg, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, and keukotriene B/sub 4/) were not suppressed. Thus, a secondary release of PAF does not appear to be involved in mediating the actions of these agents. In a reversed passive Arthus reaction, intradermal injection of L-652731 together with antibody resulted in a significant inhibition of the edema formation measured for 2 hr after i.v. antigen challenge. In contrast, edema responses induced by intradermal injection of performed immune complexes were not affected by the antagonist. These results suggest that the endogenous production of PAF, in close proximity to microvascular endothelial cells, appears to be an important step in the development of an Arthus reaction. The cellular source of PAF is unknown, but one possibility is the PMN leukocyte, which releases PAF during phagocytosis of immune complexes.

  9. Lethal synergism between organic and inorganic wood preservatives via formation of an unusual lipophilic ternary complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Li, Yan; Fan, Rui-Mei; Chao, Xi-Juan; Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331

    2013-02-01

    We have shown previously that exposing bacteria to wood preservatives pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper-containing compounds together causes synergistic toxicity. However, it is not clear whether these findings also hold true in mammalian cells; and if so, what is the underlying molecular mechanism? Here we show that PCP and a model copper complex bis-(1,10-phenanthroline) cupric (Cu(OP){sub 2}), could also induce synergistic cytotoxicity in human liver cells. By the single crystal X-ray diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy assay, the synergism was found to be mainly due to the formation of a lipophilic ternary complex with unusual structural and composition characteristics and subsequent enhanced cellular copper uptake, which markedly promoted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing pro-apoptotic protein expression, releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria and activating caspase-3, and -9. Analogous results were observed with other polychlorinated phenols (PCPs) and Cu(OP){sub 2}. Synergistic cytotoxicity could be induced by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} via formation of an unusual lipophilic complex in HepG2 cells. The formation of ternary complexes with similar lipophilic character could be of relevance as a general mechanism of toxicity, which should be taken into consideration especially when evaluating the toxicity of environmental pollutants found at currently-considered non- or sub-toxic concentrations. -- Highlights: ? The combination of PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces synergistic cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ? The synergism is mainly due to forming a lipophilic ternary complex between them. ? The formation of lipophilic ternary complex enhances cellular copper uptake. ? PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} stimulates the cellular ROS production. ? The ROS promoted by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  10. Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 130, 2-Volume Set, Geometric Structures of Phase Space in Multi-Dimensional Chaos: Applications to Chemical Reaction Dynamics in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Stuart A.; Toda, Mikito; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Konishi, Tetsuro; Berry, R. Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Edited by Nobel Prize winner Ilya Prigogine and renowned authority Stuart A. Rice, the Advances in Chemical Physics series provides a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations in every area of the discipline. In a format that encourages the expression of individual points of view, experts in the field present comprehensive analyses of subjects of interest. Advances in Chemical Physics remains the premier venue for presentations of new findings in its field. Volume 130 consists of three parts including: Part I: Phase Space Geometry of Multi-dimensional Dynamical Systems and Reaction Processes Part II Complex Dynamical Behavior in Clusters and Proteins, and Data Mining to Extract Information on Dynamics Part III New directions in Multi-Dimensional Chaos and Evolutionary Reactions

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Nitrogenase-Relevant Reactions of an Iron Sulfide Complex with a Bridging Hydride.

    PubMed

    Arnet, Nicholas A; Dugan, Thomas R; Menges, Fabian S; Mercado, Brandon Q; Brennessel, William W; Bill, Eckhard; Johnson, Mark A; Holland, Patrick L

    2015-10-21

    The FeMoco of nitrogenase is an iron-sulfur cluster with exceptional bond-reducing abilities. ENDOR studies have suggested that E4, the state that binds and reduces N2, contains bridging hydrides as part of the active-site iron-sulfide cluster. However, there are no examples of any isolable iron-sulfide cluster with a hydride, which would test the feasibility of such a species. Here, we describe a diiron sulfide hydride complex that is prepared using a mild method involving C-S cleavage of added thiolate. Its reactions with nitrogenase substrates show that the hydride can act as a base or nucleophile and that reduction can cause the iron atoms to bind N2. These results add experimental support to hydride-based pathways for nitrogenase. PMID:26457740

  12. Synergism and chemiluminescence of cerium ions and ruthenium complexes in the belousov-zhabotinskii reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karavaev, A.D.; Kazakov, V.P.; Tolstikov, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies chemiluminescence (CL) in the system BrO/sup -//sub 3/-CH/sub 2/ (COOH)/sub 2/ -Ce/sup 3 +/,4+-RuPbipy)/sub 3/ /SUP 2+,/ /sub 3/. The tests were carried out in a CL/sup 3/ unit that included a light-tight chamber, a photoelectron multiplier (FEU-97), a VS-22 high voltage power pack, and an EPPV-60M recording potentiometer. The synergism in chemiluminescence at low concentrations of ruthenium complex does not appear in the oscillation parameters. The periodic CL of this two-catalyst system may be a convenient chemical model for the study of combined chemical reactions in more complicated biochemiluminescent processes, such as that by which the firefly flashes in the dark.

  13. THE GAS PHASE REACTION OF OZONE WITH 1,3-BUTADIENE: FORMATION YIELDS OF SOME TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product yields. In separa...

  14. Secondary organic aerosol formation from gasoline vehicle emissions in a new mobile environmental reaction chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, S. M.; El Haddad, I.; Zardini, A. A.; Clairotte, M.; Astorga, C.; Wolf, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Marchand, N.; Ježek, I.; Drinovec, L.; Mo?nik, G.; Möhler, O.; Richter, R.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2013-09-01

    We present a new mobile environmental reaction chamber for the simulation of the atmospheric aging of different emission sources without limitation from the instruments or facilities available at any single site. Photochemistry is simulated using a set of 40 UV lights (total power 4 KW). Characterisation of the emission spectrum of these lights shows that atmospheric aging of emissions may be simulated over a range of temperatures (-7 to 25 °C). A photolysis rate of NO2, JNO2, of (8.0 ± 0.7) × 10-3 s-1 was determined at 25 °C. We demonstrate the utility of this new system by presenting results on the aging (OH = 12 × 106 cm-3 h) of emissions from a modern (Euro 5) gasoline car operated during a driving cycle (New European Driving Cycle, NEDC) on a chassis dynamometer in a vehicle test cell. Emissions from the entire NEDC were sampled and aged in the chamber. Total organic aerosol (OA; primary organic aerosol (POA) emission + secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation) was (369.8-397.5)10-3 g kg-1 fuel, or (13.2-15.4) × 10-3 g km-1, after aging, with aged OA/POA in the range 9-15. A thorough investigation of the composition of the gas phase emissions suggests that the observed SOA is from previously unconsidered precursors and processes. This large enhancement in particulate matter mass from gasoline vehicle aerosol emissions due to SOA formation, if it occurs across a wider range of gasoline vehicles, would have significant implications for our understanding of the contribution of on-road gasoline vehicles to ambient aerosols.

  15. Formation of environmentally persistent free radicals from the heterogeneous reaction of ozone and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Borrowman, Cuyler K; Zhou, Shouming; Burrow, Timothy E; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-01-01

    In the 1980s long-lived radical species were identified in cigarette tar. Since then, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been observed in ambient particulate matter, and have been generated in particulate matter generated from internal combustion engines. For the first time, we measure in situ the formation and decay of EPFRs through the heterogeneous reaction of ozone and several polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC). Solid anthracene (ANT), pyrene (PY), benzo[a]pyrene (BAP), benzo[ghi]perylene (BGHIP), 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4NQ), and 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) were reacted with gas-phase ozone in a flow system placed in the active cavity of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer, and the formation of radicals was measured on the timescale of tens of minutes at ambient levels of ozone down to 30 ppb. For most substrates the net radical production is initially rapid, slows at intermediate times, and is followed by a slow decay. For oxidized solid BAP, radical signal persists for many days in the absence of ozone. To evaluate the effect of substrate phase, the solid PAHs were also dissolved in squalane, an organic oil inert to ozone, which yielded a much higher maximum radical concentration and faster radical decay when exposed to ozone. With higher mobility, reactants were apparently able to more easily diffuse and react with each other, yielding the higher radical concentrations. The EPR spectra exhibit three radicals types, two of which have been assigned to semiquinone species and one to a PAH-derived, carbon-centered radical. Although our system uses levels of PAC not typically found in the environment it is worth noting that the amounts of radical formed, on the order of 10(18) radicals per g, are comparable to those observed in ambient particulate matter. PMID:26603953

  16. Reactions of alkynes with cis-RuCl2(dppm)2: exploring the interplay of vinylidene, alkynyl and ?(3)-butenynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Samantha G; Yufit, Dmitry S; Skelton, Brian W; Lynam, Jason M; Low, Paul J

    2015-12-28

    Reactions of cis-RuCl2(dppm)2 with various terminal alkynes, of the type HC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC6H4-4-R (1 equiv.), in the presence of TlBF4 have resulted in the formation of cationic vinylidene complexes trans-[RuCl([double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]CHC6H4-4-R)(dppm)2]BF4 ([1]BF4). These complexes can be isolated, or treated in situ with a suitable base (Proton Sponge, 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene) to yield the mono-alkynyl complexes trans-RuCl(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC6H4-4-R)(dppm)2 (2). Through similar reactions between cis-RuCl2(dppm)2 with 2 equiv. of alkyne, TlBF4 and base, trans-bis(alkynyl) complexes, trans-Ru(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC6H4-4-R)2(dppm)2 (3), can be isolated when R is an electron withdrawing substituent (R = NO2, COOMe, C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CSiMe3), whereas reactions with alkynes bearing electron donating substituents (R = OMe and Me) form cationic ?(3)-butenynyl complexes [Ru(?(3)-{HC(C6H4-4-R)[double bond, length as m-dash]CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC6H4-4-R})(dppm)2](+) ([4](+)). This work highlights the importance of the electronic character of the alkyne in influencing product outcome. PMID:26586466

  17. Final Report for: "Bis-pi-allylpalladium Complexes in Catalysis of Multicomponent Reactions"

    SciTech Connect

    Malinakova, H. C.; Shiota, Atsushi

    2012-06-29

    The research project involved the development of new and functionally improved Pd(II) catalyst for a three-component reaction of boronic acids, allenes and imines to afford homoallylic amines that are useful in synthesis of biologically active heterocycles. Furthermore, insights into the reaction mechanism and the structure and reactivity of the catalytically active intermediates involved in this process were sought. As a result of this work, a new type of Pd-catalysts possessing an auxiliary ligand attached to the Pd center via a C-Pd and N-Pd bonds were identified, and found to be more active than the traditional catalysts derived from Pd(OAc)2. The new catalysts provided an access to a broader range of homoallylic amine products. Although the final unequivocal evidence regarding the structure of the Pd(II) complex involved in the nucleophilic transfer of the allyl fragment from the palladium center to the imine could not be obtained, mechanistic insights into the events that are detrimental to the activity of the originally reported Pd(OAc)2-based catalytic systems were uncovered.

  18. Classification of complex Wishart matrices with a diffusion-reaction system guided by stochastic distances.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Luis; Alvarez, Luis; Mazorra, Luis; Frery, Alejandro C

    2015-12-13

    We propose a new method for polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) imagery classification based on stochastic distances in the space of random matrices obeying complex Wishart distributions. Given a collection of prototypes [Formula: see text] and a stochastic distance d(.,.), we classify any random matrix X using two criteria in an iterative set-up. First, we associate X with the class which minimizes the weighted stochastic distance w(m)d(X,Z(m)), where the positive weights w(m) are computed to max- imize the class discrimination power. Second, we improve the result by embedding the classification problem into a diffusion-reaction partial differential system where the diffusion term smooths the patches within the image, and the reaction term tends to move the pixel values towards the closest class prototype. In particular, the method inherits the benefits of speckle reduction by diffusion-like methods. Results on synthetic and real PolSAR data show the performance of the method. PMID:26527815

  19. PHOSPHOLIPIDS ARE NEEDED FOR PROPER FORMATION, STABILITY AND FUNCTION OF THE PHOTOACTIVATED RHODOPSIN-TRANSDUCIN COMPLEX

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Goc, Anna; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins become activated after they form a catalytically active complex with activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GTP replaces GDP on the G protein ? subunit. This transient coupling can be stabilized by nucleotide depletion, resulting in an empty-nucleotide G-protein-GPCR complex. Efficient and reproducible formation of conformationally homogenous GPCR-Gt complexes is a prerequisite for structural studies. Herein, we report isolation conditions that enhance the stability, and preserve activity and proper stoichiometry of productive complexes between the purified prototypical GPCR, rhodopsin (Rho), and the rod cell-specific G protein, transducin (Gt). Binding of purified Gt to photoactivated Rho (Rho*) in n-dodecyl-?-maltoside (DDM) examined by gel filtration chromatography was generally modest and purified complexes provided heterogeneous ratios of protein components, most likely because of excess detergent. Rho*-Gt complex stability and activity was greatly increased by addition of phospholipids such as DOPC, DOPE and DOPS, and asolectin to detergent-containing solutions of these proteins. In contrast, native Rho*-Gt complexes purified directly from light-exposed bovine ROS membranes by sucrose gradient centrifugation exhibited improved stability and the expected 2:1 stoichiometry between Rho* and Gt. The above results strongly indicate a lipid requirement for stable complex formation wherein the likely oligomeric structure of Rho provides a superior platform for coupling to Gt, and phospholipids likely form a matrix to which Gt can anchor through its myristoyl and farnesyl groups. Our findings also demonstrate that the choice of detergent and purification method is critical for obtaining highly purified, stable, and active complexes with appropriate stoichiometry between GPCRs and G proteins needed for structural studies. PMID:19413332

  20. Microfluidic origami: a new device format for in-line reaction monitoring by nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Andrea E; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2013-07-01

    Microfluidics is an attractive platform for chemical synthesis because it offers fast reaction times, reduced reagent usage, and the ability to integrate multiple functions on a single device. Digital Microfluidics (DMF) is particularly well-suited for microscale chemical synthesis, as it permits discretized sample handling, allowing for total process control. However, a limitation of DMF-based synthesis is analysis, which is often performed offline. To this end, we have developed "microfluidic origami", a new device format that integrates DMF with in-line analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). This format comprises a DMF platform and a folded nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) emitter formed on a single flexible polyimide film substrate. Additionally, the device contains a two-plate-to-one-plate DMF interface, which allows for straightforward coupling of micro-reaction operations and product delivery to the emitter for analysis. The integrated platform was used to perform the Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction using DMF followed by inline MS analysis for monitoring the reaction progress in real-time. We propose that this platform has potential as a new tool for real-time monitoring of reaction rates and reaction pathways and could be a useful addition to the synthetic organic chemistry laboratory. PMID:23412052

  1. Functional insight into the role of Orc6 in septin complex filament formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Akhmetova, Katarina; Balasov, Maxim; Huijbregts, Richard P. H.; Chesnokov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Septins belong to a family of polymerizing GTP-binding proteins that are important for cytokinesis and other processes that involve spatial organization of the cell cortex. We reconstituted a recombinant Drosophila septin complex and compared activities of the wild-type and several mutant septin complex variants both in vitro and in vivo. We show that Drosophila septin complex functions depend on the intact GTP-binding and/or hydrolysis domains of Pnut, Sep1, and Sep2. The presence of the functional C-terminal domain of septins is required for the integrity of the complex. Drosophila Orc6 protein, the smallest subunit of the origin recognition complex (ORC), directly binds to septin complex and facilitates septin filament formation. Orc6 forms dimers through the interactions of its N-terminal, TFIIB-like domains. This ability of the protein suggests a direct bridging role for Orc6 in stimulating septin polymerization in Drosophila. Studies reported here provide a functional dissection of a Drosophila septin complex and highlight the basic conserved and divergent features among metazoan septin complexes. PMID:25355953

  2. Reactive desorption electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometry of latest-generation counterfeit antimalarials via noncovalent complex formation.

    PubMed

    Nyadong, Leonard; Green, Michael D; De Jesus, Victor R; Newton, Paul N; Fernández, Facundo M

    2007-03-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) is rapidly becoming accepted as a powerful surface characterization tool for a wide variety of samples in the open air. Besides its well-established high-throughput capabilities, a unique feature of DESI is that chemical reactions between the charged spray microdroplets and surface molecules can be exploited to enhance ionization. Here, we present a rapid screening assay for artesunate antimalarials based on reactive DESI. Artesunate is a vital therapy for Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but artesunate tablets have been counterfeited on a very large scale in SE Asia, and more recently in Africa. For this reason, faster and more sensitive screening tests are urgently needed. The proposed DESI assay is based on the formation of stable noncovalent complexes between linear alkylamines dissolved in the DESI spray solution and artesunate molecules exposed on the tablet surface. We found that, depending on amine type and concentration, a sensitivity gain of up to 170x can be obtained, in comparison to reagent-less DESI. Hexylamine (Hex), dodecylamine (DDA), and octadecylamine (ODA) produced proton-bound noncovalent complexes with gas-phase stabilities, increasing in the order [M + Hex + H]+ < [M + DDA + H]+ < [M + ODA + H]+. Tandem MS experiments revealed that complex formation occurred by hydrogen bonding between the amine nitrogen and the ether-like moieties within the artesunate lactone ring. After the reactive DESI assay was fully characterized, it was applied to a set of recently collected suspicious artesunate tablets purchased in shops and pharmacies in SE Asia. Not only did we find that these samples were counterfeits, but we also detected the presence of several wrong active ingredients. Of particular concern was the positive detection of artesunate traces in the surface of one of the samples, which we quantified with standard chromatographic techniques. PMID:17269655

  3. Protein complex directs hemoglobin-to-hemozoin formation in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Monika; Sundararaman, Vidhya; Kumar, Saravanan; Reddy, Vanga S.; Siddiqui, Waseem A.; Stuart, Kenneth D.; Malhotra, Pawan

    2013-01-01

    Malaria parasites use hemoglobin (Hb) as a major nutrient source in the intraerythrocytic stage, during which heme is converted to hemozoin (Hz). The formation of Hz is essential for parasite survival, but to date, the underlying mechanisms of Hb degradation and Hz formation are poorly understood. We report the presence of a ?200-kDa protein complex in the food vacuole that is required for Hb degradation and Hz formation. This complex contains several parasite proteins, including falcipain 2/2?, plasmepsin II, plasmepsin IV, histo aspartic protease, and heme detoxification protein. The association of these proteins is evident from coimmunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry, coelution from a gel filtration column, cosedimentation on a glycerol gradient, and in vitro protein interaction analyses. To functionally characterize this complex, we developed an in vitro assay using two of the proteins present in the complex. Our results show that falcipain 2 and heme detoxification protein associate with each other to efficiently convert Hb to Hz. We also used this in vitro assay to elucidate the modes of action of chloroquine and artemisinin. Our results reveal that both chloroquine and artemisinin act during the heme polymerization step, and chloroquine also acts at the Hb degradation step. These results may have important implications in the development of previously undefined antimalarials. PMID:23471987

  4. Complex coacervates obtained from peptide leucine and gum arabic: Formation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Gulão, Eliana da S; de Souza, Clitor J F; Andrade, Cristina T; Garcia-Rojas, Edwin E

    2016-03-01

    In this study, interactions between polypeptide-leucine (0.2% w/w) and gum arabic (0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12, and 0.15% w/w) were examined at concentrations of NaCl (0, 0.01, 0.25, 0.3, 0.5mol/l) and at different pH values (from 1.0 to 12.0). Formation of insoluble complex coacervates was highest at pH 4.0. At pH 2.0, which is the pKa of the gum Arabic, the dissociation of precipitate occurred. The pHØ2 positively shifted with the addition of higher concentrations of salt. Samples containing 0.2% PL and 0.03% GA and no salt had higher turbidity and increased formation of precipitates showing greater turbidity and particle sizes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the complex coacervate formation of leucine and gum arabic, and rheological measurements suggest the elastic behavior of 0.2% PL and 0.03% GA complex. Overall, the study suggests that complex coacervates of PLs could be one feasible ways of incorporating amino acids in food products. PMID:26471607

  5. Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H.; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J.

    1996-09-04

    In this paper, we used mass spectrometry and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy to discover that the length of the alkylene-bridging groups had a pronounced effect on the competition between cyclization and polymerization of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and on the formation of polymeric gels. While the intramolecular reaction clearly slows gelation, the cyclic disilsesquioxanes are still tetrafunctional monomers theoretically capable of forming polymeric gels. If the ring structures, which bear a striking resemblence to carbohydrates, are preserved through the polymerization, the resulting poly(cyclic disilsesquioxane) gels may have structural similarities to branched or cross-linked carbohydrates, such as cellulose or chitosan. Under base-catalyzed sol-gel polymerization conditions, 3 and 4 (six- and seven-membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes, respectively) quickly reacted to give gels with significant ring opening as determined from the {sup 29}Si chemical shifts in solid-state (CP MAS) NMR spectra. However, gels prepared under acidic conditions reveal some or all of the cyclic disilsesquioxane functionality was preserved in the polymers. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  7. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  8. Impact of metamorphic reactions limited by water content on MCC formation and exhumation along detachment faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezri, Leila; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Wolf, Sylvie; Burov, Evgenii

    2015-04-01

    Metamorphic phase changes impact both the buoyancy (volume forces) and the rheology (surface forces) of rocks. As such, they play an important dynamic control on the tectonic processes. It is generally assumed that phase changes are mostly controlled by pressure and temperature conditions. Yet, this supposes some assumptions on the amount of water available in the system. In geodynamic community, it is systematically assumed that water is always available in sufficient quantities to minimize Gibbs energy for given P,T conditions and a constant chemical composition. So that, as a matter of fact, the influence of water on the system is completely neglected. Yet, many petrological studies point out that water, as a limiting reactant, is responsible for the lack of retrograde metamorphic reactions observed in the rocks exhumed in typical MCC contexts. In order to study the impact of fluid content on the structure of metamorphic core complexes, we have implemented fluid transport and water limited thermodynamic for phase transition, in a thermomechanical code. We describe a parametrisation of Darcy flow that is able to capture source/sink and transport aspects of fluids at the scale of the whole crust with a minimum of complexity. Using this model, phase transitions are controlled by pressure temperature and the local amount of free fluid that comes from both external meteoric and local dehydration sources. The numerical experiments imply a strong positive feedback between the asymmetry of the tectonic structures and the depth of penetration of meteoric fluid. Bending stress pattern in asymmetric detachment zone indeed drives the penetration of meteoric fluids to greater depth, where they can in turn lubricate the deep ductile part of the detachment. However, thermal weakening and/or slow re-equilibration of the protolith rocks at depth with time tends to decrease the asymmetry of structure, changing the orientation of the bending stress and to shut down the activity of asymmetric detachments in favor of spreading structures which forms double-domes.

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by nested polymerase chain reaction in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens* ,**

    PubMed Central

    Furini, Adriana Antônia da Cruz; Pedro, Heloisa da Silveira Paro; Rodrigues, Jean Francisco; Montenegro, Lilian Maria Lapa; Machado, Ricardo Luiz Dantas; Franco, Célia; Schindler, Haiana Charifker; Batista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Rossit, Andrea Regina Baptista

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) with that of cultures in the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens. METHODS: We analyzed 20 and 78 pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens, respectively, of 67 hospitalized patients suspected of having tuberculosis. An automated microbial system was used for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. cultures, and M. tuberculosis IS6110 was used as the target sequence in the NPCR. The kappa statistic was used in order to assess the level of agreement among the results. RESULTS: Among the 67 patients, 6 and 5, respectively, were diagnosed with pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and the NPCR was positive in all of the cases. Among the 98 clinical specimens, smear microscopy, culture, and NPCR were positive in 6.00%, 8.16%, and 13.26%, respectively. Comparing the results of NPCR with those of cultures (the gold standard), we found that NPCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 83%, respectively, in pulmonary specimens, compared with 83% and 96%, respectively, in extrapulmonary specimens, with good concordance between the tests (kappa, 0.50 and 0.6867, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Although NPCR proved to be a very useful tool for the detection of M. tuberculosis complex, clinical, epidemiological, and other laboratory data should also be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24473765

  10. Formation of host-guest complexes of ?-cyclodextrin and perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Karoyo, Abdalla H; Borisov, Alex S; Wilson, Lee D; Hazendonk, Paul

    2011-08-11

    Structural characterization and dynamic properties of solid-state inclusion complexes of ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were investigated by (19)F/(13)C solid-state and (19)F/(1)H solution NMR spectroscopy. The complexes in the solid state were prepared using dissolution and slow cool methods, where thermal analyses (DSC and TGA), PXRD, and FT-IR results provided complementary support that inclusion complexes were formed between ?-CD and PFOA with variable stoichiometry and inclusion geometry. (19)F DP (direct polarization) and (13)C CP (cross-polarization) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) solids NMR, along with (19)F/(1)H solution NMR were used to characterize the complexes in the solid and solution phases, respectively. The dynamics of the guest molecules in the inclusion complexes (ICs) were studied using variable temperature (VT) (19)F DP/MAS NMR experiments in the solid state. The guest molecules were observed to be in several different molecular environments, providing strong evidence of variable host-guest stoichiometry and inclusion geometry, in accordance with the preparation method of the complex and the conformational preference of PFOA. It was concluded from PXRD that ?-CD and PFOA form inclusion complexes with "channel-type" structures. Variable spin rate (VSR) (19)F DP/MAS NMR was used to assess the phase purity of the complexes, and it was revealed that slow cooling resulted in relatively pure phases. In the solution state, (1)H and (19)F NMR complexation-induced chemical shifts (CISs) of ?-CD and PFOA, respectively, provided strong support for the formation of 1:1 and 2:1 ?-CD/PFOA inclusion complexes. The dynamics of the guest molecule in the ?-CD/PFOA complexes in D(2)O solutions were probed using VT (19)F NMR and revealed some guest conformational and exchange dynamics as a function of temperature and the relative concentrations of the host and guest. PMID:21688796

  11. Stochastic Modeling of CO2 Migrations and Chemical Reactions in Deep Saline Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, C.; Lee, I.; Lin, C.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been recognized the feasible technology that can significant reduce the anthropogenic CO2 emissions from large point sources. The CO2 injection in geological formations is one of the options to permanently store the captured CO2. Based on this concept a large number of target formations have been identified and intensively investigated with different types of techniques such as the hydrogeophysical experiments or numerical simulations. The numerical simulations of CO2 migrations in saline formations recently gather much attention because a number of models are available for this purpose and there are potential sites existing in many countries. The lower part of Cholan Formation (CF) near Changhua Coastal Industrial Park (CCIP) in west central Taiwan was identified the largest potential site for CO2 sequestration. The top elevations of the KF in this area varies from 1300 to 1700m below the sea level. Laboratory experiment showed that the permeability of CF is 10-14 to 10-12 m2. Over the years the offshore seismic survey and limited onshore borehole logs have provided information for the simulation of CO2 migration in the CF although the original investigations might not focus on the purpose of CO2 sequestration. In this study we modify the TOUGHREACT model to consider the small-scale heterogeneity in target formation and the cap rock of upper CF. A Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) approach based on the TOUGHREACT model is employed to quantify the effect of small-scale heterogeneity on the CO2 migrations and hydrochemical reactions in the CF. We assume that the small-scale variability of permeability in KF can be described with a known Gaussian distribution. Therefore, the Gaussian type random field generator such as Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGSIM) in Geostatistical Software Library (GSLIB) can be used to provide the random permeability realizations for the MCS. A variety of statistical parameters such as the variances and correlation lengths in a Gaussian covariance model are varied in the MCS and the uncertainty of the CO2 and other chemical concentrations are evaluated based on 144 random realizations. In this study a constant injection rate of100Mt/year supercritical CO2 is applied in the bottom of CF. The continuous injection time is 20 years and the uncertainty results are evaluated at 100 years. By comparing with the case without small-scale variability simulation results show that the CO2 plume sizes in the horizontal direction increase from tens of meters to hundreds of meters when the variances of small-scale variability are varied from 1.0 to 4.0. The changes of correlation lengths (i.e., from 100m, 200m, to 400m) show small contribution on the size increases of CO2 plumes. Other uncertainties of chemical concentrations show behaviors similar to the CO2 plume patterns.

  12. Reaction of cationic transition metal complexes with furan, thiophene, and pyrrole. Model studies relevant to hydrodeoxygenation, hydrodesulfurization, and hydrodenitrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiar, R.; Jacobson, D.B.

    1995-12-01

    Hydrodesulfurization, denitrogenation, and deoxygenation reactions are important reactions in many research areas such as the removal of nitrogen and sulfur from coal. In this report, reactions of Fe{sup +} and FeL{sup +} (L = O, C{sub 4}H{sub 6}, c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6}, c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6}, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, C{sub 5}H{sub 4}(=CH{sub 2})) with thiophene, furan, and pyrrole in the gas phase by using Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) are described. Fe{sup +}, Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sup +}, and FeC{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +} yield exclusive, rapid adduct formation with thiophene, furan, and pyrrole. The iron-diene complex FeC{sub 4}H{sub 6}{sup +}, Fe(c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6}){sup +}), as well as FeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}(=CH{sub 2}){sup +} and FeO{sup +} are quite reactive. An intriguing reaction is the predominant, direct extrusion of CO from furan by FeC{sub 4}H{sub 6}{sup +}, Fe(c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6}){sup +}, Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 4}(=CH{sub 2}){sup +}. In addition, FeC{sub 4}H{sub 6}{sup +} and Fe(c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6}){sup +} yield minor amounts of HCN extrusion from pyrrole. The absence of CS extrusion from thiophene may be due to the higher energy requirements than that for CO extrusion from furan or HCN extrusion from pyrrole. The dominant reaction channel for reaction of Fe(c-C{sub 5}H{sub 6}){sup +} with pyrrole and thiophene is hydrogen atom displacement which implies D{sup 0}(Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sup +}-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}X) > D{sup 0}(Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sup +}-H) = 46 {+-} 5 kcal/mol. D{sup 0}(Fe{sup +}-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}S) and D{sup 0}(Fe{sup +}C{sub 4}H{sub 5}N) = D{sup 0}(Fe{sup +}-C{sub 4}H{sub 6}) = 48 {+-} 5 kcal/mol. Finally, D{sup 0}(Fe{sup +}-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O) > D{sup 0}(Fe{sup +}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) = 39.9 {+-} 1.4 kcal/mol and D{sup 0}(Fe{sup +}-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O) < D{sup 0}(Fe{sup +}-C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) = 55 {+-} 5 kcal/mol. FeO{sup +} reacts rapidly with thiophene, furan, and pyrrole to yield initial loss of CO followed by additional neutral losses.

  13. Metal Complex Formation in Melts of Acetamide-Ammonium Nitrate-Water Mixtures, Part I. Cobalt(II) Chloride Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsigrai, István J.; Gadžuri?, Slobodan B.; Matijevi?, Borko

    2005-03-01

    The complex formation between cobalt(II) and chloride ions in molten NH4NO3?2.61H2O, NH4NO3?CH3CONH2?1.61H2O and NH4NO3?2.61CH3CONH2 has been investigated. Absorption spectra of cobalt(II) chloride containing variable amounts of ammonium chloride were recorded at 45 to 60 °C. In the absence of chloride, the solutions show spectra typical for octahedral co-ordination of cobalt(II). Addition of chloride caused a shift of the absorption maximum toward lower energies and an increase of the molar absorption coefficient with increasing chloride concentration. The position of the absorption maximum and the intensity of the absorption indicate tetrahedral or severely distorted octahedral co-ordination. The stability constants for [Co(NO3)4]2-, [Co(NO3)2Cl2]2- and [CoCl4]2- complex formation in NH4NO3?2.61CH3CONH2 are reported.

  14. Reactivity studies of a pseudo three-coordinate vanadium(II) complex: Synthesis of terminal oxo and sulfido complexes of vanadium(IV) and S?S and Se?Se reductive bond cleavage reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Ba L.; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Mindiola, Daniel J.

    2012-02-07

    Terminal oxo and sulfido complexes in the form of (nacnac)V=E(Ntol{sub 2}) (nacnac = [ArNC(CH{sub 3})]{sub 2}CH{sup -}, Ar = 2,6-(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}, Ntol{sub 2} = {sup -}N(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-Me), E = O (1), S (2)) were isolated from treatment of the masked three-coordinate vanadium(II) complex, (nacnac)V(Ntol{sub 2}), with C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NO and S{sub 8}, respectively. Both vanadium(IV) species, 1 and 2, have been characterized by room temperature X-band EPR spectroscopic studies, and in the case of complex 1, a single crystal molecular structure confirmed the presence of a terminal oxo moiety. Moreover, reaction of (nacnac)V(Ntol{sub 2}) with diphenyl-disulfide and diphenyl-diselenide results in the reductive cleavage of these compounds to produce the vanadium(III) complexes (nacnac)V(XPh)(Ntol{sub 2}) (X = S, (3), Se (4)). A molecular structure of the phenylsulfide complex, 3, confirmed formation of the d{sup 2} complex resulting from reductive cleavage of the S-S bond.

  15. On the stability of metal-aminoacid complexes in water based on water-ligand exchange reactions and electronic properties: detailed study on iron-glycine hexacoordinated complexes.

    PubMed

    Mandado, Marcos; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2010-11-30

    Thermodynamic stability of metal-aminoacid complexes in water is discussed in terms of the Gibbs free energy of water-ligand exchange processes, and the electronic stabilizing factors thoroughly investigated by means of 1-electron and 2-electron density properties. Hexacoordinated complexes formed between iron cations and glycine molecules acting as monodentate or bidentate ligands have been chosen as targets for the current study. Results agree with experimental findings, and complexes formed with bidentate ligands are found to be more stable than those formed with monodentate ones. The larger the number of the coordinated glycine molecules the more stable is the complex. Fe(III) complexes are more stable than Fe(II) ones, but differences are small and the Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) exchange process appears to be energetically feasible for these complexes. Formation of the second glycine-iron interaction involving the amino nitrogen in the bidentate ligands is enthalpycally unfavorable but takes place due to the large entropy rise of the process. The larger stability of Fe(III) complexes is due however to the balance between energetic and solvation terms, which is favorable to these complexes. Electron density properties account satisfactorily for the electronic energy changes along the complex formation in terms of ligand-metal electron transfer and covalent bond orders. PMID:20839300

  16. Formation of multiple focal spots using a high NA lens with a complex spiral phase mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalithambigai, K.; Anbarasan, P. M.; Rajesh, K. B.

    2014-07-01

    The formation of a transversally polarized beam by transmitting a tightly focused double-ring-shaped azimuthally polarized beam through a complex spiral phase mask and high numerical aperture lens is presented based on vector diffraction theory. The generation of transversally polarized focal spot segment splitting and multiple focal spots is illustrated numerically. Moreover, we found that a properly designed complex spiral phase mask can move the focal spots along the optical axis in the z direction. Therefore, one can achieve a focal segment of two, three or multiple completely transversely polarized focal spots, which finds applications in optical trapping and in material processing technologies.

  17. Studies on reactions of oxidizing sulfur-sulfur three-electron-bond complexes and reducing alpha-amino radicals derived from OH reaction with methionine in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lu, C; Yao, S; Lin, N

    2001-02-16

    The technique of pulse radiolysis with spectrophotometric detection has been used to investigate the possibility of electron transfer reactions between oxidizing sulfur-sulfur three-electron-bond complexes (Met2/S thereforeS+), or reducing alpha-amino radicals (CH3SCH2CH2CH.NH2) derived from reaction of methionine with OH radicals and hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) derivatives, riboflavin (RF) or flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), respectively. The HCA derivatives, such as caffeic acid, ferulic acid, sinapic acid and chlorogenic acid, widely distributed phenolic acids in fruit and vegetables, have been identified as good antioxidants previously can rapidly and efficiently repair oxidizing three-electron-bond complexes via electron transfer. RF and FAD can oxidize reducing alpha-amino radicals derived from methionine. The electron transfer rate constants approximately 10(9) dm3 x mol(-1)x s(-1) were determined by following the build-up kinetics of species produced. PMID:11342257

  18. Multinuclear complex formation between Ca(II) and gluconate ions in hyperalkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Attila; Bajnóczi, Éva G; Canton, Sophie E; Bolin, Trudy; Peintler, Gábor; Kutus, Bence; Kele, Zoltán; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2014-06-17

    Alkaline solutions containing polyhydroxy carboxylates and Ca(II) are typical in cementitious radioactive waste repositories. Gluconate (Gluc(-)) is a structural and functional representative of these sugar carboxylates. In the current study, the structure and equilibria of complexes forming in such strongly alkaline solutions containing Ca(2+) and gluconate have been studied. It was found that Gluc(-) significantly increases the solubility of portlandite (Ca(OH)2(s)) under these conditions and Ca(2+) complexes of unexpectedly high stability are formed. The mononuclear (CaGluc(+) and [CaGlucOH](0)) complexes were found to be minor species, and predominant multinuclear complexes were identified. The formation of the neutral [Ca2Gluc(OH)3](0) (log ?213 = 8.03) and [Ca3Gluc2(OH)4](0) (log ?324 = 12.39) has been proven via H2/Pt-electrode potentiometric measurements and was confirmed via XAS, (1)H NMR, ESI-MS, conductometry, and freezing-point depression experiments. The binding sites of Gluc(-) were identified from multinuclear NMR measurements. Besides the carboxylate group, the O atoms on the second and third carbon atoms were proved to be the most probable sites for Ca(2+) binding. The suggested structure of the trinuclear complex was deduced from ab initio calculations. These observations are of relevance in the thermodynamic modeling of radioactive waste repositories, where the predominance of the binuclear Ca(2+) complex, which is a precursor of various high-stability ternary complexes with actinides, is demonstrated. PMID:24865662

  19. Formation of light exotic nuclei in low-energy multinucleon transfer reactions

    E-print Network

    V. I. Zagrebaev; B. Fornal; S. Leoni; Walter Greiner

    2014-04-17

    Low-energy multinucleon transfer reactions are shown to be very effective tool for the production and spectroscopic study of light exotic nuclei. The corresponding cross sections are found to be significantly larger as compared with high energy fragmentation reactions. Several optimal reactions for the production of extremely neutron rich isotopes of elements with Z=6-14 are proposed.

  20. Trimethylaluminum-Triflimide Complexes for the Catalysis of Highly Hindered Diels-Alder Reactions and Their Use Towards the Enantiospecific Total Synthesis of Rhodexin A

    E-print Network

    Guzaev, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    was based on the established synthesis of the TBS ether 43,based complexes. The reaction of the silyl enol ether 63ether, and THF was highly prone to polymerization under the reaction conditions. Based

  1. Experimental and Guided Theoretical Investigation of Complex Reaction Mechanisms in a Prins Reaction of Glyoxylic Acid and Isobutene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelici, Gaetano; Nicolet, Stefan; Uda, Narasimha R.; Creus, Marc

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was designed for undergraduate students, in which the outcome of an easy single-step organic synthesis with well-defined conditions was not elucidated until the end of the exercise. In class, students predict and discuss the possible products using their knowledge of reaction mechanisms. In the laboratory, they learn how to…

  2. Organo-palladium(II) complexes bearing unsymmetrical N,N,N-pincer ligands: synthesis, structures and oxidatively induced coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Wright, Luka A; Hope, Eric G; Solan, Gregory A; Cross, Warren B; Singh, Kuldip

    2015-04-28

    The 2-(2?-aniline)-6-imine-pyridines, 2-(C6H4-2?-NH2)-6-(CMe=NAr)C5H3N (Ar = 4-i-PrC6H4 (HL1a), 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (HL1b)), have been synthesised via sequential Stille cross-coupling, deprotection and condensation steps from 6-tributylstannyl-2-(2-methyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)pyridine and 2-bromonitrobenzene. The palladium(II) acetate N,N,N-pincer complexes, [{2-(C6H4-2?-NH)-6-(CMe=NAr)C5H3N}Pd(OAc)] (Ar = 4-i-PrC6H4 (1a), 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (1b)), can be prepared by reacting HL1 with Pd(OAc)2 or, in the case of 1a, more conveniently by the template reaction of ketone 2-(C6H4-2?-NH2)-6-(CMe=O)C5H3N, Pd(OAc)2 and 4-isopropylaniline; ready conversion of 1 to their chloride analogues, [{2-(C6H4-2?-NH)-6-(CMe=NAr)C5H3N}PdCl] (Ar = 4-i-PrC6H4 (2a), 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (2b)), has been demonstrated. The phenyl-containing complexes, [{2-(C6H4-2?-NH)-6-(CMe=NAr)C5H3N}PdPh] (Ar = 4-i-PrC6H4 (3a), 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (3b)), can be obtained by treating HL1 with (PPh3)2PdPh(Br) in the presence of NaH or with regard to 3a, by the salt elimination reaction of 2a with phenyllithium. Reaction of 2a with silver tetrafluoroborate or triflate in the presence of acetonitrile allows access to cationic [{2-(C6H4-2?-NH)-6-(CMe=N(4-i-PrC6H4)C5H3N}Pd(NCMe)][X] (X = BF4 (4), X = O3SCF3 (5)), respectively; the pyridine analogue of 5, [{2-(C6H4-2?-NH)-6-(CMe=N(4-i-PrC6H4)C5H3N}Pd(NC5H5)][O3SCF3] (5?), is also reported. Oxidation of phenyl-containing 3a with one equivalent of 1-chloromethyl-4-fluoro-1,4-diazoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane bis(tetrafluoroborate) (Selectfluor™) in acetonitrile at low temperature leads to a new palladium species that slowly decomposes to give 4 and biphenyl; biphenyl formation is also observed upon reaction of 3a with XeF2. However, no such oxidatively induced coupling occurs when using 3b. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies have been performed on HL1b, 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b and 5?. PMID:25789841

  3. Electron Bihole Complex Formation in Neutralization of Ne{sup +} on LiF(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Khemliche, H.; Villette, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Momeni, A.; Roncin, P.

    2001-06-18

    Neutralization of low keV Ne{sup +} ions at a LiF(001) surface is studied in a grazing incidence geometry. The combination of energy loss and electron spectroscopy in coincidence reveals two neutralization channels of comparable importance. Besides the Auger process, the Ne{sup +} neutralization can proceed via peculiar target excitation, corresponding to the formation of an electron bihole complex termed trion.

  4. The Human SepSecS-tRNA[superscript Sec] Complex Reveals the Mechanism of Selenocysteine Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Palioura, Sotiria; Sherrer, R. Lynn; Steitz, Thomas A.; Söll, Dieter; Simonovic, Miljan

    2009-08-13

    Selenocysteine is the only genetically encoded amino acid in humans whose biosynthesis occurs on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA). O-Phosphoseryl-tRNA:selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS) catalyzes the final step of selenocysteine formation by a poorly understood tRNA-dependent mechanism. The crystal structure of human tRNA{sup Sec} in complex with SepSecS, phosphoserine, and thiophosphate, together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays, supports a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent mechanism of Sec-tRNA{sup Sec} formation. Two tRNA{sup Sec} molecules, with a fold distinct from other canonical tRNAs, bind to each SepSecS tetramer through their 13-base pair acceptor-T{Upsilon}C arm (where {Upsilon} indicates pseudouridine). The tRNA binding is likely to induce a conformational change in the enzyme's active site that allows a phosphoserine covalently attached to tRNA{sup Sec}, but not free phosphoserine, to be oriented properly for the reaction to occur.

  5. Secondary organic aerosol formation from gasoline vehicle emissions in a new mobile environmental reaction chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, S. M.; El Haddad, I.; Zardini, A. A.; Clairotte, M.; Astorga, C.; Wolf, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Marchand, N.; Ježek, I.; Drinovec, L.; Mo?nik, G.; Möhler, O.; Richter, R.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new mobile environmental reaction chamber for the simulation of the atmospheric aging of aerosols from different emissions sources without limitation from the instruments or facilities available at any single site. The chamber can be mounted on a trailer for transport to host facilities or for mobile measurements. Photochemistry is simulated using a set of 40 UV lights (total power 4 KW). Characterisation of the emission spectrum of these lights shows that atmospheric photochemistry can be accurately simulated over a range of temperatures from -7-25 °C. A photolysis rate of NO2, JNO2, of (8.0 ± 0.7) × 10-3 molecules cm-3 s-1 was determined at 25 °C. Further, we present the first application of the mobile chamber and demonstrate its utility by quantifying primary organic aerosol (POA) emission and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from a Euro 5 light duty gasoline vehicle. Exhaust emissions were sampled during the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), the standard driving cycle for European regulatory purposes, and injected into the chamber. The relative concentrations of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and total hydrocarbon (THC) during the aging of emissions inside the chamber were controlled using an injection system developed as a part of the new mobile chamber set up. Total OA (POA + SOA) emission factors of (370 ± 18) × 10-3 g kg-1 fuel, or (14.6 ± 0.8) × 10-3 g km-1, after aging, were calculated from concentrations measured inside the smog chamber during two experiments. The average SOA/POA ratio for the two experiments was 15.1, a much larger increase than has previously been seen for diesel vehicles, where smog chamber studies have found SOA/POA ratios of 1.3-1.7. Due to this SOA formation, carbonaceous particulate matter (PM) emissions from a gasoline vehicle may approach those of a diesel vehicle of the same class. Furthermore, with the advent of emission controls requiring the use of diesel particle filters, gasoline vehicle emissions could become a far larger source of ambient PM than diesel vehicles. Therefore this large increase in the PM mass of gasoline vehicle aerosol emissions due to SOA formation has significant implications for our understanding of the contribution of on-road vehicles to ambient aerosols and merits further study.

  6. Formation constants of neodymium acetate complexes at elevated temperatures by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wruck, D.A.; Kadkhodayan, B.; Palmer, C.E.A.; Silva, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Chemical thermodynamic data on the formation of solution complexes by radionuclides as a function of temperature are needed for performance assessment studies of proposed radioactive waste repositories. Optical absorption spectroscopy is a preferred method for the measurement of complexation constants in aqueous solutions. Because many of radionuclides of interest, e.g., actinides, must be studied at very low solution concentrations, a system of high sensitivity is required. Therefore, a photoacoustic spectrometer has been developed for high sensitivity optical absorption measurements of aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures. The light source is a Nd: YAG-pumped dye laser system. The photoacoustic signal generated in the sample solution is detected with a piezoelectric transducer coupled to the thermostatted sample cell. The spectrometer has been tested by applying it to the determination of the formation constants of Nd(III) acetate complexes. The formation constants are reported for the temperature range 20 to 70{degrees}C; and are compared to measurements by spectrophotometry and calorimetry.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of amyloid fibril formation by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence reveals complex aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Streets, Aaron M; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, ?-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports ?-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  8. Simultaneous Measurement of Amyloid Fibril Formation by Dynamic Light Scattering and Fluorescence Reveals Complex Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R.; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, ?-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports ?-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  9. Study using a three-dimensional smog formation model under conditions of complex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, S.; Schere, K. L.; Shreffler, J. H.; Uno, I.

    1986-05-01

    To clarify the photochemical smog formation mechanisms under conditions of complex flow, the SAI Urban Airshed Model was evaluated using a 1981 field observed data base. In the Tokyo Metropolitan Area higher O3 concentrations are usually observed near the shore in the morning. As the sea breeze layer penetrates inland, this high concentration region travels with it, increasing in concentration with time. A night-time radiation inversion which persists into the early morning prevents the dispersion of primary pollutants emitted from the big coastal industrial zones and the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. The effect is believed to accelerate the formation of secondary pollutants during the next day. The quantitative role and weight of the previous days's secondary pollutants, newly emitted pollutants, temporal variation of mixing height and three-dimensional wind field for the O3 formation mechanisms were investigated. The three-dimensional simulated results showed good quantitative agreement with the observed field data but underestimated the aircraft data.

  10. Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima: Structural Insights into Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, Mariya; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-10-02

    In the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway, formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) amidotransferase, also known as PurL, catalyzes the conversion of FGAR, ATP, and glutamine to formyl glycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM), ADP, P{sub i}, and glutamate. Two forms of PurL have been characterized, large and small. Large PurL, present in most Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes, consists of a single polypeptide chain and contains three major domains: the N-terminal domain, the FGAM synthetase domain, and the glutaminase domain, with a putative ammonia channel located between the active sites of the latter two. Small PurL, present in Gram-positive bacteria and archaea, is structurally homologous to the FGAM synthetase domain of large PurL, and forms a complex with two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS. The structure of the PurS dimer is homologous with the N-terminal domain of large PurL, while PurQ, whose structure has not been reported, contains the glutaminase activity. In Bacillus subtilis, the formation of the PurLQS complex is dependent on glutamine and ADP and has been demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. In this work, a structure of the PurLQS complex from Thermotoga maritima is described revealing a 2:1:1 stoichiometry of PurS:Q:L, respectively. The conformational changes observed in TmPurL upon complex formation elucidate the mechanism of metabolite-mediated recruitment of PurQ and PurS. The flexibility of the PurS dimer is proposed to play a role in the activation of the complex and the formation of the ammonia channel. A potential path for the ammonia channel is identified.

  11. Thermodynamic study of complex formation between Kryptofix-5 and Sn2+ in several individual and binary non-aqueous solvents using a conductometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnood, Razieh Sanavi; Hatami, Elaheh

    2014-12-01

    The complex formation between 1,13-bis(8-quinolyl)-1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxatridecane (Kryptofix-5) and Sn2+ ions was studied in pure acetonitrile (AN), dimethylformamide (DMF), 1,4-dioxane (DOX), and methanol (MeOH) and in acetonitrile-1,4-dioxane (AN-DOX), acetonitrile-dichloromethane (AN-DCM), acetonitrile-methanol (AN-MeOH), and acetonitrile-dimethylformamide (AN-DMF) binary mixed solvent solutions at different temperatures using conductometric method. 1: 1 [ML] complex is formed between the metal cation and ligand in most solvent systems but in the cases of AN-MeOH (MeOH = 90 mol %) binary mixture and in pure MeOH a 2: 1 [M2L] complex was observed, that is the stoichiometry of complexes may be changed by the nature of the medium. The stability order of the (Kryptofix-5·Sn)2+ complex in the studied binary mixed solvent solutions at 25°C was found to be AN-DOX > AN-DCM > AN-MeOH > AN-DMF and in the case of pure solvents at 25°C the sequence was the following: AN > DMF > DOX. A non-linear behavior was observed for changes of log K f of (Kryptofix-5·Sn)2+ complex versus the composition of the binary mixed solvents, which was explained in terms of solvent-solvent intractions and also by the preferential solvation of the f species involved in the complexation reaction. The values of standard enthalpy changes (? Hc°) for complexation reactions were obtained from the slope of the Van't Hoff plots and the changes in standard entropy (? Sc°) were calculated from the relationship ? Gc,298.15° = ? Hc° - 298.15? Sc°. The results show that in most cases, the (Kryptofix-5·Sn)2+ complex is both enthalpy and entropy stabilized.

  12. Nonheme Fe(IV) Oxo Complexes of Two New Pentadentate Ligands and Their Hydrogen-Atom and Oxygen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Mainak; Nimir, Hassan; Demeshko, Serhiy; Bhat, Satish S; Malinkin, Sergey O; Haukka, Matti; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Lisensky, George C; Meyer, Franc; Shteinman, Albert A; Browne, Wesley R; Hrovat, David A; Richmond, Michael G; Costas, Miquel; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2015-08-01

    Two new pentadentate {N5} donor ligands based on the N4Py (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) framework have been synthesized, viz. [N-(1-methyl-2-benzimidazolyl)methyl-N-(2-pyridyl)methyl-N-(bis-2-pyridyl methyl)amine] (L(1)) and [N-bis(1-methyl-2-benzimidazolyl)methyl-N-(bis-2-pyridylmethyl)amine] (L(2)), where one or two pyridyl arms of N4Py have been replaced by corresponding (N-methyl)benzimidazolyl-containing arms. The complexes [Fe(II)(CH3CN)(L)](2+) (L = L(1) (1); L(2) (2)) were synthesized, and reaction of these ferrous complexes with iodosylbenzene led to the formation of the ferryl complexes [Fe(IV)(O)(L)](2+) (L = L(1) (3); L(2) (4)), which were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution mass spectrometry, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Complexes 3 and 4 are relatively stable with half-lives at room temperature of 40 h (L = L(1)) and 2.5 h (L = L(2)). The redox potentials of 1 and 2, as well as the visible spectra of 3 and 4, indicate that the ligand field weakens as ligand pyridyl substituents are progressively substituted by (N-methyl)benzimidazolyl moieties. The reactivities of 3 and 4 in hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) and oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions show that both complexes exhibit enhanced reactivities when compared to the analogous N4Py complex ([Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+)), and that the normalized HAT rates increase by approximately 1 order of magnitude for each replacement of a pyridyl moiety; i.e., [Fe(IV)(O)(L(2))](2+) exhibits the highest rates. The second-order HAT rate constants can be directly related to the substrate C-H bond dissociation energies. Computational modeling of the HAT reactions indicates that the reaction proceeds via a high spin transition state. PMID:26198840

  13. Oxidative addition reaction of diarylplatinum(II) complexes with MeI in ionic liquid media: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Shahsavari, Hamid R; Sepehrpour, Hajar; Hosseini, Fatemeh Niroomand; Jamali, Sirous; Rashidi, Mehdi

    2010-09-01

    A kinetic study of the oxidative addition reaction of diarylplatinum(II) complexes [Pt(p-MeC(6)H(4))(2)(NN)] (1a: NN = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and 1b: NN = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine ((t)Bu(2)bpy)) with MeI in ionic liquids 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([bmim][bta]) or 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF(4)]) is described. The reactions were investigated as a function of MeI concentration and temperature under pseudo-first-order conditions using UV-vis spectroscopy techniques. In general, the oxidative addition reactions in ionic liquids followed an S(N)2 mechanism, similar to that reported for the related reactions in conventional solvents, e.g. benzene or acetone. The reaction rates in different solvents followed the order acetone > ionic liquids > benzene. The trend in the values of k(2) clearly indicated that ionic liquids behave like conventional solvents and that no particular 'ionic liquid effect' was detected in this kind of reaction. The effect of solvent on the reactions was examined using a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) based on the Kamlet-Taft solvent scale. The activation parameters, DeltaH(++) and DeltaS(++), were obtained for the reactions in each solvent and the investigation of enthalpy-entropy compensation confirmed that the mechanism operated in all solvents is similar. PMID:20664857

  14. Formation of Mercury Sulfide from Hg(II)-Thiolate Complexes in Natural Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Manceau, Alain; Lemouchi, Cyprien; Enescu, Mironel; Gaillot, Anne-Claire; Lanson, Martine; Magnin, Valérie; Glatzel, Pieter; Poulin, Brett A; Ryan, Joseph N; Aiken, George R; Gautier-Luneau, Isabelle; Nagy, Kathryn L

    2015-08-18

    Methylmercury is the environmental form of neurotoxic mercury that is biomagnified in the food chain. Methylation rates are reduced when the metal is sequestered in crystalline mercury sulfides or bound to thiol groups in macromolecular natural organic matter. Mercury sulfide minerals are known to nucleate in anoxic zones, by reaction of the thiol-bound mercury with biogenic sulfide, but not in oxic environments. We present experimental evidence that mercury sulfide forms from thiol-bound mercury alone in aqueous dark systems in contact with air. The maximum amount of nanoparticulate mercury sulfide relative to thiol-bound mercury obtained by reacting dissolved mercury and soil organic matter matches that detected in the organic horizon of a contaminated soil situated downstream from Oak Ridge, TN, in the United States. The nearly identical ratios of the two forms of mercury in field and experimental systems suggest a common reaction mechanism for nucleating the mineral. We identified a chemical reaction mechanism that is thermodynamically favorable in which thiol-bound mercury polymerizes to mercury-sulfur clusters. The clusters form by elimination of sulfur from the thiol complexes via breaking of mercury-sulfur bonds as in an alkylation reaction. Addition of sulfide is not required. This nucleation mechanism provides one explanation for how mercury may be immobilized, and eventually sequestered, in oxygenated surface environments. PMID:26168020

  15. Lowstand transgressive upper Cretaceous (Coniacian) gravelly deltaic complexes of the Cardium formation, West Central Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.V.

    1996-12-31

    A detailed facies and sequence stratigraphic analysis is used to demonstrate the reservoir compartmentalization of gravelly deltaic complexes deposited on a ramp margin in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. Gravelly deltas of the Carrot Creek Member of the Cardium Formation in the Cyn Pem Field area of West Central Alberta occur along well defined backslapping shoreline trends that represent high frequency lowstand to transgressive systems tracts that followed the second order sea level fall ({approximately}90 Ma) of the Turonian. The Cyn Pem Cardium D pool is used to illustrate the detailed sedimentologly and stratigraphy of a gravelly deltaic complex. The pool consists of two distinct coarse-grained delta lobes oriented along a northwest-trending shoreline. Up to 21 meters of gravelly stream mouth bar and distributary channel facles were deposited unconformably on distal marine highstand deposits of the Raven River Member (Turonian) of the Cardium Formation. Production data and facies analysis indicates excellent communication along high permeability (>l Darcy) Gilbert-type deltaic foresets oriented parallel to strike and moderate to poor communication in a depositional dip direction. Poorly sorted gravelly distributary channels dissect the deltaic ioresets. A complex history of high frequency lowstand and transgressive erosion resulted in substantial paleotopographic relief that both bounds and compartmentalizes these gravelly deltaic complexes.

  16. Lowstand transgressive upper Cretaceous (Coniacian) gravelly deltaic complexes of the Cardium formation, West Central Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.V. )

    1996-01-01

    A detailed facies and sequence stratigraphic analysis is used to demonstrate the reservoir compartmentalization of gravelly deltaic complexes deposited on a ramp margin in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. Gravelly deltas of the Carrot Creek Member of the Cardium Formation in the Cyn Pem Field area of West Central Alberta occur along well defined backslapping shoreline trends that represent high frequency lowstand to transgressive systems tracts that followed the second order sea level fall ([approximately]90 Ma) of the Turonian. The Cyn Pem Cardium D pool is used to illustrate the detailed sedimentologly and stratigraphy of a gravelly deltaic complex. The pool consists of two distinct coarse-grained delta lobes oriented along a northwest-trending shoreline. Up to 21 meters of gravelly stream mouth bar and distributary channel facles were deposited unconformably on distal marine highstand deposits of the Raven River Member (Turonian) of the Cardium Formation. Production data and facies analysis indicates excellent communication along high permeability (>l Darcy) Gilbert-type deltaic foresets oriented parallel to strike and moderate to poor communication in a depositional dip direction. Poorly sorted gravelly distributary channels dissect the deltaic ioresets. A complex history of high frequency lowstand and transgressive erosion resulted in substantial paleotopographic relief that both bounds and compartmentalizes these gravelly deltaic complexes.

  17. Mechanistic study of intertypic nucleoprotein complex formation and its inhibitory effect toward influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jaru-Ampornpan, Peera; Subali, Theressa; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla T; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2015-11-01

    Co-infection of influenza A and B viruses (IAV and IBV) results in marked decreases in IAV replication. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for this phenomenon. Recently, we reported that IBV nucleoprotein (BNP) alone can suppress IAV replication and proposed an inhibition model in which BNP binds IAV nucleoprotein (ANP) and disrupts IAV polymerase complexes. Here, using mutagenesis and co-immunoprecipitation, we determined the protein motifs mediating the intertypic ANP-BNP complex and showed that it specifically interferes with ANP?s interaction with the PB2 subunit of the IAV polymerase but not with the other subunit PB1. We further demonstrated that BNP only suppresses growth of IAVs but not other RNA viruses. However, different IAV strains display varied sensitivity toward the BNP?s inhibitory effect. Together, our data provide mechanistic insights into intertypic nucleoprotein complex formation and highlight the role of BNP as a potential broad-spectrum anti-IAV agent. PMID:26218215

  18. Multinuclear complex formation in aqueous solutions of Ca(II) and heptagluconate ions.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Attila; Csendes, Zita; Kutus, Bence; Czeglédi, Eszter; Peintler, Gábor; Forgo, Péter; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2013-06-21

    The equilibria and structure of complexes formed between the Ca(2+) ion and the heptagluconate (Hglu(-)) ion in both neutral and alkaline solutions have been studied. In alkaline solutions an uncharged, multinuclear complex is formed with the composition of Ca3Hglu2(OH)4 (or [Ca3Hglu2H(-4)](0)) with an unexpectedly high stability constant (lg ?(32-4) = 14.09). The formation of the trinuclear complex was deduced from potentiometry and confirmed by freezing-point depression measurements and conductometry as well. The binding sites of Hglu(-) were determined from NMR measurements. Besides the carboxylate group, the O atoms on the second and third carbon atoms proved to be the most probable sites for Ca(2+) binding. PMID:23629045

  19. Contrasting Factors on the Kinetic Path to Protein Complex Formation Diminish the Effects of Crowding Agents

    PubMed Central

    Phillip, Yael; Harel, Michal; Khait, Ruth; Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Schreiber, Gideon

    2012-01-01

    The crowded environment of cells poses a challenge for rapid protein-protein association. Yet, it has been established that the rates of association are similar in crowded and in dilute solutions. Here we probe the pathway leading to fast association between TEM1 ?-lactamase and its inhibitor protein BLIP in crowded solutions. We show that the affinity of the encounter complex, the rate of final complex formation, and the structure of the transition state are similar in crowded solutions and in buffer. The experimental results were reproduced by calculations based on the transient-complex theory for protein association. Both experiments and calculations suggest that while crowding agents decrease the diffusion constant of the associating proteins, they also induce an effective excluded-volume attraction between them. The combination of the two opposing effects thus results in nearly identical overall association rates in diluted and crowded solutions. PMID:23009850

  20. Actomyosin-dependent formation of the mechanosensitive talin-vinculin complex reinforces actin anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanasu, Corina; Faivre, Bruno; Le Clainche, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The force generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton controls focal adhesion dynamics during cell migration. This process is thought to involve the mechanical unfolding of talin to expose cryptic vinculin-binding sites. However, the ability of the actomyosin cytoskeleton to directly control the formation of a talin-vinculin complex and the resulting activity of the complex are not known. Here we develop a microscopy assay with pure proteins in which the self-assembly of actomyosin cables controls the association of vinculin to a talin-micropatterned surface in a reversible manner. Quantifications indicate that talin refolding is limited by vinculin dissociation and modulated by the actomyosin network stability. Finally, we show that the activation of vinculin by stretched talin induces a positive feedback that reinforces the actin-talin-vinculin association. This in vitro reconstitution reveals the mechanism by which a key molecular switch senses and controls the connection between adhesion complexes and the actomyosin cytoskeleton.

  1. Access to Polyfunctionalized Chiral Piperidines through Enantioselective Addition-Carbocyclization Cascade Reaction Catalyzed by a Rhodium(I)-Diene Complex.

    PubMed

    Serpier, Fabien; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Folléas, Benoît; Darses, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    A new addition-carbocyclization cascade reaction initiated by arylboronic acids and catalyzed by a rhodium/chiral diene complex is described. Starting from N-bridged oxoenoate derivatives, highly functionalized piperidines bearing three contiguous stereogenic centers were obtained with excellent enantio- and diastereoselectivities. PMID:26469888

  2. The Electric Field Generated by Photosynthetic Reaction Center Induces Rapid Reversed Electron Transfer in the bc1 Complex

    E-print Network

    Crofts, Antony R.

    The Electric Field Generated by Photosynthetic Reaction Center Induces Rapid Reversed Electron bc1 complex is the central enzyme of respiratory and photosynthetic electron- transfer chains electrons between these sites, are also expected to be inhibited. However, we have observed in Rhodobacter

  3. Resolution of proton and electron transfer events in the photosynthetic reaction center and the cytochrome-bc1 complex of

    E-print Network

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    S12-005 Resolution of proton and electron transfer events in the photosynthetic reaction center; Keywords: proton transfer, electron transfer, bc1 complex, Rhodobacter capsulatus. 1. Introduction. Flashes potential and the acidification of the chromatophore interior. As a result, protons are driven out

  4. Evidence for the Formation of Pyrimidine Cations from the Sequential Reactions of Hydrogen Cyanide with the Acetylene Radical Cation.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Bera, Partha P; Lee, Timothy J; Aziz, Saadullah G; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O; El-Shall, M Samy

    2014-10-01

    Herein, we report the first direct evidence for the formation of pyrimidine ion isomers by sequential reactions of HCN with the acetylene radical cation in the gas phase at ambient temperature using the mass-selected variable temperature and pressure ion mobility technique. The formation and structures of the pyrimidine ion isomers are theoretically predicted via coupled cluster and density functional theory calculations. This ion-molecule synthesis may indicate that pyrimidine is produced in the gas phase in space environments before being incorporated into condensed-phase ices and transformed into nucleic acid bases such as uracil. PMID:26278451

  5. Lower molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in an open flow system by Fischer Tropsch reaction. [in primitive solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobo, T.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Hook, A. G.; Donn, B.

    1978-01-01

    A Fischer Tropsch type mechanism has been proposed for the synthesis of organic compounds in the primitive solar system. The evidence for hydrocarbon formation, especially those of higher molecular weight, under simulated conditions of the early solar nebula has been presented (Studier et al., 1968, 1972; Gelpi et al., 1970). In this paper, we report studies on the formation of specifically the lower molecular weight hydrocarbons. By using an open flow reaction system and two closed systems, several factors which may affect the production of these compounds have been examined.

  6. Opaque Mineral Assemblages at Chondrule Boundaries in the Vigarano CV Chondrite: Evidence for Gas-Solid Reactions Following Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, Dante S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies of opaque minerals in primitive ordinary chondrites suggest that metal grains exposed at chondrule boundaries were corroded when volatile elements recondensed after the transient heating event responsible for chondrule formation. Metal grains at chondrule boundaries in the Bishunpur (LL3.1) chondrite are rimmed by troilite and fayalite. If these layers formed by gas solid reaction, then the composition of the corrosion products can provide information on the chondrule formation environment. Given the broad similarities among chondrules from different chondrite groups, similar scale layers should occur on chondrules in other primitive meteorite groups. Here I report on metal grains at chondrule boundaries in Vigarano (CV3).

  7. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, People's Republic of China ; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  8. Mononuclear Nonheme Iron(III)-Iodosylarene and High-Valent Iron-Oxo Complexes in Olefin Epoxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Seo, Mi Sook; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-09-28

    High-spin iron(III)-iodosylarene complexes are highly reactive in the epoxidation of olefins, in which epoxides are formed as the major products with high stereospecificity and enantioselectivity. The reactivity of the iron(III)-iodosylarene intermediates is much greater than that of the corresponding iron(IV)-oxo complex in these reactions. The iron(III)-iodosylarene species-not high-valent iron(IV)-oxo and iron(V)-oxo species-are also shown to be the active oxidants in catalytic olefin epoxidation reactions. The present results are discussed in light of the long-standing controversy on the one oxidant versus multiple oxidants hypothesis in oxidation reactions. PMID:26273792

  9. Cytochrome P-455 nm complex formation in the metabolism of phenylalkylamines. XI. Peroxygenase versus monooxygenase function of cytochrome P-450 in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, K H; Lindeke, B

    1990-01-01

    Cytochrome P-455 nm complex formation in phenobarbital induced rat liver microsomes was investigated using both an NADPH/O2-dependent monooxygenase system and a peroxygenase/peroxidase system where hydrogen peroxide was substituted for NADPH. The substrates tested were the enantiomers of four 1-alkyl-substituted 2-phenylethanamines (unbranched 1-alkyl substituents, comprising one to four carbons), S(+)- and R(-)-N-hydroxyamphetamine and racemic mixtures of N-hydroxy-1-phenyl-2-butanamine and N-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-butanamine. During NADPH/O2-dependent metabolism the amines showed a positive correlation between extent of complex formation and lipophilicity; furthermore the S(+)-isomers gave rise to larger amounts of complex than the corresponding R(-)-analogues. With the hydroxylamines the ability to form complexes was greater than with any of the amines but no definite difference was seen among the hydroxylamines. In the peroxygenase system the hydroxylamines still gave larger amounts of complex than the amines but the differences seen within the homologous series of chiral amines when using the monooxygenase system were no longer observed. Although the quantitative trends in complex formation seen in the monooxygenase system were non-existent when H2O2 was substituted for NADPH, mere qualitative rules still seemed to apply; substrates which failed to give the complex during NADPH-dependent metabolism (2-phenylethanamine, phentermine, N-hydroxyphentermine and phenylacetone oxime) were inactive also in the peroxygenase system. The results substantiate the notion that the monooxygenase and peroxygenase reaction mechanisms of cyt. P-450 follow similar but not identical pathways. PMID:2165869

  10. THE USE OF ISOTOPE CROSSOVER EXPERIMENTS IN INVESTIGATING CARBON-CARBON BOND FORMING REACTIONS OF BINUCLEAR DIALKYL COBALT COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Robert G.

    1980-01-01

    Our present understanding of the mechanisms of organometallic reactions stems almost completely from investigation of complexes containing only one metal. Recently interest has been increasing in the synthesis, structure elucidation and reaction mechanisms of polynuclear clusters, complexes containing more than one metal. This attention derives partially from the possibility that polynuclear catalysts and reagents might be designed in such a way that the metals could interact, generating cooperative systems which might be much more selective than their mononuclear analogs. Another stimulant to this work has been the relationship of cluster complexes to larger multi-metal systems, such as heterogeneous catalysts. Many polynuclear clusters have been prepared and characterized, and some of these have been found to function as unique catalysts or catalyst precursors. However, very little is yet known about how chemical transformations take place at multinuclear reaction centers. Given this paucity of information, they decided a few years ago to initiate mechanistic study of simple cluster systems containing two metal centers, in which each of the metals has a {sigma}-bound organic ligand attached to it. They also choose to focus on reactions of these complexes in which new carbon-carbon or carbon-hydrogen bonds are formed. This Account describes the work on such a system: a binuclear alkyl cobalt complex capable of transferring both alkyl groups to a molecule of carbon monoxide. In this work they have adopted as one of our highest priorities the determination of whether the cluster 'holds together' during its reactions, a question that is in our opinion too often ignored in such studies. They have found that isotope crossover experiments provide a powerful tool for investigating this structural integrity questions, and in this Account they outline a number of examples in which such crossover experiments have provided important, and occasionally surprising, informationa bout the mechanisms involved in the reactions of binuclear cluster complexes. Also summarized are studies of the reactions of related mononuclear complexes which have provided information critical to understanding the chemistry of these binuclear system.

  11. Pt monolayer coating on complex network substrate with high catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Ma, Qiang; Zi, Wei; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Xuejie; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2015-09-01

    A deposition process has been developed to fabricate a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a large-surface-area three-dimensional (3D) Ni foam substrate using a buffer layer (Ag or Au) strategy. The quartz crystal microbalance, current density analysis, cyclic voltammetry integration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the monolayer deposition process accomplishes full coverage on the substrate and the deposition can be controlled to a single atomic layer thickness. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a 3D bulk substrate with complex fine structures; all prior literature reported on submonolayer or incomplete-monolayer coating. A thin underlayer of Ag or Au is found to be necessary to cover a very reactive Ni substrate to ensure complete-monolayer Pt coverage; otherwise, only an incomplete monolayer is formed. Moreover, the Pt monolayer is found to work as well as a thick Pt film for catalytic reactions. This development may pave a way to fabricating a high-activity Pt catalyst with minimal Pt usage. PMID:26601247

  12. Pt monolayer coating on complex network substrate with high catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man; Ma, Qiang; Zi, Wei; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Xuejie; Liu, Shengzhong (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    A deposition process has been developed to fabricate a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a large-surface-area three-dimensional (3D) Ni foam substrate using a buffer layer (Ag or Au) strategy. The quartz crystal microbalance, current density analysis, cyclic voltammetry integration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the monolayer deposition process accomplishes full coverage on the substrate and the deposition can be controlled to a single atomic layer thickness. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a 3D bulk substrate with complex fine structures; all prior literature reported on submonolayer or incomplete-monolayer coating. A thin underlayer of Ag or Au is found to be necessary to cover a very reactive Ni substrate to ensure complete-monolayer Pt coverage; otherwise, only an incomplete monolayer is formed. Moreover, the Pt monolayer is found to work as well as a thick Pt film for catalytic reactions. This development may pave a way to fabricating a high-activity Pt catalyst with minimal Pt usage. PMID:26601247

  13. Structural Complexities Influencing Biostratigraphic Interpretations of the Permian Nansen Formation type-section, Ellesmere Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M.; Guest, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Carboniferous to Permian aged Nansen Formation is a cyclic carbonate shelf deposit and potential hydrocarbon reservoir. This formation is the thickest, most widespread carbonate sequence in the Sverdrup Basin. Deformed during the Eurekan Orogeny, the Nansen Fm. is topographically prominent and responsible for the rugged topography on Axel Heiburg and Ellesmere Island. The type-section for the Nansen Fm. is located on the north side of Hare Fiord, along Girty Creek. At this location there is an estimated stratigraphic thickness of 2 km. Due to easier access most of the stratigraphic work has been completed on nearby glacially exposed sections that traverse parallel to Girty Creek along glacial margins. Extensive biostratigraphy was completed on a glacier section to the west, however, in a glacier section to the east of Girty Creek, structural complexities appear to be repeating sections of the formation. Here, the Nansen formation is bounded by two regional reverse faults. This has produced duplex structures, with clearly exposed stacked horses, footwall synclines, and truncations. By projecting the structures observed along the eastern glacier section to the western glacier section that was used for biostratigraphic studies, it is clear that these structures would affect biostratigraphic interpretations. It was previously noted by biostratigraphers that thrust faults appear to be repeating sections of the Nansen formation. However by correlating all observed faults with the biostratigraphy, we can determine the extent to which the faulting has affected the interpretations, and whether all faults or stratigraphic repetitions are accounted for.

  14. Ab Initio Treatment of the Chemical Reaction Precursor Complex Cl(2P)-HF. 1. Three-Dimensional Diabatic Potential Energy Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Waals complexes in entrance channels of neutral chemical reactions has been fully recognized.1-5 One three adiabatic potential energy surfaces of this complex that correlate with the chlorine atom in its 2

  15. A combined crossed molecular beam and theoretical investigation of the reaction of the meta-tolyl radical with vinylacetylene--toward the formation of methylnaphthalenes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Muzangwa, Lloyd; Kaiser, Ralf I; Jamal, Adeel; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-09-01

    Crossed molecular beam experiments and electronic structure calculations on the reaction of the meta-tolyl radical with vinylacetylene were conducted to probe the formation of methyl-substituted naphthalene isomers. We present the compelling evidence that under single collision conditions 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene can be formed without an entrance barrier via indirect scattering dynamics through a bimolecular collision of two non-PAH reactants: the meta-tolyl radical and vinylacetylene. The electronic structure calculations, conducted at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVDZ//UM06-2x/cc-pVTZ + ZPE(UM06-2x/cc-pVTZ) level of theory, reveal that this reaction is initiated by the barrierless addition of the meta-tolyl radical to the terminal vinyl carbon (C1) of vinylacetylene, via a van-der-Waals complex implying that this mechanism can play a key role in forming methyl-substituted PAHs in low temperature extreme environments such as the low temperature interstellar medium and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons in the outer solar system. The reaction mechanism, proposed from the C11H11 potential energy surface, involves a sequence of isomerizations involving hydrogen transfer and ring closure, followed by hydrogen dissociation, which eventually leads to 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene in an overall exoergic process. PMID:26220215

  16. Reaction between atomic N(4S) and molecular CO at very low temperature: possible formation of HNCO in the Oort cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourry, Sendres; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Krim, Lahouari

    2015-07-01

    Beyond the Kuiper belt, the Oort cloud is characterized by particularly cold temperatures and the absence of energetic particles. Specific chemical processes involving cold radicals may occur in this reservoir of comets. A microwave-driven atomic source can be used to generate cold atomic nitrogen (N (4S)) for reactivity study of ices relevant to the Oort cloud. Without any additional source of energy, atomic nitrogen does not react with CO molecules to form NCO. This is consistent with a previous theoretical investigation carried out by Yazidi et al., who have shown that the potential energy surface for the CO (X1?+) + N (4S) system is purely dissociative. On the other hand, a very small amount of water is sufficient to induce a reaction between these two species. This three-body reaction leads to the formation of the HNCO monomer, the (HNCO)(H2O) complex, and the hydroxyl radical. Such reactions, leading to prebiotic molecules, may take place in the Oort cloud and in the Kuiper belt, from which most of the comets come.

  17. Formation and transition of highly ordered structures of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S.; Yeh, F.; Chu, B.; Burger, C.

    1999-03-25

    Small-angle X-ray scattering studies on the nanostructures of water-equilibrated complexes, formed by slightly cross-linked copolymer gels of poly(sodium methacrylate/N-isopropylacrylamide) P(MAA/NIPAM) and fully charged sodium polystyrenesulfonate (PSS), respectively, interacting with oppositely charged surfactants of alkyltrimethylammonium bromide (C{sub n}TAB, with n being the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain) at {approximately}23 C, are presented. In P(MAA/NIPAM)-C{sub n}TA complexes, the formation and transition of highly ordered structures were investigated in terms of the surfactant alkyl chain length and the hydrophobicity of the polyelectrolyte chain. The complexes between fully charged PMAA gel and C{sub n}TAB showed Pm3n cubic structures at 10 {le} n {le} 16 but did not show highly ordered structures at n = 8 and 18 due to the weak hydrophobic interaction and the steric hindrance of the long alkyl chains inside the gel, respectively. In complexes formed by moderately charged P(MAA/NIPAM) gel with C{sub n}TAB, the decrease in the surfactant alkyl chain length could induce the phase structure transition from Pm3n cubic to face-centered cubic, and then to hexagonal close packing of spheres. The longer the surfactant alkyl chain, the lower the charge density and the hydrophobicity of polyelectrolyte chains are required to form highly ordered structures inside the resulting complexes. In PSS-C{sub n}Ta complexes, structures of two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal packing of cylinders were determined. The 2D hexagonal structures were different from both the layered structures in the corresponding solid-state complexes and the Pm3n cubic structures in PMAA-C{sub n}TA complexes, in which the PMAA chains were more flexible than the PSS chains.

  18. Complement complex C5b-8 induces PGI/sub 2/ formation in culture endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suttorp, N.; Seeger, W.; Zinsky, S.; Bhakdi, S.

    1987-07-01

    The effects of the terminal complement sequence on prostacyclin (PGI/sub 2/) generation in antibody-sensitized pulmonary arterial endothelial cells were examined. Whereas C5b-7 complement complexes induced no PGI/sub 2/ formation, addition of purified complement component C8 resulted in a time- and dose-dependent burst of PGI/sub 2/ release in the absence of overt cell damage. Formation of the complete terminal complement complex C5b-9 enhanced PGI/sub 2/ release but was accompanied by cytolysis. Extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ was required for C5b-8-dependent PGI/sub 2/ formation. Three different blockers of physiological calcium channels failed to suppress the observed stimulatory effect. In contrast, W7 (N-(6-amino-hexyl)-5-chloro-1-napththalene sulfonamide) and trifluoperazine, inhibitors of calmodulin activity, all reduced the C5b-8-dependent PGI/sub 2/ generation. None of the inhibitors used impaired Ca/sup 2 +/ flux into the cells. One minute after addition of C8 to endothelial cells carrying C5b-7 complexes, a six- to seven-fold enhanced passive influx of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ into the cells was noted. An enhanced passive influx was also observed for /sup 51/CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, (/sup H/) aminobutyric acid, and (/sup 3/H) sucrose, but not for (/sup 3/H)inulin and (/sup 3/H)dextran. These data together suggest that complement C5b-8 complexes may serve as Ca/sup 2 +/bypass gates in endothelial cells, the ensuring influx of Ca/sup 2 +/ leading to subsequent activation of the arachiodonic acid pathway.

  19. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H?O/CO? systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    PubMed

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media. PMID:25469518

  20. Formation of medical radioisotopes 111In, 117 m Sn, 124Sb, and 177Lu in photonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H.; Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Avagyan, R. H.; Avetisyan, A. E.; Kerobyan, I. A.; Dallakyan, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of the photonuclear production of radioisotopes 111In, 117 m Sn, 124Sb, and 177Lu is discussed. Reaction yields were measured by the gamma-activation method. The enriched tin isotopes 112, 118Sn and Te and HfO2 of natural isotopic composition were used as targets. The targets were irradiated at the linear electron accelerator of Alikhanian National Science Laboratory (Yerevan) at the energy of 40 MeV. The experimental results obtained in this way reveal that the yield and purity of radioisotopes 111In and 117 mSn are acceptable for their production via photonuclear reactions. Reactions proceeding on targets from Te and HfO2 of natural isotopic composition and leading to the formation of 124Sb and 177Lu have small yields and are hardly appropriate for the photoproduction of these radioisotopes even in the case of enriched targets.

  1. Investigation of laser induced silane/hydrocarbon reactions in the formation of Si and SiC powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantoni, R.; Bijnen, F.; Piccirillo, S.; Enzo, S.

    1990-11-01

    Broadband CARS technique has been employed to monitor on-line the gas-phase reactions involved in IR photodissociation of SiH 4 in the presence of different hydrocarbons (CH 4, C 2H 2, C 2H 4, C 2H 6). The experiment has been performed in a flow reactor where a low power (up to 50 W ) cw CO 2 laser tuned at 944.19 cm -1 was focused. Space-resolved detection of reactants dissociation and primary products formation has been performed on the reaction flame. Evidence of C 2 formed in ground and electronically excited states has been found. Off-line diagnostics have been used to characterize the final products, which resulted to be ultrafine Si and SiC powders with different crystalline phases according to the average reaction temperature.

  2. A rapid, automated gradient flow injection-spectrophotometric technique for study of metal complexation reactions.

    PubMed

    Izadmanesh, Y; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2014-10-01

    Controlled dispersion as generated in flow injection analysis (FIA) essentially permits an infinite variety of known compositional gradients. Using this unique advantage of FIA, the stability constants of metal complexation are calculated by injecting an aliquot of metal solution into the flow of ligand solution in a single-line manifold. While the ligand dilution is negligible, the concentration gradient of injected metal ion can be calculated from the dispersion pattern which is calibrated previously using a dye solution. To show the simplicity, versatility and ease of instrumental setup over approaches based on the classical titration, the method was applied to determine stability constants of murexide with several metal ions. The SQUAD computer program was used for fitting the predefined complexation model to the spectral-mole ratio data. The proper selection of the chemical model was verified by the determination of the number of absorbing species by using a singular value decomposition of each data set. The stability constants obtained for murexide and metals including Cu(2+),Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Ca(2+) and Co(2+) are 4.35, 4.27, 4.50, 2.55 and 2.57, respectively. The formation constants determined here are in good agreement with those previously reported and with those obtained from conventional batch titrations. The main advantage over the classical batch titration method is that by utilizing just one injection per sample, the proposed method reduces experimental error by reducing the experimental steps needed to obtain the required spectral-mole ratio data. The details of the proposed method are discussed. PMID:25059194

  3. Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-08-01

    The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 C and 50 C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times ({approx}3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

  4. Numerical investigation of the effects of iron oxidation reactions on the fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanibondi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Fume formation during arc welding has been modelled using a stochastic approach taking into account iron oxidation reactions. The model includes the nucleation and condensation of Fe and FeO vapours, the reaction of gaseous O2 and O on the nanoparticle surface, the coagulation of the nanoparticles including a sintering time as a function of temperature and composition, assuming chemical equilibrium for species in the gaseous phase. Results suggest that fumes generated in gas metal arc welding with oxidizing shielding mixtures are composed of aggregates of primary particles that are nucleated from gas-phase FeO and further oxidized to Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 in the liquid and solid phase, respectively. The composition of the fumes at the end of the formation process depends on the relative initial concentration of Fe and O2 species in the gas mixture and on the diameter of the primary particles that compose the aggregates: as the oxidation reactions are driven by deposition of oxygen on nanoparticle surface, the oxidation of larger particles is slower than that of smaller particles because of their lower surface to volume ratio. Solid-state diffusion is limiting the oxidation process at temperatures lower than 1500 K, inducing the formation of not fully oxidized particles composed of Fe3O4.

  5. Catalysis by cytochrome P-450 of an oxidative reaction in xenobiotic aldehyde metabolism: deformylation with olefin formation.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, E S; Vaz, A D; Coon, M J

    1991-01-01

    As we have briefly described elsewhere, cytochrome P-450 catalyzes the oxidative deformylation of cyclohexane carboxaldehyde to yield cyclohexene and formic acid in a reaction believed to involve a peroxyhemiacetal-like adduct formed between the substrate and molecular oxygen-derived hydrogen peroxide. This reaction is a useful model for the demethylation reactions catalyzed by the steroidogenic P-450s, aromatase, and lanosterol demethylase. In the present study, the cytochrome P-450-catalyzed formation of olefinic products from a series of xenobiotic aldehydes has been demonstrated. Isobutyraldehyde and trimethylacetaldehyde, but not propionaldehyde, are converted to the predicted olefinic products, suggesting a requirement for branching at the alpha carbon. In addition, the four C5 aldehydes of similar hydrophobicity were compared for their ability to undergo the reaction. The straight-chain valeraldehyde gave no olefinic products with five different rabbit liver microsomal P-450 isozymes. However, increasing activity was seen with the other isomers in the order of isovaleraldehyde, 2-methylbutyraldehyde, and trimethylacetaldehyde, with all of the P-450 cytochromes. The catalytic rate with trimethylacetaldehyde is highest with antibiotic-inducible P-450 form 3A6, followed by phenobarbital-inducible form 2B4 and ethanol-inducible form 2E1. Citronellal, a beta-branched aldehyde that is found in many essential oils and is widely used as an odorant and a flavorant, was found to undergo the oxidative deformylation reaction to yield 2,6-dimethyl-1,5-heptadiene, but only with P-450 2B4. The oxidative cleavage reaction with olefin formation appears to be widespread, as judged by the variety of aldehydes that serve as substrates and of P-450 cytochromes that serve as catalysts. PMID:1924356

  6. Towards reducing DBP formation potential of drinking water by favouring direct ozone over hydroxyl radical reactions during ozonation.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Glen Andrew; Stalter, Daniel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Keller, Jurg; Farré, Maria José

    2015-12-15

    When ozonation is employed in advanced water treatment plants to produce drinking water, dissolved organic matter reacts with ozone (O3) and/or hydroxyl radicals (OH) affecting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation with subsequently used chlorine-based disinfectants. This study presents the effects of varying exposures of O3 and OH on DBP concentrations and their associated toxicity generated after subsequent chlorination. DBP formation potential tests and in vitro bioassays were conducted after batch ozonation experiments of coagulated surface water with and without addition of tertiary butanol (t-BuOH, 10 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mg/mg O3), and at different pH (6-8) and transferred ozone doses (0-1 mg/mg TOC). Although ozonation led to a 24-37% decrease in formation of total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetamides, an increase in formation of total trihalonitromethanes, chloral hydrate, and haloketones was observed. This effect however was less pronounced for samples ozonated at conditions favoring molecular ozone (e.g., pH 6 and in the presence of t-BuOH) over OH reactions (e.g., pH 8 and in the presence of H2O2). Compared to ozonation only, addition of H2O2 consistently enhanced formation of all DBP groups (20-61%) except trihalonitromethanes. This proves that OH-transformed organic matter is more susceptible to halogen incorporation. Analogously, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) concentrations increased under conditions that favor OH reactions. The ratio of unknown to known AOX, however, was greater at conditions that promote direct O3 reactions. Although significant correlation was found between AOX and genotoxicity with the p53 bioassay, toxicity tests using 4 in vitro bioassays showed relatively low absolute differences between various ozonation conditions. PMID:26378731

  7. Inhibition of human amylin fibril formation by insulin-mimetic vanadium complexes.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhao, Cong; Zhu, Dengsen; Du, Weihong

    2014-05-01

    The toxicity of amyloid-forming proteins can be linked to many degenerative and systemic diseases. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP, amylin) has been associated with type II diabetes. Methods for efficient inhibition of amyloid fibril formation are highly clinically important. This study demonstrated the significant inhibitory effects of six vanadium complexes on hIAPP aggregation. Vanadium complexes, such as bis(maltolato)-oxovanadium (BMOV), have been used as insulin-mimetic agents for the treatment of diabetes for many years. Different biophysical methods were applied to investigate the interaction between V complexes and hIAPP. The results indicated that the selected compounds affected the peptide aggregation by different action modes and protected the cells from the cytotoxicity induced by hIAPP. Both the high binding affinity and the ligand spatial effect on inhibiting hIAPP aggregation are significant. Although some of these compounds undergo biotransformation under the conditions of the experiments, and the active species are not identified, it is understood that the effect results from a particular compound and its conversion products. Importantly, our work provided information on the effects of the selected V complexes on hIAPP and demonstrated multiple levels of effects of V complexes against amyloid-related diseases. PMID:24714786

  8. Structural and Thermodynamic Characterization of Cadherin·?-Catenin·?-Catenin Complex Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Pokutta, Sabine; Choi, Hee-Jung; Ahlsen, Goran; Hansen, Scott D.; Weis, William I.

    2014-01-01

    The classical cadherin·?-catenin·?-catenin complex mediates homophilic cell-cell adhesion and mechanically couples the actin cytoskeletons of adjacent cells. Although ?-catenin binds to ?-catenin and to F-actin, ?-catenin significantly weakens the affinity of ?-catenin for F-actin. Moreover, ?-catenin self-associates into homodimers that block ?-catenin binding. We investigated quantitatively and structurally ?E- and ?N-catenin dimer formation, their interaction with ?-catenin and the cadherin·?-catenin complex, and the effect of the ?-catenin actin-binding domain on ?-catenin association. The two ?-catenin variants differ in their self-association properties: at physiological temperatures, ?E-catenin homodimerizes 10× more weakly than does ?N-catenin but is kinetically trapped in its oligomeric state. Both ?E- and ?N-catenin bind to ?-catenin with a Kd of 20 nm, and this affinity is increased by an order of magnitude when cadherin is bound to ?-catenin. We describe the crystal structure of a complex representing the full ?-catenin·?N-catenin interface. A three-dimensional model of the cadherin·?-catenin·?-catenin complex based on these new structural data suggests mechanisms for the enhanced stability of the ternary complex. The C-terminal actin-binding domain of ?-catenin has no influence on the interactions with ?-catenin, arguing against models in which ?-catenin weakens actin binding by stabilizing inhibitory intramolecular interactions between the actin-binding domain and the rest of ?-catenin. PMID:24692547

  9. Achieving Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Imposed Conditions in the Ammonia Formation Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Under conditions of constant temperature T and pressure P, chemical equilibrium occurs in a closed system (fixed mass) when the Gibbs free energy G of the reaction mixture is minimized. However, when chemical reactions occur under other conditions, other thermodynamic functions are minimized or maximized. For processes at constant T and volume V,…

  10. Chirality transfer based on reversible C-C bond formation/breaking in nickel(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Narumi; Ono, Takeshi; Gong, Dafei; Konno, Takumi

    2013-01-25

    The reaction of (1R)-(-)-myrtenal-derived benzothiazoline with nickel(II) acetate in ethanol exclusively gave a Schiff base-type nickel(II) complex having M helical configurational myrtenyl arms, which is reversibly converted to a non-innocent-type complex having additional S,S configurational asymmetric carbon centres. PMID:23090291

  11. NADP-Specific Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase in a Functional Complex with Formate Dehydrogenase in Clostridium autoethanogenum Grown on CO

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg; Mueller, Alexander P.; Köpke, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Flavin-based electron bifurcation is a recently discovered mechanism of coupling endergonic to exergonic redox reactions in the cytoplasm of anaerobic bacteria and archaea. Among the five electron-bifurcating enzyme complexes characterized to date, one is a heteromeric ferredoxin- and NAD-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase. We report here a novel electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase that is NADP rather than NAD specific and forms a complex with a formate dehydrogenase. The complex was found in high concentrations (6% of the cytoplasmic proteins) in the acetogenic Clostridium autoethanogenum autotrophically grown on CO, which was fermented to acetate, ethanol, and 2,3-butanediol. The purified complex was composed of seven different subunits. As predicted from the sequence of the encoding clustered genes (fdhA/hytA-E) and from chemical analyses, the 78.8-kDa subunit (FdhA) is a selenocysteine- and tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase, the 65.5-kDa subunit (HytB) is an iron-sulfur flavin mononucleotide protein harboring the NADP binding site, the 51.4-kDa subunit (HytA) is the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proper, and the 18.1-kDa (HytC), 28.6-kDa (HytD), 19.9-kDa (HytE1), and 20.1-kDa (HytE2) subunits are iron-sulfur proteins. The complex catalyzed both the reversible coupled reduction of ferredoxin and NADP+ with H2 or formate and the reversible formation of H2 and CO2 from formate. We propose the complex to have two functions in vivo, namely, to normally catalyze CO2 reduction to formate with NADPH and reduced ferredoxin in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and to catalyze H2 formation from NADPH and reduced ferredoxin when these redox mediators get too reduced during unbalanced growth of C. autoethanogenum on CO (E0? = ?520 mV). PMID:23893107

  12. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  13. Selective repression of light harvesting complex 2 formation in Rhodobacter azotoformans by light under semiaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huiying; Zhao, Chungui; Li, Kai; Yang, Suping

    2015-11-01

    Photosystem formation in anaerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (APB) is repressed by oxygen but is de-repressed when oxygen tension decreases. Under semiaerobic conditions, the synthesis of photopigments and pigment protein complexes in Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides are repressed by light. AppA, a blue-light receptor, mediates this regulation. In the present study, it was showed that the synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll, carotenoid, and pigment protein complexes in Rba. azotoformans 134K20 was significantly repressed by oxygen. Oxygen exposure also led to a conversion of spheroidene to spheroidenone. In semiaerobically growing cells, light irradiation resulted in a decrease in the formation of photosystem, and blue light was found to be the most effective light source. Blue light reduced the contents of bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid slightly, but had negligible effects on light harvesting complex (LH) 1 content, whereas the content of LH2 was significantly decreased indicating that blue light selectively repressed the synthesis of LH2 in semiaerobically growing 134K20. It was concluded that, similar to Rba. sphaeroides, a blue light receptor presented in strain 134K20 played important roles in its light-dependent repression. A possible mechanism involved in controlling the differential inhibitory of blue light on the synthesis of photosystem was discussed. PMID:26193456

  14. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence. PMID:25386732

  15. Some insights into formamide formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-01-10

    We study the viability of different gas-phase ion-molecule reactions that could produce precursors of formamide in the interstellar medium. We analyze different reactions between cations containing a nitrogen atom (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 3}OH{sup +}, and NH{sub 2}OH{sup +}) and neutral molecules having one carbonyl group (H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH). First, we report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies for the proposed processes. Second, for more favorable reactions, from a thermodynamic point of view, we perform a theoretical study of the potential energy surface. In particular, the more exothermic processes correspond to the reactions of ionized and protonated hydroxylamine with formaldehyde. In addition, a neutral-neutral reaction has also been considered. The analysis of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to these reactions shows that these processes present a net activation barrier and that they cannot be considered as a source of formamide in space.

  16. RAPID ASSOCIATION REACTIONS AT LOW PRESSURE: IMPACT ON THE FORMATION OF HYDROCARBONS ON TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Vuitton, V.; Klippenstein, S. J. E-mail: yelle@lpl.arizona.edu E-mail: sjk@anl.gov

    2012-01-01

    Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere predict that three-body association reactions are the main production route for several major hydrocarbons. The kinetic rate constants of these reactions strongly depend on density and are therefore only important in Titan's lower atmosphere. However, radiative association reactions do not depend on pressure. The possible existence of large rates at low density suggests that association reactions could significantly affect the chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere and better constraints for them are required. The kinetic parameters of these reactions are extremely difficult to constrain by experimental measurements as the low pressure of Titan's upper atmosphere cannot be reproduced in the laboratory. However, in the recent years, theoretical calculations of kinetics parameters have become more and more reliable. We therefore calculated several radical-radical and radical-molecule association reaction rates using transition state theory. The calculations indicate that association reactions are fast even at low pressure for adducts having as few as four C atoms. These drastic changes have however only moderate consequences for Titan's composition. Locally, mole fractions can vary by as much as one order of magnitude but the column-integrated production and condensation rates of hydrocarbons change only by a factor of a few. We discuss the impact of these results for the organic chemistry. It would be very interesting to check the impact of these new rate constants on other environments, such as giant and extrasolar planets as well as the interstellar medium.

  17. Optimization of reaction parameters in hydrothermal synthesis: a strategy towards the formation of CuS hexagonal plates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For decades, copper sulphide has been renowned as the superior optical and semiconductor materials. Its potential applications can be ranged from solar cells, lithium-ion batteries, sensors, and catalyst systems. The synthesis methodologies of copper sulphide with different controlled morphology have been widely explored in the literature. Nevertheless, the understanding on the formation chemistry of CuS is still limited. The ultimate approach undertaking in this article is to investigate the formation of CuS hexagonal plates via the optimization of reaction parameters in hydrothermal reaction between copper (II) nitrate and sodium thiosulphate without appending any assistant agent. Results Covellite (CuS) hexagonal plates were formed at copper ion: thiosulphate ion (Cu2+:S2O32?) mole ratio of 1:2 under hydrothermal treatment of 155°C for 12 hours. For synthesis conducted at reaction temperature lower than 155°C, copper sulphate (CuSO4), krohnite (NaCu2(SO4)(H2O)2] and cyclooctasulphur (S8) were present as main impurities with covellite (CuS). When Cu2+:S2O32? mole ratio was varied to 1: 1 and 1: 1.5, phase pure plate-like natrochalcite [NaCu2(SO4)(H2O)] and digenite (Cu9S5) were produced respectively. Meanwhile, mixed phases of covellite (CuS) and cyclooctasulphur (S8) were both identified when Cu2+:S2O32? mole ratio was varied to 1: 2.5, 1: 3 and 1: 5 as well as when reaction time was shortened to 1 hour. Conclusions CuS hexagonal plates with a mean edge length of 1 ?m, thickness of 100 nm and average crystallite size of approximately (45?±?2) nm (Scherrer estimation) were successfully synthesized via assisting agent- free hydrothermal method. Under a suitable Cu2+:S2O32? mole ratio, we evidenced that the formation of covellite (CuS) is feasible regardless of the reaction temperature applied. However, a series of impurities were attested with CuS if reaction temperature was not elevated high enough for the additional crystallite phase decomposition. It was also identified that Cu2+:S2O32? mole ratio plays a vital role in controlling the amount of cyclooctasulphur (S8) in the final powder obtained. Finally, reaction time was recognized as an important parameter in impurity decomposition as well as increasing the crystallite size and crystallinity of the CuS hexagonal plates formed. PMID:23575312

  18. Col1a1-cre mediated activation of ?-catenin leads to aberrant dento-alveolar complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tak-Heun; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Jang, Eun-Ha; Yoon, Chi-Young; Bae, Young; Ko, Seung-O; Taketo, Makoto M.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/?-catenin signaling plays a critical role in bone formation and regeneration. Dentin and cementum share many similarities with bone in their biochemical compositions and biomechanical properties. Whether Wnt/?-catenin signaling is involved in the dento-alveolar complex formation is unknown. To understand the roles of Wnt/?-catenin signaling in the dento-alveolar complex formation, we generated conditional ?-catenin activation mice through intercross of Catnb+/lox(ex3) mice with Col1a1-cre mice. In mutant mice, tooth formation and eruption was disturbed. Lower incisors and molars did not erupt. Bone formation was increased in the mandible but tooth formation was severely disturbed. Hypomineralized dentin was deposited in the crown but roots of molars were extremely short and distorted. In the odontoblasts of mutant molars, expression of dentin matrix proteins was obviously downregulated following the activation of ?-catenin whereas that of mineralization inhibitor was increased. Cementum and periodontal ligament were hypoplastic but periodontal space was narrow due to increased alveolar bone formation. While cementum matrix proteins were decreased, bone matrix proteins were increased in the cementum and alveolar bone of mutant mice. These results indicate that local activation of ?-catenin in the osteoblasts and odontoblasts leads to aberrant dento-alveolar complex formation. Therefore, appropriate inhibition of Wnt/?-catenin signaling is important for the dento-alveolar complex formation. PMID:23094208

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a nickel(II) complex of 9-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzoxyzepine derived from a Schiff base ligand and its ligand substitution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sudeshna; Kottalanka, Ravi K.; Bhowmik, Prasanta; Jana, Subrata; Harms, Klaus; Panda, Tarun K.; Chattopadhyay, Shouvik; Nayek, Hari Pada

    2014-03-01

    A Schiff base ligand (2-{(E)-[2-bromoethyl)imino]methyl}-6-methoxy phenol (LH) has been synthesized and characterized by NMR, IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The reaction of LH with nickel acetate tetrahydrate results in the formation of a nickel(II) complex (1). The ligand (LH) has been converted into a heterocyclic moiety, 9-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzoxyzepine (L) in 1 and coordinated to nickel(II) ion. Ligand substitution reaction of 1 with 3-aminopyridine leads to the formation of 3-aminopyridine derivative of complex 1, [{3-(NH2-Py)}4Ni(H2O)2]Br2?2(CH2Cl2) (2). Complexes 1 and 2 were characterized by using standard analytical techniques and their solid-state structures were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex 1 crystallizes in orthorhombic space group Pccn with cell dimensions of a = 7.8483(10) Å, b = 30.662(3) Å, c = 9.3872(11) Å, Z = 4 and complex 2 crystallizes in orthorhombic space group Fddd with cell dimensions of a = 8.8108(4) Å, b = 21.0583(11) Å, c = 34.1913(17) Å, Z = 8. The optical properties and thermogravimetric analyses of complexes 1 and 2 are also reported.

  20. Replacement of chlorophyll with di-vinyl chlorophyll in the antenna and reaction center complexes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: characterization of spectral and photochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Seiji; Ito, Hisashi; Tsuchiya, Tohru; Fukuya, Michitaka; Tanaka, Ayumi; Mimuro, Mamoru

    2009-03-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) a in a cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was replaced with di-vinyl (DV)-Chl a by knock-out of the specific gene (slr1923), responsible for the reduction of a 8-vinyl group, and optical and photochemical properties of purified photosystem (PS) II complexes (DV-PS II) were investigated. We observed differences in the peak wavelengths of absorption and fluorescence spectra; however, replacement of Chl a with DV-Chl a had limited effects. On the contrary, photochemical reactions were highly sensitive to high-light treatments in the mutant. Specifically, DV-Chl a was rapidly bleached under high-light conditions, and we detected significant dissociation of complexes and degradation of D1 proteins (PsbA). By comparing the SDS-PAGE patterns observed in this study to those observed in spinach chloroplasts, this degradation is assigned to the acceptor-side photoinhibition. The delayed fluorescence in the nanosecond time region at 77 K was suppressed in DV-PS II, possibly increasing triplet formation of Chl molecules. Our findings provide insight into the evolutionary processes of cyanobacteria. The effects of pigment replacement on the optimization of reactions are discussed. PMID:19168027

  1. Formation of trivalent zirconocene complexes from ansa-zirconocene-based olefin-polymerization precatalysts: an EPR- and NMR-spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Taylor N; Bercaw, John E; Panchenko, Valentina N; Zakharov, Vladimir A; Babushkin, Dmitrii E; Soshnikov, Igor E; Talsi, Evgenii P; Brintzinger, Hans H

    2013-07-24

    Reduction of Zr(IV) metallocenium cations with sodium amalgam (NaHg) produces EPR signals assignable to Zr(III) metallocene complexes. The chloro-bridged heterodinuclear ansa-zirconocenium cation [(SBI)Zr(?-Cl)2AlMe2](+) (SBI = rac-dimethylsilylbis(1-indenyl)), present in toluene solution as its B(C6F5)4(-) salt, thus gives rise to an EPR signal assignable to the complex (SBI)Zr(III)(?-Cl)2AlMe2, while (SBI)Zr(III)-Me and (SBI)Zr(III)(?-H)2Al(i)Bu2 are formed by reduction of [(SBI)Zr(?-Me)2AlMe2](+) B(C6F5)4(-) and [(SBI)Zr(?-H)3(Al(i)Bu2)2](+) B(C6F5)4(-), respectively. These products can also be accessed, along with (SBI)Zr(III)-(i)Bu and [(SBI)Zr(III)](+) AlR4(-), when (SBI)ZrMe2 is allowed to react with HAl(i)Bu2, eliminating isobutane en route to the Zr(III) complex. Further studies concern interconversion reactions between these and other (SBI)Zr(III) complexes and reaction mechanisms involved in their formation. PMID:23745750

  2. Struvite crystal growth inhibition by trisodium citrate and the formation of chemical complexes in growth solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa; Olszynski, Marcin

    2015-05-01

    Effect of trisodium citrate on the crystallization of struvite was studied. To evaluate such an effect an experiment of struvite growth from artificial urine was performed. The investigations are related to infectious urinary stones formation. The crystallization process was induced by the addition of aqueous ammonia solution to mimic the bacterial activity. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that trisodium citrate increases induction time with respect to struvite formation and decreases the growth efficiency of struvite. The inhibitory effect of trisodium citrate on the nucleation and growth of struvite is explained in base of chemical speciation analysis. Such an analysis demonstrates that the inhibitory effect is related with the fact that trisodium citrate binds NH4 + and Mg2+ ions in the range of pH from 7 to 9.5 characteristic for struvite precipitation. The most important is the MgCit- complex whose concentration strongly depends on an increase in pH rather than on an increase in citrate concentrations.

  3. High-Throughput Metagenomic Technologies for Complex Microbial Community Analysis: Open and Closed Formats

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT?  Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications and focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions. PMID:25626903

  4. High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial community analysis. Open and closed formats

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications andmore »focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions.« less

  5. Cord formation in BACTEC(TM) medium aids rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, G A; Abdullah, S; Creer, D D; Elsaghier, A F

    2015-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) organisms form serpentine cords in fluid culture medium. Reporting of a presumptive identification of MTC based on cording allows rapid identification of patients with tuberculosis. A total of 612 positive mycobacterial cultures from 316 patients over 3 years (2008-2010) were evaluated for the presence of cord formation. Cording was identified in 426 (69.6%) specimens, while the reference laboratory confirmed M. tuberculosis in 424 specimens (69.3%). Sensitivity of the test in our laboratory was 99.1% (95%CI 97.4-99.7) and specificity was 96.8% (95%CI 92.8-98.7). Presumptive identification of M. tuberculosis by the presence of cording formation is both sensitive and specific. PMID:25946364

  6. High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial community analysis. Open and closed formats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications and focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions.

  7. Octacoordinated Dioxo-Molybdenum Complex via Formal Oxidative Addition of Molecular Oxygen. Studies of Chemical Reactions Between M(CO)6 (M = Cr, Mo) and 2,4-Di-tert-butyl-6-(pyridin-2-ylazo)-phenol.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ipsita; Saha Chowdhury, Nabanita; Ghosh, Pradip; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2015-06-01

    Reactions of M(CO)6 (M = Mo, Cr) and 2 mol of 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(pyridin-2-ylazo)-phenol ligand (HL) in air yielded [Mo(VI)O2(L(1)¯)2], 1, and [Cr(III)(L(1)¯)(L(•2)¯)], 2, respectively, in high yields. Formation of the Cr-complex is a substitution reaction, which is associated with electron transfer, while that of Mo is an example of molecular oxygen activation. Isolated monoradical chromium complex 2 is susceptible to oxidation. Accordingly the reaction of 2 with the oxidant, I2 produces a cationic nonradical complex of chemical composition [Cr(III)(L(1)¯)2]I3, [2]I3 in almost quantitative yield. All the isolated complexes are primarily characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and magnetic measurements. While the molybdenum complex is diamagnetic, the two chromium complexes behave as simple paramagnets: ?eff (295 K), 2.81 ?B and 3.79 ?B for 2 and [2]I3, respectively. Single-crystal three-dimensional X-ray structures of 1, 2, [2]I3 are reported. The geometry of the Mo-complex is square antiprism (octacoordination), and that of the Cr-complexes is distorted octahedral. Redox properties of the complexes are studied by cyclic voltammetry and constant potential coulometry. The data are analyzed based on density functional theoretical calculations of molecular orbitals of redox isomers of the Cr complexes. The results indicated that the redox events in the complexes occur at the ligand center. The oxidation state of Cr in 2 is further assessed by XPS measurements and compared with the reported systems. PMID:25978689

  8. Kinetics of SiC Formation During High P-T Reaction Between Diamond and Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Pantea,C.; Voronin, G.; Zerda, T.; Wang, L.; Zhao, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Time-resolved in situ X-ray diffraction at simultaneous high pressures (P) and high temperatures (T) was used to monitor kinetics of the reaction between diamond and silicon. Analysis of the data indicated that the reaction was diffusion controlled, and the diffusion was taking place through grain boundaries. For the nm size diamond the activation energy (170 kJ/mol) was smaller than that for {mu}m size diamond (260 kJ/mol), and the reaction started at a temperature below the melting point of silicon. These effects are attributed to nanocrystalline structure and strained bonds within grain boundaries.

  9. Electromagnetic containerless reaction of samarium with cobalt for the formation of samarium-cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. W.; Das, D. K.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The electromagnetic levitation technique has been used to obtain nearly stoichiometric SmCo5, with the reaction temperature controlled by a gas jet. The results of several experiments carried out at a 450 kHz, 25 kw RF power levitation facility using different reaction times and cooling rates are presented. It is shown that reaction rates achieved with the levitation technique are larger than the expected diffusion rate in the system liquid samarium-solid cobalt. It is also shown that substantial mixing occurs in the RF-levitated melt.

  10. Probing the Energy Transfer Dynamics of Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complexes Through Hole-Burning and Single-Complex Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kerry Riley

    2008-05-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is used to drive reactions that generate sugars to supply energy for cellular processes. It is one of the most important fundamental biological reactions and occurs in both prokaryotic (e.g. bacteria) and eukaryotic (e.g. plants and algae) organisms. Photosynthesis is also remarkably intricate, requiring the coordination of many different steps and reactions in order to successfully transform absorbed solar energy into a biochemical usable form of energy. However, the net reaction for all photosynthetic organisms can be reduced to the following, deceptively general, equation developed by Van Niel[1] H{sub 2} - D + A {sub {implies}}{sup hv} A - H{sub 2} + D where H{sub 2}-D is the electron donor, e.g. H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}S. A is the electron acceptor, e.g. CO{sub 2}, and A-H{sub 2} is the synthesized sugar. Amazingly, this simple net equation is responsible for creating the oxidizing atmosphere of Earth and the recycling of CO{sub 2}, both of which are necessary for the sustainment of the global ecosystem.

  11. Equilibrium thermodynamics to form a rhodium formyl complex from reactions of CO and H2: metal ? donor activation of CO.

    PubMed

    Imler, Gregory H; Zdilla, Michael J; Wayland, Bradford B

    2014-04-23

    A rhodium(II) dibenzotetramethylaza[14]annulene dimer ([(tmtaa)Rh]2) (1) reacts with CO and H2 in toluene and pyridine to form equilibrium distributions with hydride and formyl complexes ((tmtaa)Rh-H (2); (tmtaa)Rh-C(O)H (3)). The rhodium formyl complex ((tmtaa)Rh-C(O)H) was isolated under a CO/H2 atmosphere, and the molecular structure was determined by X-ray diffraction. Equilibrium constants were evaluated for reactions of (tmtaa)Rh-H with CO to produce formyl complexes in toluene (K2(298 K)(tol) = 10.8 (1.0) × 10(3)) and pyridine (K2(298 K)(py) = 2.2 (0.2) × 10(3)). Reactions of 1 and 2 in toluene and pyridine are discussed in the context of alternative radical and ionic pathways. The five-coordinate 18-electron Rh(I) complex ([(py)(tmtaa)Rh(I)](-)) is proposed to function as a nucleophile toward CO to give a two-electron activated bent Rh-CO unit. Results from DFT calculations on the (tmtaa)Rh system correlate well with experimental observations. Reactions of 1 with CO and H2 suggest metal catalyst design features to reduce the activation barriers for homogeneous CO hydrogenation. PMID:24724571

  12. Sugar-Conjugated Bis(glycinato)copper(II) Complexes and Their Modulating Influence on the Maillard Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nashalian, Ossanna; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2015-05-01

    Transition metal ions are known to play an important role in the Maillard reaction in catalyzing redox reactions. They can also form strong binary complexes with amino acids with increased reactivity toward smaller aldehydes. To take advantage of this enhanced reactivity and to demonstrate the ability of glucose to conjugate with glycine copper complexes, model systems containing (Gly)2Cu and glucose or their isotopically enriched counterparts were heated in aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of paraformaldehyde at 110 °C for 2 h and the residues were analyzed by electrospray ionization/quadrupole time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (ESI/qTOF/MS). Isotope-labeling studies have indicated the ability of (Gly)2Cu complexes to act as molecular scaffolds and undergo multiple reactions with glucose to generate various complexes of sugar conjugates. These relatively stable intermediates allowed for the slower release of aroma and browning precursors, such as Amadori products, during heating, as assessed by the extent of browning and total volatile release. PMID:25891171

  13. Chiral Phosphine-Silver(I) Complex Catalyzed Enantioselective Interrupted Feist-Bénary Reaction with Ynones: The Aldol-Cycloisomerization Cascade.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Debarshi; Biswas, Arnab; Singh, Vinod K

    2015-07-01

    Silver-catalyzed interrupted Feist-Bénary reaction is described for the efficient enantioselective synthesis of dihydrofuran heterocycles. A new method has been developed for the silver(I)-(R)-BINAP complex mediated aldol-cycloisomerization cascade reaction between ynones and 1,3-diketones to provide functionalized dihydrofurans with moderate to good yields (up to 95%) and good to excellent enantiomeric excess (up to 98%). The presence of an exocyclic double bond and hydroxy group in the dihydrofuran products provides wide scope for further structural manipulation. PMID:26106952

  14. The Synthesis of Stable, Complex Organocesium Tetramic Acids through the Ugi Reaction and Cesium-Carbonate-Promoted Cascades.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Ayaz, Muhammad; Roberts, Sue A; Rabanal-León, Walter A; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro; Hulme, Christopher

    2015-09-28

    Two structurally unique organocesium carbanionic tetramic acids have been synthesized through expeditious and novel cascade reactions of strategically functionalized Ugi skeletons delivering products with two points of potential diversification. This is the first report of the use of multicomponent reactions and subsequent cascades to access complex, unprecedented organocesium architectures. Moreover, this article also highlights the first use of mild cesium carbonate as a cesium source for the construction of cesium organometallic scaffolds. Relativistic DFT calculations provide an insight into the electronic structure of the reported compounds. PMID:26270696

  15. Evaluating the Influence of Chemical Reactions on Wellbore Cement Integrity and Geochemical Tracer Behavior in Hydraulically-Fractured Shale Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verba, C.; Lieuallen, A.; Yang, J.; Torres, M. E.; Hakala, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ensuring wellbore integrity for hydraulically-fractured shale reservoirs is important for maintaining zonal isolation of gases and fluids within the reservoir. Chemical reactions between wellbore cements, the shale formation, formation fluids, and fracturing fluids could affect the ability for cement to form an adequate seal. This study focuses on experimental investigations to evaluate how cement, rock, brines, and fracturing fluids react under conditions similar to the perforated zone associated with the Marcellus shale (Greene County, Pennsylvania). Two pressure/temperature regimes were investigated- moderate (25 MPa, 50oC) and high (27.5 MPa, 90oC). Shale collected from the Lower Marcellus section was encased in Class A cement, cured for 24 hours, and then exposed to simulated conditions in experimental autoclave reactors. The simulated formation fluid was a synthetic brine, modeled after a flowback fluid contained 187,000 mg/l total dissolved solids and had a pH of 7.6. The effect of pH was probed to evaluate the potential for cement reactivity under different pH conditions, and the potential for contaminant or geochemical tracer release from the shale (e.g. arsenic and rare earth elements). In addition to dissolution reactions, sorption and precipitation reactions between solutes and the cement are being evaluated, as the cement could bond with solute-phase species during continued hydration. The cements are expected to show different reactivity under the two temperature conditions because the primary cement hydration product, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is heavily influenced by temperature. Results from these experimental studies will be used both to inform the potential changes in cement chemistry that may occur along a wellbore in the hydraulically-fractured portion of a reservoir, and the types of geochemical tracers that may be useful in tracking these reactions.

  16. Reactions of SIV species with organic compounds: formation mechanisms of organo-sulfur derivatives in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passananti, Monica; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have an important impact on climate, air quality and human health. However the chemical reactions involved in their formation and growth are not fully understood or well-constrained in climate models. It is well known that inorganic sulfur (mainly in oxidation states (+IV) and (+VI)) plays a key role in aerosol formation, for instance sulfuric acid is known to be a good nucleating gas. In addition, acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic compounds has shown to produce new particles, with a clear enhancement in the presence of ozone (Iinuma 2013). Organosulfates have been detected in tropospheric particles and aqueous phases, which suggests they are products of secondary organic aerosol formation process (Tolocka 2012). Originally, the production of organosulfates was explained by the esterification reaction of alcohols, but this reaction in atmosphere is kinetically negligible. Other formation pathways have been suggested such as hydrolysis of peroxides and reaction of organic matter with sulfite and sulfate radical anions (SO3-, SO4-) (Nozière 2010), but it remains unclear if these can completely explain atmospheric organo-sulfur aerosol loading. To better understand the formation of organo-sulfur compounds, we started to investigate the reactivity of SIV species (SO2 and SO32-) with respect to specific functional groups (organic acids and double bonds) on atmospherically relevant carboxylic acids and alkenes. The experiments were carried out in the homogeneous aqueous phase and at the solid-gas interface. A custom built coated-wall flow tube reactor was developed to control relativity humidity, SO2 concentration, temperature and gas flow rate. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics were measured and resulting products were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer (LC-HR-MS). The experiments were performed with and without the presence of ozone in order to evaluate any impact on the SIV oxidation and product formation. Preliminary results reveal that oxidation of SIV species can occur under a variety of atmospherically relevant conditions. Furthermore, LC-HR-MS analysis confirms the formation of organo-sulfur compounds that could derive from sulfate and/or the sulfite radical anion. These results elucidate the role of organo-sulfates aqueous and interfacial chemistry, important for our scientific understanding of atmospheric SOA formation. Iinuma Y., Kahnt A., Mutzel A., Böge O., Herrmann H., Environ. Sci. Technol., 2013, (47), 3639-3647, DOI: 10.1021/es305156z. Mauldin III R. L., Berndt T., Sipilä M., Paasonen P., Petäjä T., Kim S., Kurtén T., Stratmann F., Kerminen V.-M., Kulmala M., Nature, 2012, (488), 193-196, DOI: 10.1038/nature11278. Nozière B., Ekström S., AlsbergT., Holmström S., Geophys. Res. Lett., 2010, (37), 1-6, DOI: 10.1029/2009GL041683. Tolocka M.P., Turpin B., Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, (46), 7978-7983, DOI: 10.1021/es300651v.

  17. Formation and dynamics of "waterproof" photoluminescent complexes of rare earth ions in crowded environment.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Blades, Michael; Duque, Juan G; Doorn, Stephen K; Biaggio, Ivan; Rotkin, Slava V

    2014-12-28

    Understanding behavior of rare-earth ions (REI) in crowded environments is crucial for several nano- and bio-technological applications. Evolution of REI photoluminescence (PL) in small compartments inside a silica hydrogel, mimic to a soft matter bio-environment, has been studied and explained within a solvation model. The model uncovered the origin of high PL efficiency to be the formation of REI complexes, surrounded by bile salt (DOC) molecules. Comparative study of these REI-DOC complexes in bulk water solution and those enclosed inside the hydrogel revealed a strong correlation between an up to 5×-longer lifetime of REIs and appearance of the DOC ordered phase, further confirmed by dynamics of REI solvation shells, REI diffusion experiments and morphological characterization of microstructure of the hydrogel. PMID:25379879

  18. Reactivity of platinum alkyne complexes towards N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide: formation of platinum compounds bearing a ?-fluorovinyl ligand.

    PubMed

    Berger, Josefine; Braun, Thomas; Herrmann, Roy; Braun, Beatrice

    2015-12-01

    The platinum(0) alkyne complexes [Pt(L)(?(2)-PhC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CPh)] 1-4 were synthesized by reactions of [Pt(cod)2] with diphenylacetylene and a phosphine ligand precursor (1: L = dcpe, 2: L = xantphos, 3: L = ?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC3H6NMe2, 4: L = ?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC2H4NMe2). Treatment of 1 or 4 with NFSI gave the complexes [Pt(F){N(SO2Ph)2}(dcpe)] (5) and [Pt(PhC[double bond, length as m-dash]CFPh){N(SO2Ph)2}{?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC2H4NMe2}] (8), whereas the reactivity of 2 and 3 towards NFSI led to product mixtures. The compounds [Pt(F){N(SO2Ph)2}(xantphos)] (6a) as well as [Pt(PhC[double bond, length as m-dash]CFPh){N(SO2Ph)2}{?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC2H4NMe2}] (7a) and [Pt(PhC[double bond, length as m-dash]CFPh)(F){?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC2H4NMe2}] (7b) were clearly identified. Ligand exchange reactions at 8 resulted in the formation of the ?-fluorovinyl platinum(ii) complexes [Pt(PhC[double bond, length as m-dash]CFPh){OC(O)CF3}{?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC2H4NMe2}] (9), [Pt(PhC[double bond, length as m-dash]CFPh)(FHF){?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC2H4NMe2}] (10) and [Pt(PhC[double bond, length as m-dash]CFPh)(F){?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC2H4NMe2}] (11). Treatment of 8 with dihydrogen yielded the fluorinated olefin (Z)-(1-fluoroethene-1,2-diyl)dibenzene and [Pt{N(SO2Ph)2}(H){?(2)-(P,N)-iPr2PC2H4NMe2}] (12). PMID:26308149

  19. Mean reaction rate closures for nanoparticle formation in turbulent reacting flow

    E-print Network

    Akroyd, Jethro

    2012-11-08

    , particle population dynamics and turbulent flow, and offer the potential to improve the understanding of a range of industrial processes. The numerical behaviour of a mean reaction rate closure based on the direct quadrature method of moments using...

  20. Synthesis of Polysiloxane-Bound (Ether-phosphine)palladium Complexes. Stoichiometric and Catalytic Reactions in Interphases(1).

    PubMed

    Lindner, Ekkehard; Schreiber, Rudolf; Schneller, Theodor; Wegner, Peter; Mayer, Hermann A.; Göpel, Wolfgang; Ziegler, Christiane

    1996-01-17

    The reaction of two equiv of the monomeric ether-phosphine O,P ligand (MeO)(3)Si(CH(2))(3)(Ph)PCH(2)-Do [1a(T(0)()), 1b(T(0)())] {Do = CH(2)OCH(3) [1a(T(0)())], CHCH(2)CH(2)CH(2)O [1b(T(0)())]} with PdCl(2)(COD) yields the monomeric palladium(II) complexes Cl(2)Pd(P approximately O)(2) [2a(T(0)())(2)(), 2b(T(0)())(2)()]. The compounds 2a(T(0)())(2)() and 2b(T(0)())(2)() are sol-gel processed with variable amounts (y) of Si(OEt)(4) (Q(0)()) to give the polysiloxane-bound complexes 2a(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(y)(), 2b(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(y)() (Table 1) {P approximately O = eta(1)-P-coordinated ether-phosphine ligand; for T(n)() and Q(k)(), y = number of condensed T type (three oxygen neighbors), Q type (four oxygen neighbors) silicon atoms; n and k = number of Si-O-Si bonds; n = 0-3; k = 0-4; 2a(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(y)(), 2b(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(y)() = {[M]-SiO(n)()(/2)(OX)(3)(-)(n)()}(2)[SiO(k)()(/2)(OX)(4)(-)(k)()](y)(), [M] = (Cl(2)Pd)(1/2)(Ph)P(CH(2)Do)(CH(2))(3)-, X = H, Me, Et}. The complexes 2b(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(y)() (y = 4, 12, 36) show high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of 1-hexyne and tolan. The dicationic complexes [Pd(P&arcraise;O)(2)][SbF(6)](2) [3a(T(0)())(2)(), 3b(T(0)())(2)()] are formed by reacting Cl(2)Pd(P approximately O)(2) with 2 equiv of a silver salt {P&arcraise;O = eta(2)-O&arcraise;P-coordinated ether-phosphine ligand; 3a(T(0)())(2)(), 3b(T(0)())(2)() = [M]-SiOMe(3); [M] = {[Pd(2+)](1/)(2)P(Ph)(CH(2)CH(2)OCH(3))(CH(2))(3)-}{SbF(6)} (a), {[Pd(2+)](1/)(2)P(Ph)(CH(2)CHCH(2)CH(2)CH(2)O)(CH(2))(3)-}{SbF(6)} (b)}. Their polysiloxane-bound congeners 3a(T(n)())(2)(), 3b(T(n)())(2)() {[M]-SiO(n)()(/2)(OX)(3)(-)(n)} are obtained if a volatile, reversible bound ligand like acetonitrile is employed during the sol-gel process. The bis(chelate)palladium(II) complexes 3a(T(n)())(2)(), 3b(T(n)())(2)() are catalytic active in the solvent-free CO-ethene copolymerization, producing polyketones with chain lengths comparable to those obtained with chelating diphosphine ligands. The polysiloxane-bound palladium(0) complexes 5a(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(4)(), 5b(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(4)() {[M]-SiO(n)()(/)(2)(OX)(3)(-)(n)}(2)[SiO(k)()(/2)(OX)(4)(-)(k)](4), [M] = [(dba)Pd](1/)(2)P(Ph)(CH(2)Do)(CH(2))(3)-} undergo an oxidative addition reaction with iodobenzene in an interphase with formation of the complexes PhPd(I)(P approximately O)(2).4SiO(2) [6a(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(4)(), 6b(T(n)())(2)()(Q(k)())(4)()] {[M]-SiO(n)()(/)(2)(OX)(3)(-)(n)](2)[SiO(k)()(/2)(OX)(4)(-)(k)](4), [M] = [PhPd(I)](1/2)P(Ph)(CH(2)Do)(CH(2))(3)-}, which insert carbon monoxide into the palladium-aryl bond even in the solid state. PMID:11666239