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Sample records for complex neurological diseases

  1. Neurologic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong ... develops, such as spina bifida Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are ... to the spinal cord and brain Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy ...

  2. [Sleep and neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Mayer, G

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the physiology of sleep-wake regulation can contribute to an understanding of the pathophysiology and symptoms of neurological diseases and is helpful for initiating specific therapies for sleep-wake cycle stabilization. Based on historically important observations on the close relationship between sleep and neurological diseases, new insights and developments in selected neurological entities are presented in this review article. PMID:27167889

  3. Creativity and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

    2014-08-01

    Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

  4. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  5. The neurological disease ontology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Description ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms ‘disease’, ‘diagnosis’, ‘disease course’, and ‘disorder’. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. Conclusion ND seeks to provide a formal

  6. PIPs in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Phosphoinositide (PIP) lipids regulate many aspects of cell function in the nervous system including receptor signalling, secretion, endocytosis, migration and survival. Levels of PIPs such as PI4P, PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 are normally tightly regulated by phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases. Deregulation of these biochemical pathways leads to lipid imbalances, usually on intracellular endosomal membranes, and these changes have been linked to a number of major neurological diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy, stroke, cancer and a range of rarer inherited disorders including brain overgrowth syndromes, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies and neurodevelopmental conditions such as Lowe's syndrome. This article analyses recent progress in this area and explains how PIP lipids are involved, to varying degrees, in almost every class of neurological disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids. PMID:25680866

  7. The Complexity Signature: Developing a Tool to Communicate Biopsychosocial Severity of Disease for Children with Chronic Neurological Complexity.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Sandro M; Sonanini, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Focke, Axel; Gerstl, Lucia; Heinen, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Aim For children with medical complexity, interdisciplinary treatment approaches are required to address the various aspects defined within the biopsychosocial model. Methods The present study identifies dimensions of the biopsychosocial model to generate a standardized visualized severity score for chronic neurological diseases in children. We demonstrate the score's applicability and usefulness in clinical practice among clinicians with and without pediatric board certification with the aid of illustrative patient cases. The results are compared by Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Nine dimensions were identified as the basis for the development of the score, which consists of five grades of severity for each of the selected neuropediatric subsections. All board-certified pediatricians would recommend the application of the severity score in clinical routine. Furthermore, a good correlation was revealed between direct and indirect (severity score) assessment. Interpretation The severity score developed in this study takes into account biopsychosocial aspects of chronic diseases while being comprehensible and easily applicable in clinical routine-a biopsychosocial signature serving as an excellent, striking communication basis within the interdisciplinary team. However, upcoming studies including more patient cases are needed for further refinement. PMID:27228000

  8. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases. PMID:27388288

  9. Genomic medicine and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Lupski, James R.

    2011-01-01

    “Genomic medicine” refers to the diagnosis, optimized management, and treatment of disease—as well as screening, counseling, and disease gene identification—in the context of information provided by an individual patient’s personal genome. Genomic medicine, to some extent synonymous with “personalized medicine,” has been made possible by recent advances in genome technologies. Genomic medicine represents a new approach to health care and disease management that attempts to optimize the care of a patient based upon information gleaned from his or her personal genome sequence. In this review, we describe recent progress in genomic medicine as it relates to neurological disease. Many neurological disorders either segregate as Mendelian phenotypes or occur sporadically in association with a new mutation in a single gene. Heritability also contributes to other neurological conditions that appear to exhibit more complex genetics. In addition to discussing current knowledge in this field, we offer suggestions for maximizing the utility of genomic information in clinical practice as the field of genomic medicine unfolds. PMID:21594611

  10. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    PubMed

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. PMID:24041285

  11. Neurologic manifestations of Kanzaki disease.

    PubMed

    Umehara, F; Matsumuro, K; Kurono, Y; Arimura, K; Osame, M; Kanzaki, T

    2004-05-11

    We describe the neurologic findings in a patient with alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency (Kanzaki disease). Clinical and electrophysiologic studies revealed sensory-motor polyneuropathy, and sural nerve pathology showed decreased density of myelinated fibers with axonal degeneration. The patient had mildly impaired intellectual function with abnormal brain MRI and sensory-neuronal hearing impairment with repeated episodes of vertigo attacks. These findings suggest that Kanzaki disease may develop neurologic complications in the CNS and peripheral nervous system. PMID:15136691

  12. Genetics of complex neurological disease: challenges and opportunities for modeling epilepsy in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Wayne N

    2009-08-01

    Currently, approximately 20 genetic variants are known to cause Mendelian forms of human epilepsy, leaving a vast heritability undefined. Rodent models for genetically complex epilepsy have been studied for many years, but only recently have strong candidate genes emerged, including Cacna1 g in the GAERS rat model of absence epilepsy and Kcnj10 in the low seizure threshold of DBA/2 mice. In parallel, a growing number of mouse mutations studied on multiple strain backgrounds reveal the impact of genetic modifiers on seizure severity, incidence or form--perhaps mimicking the complexity seen in humans. The field of experimental genetics in rodents is poised to study discrete epilepsy mutations on a diverse choice of strain backgrounds to develop better models and identify modifiers. But, it must find the right balance between embracing the strain diversity available, with the ability to detect and characterize genetic effects. Using alternative strain backgrounds when studying epilepsy mutations will enhance the modeling of epilepsy as a complex genetic disease. PMID:19665252

  13. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  14. Neurological disorders and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Casella, Giovanni; Bordo, Bianca M; Schalling, Renzo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; DI Bella, Camillo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) determines neurologic manifestations in 10% of all CD patients. We describe the most common clinical manifestations as cerebellar ataxia, gluten encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuropathies, sensorineural hearing loss, epilepsy, headache, depression, cognitive deficiencies and other less described clinical conditions. Our aim is to perform, as more as possible, a review about the most recent update on the topics in international literature. It is important to consider clinical neurological manifestations in celiac patients and to research these conditions also in the follow-up because they may start also one year after the start of gluten free diet (GFD) as peripheral neuropathy. The association with autism is analysed and possible new association with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are considered. PMID:26619901

  15. Neurotrophic factors and neurologic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, D M; Mobley, W C

    1994-01-01

    Discovered only 40 years ago, nerve growth factor is the prototypic neurotrophic factor. By binding to specific receptors on certain neurons in the peripheral nervous system and brain, nerve growth factor acts to enhance their survival, differentiation, and maintenance. In recent years, many additional neurotrophic factors have been discovered; some are structurally related to nerve growth factor while others are distinct from it. The robust actions of neurotrophic factors have suggested their use in preventing or lessening the dysfunction and death of neurons in neurologic disorders. We review the progress in defining neurotrophic factors and their receptors and in characterizing their actions. We also discuss some of the uses of neurotrophic factors in animal models of disease. Finally, we discuss how neurotrophic factors could be implicated in the pathogenesis of neurologic disorders. Images PMID:7975562

  16. Toward precision medicine in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Jiang, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Technological development has paved the way for accelerated genomic discovery and is bringing precision medicine into view. The goal of precision medicine is to deliver optimally targeted and timed interventions tailored to an individual’s molecular drivers of disease. Neurological diseases are promisingly suited models for precision medicine because of the rapidly expanding genetic knowledge base, phenotypic classification, the development of biomarkers and the potential modifying treatments. Moving forward, it is crucial that through these integrated research platforms to provide analysis both for accurate personal genome analysis and gene and drug discovery. Here we describe our vision of how precision medicine can bring greater clarity to the clinical and biological complexity of neurological diseases. PMID:27127757

  17. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions. PMID:27264859

  18. [Neurological diseases and nutrition -- what can we do?].

    PubMed

    Tamási, Péter

    2014-12-21

    Neurological diseases and nutrition are in complex relationship. In the first part of this review the nutritional consequences of acute neurological diseases is presented, with special emphasis on traumatic injuries of the nervous system and stroke. Nutritional therapy of these patients is described in detail. In addition, chronic, degenerative neurological pathological conditions are also discussed, including nutritional consequences and possibilities of therapy. Some ethical and legal issues are also considered. The second part of this review article describes neurological consequences of nutritional problems, both deficits of macro- and micronutrients and toxic effects. PMID:25497154

  19. Mitochondrial Biology and Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arun, Siddharth; Liu, Lei; Donmez, Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are extremely active organelles that perform a variety of roles in the cell including energy production, regulation of calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, and population maintenance through fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of oxidative stress and mutations can contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's (PD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Huntington's diseases (HD). Abnormalities of Complex I function in the electron transport chain have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, inhibiting ATP production and generating reactive oxygen species that can cause major damage to mitochondria. Mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can contribute to neurodegenerative disease, although the pathogenesis of these conditions tends to focus on nuclear mutations. In PD, nuclear genome mutations in the PINK1 and parkin genes have been implicated in neurodegeneration [1], while mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 have been implicated in a variety of clinical symptoms of AD [5]. Mutant htt protein is known to cause HD [2]. Much progress has been made to determine some causes of these neurodegenerative diseases, though permanent treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:26903445

  20. Mitochondrial Biology and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Siddharth; Liu, Lei; Donmez, Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are extremely active organelles that perform a variety of roles in the cell including energy production, regulation of calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, and population maintenance through fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of oxidative stress and mutations can contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s (PD), Alzheimer’s (AD), and Huntington’s diseases (HD). Abnormalities of Complex I function in the electron transport chain have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, inhibiting ATP production and generating reactive oxygen species that can cause major damage to mitochondria Mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can contribute to neurodegenerative disease, although the pathogenesis of these conditions tends to focus on nuclear mutations. In PD, nuclear genome mutations in the PINK1 and parkin genes have been implicated in neurodegeneration [1], while mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 have been implicated in a variety of clinical symptoms of AD [5]. Mutant htt protein is known to cause HD [2]. Much progress has been made to determine some causes of these neurodegenerative diseases, though permanent treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:26903445

  1. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  2. Roles of Circular RNAs in Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel type of endogenous noncoding RNA receiving increasing attention. They have been shown to act as a natural microRNA sponges that repress the activity of corresponding miRNAs by binding with them, thus regulating target genes. Numerous studies have shown that miRNAs are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Therefore, circRNAs may act as important regulatory factors in the occurrence and development processes of neurological disease. PMID:27147959

  3. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Trofimenko, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:26904416

  4. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Trofimenko, Vera; Hotaling, James M

    2016-02-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:26904416

  5. A health systems constraints analysis for neurologic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic care exists within health systems and complex social, political, and economic environments. Identification of obstacles within health systems, defined as “constraints,” is crucial to improving the delivery of neurologic care within its macroclimate. Here we use the World Health Organization's 6 building blocks of a health system to examine core services for priority interventions related to neurologic disease: (1) service delivery; (2) health workforce; (3) information; (4) medical products, vaccines, and technologies; (5) financing; and (6) leadership and governance. We demonstrate the use of a constraints analysis for neurologic disorders using the example of Timor-Leste, a newly sovereign and low-income country, which aims to improve neurologic care in the coming years. PMID:24711532

  6. Metabolic Disturbances in Diseases with Neurological Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Schuck, Patrícia F.; Wenk, Gary L.; Ferreira, Gustavo C.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of specific neuronal populations and progressive nervous system dysfunction characterize neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. These findings are also reported in inherited diseases such as phenylketonuria and glutaric aciduria type I. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases was reported, elicited by genetic alterations, exogenous toxins or buildup of toxic metabolites. In this review we shall discuss some metabolic alterations related to the pathophysiology of diseases with neurological involvement and aging process. These findings may help identifying early disease biomarkers and lead to more effective therapies to improve the quality of life of the patients affected by these devastating illnesses. PMID:25110608

  7. Regenerative cellular therapies for neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael; Boulis, Nicholas; Rao, Mahendra; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-05-01

    The promise of stem cell regeneration has been the hope of many neurologic patients with permanent damage to the central nervous system. There are hundreds of stem cell trials worldwide intending to test the regenerative capacity of stem cells in various neurological conditions from Parkinson׳s disease to multiple sclerosis. Although no stem cell therapy is clinically approved for use in any human disease indication, patients are seeking out trials and asking clinicians for guidance. This review summarizes the current state of regenerative stem cell transplantation divided into seven conditions for which trials are currently active: demyelinating diseases/spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease, macular degeneration and peripheral nerve diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: PSC and the brain. PMID:26239912

  8. [Molecular imaging in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Reimold, M; la Fougère, C

    2016-07-01

    In neurodegeneration and in neuro-oncology, the standard imaging procedure, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), shows limited sensitivity and specificity. Molecular imaging with specific positron-emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers allows various molecular targets and metabolic processes to be assessed and is thus a valuable adjunct to MRI. Two important examples are referred to here: amino acid transport for neuro-oncological issues, and the recently approved PET tracers for detecting amyloid depositions during the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease. This review discusses the clinical relevance and indications for the following nuclear medicine imaging procedures: amyloid PET, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET, and dopamine transporter (DaT)-SPECT for the diagnosis of dementia and the differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, in addition to amino acid PET for the diagnosis of brain tumors and somatostatin receptor imaging in meningioma. PMID:27306201

  9. Neurologic diseases in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bilgrami, Mohammed; O'Keefe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy there has been an improvement in the quality of life for people with HIV infection. Despite the progress made, about 70% of HIV patients develop neurologic complications. These originate either in the central or the peripheral nervous system (Sacktor, 2002). These neurologic disorders are divided into primary and secondary disorders. The primary disorders result from the direct effects of the virus and include HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy (VM), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). Secondary disorders result from marked immunosuppression and include opportunistic infections and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). A differential diagnosis which can be accomplished by detailed history, neurologic examination, and by having a good understanding of the role of HIV in various neurologic disorders will help physicians in approaching these problems. The focus of this chapter is to discuss neuropathogenesis of HIV, the various opportunistic infections, primary CNS lymphoma, neurosyphilis, CNS tuberculosis, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), and vacuolar myelopathy (VM). It also relies on the treatment recommendations and guidelines for the above mentioned neurologic disorders proposed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. PMID:24365422

  10. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  11. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25083051

  12. Astrocytes: The missing link in neurological disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Ching John; Deneen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is comprised of numerous cell types that work in concert to facilitate proper function and homeostasis. Disruption of these carefully orchestrated networks results in neuronal dysfunction, manifesting itself in a variety of neurological disorders. While neuronal dysregulation is causative of symptoms manifest in the clinic, the etiology of these disorders is often more complex than simply a loss of neurons or intrinsic dysregulation of their function. In the adult brain, astrocytes comprise the most abundant cell type and play key roles in CNS physiology, therefore it stands to reason that dysregulation of normal astrocyte function contributes to the etiology and progression of varied neurological disorders. We review here some neurological disorders associated with an astrocyte factor and discuss how the related astrocyte dysfunction contributes to the etiology and/or progression of these disorders. PMID:24365571

  13. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  14. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. PMID:26818266

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS’s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. “Epigenetics”, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS's regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. "Epigenetics", introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics and

  17. Rare Neurological Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Uzma; Imdad, Aamer; Beg, Mirza

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease characterized by permanent gastrointestinal tract sensitivity to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has varied clinical manifestations, ranging from gastrointestinal to extraintestinal, including neurological, skin, reproductive and psychiatric symptoms, which makes its diagnosis difficult and challenging. Known neurological manifestations of CD include epilepsy with or without occipital calcification, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ataxia, headache, neuropathies and behavior disorders. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with headaches and blurred vision for 1 year; she was noted to have papilledema on ophthalmic examination with increased cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure on lumber puncture and was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC). Meanwhile her workup for chronic constipation revealed elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA and antiendomysial IgA antibodies. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CD. The patient was started on a gluten-free diet, leading to resolution of not only gastrointestinal symptoms but also to almost complete resolution of symptoms of PTC. This report describes the correlation of CD and PTC as its neurological manifestation. PMID:26120302

  18. Exosomal Protein Deficiencies: How Abnormal RNA Metabolism Results in Childhood-Onset Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Juliane S.; Giunta, Michele; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Defects of RNA metabolism have been increasingly identified in various forms of inherited neurological diseases. Recently, abnormal RNA degradation due to mutations in human exosome subunit genes has been shown to cause complex childhood onset neurological presentations including spinal muscular atrophy, pontocerebellar hypoplasia and myelination deficiencies. This paper summarizes our current knowledge about the exosome in human neurological disease and provides some important insights into potential disease mechanisms. PMID:27127732

  19. Efficacy of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lünemann, Jan D; Quast, Isaak; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2016-01-01

    Owing to its anti-inflammatory efficacy in various autoimmune disease conditions, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-pooled IgG obtained from the plasma of several thousands individuals-has been used for nearly three decades and is proving to be efficient in a growing number of neurological diseases. IVIG therapy has been firmly established for the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and multifocal motor neuropathy, either as first-line therapy or adjunctive treatment. IVIG is also recommended as rescue therapy in patients with worsening myasthenia gravis and is beneficial as a second-line therapy for dermatomyositis and stiff-person syndrome. Subcutaneous rather than intravenous administration of IgG is gaining momentum because of its effectiveness in patients with primary immunodeficiency and the ease with which it can be administered independently from hospital-based infusions. The demand for IVIG therapy is growing, resulting in rising costs and supply shortages. Strategies to replace IVIG with recombinant products have been developed based on proposed mechanisms that confer the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG, but their efficacy has not been tested in clinical trials. This review covers new developments in the immunobiology and clinical applications of IVIG in neurological diseases. PMID:26400261

  20. Synaptic pathology: A shared mechanism in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Henstridge, Christopher M; Pickett, Eleanor; Spires-Jones, Tara L

    2016-07-01

    Synaptic proteomes have evolved a rich and complex diversity to allow the exquisite control of neuronal communication and information transfer. It is therefore not surprising that many neurological disorders are associated with alterations in synaptic function. As technology has advanced, our ability to study the anatomical and physiological function of synapses in greater detail has revealed a critical role for both central and peripheral synapses in neurodegenerative disease. Synapse loss has a devastating effect on cellular communication, leading to wide ranging effects such as network disruption within central neural systems and muscle wastage in the periphery. These devastating effects link synaptic pathology to a diverse range of neurological disorders, spanning Alzheimer's disease to multiple sclerosis. This review will highlight some of the current literature on synaptic integrity in animal models of disease and human post-mortem studies. Synaptic changes in normal brain ageing will also be discussed and finally the current and prospective treatments for neurodegenerative disorders will be summarised. PMID:27108053

  1. Type I interferon dysregulation and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    McGlasson, Sarah; Jury, Alexa; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, David

    2015-09-01

    Type I interferon is an essential component of the brain's innate immune defence, conferring protection against viral infection. Recently, dysregulation of the type I interferon pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a spectrum of neuroinfectious and neuroinflammatory disorders. Underactivity of the type I interferon response is associated with a predisposition to herpes simplex encephalitis. Conversely, a group of 'interferonopathic' disorders, characterized by severe neuroinflammation and overactivity of type I interferon, has been described. Elucidation of the genetic basis of these Mendelian neuroinflammatory diseases has uncovered important links between nucleic acid sensors, innate immune activation and neuroinflammatory disease. These mechanisms have an important role in the pathogenesis of more common polygenic diseases that can affect the brain, such as lupus and cerebral small vessel disease. In this article, we review the spectrum of neurological disease associated with type I interferon dysregulation, as well as advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of these conditions. We highlight the potential utility of type I interferon as both a biomarker and a therapeutic target in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:26303851

  2. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological

  3. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classic copper metabolism disorder, Wilson disease (WD), was first defined in 1912. Both early onset presentations in infancy and late onset manifestations in adults > 70 years are now well recognized. Modern biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that WD may be considerably more common than previously appreciated. Early diagnosis of WD is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations is increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of WD. WD needs to be differentiated from other conditions that present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with WD, such as reduced serum cerulo plasmin levels. Disordered copper metabolism is also implied in an increasing number of other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations, and the common late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25496901

  4. Dynamic diseases in neurology and psychiatry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, John; Black, Deborah

    1995-03-01

    Thirty-two (32) periodic diseases of the nervous system are identified in which symptoms and/or signs recur. In 10/32, the recurrence of a symptom complex is one of the defining features of the illness, whereas in 22/32 oscillatory signs occur in the setting of an ongoing nervous system disorder. We discuss the possibility that these disorders may be dynamic diseases.

  5. [Neurological presentations of lysosomal diseases in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Sedel, F; Turpin, J-C; Baumann, N

    2007-10-01

    Lysosomal diseases represent a large group of genetic storage disorders characterized by a defect in the catabolism of complex molecules within the lysosome. Effective treatments are now possible for some of them given progresses in bone-marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy. Neurologists and psychiatrists are concerned by these diseases because they can present in adolescence or adulthood with progressive neuropsychiatric signs. Here we focus on late-onset clinical forms which can be met in an adult neurology or psychiatric department. Lysosomal diseases were classified into 3 groups: (1) leukodystrophies (metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's disease and Salla's disease); (2) Neurodegenerative or psychiatric-like diseases (GM1 and GM2 gangliosidoses, Niemann Pick type C disease, sialidosis type I, ceroid-lipofuscinosis, mucopolysaccharidosis type III); (3) multisystemic diseases (Gaucher's disease, Fabry's disease, alpha and B mannosidosis, Niemann Pick disease type B, fucosidosis, Schindler/Kanzaki disease, and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and II. We propose a diagnostic approach guided by clinical examination, brain MRI, electrodiagnostic studies and abdominal echography. PMID:18033028

  6. Emerging links between homeostatic synaptic plasticity and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Wondolowski, Joyce; Dickman, Dion

    2013-01-01

    Homeostatic signaling systems are ubiquitous forms of biological regulation, having been studied for hundreds of years in the context of diverse physiological processes including body temperature and osmotic balance. However, only recently has this concept been brought to the study of excitatory and inhibitory electrical activity that the nervous system uses to establish and maintain stable communication. Synapses are a primary target of neuronal regulation with a variety of studies over the past 15 years demonstrating that these cellular junctions are under bidirectional homeostatic control. Recent work from an array of diverse systems and approaches has revealed exciting new links between homeostatic synaptic plasticity and a variety of seemingly disparate neurological and psychiatric diseases. These include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, schizophrenia, and Fragile X Syndrome. Although the molecular mechanisms through which defective homeostatic signaling may lead to disease pathogenesis remain unclear, rapid progress is likely to be made in the coming years using a powerful combination of genetic, imaging, electrophysiological, and next generation sequencing approaches. Importantly, understanding homeostatic synaptic plasticity at a cellular and molecular level may lead to developments in new therapeutic innovations to treat these diseases. In this review we will examine recent studies that demonstrate homeostatic control of postsynaptic protein translation, retrograde signaling, and presynaptic function that may contribute to the etiology of complex neurological and psychiatric diseases. PMID:24312013

  7. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  8. Association of sickle cell disease, priapism, exchange transfusion and neurological events: ASPEN syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J F; Rich, M A; Brock, W A

    1993-11-01

    Priapism and acute neurological events are believed to be unrelated complications of sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. We describe a syndrome based on our experience and a review of the literature of significant neurological events after partial exchange transfusion to treat priapism in sicklemic patients. Severe headache is often the initiating symptom of this complex. The ensuing neurological events range from seizure activity to obtundation requiring ventilatory support. The proposed pathophysiology of these neurological events is related to cerebral ischemia after an acute increase in per cent total hemoglobin, concomitant decrease in per cent hemoglobin S and subsequent release of vasoactive substances during penile detumescence. We have termed this constellation of events the ASPEN syndrome, an eponym for association of sickle cell disease, priapism, exchange transfusion and neurological events. Early recognition and aggressive medical management resulted in complete reversal of neurological sequela. PMID:8411432

  9. [Overcoming neurological diseases-breakthrough for new era].

    PubMed

    Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases have long been thought to be difficult or intractable to be cured. Recent progress in researches on etiologies and pathogeneses of many neurological diseases, however, has made it become possible to treat some diseases such as bulbo-spinal muscular atrophy and Alzheimer's disease not only symptomatically but also in the sense of disease modification. We may be at the entrance of a new era where many neurological diseases would become treatable and overcome. My individual experiences studying 3 diseases, namely, distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinocerebellar ataxia were presented and through them the following massages were conveyed to young neurologists of the Japanese Society of Neurology (JSN); To tackle the case even there is no similar case in the literature because you are the only one who could help the patient and some clues must be found, To cooperate with other colleagues and patients because you are not alone, To be reasonable, logical or scientific, To always be innovative or seek better situations, and To be global or international sharing real time information with other peoples in the world. JSN will make great leaps to the goals under the mission to contribute happiness of peoples in Japan and other countries through neurology including neurological practice, education and research. PMID:24291826

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease: An increased risk factor for neurologic complications

    PubMed Central

    Morís, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Only a very few systematic studies have investigated the frequency of neurologic disorders in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results have been inconsistent and variable, owing to differences in case-finding methods and evaluated outcomes in different studies. The most frequent neurologic manifestations reported in CD and UC populations are cerebrovascular disease (with either arterial or venous events), demyelinating central nervous system disease, and peripheral neuropathy (whether axonal or demyelinating); however, the literature describes numerous nervous system disorders as being associated with IBD. The pathogenesis of nervous system tissue involvement in IBD has yet to be elucidated, although it seems to be related to immune mechanisms or prothrombotic states. The recently-introduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have proven successful in controlling moderate to severe IBD activity. However, severe neurologic disorders associated with TNF inhibitors have been reported, which therefore raises concerns regarding the effect of anti-TNF-α antibodies on the nervous system. Although neurological involvement associated with IBD is rarely reported, gastroenterologists should be aware of the neurologic manifestations of IBD in order to provide early treatment, which is crucial for preventing major neurologic morbidity. PMID:24574797

  11. Astaxanthin as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent for Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haijian; Niu, Huanjiang; Shao, Anwen; Wu, Cheng; Dixon, Brandon J; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Shuxu; Wang, Yirong

    2015-09-01

    Neurological diseases, which consist of acute injuries and chronic neurodegeneration, are the leading causes of human death and disability. However, the pathophysiology of these diseases have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments are still lacking. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is a red-orange carotenoid with unique cell membrane actions and diverse biological activities. More importantly, there is evidence demonstrating that astaxanthin confers neuroprotective effects in experimental models of acute injuries, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, and neurological diseases. The beneficial effects of astaxanthin are linked to its oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic characteristics. In this review, we will focus on the neuroprotective properties of astaxanthin and explore the underlying mechanisms in the setting of neurological diseases. PMID:26378548

  12. Astaxanthin as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent for Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haijian; Niu, Huanjiang; Shao, Anwen; Wu, Cheng; Dixon, Brandon J.; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Shuxu; Wang, Yirong

    2015-01-01

    Neurological diseases, which consist of acute injuries and chronic neurodegeneration, are the leading causes of human death and disability. However, the pathophysiology of these diseases have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments are still lacking. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is a red-orange carotenoid with unique cell membrane actions and diverse biological activities. More importantly, there is evidence demonstrating that astaxanthin confers neuroprotective effects in experimental models of acute injuries, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, and neurological diseases. The beneficial effects of astaxanthin are linked to its oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic characteristics. In this review, we will focus on the neuroprotective properties of astaxanthin and explore the underlying mechanisms in the setting of neurological diseases. PMID:26378548

  13. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: Applications and Challenges in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hibaoui, Youssef; Feki, Anis

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) holds great promise for the understanding and the treatment of human neurological diseases in modern medicine. The hPSCs are considered for their in vitro use as research tools to provide relevant cellular model for human diseases, drug discovery, and toxicity assays and for their in vivo use in regenerative medicine applications. In this review, we highlight recent progress, promises, and challenges of hPSC applications in human neurological disease modeling and therapies. PMID:22934023

  14. A health systems constraints analysis for neurologic diseases: the example of Timor-Leste.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah J; Martins, Nelson

    2014-04-01

    Neurologic care exists within health systems and complex social, political, and economic environments. Identification of obstacles within health systems, defined as "constraints," is crucial to improving the delivery of neurologic care within its macroclimate. Here we use the World Health Organization's 6 building blocks of a health system to examine core services for priority interventions related to neurologic disease: (1) service delivery; (2) health workforce; (3) information; (4) medical products, vaccines, and technologies; (5) financing; and (6) leadership and governance. We demonstrate the use of a constraints analysis for neurologic disorders using the example of Timor-Leste, a newly sovereign and low-income country, which aims to improve neurologic care in the coming years. PMID:24711532

  15. Neurologic and Head and Neck Manifestations of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Steven, Andrew; Raghavan, Prashant; Rath, Tanya J; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-08-01

    Sickle cell disease is a common, inherited disordered characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia with repetitive episodes of vasoocclusion resulting from deformed red blood cells. This article reviews the most significant neurologic and head and neck manifestations of this disease. PMID:27443997

  16. Parkinson's disease between internal medicine and neurology.

    PubMed

    Csoti, Ilona; Jost, Wolfgang H; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    General medical problems and complications have a major impact on the quality of life in all stages of Parkinson's disease. To introduce an effective treatment, a comprehensive analysis of the various clinical symptoms must be undertaken. One must distinguish between (1) diseases which arise independently of Parkinson's disease, and (2) diseases which are a direct or indirect consequence of Parkinson's disease. Medical comorbidity may induce additional limitations to physical strength and coping strategies, and may thus restrict the efficacy of the physical therapy which is essential for treating hypokinetic-rigid symptoms. In selecting the appropriate medication for the treatment of any additional medical symptoms, which may arise, its limitations, contraindications and interactions with dopaminergic substances have to be taken into consideration. General medical symptoms and organ manifestations may also arise as a direct consequence of the autonomic dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease. As the disease progresses, additional non-parkinsonian symptoms can be of concern. Furthermore, the side effects of Parkinson medications may necessitate the involvement of other medical specialists. In this review, we will discuss the various general medical aspects of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26298728

  17. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gano, Lindsey B; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate "classic KD", as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  18. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gano, Lindsey B.; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M.

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate “classic KD”, as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  19. The role of cannabinoids and leptin in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Agar, E

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoids exert a neuroprotective influence on some neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists or compounds can provide symptom relief or control the progression of neurological diseases. However, the molecular mechanism and the effectiveness of these agents in controlling the progression of most of these diseases remain unclear. Cannabinoids may exert effects via a number of mechanisms and interactions with neurotransmitters, neurotropic factors and neuropeptides. Leptin is a peptide hormone involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance via its actions on specific hypothalamic nuclei. Leptin receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, especially in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, cortex and cerebellum. Leptin has also shown neuroprotective properties in a number of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Therefore, cannabinoid and leptin hold therapeutic potential for neurological diseases. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects on these agents may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:25880465

  20. The Unstable Repeats - Three Evolving Faces of Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David L.; Orr, Harry T.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Disorders characterized by expansion of an unstable nucleotide repeat account for a number of inherited neurological diseases. Here, we review examples of unstable repeat disorders that nicely illustrate the three of the major pathogenic mechanisms associated with these diseases: loss-of-function typically by disrupting transcription of the mutated gene, RNA toxic gain-of-function, and protein toxic gain-of-function. In addition to providing insight into the mechanisms underlying these devastating neurological disorders, the study of these unstable microsatellite repeat disorders has provided insight into very basic aspects of neuroscience. PMID:23473314

  1. Node of Ranvier disruption as a cause of neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Susuki, Keiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction and/or disruption of nodes of Ranvier are now recognized as key contributors to the pathophysiology of various neurological diseases. One reason is that the excitable nodal axolemma contains a high density of Nav (voltage-gated Na+ channels) that are required for the rapid and efficient saltatory conduction of action potentials. Nodal physiology is disturbed by altered function, localization, and expression of voltage-gated ion channels clustered at nodes and juxtaparanodes, and by disrupted axon–glial interactions at paranodes. This paper reviews recent discoveries in molecular/cellular neuroscience, genetics, immunology, and neurology that highlight the critical roles of nodes of Ranvier in health and disease. PMID:23834220

  2. Node of Ranvier disruption as a cause of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Susuki, Keiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction and/or disruption of nodes of Ranvier are now recognized as key contributors to the pathophysiology of various neurological diseases. One reason is that the excitable nodal axolemma contains a high density of Nav (voltage-gated Na+ channels) that are required for the rapid and efficient saltatory conduction of action potentials. Nodal physiology is disturbed by altered function, localization, and expression of voltage-gated ion channels clustered at nodes and juxtaparanodes, and by disrupted axon-glial interactions at paranodes. This paper reviews recent discoveries in molecular/cellular neuroscience, genetics, immunology, and neurology that highlight the critical roles of nodes of Ranvier in health and disease. PMID:23834220

  3. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term "junk DNA" has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  4. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  5. Neuroimmunology I: Immunoregulation in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Weiner, H L; Hauser, S L

    1982-05-01

    Aberrations in immune function that ultimately result in disease states may involve three aspects of immune regulation: (1) regulatory T cells, which both suppress and induce immune responses; (2) idiotype-antiidiotype networks, which serve as internal regulatory networks during generation of an immune response; and (3) immune response genes, which determine genetic differences in an individual's immune response. Three major diseases of the nervous system, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and acute inflammatory polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome), are classified as "autoimmune" in nature and may be due to underlying disorders of immunoregulation. In multiple sclerosis there is a loss of suppressor T cells in the peripheral blood during attacks, in myasthenia gravis there are thymic abnormalities and antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor, and in acute inflammatory polyneuropathy, macrophage-mediated destruction of peripheral nerve myelin occurs in the context of sensitized T cells and is usually associated with a preceding viral illness. In each of these diseases the following central questions must be answered: (1) against what antigen (or antigens) of the nervous system is the autoimmune response directed? (2) what is the mechanism of immune damage? and (3) what initiates, or triggers, the autoimmune response? PMID:6179458

  6. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms in neurologic disease: a review.

    PubMed

    George, M S; Melvin, J A; Kellner, C H

    1992-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an increasingly recognized disorder with a prevalence of 2-3% (Robins et al., 1984). Once thought to be psychodynamic in origin, OCD is now generally recognized as having a neurobiological cause. Although the exact pathophysiology of OCD in its pure form remains unknown, there are numerous reports of obsessive-compulsive symptoms arising in the setting of known neurological disease. In this paper, we review the reported cases of obsessive-compulsive symptoms associated with neurologic diseases and outline the known facts about the underlying neurobiology of OCD. Finally, we synthesize these findings into a proposed theory of the pathophysiology of OCD, in both its pure form and when it accompanies other neurological illness. PMID:24487654

  7. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Bocci, Tommaso; Cortese, Francesca; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with neurological diseases, including dementia, epilepsy, post-stroke dysfunctions, movement disorders, and other pathological conditions. Because of this technique's ability to modify cerebellar excitability without significant side effects, cerebellar tDCS is a new, interesting, and powerful tool to induce plastic modifications in the cerebellum. In this report, we review a number of interesting studies on the application of cerebellar tDCS for various neurological conditions (ataxia, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, essential tremor) and the possible mechanism by which the stimulation acts on the cerebellum. Study findings indicate that cerebellar tDCS is a promising therapeutic tool in treating several neurological disorders; however, this method's efficacy appears to be limited, given the current data. PMID:27595007

  8. Nucleotide excision repair deficient mouse models and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Niedernhofer, Laura J

    2008-07-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved mechanism to remove helix-distorting DNA base damage. A major substrate for NER is DNA damage caused by environmental genotoxins, most notably ultraviolet radiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy are three human diseases caused by inherited defects in NER. The symptoms and severity of these diseases vary dramatically, ranging from profound developmental delay to cancer predisposition and accelerated aging. All three syndromes include neurological disease, indicating an important role for NER in protecting against spontaneous DNA damage as well. To study the pathophysiology caused by DNA damage, numerous mouse models of NER-deficiency were generated by knocking-out genes required for NER or knocking-in disease-causing human mutations. This review explores the utility of these mouse models to study neurological disease caused by NER-deficiency. PMID:18272436

  9. Unusual neurological presentation of Fusobacterium necrophorum disease.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nasrean; Morris, Trefor; Dhillon, Rishi; Gibbon, Frances

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl presented to hospital, with reduced consciousness and fever. She had a 4-week history of fever treated with two courses of amoxicillin for tonsillitis diagnosed in primary care. Neuroimaging revealed multiple cerebral abscesses and subdural empyema. Pus aspirated from the intracranial collections grew Fusobacterium necrophorum and meropenem was started. Following neurosurgery, the patient continued to be agitated with fluctuating fever. She underwent close monitoring with regular neuroimaging. To control the progression of intracranial infection, she underwent three separate neurosurgical procedures following which she made a good recovery. This case demonstrates how an organism rarely associated with childhood illnesses presented atypically and progressed into a complex potentially fatal intracranial infection requiring a high degree of neurosurgical intervention. Awareness of this organism is important. The combination of source control together with appropriate antibiotic use was crucial in controlling the infection. PMID:26759436

  10. Functions of noncoding RNAs in neural development and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Shan; Sun, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The development of the central nervous system (CNS) relies on precisely orchestrated gene expression regulation. Dysregualtion of both genetic and environmental factors can affect proper CNS development and results in neurological diseases. Recent studies have shown that similar to protein coding genes, noncoding RNA molecules have a significant impact on normal CNS development and on causes and progression of human neurological disorders. In this review, we have highlighted discoveries of functions of noncoding RNAs, in particular microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in neural development and neurological diseases. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs play an essential role in many aspects of neural development, such as proliferation of neural stem cells and progenitors, neuronal differentiation, maturation and synaptogenesis. Misregulation of microRNAs is associated with some mental disorders and neurodegeneration diseases. In addition, long noncoding RNAs are found to play a role in neural development by regulating expression of protein coding genes. Therefore, examining noncoding RNA-mediated gene regulations has revealed novel mechanisms of neural development and provided new insights into the etiology of human neurological diseases. PMID:21969146

  11. [Symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kutlubaev, M A

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common form of neurosis. Symptoms of OCD could develop as a sign of focal brain lesion, particularly in multiple sclerosis, extrapyramidal disorders, epilepsy, less frequently - in other diseases. Timely diagnosis and treatment of the symptoms of OCD is an important aspect in the management of mentioned neurological disorders. PMID:27240053

  12. Olfaction in Neurologic and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Maria Dantas Costa Lima; Voegels, Richard Louis; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Imamura, Rui; Farfel, José Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Loss of smell is involved in various neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. However, the olfactory test is usually neglected by physicians at large. Objective The aim of this study was to review the current literature about the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases. Data Synthesis Twenty-seven studies were selected for analysis, and the olfactory system, olfaction, and the association between the olfactory dysfunction and dementias were reviewed. Furthermore, is described an up to date in olfaction. Conclusion Otolaryngologist should remember the importance of olfaction evaluation in daily practice. Furthermore, neurologists and physicians in general should include olfactory tests in the screening of those at higher risk of dementia. PMID:25992176

  13. Complex Neurological and Oto-Neurological Remote Care: From Space Station to Clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchbanks, Robert J.; Good, Edward F.

    2013-02-01

    The main aim of this paper is to highlight the synergy between the remote care requirements for NASA and community/rural based medicine. It demonstrates the appropriateness of applying similar health-care models for space-based medicine, as for ‘2020 vision’ community-based medicine, and the common use of screening devices with telemedicine capabilities. There is a requirement to diagnose and manage complex cases remotely and the need to empower on-site medically trained personnel to undertake the physiological measurements and decision-making. For space exploration at greater distances, the telemedicine systems will require additional sophistication to support autonomous crew medical diagnosis and interventions.1 Non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement is a priority both for terrestrial and space medicine. Arguably it is the most important neurological physiological measurement yet to be mastered and to be routinely used.

  14. Ultrasound treatment of neurological diseases - current and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Leinenga, Gerhard; Langton, Christian; Nisbet, Rebecca; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Like cardiovascular disease and cancer, neurological disorders present an increasing challenge for an ageing population. Whereas nonpharmacological procedures are routine for eliminating cancer tissue or opening a blocked artery, the focus in neurological disease remains on pharmacological interventions. Setbacks in clinical trials and the obstacle of access to the brain for drug delivery and surgery have highlighted the potential for therapeutic use of ultrasound in neurological diseases, and the technology has proved useful for inducing focused lesions, clearing protein aggregates, facilitating drug uptake, and modulating neuronal function. In this Review, we discuss milestones in the development of therapeutic ultrasound, from the first steps in the 1950s to recent improvements in technology. We provide an overview of the principles of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound, for surgery and transient opening of the blood-brain barrier, and its application in clinical trials of stroke, Parkinson disease and chronic pain. We discuss the promising outcomes of safety and feasibility studies in preclinical models, including rodents, pigs and macaques, and efficacy studies in models of Alzheimer disease. We also consider the challenges faced on the road to clinical translation. PMID:26891768

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological diseases: genes, syndromes, and therapies.

    PubMed

    Urdinguio, Rocio G; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and modifications to histone proteins regulate high-order DNA structure and gene expression. Aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the development of many diseases, including cancer. The neurological disorder most intensely studied with regard to epigenetic changes is Rett syndrome; patients with Rett syndrome have neurodevelopmental defects associated with mutations in MeCP2, which encodes the methyl CpG binding protein 2, that binds to methylated DNA. Other mental retardation disorders are also linked to the disruption of genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms; such disorders include alpha thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, and Coffin-Lowry syndrome. Moreover, aberrant DNA methylation and histone modification profiles of discrete DNA sequences, and those at a genome-wide level, have just begun to be described for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, and in other neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this Review, we describe epigenetic changes present in neurological diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors. PMID:19833297

  16. Hodgkin’s lymphoma presenting as a complex paraneoplastic neurological syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Paraneoplastic neuropathies are rare. They are often difficult to diagnose, especially when they precede the diagnosis of cancer. Hodgkin's lymphoma is associated with multiple paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, of which demyelinating polyneuropathies are very unusual. Association with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is even more uncommon. Case presentation We report the rare case of a 74-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a complex neurological syndrome and was eventually diagnosed with the nodular sclerosing variant of Hodgkin's lymphoma. With timely diagnosis and early institution of treatment of the underlying malignancy, our patient began to show gradual improvement of his symptoms. Conclusion Hodgkin's lymphoma is associated with several paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Sometimes it can be the only presenting feature of an underlying Hodgkin's lymphoma, posing a diagnostic challenge. Prompt oncologic treatment and immunotherapy can be beneficial if instituted early in the course of the disease. PMID:23566362

  17. K-Cl cotransporters, cell volume homeostasis, and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Kristopher T.; Khanna, Arjun R.; Alper, Seth L.; Adragna, Norma C.; Lauf, Peter K.; Sun, Dandan; Delpire, Eric

    2016-01-01

    K+-Cl− cotransporters (KCCs) were originally characterized as regulators of red blood cell (RBC) volume. Since then, four distinct KCCs have been cloned, and their importance for volume regulation has been demonstrated in other cell types. Genetic models of certain KCCs, such as KCC3, and their inhibitory WNK-STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) serine-threonine kinases, have demonstrated the evolutionary necessity of these molecules for nervous system cell volume regulation, structure, and function, and their involvement in neurological disease. The recent characterization of a swelling-activated dephosphorylation mechanism that potently stimulates the KCCs has pinpointed a potentially druggable switch of KCC activity. An improved understanding of WNK/SPAK-mediated KCC cell volume regulation in the nervous system might reveal novel avenues for the treatment of multiple neurological diseases. PMID:26142773

  18. K-Cl cotransporters, cell volume homeostasis, and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Khanna, Arjun R; Alper, Seth L; Adragna, Norma C; Lauf, Peter K; Sun, Dandan; Delpire, Eric

    2015-08-01

    K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters (KCCs) were originally characterized as regulators of red blood cell (RBC) volume. Since then, four distinct KCCs have been cloned, and their importance for volume regulation has been demonstrated in other cell types. Genetic models of certain KCCs, such as KCC3, and their inhibitory WNK-STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) serine-threonine kinases, have demonstrated the evolutionary necessity of these molecules for nervous system cell volume regulation, structure, and function, and their involvement in neurological disease. The recent characterization of a swelling-activated dephosphorylation mechanism that potently stimulates the KCCs has pinpointed a potentially druggable switch of KCC activity. An improved understanding of WNK/SPAK-mediated KCC cell volume regulation in the nervous system might reveal novel avenues for the treatment of multiple neurological diseases. PMID:26142773

  19. Divergent Astrovirus Associated with Neurologic Disease in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linlin; Diab, Santiago; McGraw, Sabrina; Barr, Bradd; Traslavina, Ryan; Higgins, Robert; Talbot, Tom; Blanchard, Pat; Rimoldi, Guillermo; Fahsbender, Elizabeth; Page, Brady; Phan, Tung Gia; Wang, Chunlin; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Using viral metagenomics of brain tissue from a young adult crossbreed steer with acute onset of neurologic disease, we sequenced the complete genome of a novel astrovirus (BoAstV-NeuroS1) that was phylogenetically related to an ovine astrovirus. In a retrospective analysis of 32 cases of bovine encephalitides of unknown etiology, 3 other infected animals were detected by using PCR and in situ hybridization for viral RNA. Viral RNA was restricted to the nervous system and detected in the cytoplasm of affected neurons within the spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebellum. Microscopically, the lesions were of widespread neuronal necrosis, microgliosis, and perivascular cuffing preferentially distributed in gray matter and most severe in the cerebellum and brainstem, with increasing intensity caudally down the spinal cord. These results suggest that infection with BoAstV-NeuroS1 is a potential cause of neurologic disease in cattle. PMID:23965613

  20. Nutritional Alterations Associated with Neurological and Neurosurgical Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis; Papachristos, Aris; Petropoulou, Konstantina; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and neurosurgical diseases lead to complications producing malnutrition increasing pathology and mortality. In order to avoid complications because of malnutrition or overcome deficiencies in nutrients supplements are often used for these subjects. The physiopathological mechanisms of malnutrition, methods of nutritional assessment and the supplemental support are reviewed in this paper based on the assumption that patients need to receive adequate nutrition to promote optimal recovery, placing nutrition as a first line treatment and not an afterthought in the rehabilitation. PMID:27563361

  1. Neurological manifestations of ear disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Garosi, Laurent S; Lowrie, Mark L; Swinbourne, Natalie F

    2012-11-01

    There are four major neuroanatomical structures associated with the ear that, when damaged, result in different neurologic clinical signs. These structures are the facial nerve, the ocular sympathetic tract, the vestibular receptors, and the cochlea. The clinical signs associated with disorders of each structure are discussed, followed by a summary of the diseases that should be considered in each case. The article begins with a description of the neuroanatomy of each of these structures. PMID:23122174

  2. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  3. Nutritional Alterations Associated with Neurological and Neurosurgical Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis; Papachristos, Aris; Petropoulou, Konstantina; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and neurosurgical diseases lead to complications producing malnutrition increasing pathology and mortality. In order to avoid complications because of malnutrition or overcome deficiencies in nutrients supplements are often used for these subjects. The physiopathological mechanisms of malnutrition, methods of nutritional assessment and the supplemental support are reviewed in this paper based on the assumption that patients need to receive adequate nutrition to promote optimal recovery, placing nutrition as a first line treatment and not an afterthought in the rehabilitation. PMID:27563361

  4. Cell therapy: the final frontier for treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Susmita; Singh, Gurbind; Sreejith, Sailaja; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Husin, Juani Mazmin; Datta, Indrani; Pal, Rajarshi; Das, Anjan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating because they cause increasing loss of cognitive and physical functions and affect an estimated 1 billion individuals worldwide. Unfortunately, no drugs are currently available to halt their progression, except a few that are largely inadequate. This mandates the search of new treatments for these progressively degenerative diseases. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been successfully isolated, propagated, and characterized from the adult brains of mammals, including humans. The confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain via NSCs opens up fresh avenues for treating neurological problems. The proof-of-concept studies demonstrating the neural differentiation capacity of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo have raised widespread enthusiasm toward cell-based interventions. It is anticipated that cell-based neurogenic drugs may reverse or compensate for deficits associated with neurological diseases. The increasing interest of the private sector in using human stem cells in therapeutics is evidenced by launching of several collaborative clinical research activities between Pharma giants and research institutions or small start-up companies. In this review, we discuss the major developments that have taken place in this field to position stem cells as a prospective candidate drug for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:23253099

  5. [Neurologic manifestations of Behçet's disease].

    PubMed

    Wechsler, B; Gerber, S; Vidailhet, M; Dormont, D

    1999-11-01

    Neurological involvement in Behçet's disease, the cause of the disease's severe functional sequellae, is reported in 5.3 to 30% of cases. Coagulation disorders have been reported but they cannot explain the different thrombotic manifestations which are probably the consequence of an abnormal response of the vascular endothelial cells. Neurological manifestations include: a) dural sinus thrombosis which can be diagnosed by angio-MRI and whose prognosis is improved with the use of anticoagulants; b) exceptional lesions to arteries supplying the brain; c) aseptic meningitis and meningo-encephalitis; and d) exceptionally, solitary spinal cord involvement and peripheral disease. Neurological involvement can occur early or late after development of skin and mucosal signs and when inaugural make mislead diagnosis. The spinal tap usually gives objective evidence of lymphocyte meningitis. MRI is nonspecific, but the T2 and Flair sequences can evidence hypersignal areas, preferentially in the brain stem, basal nuclei, and subtentorial white matter with no preference for the periventricular regions. Spontaneous aggravation is the rule and the neurological prognosis is severe (dementia, pseudo-bulbar syndrome, loss of independence). Treatment is similar to that used for vasculitis and is aimed initially at reducing the inflammation with corticosteroids and at preventing relapse with the adjunction of an immunosuppressor. Results are better when treatment begins early; restitutio ad integrum has been observed. Duration of treatment is poorly defined: immunosuppressors have been proposed for a minimal duration of 2 years; corticosteroid therapy can be tapered off but interruption would expose to relapse. A maintenance therapy is advisable and, in our opinion, should be proposed indefinitely combining colchicine (1 to 2 mg/d), anti-aggregate doses of aspirin, and low-dose corticosteroids (1/10 mg/kg/d). PMID:10637671

  6. Could a neurological disease be a part of Mozart's pathography?

    PubMed

    Ivkić, Goran; Erdeljić, Viktorija

    2011-01-01

    As expected, since we recently celebrated the 250th anniversary of birth of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, there has been again a renewal of interest in his short but intensive life, as well as in the true reason of his untimely dead. Mozart lived and died in time when the medical knowledge was based mostly on subjective observations, without the established basics of standardized medical terminology and methodology. This leaves a great space for hypothesizing about his health problems, as well as about the cause of his death. The medical academic community attributed to Mozart approximately 150 different medical diagnoses. There is much speculation on the possible causes of Mozart's death: uremia, infection, rheumatic fever, trichinellosis, etc. Recently some authors have raised the question about a possible concomitant neurological disease. According to available records, Mozart has shown some elements of cyclotimic disorder, epilepsy and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Furthermore, the finding of a temporal fracture on (allegedly) Mozart's skull, gives a way to speculations about the possibility of a chronic subdural hematoma and its compressive effect on the temporal lobe. Despite numerous theories on Mozart's pathography that also include a concomitant neurological disorder, the medical and history records about Mozart's health status indicate that he probably had suffered from an infective illness, followed most likely by the reactivation of rheumatic fever, which was followed by strong immunologic reaction in the last days of his life. Taking all the above into consideration, it is reasonably to conclude that Mozart's neurological disturbances were caused by the intensity of the infective disease, and not primarily by a neurological disease. PMID:21648330

  7. An autoinflammatory neurological disease due to interleukin 6 hypersecretion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are rare illnesses characterized by apparently unprovoked inflammation without high-titer auto-antibodies or antigen-specific T cells. They may cause neurological manifestations, such as meningitis and hearing loss, but they are also characterized by non-neurological manifestations. In this work we studied a 30-year-old man who had a chronic disease characterized by meningitis, progressive hearing loss, persistently raised inflammatory markers and diffuse leukoencephalopathy on brain MRI. He also suffered from chronic recurrent osteomyelitis of the mandible. The hypothesis of an autoinflammatory disease prompted us to test for the presence of mutations in interleukin-1−pathway genes and to investigate the function of this pathway in the mononuclear cells obtained from the patient. Search for mutations in genes associated with interleukin-1−pathway demonstrated a novel NLRP3 (CIAS1) mutation (p.I288M) and a previously described MEFV mutation (p.R761H), but their combination was found to be non-pathogenic. On the other hand, we uncovered a selective interleukin-6 hypersecretion within the central nervous system as the likely pathogenic mechanism. This is also supported by the response to the anti-interleukin-6−receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab, but not to the recombinant interleukin-1−receptor antagonist anakinra. Exome sequencing failed to identify mutations in other genes known to be involved in autoinflammatory diseases. We propose that the disease described in this patient might be a prototype of a novel category of autoinflammatory diseases characterized by prominent neurological involvement. PMID:23432807

  8. Therapeutic Effects of Bee Venom on Immunological and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Deok-Sang; Kim, Sun Kwang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-01-01

    Bee Venom (BV) has long been used in Korea to relieve pain symptoms and to treat inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. The underlying mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions of BV have been proved to some extent. Additionally, recent clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that BV and BV-derived active components are applicable to a wide range of immunological and neurodegenerative diseases, including autoimmune diseases and Parkinson’s disease. These effects of BV are known to be mediated by modulating immune cells in the periphery, and glial cells and neurons in the central nervous system. This review will introduce the scientific evidence of the therapeutic effects of BV and its components on several immunological and neurological diseases, and describe their detailed mechanisms involved in regulating various immune responses and pathological changes in glia and neurons. PMID:26131770

  9. Neurological manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of celiac disease: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present as one or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormalities including ataxia, epilepsy, neuropathy, dementia, and cognitive disorders. In this study, we aimed to review the neurological aspects of celiac disease. Early diagnosis and treatment could prevent related disability in patients with celiac disease. PMID:24250863

  10. [Neurological manifestations of Behçet's disease].

    PubMed

    Bousser, M G; Rougemont, D; Youl, B D; Wechsler, B

    1988-01-01

    Characterised classically by the association of buccal and genital ulceration and uveitis with hypopyon, Behçet's disease has many other manifestations, amongst which the neurological ones (often referred to as Neuro-Behçet) are important in view of their frequency and their gravity. Anatomically, it produces a subacute haemorrhagic and necrotising meningo-encephalitis, which most typically effects the hypothalamus and brainstem. Clinically, there is extreme polymorphism, central manifestations being the most frequent: seizures, organic brain syndromes, disorders of consciousness, aphasia, hemiplegia, cranial nerve palsies, pseudobulbar and extrapyramidal syndromes and meningism. The peripheral nerves and muscles are rarely affected. Alongside Neuro-Behçet per se, attention has recently been directed to the various cerebro-vascular manifestations, dominated by venous thrombosis. A review of the principal neurological manifestations is given, with comment on anatomico-pathological aspects, clinical presentation, investigational techniques, diagnostic difficulties, prognosis, and treatment. PMID:3049880

  11. An overview of neurological and neuromuscular signs in mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Chaussenot, A; Paquis-Flucklinger, V

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have a broad clinical spectrum and are genetically heterogeneous, involving two genomes. These disorders may be develop at any age, with isolated or multiple system involvement, and any pattern of inheritance. Neurological involvement is the most frequent, and concerns muscular, peripheral and central nervous system. Among these diverse signs, some are suggestive of mitochondrial disease, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, psychomotor regression, stroke-like episodes, refractory epilepsy and Epilepsia Partialis Continua. Others are less specific and mitochondrial hypothesis may be evocated because of either association of different neuromuscular signs or a multisystemic involvement. This review describes the wealth of this neurological and neuromuscular symptomatology through different syndromes reported in the literature, according to preponderant signs and to modes of inheritance, as key elements to guide genetics testing. PMID:24792434

  12. Texas Occurrence of Lyme Disease and Its Neurological Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Dandashi, Jad A; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dayawansa, Samantha; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Huang, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The culprits behind Lyme disease are the Borrelia species of bacteria. In the USA, Borrelia burgdorferi causes the majority of cases, while in Europe and Asia Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii carry the greatest burden of disease. The clinical manifestations of Lyme disease have been identified as early localized, early disseminated, and late chronic. The neurological effects of Lyme disease include both peripheral and central nervous systems involvement, including focal nerve abnormalities, cranial neuropathies, painful radiculoneuritis, meningitis, and/or toxic metabolic encephalopathy, known as Lyme encephalopathy. Given the geographic predominance of Lyme disease in the Northeast and Midwest of the USA, no major studies have been conducted regarding Southern states. Between 2005 and 2014, the Center for Disease Control has reported 582 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Texas. Because of the potential for increased incidence and prevalence in Texas, it has become essential for research and clinical efforts to be diverted to the region. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Lyme Lab has been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease in Texas and developing a pan-specific serological test for Lyme diagnosis. This report aimed to exposure materials and raise awareness of Lyme disease to healthcare providers. PMID:27478852

  13. Glia: an emerging target for neurological disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies using stem cells for treating neurological diseases are receiving more attention as the scientific community appreciates cell-autonomous contributions to several diseases of the central nervous system. The transplantation of stem cells from various sources is now being employed for both neuronal and glial replacement. This review provides an assessment of glial contributions to some of the central nervous system diseases and the advancements in cellular replacement approaches. The rationale for glial replacement in individual diseases and the potential hurdles for cell-replacement strategies are also emphasized. The significant progress in the field of stem cell biology with the advent of tools such as induced pluripotent stem cells and imaging techniques holds promise for the clinical application of cell therapeutics. PMID:23021042

  14. Complications of Immunosuppressive/Immunomodulatory Therapy in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Avindra

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement The first critical step in the appropriate treatment of neurological infectious disease accompanying immunosuppressive states or immunomodulatory medication is to properly identify the offending organism. Broadly immunosuppressive conditions will predispose to both common and uncommon infectious diseases. There are substantial differences between neurological infectious disorders complicating disturbances of the innate immunity (neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages) and those due to abnormal adaptive immunity (humoral and cellular immunity). Similarly, there are differences in the types of infections with impaired humoral immunity compared to disturbed cellular immunity and between T- and B-cell disorders. HIV/AIDS has been a model of acquired immunosuppression and the nature of opportunistic infections with which it has been associated has been well characterized and generally correlates well with the degree of CD4 lymphopenia. Increasingly, immunotherapies target specific components of the immune system, such as an adhesion molecule or its ligand or surface receptors on a special class of cells. These targeted perturbations of the immune system increase the risk of particular infectious diseases. For instance, natalizumab, an α4β1 integrin inhibitor that is highly effective in multiple sclerosis, increases the risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy for reasons that still remain unclear. It is likely that other therapies that result in a disruption of a specific component of the immune system will be associated with other unique opportunistic infections. The risk of multiple simultaneous neurological infections in the immunosuppressed host must always be considered, particularly with a failure to respond to a therapeutic regimen. With respect to appropriate and effective therapy, diagnostic accuracy assumes primacy, but occasionally broad spectrum therapy is necessitated. For a number of opportunistic infectious disorders

  15. Genomic Discoveries and Personalized Medicine in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades, we have witnessed dramatic changes in clinical diagnoses and treatments due to the revolutions of genomics and personalized medicine. Undoubtedly we also met many challenges when we use those advanced technologies in drug discovery and development. In this review, we describe when genomic information is applied in personal healthcare in general. We illustrate some case examples of genomic discoveries and promising personalized medicine applications in the area of neurological disease particular. Available data suggest that individual genomics can be applied to better treat patients in the near future. PMID:26690205

  16. Immune aging, dysmetabolism, and inflammation in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deleidi, Michela; Jäggle, Madeline; Rubino, Graziella

    2015-01-01

    As we age, the immune system undergoes a process of senescence accompanied by the increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, a chronic subclinical condition named as “inflammaging”. Emerging evidence from human and experimental models suggest that immune senescence also affects the central nervous system and promotes neuronal dysfunction, especially within susceptible neuronal populations. In this review we discuss the potential role of immune aging, inflammation and metabolic derangement in neurological diseases. The discovery of novel therapeutic strategies targeting age-linked inflammation may promote healthy brain aging and the treatment of neurodegenerative as well as neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26089771

  17. Imaging Microglial Activation with TSPO PET: Lighting Up Neurologic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Vivash, Lucy; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric diseases. For over 20 years, (11)C-PK11195 PET, which aims to image expression of the translocator protein (TSPO) on activated microglia in the brain, has been used in preclinical and clinical research to investigate neuroinflammation in vivo in patients with brain diseases. However, (11)C-PK11195 suffers from two major limitations: its low brain permeability and high nonspecific and plasma binding results in a low signal-to-noise ratio, and the use of (11)C restricts its use to PET research centers and hospitals with an on-site cyclotron. In recent years, there has been a great deal of work into the development of new TSPO-specific PET radiotracers. This work has focused on fluorinated radiotracers, which would enable wider use and improved signal-to-noise ratios. These radiotracers have been utilized in preclinical and clinical studies of several neurologic diseases with varying degrees of success. Unfortunately, the application of these second-generation TSPO radiotracers has revealed additional problems, including a polymorphism that affects TSPO binding. In this review, the developments in TSPO imaging are discussed, and current limitations and suggestions for future directions are explored. PMID:26697963

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor: a neurovascular target in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian; Storkebaum, Erik; de Almodóvar, Carmen Ruiz; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Brain function critically relies on blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients, to establish a barrier for neurotoxic substances, and to clear waste products. The archetypal vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, arose in evolution as a signal affecting neural cells, but was later co-opted by blood vessels to regulate vascular function. Consequently, VEGF represents an attractive target to modulate brain function at the neurovascular interface. On the one hand, VEGF is neuroprotective, through direct effects on neural cells and their progenitors and indirect effects on brain perfusion. In accordance, preclinical studies show beneficial effects of VEGF administration in neurodegenerative diseases, peripheral neuropathies and epilepsy. On the other hand, pathologically elevated VEGF levels enhance vessel permeability and leakage, and disrupt blood-brain barrier integrity, as in demyelinating diseases, for which blockade of VEGF may be beneficial. Here, we summarize current knowledge on the role and therapeutic potential of VEGF in neurological diseases. PMID:27364743

  19. RNA structures as mediators of neurological diseases and as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Disney, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    RNAs adopt diverse folded structures that are essential for function and thus play critical roles in cellular biology. A striking example of this is the ribosome, a complex, three-dimensionally folded macromolecular machine that orchestrates protein synthesis. Advances in RNA biochemistry, structural and molecular biology, and bioinformatics have revealed other non-coding RNAs whose functions are dictated by their structure. It is not surprising that aberrantly folded RNA structures contribute to disease. In this review, we provide a brief introduction into RNA structural biology and then describe how RNA structures function in cells and cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we highlight successful applications of rational design principles to provide chemical probes and lead compounds targeting structured RNAs. Based on several examples of well-characterized RNA-driven neurological disorders, we demonstrate how designed small molecules can facilitate study of RNA dysfunction, elucidating previously unknown roles for RNA in disease, and provide lead therapeutics. PMID:26139368

  20. RNA Structures as Mediators of Neurological Diseases and as Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-07-01

    RNAs adopt diverse folded structures that are essential for function and thus play critical roles in cellular biology. A striking example of this is the ribosome, a complex, three-dimensionally folded macromolecular machine that orchestrates protein synthesis. Advances in RNA biochemistry, structural and molecular biology, and bioinformatics have revealed other non-coding RNAs whose functions are dictated by their structure. It is not surprising that aberrantly folded RNA structures contribute to disease. In this Review, we provide a brief introduction into RNA structural biology and then describe how RNA structures function in cells and cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we highlight successful applications of rational design principles to provide chemical probes and lead compounds targeting structured RNAs. Based on several examples of well-characterized RNA-driven neurological disorders, we demonstrate how designed small molecules can facilitate the study of RNA dysfunction, elucidating previously unknown roles for RNA in disease, and provide lead therapeutics. PMID:26139368

  1. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dan-Dan; Li, Lu; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS) development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases. PMID:27240359

  2. [Personal experience with strain-induced diseases--neurologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Kovarík, J; Salandová, J; Kuzelová, M; Ehler, E

    1989-09-01

    The author summarizes his experience with diseases of the locomotor system of the extremities caused by long-term, excessive unilateral overload (item 29 of the Czechoslovak "List of occupational diseases") assembled during the period 1976 to 1987. In the department for occupational diseases of the District Institute of National Health Pardubice 349 subjects were examined where the disease was suspected, in 93 workers the occupational affection was notified. From a total of 2,294 notified occupational during the above period disease due to overload accounted for 4.1%. The cause of the affection was most frequently bursitis (32x), epicondylitis (25x) and carpal tunnel syndromes (24x), other affections being less frequent. The author analyzed the results with regard to sex, age, period of exposure, occupation. Special attention was devoted to glass workers who accounted for 51.6% of all affected subjects. The author discusses possible neurological affections, i. e. damage of the peripheral nerves. In the assessment of disease caused by overload the authors emphasized the importance of close cooperation of specialists for occupational diseases, neurologists, orthopaedists, physiologists and specialists in hygiene of work. PMID:2598283

  3. Neurologic Complications of HIV Disease and Their Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Scott L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Everall, Ivan; Ances, Beau; Bharti, Ajay; McCutchan, J. Allen

    2011-01-01

    Substantial work on the peripheral and central nervous system complications of HIV was presented at the 16th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Six studies of more than 4500 volunteers identified that distal sensory polyneuropathy remains common, ranging from 19% to 66%, with variation based on disease stage, type of antiretroviral therapy, age, and height. Eight studies of more than 2500 volunteers identified that neurocognitive disorders are also common, ranging from 25% to 69%, with variation based on stage of disease, antiretroviral use, diabetes mellitus, and coinfection with hepatitis viruses. Therapy-focused studies identified that resistance testing of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-derived HIV may improve management of people with HIV-associated neurologic complications, that poorly penetrating antiretroviral therapy is associated with persistent low-level HIV RNA in CSF, and that efavirenz concentrations in CSF are low but in the therapeutic range in most individuals. Neuroimaging reports identified that people living with HIV had abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging (gray matter atrophy, abnormal white matter), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (lower neuronal metabolites), and blood-oxygen-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (lower cerebral blood flow). Other important findings on the basic neuroscience of HIV and diagnosis and management of neurologic opportunistic infections are discussed. PMID:19401607

  4. [Neurological and psychiatric aspects of some gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Aszalós, Zsuzsa

    2008-11-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is controlled by the independent enteric nervous system. It is also closely connected to the central nervous system, and bi-directional communication exists between them. The communication involves neural pathways as well as immune and endocrine mechanisms. The brain-gut axis plays a prominent role in the modulation of gut functions. Signals from different sources (e.g. sound, sight, smell, somatic and visceral sensations, pain) reach the brain. These inputs are modified by memory, cognition and affective mechanisms and integrated within the neural circuits of the central nervous system, spinal cord, autonomic and enteral nervous systems. These inputs can have physiologic effects, such as changes in motility, secretion, immune function, and blood flow to the gastrointestinal tract. One of the most important neurotransmitters is serotonin that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the most common chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder: the irritable bowel syndrome. It is a biopsychosocial disease, resulting from the dysregulation of the brain-gut axis. Endogenous pain facilitation rather than inhibition, pathologic gradation of visceral perception and reduced threshold for pain are all evident in these patients. Abuse history is common in their anamnesis. Exaggerated conscientiousness, perfectionism, oversensitivity, feeling of deficiency in effectiveness, and higher demand for social parity, neuroticism and alexithymia have been detected among their constant personality features. Females are also characterized by gender role conflict and low assertiveness. Antidepressants and psychotherapy have important roles in their treatment. Also patients with inflammatory bowel disease are characterized by neuroticism and alexithymia and altered mother-child attachment is often described in their anamnesis. Autonomic neuropathy is a frequent and early neurological complication. Reflux disease and obstructive sleep apnea mutually generate

  5. PPAR agonists as therapeutics for CNS trauma and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar-Colucci, Shweta; Sauerbeck, Andrew; Popovich, Phillip G.; McTigue, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury or disease of the spinal cord and brain elicits multiple cellular and biochemical reactions that together cause or are associated with neuropathology. Specifically, injury or disease elicits acute infiltration and activation of immune cells, death of neurons and glia, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the secretion of substrates that inhibit axon regeneration. In some diseases, inflammation is chronic or non-resolving. Ligands that target PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors), a group of ligand-activated transcription factors, are promising therapeutics for neurologic disease and CNS injury because their activation affects many, if not all, of these interrelated pathologic mechanisms. PPAR activation can simultaneously weaken or reprogram the immune response, stimulate metabolic and mitochondrial function, promote axon growth and induce progenitor cells to differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. PPAR activation has beneficial effects in many pre-clinical models of neurodegenerative diseases and CNS injury; however, the mechanisms through which PPARs exert these effects have yet to be fully elucidated. In this review we discuss current literature supporting the role of PPAR activation as a therapeutic target for treating traumatic injury and degenerative diseases of the CNS. PMID:24215544

  6. Neurological images and the predictors for neurological sequelae of epidemic herpangina/hand-foot-mouth disease with encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Kuo, Hung-Tsung; Chen, Shan-Ming; Lue, Ko-Huang; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2014-04-01

    Since 1998 in Taiwan, enterovirus (EV) 71 epidemics have caused encephalomyelitis and placed a significant burden on parents and physicians. In this study, we present clinical manifestations, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings, and neurological sequelae on epidemic EV-infected patients with encephalomyelitis. Of the 46 patients, 14 patients presented with neurological sequelae; of them, 3 patients suffered from complications of mental regression. Predictors of unfavorable neurological sequelae were myoclonic jerks (> 4 times/night) and pleocytosis (167/μL) of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Results from viral culture and MR imaging indicated that positive identification of EV71 infection was associated significantly with lesions on MR imaging. Our results show that hand-foot-mouth disease carries a higher risk of encephalomyelitis and that frequent myoclonic jerks and pleocytosis of the CSF are risk factors for subsequent neurological sequelae. Positive identification of EV71 might be useful as a predictor of lesions in MR imaging. PMID:24258524

  7. [Neurological diseases after lightning strike : Lightning strikes twice].

    PubMed

    Gruhn, K M; Knossalla, Frauke; Schwenkreis, Peter; Hamsen, Uwe; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Tegenthoff, Martin; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Lightning strikes rarely occur but 85 % of patients have lightning-related neurological complications. This report provides an overview about different modes of energy transfer and neurological conditions related to lightning strikes. Moreover, two case reports demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary treatment and the spectrum of neurological complications after lightning strikes. PMID:26873252

  8. [Palliative Care for Neurological Intractable Diseases and Home Medical Support].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Ogino, Mieko; Ishigaki, Yasunori; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2015-08-01

    Many medical doctors regard the end stage and palliative care of neurological intractable diseases as the point at which aggressive treatment should be interrupted and death is imminent. However, the definition of health by the World Health Organization as the physical, psychological, and social goal to achieve a fully favorable health condition should be revisited. In the real clinical setting, the health condition, as the ability to adapt and self-manage in the face of social, physical, and emotional challenges with the aim to overcome stress (resilience), is dynamic and involves a healthy condition and satisfaction with one's own living. The most important step in palliative therapy that is shared by neurologists is the maintenance of the health status with the help of multi-disciplinary team with the view to improving the quality of life. PMID:26241362

  9. [Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases by vaccines].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M

    1997-04-01

    Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases are surveyed. Patients of poliomyelitis has recently been drastically reduced by world-wide administrating live vaccines. In view of rare incidence of paralysis after giving live vaccine, adoption of inactivated vaccine has recently been reconsidered. A live varicella vaccine was developed and has been world-wide used for normal and high-risk children. Incidence of zoster in vaccinated acute leukemic children is several times higher in those who with rash after vaccination as compared with those without rash, and as no or few rash appears after vaccination of normal children, it is expected that vaccination of normal children would lead to reduction of zoster after their aging. Measles encephalitis has rapidly been reduced by world-wide use of live vaccines. Mouse-brain derived vaccine against Japanese encephalitis(JE) has been used in Asian countries. Development of tissue-culture derived JE vaccine is under way. PMID:9103901

  10. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  11. Chagas disease in a Texan horse with neurologic deficits.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Laura K; Hamer, Sarah A; Shaw, Sarah; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Auckland, Lisa D; Hodo, Carolyn L; Chaffin, Keith; Rech, Raquel R

    2016-01-30

    A 10-year-old Quarter Horse gelding presented to the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a six month-history of ataxia and lameness in the hind limbs. The horse was treated presumptively for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) based on clinical signs but was ultimately euthanized after its condition worsened. Gross lesions were limited to a small area of reddening in the gray matter of the thoracic spinal cord. Histologically, trypanosome amastigotes morphologically similar to Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, were sporadically detected within segments of the thoracic spinal cord surrounded by mild lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Ancillary testing for Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. was negative. Conventional and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of affected paraffin embedded spinal cord were positive for T. cruzi, and sequencing of the amplified T. cruzi satellite DNA PCR fragment from the horse was homologous with various clones of T. cruzi in GenBank. While canine Chagas disease cases have been widely reported in southern Texas, this is the first report of clinical T. cruzi infection in an equid with demonstrable amastigotes in the spinal cord. In contrast to previous instances of Chagas disease in the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and humans, no inflammation or T. cruzi amastigotes were detected in the heart of the horse. Based on clinical signs, there is a potential for misdiagnosis of Chagas disease with other infectious diseases that affect the equine CNS. T. cruzi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with neurologic clinical signs and histologic evidence of meningomyelitis that originate in areas where Chagas disease is present. The prevalence of T. cruzi in horses and the role of equids in the parasite life cycle require further study. PMID:26801589

  12. Neurological diseases in relation to the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Gary A

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) has an important part in cellular damage in neurological diseases, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and brain infections. The neurovascular unit (NVU) forms the interface between the blood and brain tissues. During an injury, the cascade of molecular events ends in the final common pathway for BBB disruption by free radicals and proteases, which attack membranes and degrade the tight junction proteins in endothelial cells. Free radicals of oxygen and nitrogen and the proteases, matrix metalloproteinases and cyclooxgyenases, are important in the early and delayed BBB disruption as the neuroinflammatory response progresses. Opening of the BBB occurs in neurodegenerative diseases and contributes to the cognitive changes. In addition to the importance of the NVU in acute injury, angiogenesis contributes to the recovery process. The challenges to treatment of the brain diseases involve not only facilitating drug entry into the brain, but also understanding the timing of the molecular cascades to block the early NVU injury without interfering with recovery. This review will describe the molecular and cellular events associated with NVU disruption and potential strategies directed toward restoring its integrity. PMID:22252235

  13. [Intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Bembeeva, R Ts; Zavadenko, N N

    2015-01-01

    Though the mechanisms of action of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) are not completely understood, these drugs are widely used in treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we have analyzed the literature on the use of IVIG in the treatment of autoimmune diseases of the nervous system in children and discuss the management of patients basing on the recommendation of the European Federation of Neurological Societies. The efficacy of IVIG in children has been shown as first line treatment in Guillain-Barre syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, dermatomyositis as a second-line drug in the combination with prednisolone or immunosuppressors in patients refractory to treatment with corticosteroids and cytostatics, myasthenic crisis in myasthenia gravis, exacerbations and short-term treatment of severe forms, non-responsiveness to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, multiple sclerosis as second or third line of treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting course with intolerance to standard immunomodulatory therapy, acute multiple encephalomyelitis with no response to the treatment with high doses of corticosteroids, paraneoplastic syndromes, pharmacoresistant epilepsy and autoimmune encephalitis. Because the right choice of the drug plays a key role, in particular, in children, that determines the efficacy and safety of the treatment, we present the main approaches to the choice of the drug and schemes of treatment of autoimmune diseases of the nervous system in children. PMID:26356621

  14. Cannabinoids: new promising agents in the treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Mandolino, Giuseppe; Galuppo, Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, Cannabis sativa is considered the most extensively used narcotic. Nevertheless, this fame obscures its traditional employ in native medicine of South Africa, South America, Turkey, Egypt and in many regions of Asia as a therapeutic drug. In fact, the use of compounds containing Cannabis and their introduction in clinical practice is still controversial and strongly limited by unavoidable psychotropic effects. So, overcoming these adverse effects represents the main open question on the utilization of cannabinoids as new drugs for treatment of several pathologies. To date, therapeutic use of cannabinoid extracts is prescribed in patients with glaucoma, in the control of chemotherapy-related vomiting and nausea, for appetite stimulation in patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome by HIV, and for the treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Recently, researcher efforts are aimed to employ the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis sativa in the modulation of cannabinoid receptor activity within the central nervous system, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. This review evaluates the most recent available data on cannabinoids utilization in experimental and clinical studies, and highlights their beneficial effects in the prevention of the main neurological diseases and for the clinical treatment of symptoms with them correlated. PMID:25407719

  15. [Neurologic characteristics of diseases caused by Inkoo and Tahyna viruses].

    PubMed

    Demikhov, V G; Chaĭtsev, V G

    1995-01-01

    Two principal forms of diseases caused by Inkoo and Tahyna viruses were observed, fever (25 pts, 61%) and neuroinfection (13 pts, 31.7%). In 3 (7.3%) subjects the infection was inapparent. Ten patients presented with mixed forms of infection (virus-virus or virus-bacterial). Clinical manifestations were characterized by marked polymorphism and low specificity. The onset was acute with expressed symptoms of infection and weak catarrhal manifestations. Of the patients with the neuroinfectious form of the disease 3 presented with aseptic meningitis, 2 with meningoencephalitis, and 5 with encephalitis. Aseptic meningitis was characterized by a combination of general infectious and moderately expressed meningeal syndromes with weak inflammatory changes in the spinal fluid. Encephalitides were associated with numerous neurological symptoms which manifested on days 3-7 of the illness. These symptoms were asymmetry of nasolabial folds, hemiparesis, dysarthria, dysphagia, generalized tremor, tongue deviation. No significant differences in the clinical manifestations of Inkoo and Tahyna infections were observed. PMID:7740783

  16. [Cortical spreading depolarization: a new pathophysiological mechanism in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Santos, Edgar

    2014-05-20

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a wave of almost complete depolarization of the neuronal and glial cells that occurs in different neurological diseases such as migraine with aura, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, head trauma and stroke. These depolarization waves are characterized by a change in the negative potential with an amplitude between -10 and -30mV, duration of ∼1min and changes in the ion homeostasis between the intra- and extracellular space. This results in neuronal edema and dendritic distortion. Under pathologic states of hypoperfusion, cortical spreading depolarization can produce oxidative stress, worsen hypoxia and induce neuronal death. This is due to intense arterial vasoconstriction produced by an inverse response called spreading ischemia. Only in the last years there has been an electrophysiological confirmation of cortical spreading depolarization in human brains. Occurrence of cortical spreading depolarization has been associated with worse outcome in patients. Currently, increased knowledge regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms supports the hypothetical correlation of cortical spreading depolarization with brain damage in humans. There are diverse therapeutic alternatives that promise inhibition of cortical spreading depolarization and subsequent better outcomes. PMID:23928069

  17. Sindbis and Middelburg Old World Alphaviruses Associated with Neurologic Disease in Horses, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    van Niekerk, Stephanie; Human, Stacey; Williams, June; van Wilpe, Erna; Pretorius, Marthi; Swanepoel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Old World alphaviruses were identified in 52 of 623 horses with febrile or neurologic disease in South Africa. Five of 8 Sindbis virus infections were mild; 2 of 3 fatal cases involved co-infections. Of 44 Middelburg virus infections, 28 caused neurologic disease; 12 were fatal. Middelburg virus likely has zoonotic potential. PMID:26583836

  18. [The complex of neurological symptoms of substance abuse].

    PubMed

    Litvintsev, B S; Odinak, M M; Litvinenko, I V; Goncharenko, A Yu; Petrov, A D; Kovalenko, A P

    2015-08-01

    Standard neurological examination was performed in 85 patients of military service age (the average age was 32,6±5,3 years - from 19 to 44 years) with a confirmed diagnosis of substance abuse, caused by the use of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances: cocaine and amphetamine in 12 patients, opioids - in 73 patienls. Some symptoms of nervous system damage had statistically characteristic peculiarities for different forms of substance abuse. Mydriasis, signs a bilateral pyramidal insufficiency, hyperkinetic disorder are often characteristic for cocaine and amphetamine abuse. Opioid abuse is characterised by more severe symptoms of nervous system damage, disseminated neurologic symptomatic and polyneurotic disorders. Symptoms of neurasthenia and vegetative-vascular dystonia, which are usually accompanied by the; symptoms of organic lesions of the central and peripheral nervous system, were observed in all patients with substance abuse. In order to detect the symptoms of nervous system damage in patients, which are supposed to be conscribe, it is necessary to take medical history. PMID:26829868

  19. [Cannabinoid drugs for neurological diseases: what is behind?].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-05-16

    In recent years progress has been made in the development of pharmaceuticals based on the plant Cannabis sativa or on synthetic molecules with a similar action. Some of these pharmaceuticals, such as the mouth spray Sativex, have recently been approved for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis, but they are not the first and others, such as Marinol or Cesamet for the treatment of vomiting and nausea, and anorexia-cachexia syndrome, had already been approved. This incipient clinical use of cannabinoid drugs confirms something that was already known from fairly ancient times up to practically the last century, which is the potential use of this plant for medicinal applications - something which was brought to a standstill by the abusive use of preparations of the plant for recreational purposes. In any case, this incipient clinical use of cannabinoid drugs is not backed just by the anecdote of the medicinal use of cannabis since ancient times, but instead the boost it has been given by scientific research, which has made it possible to identify the target molecules that are activated or inhibited by these substances. These targets are part of a new system of intercellular communication that is especially active in the central nervous system, which is called the 'endogenous cannabinoid system' and, like many other systems, can be manipulated pharmacologically. The aim of this review is to probe further into the scientific knowledge about this system generated in the last few years, as a necessary step to justify the development of pharmaceuticals based on its activation or inhibition and which can be useful in different neurological diseases. PMID:22573509

  20. The mTOR signalling cascade: paving new roads to cure neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Crino, Peter B

    2016-07-01

    Defining the multiple roles of the mechanistic (formerly 'mammalian') target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway in neurological diseases has been an exciting and rapidly evolving story of bench-to-bedside translational research that has spanned gene mutation discovery, functional experimental validation of mutations, pharmacological pathway manipulation, and clinical trials. Alterations in the dual contributions of mTOR - regulation of cell growth and proliferation, as well as autophagy and cell death - have been found in developmental brain malformations, epilepsy, autism and intellectual disability, hypoxic-ischaemic and traumatic brain injuries, brain tumours, and neurodegenerative disorders. mTOR integrates a variety of cues, such as growth factor levels, oxygen levels, and nutrient and energy availability, to regulate protein synthesis and cell growth. In line with the positioning of mTOR as a pivotal cell signalling node, altered mTOR activation has been associated with a group of phenotypically diverse neurological disorders. To understand how altered mTOR signalling leads to such divergent phenotypes, we need insight into the differential effects of enhanced or diminished mTOR activation, the developmental context of these changes, and the cell type affected by altered signalling. A particularly exciting feature of the tale of mTOR discovery is that pharmacological mTOR inhibitors have shown clinical benefits in some neurological disorders, such as tuberous sclerosis complex, and are being considered for clinical trials in epilepsy, autism, dementia, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. PMID:27340022

  1. Bone marrow transplantation prolongs life span and ameliorates neurologic manifestations in Sandhoff disease mice.

    PubMed

    Norflus, F; Tifft, C J; McDonald, M P; Goldstein, G; Crawley, J N; Hoffmann, A; Sandhoff, K; Suzuki, K; Proia, R L

    1998-05-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are a group of severe, neurodegenerative conditions that include Tay-Sachs disease, Sandhoff disease, and the GM2 activator deficiency. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was examined as a potential treatment for these disorders using a Sandhoff disease mouse model. BMT extended the life span of these mice from approximately 4.5 mo to up to 8 mo and slowed their neurologic deterioration. BMT also corrected biochemical deficiencies in somatic tissues as indicated by decreased excretion of urinary oligosaccharides, and lower glycolipid storage and increased levels of beta-hexosaminidase activity in visceral organs. Even with neurologic improvement, neither clear reduction of brain glycolipid storage nor improvement in neuronal pathology could be detected, suggesting a complex pathogenic mechanism. Histological analysis revealed beta-hexosaminidase-positive cells in the central nervous system and visceral organs with a concomitant reduction of colloidal iron-positive macrophages. These results may be important for the design of treatment approaches for the GM2 gangliosidoses. PMID:9576752

  2. Neurological channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Graves, T; Hanna, M

    2005-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane-bound proteins that perform key functions in virtually all human cells. Such channels are critically important for the normal function of the excitable tissues of the nervous system, such as muscle and brain. Until relatively recently it was considered that dysfunction of ion channels in the nervous system would be incompatible with life. However, an increasing number of human diseases associated with dysfunctional ion channels are now recognised. Such neurological channelopathies are frequently genetically determined but may also arise through autoimmune mechanisms. In this article clinical, genetic, immunological, and electrophysiological aspects of this expanding group of neurological disorders are reviewed. Clinical situations in which a neurological channelopathy should enter into the differential diagnosis are highlighted. Some practical guidance on how to investigate and treat this complex group of disorders is also included. PMID:15640425

  3. The neurotechnological revolution: unlocking the brain's secrets to develop innovative technologies as well as treatments for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The brain contains all that makes us human, but its complexity is the source of both inspiration and frailty. Aging population is increasingly in need of effective care and therapies for brain diseases, including stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The world's scientific community working hard to unravel the secrets of the brain's computing power and to devise technologies that can heal it when it fails and restore critical functions to patients with neurological conditions. Neurotechnology is the emerging field that brings together the development of technologies to study the brain and devices that improve and repair brain function. What is certain is the momentum behind neurotechnological research is building, and whether through implants, BCIs, or innovative computational systems inspired by the human brain, more light will be shed on our most complex and most precious organ, which will no doubt lead to effective treatment for many neurological conditions. PMID:25782106

  4. Nonlanguage disorders of speech reflect complex neurologic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Valenstein, E

    1975-09-01

    jerk or gag reflex, and absence of other upper motor neuron signs, such as upgoing toes, indicate a lower motor neuron or neuromuscular junction problem. Appropriate tests to rule out myasthenia gravis should be done. The other conditions discussed here are often obvious from their clinical presentation. Although the specific disorder of speech sometimes is helpful in localizing the cause, in most patients, the associated deficits on neurologic examination are of greatest value. PMID:169183

  5. [Neurological manifestations of Rendu-Osler-Weber disease. Apropos of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Neau, J P; Boissonnot, L; Boutaud, P; Fontanel, J P; Gil, R; Lefèvre, J P

    1987-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a generalized vascular dysplasia which also involves the central nervous system. The neurological manifestations of the disease are due either to primary intracranial or spinal vascular lesions or to neurological complications of other visceral lesions, notably those of the lung (arteriovenous fistulae). The prevention of ischaemic or infectious cerebral accidents rests on the anatomical (excision) or functional (selective embolization) exclusion of pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae, when present. PMID:3563167

  6. Targeting plasticity with vagus nerve stimulation to treat neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Hays, Seth A; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Pathological neural activity in a variety of neurological disorders could be treated by directing plasticity to specifically renormalize aberrant neural circuits, thereby restoring normal function. Brief bursts of acetylcholine and norepinephrine can enhance the neural plasticity associated with coincident events. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) represents a safe and effective means to trigger the release of these neuromodulators with a high degree of temporal control. VNS-event pairing can generate highly specific and long-lasting plasticity in sensory and motor cortex. Based on the capacity to drive specific changes in neural circuitry, VNS paired with experience has been successful in effectively ameliorating animal models of chronic tinnitus, stroke, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Targeted plasticity therapy utilizing VNS is currently being translated to humans to treat chronic tinnitus and improve motor recovery after stroke. This chapter will discuss the current progress of VNS paired with experience to drive specific plasticity to treat these neurological disorders and will evaluate additional future applications of targeted plasticity therapy. PMID:24309259

  7. Neurological Disease Produced by Varicella Zoster Virus Reactivation Without Rash

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Nagel, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) from latently infected human ganglia usually produces herpes zoster (shingles), characterized by dermatomal distribution pain and rash. Zoster is often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia or PHN) as well as meningitis or meningoencephalitis, cerebellitts, isolated cranial nerve palsies that produce ophthalmoplegia or the Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple cranial nerve palsies (polyneuritis cranialis), vasculopathy. myelopathy, and various inflammatory disorders of the eye. Importantly, VZV reactivation can produce chronic radicular pain without rash (zoster sine herpete), as well as all the neurological disorders listed above without rash. The protean neurological and ocular disorders produced by VZV in the absence of rash are a challenge to the practicing clinician. The presentation of these conditions vanes from acute to subacute to chronic. Virological confirmation requires the demonstration of amplifiable VZV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or in blood mononuclear cells, or the presence of anti-VZV IgG antibody in CSF or of anti-VZV IgM antibody in CSF or serum. PMID:20186614

  8. Neurological disease in wild loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Elliott R; Homer, Bruce L; Stacy, Brian A; Greiner, Ellis C; Szabo, Nancy J; Chrisman, Cheryl L; Origgi, Francesco; Coberley, Sadie; Foley, Allen M; Landsberg, Jan H; Flewelling, Leanne; Ewing, Ruth Y; Moretti, Richie; Schaf, Susan; Rose, Corinne; Mader, Douglas R; Harman, Glenn R; Manire, Charles A; Mettee, Nancy S; Mizisin, Andrew P; Shelton, G Diane

    2006-06-12

    Beginning in October 2000, subadult loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta showing clinical signs of a neurological disorder were found in waters off south Florida, USA. Histopathology indicated generalized and neurologic spirorchiidiasis. In loggerhead sea turtles (LST) with neurospirorchiidiasis, adult trematodes were found in the meninges of the brain and spinal cord of 7 and 3 affected turtles respectively, and multiple encephalic intravascular or perivascular eggs were associated with granulomatous or mixed leukocytic inflammation, vasculitis, edema, axonal degeneration and occasional necrosis. Adult spirorchiids were dissected from meningeal vessels of 2 of 11 LST brains and 1 of 10 spinal cords and were identified as Neospirorchis sp. Affected LST were evaluated for brevetoxins, ciguatoxins, saxitoxins, domoic acid and palytoxin. While tissues from 7 of 20 LST tested positive for brevetoxins, the levels were not considered to be in a range causing acute toxicosis. No known natural (algal blooms) or anthropogenic (pollutant spills) stressors co-occurred with the turtle mortality. While heavy metal toxicosis and organophosphate toxicosis were also investigated as possible causes, there was no evidence for their involvement. We speculate that the clinical signs and pathologic changes seen in the affected LST resulted from combined heavy spirorchiid parasitism and possible chronic exposure to a novel toxin present in the diet of LST. PMID:16875401

  9. Helicobacter pylori and neurological diseases: Married by the laws of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review current information about the role of inflammation caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and other inflammatory diseases including ischemic stroke. Infection with H. pylori usually persists throughout life, resulting in a chronic inflammatory response with local secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators including chemokines [interleukin (IL)-8, macrophage chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, growth-regulated oncogene (GRO)-α] and cytokines [IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, IL-12, interferon (IFN)-γ], which can pass into the circulation and have a systemic effect. The persistence of detectable systemic and local concentrations of inflammatory mediators is likely to alter the outcome of neurological diseases. These proinflammatory factors can induce brain inflammation and the death of neurons and could eventually be associated to Parkinson’s disease and also may be involved in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. However, most neurological diseases are the result of a combination of multiple factors, but the systemic inflammatory response is a common component and determinant in the onset, evolution, and outcome of diseases. However, more studies are needed to allow understanding of the effects and mechanisms by which the inflammatory response generated by H. pylori infection affects neurological diseases. PMID:25400983

  10. [Demyelinating diseases in children with acute neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Isa Amalie; Skov, Liselotte; Miranda, Maria Jose

    2015-12-01

    Demyelinating diseases in children is a broad group of illnesses, which affect the central nervous system. Demyelinating diseases can be monophasic or chronic and comprise acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Demyelinating diseases are rare, but it is important for the physician to recognize these diseases, as well as to understand the differential diagnoses. This review summarizes the current knowledge of demyelinating disorders in children, focusing on an approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:26651911

  11. Neurologic disease putatively associated with ingestion of Solanum viarum in goats.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael B; MacKay, Robert J; Uhl, Elizabeth; Platt, Simon R; de Lahunta, Alexander

    2003-08-15

    Several Nubian-cross goats were evaluated because of chronic progressive neurologic disease. Physical and neurologic examination revealed signs consistent with diffuse cerebellar disease. Neurologic signs included generalized hyperresponsiveness, fine head tremors, wide-based posture, dysmetria, weakness, and horizontal nystagmus. No clinical improvement was noted after removing goats from affected enclosures. Histologic examination of cerebellar tissues revealed extensive vacuolation within the cytoplasm of Purkinje cells. The clinical and histologic lesions resembled closely findings that were associated with ingestion of Solanum spp in cattle and goats. Examination of enclosures revealed Solanum viarum (tropical soda apple) that had been heavily consumed by the goat herd. We hypothesized that ingestion of S. viarum caused the neurologic disorder. PMID:12930090

  12. Current neurology

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, S.H. )

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases.

  13. Infection of Immunodeficient Horses with Sarcocystis neurona Does Not Result in Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, Debra C.; Knowles, Donald P.; Greiner, Ellis C.; Long, Maureen T.; Hines, Melissa T.; Hochstatter, Tressa; Tibary, Ahmed; Dame, John B.

    2004-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is a progressive neurologic disease of horses most commonly caused by infection with the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona. Factors affecting neuroinvasion and neurovirulence have not been determined. We investigated the pathogenesis of infection with S. neurona in horses with severe combined immune deficiency (SCID). Two immunocompetent (IC) Arabian horses and two Arabian horses with SCID were infected orally with 5 × 105 sporocysts of S. neurona. Four IC horses and one SCID horse were infected intravenously (i.v.) with 5 × 108 merozoites of the WSU-1 isolate of S. neurona. Despite prolonged parasitemia and persistent infection of visceral tissues (skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, lung, liver, and spleen) as demonstrated by PCR and culture, SCID horses did not develop neurologic signs after oral or i.v. infection. S. neurona was undetectable in the neuronal tissues of SCID horses by either PCR, immunohistochemistry, or culture. In contrast, although parasitemia was undetectable in orally infected IC horses and of only short duration in i.v. infected IC horses, four of six IC horses developed neurologic signs. S. neurona was detectable by PCR and/or culture of neural tissue but not visceral tissue of IC horses with neurologic disease. Infected SCID horses are unable to clear S. neurona from visceral tissues, but the infection does not result in neurologic signs; in contrast, IC horses rapidly control parasitemia and infection of visceral tissues but frequently experience neuroinvasion and exhibit clinical signs of neurologic disease. PMID:15539518

  14. Ion channel genes and human neurological disease: Recent progress, prospects, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Edward C.; Jan, Lily Yeh

    1999-01-01

    What do epilepsy, migraine headache, deafness, episodic ataxia, periodic paralysis, malignant hyperthermia, and generalized myotonia have in common? These human neurological disorders can be caused by mutations in genes for ion channels. Many of the channel diseases are “paroxysmal disorders” whose principal symptoms occur intermittently in individuals who otherwise may be healthy and active. Some of the ion channels that cause human neurological disease are old acquaintances previously cloned and extensively studied by channel specialists. In other cases, however, disease-gene hunts have led the way to the identification of new channel genes. Progress in the study of ion channels has made it possible to analyze the effects of human neurological disease-causing channel mutations at the level of the single channel, the subcellular domain, the neuronal network, and the behaving organism. PMID:10220366

  15. Neurologic manifestations, diagnosis and management of Wilson's disease in children - an update.

    PubMed

    Alam, S T; Rahman, M M; Islam, K A; Ferdouse, Z

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper (Cu) metabolism. It is a progressive hepatolenticular degenerative disease due to toxic accumulation of copper in the various tissues particularly in the liver, brain and eyes. The neurologic manifestations of Wilson's disease are extremely varied like simple behavioral change such as irritability, depression, deterioration of school performance to severe form of neurologic presentations like dystonia, dysarthria, tremor and gait disturbance. Early diagnosis is possible by history of progressive neurologic dysfunction, clinical examination of Kayser Flescher rings (K-F rings) in eyes, along with some important investigations like low serum ceruloplasmin, high 24 hours urinary excretion of copper, presence of basal ganglia lesion in neuro imaging of the brain. Though hepatic copper estimation done by liver biopsy is the gold standard, is not available in Bangladesh. Most of the neurodegenerative diseases have no specific treatment and worse outcome. But it has a specific treatment with life long medication that reduces copper absorption or removes the excess copper from the body. Children on therapy must be monitored regularly for response, side effects and compliance. The aim of this article is to gather update information of neurologic manifestations of Wilson's disease and proper management as well to prevent the major neurological complications and better out come. PMID:24584398

  16. Recent achievements in restorative neurology: Progressive neuromuscular diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrijevic, M.R.; Kakulas, B.A.; Vrbova, G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 27 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Computed Tomography of Muscles in Neuromuscular Disease; Mapping the Genes for Muscular Dystrophy; Trophic Factors and Motor Neuron Development; Size of Motor Units and Firing Rate in Muscular Dystrophy; Restorative Possibilities in Relation to the Pathology of Progressive Neuromuscular Disease; and An Approach to the Pathogenesis of some Congenital Myopathies.

  17. [Delirium in patients with neurological diseases: diagnosis, management and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Hüfner, K; Sperner-Unterweger, B

    2014-04-01

    Delirium is a common acute neuropsychiatric syndrome. It is characterized by concurrent disturbances of consciousness and attention, perception, reasoning, memory, emotionality, the sleep-wake cycle as well as psychomotor symptoms. Delirium caused by alcohol or medication withdrawal is not the subject of the current review. Specific predisposing and precipitating factors have been identified in delirium which converge in a common final pathway of global brain dysfunction. The major predisposing factors are older age, cognitive impairment or dementia, sensory deficits, multimorbidity and polypharmacy. Delirium is always caused by one or more underlying pathologies which need to be identified. In neurology both primary triggers of delirium, such as stroke or epileptic seizures and also secondary triggers, such as metabolic factors or medication side effects play a major role. Nonpharmacological interventions are important in the prevention of delirium and lead to an improvement in prognosis. Delirium is associated with increased mortality and in the long term the development of cognitive deficits and functional impairment. PMID:24668399

  18. Genome-Wide Approaches to Dissect the Roles of RNA Binding Proteins in Translational Control: Implications for Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kapeli, Katannya; Yeo, Gene W.

    2012-01-01

    Translational control of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) is a key aspect of neurobiology, defects of which can lead to neurological diseases. In response to stimuli, local translation of mRNAs is activated at synapses to facilitate long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity, the cellular basis for learning, and memory formation. Translation, as well as all other aspects of RNA metabolism, is controlled in part by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that directly interact with mRNAs to form mRNA-protein complexes. Disruption of RBP function is becoming widely recognized as a major cause of neurological diseases. Thus understanding the mechanisms that govern the interplay between translation control and RBP regulation in both normal and diseased neurons will provide new opportunities for novel diagnostics and therapeutic intervention. As a means of studying translational control, genome-wide methods are emerging as powerful tools that have already begun to unveil mechanisms that are missed by single-gene studies. Here, we describe the roles of RBPs in translational control, review genome-wide approaches to examine translational control, and discuss how the application of these approaches may provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenic underpinnings of RBPs in neurological diseases. PMID:23060744

  19. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases III: Manganese, neurological diseases, and associated pathologies.

    PubMed

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an often overlooked but important nutrient, required in small amounts for multiple essential functions in the body. A recent study on cows fed genetically modified Roundup(®)-Ready feed revealed a severe depletion of serum Mn. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup(®), has also been shown to severely deplete Mn levels in plants. Here, we investigate the impact of Mn on physiology, and its association with gut dysbiosis as well as neuropathologies such as autism, Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, anxiety syndrome, Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion diseases. Glutamate overexpression in the brain in association with autism, AD, and other neurological diseases can be explained by Mn deficiency. Mn superoxide dismutase protects mitochondria from oxidative damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of autism and Alzheimer's. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis depends on Mn, and its deficiency leads to osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Lactobacillus, depleted in autism, depend critically on Mn for antioxidant protection. Lactobacillus probiotics can treat anxiety, which is a comorbidity of autism and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reduced gut Lactobacillus leads to overgrowth of the pathogen, Salmonella, which is resistant to glyphosate toxicity, and Mn plays a role here as well. Sperm motility depends on Mn, and this may partially explain increased rates of infertility and birth defects. We further reason that, under conditions of adequate Mn in the diet, glyphosate, through its disruption of bile acid homeostasis, ironically promotes toxic accumulation of Mn in the brainstem, leading to conditions such as PD and prion diseases. PMID:25883837

  20. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases III: Manganese, neurological diseases, and associated pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an often overlooked but important nutrient, required in small amounts for multiple essential functions in the body. A recent study on cows fed genetically modified Roundup®-Ready feed revealed a severe depletion of serum Mn. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup®, has also been shown to severely deplete Mn levels in plants. Here, we investigate the impact of Mn on physiology, and its association with gut dysbiosis as well as neuropathologies such as autism, Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, anxiety syndrome, Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion diseases. Glutamate overexpression in the brain in association with autism, AD, and other neurological diseases can be explained by Mn deficiency. Mn superoxide dismutase protects mitochondria from oxidative damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of autism and Alzheimer’s. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis depends on Mn, and its deficiency leads to osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Lactobacillus, depleted in autism, depend critically on Mn for antioxidant protection. Lactobacillus probiotics can treat anxiety, which is a comorbidity of autism and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reduced gut Lactobacillus leads to overgrowth of the pathogen, Salmonella, which is resistant to glyphosate toxicity, and Mn plays a role here as well. Sperm motility depends on Mn, and this may partially explain increased rates of infertility and birth defects. We further reason that, under conditions of adequate Mn in the diet, glyphosate, through its disruption of bile acid homeostasis, ironically promotes toxic accumulation of Mn in the brainstem, leading to conditions such as PD and prion diseases. PMID:25883837

  1. Neurology and neurologic practice in China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions. PMID:22123780

  2. Neurological Management of Von Hippel-Lindau Disease.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Trent S; Nielsen, Sarah M; Lesniak, Maciej S; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-09-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease is a genetic condition due to mutation of the Von Hippel-Lindau gene, which leads to an increased risk in the development of hemangioblastomas of the brain and spinal cord. The pathophysiology of disease and its clinical manifestations, as they pertain to the general neurologist, are discussed. Therapeutic management of central nervous system hemangioblastomas ranging from neurosurgical resection, radiation therapy, and systemic therapies is reviewed. PMID:27564075

  3. Serum antioxidant capacity in neurological, psychiatric, renal diseases and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sofic, E; Rustembegovic, A; Kroyer, G; Cao, G

    2002-05-01

    The role of free radicals (FR) in the pathogenesis and in the progression of many diseases has been often discussed, but not widely investigated. However, the total antioxidant capacity in the serum seems to be of great evidence. Total antioxidant capacity was determined using oxygen absorbance capacity assay (ORAC) in serum of patients suffering from depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), anorexia nervosa, Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Aids-encephalopathy, diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP), cardiomyopathy (CM), renal disease, and healthy individuals as controls (C). The results showed that the total antioxidant capacity in serum decreased significantly (p < 0.01) by 24, 20, 13, and 17% for anorexia nervosa, Aids-encephalopathy, PNP and CM respectively. In serum of patients with renal disease significantly elevated antioxidant capacity was found. The data indicated that increased oxidative stress can be involved in the pathogenesis or in the progression of PNP and CM. Decrease of serum antioxidant capacity in patients with anorexia nervosa and Aids-encephalopathy are probably due primarily to malnutrition and secondly to insufficient antioxidant and immune system. In renal disease, the accumulation of urea in serum seems to be responsible for high antioxidant capacity. In contrast, there were no changes in PD, AD, depression syndrome and schizophrenia. PMID:12111462

  4. Childhood neurologic disorders and Lyme disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gerber, M A; Zalneraitis, E L

    1994-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of clinically significant nervous system disease attributable to transplacental transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we surveyed neurologists in areas of the United States in which Lyme disease is endemic (i.e., Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Wisconsin, and Minnesota). Overall, 162 of the 176 (92%) pediatric neurologists contacted responded to the survey with a range of 90-100% in the different geographic areas. One pediatric neurologist was following 3 children who were labeled as having "congenital Lyme disease," but none of the 3 met our case definition. None of the other pediatric neurologists surveyed had ever seen a child whose mother had been diagnosed as having Lyme disease during pregnancy. Similarly, none of the 37 adult neurologists in Connecticut surveyed had ever seen a child whose mother had been diagnosed as having had Lyme disease during pregnancy. We conclude that congenital neuroborreliosis is either not occurring or is occurring at an extremely low rate in areas endemic for Lyme disease. PMID:7986291

  5. Potential of caveolae in the therapy of cardiovascular and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Fuxe, Kjell; Franco, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Caveolae are membrane micro-domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and caveolins, which are transmembrane proteins with a hairpin-like structure. Caveolae participate in receptor-mediated trafficking of cell surface receptors and receptor-mediated signaling. Furthermore, caveolae participate in clathrin-independent endocytosis of membrane receptors. On the one hand, caveolins are involved in vascular and cardiac dysfunction. Also, neurological abnormalities in caveolin-1 knockout mice and a link between caveolin-1 gene haplotypes and neurodegenerative diseases have been reported. The aim of this article is to present the rationale for considering caveolae as potential targets in cardiovascular and neurological diseases. PMID:25324780

  6. Seizure control and improvement of neurological dysfunction in Lafora disease with perampanel

    PubMed Central

    Dirani, Maya; Nasreddine, Wassim; Abdulla, Fatima; Beydoun, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Lafora disease is a rare and fatal disease characterized by seizures, progressive cognitive and behavioral deterioration, as well as cerebellar dysfunction. Currently, there is no efficacious treatment that will control the seizures and improve the cognitive decline in this disease. We report a patient with Lafora disease who experienced a dramatic amelioration in her seizure frequency as well as the associated neurological and cognitive dysfunction following initiation of treatment with perampanel administered as monotherapy. Perampanel is the first potentially efficacious treatment for Lafora disease. We discuss a potential mechanism for the efficacy of perampanel in this disease. PMID:25667898

  7. Developing retinal biomarkers of neurological disease: an analytical perspective

    PubMed Central

    MacCormick, Ian JC; Czanner, Gabriela; Faragher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The inaccessibility of the brain poses a problem for neuroscience. Scientists have traditionally responded by developing biomarkers for brain physiology and disease. The retina is an attractive source of biomarkers since it shares many features with the brain. Some even describe the retina as a ‘window’ to the brain, implying that retinal signs are analogous to brain disease features. However, new analytical methods are needed to show whether or not retinal signs really are equivalent to brain abnormalities, since this requires greater evidence than direct associations between retina and brain. We, therefore propose a new way to think about, and test, how clearly one might see the brain through the retinal window, using cerebral malaria as a case study. PMID:26174843

  8. Lymphatics in Neurological Disorders: A Neuro-Lympho-Vascular Component of Multiple Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Louveau, Antoine; Da Mesquita, Sandro; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic vasculature drains interstitial fluids, which contain the tissue's waste products, and ensures immune surveillance of the tissues, allowing immune cell recirculation. Until recently, the CNS was considered to be devoid of a conventional lymphatic vasculature. The recent discovery in the meninges of a lymphatic network that drains the CNS calls into question classic models for the drainage of macromolecules and immune cells from the CNS. In the context of neurological disorders, the presence of a lymphatic system draining the CNS potentially offers a new player and a new avenue for therapy. In this review, we will attempt to integrate the known primary functions of the tissue lymphatic vasculature that exists in peripheral organs with the proposed function of meningeal lymphatic vessels in neurological disorders, specifically multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. We propose that these (and potentially other) neurological afflictions can be viewed as diseases with a neuro-lympho-vascular component and should be therapeutically targeted as such. PMID:27608759

  9. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep

    PubMed Central

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q.; Watson, Thomas C.; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L.; Palmer, David N.; Jones, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders. PMID:25724202

  10. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep.

    PubMed

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q; Watson, Thomas C; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L; Palmer, David N; Jones, Matthew W; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders. PMID:25724202

  11. Stem cell transplantation in neurological diseases: improving effectiveness in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Raffaella; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bottai, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Neurological diseases afflict a growing proportion of the human population. There are two reasons for this: first, the average age of the population (especially in the industrialized world) is increasing, and second, the diagnostic tools to detect these pathologies are now more sophisticated and can be used on a higher percentage of the population. In many cases, neurological disease has a pharmacological treatment which, as in the case of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy, and Multiple Sclerosis can reduce the symptoms and slow down the course of the disease but cannot reverse its effects or heal the patient. In the last two decades the transplantation approach, by means of stem cells of different origin, has been suggested for the treatment of neurological diseases. The choice of slightly different animal models and the differences in methods of stem cell preparation make it difficult to compare the results of transplantation experiments. Moreover, the translation of these results into clinical trials with human subjects is difficult and has so far met with little success. This review seeks to discuss the reasons for these difficulties by considering the differences between human and animal cells (including isolation, handling and transplantation) and between the human disease model and the animal disease model. PMID:25364724

  12. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  13. Neurological features and management of Wilson disease in children: an evaluation of 12 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Ayşe Kaçar; Gümüş, Hakan; Arslan, Duran; Özçora, Güldemet Kaya; Kumandaş, Sefer; Karacabey, Neslihan; Canpolat, Mehmet; Per, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Wilson’s disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism which leads to copper overload in different tissues of the body. The aim of this study was to present the neurologic features of Wilson’s disease and to assess the clinical course of neurological findings in children receiving anti-copper treatment. Material and Methods: Twelve children with a diagnosis of Wilson’s disease and findings of central nervous system involvement who were followed up in the Department of Pediatric Neurology and Pediatric Gastroenterology of the School of Medicine at Erciyes University were enrolled in the study. Results: The study cases consisted of five boys (42%) and seven girls (58%). The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 9.9±3.4 years (5–15 years). The mean duration of follow-up was 49.0±36.4 months (15–128 months). Neurological findings at presentation included headache in seven cases (58%), tremor in seven cases (58%), dystonia in three cases (25%), ataxia in two cases (17%), dizziness in two cases (17%), numbness in the hands and acute weakness in one case (8%) and syncope in one case (8%). Headache, dizziness, syncope, numbness in hands and acute weakness symptoms resolved completely within six months after receiving treatment. Movement disorders either decreased or remained stable in seven of the eight cases. However, one patient developed progressively worsening dystonia despite to all treatments. Conclusions: Wilson’s disease can be manifested with signs and symptoms of central nervous system in the childhood. Wilson’s disease should be considered in all children presenting with movement disorders. A complete neurological assessment should be carried out in all cases with Wilson’s disease. PMID:27103860

  14. Creation of an Open-Access, Mutation-Defined Fibroblast Resource for Neurological Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Wray, Selina; Self, Matthew; Lewis, Patrick A.; Taanman, Jan-Willem; Ryan, Natalie S.; Mahoney, Colin J.; Liang, Yuying; Devine, Michael J.; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Houlden, Henry; Morris, Huw R.; Healy, Daniel; Marti-Masso, Jose-Felix; Preza, Elisavet; Barker, Suzanne; Sutherland, Margaret; Corriveau, Roderick A.; D'Andrea, Michael; Schapira, Anthony H. V.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Guttman, Mark; Opala, Grzegorz; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Puschmann, Andreas; Nilsson, Christer; Espay, Alberto J.; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Gutmann, Ludwig; Boeve, Bradley F.; Boylan, Kevin; Stoessl, A. Jon; Ross, Owen A.; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Van Gerpen, Jay; Gerstenhaber, Melissa; Gwinn, Katrina; Dawson, Ted M.; Isacson, Ole; Marder, Karen S.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Przedborski, Serge E.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Rossor, Martin N.; Hardy, John

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of many neurological disorders has been greatly enhanced by the discovery of mutations in genes linked to familial forms of these diseases. These have facilitated the generation of cell and animal models that can be used to understand the underlying molecular pathology. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the use of patient-derived cells, due to the development of induced pluripotent stem cells and their subsequent differentiation into neurons and glia. Access to patient cell lines carrying the relevant mutations is a limiting factor for many centres wishing to pursue this research. We have therefore generated an open-access collection of fibroblast lines from patients carrying mutations linked to neurological disease. These cell lines have been deposited in the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Repository at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and can be requested by any research group for use in in vitro disease modelling. There are currently 71 mutation-defined cell lines available for request from a wide range of neurological disorders and this collection will be continually expanded. This represents a significant resource that will advance the use of patient cells as disease models by the scientific community. PMID:22952635

  15. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with common neurologic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Gyu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a phrase used to describe additional health care methods such as mind/body practices and natural products not regarded as treatments by conventional medicine. The use of CAM in children with common neurologic diseases is more frequent than its use in healthy children (24%–78% vs. 12%). However, less than half of patients report such use to their physicians. The preferred modalities of CAM vary in different countries due to their different cultures and traditions. The most common factor significantly associated with the use of CAM is parental CAM use in most studies. The frequency of the use of CAM in children and adults with neurologic diseases is similar, and both rates are higher than the rates in those without these conditions. The preferred modalities of CAM in adults are diverse, and megavitamins and mind/body therapy (prayer and chiropractic care) are included. The most common factor significantly associated with the use of CAM in adults with neurologic diseases is high educational level. Physicians need to be concerned with patients' use of CAM and provide correct information about CAM so that patients may make the right decisions. Further study is needed to determine the evidence-based efficacy of CAM use in children with common neurologic diseases. PMID:27610179

  16. Dolphins, dogs, and robot seals for the treatment of neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Burton, Adrian

    2013-09-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that animal-assisted therapies and activities involving all kinds of real and even robotic animals can have beneficial eff ects in people with neurological disease or mental illness. But what is the quality of that evidence and do these interventions really provide any health benefits? Adrian Burton investigates. PMID:23948175

  17. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with common neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Gyu-Min; Nam, Sang Ook

    2016-08-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a phrase used to describe additional health care methods such as mind/body practices and natural products not regarded as treatments by conventional medicine. The use of CAM in children with common neurologic diseases is more frequent than its use in healthy children (24%-78% vs. 12%). However, less than half of patients report such use to their physicians. The preferred modalities of CAM vary in different countries due to their different cultures and traditions. The most common factor significantly associated with the use of CAM is parental CAM use in most studies. The frequency of the use of CAM in children and adults with neurologic diseases is similar, and both rates are higher than the rates in those without these conditions. The preferred modalities of CAM in adults are diverse, and megavitamins and mind/body therapy (prayer and chiropractic care) are included. The most common factor significantly associated with the use of CAM in adults with neurologic diseases is high educational level. Physicians need to be concerned with patients' use of CAM and provide correct information about CAM so that patients may make the right decisions. Further study is needed to determine the evidence-based efficacy of CAM use in children with common neurologic diseases. PMID:27610179

  18. Raspberry Mosaic Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry mosaic disease (RMD) is an overarching term used to describe a range of diseases caused by various combinations of different viruses that are each transmitted by aphids. In the scientific literature RMD has been given various alternative names, including red raspberry mosaic, type b mosaic...

  19. HAX1 Mutations causing SCN and Neurological Disease Lead to Microstructural Abnormalities Revealed by Quantitative MRI

    PubMed Central

    Boztug, Kaan; Ding, Xiao-Qi; Hartmann, Hans; Ziesenitz, Lena; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Diestelhorst, Jana; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Appaswamy, Giridharan; Kehbel, Sonja; Simon, Thorsten; Jefri, Abdullah Al; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Klein, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in the gene encoding HCLS-associated protein X-1 (HAX1) cause autosomal recessive severe congenital neutropenia. Some of these patients display neurological abnormalities including developmental delay, cognitive impairment and/or epilepsy. Recent genotype-phenotype studies have shown that mutations in HAX1 affecting transcripts A (NM_006118.3) and B (NM_001018837.1) cause the phenotype of SCN with neurological impairment, while mutations affecting isoform A but not B lead to SCN without neurological aberrations. In this study, we identified a consanguineous family with two patients suffering from SCN and neurological disease caused by a novel, homozygous genomic deletion including exons 4–7 of the HAX1 gene. Quantitative MRI analyses revealed general alterations in cerebral proton density in both of the patients, as well as in an additional unrelated patient with another HAX1 mutation (Arg86X) known to be associated with neurological manifestations. This study provides first in vivo evidence of general neurodegeneration associated with HAX1 deficiency in SCN patients. PMID:21108402

  20. Frontiers in therapeutic development of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Ronald W.; Solinsky, Christine M.; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2014-01-01

    Allopregnanolone (Allo), a neurosteroid, has emerged as a promising promoter of endogenous regeneration in brain. In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, Allo induced neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, white matter generation and cholesterol homeostasis while simultaneously reducing β-amyloid and neuroinflammatory burden. Allo activates signaling pathways and gene expression required for regeneration of neural stem cells and their differentiation into neurons. In parallel, Allo activates systems to sustain cholesterol homeostasis and reduce β-amyloid generation. To advance Allo into studies for chronic human neurological conditions, we examined translational and clinical parameters: dose, regimen, route, formulation, outcome measures, and safety regulations. A treatment regimen of once per week at sub-sedative doses of Allo was optimal for regeneration and reduction in Alzheimer’s pathology. This regimen had a high safety profile following chronic exposure in aged normal and Alzheimer’s mice. Formulation of Allo for multiple routes of administration has been developed for both preclinical and clinical testing. Preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy of Allo spans multiple neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, Niemann-Pick, diabetic neuropathy, status epilepticus, and traumatic brain injury. To successfully translate Allo as a therapeutic for multiple neurological disorders, it will be necessary to tailor dose and regimen to the targeted therapeutic mechanisms and disease etiology. Treatment paradigms conducted in accelerated disease models in young animals have a low probability of successful translation to chronic diseases in adult and aged humans. Gender, genetic risks, stage and burden of disease are critical determinants of efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in development of Allo for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that have the potential to accelerate therapeutic translation for multiple unmet

  1. Clinical and immunological relevance of anti-neuronal antibodies in celiac disease with neurological manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Caio, Giacomo; Giorgio, Roberto De; Venturi, Alessandro; Giancola, Fiorella; Latorre, Rocco; Boschetti, Elisa; Serra, Mauro; Ruggeri, Eugenio; Volta, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess anti-neuronal antibodies (NA) prevalence and their correlation with neurological disorders and bowel habits in celiac disease (CD) patients. Background: Neurological manifestations are estimated to occur in about 10% of celiac disease patients and NA to central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS) are found in a significant proportion of them. Little is known about the clinical and immunological features in CD patients with neurological manifestations. Patients and methods: NA to CNS and ENS were investigated in 106 CD patients and in 60 controls with autoimmune disorders by indirect immunofluorescence on rat / primate cerebellar cortex and intestinal (small and large bowel) sections. Results: IgG NA to CNS (titer 1:50 - 1:400) were positive in 23 celiacs (21%), being more frequently detected in those with neurological disorders that in those without neurological dysfunction (49% vs. 8%, P< 0.0001). Of the 26 celiacs (24%) with IgG NA to ENS, 11 out of 12 with an antibody titer > 1:200 had severe constipation. Only one patient with cerebellar ataxia and intestinal sub-occlusion was positive for NA to CNS and ENS. NA to CNS and ENS were found in 7% and 5% of controls, respectively. Conclusion: In CD the positivity of NA to CNS can be regarded as a marker of neurological manifestations. High titer NA to ENS are associated with severe constipation. The demonstration of NA to CNS and ENS suggests an immune-mediated pathogenesis leading to central neural impairment as well as gut dysfunction (hence constipation), respectively. PMID:25926940

  2. Minds on replay: musical hallucinations and their relationship to neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Golden, Erin C; Josephs, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of musical hallucinations, in which individuals perceive music in the absence of an external auditory stimulus, has been described sparingly in the literature through small case reports and series. Musical hallucinations have been linked to multiple associated conditions, including psychiatric and neurologic disease, brain lesions, drug effect, and hearing impairment. This study aimed to review the demographics of subjects with musical hallucinations and to determine the prevalence of neurological disorders, particularly neurodegenerative disease. Through the Mayo medical record, 393 subjects with musical hallucinations were identified and divided into five categories based on comorbid conditions that have been associated with musical hallucinations: neurological, psychiatric, structural, drug effect and not otherwise classifiable. Variables, including hearing impairment and the presence of visual and other auditory hallucinations, were evaluated independently in all five groups. The mean age at onset of the hallucinations was 56 years, ranging from 18 to 98 years, and 65.4% of the subjects were female. Neurological disease and focal brain lesions were found in 25% and 9% of the total subjects, respectively. Sixty-five subjects were identified with a neurodegenerative disorder, with the Lewy body disorders being the most common. Visual hallucinations were more common in the group with neurological disease compared to the psychiatric, structural, and not otherwise classifiable groups (P < 0.001), whereas auditory hallucinations were more common in the psychiatric group compared to all other groups (P < 0.001). Structural lesions associated with musical hallucinations involved both hemispheres with a preference towards the left, and all but two included the temporal lobe. Hearing impairment was common, particularly in the not otherwise classifiable category where 67.2% had documented hearing impairment, more than in any other group (P < 0.001). Those

  3. Phenotype variability of infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease IMNEPD.

    PubMed

    Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Hashem, Mais; Faqeih, Eissa; Josset, Patrice; Dubern, Béatrice; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Kraemer, Nadine; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease (IMNEPD) has been recently linked to biallelic mutation of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 gene PTRH2. Two index patients with IMNEPD in the original report had multiple neurological symptoms such as postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability, developmental delay, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition, distal muscle weakness and abnormalities of thyroid, pancreas, and liver were found. Here, we report five further IMNEPD patients with a different homozygous PTRH2 mutation, broaden the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and differentiate common symptoms and interindividual variability in IMNEPD associated with a unique mutation. We thereby hope to better define IMNEPD and promote recognition and diagnosis of this novel disease entity. PMID:27129381

  4. An update of neurological manifestations of vasculitides and connective tissue diseases: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bougea, Anastasia; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Spandideas, Nikolaos; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos; Kararizou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitides comprise a heterogeneous group of autoimmune disorders, occurring as primary or secondary to a broad variety of systemic infectious, malignant or connective tissue diseases. The latter occur more often but their pathogenic mechanisms have not been fully established. Frequent and varied central and peripheral nervous system complications occur in vasculitides and connective tissue diseases. In many cases, the neurological disorders have an atypical clinical course or even an early onset, and the healthcare professionals should be aware of them. The purpose of this brief review was to give an update of the main neurological disorders of common vasculitis and connective tissue diseases, aiming at accurate diagnosis and management, with an emphasis on pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:26313435

  5. Neuropsychological Assessment of Driving Safety Risk in Older Adults With and Without Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Steven W.; Aksan, Nazan; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Uc, Ergun Y.; Johnson, Amy M.; Rizzo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Decline in cognitive abilities can be an important contributor to the driving problems encountered by older adults, and neuropsychological assessment may provide a practical approach to evaluating this aspect of driving safety risk. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate several commonly used neuropsychological tests in the assessment of driving safety risk in older adults with and without neurological disease. A further goal of this study was to identify brief combinations of neuropsychological tests that sample performances in key functional domains and thus could be used to efficiently assess driving safety risk. 345 legally licensed and active drivers over the age of 50, with either no neurologic disease (N=185), probable Alzheimer's disease (N=40), Parkinson's disease (N=91), or stroke (N=29), completed vision testing, a battery of 10 neuropsychological tests, and an 18 mile drive on urban and rural roads in an instrumented vehicle. Performances on all neuropsychological tests were significantly correlated with driving safety errors. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to identify 3 key cognitive domains assessed by the tests (speed of processing, visuospatial abilities, and memory), and several brief batteries consisting of one test from each domain showed moderate corrected correlations with driving performance. These findings are consistent with the notion that driving places demands on multiple cognitive abilities that can be affected by aging and age-related neurological disease, and that neuropsychological assessment may provide a practical off-road window into the functional status of these cognitive systems. PMID:22943767

  6. Association of traumatic brain injury with subsequent neurological and psychiatric disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Perry, David C; Sturm, Virginia E; Peterson, Matthew J; Pieper, Carl F; Bullock, Thomas; Boeve, Bradley F; Miller, Bruce L; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Berger, Mitchel S; Kramer, Joel H; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and other illnesses. This study's objective was to determine the association of prior mild TBI with the subsequent diagnosis (that is, at least 1 year postinjury) of neurological or psychiatric disease. METHODS All studies from January 1995 to February 2012 reporting TBI as a risk factor for diagnoses of interest were identified by searching PubMed, study references, and review articles. Reviewers abstracted the data and assessed study designs and characteristics. RESULTS Fifty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. A random effects meta-analysis revealed a significant association of prior TBI with subsequent neurological and psychiatric diagnoses. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the development of any illness subsequent to prior TBI was 1.67 (95% CI 1.44-1.93, p < 0.0001). Prior TBI was independently associated with both neurological (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.31-1.83, p < 0.0001) and psychiatric (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.50-2.66, p < 0.0001) outcomes. Analyses of individual diagnoses revealed higher odds of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, mild cognitive impairment, depression, mixed affective disorders, and bipolar disorder in individuals with previous TBI as compared to those without TBI. This association was present when examining only studies of mild TBI and when considering the influence of study design and characteristics. Analysis of a subset of studies demonstrated no evidence that multiple TBIs were associated with higher odds of disease than a single TBI. CONCLUSIONS History of TBI, including mild TBI, is associated with the development of neurological and psychiatric illness. This finding indicates that either TBI is a risk factor for heterogeneous pathological processes or that TBI may contribute to a common pathological mechanism. PMID:26315003

  7. Neurologic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the ... something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can have trouble moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing, ...

  8. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangchun; Sun, Jiya; Wang, Jiajia; Bai, Zhouxian; Song, Fuhai; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be discussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:25108264

  9. Genetic Analysis in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Alan; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, neurogenetics research had made some remarkable advances owing to the advent of genotyping arrays and next-generation sequencing. These improvements to the technology have allowed us to determine the whole-genome structure and its variation and to examine its effect on phenotype in an unprecedented manner. The identification of rare disease-causing mutations has led to the identification of new biochemical pathways and has facilitated a greater understanding of the etiology of many neurological diseases. Furthermore, genome-wide association studies have provided information on how common genetic variability impacts on the risk for the development of various complex neurological diseases. Herein, we review how these technological advances have changed the approaches being used to study the genetic basis of neurological disease and how the research findings will be translated into clinical utility. PMID:23571731

  10. EFhd2, a Protein Linked to Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Irving E.

    2016-01-01

    EFhd2 is a conserved calcium binding protein linked to different neurological disorders and types of cancer. Although, EFhd2 is more abundant in neurons, it is also found in other cell types. The physiological function of this novel protein is still unclear, but it has been shown in vitro to play a role in calcium signaling, apoptosis, actin cytoskeleton, and regulation of synapse formation. Recently, EFhd2 was shown to promote cell motility by modulating the activity of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA. Although, EFhd2's role in promoting cell invasion and metastasis is of great interest in cancer biology, this review focusses on the evidence that links EFhd2 to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurological disorders. Altered expression of EFhd2 has been documented in AD, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and schizophrenia, indicating that Efhd2 gene expression is regulated in response to neuropathological processes. However, the specific role that EFhd2 plays in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders is still poorly understood. Recent studies demonstrated that EFhd2 has structural characteristics similar to amyloid proteins found in neurological disorders. Moreover, EFhd2 co-aggregates and interacts with known neuropathological proteins, such as tau, C9orf72, and Lrrk2. These results suggest that EFhd2 may play an important role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the understanding of EFhd2's role in health and disease could lead to decipher molecular mechanisms that become activated in response to neuronal stress and degeneration. PMID:27064956

  11. Barriers to care for patients with neurologic disease in rural Zambia.

    PubMed

    Birbeck, G L

    2000-03-01

    The awesome burden of treatable yet untreated neurologic disease in the developing world presents a humanitarian crisis to those of us with neurologic expertise from more privileged situations. Although increased economic resources are critically needed, a shortage of personnel to care for these patients is as great a problem. It is neither feasible nor desirable to propose training neurologists to work in these regions. However, COs could be selected to receive additional training and return to their home regions to serve as resources for referrals and as community educators. Such a training program would not require massive financial commitments. A handful of dedicated neurologists could conceivably accomplish this in 6- to 8-week training sessions. Ideally, educational materials, such as posters and pamphlets in both English and the native language of the various regions, would be provided at no cost. Existing textbooks in neurology are written for physicians and often focus on diagnostic evaluations and therapies far beyond the services available in developing countries. A text for practical use by COs and community health workers that discusses the application of available medicines and therapies for common neurologic problems would be invaluable. Similar books exist that address general medical and obstetrical problems (for example, Where There Is No Doctor: A Village Health Care Handbook). Where There Is No Neurologist could be developed as a primary teaching tool and a valuable reference for COs with neurologic expertise. Neuroscience researchers, clinical neurologists, and neurology residents from industrialized countries have much to offer and to gain by working in the Third World. Research to monitor the incidence and resource utilization of emerging problems such as stroke is needed to influence public policy. The economic burden and lost productivity caused by neurologic disease in this part of the world has not been appreciated or explored. Disease

  12. Inhibitory system overstimulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular and neurological diseases: a novel hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Tuk, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Based upon a thorough review of published clinical observations regarding the inhibitory system, I hypothesize that this system may play a key role in the pathogenesis of a variety of neuromuscular and neurological diseases. Specifically, excitatory overstimulation, which is commonly reported in neuromuscular and neurological diseases, may be a homeostatic response to inhibitory overstimulation. Involvement of the inhibitory system in disease pathogenesis is highly relevant, given that most approaches currently being developed for treating neuromuscular and neurological diseases focus on reducing excitatory activity rather than reducing inhibitory activity. PMID:27547379

  13. Clinical experience with stem cells and other cell therapies in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Karussis, Dimitrios; Petrou, Panayiota; Kassis, Ibrahim

    2013-01-15

    To overcome the limited capacity of the CNS for regeneration, the theoretical alternative would be to use stem cells for more effective management of chronic degenerative and inflammatory neurological conditions, and also of acute neuronal damage from injuries or cerebrovascular diseases. Although the adult brain contains small numbers of stem cells in restricted areas, this intrinsic stem cell repertoire is small and does not measurably contribute to functional recovery. Embryonic cells carrying pluripotent and self-renewal properties represent the stem cell prototype, but there are additional somatic stem cells that may be harvested and expanded from various tissues during adult life. Stem cell transplantation is based on the assumption that such cells may have the potential to regenerate or support the survival of the existing, partially damaged cells. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art and the clinical worldwide experience with the use of various types of stem cells in neurological diseases. PMID:23107343

  14. Zebrafish: An in vivo model for the study of neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Best, J D; Alderton, Wendy K

    2008-01-01

    As the population ages, there is a growing need for effective therapies for the treatment of neurological diseases. A limited number of therapeutics are currently available to improve cognitive function and research is limited by the need for in vivo models. Zebrafish have recently become a focus of neurobehavioral studies since larvae display neuropathological and behavioral phenotypes that are quantifiable and relate to those seen in man. Due to the small size of Zebrafish larvae, assays can be undertaken in 96 well plates and as the larvae can live in as little as 200 μl of fluid, only a few milligrams of compound are needed for screening. Thus in vivo analysis of the effects of compounds can be undertaken at much earlier stages in the drug discovery process. This review will look at the utility of the zebrafish in the study of neurological diseases and its role in improving the throughput of candidate compounds in in vivo screens. PMID:18830398

  15. Newer insights to the neurological diseases among biblical characters of old testament

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Stephen K.; Pandian, Jeyaraj D.

    2010-01-01

    Many people over the years have studied the Bible from a medical point of view offering diagnoses for the symptoms and signs that appear to have afflicted numerous individuals in the Bible. We review the biblical characters in the Old Testament and offer newer insights to their neurological diseases. We first look at the battle between Goliath and David. Interestingly, Goliath probably suffered from acromegaly. We propose autism as a diagnosis for Samson which would precede the first known case of autism by centuries. Isaac was a diabetic, and he probably had autonomic neuropathy. Few verses from the books of I Samuel, Psalms, and Ezekiel reveal symptoms suggestive of stroke. Jacob suffered from sciatica, and the child of the Shunnamite woman in II Kings had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These instances among others found in the Old Testament of the Bible offer newer insights on the history of current neurological diseases. PMID:21085524

  16. Clinical and neuroimaging features as diagnostic guides in neonatal neurology diseases with cerebellar involvement.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jessica L; Lemmon, Monica E; Northington, Frances J; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar abnormalities are encountered in a high number of neurological diseases that present in the neonatal period. These disorders can be categorized broadly as inherited (e.g. malformations, inborn errors of metabolism) or acquired (e.g. hemorrhages, infections, stroke). In some disorders such as Dandy-Walker malformation or Joubert syndrome, the main abnormalities are located within the cerebellum and brainstem. In other disorders such as Krabbe disease or sulfite oxidase deficiency, the main abnormalities are found within the supratentorial brain, but the cerebellar involvement may be helpful for diagnostic purposes. In In this article, we review neurological disorders with onset in the neonatal period and cerebellar involvement with a focus on how characterization of cerebellar involvement can facilitate accurate diagnosis and improved accuracy of neuro-functional prognosis. PMID:26770813

  17. Neurologic disease induced in transgenic mice by cerebral overexpression of interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, I L; Abraham, C R; Masliah, E; Kemper, P; Inglis, J D; Oldstone, M B; Mucke, L

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines are thought to be important mediators in physiologic and pathophysiologic processes affecting the central nervous system (CNS). To explore this hypothesis, transgenic mice were generated in which the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6), under the regulatory control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene promoter, was overexpressed in the CNS. A number of transgenic founder mice and their offspring exhibited a neurologic syndrome the severity of which correlated with the levels of cerebral IL-6 expression. Transgenic mice with high levels of IL-6 expression developed severe neurologic disease characterized by runting, tremor, ataxia, and seizure. Neuropathologic manifestations included neuro-degeneration, astrocytosis, angiogenesis, and induction of acute-phase-protein production. These findings indicate that cytokines such as IL-6 can have a direct pathogenic role in inflammatory, infectious, and neurodegenerative CNS diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7694279

  18. Neurological diseases and health care utilization among first-generation immigrants.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Nembrini, Stefano; Concoreggi, Carlo; Magoni, Mauro; Padovani, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Migrants may constitute a risk group and should have specific targets for health policy. To identify their health needs, it is important to investigate their epidemiological profile and their access to health services. The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of hospital and neurological services use among immigrants living in Brescia (Italy). The analysis took into account the records of 45,645 immigrants admitted to the ER (Emergency Room) as well as the discharge data of 6419 patients hospitalized in the Department of Neurology of the Azienda Ospedaliera Spedali Civili di Brescia, over a 3.5 years period. To take confounding factors into account, immigrant patients admitted to the department of Neurology were compared to a selection of Italian patients matched by age and sex. The main objectives were to explore causes of admission of the immigrant population-along with socio-demographic characteristics-to the Emergency Room and to the Neurology Units. Immigrants showed a similar pattern of hospital use to the Italian patients, although with a higher frequency of infective diseases and traumatic injuries. They also showed a higher mean Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG) weight than the Italians. Average length of hospitalization was longer in immigrant population. However, the use of neurological services by migrants is less than their demographic share. Poorer economic and social conditions, as well as a worse labor market experienced by immigrants may expose them to risk factors for injuries and infective diseases. Reducing the language and bureaucratic barriers, as well as enhancing cross-cultural skills of physicians, might be crucial in decreasing the length and the cost of hospitalization. PMID:26872665

  19. Management of disease-modifying treatments in neurological autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Salmen, A; Gold, R; Chan, A

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium for autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system, specifically multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica, is steadily increasing, with a large spectrum of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents targeting different mechanisms of the immune system. However, increasingly efficacious treatment options also entail higher potential for severe adverse drug reactions. Especially in cases failing first-line treatment, thorough evaluation of the risk–benefit profile of treatment alternatives is necessary. This argues for the need of algorithms to identify patients more likely to benefit from a specific treatment. Moreover, paradigms to stratify the risk for severe adverse drug reactions need to be established. In addition to clinical/paraclinical measures, biomarkers may aid in individualized risk–benefit assessment. A recent example is the routine testing for anti-John Cunningham virus antibodies in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis patients to assess the risk for the development of progressive multi-focal leucoencephalopathy. Refined algorithms for individualized risk assessment may also facilitate early initiation of induction treatment schemes in patient groups with high disease activity rather than classical escalation concepts. In this review, we will discuss approaches for individiualized risk–benefit assessment both for newly introduced agents as well as medications with established side-effect profiles. In addition to clinical parameters, we will also focus on biomarkers that may assist in patient selection. Other Articles published in this series Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 336–48. Disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: common and divergent current and future strategies. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175: 359–72. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple

  20. Approach to Neurometabolic Diseases from a Pediatric Neurological Point of View

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neurometabolic disorders are an important group of diseases that mostly are presented in newborns and infants. Neurological manifestations are the prominent signs and symptoms in this group of diseases. Seizures are a common sign and are often refractory to antiepileptic drugs in untreated neurometabolic patients. The onset of symptoms for neurometabolic disorders appears after an interval of normal or near normal growth and development.Additionally, affected children may fare well until a catabolic crisis occurs. Patients with neurometabolic disorders during metabolic decompensation have severe clinical presentation, which include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, seizures, and loss of consciousness. This symptom is often fatal but severe neurological insult and regression in neurodevelopmental milestones can result as a prominent sign in patients who survived. Acute symptoms should be immediately treated regardless of the cause. A number of patients with neurometabolic disorders respond favorably and, in some instances, dramatically respond to treatment. Early detection and early intervention is invaluable in some patients to prevent catabolism and normal or near normal neurodevelopmental milestones. This paper discusses neurometabolic disorders, approaches to this group of diseases (from the view of a pediatric neurologist), clinical and neurological manifestations, neuroimaging and electroencephalography findings, early detection, and early treatment. PMID:25767534

  1. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot reactivity in a cohort of patients with neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Soldan, S S; Graf, M D; Waziri, A; Flerlage, A N; Robinson, S M; Kawanishi, T; Leist, T P; Lehky, T J; Levin, M C; Jacobson, S

    1999-09-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with a chronic, progressive neurological disease known as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Screening for HTLV-I involves the detection of virus-specific serum antibodies by EIA and confirmation by Western blot. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot patterns have been described worldwide. However, the significance of this blot pattern is unclear. We identified 8 patients with neurological disease and an HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot pattern, none of whom demonstrated increased spontaneous proliferation and HTLV-I-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. However, HTLV-I tax sequence was amplified from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 4 of them. These data suggest that patients with chronic progressive neurological disease and HTLV-I/II Western blot seroindeterminate reactivity may harbor either defective HTLV-I, novel retrovirus with partial homology to HTLV-I, or HTLV-I in low copy number. PMID:10438355

  2. Neurogenesis in neurological and psychiatric diseases and brain injury: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Linhui; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Wang, Jixian; Huang, Lijie; Zhuge, Qichuan; Wang, Brian; Jin, Kunlin; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-04-01

    Researchers who have uncovered the presence of stem cells in an adult's central nervous system have not only challenged the dogma that new neurons cannot be generated during adulthood, but also shed light on the etiology and disease mechanisms underlying many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Brain trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, and psychiatric disorders pose enormous burdens at both personal and societal levels. Although medications for these disorders are widely used, the treatment mechanisms underlying the illnesses remain largely elusive. In the past decade, an increasing amount of evidence indicate that adult neurogenesis (i.e. generating new CNS neurons during adulthood) may be involved in the pathology of different CNS disorders, and thus neurogenesis may be a potential target area for treatments. Although new neurons were shown to be a major player in mediating treatment efficacy of neurological and psychotropic drugs on cognitive functions, it is still debatable if the altered production of new neurons can cause the disorders. This review hence seeks to discuss pre and current clinical studies that demonstrate the functional impact adult neurogenesis have on neurological and psychiatric illnesses while examining the related underlying disease mechanisms. PMID:24384539

  3. [Swiss scrapie surveillance. I. Clinical aspects of neurological diseases in sheep and goats].

    PubMed

    Maurer, E; Botteron, C; Ehrensperger, F; Fatzer, R; Jaggy, A; Kolly, C; Meylan, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2005-10-01

    Small ruminants infected with scrapie show a large range of often unspecific clinical symptoms. The most-often described signs, locomotion, sensibility and behavioural disorders and emaciation, rarely occur together, and cases have been described in which only one of those signs was detectable.Thus, formulating a well-circumscribed definition of a clinical suspect case is difficult. Most animals with CNS-effecting diseases such as listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, cerebrospinal nematidiasis and enterotoxemia will, in a thorough neurological examination, show at least some scrapie-like symptoms. Among the 22 neurological field cases examined in this study, a goat with cerebral gliomatosis and hair lice showed the closest similarity to clinical scrapie. The unilateral deficiency of the cerebral nerves has potential as an clinical exclusion criterion for scrapie. However, the laboratory confirmation--or exclusion--of scrapie remains important. It thus needs to be realized that a consistent and thorough examination of neurologically diseased small ruminants (including fallen stock) is the backbone of a good surveillance system for these diseases. This should be a motivation for submitting adult sheep and goats for neuropathological examination. PMID:16259408

  4. Application of Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Pediatric Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Jung Hye; Shin, Eunsim; Kim, Gun-Ha; Lee, Kyungok; Hong, Young Sook; Lee, Joo Won

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a technique used to analyze quantitative increase or decrease of chromosomes by competitive DNA hybridization of patients and controls. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits and yield of array-CGH in comparison with conventional karyotyping in pediatric neurology patients. Materials and Methods We included 87 patients from the pediatric neurology clinic with at least one of the following features: developmental delay, mental retardation, dysmorphic face, or epilepsy. DNA extracted from patients and controls was hybridized on the Roche NimbleGen 135K oligonucleotide array and compared with G-band karyotyping. The results were analyzed with findings reported in recent publications and internet databases. Results Chromosome imbalances, including 9 cases detected also by G-band karyotyping, were found in 28 patients (32.2%), and at least 19 of them seemed to be causally related to the abnormal phenotypes. Regarding each clinical symptom, 26.2% of 42 developmental delay patients, 44.4% of 18 mental retardation patients, 42.9% of 28 dysmorphic face patients, and 34.6% of 26 epilepsy patients showed abnormal array results. Conclusion Although there were relatively small number of tests in patients with pediatric neurologic disease, this study demonstrated that array-CGH is a very useful tool for clinical diagnosis of unknown genome abnormalities performed in pediatric neurology clinics. PMID:24339284

  5. Neurological and Psychiatric Diseases and Their Unique Cognitive Profiles: Implications for Nursing Practice and Research

    PubMed Central

    Vance, David E.; Dodson, Joan E.; Watkins, Jason; Kennedy, Bridgett H.; Keltner, Norman L.

    2013-01-01

    To successfully negotiate and interact with one’s environment, optimal cognitive functioning is needed. Unfortunately, many neurological and psychiatric diseases impede certain cognitive abilities such as executive functioning or speed of processing; this can produce a poor fit between the patient and the cognitive demands of his or her environment. Such non-dementia diseases include bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, and anxiety disorders, just to name a few. Each of these diseases negatively affects particular areas of the brain, resulting in distinct cognitive profiles (e.g., deficits in executive functioning but normal speed of processing as seen in schizophrenia). In fact, it is from these cognitive deficits in which such behavioral and emotional symptoms may manifest (e.g., delusions, paranoia). This article highlights the distinct cognitive profiles of such common neurological and psychiatric diseases. An understanding of such disease-specific cognitive profiles can assist nurses in providing care to patients by knowing what cognitive deficits are associated with each disease and how these cognitive deficits impact everyday functioning and social interactions. Implications for nursing practice and research are posited within the framework of cognitive reserve and neuroplasticity. PMID:23422693

  6. An overview on the correlation of neurological disorders with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, C.K.; Jabir, Nasimudeen R.; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Mahmoud, Maged; Shakil, Shazi; Damanhouri, Ghazi A.; Zaidi, Syed Kashif; Tabrez, Shams; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders (NDs) are one of the leading causes of death especially in the developed countries. Among those NDs, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) are heading the table. There have been several reports in the scientific literatures which suggest the linkage between cardiovascular disorders (CVDs) and NDs. In the present communication, we have tried to compile NDs (AD and PD) association with CVDs reported in the literature. Based on the available scientific literature, we believe that further comprehensive study needs to be done to elucidate the molecular linking points associated with the above mentioned disorders. PMID:25561878

  7. PDE5 Exists in Human Neurons and is a Viable Therapeutic Target for Neurologic Disease.

    PubMed

    Teich, Andrew F; Sakurai, Mikako; Patel, Mitesh; Holman, Cameron; Saeed, Faisal; Fiorito, Jole; Arancio, Ottavio

    2016-03-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) is a critical component of the cGMP-PKG axis of cellular signaling in neurons, and inhibition of PDE5 has been shown to be therapeutic in a wide range of neurologic conditions in animal models. However, enthusiasm for PDE5 inhibitors in humans is limited by data suggesting that PDE5 may not exist in human neurons. Here, we first show that past attempts to quantify PDE5 mRNA were flawed due to the use of incorrect primers, and that when correct primers are used, PDE5 mRNA is detectable in human brain tissue. We then show that PDE5 protein exists in human brain by western blot and ELISA. Most importantly, we performed immunohistochemistry and demonstrate that PDE5 is present in human neurons. We hope that this work will trigger a renewed interest in the development of PDE5 inhibitors for neurologic disease. PMID:26967220

  8. PDE5 Exists in Human Neurons and is a Viable Therapeutic Target for Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Andrew F.; Sakurai, Mikako; Patel, Mitesh; Holman, Cameron; Saeed, Faisal; Fiorito, Jole; Arancio, Ottavio

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) is a critical component of the cGMP-PKG axis of cellular signaling in neurons, and inhibition of PDE5 has been shown to be therapeutic in a wide range of neurologic conditions in animal models. However, enthusiasm for PDE5 inhibitors in humans is limited by data suggesting that PDE5 may not exist in human neurons. Here, we first show that past attempts to quantify PDE5 mRNA were flawed due to the use of incorrect primers, and that when correct primers are used, PDE5 mRNA is detectable in human brain tissue. We then show that PDE5 protein exists in human brain by western blot and ELISA. Most importantly, we performed immunohistochemistry and demonstrate that PDE5 is present in human neurons. We hope that this work will trigger a renewed interest in the development of PDE5 inhibitors for neurologic disease. PMID:26967220

  9. Neurological disease in human and canine leishmaniasis--clinical features and immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maia, C S F; Monteiro, M C; Gavioli, E C; Oliveira, F R; Oliveira, G B; Romão, P R T

    2015-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vectorborne disease caused by Leishmania protozoa, which is a major health problem and a neglected disease common in many regions of the world. Leishmania is an intracellular parasite transmitted by sand flies that causes clinical manifestations ranging from a severe and potentially fatal disease named visceral leishmaniasis to less severe but in many cases disfiguring diseases that mainly affect the skin or mucosal tissues, known as cutaneous leishmaniasis. Despite the detection of Leishmania parasites in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of human patients and dogs, epidemiological data, as well as information about the mechanisms of central and peripheral nervous system alterations, are poorly described. This review is focused on the current knowledge about the neurological manifestations and immunopathogenic mechanisms in human patients and animals infected with Leishmania. PMID:25983042

  10. Focused ultrasound as a non-invasive intervention for neurological disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Piper, Rory J; Hughes, Mark A; Moran, Carmel M; Kandasamy, Jothy

    2016-06-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is an incision-less intervention that is a Food and Drug Association (FDA) approved surgical treatment for various pathologies including uterine fibroids and bone metastases. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging thermometry and ability to use FUS across the intact calvarium have re-opened interest in the use of FUS in the treatment of neurological diseases. FUS currently has a European CE mark for use in movement disorders. However, it shows potential in the treatment of other neuropathologies including tumours and as a lesional tool in epilepsy. FUS may exert its therapeutic effect through thermal or mechanical fragmentation of intracranial lesions, or by enhancing delivery of pharmaceutical agents across the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms, clinical applications and potential future of FUS for the treatment of neurological disease. We have searched for and described the recently completed and on-going clinical trials investigating FUS for the treatment of neurological disorders. We identified phase one trials investigating utility of FUS in: movement disorders (including essential tremor and Parkinson's disease), chronic pain, obsessive-compulsive disorder and cerebral tumours. Current literature also reports pre-clinical work exploring utility in epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease) and thrombolysis. Safety and early efficacy data are now emerging, suggesting that transcalvarial FUS is a feasible and safe intervention. Further evidence is required to determine whether FUS is an effective alternative in comparison to current neurosurgical interventions. The cost of requisite hardware is currently a barrier to widespread uptake in UK neurosurgical centres. PMID:27101792

  11. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-03-01

    Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  12. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  13. The Application of Human iPSCs in Neurological Diseases: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Nina; Tang, Beisha

    2016-01-01

    In principle, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are generated from somatic cells by reprogramming and gaining the capacity to self-renew indefinitely as well as the ability to differentiate into cells of different lineages. Human iPSCs have absolute advantages over human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and animal models in disease modeling, drug screening, and cell replacement therapy. Since Takahashi and Yamanaka first described in 2007 that iPSCs can be generated from human adult somatic cells by retroviral transduction of the four transcription factors, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, disease specific iPSC lines have sprung up worldwide like bamboo shoots after a spring rain, making iPSC one of the hottest and fastest moving topics in modern science. The craze for iPSCs has spread throughout main branches of clinical medicine, covering neurology, hematology, cardiology, endocrinology, hepatology, ophthalmology, and so on. Here in this paper, we will focus on the clinical application of human iPSCs in disease modeling, drug screening, and cell replacement therapy for neurological diseases. PMID:26880979

  14. Complex disease, gender and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Zachary; Wang, Sun-Chong; Petronis, Arturas

    2006-01-01

    Gender differences in susceptibility to complex disease such as asthma, diabetes, lupus, autism and major depression, among numerous other disorders, represent one of the hallmarks of non-Mendelian biology. It has been generally accepted that endocrinological differences are involved in the sexual dimorphism of complex disease; however, specific molecular mechanisms of such hormonal effects have not been elucidated yet. This paper will review evidence that sex hormone action may be mediated via gene-specific epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones. The epigenetic modifications can explain sex effects at DNA sequence polymorphisms and haplotypes identified in gender-stratified genetic linkage and association studies. Hormone-induced DNA methylation and histone modification changes at specific gene regulatory regions may increase or reduce the risk of a disease. The epigenetic interpretation of sexual dimorphism fits well into the epigenetic theory of complex disease, which argues for the primary pathogenic role of inherited and/or acquired epigenetic misregulation rather than DNA sequence variation. The new experimental strategies, especially the high throughput microarray-based epigenetic profiling, can be used for testing the epigenetic hypothesis of gender effects in complex diseases. PMID:17438668

  15. Clinical studies on rising and re-rising neurological diseases in Japan--a personal contribution.

    PubMed

    Igata, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    Throughout my research life, I experienced to discover the causes of some neurological diseases in Japan. 1) SMON (subacute myelo-optico-neuropathy). Since the early 1960s, a peculiar neurological disease became prevalent throughout Japan. Through the chemical analysis of the green urine, characteristic of this disease, it was found that this disease was caused by intoxication of the administered clioquinol, an anti-diarrheal drug. This discovery is a big topic in the history of Japanese medicine. 2) In early 1970s, I experienced many young patients with oedema and polyneuropathy in Kagoshima. Finally it was found that the disease was the long-forgotten beriberi, which had disappeared several decades ago. We must always be aware of beriberi even now, as far as we eat well-polished rice. 3) In 1972, we noticed a group of sporadic paraparesis in Kagoshima, which was 20 years later confirmed to be induced by human T lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I). We named this disease as "HTLV-I associated myelopathy" (HAM). It gave a strong impact that the causative virus of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) can induce entirely different diseases, in terms of both the clinical course and the pathological features. It was also proven that HAM was identical with tropical spastic paraparesis, (TSP), which had been prevalent in many areas of tropical zones. These experiences are good examples of our slogan "to keep in mind to send message of scientific progress from the local area to the international stage. PMID:20431261

  16. Replication Validity of Initial Association Studies: A Comparison between Psychiatry, Neurology and Four Somatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Button, Katherine; Boraud, Thomas; Munafo, Marcus; Gonon, François

    2016-01-01

    Context There are growing concerns about effect size inflation and replication validity of association studies, but few observational investigations have explored the extent of these problems. Objective Using meta-analyses to measure the reliability of initial studies and explore whether this varies across biomedical domains and study types (cognitive/behavioral, brain imaging, genetic and “others”). Methods We analyzed 663 meta-analyses describing associations between markers or risk factors and 12 pathologies within three biomedical domains (psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases). We collected the effect size, sample size, publication year and Impact Factor of initial studies, largest studies (i.e., with the largest sample size) and the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial studies were considered as replicated if they were in nominal agreement with meta-analyses and if their effect size inflation was below 100%. Results Nominal agreement between initial studies and meta-analyses regarding the presence of a significant effect was not better than chance in psychiatry, whereas it was somewhat better in neurology and somatic diseases. Whereas effect sizes reported by largest studies and meta-analyses were similar, most of those reported by initial studies were inflated. Among the 256 initial studies reporting a significant effect (p<0.05) and paired with significant meta-analyses, 97 effect sizes were inflated by more than 100%. Nominal agreement and effect size inflation varied with the biomedical domain and study type. Indeed, the replication rate of initial studies reporting a significant effect ranged from 6.3% for genetic studies in psychiatry to 86.4% for cognitive/behavioral studies. Comparison between eight subgroups shows that replication rate decreases with sample size and “true” effect size. We observed no evidence of association between replication rate and publication year or Impact Factor. Conclusion The differences in reliability

  17. Respiratory and neurological disease in rabbits experimentally infected with equid herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Kanitz, Fábio A; Cargnelutti, Juliana F; Anziliero, Deniz; Gonçalves, Kelley V; Masuda, Eduardo K; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F

    2015-10-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is an important pathogen of horses worldwide, associated with respiratory, reproductive and/or neurological disease. A mouse model for EHV-1 infection has been established but fails to reproduce some important aspects of the viral pathogenesis. Then, we investigated the susceptibility of rabbits to EHV-1 aiming at proposing this species as an alternative model for EHV-1 infection. Weanling rabbits inoculated intranasal with EHV-1 Kentucky D (10(7) TCID50/animal) shed virus in nasal secretions up to day 8-10 post-inoculation (pi), presented viremia up to day 14 pi and seroconverted to EHV-1 (virus neutralizing titers 4 to 64). Most rabbits (75%) developed respiratory disease, characterized by serous to hemorrhagic nasal discharge and mild to severe dyspnea. Some animals (20%) presented neurological signs as circling, bruxism and opisthotonus. Six animals died during acute disease (days 3-6); infectious virus and/or viral DNA were detected in the lungs, trigeminal ganglia (TG), olfactory bulbs (OBs) and cerebral cortex/brain (CC). Histological examination showed necrohemorrhagic, multifocal to coalescent bronchointerstitial pneumonia and diffuse alveolar edema. In two rabbits euthanized at day 50 pi, latent EHV-1 DNA was detected in the OBs. Dexamethasone administration at day 50 pi resulted in virus reactivation, demonstrated by virus shedding, viremia, clinical signs, and increase in VN titers and/or by detection of virus DNA in lungs, OBs, TGs and/or CC. These results demonstrate that rabbits are susceptible to EHV-1 infection and develop respiratory and neurological signs upon experimental inoculation. Thus, rabbits may be used to study selected aspects of EHV-1 biology and pathogenesis, extending and complementing the mouse model. PMID:26187161

  18. Neurological Disease Rises from Ocean to Bring Model for Human Epilepsy to Life

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Domoic acid of macroalgal origin was used for traditional and medicinal purposes in Japan and largely forgotten until its rediscovery in diatoms that poisoned 107 people after consumption of contaminated mussels. The more severely poisoned victims had seizures and/or amnesia and four died; however, one survivor unexpectedly developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) a year after the event. Nearly a decade later, several thousand sea lions have stranded on California beaches with neurological symptoms. Analysis of the animals stranded over an eight year period indicated five clusters of acute neurological poisoning; however, nearly a quarter have stranded individually outside these events with clinical signs of a chronic neurological syndrome similar to TLE. These poisonings are not limited to sea lions, which serve as readily observed sentinels for other marine animals that strand during domoic acid poisoning events, including several species of dolphin and whales. Acute domoic acid poisoning is five-times more prominent in adult female sea lions as a result of the proximity of their year-round breeding grounds to major domoic acid bloom events. The chronic neurological syndrome, on the other hand, is more prevalent in young animals, with many potentially poisoned in utero. The sea lion rookeries of the Channel Islands are at the crossroads of domoic acid producing harmful algal blooms and a huge industrial discharge site for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs). Studies in experimental animals suggest that chronic poisoning observed in immature sea lions may result from a spatial and temporal coincidence of DDTs and domoic acid during early life stages. Emergence of an epilepsy syndrome from the ocean brings a human epilepsy model to life and provides unexpected insights into interaction with legacy contaminants and expression of disease at different life stages. PMID:22069654

  19. Demyelinizing Neurological Disease after Treatment with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Bruè, Claudia; Mariotti, Cesare; Rossiello, Ilaria; Saitta, Andrea; Giovannini, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Demyelinizing neurological disease is a rare complication after treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α antagonists. We report on a case of multiple sclerosis after TNFα antagonist treatment and discuss its differential diagnosis. Methods This is an observational case study. Results A 48-year-old male was referred to Ophthalmology in January 2015 for an absolute scotoma in the superior quadrant of the visual field in his right eye. Visual acuity was 20/50 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left. Fundus examination was unremarkable bilaterally. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed a normal macular retina structure. Visual field examination revealed a superior hemianopsia in the right eye. Head magnetic resonance imaging showed findings compatible with optic neuritis. The visual evoked potentials confirmed the presence of optic neuritis. The patient had been under therapy with adalimumab since January 2014, for Crohn's disease. Suspension of adalimumab was recommended, and it was substituted with tapered deltacortene, from 1 mg/kg/day. After 1 month, the scotoma was resolved completely. Conclusions TNFα antagonists can provide benefit to patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, they can also be associated with severe adverse effects. Therefore, adequate attention should be paid to neurological abnormalities in patients treated with TNFα antagonists. PMID:27504093

  20. Using phosphate supplementation to reverse hypophosphatemia and phosphate depletion in neurological disease and disturbance.

    PubMed

    Håglin, Lena

    2016-06-01

    Hypophosphatemia (HP) with or without intracellular depletion of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine triphosphate has been associated with central and peripheral nervous system complications and can be observed in various diseases and conditions related to respiratory alkalosis, alcoholism (alcohol withdrawal), diabetic ketoacidosis, malnutrition, obesity, and parenteral and enteral nutrition. In addition, HP may explain serious muscular, neurological, and haematological disorders and may cause peripheral neuropathy with paresthesias and metabolic encephalopathy, resulting in confusion and seizures. The neuropathy may be improved quickly after proper phosphate replacement. Phosphate depletion has been corrected using potassium-phosphate infusion, a treatment that can restore consciousness. In severe ataxia and tetra paresis, complete recovery can occur after adequate replacement of phosphate. Patients with multiple risk factors, often with a chronic disease and severe HP that contribute to phosphate depletion, are at risk for neurologic alterations. To predict both risk and optimal phosphate replenishment requires assessing the nutritional status and risk for re-feeding hypophosphatemia. The strategy for correcting HP depends on the severity of the underlying disease and the goal for re-establishing a phosphate balance to limit the consequences of phosphate depletion. PMID:25909152

  1. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, Tasso J.; Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases. PMID:24387579

  2. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, Tasso J. Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-12-15

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  3. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaper, Tasso J.; Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-12-01

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  4. Cerebrovascular diseases at the C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology: from Ottorino Rossi to the present day

    PubMed Central

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Martignoni, Emilia; Sandrini, Giorgio; Bono, Giorgio; Nappi, Giuseppe

    Summary This paper traces the development of research and healthcare models in the field of cerebrovascular disorders at the C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology in Pavia, Italy. It starts with a description of the original experiences of Ottorino Rossi and his thesis on atherosclerosis which date back to the beginning of the last century; it then illustrates the connections between his seminal essay and the future directions followed by research in this institute, through to the development of one of the first stroke units in Italy. In this context, we examine a large range of scientific approaches, many related to cerebrovascular diseases (such as headaches) and autonomic disorders, and some of their biological and physiological markers. The originality of an approach also based on tools of advanced technology, including information technology, is emphasised, as is the importance of passion and perseverance in the pursuit of extraordinary results in what is an extremely complex and difficult field. PMID:21729590

  5. Resting-state networks link invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation across diverse psychiatric and neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Fox, Michael D; Buckner, Randy L; Liu, Hesheng; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Lozano, Andres M; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-10-14

    Brain stimulation, a therapy increasingly used for neurological and psychiatric disease, traditionally is divided into invasive approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), and noninvasive approaches, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The relationship between these approaches is unknown, therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear, and the ideal stimulation site for a given technique is often ambiguous, limiting optimization of the stimulation and its application in further disorders. In this article, we identify diseases treated with both types of stimulation, list the stimulation sites thought to be most effective in each disease, and test the hypothesis that these sites are different nodes within the same brain network as defined by resting-state functional-connectivity MRI. Sites where DBS was effective were functionally connected to sites where noninvasive brain stimulation was effective across diseases including depression, Parkinson's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, essential tremor, addiction, pain, minimally conscious states, and Alzheimer's disease. A lack of functional connectivity identified sites where stimulation was ineffective, and the sign of the correlation related to whether excitatory or inhibitory noninvasive stimulation was found clinically effective. These results suggest that resting-state functional connectivity may be useful for translating therapy between stimulation modalities, optimizing treatment, and identifying new stimulation targets. More broadly, this work supports a network perspective toward understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeted brain network modulation. PMID:25267639

  6. Resting-state networks link invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation across diverse psychiatric and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Buckner, Randy L.; Liu, Hesheng; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Lozano, Andres M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Brain stimulation, a therapy increasingly used for neurological and psychiatric disease, traditionally is divided into invasive approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), and noninvasive approaches, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The relationship between these approaches is unknown, therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear, and the ideal stimulation site for a given technique is often ambiguous, limiting optimization of the stimulation and its application in further disorders. In this article, we identify diseases treated with both types of stimulation, list the stimulation sites thought to be most effective in each disease, and test the hypothesis that these sites are different nodes within the same brain network as defined by resting-state functional-connectivity MRI. Sites where DBS was effective were functionally connected to sites where noninvasive brain stimulation was effective across diseases including depression, Parkinson's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, essential tremor, addiction, pain, minimally conscious states, and Alzheimer’s disease. A lack of functional connectivity identified sites where stimulation was ineffective, and the sign of the correlation related to whether excitatory or inhibitory noninvasive stimulation was found clinically effective. These results suggest that resting-state functional connectivity may be useful for translating therapy between stimulation modalities, optimizing treatment, and identifying new stimulation targets. More broadly, this work supports a network perspective toward understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeted brain network modulation. PMID:25267639

  7. National response to neurological diseases in Malaysia: planning for the future.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Hussin, Ahmad Munnawir; Tharakan, John; Abdullah, Mohamed Rusli; Saad, Ramli; Kamari, Zaidun; Hussin, Zabidi Azhar Mohd; Razak, Dzulkifli Abdul

    2006-07-01

    The number of cases of neurological disease is expected to rise in the next 10 years, making this the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality after heart disease in Malaysia. The lack of human resources in the neurological field currently serving the Malaysian population may cause a deficiency in specialized care, especially in rural areas where neurological and neurosurgical care may be lacking. Thus, a resolve was made to increase the numbers of specialists by the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) with the help of the Ministry of Health of Malaysia. A study was made to evaluate the number of referral centers needed in strategic parts of Malaysia. Our calculation was based on service demands and operative procedures following the guidelines of the Association of British Neurologists (ABN) where 15 minutes of service time was equivalent to 1 unit. Based on 2 million population covered in the state of Kelantan by this University Hospital, 4.27 neurologists are needed to meet service demands with a consultant to population ratio (CPR) of 1:468,384, compared to 7.46 neurosurgeons, with a CPR of 1:268,097. According to the current service demands, one neurologist has to work more than 407 hours per year and one neurosurgeon 1,219 hours per year in our hospital. Hospitals with a larger catchment area would need to have more neurologists and neurosurgeons for optimal care in their area. Thus, more neurologists and neurosurgeons are needed to be produced, since the existing numbers are too small for quality care in Malaysia. PMID:17121309

  8. Infliximab is a plausible alternative for neurologic complications of Behçet disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeydan, Burcu; Uygunoglu, Ugur; Saip, Sabahattin; Demirci, Onat N.; Seyahi, Emire; Ugurlu, Serdal; Hamuryudan, Vedat; Siva, Aksel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of infliximab in patients with neuro-Behçet syndrome for whom other immunosuppressive medications had failed. Methods: Patients whose common immunosuppressive medications fail in recurrent neuro-Behçet syndrome need an alternative. We report our experience with the tumor necrosis factor α blocker infliximab for long-term treatment of neuro-Behçet syndrome. We recruited patients within a multidisciplinary referral practice of Behçet disease and prospectively followed everyone with a neurologic symptom(s). Patients (n = 16) with ≥2 neurologic bouts (excluding purely progressive disease) while on another immunosuppressive treatment were switched to and successfully sustained on infliximab (5 mg/kg in weeks 0, 2, and 6, then once every 8 weeks; minimum follow-up duration ≥12 months). Infliximab was stopped within 2 months after initiation in one patient because of pulmonary and CNS tuberculosis. Results: Patients had stepwise worsening due to relapses in the Expanded Disability Status Scale modified for neuro-Behçet syndrome before switching to infliximab (median score of 5.0, range 2.0–7.0; median neuro-Behçet syndrome duration 29.1 months, range 5.0–180.7). Median duration of preinfliximab immunosuppressive medication use was 20.0 months (range 3.0–180.7). In all 15 patients, during infliximab treatment (median score 4.0, range 2.0–7.0; median duration 39.0 months, range 16.0–104.9 months), neurologic relapses were completely aborted and there was no further disability accumulation. Conclusion: We observed a significant beneficial effect of infliximab in neuro-Behçet syndrome. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with neuro-Behçet syndrome whose other immunosuppressive medications failed, infliximab prevents further relapses and stabilizes disability. PMID:27458602

  9. Autoimmunity due to molecular mimicry as a cause of neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael C.; Lee, Sang Min; Kalume, Franck; Morcos, Yvette; Dohan, F. Curtis; Hasty, Karen A.; Callaway, Joseph C.; Zunt, Joseph; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Stuart, John M.

    2009-01-01

    One hypothesis that couples infection with autoimmune disease is molecular mimicry. Molecular mimicry is characterized by an immune response to an environmental agent that cross-reacts with a host antigen, resulting in disease1,2. This hypothesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, lupus and multiple sclerosis (MS)1–4. There is limited direct evidence linking causative agents with pathogenic immune reactions in these diseases. Our study establishes a clear link between viral infection, autoimmunity and neurological disease in humans. As a model for molecular mimicry, we studied patients with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a disease that can be indistinguishable from MS (refs. 5–7). HAM/TSP patients develop antibodies to neurons8. We hypothesized these antibodies would identify a central nervous system (CNS) autoantigen. Immunoglobulin G isolated from HAM/TSP patients identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein-A1 (hnRNP-A1) as the autoantigen. Antibodies to hnRNP-A1 cross-reacted with HTLV-1-tax, the immune response to which is associated with HAM/TSP (refs. 5,9). Immunoglobulin G specifically stained human Betz cells, whose axons are preferentially damaged7. Infusion of autoantibodies in brain sections inhibited neuronal firing, indicative of their pathogenic nature. These data demonstrate the importance of molecular mimicry between an infecting agent and hnRNP-A1 in autoimmune disease of the CNS. PMID:11984596

  10. Studies of generalized elemental imbalances in neurological disease patients using INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Vance, D.E.; Khare, S.S.; Kasarskis, E.J.; Markesbery, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Evidence has been presented in the literature to implicate trace elements in the etiology of several age-related neurological diseases. Most of these studies are based on brain analyses. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), we have observed trace element imbalances in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Picks's disease. The most prevalent elemental imbalances found in the brain were for bromine, mercury, and the alkali metals. In this study the authors report INAA studies of trace elements in nonneural tissues from Alzheimer's disease and ALS patients. Samples from household relatives were collected for use as controls wherever possible. Hair samples were washed according to the International Atomic Energy Agency recommended procedure. Fingernail samples were scraped with a quartz knife prior to washing by the same procedure. For ALS patients, blood samples were also collected. These data indicate that elemental imbalances in Alzheimer's disease and ALS are not restricted to the brain. Many elements perturbed in the brain are also altered in the several nonneural tissues examined to date. The imbalances in different tissues, however, are not always in the same direction. The changes observed may represent causes, effects, or simply epiphenomena. Longitudinal studies of nonneural tissues and blood, as well as tissue microprobe analyses at the cellular and subcellular level, will be required in order to better assess the role of trace elements in the etiology of these diseases.

  11. Copper mediated neurological disorder: visions into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer and Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Anami; Dev, Kapil; Tanwar, Ranjeet S; Selwal, Krishan K; Tyagi, Pankaj K

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a vital redox dynamic metal that is possibly poisonous in superfluous. Metals can traditionally or intricately cause propagation in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accretion in cells and this may effect in programmed cell death. Accumulation of Cu causes necrosis that looks to be facilitated by DNA damage, followed by activation of P53. Cu dyshomeostasis has also been concerned in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Menkes disease and is directly related to neurodegenerative syndrome that usually produces senile dementia. These mortal syndromes are closely related with an immense damage of neurons and synaptic failure in the brain. This review focuses on copper mediated neurological disorders with insights into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer and Menkes disease. PMID:24975171

  12. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  13. Konzo: From Poverty, Cassava, and Cyanogen Intake to Toxico-Nutritional Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Cliff, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Konzo is a distinct neurological entity with selective upper motor neuron damage, characterized by an abrupt onset of an irreversible, non-progressive, and symmetrical spastic para/tetraparesis. Despite its severity, konzo remains a neglected disease. The disease is associated with high dietary cyanogen consumption from insufficiently processed roots of bitter cassava combined with a protein-deficient diet. Epidemics occur when these conditions coincide at times of severe food shortage. Up to 1993, outbreaks in poor rural areas in Africa contributed to more than 3,700 cases of konzo. The number of affected people is underestimated. From unofficial reports, the number of cases was estimated to be at least 100,000 in 2000, in contrast to the 6,788 cases reported up to 2009 from published papers. PMID:21738800

  14. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain in children: normal and neurologic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.A,; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Thomas, D.J.; Hayward, R.; Bryant, D.R.T.; Payne, J.A.; Levene, M.I.; Whitelaw, A.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Dubowitz, V.

    1983-11-01

    The results of initial clinical nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in eight normal and 52 children with a wide variety of neurologic diseases were reviewed. The high level of gray-white matter contrast available with inversion-recovery sequences provided a basis for visualizing normal myelination as well as delays or deficits in this process. The appearances seen in cases of parenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and proencephalic cysts are described. Ventricular enlargement was readily identified and marginal edema was demonstrated with spin-echo sequences. Abnormalities were seen in cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, Hallervorden-Spatz disease, aminoaciduria, and meningitis. Space-occupying lesions were identified by virtue of their increased relaxation times and mass effects. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has considerable potential in pediatric neuroradiologic practice, in some conditions supplying information not available by computed tomography or sonography.

  15. Maternal Stress Induces Epigenetic Signatures of Psychiatric and Neurological Diseases in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, Fabiola C. R.; Yao, Youli; Ward, Isaac D.; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Olson, David M.; Benzies, Karen; Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga; Metz, Gerlinde A. S.

    2013-01-01

    The gestational state is a period of particular vulnerability to diseases that affect maternal and fetal health. Stress during gestation may represent a powerful influence on maternal mental health and offspring brain plasticity and development. Here we show that the fetal transcriptome, through microRNA (miRNA) regulation, responds to prenatal stress in association with epigenetic signatures of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned to stress from gestational days 12 to 18 while others served as handled controls. Gestational stress in the dam disrupted parturient maternal behaviour and was accompanied by characteristic brain miRNA profiles in the mother and her offspring, and altered transcriptomic brain profiles in the offspring. In the offspring brains, prenatal stress upregulated miR-103, which is involved in brain pathologies, and downregulated its potential gene target Ptplb. Prenatal stress downregulated miR-145, a marker of multiple sclerosis in humans. Prenatal stress also upregulated miR-323 and miR-98, which may alter inflammatory responses in the brain. Furthermore, prenatal stress upregulated miR-219, which targets the gene Dazap1. Both miR-219 and Dazap1 are putative markers of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder in humans. Offspring transcriptomic changes included genes related to development, axonal guidance and neuropathology. These findings indicate that prenatal stress modifies epigenetic signatures linked to disease during critical periods of fetal brain development. These observations provide a new mechanistic association between environmental and genetic risk factors in psychiatric and neurological disease. PMID:23451123

  16. Burden of Invasive Group B Streptococcus Disease and Early Neurological Sequelae in South African Infants

    PubMed Central

    Dangor, Ziyaad; Lala, Sanjay G.; Cutland, Clare L.; Koen, Anthonet; Jose, Lisa; Nakwa, Firdose; Ramdin, Tanusha; Fredericks, Joy; Wadula, Jeannette; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. We aimed to evaluate the burden of invasive early-onset (0–6 days of life, EOD) and late-onset (7–89 days, LOD) GBS disease and subsequent neurological sequelae in infants from a setting with a high prevalence (29.5%) of HIV among pregnant women. Methods A case-control study was undertaken at three secondary-tertiary care public hospitals in Johannesburg. Invasive cases in infants <3 months age were identified by surveillance of laboratories from November 2012 to February 2014. Neurodevelopmental screening was done in surviving cases and controls at 3 and 6 months of age. Results We identified 122 cases of invasive GBS disease over a 12 month period. Although the incidence (per 1,000 live births) of EOD was similar between HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants (1.13 vs. 1.46; p = 0.487), there was a 4.67-fold (95%CI: 2.24–9.74) greater risk for LOD in HIV-exposed infants (2.27 vs. 0.49; p<0.001). Overall, serotypes Ia, Ib and III constituted 75.8% and 92.5% of EOD and LOD, respectively. Risk factors for EOD included offensive draining liquor (adjusted Odds Ratio: 27.37; 95%CI: 1.94–386.50) and maternal GBS bacteriuria (aOR: 8.41; 95%CI: 1.44–49.15), which was also a risk-factor for LOD (aOR: 3.49; 95%CI: 1.17–10.40). The overall case fatality rate among cases was 18.0%. The adjusted odds for neurological sequelae at 6 months age was 13.18-fold (95%CI: 1.44–120.95) greater in cases (13.2%) than controls (0.4%). Discussion The high burden of invasive GBS disease in South Africa, which is also associated with high case fatality rates and significant neurological sequelae among survivors, is partly due to the heightened risk for LOD in infants born to HIV-infected women. An effective trivalent GBS conjugate vaccine targeted at pregnant women could prevent invasive GBS disease in this setting. PMID:25849416

  17. Brain-Delivery of Zinc-Ions as Potential Treatment for Neurological Diseases: Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Andreas M.; Rowan, Magali; Garner, Craig C.

    2011-01-01

    Homeostasis of metal ions such as Zn2+ is essential for proper brain function. Moreover, the list of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders involving a dysregulation of brain Zn2+-levels is long and steadily growing, including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease as well as schizophrenia, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, depression, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Down's syndrome, multiple sclerosis, Wilson’s disease and Pick’s disease. Furthermore, alterations in Zn2+-levels are seen in transient forebrain ischemia, seizures, traumatic brain injury and alcoholism. Thus, the possibility of altering Zn2+-levels within the brain is emerging as a new target for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Although the role of Zn2+ in the brain has been extensively studied over the past decades, methods for controlled regulation and manipulation of Zn2+ concentrations within the brain are still in their infancy. Since the use of dietary Zn2+ supplementation and restriction has major limitations, new methods and alternative approaches are currently under investigation, such as the use of intracranial infusion of Zn2+ chelators or nanoparticle technologies to elevate or decrease intracellular Zn2+ levels. Therefore, this review briefly summarizes the role of Zn2+ in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases and highlights key findings and impediments of brain Zn2+-level manipulation. Furthermore, some methods and compounds, such as metal ion chelation, redistribution and supplementation that are used to control brain Zn2+-levels in order to treat brain disorders are evaluated. PMID:22102982

  18. A neuropsychological comparison of siblings with neurological versus hepatic symptoms of Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arguedas, Deborah; Stewart, Jeanette; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Batchelor, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's Disease (WD) (also known as hepatolenticular degeneration) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder of abnormal copper metabolism, with an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 30,000. The clinical features associated with WD are highly varied. However, subtypes generally reflect neurological, hepatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The present case study reports two brothers with a recent diagnosis of WD. Neurological symptoms and cognitive deficits were exhibited in one brother (BL) in the form of extrapyramidal features, while the other brother (AL) only exhibited hepatic symptoms. Extensive neuropsychological testing was conducted on both siblings to compare cognitive profiles. Results for BL indicated significantly impaired motor functioning and information processing speed, which impacted him significantly at school. Aspects of executive dysfunction were also apparent in addition to reduced visual and verbal memory, working memory, and attention. Results for AL revealed evidence of verbal memory difficulties and aspects of executive dysfunction. Comparison is made of the distinct and common cognitive characteristics of the cases presented in terms of implications for early intervention and management of cognitive difficulties. PMID:24499483

  19. Neurologic Complications Associated with Sjögren's Disease: Case Reports and Modern Pathogenic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Colaci, Michele; Cassone, Giulia; Manfredi, Andreina; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Sjögren's syndrome (SS) may be complicated by some neurological manifestations, generally sensory polyneuropathy. Furthermore, involvement of cranial nerves was described as rare complications of SS. Methods. We reported 2 cases: the first one was a 40-year-old woman who developed neuritis of the left optic nerve as presenting symptom few years before the diagnosis of SS; the second was a 54-year-old woman who presented a paralysis of the right phrenic nerve 7 years after the SS onset. An exhaustive review of the literature on patients with cranial or phrenic nerve involvements was also carried out. Results. To the best of our knowledge, our second case represents the first observation of SS-associated phrenic nerve mononeuritis, while optic neuritis represents the most frequent cranial nerve involvement detectable in this connective tissue disease. Trigeminal neuropathy is also frequently reported, whereas neuritis involving the other cranial nerves is quite rare. Conclusions. Cranial nerve injury is a harmful complication of SS, even if less commonly recorded compared to peripheral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations may precede the clinical onset of SS; therefore, in patients with apparently isolated cranial nerve involvement, a correct diagnosis of the underlying SS is often delayed or overlooked entirely; in these instances, standard clinicoserological assessment is recommendable. PMID:25161786

  20. Dysregulation of gene expression as a cause of Cockayne syndrome neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuming; Chakravarty, Probir; Ranes, Michael; Kelly, Gavin; Brooks, Philip J; Neilan, Edward; Stewart, Aengus; Schiavo, Giampietro; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2014-10-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder with severe neurological symptoms. The majority of CS patients carry mutations in Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Indeed, because various repair pathways are compromised in patient cells, CS is widely considered a genome instability syndrome. Here, we investigate the connection between the neuropathology of CS and dysregulation of gene expression. Transcriptome analysis of human fibroblasts revealed that even in the absence of DNA damage, CSB affects the expression of thousands of genes, many of which are neuronal genes. CSB is present in a significant subset of these genes, suggesting that regulation is direct, at the level of transcription. Importantly, reprogramming of CS fibroblasts to neuron-like cells is defective unless an exogenous CSB gene is introduced. Moreover, neuroblastoma cells from which CSB is depleted show defects in gene expression programs required for neuronal differentiation, and fail to differentiate and extend neurites. Likewise, neuron-like cells cannot be maintained without CSB. Finally, a number of disease symptoms may be explained by marked gene expression changes in the brain of patients with CS. Together, these data point to dysregulation of gene regulatory networks as a cause of the neurological symptoms in CS. PMID:25249633

  1. Dysregulation of gene expression as a cause of Cockayne syndrome neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuming; Chakravarty, Probir; Ranes, Michael; Kelly, Gavin; Brooks, Philip J.; Neilan, Edward; Stewart, Aengus; Schiavo, Giampietro; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder with severe neurological symptoms. The majority of CS patients carry mutations in Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Indeed, because various repair pathways are compromised in patient cells, CS is widely considered a genome instability syndrome. Here, we investigate the connection between the neuropathology of CS and dysregulation of gene expression. Transcriptome analysis of human fibroblasts revealed that even in the absence of DNA damage, CSB affects the expression of thousands of genes, many of which are neuronal genes. CSB is present in a significant subset of these genes, suggesting that regulation is direct, at the level of transcription. Importantly, reprogramming of CS fibroblasts to neuron-like cells is defective unless an exogenous CSB gene is introduced. Moreover, neuroblastoma cells from which CSB is depleted show defects in gene expression programs required for neuronal differentiation, and fail to differentiate and extend neurites. Likewise, neuron-like cells cannot be maintained without CSB. Finally, a number of disease symptoms may be explained by marked gene expression changes in the brain of patients with CS. Together, these data point to dysregulation of gene regulatory networks as a cause of the neurological symptoms in CS. PMID:25249633

  2. Identification of a common epitope between enterovirus 71 and human MED25 proteins which may explain virus-associated neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Shiyang; Su, Weiheng; An, Dong; Gao, Feng; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2015-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative pathogen of hand, foot and mouth disease with especially severe neurologic complications, which mainly account for fatalities from this disease. To date, the pathogenesis of EV71 in the central neurons system has remained unclear. Cytokine-mediated immunopathogenesis and nervous tissue damage by virus proliferation are two widely speculated causes of the neurological disease. To further study the pathogenesis, we identified a common epitope (co-epitope) between EV71 VP1 and human mediator complex subunit 25 (MED25) highly expressed in brain stem. A monoclonal antibody (2H2) against the co-epitope was prepared, and its interaction with MED25 was examined by ELISA, immunofluorescence assay and Western blot in vitro and by live small animal imaging in vivo. Additionally, 2H2 could bind to both VP1 and MED25 with the affinity constant (Kd) of 10-7 M as determined by the ForteBio Octet System. Intravenously injected 2H2 was distributed in brain stem of mice after seven days of EV71 infection. Interestingly, 2H2-like antibodies were detected in the serum of EV71-infected patients. These findings suggest that EV71 infection induces the production of antibodies that can bind to autoantigens expressed in nervous tissue and maybe further trigger autoimmune reactions resulting in neurological disease. PMID:25826188

  3. Impact of Rhesus disease on the global problem of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zipursky, Alvin; Bhutani, Vinod K

    2015-02-01

    Clinical experience with Rhesus (Rh) disease and its post-icteric sequelae is limited among high-income countries because of nearly over four decades of effective prevention care. We hypothesized that Rh disease is prevalent in other regions of the world because it is likely that protection is limited or non-existent. Following a worldwide study, it has been concluded that Rh hemolytic disease is a significant public health problem resulting in stillbirths and neonatal deaths, and is a major cause of severe hyperbilirubinemia with its sequelae, kernicterus and bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction. Knowing that effective Rh-disease prophylaxis depends on maternal blood-type screening, healthcare afforded to the high-risk mothers needs to be free of bottlenecks and coupled with unfettered access to effective Rh-immunoglobulin. Future studies that match the universal identification of Rh-negative status of women and targeted use of immunoprophylaxis to prevent childhood bilirubin neurotoxicity are within reach, based on vast prior experiences. PMID:25582277

  4. [My way to "Keep Pioneering": integrated neuroscience and immunology research produces a paradigm shift for intractable neurological disease].

    PubMed

    Kira, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The motto of Prof. Yoshigoro Kuroiwa, who established the first independent neurology department in Japan at Kyushu University, is "Keep Pioneering". His students have followed this motto in all fields. I hereby present my efforts to keep pioneering in the following fields: (1) multiple sclerosis (MS); (2) central nervous system (CNS) involvement associated with peripheral atopic inflammation; and (3) care network for patients with intractable neurological disease. In MS, I propose that Th1/Th17 cell-mediated connexin astrocytopathy may play a critical role in producing huge demyelinating lesions in MS, neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and Baló's concentric sclerosis. I discovered a peculiar myelitis that occurred in patients with atopic disorders, and designated it atopic myelitis. In this condition, allodynia and neuropathic pain are cardinal features, regardless of the presence or absence of spinal cord MRI lesions. We found that peripheral atopic inflammation in mice produces allodynia as well as activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal cord. It is important to involve a variety of medical specialists and care coordinators for collaborative work on medical and social care issues for people with intractable disease. The motto of "Keep Pioneering" in neurology covers not only advanced research for the creation of new therapies for intractable neurological disease, but also caring for actual people with intractable disease, which I believe is the corporate social responsibility of our neurological society. I think that "Keep Pioneering" is a challenging process that never ends throughout one's life. PMID:25672676

  5. How aluminum, an intracellular ROS generator promotes hepatic and neurological diseases: the metabolic tale.

    PubMed

    Han, Sungwon; Lemire, Joseph; Appanna, Varun P; Auger, Christopher; Castonguay, Zachary; Appanna, Vasu D

    2013-04-01

    Metal pollutants are a global health risk due to their ability to contribute to a variety of diseases. Aluminum (Al), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant is implicated in anemia, osteomalacia, hepatic disorder, and neurological disorder. In this review, we outline how this intracellular generator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggers a metabolic shift towards lipogenesis in astrocytes and hepatocytes. This Al-evoked phenomenon is coupled to diminished mitochondrial activity, anerobiosis, and the channeling of α-ketoacids towards anti-oxidant defense. The resulting metabolic reconfiguration leads to fat accumulation and a reduction in ATP synthesis, characteristics that are common to numerous medical disorders. Hence, the ability of Al toxicity to create an oxidative environment promotes dysfunctional metabolic processes in astrocytes and hepatocytes. These molecular events triggered by Al-induced ROS production are the potential mediators of brain and liver disorders. PMID:23463459

  6. Histone turnover and chromatin accessibility: Critical mediators of neurological development, plasticity, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenderski, Wendy; Maze, Ian

    2016-01-01

    In postmitotic neurons, nucleosomal turnover was long considered to be a static process that is inconsequential to transcription. However, our recent studies in human and rodent brain indicate that replication-independent (RI) nucleosomal turnover, which requires the histone variant H3.3, is dynamic throughout life and is necessary for activity-dependent gene expression, synaptic connectivity, and cognition. H3.3 turnover also facilitates cellular lineage specification and plays a role in suppressing the expression of heterochromatic repetitive elements, including mutagenic transposable sequences, in mouse embryonic stem cells. In this essay, we review mechanisms and functions for RI nucleosomal turnover in brain and present the hypothesis that defects in histone dynamics may represent a common mechanism underlying neurological aging and disease. PMID:26990528

  7. The Global Burden of Mental, Neurological and Substance Use Disorders: An Analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

    PubMed Central

    Whiteford, Harvey A.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Degenhardt, Louisa; Feigin, Valery; Vos, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Background The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010), estimated that a substantial proportion of the world’s disease burden came from mental, neurological and substance use disorders. In this paper, we used GBD 2010 data to investigate time, year, region and age specific trends in burden due to mental, neurological and substance use disorders. Method For each disorder, prevalence data were assembled from systematic literature reviews. DisMod-MR, a Bayesian meta-regression tool, was used to model prevalence by country, region, age, sex and year. Prevalence data were combined with disability weights derived from survey data to estimate years lived with disability (YLDs). Years lost to premature mortality (YLLs) were estimated by multiplying deaths occurring as a result of a given disorder by the reference standard life expectancy at the age death occurred. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were computed as the sum of YLDs and YLLs. Results In 2010, mental, neurological and substance use disorders accounted for 10.4% of global DALYs, 2.3% of global YLLs and, 28.5% of global YLDs, making them the leading cause of YLDs. Mental disorders accounted for the largest proportion of DALYs (56.7%), followed by neurological disorders (28.6%) and substance use disorders (14.7%). DALYs peaked in early adulthood for mental and substance use disorders but were more consistent across age for neurological disorders. Females accounted for more DALYs in all mental and neurological disorders, except for mental disorders occurring in childhood, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy where males accounted for more DALYs. Overall DALYs were highest in Eastern Europe/Central Asia and lowest in East Asia/the Pacific. Conclusion Mental, neurological and substance use disorders contribute to a significant proportion of disease burden. Health systems can respond by implementing established, cost effective interventions, or by supporting the

  8. Responsibilities of Health Care Professionals in Counseling and Educating Patients With Incurable Neurological Diseases Regarding "Stem Cell Tourism": Caveat Emptor.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Michelle; Racke, Michael; Kissel, John; Imitola, Jaime

    2015-11-01

    "Stem cell tourism" is a rising Internet-based industry that aims to offer unproven procedures to patients with incurable diseases. This unregulated activity is reaching the neurologist's office as well as across the world, as patients request information or clearance for such procedures. Herein, we posit the need for medical societies and licensing boards to bring this issue to the forefront of neurology because it has the potential to affect patient care with risk of morbidity and mortality, as well as to undermine public confidence in legitimate stem cell research for incurable neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:26322563

  9. Clinical, electrophysiological, and serum biochemical measures of progressive neurological and hepatic dysfunction in feline Niemann-Pick type C disease

    PubMed Central

    Vite, Charles H; Ding, Wenge; Bryan, Caroline; O’Donnell, Patricia; Cullen, Karyn; Aleman, David; Haskins, Mark E.; van Winkle, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NP-C) disease is a neurovisceral lysosomal storage disease characterized by neurological dysfunction, hepatosplenomegaly, and early death. Natural history studies are very difficult to perform due to the low incidence and high heterogeneity of disease in the human population. Sixteen cats with a spontaneously occurring missense mutation in NPC1 were evaluated over time to define the progression of neurological and hepatic disease. Affected cats had remarkably regular onsets of specific signs of cerebellar and vestibular system dysfunction with progressive severity of dysfunction quantified by post-rotatory nystagmus and brain stem auditory evoked response measures. NP-C disease cats also showed increasing serum activity of alanine aminotransferase, asparate aminotransferase, and cholesterol with advancing age. Affected cats lived to a mean age of 20.5 +/- 4.8 weeks. Central nervous system and hepatic lesions were similar to those described in human patients. These data are the first to document progressive hepatic disease in the feline model and demonstrate the importance of liver disease as part of the NP-C disease phenotype. Both neurological and hepatic measures of disease onset and severity can be used as a baseline with which to assess the efficacy of experimental therapies of NP-C disease in the feline model. PMID:18614965

  10. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Kent; Sone, Takefumi; Ibata, Keiji; Fujimori, Koki; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P) and dorsoventral (D-V) axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs. PMID:26549851

  11. Sustained normalization of neurological disease after intracranial gene therapy in a feline model**

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, Victoria J.; Johnson, Aime K.; Gray-Edwards, Heather; Randle, Ashley N.; Brunson, Brandon L.; Morrison, Nancy E.; Salibi, Nouha; Johnson, Jacob A.; Hwang, Misako; Beyers, Ronald J.; Leroy, Stanley G.; Maitland, Stacy; Denney, Thomas S.; Cox, Nancy R.; Baker, Henry J.; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive debilitating neurological defects characterize feline GM1 gangliosidosis, a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of lysosomal β-galactosidase. No effective therapy exists for affected children, who often die before age 5. In the current study, an adeno-associated viral vector carrying the therapeutic gene was injected bilaterally into two brain targets (thalamus and deep cerebellar nuclei) of a feline model of GM1 gangliosidosis. Gene therapy normalized β-galactosidase activity and storage throughout the brain and spinal cord. The mean survival of 12 treated GM1 animals was >38 months compared to 8 months for untreated animals. Seven of the 8 treated animals remaining alive demonstrated normalization of disease, with abrogation of many symptoms including gait deficits and postural imbalance. Sustained correction of the GM1 gangliosidosis disease phenotype after limited intracranial targeting by gene therapy in a large animal model suggests that this approach may be useful for treating the human version of this lysosomal storage disorder. PMID:24718858

  12. Parental quality of life in complex paediatric neurologic disorders of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    van Nimwegen, K J M; Kievit, W; van der Wilt, G J; Schieving, J H; Willemsen, M A A P; Donders, A R T; Verhaak, C M; Grutters, J P C

    2016-09-01

    Complex paediatric neurology (CPN) patients generally present with non-specific symptoms, such as developmental delay, impaired movement and epilepsy. The diagnostic trajectory in these disorders is usually complicated and long-lasting, and may be burdensome to the patients and their parents. Additionally, as caring for a chronically ill child can be stressful and demanding, parents of these patients may experience impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study aims to assess parental HRQoL and factors related to it in CPN. Physical and mental HRQoL of 120 parents was measured and compared to the general population using the SF-12 questionnaire. Parents also completed this questionnaire for the measurement of patient HRQoL. Additional questionnaires were used to measure parental uncertainty (Visual Analogue Scale) and worry phenomena (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), and to obtain socio-demographic data. A linear mixed model with random effect was used to investigate which of these variables were associated with parental HRQoL. As compared to the general population, HRQoL of these parents appeared diminished. Fathers showed both lowered physical (51.76, p < 0.05) and mental (49.41, p < 0.01) HRQoL, whereas mothers only showed diminished mental (46.46, p < 0.01) HRQoL. Patient HRQoL and parental worry phenomena were significantly correlated with overall and mental parental HRQoL. The reduction in parental mental HRQoL is alarming, also because children strongly rely on their parents and parental mental health is known to influence children's health. Awareness of these problems among clinicians, and supportive care if needed are important to prevent exacerbation of the problems. PMID:27321953

  13. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medijainen, Kadri; Pääsuke, Mati; Lukmann, Aet; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. Methods. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-meter walk test (10MWT) and by performing timed-up-and-go-test (TUG). Neurological assessment included Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HY), Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (S-E), and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Results. In women with PD, Kendall's tau-b correlation analyses revealed significant correlations between functional performance tests and neurological assessment measures, with the exception in MMSE. No corresponding associations were found for men, although they demonstrated better functional performance, as expected. Conclusion. Men in similar clinical stage of the PD perform better on functional tests than women. Disease severity reflects upon functional performance differently in men and women with PD. Results indicate that when interpreting the assessment results of both functional performance and neurological assessment tests, the gender of the patient should be taken into consideration. PMID:26586928

  14. Transcranial Sonography Findings in Depression in Association With Psychiatric and Neurologic Diseases: A Review.

    PubMed

    Krogias, Christos; Walter, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    The transcranial sonography (TCS) finding of reduced echogenicity of brainstem raphe (hypoechogenic BR) has been associated with depressive states. Here, we review the TCS studies in subjects with depressive disorders and with depression related to degenerative brain diseases, and compare the frequency and clinical correlates of hypoechogenic BR in these reports. Summarizing the data published so far, hypoechogenic BR is present in 67% (range, 37-95%) of depressed but only in 15% (5-36%) of nondepressed subjects without history of neurodegenerative disease. The finding of hypoechogenic BR in these subjects is associated with a relative risk of 3.03 (95% CI, 2.44-3.75; P < .001) of being diagnosed with depression. In patients with Parkinson's disease, hypoechogenic BR is present in 63% (35-92%) of depressed but only in 27% (10-62%) of nondepressed patients, resulting in a relative risk of 2.18 (95% CI, 1.80-2.66; P < .001) of being diagnosed with depression. Hypoechogenic BR is associated with depression in a number of neurological disorders such Huntington's disease, idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, myotonic dystrophies, and cerebral small vessel disease. Although some studies did not show any relationship between BR echogenicity and severity of depression, others suggest an association with higher severity of depression, or even with suicidal ideation. In one study BR hypoechogenicity was found to be associated with better responsivity to serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Further studies are warranted to compare the TCS findings of BR alteration with post-mortem histopathological findings, and with genetic variants related to cerebral serotonin metabolism. PMID:27119431

  15. Recurrent headaches: a case of neurological Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Alaa M; Dubrey, Simon W; Patel, Maneesh C

    2013-10-01

    A 48-year-old black male, of Nigerian heritage, presented with a 24-hour history of frontal headache of gradual onset. The headache characteristic was migranous, being described as throbbing in nature and located to the right frontal area with associated blurring of vision. Although similar to prior frequent headaches, there was now increasing unsteadiness on walking. Diagnosed 10 years earlier with Behçet's disease, the initial presentation was with oral and genital ulceration. Recurrent episodes of headache caused by neurological flare-ups resulted in a stroke at the age of 46 years. This previous stroke was ischaemic in character with involvement of the brainstem, pons, midbrain and right cerebral peduncle with extension into the right internal capsule. Surveillance brain imaging (computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging with venography) 10 months earlier showed brainstem disease activity (Figure 1a) with disease quiescence a month later (Figure 1b) following an escalation of immunosuppressant therapy. Regular medications comprised prednisolone 10 mg (however, regular recurrences had resulted in him taking doses of between 20 and 30 mg/day of prednisolone for most of the past 24 months) and azathioprine 150 mg daily, aspirin 75 mg daily, one adcal D3 twice daily with weekly alendronic acid, and omeprazole 20 mg daily. For headache he took topiramate 25 mg daily and for depression mirtazepine 15 mg daily. The patient was also addicted to a high level of cannabis use which he was reluctant to stop as he felt it helped his symptoms. On examination he was apyrexial and cardiovascularly stable. Neurological examination revealed a residual horizontal nystagmus to the right on lateral gaze, mild left hemiparesis with moderate spasticity, in addition to dysarthria and dysphonia from his prior stroke. A new feature was an exacerbation of gait unsteadiness. Blood tests were unremarkable and specifically the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was normal at 2 mm

  16. The Preoperative Neurological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Probasco, John; Sahin, Bogachan; Tran, Tung; Chung, Tae Hwan; Rosenthal, Liana Shapiro; Mari, Zoltan; Levy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are prevalent in the general population, and the neurohospitalist has an important role to play in the preoperative planning for patients with and at risk for developing neurological disease. The neurohospitalist can provide patients and their families as well as anesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitalists, and other providers guidance in particular to the patient’s neurological disease and those he or she is at risk for. Here we present considerations and guidance for the neurohospitalist providing preoperative consultation for the neurological patient with or at risk of disturbances of consciousness, cerebrovascular and carotid disease, epilepsy, neuromuscular disease, and Parkinson disease. PMID:24198903

  17. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase in neuronal injury and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsin-Tzu; Liu, Chan-Chuan; Chen, Shur-Tzu; Yap, Ye Vone; Chang, Nan-Shang; Sze, Chun-I

    2014-01-01

    The human and mouse WWOX/Wwox gene encodes a candidate tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase protein. This gene is located on a common fragile site FRA16D. WWOX participates in a variety of cellular events and acts as a transducer in the many signal pathways, including TNF, chemotherapeutic drugs, UV irradiation, Wnt, TGF-β, C1q, Hyal-2, sex steroid hormones, and others. While transiently overexpressed WWOX restricts relocation of transcription factors to the nucleus for suppressing cancer survival, physiological relevance of this regard in vivo has not been confirmed. Unlike many tumor suppressor genes, mutation of WWOX is rare, raising a question whether WWOX is a driver for cancer initiation. WWOX/Wwox was initially shown to play a crucial role in neural development and in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and neuronal injury. Later on, WWOX/Wwox was shown to participate in the development of epilepsy, mental retardation, and brain developmental defects in mice, rats and humans. Up to date, most of the research and review articles have focused on the involvement of WWOX in cancer. Here, we review the role of WWOX in neural injury and neurological diseases, and provide perspectives for the WWOX-regulated neurodegeneration. PMID:25537520

  18. [Evaluation of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation effectiveness in treatment of psychiatric and neurologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Stępień, Anna; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Brodacki, Bogdan; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a treatment option with proved effectiveness especially in drug resist depression. It is used in functional brain mapping before neurosurgery operations and diagnostic of corticospinal tract transmission. Many studies are performed to evaluate rTMS using in treatment of obsessive - compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, autism, strokes, tinnitus, Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, cranial traumas. Moreover rTMS was used in treatment of multiple sclerosis, migraine, dystonia. Electromagnetical field generated by rTMS penetrate skin of the scalp and infiltrate brain tissues to a depth of 2 cm, cause neurons depolarization and generating motor, cognitive and affective effects. Depending on the stimulation frequency rTMS can stimuli or inhibit brain cortex. rTMS mechanism of action remains elusive. Probably it is connected with enhancement of neurotransmitters, modulation of signals transductions pathways in Central Nervous System, gene transcription and release of neuroprotective substances. Studies with use of animals revealed that rTMS stimulation can generate brain changes similar to those seen after electric shock therapy without provoking seizures. The aim of presenting study was to analyze actual researches evaluating rTMS use in treatment of psychiatric and neurological diseases. PMID:27403908

  19. The use of herpes simplex virus vectors for gene therapy in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, P G; Steiner, I

    1993-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) vectors have now been developed and enable the efficient delivery of foreign genes under the control of appropriate promoter elements into non-dividing neurons in vitro and in vivo. Their use is based on the natural ability of HSV-1 to spread throughout the nervous system and to establish a lifelong latent infection in neurons. HSV is present in an episomal form in the neuronal nucleus, and normal neuronal functions remain unaltered. A wide variety of foreign genes can theoretically be packaged into the large HSV genome. A number of technical problems will need to be overcome to ensure the stable expression of the foreign gene products, adequate control of the levels of their expression, the safety of the vectors and the correct targeting of the vectors to the appropriate neuronal cell populations. Such vectors have the potential to replace missing gene products in neurons in patients with a variety of metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, and also to insert growth factors or enzymes into the local vicinity of neurological lesions to promote neuronal repair. HSV-1 vectors also have the potential to define the genetic basis of various neurophysiological functions which may prove to be useful in evaluating altered neuronal function encountered in disease. PMID:8265768

  20. Epilepsy and Other Neurological Diseases in the Parents of Children with Infantile Autism. A Case Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the broader phenotype of infantile autism (IA) we compared the rates and types of epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of 111 consecutively admitted patients with IA with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All participants were screened through the nationwide Danish…

  1. Hans von Bülow: creativity and neurological disease in a famous pianist and conductor.

    PubMed

    Wöhrle, Johannes C; Haas, Frithjof

    2007-01-01

    Hans von Bülow (1830-1894) was a conductor and pianist of worldwide reputation and founder of many stylistic interpretations of classic and romantic symphonies. The close friendship with Richard Wagner, but not the enthusiastic admiration of his dramatic musical opus, ended abruptly when Hans von Bülow became aware of the betrayal of his wife Cosima and Richard Wagner. Hans von Bülow reported symptoms and signs of neurological disease in many letters that were kept and edited by his second wife Marie. For decades he suffered from chronic neuralgiforme headaches, which were caused by a tumor of the cervical radicular nerves. At the age of 45 years, he suddenly developed a motorsensory deficit in the right arm and hand and a contralateral facial deficit, suggestive of brainstem infarction. He recovered and celebrated even greater successes as a musician, although phases of major depression also interfered with his professional life. In the last, phase of his life, he experienced the consequences of generalized atherosclerosis and cerebral microangiopathy. It was a second cerebrovascular accident of the brainstem that caused his death, only 10 months after his last concert performance. Although his death occurred in Egypt, an autopsy was performed by Professor Ludwig Edinger and the results will be presented. PMID:17495513

  2. Advances in mechanisms of genetic instability related to hereditary neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Robert D.; Dere, Ruhee; Hebert, Micheal L.; Napierala, Marek; Son, Leslie S.

    2005-01-01

    Substantial progress has been realized in the past several years in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the expansions and deletions (genetic instabilities) of repeating tri-, tetra- and pentanucleotide repeating sequences associated with a number of hereditary neurological diseases. These instabilities occur by replication, recombination and repair processes, probably acting in concert, due to slippage of the DNA complementary strands relative to each other. The biophysical properties of the folded-back repeating sequence strands play a critical role in these instabilities. Non-B DNA structural elements (hairpins and slipped structures, DNA unwinding elements, tetraplexes, triplexes and sticky DNA) are described. The replication mechanisms are influenced by pausing of the replication fork, orientation of the repeat strands, location of the repeat sequences relative to replication origins and the flap endonuclease. Methyl-directed mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, and repair of damage caused by mutagens are discussed. Genetic recombination and double-strand break repair advances in Escherichia coli, yeast and mammalian models are reviewed. Furthermore, the newly discovered capacities of certain triplet repeat sequences to cause gross chromosomal rearrangements are discussed. PMID:16006624

  3. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs): therapeutic targets for neurological diseases and their regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular acidification occurs not only in pathological conditions such as inflammation and brain ischemia, but also in normal physiological conditions such as synaptic transmission. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) can detect a broad range of physiological pH changes during pathological and synaptic cellular activities. ASICs are voltage-independent, proton-gated cation channels widely expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous system. Activation of ASICs is involved in pain perception, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, fear, ischemic neuronal injury, seizure termination, neuronal degeneration, and mechanosensation. Therefore, ASICs emerge as potential therapeutic targets for manipulating pain and neurological diseases. The activity of these channels can be regulated by many factors such as lactate, Zn2+, and Phe-Met-Arg-Phe amide (FMRFamide)-like neuropeptides by interacting with the channel’s large extracellular loop. ASICs are also modulated by G protein-coupled receptors such as CB1 cannabinoid receptors and 5-HT2. This review focuses on the physiological roles of ASICs and the molecular mechanisms by which these channels are regulated. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(6): 295-304] PMID:23790972

  4. Role of the Retromer Complex in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaosi; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Zhao, Deming; Yang, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    The retromer complex is a protein complex that plays a central role in endosomal trafficking. Retromer dysfunction has been linked to a growing number of neurological disorders. The process of intracellular trafficking and recycling is crucial for maintaining normal intracellular homeostasis, which is partly achieved through the activity of the retromer complex. The retromer complex plays a primary role in sorting endosomal cargo back to the cell surface for reuse, to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), or alternatively to specialized endomembrane compartments, in which the cargo is not subjected to lysosomal-mediated degradation. In most cases, the retromer acts as a core that interacts with associated proteins, including sorting nexin family member 27 (SNX27), members of the vacuolar protein sorting 10 (VPS10) receptor family, the major endosomal actin polymerization-promoting complex known as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and scar homolog (WASH), and other proteins. Some of the molecules carried by the retromer complex are risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases. Defects such as haplo-insufficiency or mutations in one or several units of the retromer complex lead to various pathologies. Here, we summarize the molecular architecture of the retromer complex and the roles of this system in intracellular trafficking related the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26973516

  5. [Neurologic aspects of clinical manifestations, pathophysiology and therapy of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (causalgia, Sudeck's disease)].

    PubMed

    Blumberg, H; Griesser, H J; Hornyak, M

    1991-04-01

    The symptomatology of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), a diagnostic term which today includes causalgia and M. Sudeck, is characterized clinically by a triad of autonomic (sympathetic), motor and sensory disturbances. They develop following a noxious event--though independent of its nature and location--in a generalized distribution pattern at the distal site of the affected extremity. Pathophysiologically, a complex disturbance of the sympathetic vasoconstrictor system is involved, which mediates the dominant symptoms of RSD, namely the spontaneous pain and the swelling. This disturbance is thought to be initiated by nociceptive impulses, occurring in conjunction with the preceding noxious event, and to be maintained reflexly, in a form of a vicious circle, by means of the typical pain sensation accompanying the RSD-syndrome. From these ideas, an important part of the RSD therapy is deduced; i.e. the early interruption of the neuronal sympathetic activity by means of a sympathetic blockade. Such a blockade can interrupt the pain and at the same time also the vicious circle of RSD. Altogether, for the RSD syndrome there are relevant neurological aspects with respect to its clinical symptomatology, its pathophysiology and its therapy. PMID:1713305

  6. GABAA receptor complex function in frontal cortex membranes from control and neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G K; Lowenthal, A; Javoy-Agid, F; Constantidinis, J

    1991-05-01

    The functional integrity of the GABAA receptor-benzodiazepine (BZ) recognition site-Cl- ionophore complex was assessed by means of [35S]TBPS (t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate) binding to frontal cortex membranes prepared from frozen postmortem brain tissue taken from control (n = 4), Alzheimer (n = 7), Parkinson (n = 3) and Huntington's chorea (n = 2) patients. Specific [35S]TBPS binding was similar in control, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea brains, but was significantly reduced (78% control, P less than 0.01) in frontal cortex membranes from Alzheimer's patients. The linkage between the BZ recognition sites and the GABAA receptor-linked Cl- ionophore was functionally intact in these membranes as BZ site agonists (zolpidem, alpidem, flunitrazepam and clonazepam) enhanced [35S]TBPS binding under the conditions used (well-washed membranes in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl). Zolpidem (BZ1 selective) exhibited a biphasic enhancement in control membranes whereas the other compounds induced a bell-shaped concentration-response curve. The enhancement of [35S]TBPS binding by alpidem, flunitrazepam and clonazepam was greater in frontal cortex membranes from Alzheimer's patients than in controls whereas it tended to be reduced in membranes from the brains of Huntington's chorea patients. These studies demonstrate the functional integrity of the GABAA receptor macromolecular complex and also the usefulness of [35S]TBPS binding in the study of human postmortem tissue. PMID:1654259

  7. The importance of de novo mutations for pediatric neurological disease-It is not all in utero or birth trauma.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing (NGS, which consists of massively parallel sequencing to perform TGS (total genome sequencing) or WES (whole exome sequencing)) has abundantly discovered many causative mutations in patients with pediatric neurological disease. A surprisingly high number of these are de novo mutations which have not been inherited from either parent. For epilepsy, autism spectrum disorders, and neuromotor disorders, including cerebral palsy, initial estimates put the frequency of causative de novo mutations at about 15% and about 10% of these are somatic. There are some shared mutated genes between these three classes of disease. Studies of copy number variation by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) proceded the NGS approaches but they also detect de novo variation which is especially important for ASDs. There are interesting differences between the mutated genes detected by CGS and NGS. In summary, de novo mutations cause a very significant proportion of pediatric neurological disease. PMID:27036065

  8. Blackberry Yellow Vein Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new virus disease has emerged in the Midsouth and Southeastern United States and was named blackberry yellow vein disease (BYVD). Originally, it was thought the disease was caused by Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) as the virus was found in many diseased plants and symptoms were very similar to thos...

  9. Application of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid for Treatment of Neurological and Non-neurological Diseases: Is There a Potential for Treating Traumatic Brain Injury?

    PubMed

    Gronbeck, Kyle R; Rodrigues, Cecilia M P; Mahmoudi, Javad; Bershad, Eric M; Ling, Geoffrey; Bachour, Salam P; Divani, Afshin A

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate the potential of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) for neuroprotection in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients in the neurocritical care setting. Specifically, we surveyed preclinical studies describing the neuroprotective and systemic effects of TUDCA, and the potential therapeutic application of TUDCA. Preclinical studies have provided promising data supporting its use in neurological disease characterized by apoptosis-induced neuronal loss. TUDCA inhibits multiple proteins involved in apoptosis and upregulates cell survival pathways. In addition, TUDCA exhibits anti-inflammatory effects in models of neuroinflammation and attenuates neuronal loss in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. This may be applicable to TBI, which also triggers inflammatory and apoptotic processes. Additionally, preliminary data support the use of pharmacological therapies that reduce apoptosis and inflammation associated with TBI. The anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of TUDCA could prove promising in the treatment of TBI. Currently, there are no published data supporting improvement in clinical outcomes of TBI by treatment with TUDCA, but future studies should be considered. PMID:26759227

  10. Bravo! Neurology at the opera.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Brandy R

    2010-01-01

    Opera is a complex musical form that reflects the complexity of the human condition and the human brain. This article presents an introduction to the portrayal of medical professionals in opera, including one neurologist, as well as two characters in whom neurological disease contributes to the action of the musical drama. Consideration is also given to the neuroanatomy and neuropathology of opera singers with further speculation regarding the neural underpinnings of the passion of opera's audience. PMID:20375526