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Sample records for complex projective spaces

  1. Risk Reduction for Use of Complex Devices in Space Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; Poivey, Christian; Friendlich, Mark; Petrick, Dave; LaBel, Kenneth; Stansberry, Scott

    2007-01-01

    We present guidel!nes to reduce risk to an acceptable level when using complex devices in space applications. Application to Virtex 4 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) on Express Logistic Carrier (ELC) project is presented.

  2. The Characteristics of Project Managers: An Exploration of Complex Projects in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.

    2000-01-01

    Study of characteristics and relationships of project managers of complex projects in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Study is based on Research Design, Data Collection, Interviews, Case Studies, and Data Analysis across varying disciplines such as biological research, space research, advanced aeronautical test facilities, aeronautic flight demonstrations, and projects at different NASA centers to ensure that findings were not endemic to one type of project management, or to one Center's management philosophies. Each project is treated as a separate case with the primary data collected during semi-structured interviews with the project manager responsible for the overall project. Results of the various efforts show some definite similarities of characteristics and relationships among the project managers in the study. A model for how the project managers formulated and managed their projects is included.

  3. Environmental projects. Volume 13: Underground storage tanks, removal and replacement. Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengelsdorf, Irv

    1991-01-01

    The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC), located in the Mojave Desert about 40 miles north of Barstow, California, and about 160 miles northeast of Pasadena, is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Deep Space Network, one of the world's largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation networks. Activities at the GDSCC are carried out in support of six large parabolic dish antennas. As a large-scale facility located in a remote, isolated desert region, the GDSCC operations require numerous on-site storage facilities for gasoline, diesel oil, hydraulic oil, and waste oil. These fluids are stored in underground storage tanks (USTs). This present volume describes what happened to the 26 USTs that remained at the GDSCC. Twenty-four of these USTs were constructed of carbon steel without any coating for corrosion protection, and without secondary containment or leak detection. Two remaining USTs were constructed of fiberglass-coated carbon steel but without secondary containment or leak protection. Of the 26 USTs that remained at the GDSCC, 23 were cleaned, removed from the ground, cut up, and hauled away from the GDSCC for environmentally acceptable disposal. Three USTs were permanently closed (abandoned in place).

  4. Planning Complex Projects Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henke, Andrea L.; Stottler, Richard H.; Maher, Timothy P.

    1995-01-01

    Automated Manifest Planner (AMP) computer program applies combination of artificial-intelligence techniques to assist both expert and novice planners, reducing planning time by orders of magnitude. Gives planners flexibility to modify plans and constraints easily, without need for programming expertise. Developed specifically for planning space shuttle missions 5 to 10 years ahead, with modifications, applicable in general to planning other complex projects requiring scheduling of activities depending on other activities and/or timely allocation of resources. Adaptable to variety of complex scheduling problems in manufacturing, transportation, business, architecture, and construction.

  5. The Classroom Space Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbickas, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the Classroom Space project aimed at revitalizing science education at Key Stages 3 and 4 by using exciting examples from Space Science and Astronomy to illustrate key science concepts. (Author/YDS)

  6. Space Traveler Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes the winners of the Space Traveler Project, a contest jointly sponsored by Rockwell International, NASA, and this magazine to identify worthwhile elementary science programs relating to the Space Shuttle. (SJL)

  7. Canonical Groups for Quantization on the Two-Dimensional Sphere and One-Dimensional Complex Projective Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Sumadi A. H.; H, Zainuddin

    2014-11-01

    Using Isham's group-theoretic quantization scheme, we construct the canonical groups of the systems on the two-dimensional sphere and one-dimensional complex projective space, which are homeomorphic. In the first case, we take SO(3) as the natural canonical Lie group of rotations of the two-sphere and find all the possible Hamiltonian vector fields, and followed by verifying the commutator and Poisson bracket algebra correspondences with the Lie algebra of the group. In the second case, the same technique is resumed to define the Lie group, in this case SU (2), of CP'.We show that one can simply use a coordinate transformation from S2 to CP1 to obtain all the Hamiltonian vector fields of CP1. We explicitly show that the Lie algebra structures of both canonical groups are locally homomorphic. On the other hand, globally their corresponding canonical groups are acting on different geometries, the latter of which is almost complex. Thus the canonical group for CP1 is the double-covering group of SO(3), namely SU(2). The relevance of the proposed formalism is to understand the idea of CP1 as a space of where the qubit lives which is known as a Bloch sphere.

  8. Recent results on complex Cartan spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, Nicoleta; Munteanu, Gheorghe

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we first provide an updated survey of the geometry of complex Cartan spaces. New characterizations for some particular classes of complex Cartan spaces are pointed out, e.g. Landsberg-Cartan, strongly Berwald-Cartan and others. We introduce the Cartan-Randers spaces which offer examples of Berwald-Cartan and strongly Berwald-Cartan spaces. Then, we investigate the complex geodesic curves of a complex Cartan space, using the image by Legendre transformation (L-duality) of complex geodesic curves of a complex Finsler space. Assuming the weakly Kähler condition for a complex Cartan space, we establish that its complex geodesic curves derive from Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Also, by L-duality, we introduce the corespondent notion of the projectively related complex Finsler metrics, on the complex Cartan spaces. Various descriptions of the projectively related complex Cartan metrics are given. As applications, the projectiveness of a complex Cartan-Randers metric and the locally projectively flat complex Cartan metrics are analyzed.

  9. On projective coordinate spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćiftçi, Süleyman; Erdoǧan, Fatma Özen

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, an (n+1)-dimensional module over the local ring K = Mmm(ℝ) is constructed. Further, an n- dimensional projective coordinate space over this module is constructed by the help of equivalence classes. The points and lines of this space are determined and the points are classified. Finally, for a 3-dimensional projective coordinate space, the incidence matrix for a line that goes through the given points and also all points of a line given with the incidence matrix are found by the use of Maple commands.

  10. Noncommutative complex structures on quantum homogeneous spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Buachalla, Réamonn

    2016-01-01

    A new framework for noncommutative complex geometry on quantum homogeneous spaces is introduced. The main ingredients used are covariant differential calculi and Takeuchi's categorical equivalence for quantum homogeneous spaces. A number of basic results are established, producing a simple set of necessary and sufficient conditions for noncommutative complex structures to exist. Throughout, the framework is applied to the quantum projective spaces endowed with the Heckenberger-Kolb calculus.

  11. Projection of gene-protein networks to the functional space of the proteome and its application to analysis of organism complexity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of biological complexity via a projection of protein-coding genes of complex organisms onto the functional space of the proteome. The latter can be defined as a set of all functions committed by proteins of an organism. Alternative splicing (AS) allows an organism to generate diverse mature RNA transcripts from a single mRNA strand and thus it could be one of the key mechanisms of increasing of functional complexity of the organism's proteome and a driving force of biological evolution. Thus, the projection of transcription units (TU) and alternative splice-variant (SV) forms onto proteome functional space could generate new types of relational networks (e.g. SV-protein function networks, SFN) and lead to discoveries of novel evolutionarily conservative functional modules. Such types of networks might provide new reliable characteristics of organism complexity and a better understanding of the evolutionary integration and plasticity of interconnection of genome-transcriptome-proteome functions. Results We use the InterPro and UniProt databases to attribute descriptive features (keywords) to protein sequences. UniProt database includes a controlled and curated vocabulary of specific descriptors or keywords. The keywords have been assigned to a protein sequence via conserved domains or via similarity with annotated sequences. Then we consider the unique combinations of keywords as the protein functional labels (FL), which characterize the biological functions of the given protein and construct the contingency tables and graphs providing the projections of transcription units (TU) and alternative splice-variants (SV) onto all FL of the proteome of a given organism. We constructed SFNs for organisms with different evolutionary history and levels of complexity, and performed detailed statistical parameterization of the networks. Conclusions The application of the algorithm to organisms with different evolutionary history and level of biological

  12. Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Three 34m (110 ft.) diameter Beam Waveguide antennas located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, situated in the Mojave Desert in California. This is one of three complexes which comprise NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The DSN provides radio communications for all of NASA's interplanetary spacecraft and is also utilized for radio astronomy and radar observations of the solar system and the universe.

  13. Space astrometry project JASMINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Yano, Y.; Jasmine Working Group

    A Japanese plan for an infrared ( z-band: 0.9 m) space astrometry project, JASMINE, is introduced. JASMINE is a satellite (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for INfrared Exploration) to measure distances and apparent motions of stars in the bulge of the Milky Way with yet unprecedented precision. It will measure parallaxes and positions with an accuracy of 10 μarcsec and proper motions with an accuracy of 4 μarcsec/year for stars brighter than z = 14 mag. JASMINE will observe about 10 million stars belonging to the bulge component of our Galaxy. With a completely new "map of the Galactic bulge", it is expected that many new exciting scientific results will be obtained in various fields of astronomy. Presently, JASMINE is in the development phase, with a target launch date around 2015. Overall system (bus) design is presently ongoing, in cooperation with the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Preliminary design of instruments, observing strategy, data reduction, and critical technical issues for JASMINE will be described.

  14. NDT for Complex Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Non-destructive testing of structures composed of various types of materials is performed using a variety of methods. Most commonly, electromagnetic and acoustic methods are used to perform this task. Advances in computer software and electro-mechanical hardware have resulted in semi-automated systems for performing simple low-cost in-situ concrete testing. These systems are designed to be operated by anyone who can read a manual and push the right buttons. Although useful in many circumstances, we ask: "What happens when concrete structures are not simple and are too complex to be analyzed by these semi-automated systems and, most importantly, by minimally trained operators?" Many infrastructure projects are boldly pushing the limit of traditional engineering design. As structures become more complex, the methods and techniques used to evaluate these structures must also evolve. A first step towards adapting geophysical methods to evaluate complex structures is to develop pre-investigation conceptual models of possible responses that structures will have to available geophysical methods. This approach is important for designing the geometry and data acquisition parameters necessary for achieving the desired results. Examples of case by case assessments of the application of GPR to concrete investigations are examined. These include complex concrete wall structures, soil tunnel structures, and airport runways. HGI's adaption of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic methods for assessing the substrate of a heavily reinforced concrete structure up to seven feet thick is reviewed. A range of GPR antenna frequencies were used to image the concrete and the underlying material. Time and frequency domain GPR analyses where used in the assessment. A multi-channel seismic survey using a roll-along data collection technique was used to assess the resonant frequency of the concrete structure, the nature of the underlying medium, and behavior of the structural system.

  15. Space processing: A projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.; Griffin, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Estimates concerning space manufacturing, which might well become the largest and most specific application of space technology by the end of the century are given. Two classes of materials are considered - electronic crystals and biologicals.

  16. Teacher in Space Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Prepared by NASA, this guide contains lessons dealing with space for use in elementary and secondary social studies classes. Activities are many and varied. For example, students analyze the costs and benefits of space travel, develop their own space station, and explore the decision-making processes involved in the shuttle. (RM)

  17. Teacher in Space Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The materials in this guide were designed to help teachers and other adults maximize the learning experiences and other educational events scheduled on space shuttle Mission 51-L. They include: (1) a description of the live lessons to be conducted by Christa McAuliffe; (2) teaching-related events of Mission 51-L; (3) a list of key mission-related…

  18. Characterization of projection lattices of Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Szambien, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The classical lattices of projections of Hilbert spaces over the real, the complex or the quaternion number field are characterized among the totality of irreducible, complete, orthomodular, atomic lattices satisfying the covering property. To this end, so-called paratopological lattices are introduced, i.e, lattices carrying a topology that renders the lattice operations restrictedly continuous.

  19. Space market model development project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the research program, Space Market Model Development Project, (Phase 1) were: (1) to study the need for business information in the commercial development of space; and (2) to propose a design for an information system to meet the identified needs. Three simultaneous research strategies were used in proceeding toward this goal: (1) to describe the space business information which currently exists; (2) to survey government and business representatives on the information they would like to have; and (3) to investigate the feasibility of generating new economical information about the space industry.

  20. Double complexes and local cochain projections

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Richard S; Winther, Ragnar

    2015-01-01

    The construction of projection operators, which commute with the exterior derivative and at the same time are bounded in the proper Sobolev spaces, represents a key tool in the recent stability analysis of finite element exterior calculus. These so-called bounded cochain projections have been constructed by combining a smoothing operator and the unbounded canonical projections defined by the degrees of freedom. However, an undesired property of these bounded projections is that, in contrast to the canonical projections, they are nonlocal. The purpose of this article is to discuss a recent alternative construction of bounded cochain projections, which also are local. A key tool for the new construction is the structure of a double complex, resembling the Čech-de Rham double complex of algebraic topology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Numer Methods Partial Differential Eq 31: 541–551, 2015 PMID:25914441

  1. Chinese Manned Space Utility Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.

    Since 1992 China has been carrying out a conspicuous manned space mission A utility project has been defined and created during the same period The Utility Project of the Chinese Manned Space Mission involves wide science areas such as earth observation life science micro-gravity fluid physics and material science astronomy space environment etc In the earth observation area it is focused on the changes of global environments and relevant exploration technologies A Middle Revolution Image Spectrometer and a Multi-model Micro-wave Remote Sensor have been developed The detectors for cirrostratus distribution solar constant earth emission budget earth-atmosphere ultra-violet spectrum and flux have been manufactured and tested All of above equipment was engaged in orbital experiments on-board the Shenzhou series spacecrafts Space life science biotechnologies and micro-gravity science were much concerned with the project A series of experiments has been made both in ground laboratories and spacecraft capsules The environmental effect in different biological bodies in space protein crystallization electrical cell-fusion animal cells cultural research on separation by using free-low electrophoresis a liquid drop Marangoni migration experiment under micro-gravity as well as a set of crystal growth and metal processing was successfully operated in space The Gamma-ray burst and high-energy emission from solar flares have been explored A set of particle detectors and a mass spectrometer measured

  2. Space Station Biological Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wade, C. E.; Givens, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    To meet NASA's objective of using the unique aspects of the space environment to expand fundamental knowledge in the biological sciences, the Space Station Biological Research Project at Ames Research Center is developing, or providing oversight, for two major suites of hardware which will be installed on the International Space Station (ISS). The first, the Gravitational Biology Facility, consists of Habitats to support plants, rodents, cells, aquatic specimens, avian and reptilian eggs, and insects and the Habitat Holding Rack in which to house them at microgravity; the second, the Centrifuge Facility, consists of a 2.5 m diameter centrifuge that will provide acceleration levels between 0.01 g and 2.0 g and a Life Sciences Glovebox. These two facilities will support the conduct of experiments to: 1) investigate the effect of microgravity on living systems; 2) what level of gravity is required to maintain normal form and function, and 3) study the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the deleterious effects of microgravity observed in the crew. Upon completion, the ISS will have three complementary laboratory modules provided by NASA, the European Space Agency and the Japanese space agency, NASDA. Use of all facilities in each of the modules will be available to investigators from participating space agencies. With the advent of the ISS, space-based gravitational biology research will transition from 10-16 day short-duration Space Shuttle flights to 90-day-or-longer ISS increments.

  3. COMPLEXITY and the QGCW Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichichi, Antonino

    2014-06-01

    The following sections are included: * Seven definitions of Complexity * Complexity exists at all scales * AFB phenomena from Beethoven to the Superworld * UEEC events, from Galilei up to SM&B * The two asymptotic limits: History and Science * The basic points on the correlation between Complexity and Predictions * The lesson needed for the future * From Planck to Complexity * Consequences for LHC: the QGCW project * Conclusions * The Platonic Grand Unification * The Platonic Supersymmetry * Examples of UEEC events in the construction of the SM&B * Open Problems in Subnuclear Physics * The ten challenges of Subnuclear Physics * References

  4. How Project Managers Really Manage: An Indepth Look at Some Managers of Large, Complex NASA Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Impaeilla, Cliff (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on a research study by the author that examined ten contemporary National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) complex projects. In-depth interviews with the project managers of these projects provided qualitative data about the inner workings of the project and the methodologies used in establishing and managing the projects. The inclusion of a variety of space, aeronautics, and ground based projects from several different NASA research centers helped to reduce potential bias in the findings toward any one type of project, or technical discipline. The findings address the participants and their individual approaches. The discussion includes possible implications for project managers of other large, complex, projects.

  5. Space infrared telescope facility project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1988-01-01

    The functions undertaken during this reporting period were: to inform the planetary science community of the progress and status of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Project; to solicit input from the planetary science community on needs and requirements of planetary science in the use of SIRTF at such time that it becomes an operational facility; and a white paper was prepared on the use of the SIRTF for solar system studies.

  6. Complex Organics in Interstellar Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Ruiterkamp, R.; Cox, N.

    There are signatures of large organic molecules in the interstellar medium, from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Some infrared emission bands, which have been ascribed to families of large aromatic compounds are not specific for individual identification (and for discriminating free floating PAH molecules from loosely bound aromatics in amorphous carbon compounds). Red fluorescence and FUV absorption have also been ascribed to these aromatic compounds. Electronic transitions in the visible are a key to identify free gas phase molecules. The origin of Diffuse Interstellar Bands (Herbig 1995), more than 300 in recent surveys (O' Tuairisg et al 2000) is still a mystery. However the measurements of sub-structures rotational contours in DIBs (Ehrenfreund Foing 1996) indicate large molecules such as chains (12-18C), rings, 50 C PAHs or fullerenes. The distribution of DIB widths permit to estimate a distribution of size of molecular carriers. The environment properties of DIB carriers also indicate ionisation potentials similar to those of cations of large carbonaceous molecules, such as large PAHs or fullerenes (Sonnentrucker et al 1997). The correlation studies of DIBS also indicate different carriers for the strong DIBs observed in the visible (Cami et al 1997). DIBS are weakened in the in the low-metallicity Magellanic clouds (Ehrenfreund et al 2002, Cox et al 2004). The detection of near IR bands at 9577 and 9632 A coinciding with laboratory transitions of C60+ (Foing, Ehrenfreund 1994, 1997, Galatzudinov et al 2000 ) suggest that significant interstellar carbon could reside in complex fullerene type compounds. These results indicate that many different large and complex organic molecules can form and survive in the very harsh interstellar environments. A follow up interdisciplinary work is required between astronomical observations, laboratory matrix and gas phase spectroscopy, theoretical work and modelling, and active experiments in space to study the formation

  7. Forces in the complex octonion curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2016-04-01

    The paper aims to extend major equations in the electromagnetic and gravitational theories from the flat space into the complex octonion curved space. Maxwell applied simultaneously the quaternion analysis and vector terminology to describe the electromagnetic theory. It inspires subsequent scholars to study the electromagnetic and gravitational theories with the complex quaternions/octonions. Furthermore Einstein was the first to depict the gravitational theory by means of tensor analysis and curved four-space-time. Nowadays some scholars investigate the electromagnetic and gravitational properties making use of the complex quaternion/octonion curved space. From the orthogonality of two complex quaternions, it is possible to define the covariant derivative of the complex quaternion curved space, describing the gravitational properties in the complex quaternion curved space. Further it is possible to define the covariant derivative of the complex octonion curved space by means of the orthogonality of two complex octonions, depicting simultaneously the electromagnetic and gravitational properties in the complex octonion curved space. The result reveals that the connection coefficient and curvature of the complex octonion curved space will exert an influence on the field strength and field source of the electromagnetic and gravitational fields, impacting the linear momentum, angular momentum, torque, energy, and force and so forth.

  8. The NASA Advanced Space Power Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Hoberecht, Mark A.; Bennett, William R.; Lvovich, Vadim F.; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Advanced Space Power Systems Project is to develop advanced, game changing technologies that will provide future NASA space exploration missions with safe, reliable, light weight and compact power generation and energy storage systems. The development effort is focused on maturing the technologies from a technology readiness level of approximately 23 to approximately 56 as defined in the NASA Procedural Requirement 7123.1B. Currently, the project is working on two critical technology areas: High specific energy batteries, and regenerative fuel cell systems with passive fluid management. Examples of target applications for these technologies are: extending the duration of extravehicular activities (EVA) with high specific energy and energy density batteries; providing reliable, long-life power for rovers with passive fuel cell and regenerative fuel cell systems that enable reduced system complexity. Recent results from the high energy battery and regenerative fuel cell technology development efforts will be presented. The technical approach, the key performance parameters and the technical results achieved to date in each of these new elements will be included. The Advanced Space Power Systems Project is part of the Game Changing Development Program under NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate.

  9. Space and the complexity of European rules and policies: The common projects Galileo and GMES—precedence for a new European legal approach?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Annette

    2010-04-01

    The two European flagship space projects, Galileo and GMES, clearly show that the current existing legal rules of the two organisations involved (European Union and European Space Agency) are not compatible. Moreover, it is quite impossible to implement a common project if every single organisation insists on the application of its own rules strictu sensu. Nevertheless, due to the political desire to advance these projects rapidly and to make them a success, legal obstacles were to be overcome. Consequently, recently concluded agreements between ESA and the EU-Commission concerning the financial and governmental matters of the Galileo and GMES implementation feature a new approach to cooperation between these two organisations. However, the question remains if they can be taken as precedence for a future institutionalised cooperation? It follows that the agreements have to be analysed in order to understand how a mutually acceptable agreement was reached despite the disparity in the rules of both organisations. In this regard, especially the financial decision agreement concerning Galileo in December 2007 shows a very interesting and unique way in applying EU-competition law. In the same way, the GMES-Delegation Agreement of spring 2008 is a good example of how two different legal systems can be applied to make a project success. Additionally, the reasons and arguments of both organisations have to be considered, especially once the Treaty of Lisbon will be in force. As these two main projects of the European Space Policy are characterized by the desire for a successful European cooperation, they can be regarded as an important step forward for a new legal approach. A new system emerges which could be taken into consideration for further common projects undertaken by ESA and the EU.

  10. International Space Station Medical Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkey, Blythe A.

    2008-01-01

    The goals and objectives of the ISS Medical Project (ISSMP) are to: 1) Maximize the utilization the ISS and other spaceflight platforms to assess the effects of longduration spaceflight on human systems; 2) Devise and verify strategies to ensure optimal crew performance; 3) Enable development and validation of a suite of integrated physical (e.g., exercise), pharmacologic and/or nutritional countermeasures against deleterious effects of space flight that may impact mission success or crew health. The ISSMP provides planning, integration, and implementation services for Human Research Program research tasks and evaluation activities requiring access to space or related flight resources on the ISS, Shuttle, Soyuz, Progress, or other spaceflight vehicles and platforms. This includes pre- and postflight activities; 2) ISSMP services include operations and sustaining engineering for HRP flight hardware; experiment integration and operation, including individual research tasks and on-orbit validation of next generation on-orbit equipment; medical operations; procedures development and validation; and crew training tools and processes, as well as operation and sustaining engineering for the Telescience Support Center; and 3) The ISSMP integrates the HRP approved flight activity complement and interfaces with external implementing organizations, such as the ISS Payloads Office and International Partners, to accomplish the HRP's objectives. This effort is led by JSC with Baseline Data Collection support from KSC.

  11. Self mobile space manipulator project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, H. Ben; Friedman, Mark; Xu, Yangsheng; Kanade, Takeo

    1992-01-01

    A relatively simple, modular, low mass, low cost robot is being developed for space EVA that is large enough to be independently mobile on a space station or platform exterior, yet versatile enough to accomplish many vital tasks. The robot comprises two long flexible links connected by a rotary joint, with 2-DOF 'wrist' joints and grippers at each end. It walks by gripping pre-positioned attachment points, such as trusswork nodes, and alternately shifting its base of support from one foot (gripper) to the other. The robot can perform useful tasks such as visual inspection, material transport, and light assembly by manipulating objects with one gripper, while stabilizing itself with the other. At SOAR '90, we reported development of 1/3 scale robot hardware, modular trusswork to serve as a locomotion substrate, and a gravity compensation system to allow laboratory tests of locomotion strategies on the horizontal face of the trusswork. In this paper, we report on project progress including the development of: (1) adaptive control for automatic adjustment to loads; (2) enhanced manipulation capabilities; (3) machine vision, including the use of neural nets, to guide autonomous locomotion; (4) locomotion between orthogonal trusswork faces; and (5) improved facilities for gravity compensation and telerobotic control.

  12. Infrared space astrometry project JASMINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Yano, T.; Yano

    2008-07-01

    A Japanese plan of an infrared (z-band:0.9 μas or k-band:2.2 μas) space astrometry (JASMINE-project) is introduced. JASMINE (Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for INfrared Exploration) will measure distances and tangential motions of stars in the bulge of the Milky Way. It will measure parallaxes, positions with an accuracy of 10 μas and proper motions with an accuracy of 10 μas/year for stars brighter than z=14 mag or k=11 mag. JASMINE will observe about ten million stars belonging to the bulge component of our Galaxy. With a completely new “map” of the Galactic bulge, it is expected that many new exciting scientific results will be obtained in various fields of astronomy. Presently, JASMINE is in a development phase, with a targeted launch date around 2016. Science targets, preliminary design of instruments, observing strategy, critical technical issues in JASMINE and also Nano-JASMINE project are described in this paper.

  13. 2008 ESMD Space Grant Faculty Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gloria; Conrad, James; Guo, Jiang; Lackey, Ellen; Lambright, Jonathan; Misra, Prabhakar; Prasad, Nadipuram; Radcliff, Roger; Selby, Gregory; Wersinger, Jean-Marie; Whitmore, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Objectives of this project was to: Gather senior design project ideas and internship opportunities: Relative to space explorationnd In support of the ESMD Space Grant Student Project Support NASAs Educational Framework Outcome 1: Contribute to the development of the STEM workforce

  14. Space Station Biological Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine C.; Hargens, Alan R.; Wade, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is responsible for the development of the Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) which will support non-human life sciences research on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA). The SSBRP is designed to support both basic research to understand the effect of altered gravity fields on biological systems and applied research to investigate the effects of space flight on biological systems. The SSBRP will provide the necessary habitats to support avian and reptile eggs, cells and tissues, plants and rodents. In addition a habitat to support aquatic specimens will be provided by our international partners. Habitats will be mounted in ISSA compatible racks at u-g and will also be mounted on a 2.5 m diameter centrifuge except for the egg incubator which has an internal centrifuge. The 2.5 m centrifuge will provide artificial gravity levels over the range of 0.01 G to 2 G. The current schedule is to launch the first rack in 1999, the Life Sciences glovebox and a second rack early in 2001, a 4 habitat 2.5 in centrifuge later the same year in its own module, and to upgrade the centrifuge to 8 habitats in 2004. The rodent habitats will be derived from the Advanced Animal Habitat currently under development for the Shuttle program and will be capable of housing either rats or mice individually or in groups (6 rats/group and at least 12 mice/group). The egg incubator will be an upgraded Avian Development Facility also developed for the Shuttle program through a Small Business and Innovative Research grant. The Space Tissue Loss cell culture apparatus, developed by Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, is being considered for the cell and tissue culture habitat. The Life Sciences Glovebox is crucial to all life sciences experiments for specimen manipulation and performance of science procedures. It will provide two levels of containment between the work volume and the crew through the use of seals and negative pressure. The glovebox

  15. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Complex Electronics (CE) are now programmed to perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. Many of the methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to CE development. For instance, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. Since CE devices are obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications in the development of these devices. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE) is a research project that looks at using standardized S/W Assurance/Engineering practices to provide an assurance framework for development activities. Tools such as checklists, best practices and techniques can be used to detect missing requirements and bugs earlier in the development cycle creating a development process for CE that will be more easily maintained, consistent and configurable based on the device used.

  16. Managing Programmatic Risk for Complex Space System Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panetta, Peter V.; Hastings, Daniel; Brumfield, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Risk management strategies have become a recent important research topic to many aerospace organizations as they prepare to develop the revolutionary complex space systems of the future. Future multi-disciplinary complex space systems will make it absolutely essential for organizations to practice a rigorous, comprehensive risk management process, emphasizing thorough systems engineering principles to succeed. Project managers must possess strong leadership skills to direct high quality, cross-disciplinary teams for successfully developing revolutionary space systems that are ever increasing in complexity. Proactive efforts to reduce or eliminate risk throughout a project's lifecycle ideally must be practiced by all technical members in the organization. This paper discusses some of the risk management perspectives that were collected from senior managers and project managers of aerospace and aeronautical organizations by the use of interviews and surveys. Some of the programmatic risks which drive the success or failure of projects are revealed. Key findings lead to a number of insights for organizations to consider for proactively approaching the risks which face current and future complex space systems projects.

  17. Quantum Weighted Projective and Lens Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, Francesco; Landi, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    We generalize to quantum weighted projective spaces in any dimension previous results of us on K-theory and K-homology of quantum projective spaces `tout court'. For a class of such spaces, we explicitly construct families of Fredholm modules, both bounded and unbounded (that is, spectral triples), and prove that they are linearly independent in the K-homology of the corresponding C *-algebra. We also show that the quantum weighted projective spaces are base spaces of quantum principal circle bundles whose total spaces are quantum lens spaces. We construct finitely generated projective modules associated with the principal bundles and pair them with the Fredholm modules, thus proving their non-triviality.

  18. Fock spaces for modeling macromolecular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Justin

    Large macromolecular complexes play a fundamental role in how cells function. Here I describe a Fock space formalism for mathematically modeling these complexes. Specifically, this formalism allows ensembles of complexes to be defined in terms of elementary molecular ``building blocks'' and ``assembly rules.'' Such definitions avoid the massive redundancy inherent in standard representations, in which all possible complexes are manually enumerated. Methods for systematically computing ensembles of complexes from a list of components and interaction rules are described. I also show how this formalism readily accommodates coarse-graining. Finally, I introduce diagrammatic techniques that greatly facilitate the application of this formalism to both equilibrium and non-equilibrium biochemical systems.

  19. Life sciences space biology project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G.; Newkirk, K.; Miller, L.; Lewis, G.; Michaud, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Life Sciences Space Biology (LSSB) research will explore the effect of microgravity on humans, including the physiological, clinical, and sociological implications of space flight and the readaptations upon return to earth. Physiological anomalies from past U.S. space flights will be used in planning the LSSB project.The planning effort integrates science and engineering. Other goals of the LSSB project include the provision of macroscopic view of the earth's biosphere, and the development of spinoff technology for application on earth.

  20. Recommendations to Improve Space Projection Models and University Space Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigall, Sam W.

    2007-01-01

    In today"s economy, public university administrators need to reflect on current practices for reporting and projecting space requirements to government entities as the cost of constructing new facilities or renovating space rises while income from legislative appropriations diminishes. As stewards of public buildings and funds, institutions are…

  1. Live from Space Station Learning Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This is the Final Report for the Live From Space Station (LFSS) project under the Learning Technologies Project FY 2001 of the MSFC Education Programs Department. AZ Technology, Inc. (AZTek) has developed and implemented science education software tools to support tasks under the LTP program. Initial audience consisted of 26 TreK in the Classroom schools and thousands of museum visitors to the International Space Station: The Earth Tour exhibit sponsored by Discovery Place museum.

  2. Tailoring Enterprise Systems Engineering Policy for Project Scale and Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Renee I.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2014-01-01

    Space systems are characterized by varying degrees of scale and complexity. Accordingly, cost-effective implementation of systems engineering also varies depending on scale and complexity. Recognizing that systems engineering and integration happen everywhere and at all levels of a given system and that the life cycle is an integrated process necessary to mature a design, the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a suite of customized implementation approaches based on project scale and complexity. While it may be argued that a top-level system engineering process is common to and indeed desirable across an enterprise for all space systems, implementation of that top-level process and the associated products developed as a result differ from system to system. The implementation approaches used for developing a scientific instrument necessarily differ from those used for a space station. .

  3. Complex researches aboard the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhyl, Yu. A.

    Special Research and Development Bureau SRDB is a general organizer on Ukrainian part of three Ukrainian- Russian joint experiments to be implemented aboard the Russian segment of International Space Station RS-ISS Experiment Material- Friction It is proposed to carry out a series of comparative tribological research under conditions of orbital flight aboard the ISS versus those in on- ground laboratory conditions To meet these objectives there will be employed a special onboard 6-module Space- borne tribometer- facility The on- ground research will be implemented under conditions of laboratory simulation of Space environmental factors Results thus obtained would enable one to forecast a behavior of friction pairs as well as functional safety and lifetime of the space- vehicle This experiment will also enable us determine an adequacy of tribological results obtained under conditions of outer Space and on- ground simulation Experiment Penta- Fatigue It is proposed to develop fabricate and deliver aboard the RS-ISS a facility intended for studies of SEF- influence on characteristics of metallic and polymeric materials resistance to fatigue destruction Such a project to be implemented in outer Space for the first ever time would enable us to estimate the parameter of cosmic lifetime for constructional materials due to such mechanical characteristic as fatigue strength so as to enable selection of specific sorts of constructional materials appropriate to service in Space technologies At the same time

  4. Space market model development project, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Hamel, Gary P.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a research project investigating information needs for space commercialization is described. The Space Market Model Development Project (SMMDP) was designed to help NASA identify the information needs of the business community and to explore means to meet those needs. The activity of the SMMDP is reviewed and a report of its operation via three sections is presented. The first part contains a brief historical review of the project since inception. The next part reports results of Phase 3, the most recent stage of activity. Finally, overall conclusions and observations based on the SMMDP research results are presented.

  5. Technology Developed In Two Space Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Carlton H.

    1988-01-01

    Two projects examined for their influences on commercial products and future space missions. Three-volume report presents study of technological benefits of two spaceflight projects, Galileo, and Hubble space telescope. Study focused on equipment and computer programs developed between initial approval of projects and integration and testing of the systems. Volume 1 presents overview of study, discusses methods of collection and evaluation of data, and offers conclusion and recommendations. Volume 2 describes interview process and summarizes raw data. Volume 3 contains technology-assessment sheets for developments.

  6. Space Mission Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the Space Mission Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) Project is to extend current ground-based HRA risk prediction techniques to a long-duration, space-based tool. Ground-based HRA methodology has been shown to be a reasonable tool for short-duration space missions, such as Space Shuttle and lunar fly-bys. However, longer-duration deep-space missions, such as asteroid and Mars missions, will require the crew to be in space for as long as 400 to 900 day missions with periods of extended autonomy and self-sufficiency. Current indications show higher risk due to fatigue, physiological effects due to extended low gravity environments, and others, may impact HRA predictions. For this project, Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) will work with Human Health & Performance (HH&P) to establish what is currently used to assess human reliabiilty for human space programs, identify human performance factors that may be sensitive to long duration space flight, collect available historical data, and update current tools to account for performance shaping factors believed to be important to such missions. This effort will also contribute data to the Human Performance Data Repository and influence the Space Human Factors Engineering research risks and gaps (part of the HRP Program). An accurate risk predictor mitigates Loss of Crew (LOC) and Loss of Mission (LOM).The end result will be an updated HRA model that can effectively predict risk on long-duration missions.

  7. Resolution of Complexity in ISD Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Jill; Linger, Henry

    ISD projects are characterised by complexity because they are situated in an unstructured environment where requirements are dynamic and the technical solution is potentially unknown. In this context existing tools, routines and methodologies may not be sufficient to resolve the complexity that emerges during the project life span. The resolution of complex issues requires access to a broad range of experience and knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge to the specific requirements of the project. Knowledge processes, such as experimentation, sense making and learning, amongst others, represent an innovative and flexible means to address the intrinsic complexity of ISD projects. In this chapter we argue that knowledge processes must be explicitly incorporated into project management in order to resolve emergent issues and integrate knowledge created by those practices into project management tools, techniques and methodologies. The chapter presents a study of the rollout of an enterprise project management software project in an Australian government department to illustrate the role of knowledge processes to resolve complex issues and how these processes became incorporated into the emergent methodology used to manage the project.

  8. Space-time complexity in Hamiltonian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, V; Zaslavsky, G M

    2003-06-01

    New notions of the complexity function C(epsilon;t,s) and entropy function S(epsilon;t,s) are introduced to describe systems with nonzero or zero Lyapunov exponents or systems that exhibit strong intermittent behavior with "flights," trappings, weak mixing, etc. The important part of the new notions is the first appearance of epsilon-separation of initially close trajectories. The complexity function is similar to the propagator p(t(0),x(0);t,x) with a replacement of x by the natural lengths s of trajectories, and its introduction does not assume of the space-time independence in the process of evolution of the system. A special stress is done on the choice of variables and the replacement t-->eta=ln t, s-->xi=ln s makes it possible to consider time-algebraic and space-algebraic complexity and some mixed cases. It is shown that for typical cases the entropy function S(epsilon;xi,eta) possesses invariants (alpha,beta) that describe the fractal dimensions of the space-time structures of trajectories. The invariants (alpha,beta) can be linked to the transport properties of the system, from one side, and to the Riemann invariants for simple waves, from the other side. This analog provides a new meaning for the transport exponent mu that can be considered as the speed of a Riemann wave in the log-phase space of the log-space-time variables. Some other applications of new notions are considered and numerical examples are presented. PMID:12777116

  9. Space Shuttle Projects Overview to Columbia Air Forces War College

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Jody; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, a general overview of space shuttle projects. Some of the topics include: 1) Space Shuttle Projects; 2) Marshall Space Flight Center Space Shuttle Projects Office; 3) Space Shuttle Propulsion systems; 4) Space Shuttle Program Major Sites; 5) NASA Office of Space flight (OSF) Center Roles in Space Shuttle Program; 6) Space Shuttle Hardware Flow; and 7) Shuttle Flights To Date.

  10. Radiation Risk Projections for Space Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis

    2003-01-01

    Space travelers are exposed to solar and galactic cosmic rays comprised of protons and heavy ions moving with velocities close to the speed of light. Cosmic ray heavy ions are known to produce more severe types of biomolecular damage in comparison to terrestrial forms of radiation, however the relationship between such damage and disease has not been fully elucidated. On Earth, we are protected from cosmic rays by atmospheric and magnetic shielding, and only the remnants of cosmic rays in the form of ground level muons and other secondary radiations are present. Because human epidemiology data is lacking for cosmic rays, risk projection must rely on theoretical understanding and data from experimental models exposed to space radiation using charged particle accelerators to simulate space radiation. Although the risks of cancer and other late effects from cosmic rays are currently believed to present a severe challenge to space travel, this challenge is centered on our lack of confidence in risk projections methodologies. We review biophysics and radiobiology data on the effects of the cosmic ray heavy ions, and the current methods used to project radiation risks . Cancer risk projections are described as a product of many biological and physical factors, each of which has a differential range of uncertainty due to lack of data and knowledge. Risk projections for space travel are described using Monte-Carlo sampling from subjective error di stributions that represent the lack of knowledge in each factor that contributes to the projection model in order to quantify the overall uncertainty in risk projections. This analysis is applied to space mi ssion scenarios including lunar colony, deep space outpost, and a Mars mission. Results suggest that the number of days in space where cancer mortality risks can be assured at a 95% confidence level to be below the maximum acceptable risk for radi ation workers on Earth or the International Space Station is only on the order

  11. Risk management integration into complex project organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, K.; Greanias, G.; Rose, J.; Dumas, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used in designing and adapting the SIRTF prototype, discusses some of the lessons learned in developing the SIRTF prototype, and explains the adaptability of the risk management database to varying levels project complexity.

  12. Quantum Bundle Description of Quantum Projective Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Buachalla, Réamonn

    2012-12-01

    We realise Heckenberger and Kolb's canonical calculus on quantum projective ( N - 1)-space C q [ C p N-1] as the restriction of a distinguished quotient of the standard bicovariant calculus for the quantum special unitary group C q [ SU N ]. We introduce a calculus on the quantum sphere C q [ S 2 N-1] in the same way. With respect to these choices of calculi, we present C q [ C p N-1] as the base space of two different quantum principal bundles, one with total space C q [ SU N ], and the other with total space C q [ S 2 N-1]. We go on to give C q [ C p N-1] the structure of a quantum framed manifold. More specifically, we describe the module of one-forms of Heckenberger and Kolb's calculus as an associated vector bundle to the principal bundle with total space C q [ SU N ]. Finally, we construct strong connections for both bundles.

  13. Design methodology and projects for space engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, S.; Kleespies, H.; Wood, K.; Crawford, R.

    1993-01-01

    NASA/USRA is an ongoing sponsor of space design projects in the senior design course of the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Austin. This paper describes the UT senior design sequence, consisting of a design methodology course and a capstone design course. The philosophical basis of this sequence is briefly summarized. A history of the Department's activities in the Advanced Design Program is then presented. The paper concludes with a description of the projects completed during the 1991-92 academic year and the ongoing projects for the Fall 1992 semester.

  14. Space Engineering Projects in Design Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R.; Wood, K.; Nichols, S.; Hearn, C.; Corrier, S.; DeKunder, G.; George, S.; Hysinger, C.; Johnson, C.; Kubasta, K.

    1993-01-01

    NASA/USRA is an ongoing sponsor of space design projects in the senior design courses of the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Austin. This paper describes the UT senior design sequence, focusing on the first-semester design methodology course. The philosophical basis and pedagogical structure of this course is summarized. A history of the Department's activities in the Advanced Design Program is then presented. The paper includes a summary of the projects completed during the 1992-93 Academic Year in the methodology course, and concludes with an example of two projects completed by student design teams.

  15. Understanding the Complexity of Epigenetic Target Space.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vineet

    2016-02-25

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the complexity of the epigenetic target space. Chemical modifications of histones and nucleic acids constitute a key epigenetic mechanism. Whereas modifications such as methylation and acetylation are well-known, there are many additional, less explored modifications described here. The writers, readers and erasers of such diverse modifications, which constitute a major portion of the potential epigenetic target space, are discussed, in addition to the various other protein families that do not fall under these three categories. Finally, disease relevance and druggability of epigenetic targets are discussed with concluding remarks about the richness and diversity they will provide for future targeted therapies. PMID:26796965

  16. Complexity and Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    Sporadic and localized interactions of coherent structures arising from plasma resonances can be the origin of "complexity" of the coexistence of non- propagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes in space plasmas. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the intermittent character of the non-propagating fluctuations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization-group is introduced and applied to the study of scale invariance of such type of multiscale fluctuations. We also demonstrate that the particle interactions with the intermittent turbulence can lead to the efficient energization of the plasma populations. An example related to the ion acceleration processes in the auroral zone is provided.

  17. Space weathering on S-complex asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, M.

    Space weathering was hypothesized to reconcile the different spectra from meteorites and their putative source, S-complex asteroids. We measured a new space weathering time and the first regolith gardening time for changing surface color on S-complex asteroids. We also measured the principal component color (PC1) range over which space weathering operates. Our space weathering models evolved from the single tau model with only one weathering time, to the dual tau model incorporating the gardening time, and finally to the enhanced dual tau model using a probability density function to represent an asteroid's PC1 and age. The first two models were fit to pre-existing data plus new observations of the youngest families and even younger sub-Myr clusters. The third model used a sample common to SMASS and SDSS. The enhanced dual tau model best represents space weathering but it was fit to a small data sample of limited size and age range. Therefore we believe that the best estimate of space weathering and gardening times comes from the dual tau model which yields 960 +/- 160 Myr and 2000 +/- 290 Myr, respectively. On the other hand, the enhanced dual tau model solved a PC1 truncation problem when inverting the dual tau model, so we prefer its initial and maximum likely PC 1 values of --0.05 +/- 0.01 and 1.29 +/- 0.04. We independently calculated an average resurfacing time of tau g = 270 +/- 110 My from impact rates and cratering physics that is 7x smaller than our measured gardening time. Hence, we postulate that due to internal porosity, small asteroids absorb impactors up to 10--20 m diameter through inelastic deformation without producing significant ejecta blankets, a 'honeycomb' mechanism. This may also explain the paucity of craters <200 m on Eros. The only data point not fitting our models was from asteroid two-members families that have an average color of PC1 = 0.49 +/- 0.03, 5sigma redder than predicted. This anomaly may be due to a different formation

  18. Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit previews at Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Children on a tour at the KSC Visitor Complex get an early look at the Discovery Channel's Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit, which opens to the public on Saturday, June 17. They are on a re- creation of the deck of Ocean Project, the ship that located and recovered the space capsule from the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. Liberty Bell 7 launched U.S. Air Force Captain Virgil '''Gus''' Grissom July 21, 1961, on a mission that lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds before sinking. It lay undetected for nearly four decades before a Discovery Channel expedition located it and recovered it. The space capsule, now restored and preserved, is part of an interactive exhibit touring science centers and museums in 12 cities throughout the United States until 2003. The exhibit also includes hands-on elements such as a capsule simulator, a centrifuge, and ROV pilot.

  19. Military space station implications. Study project

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.D.; Skirvin, G.D.; Wilson, G.R.

    1987-03-23

    Justifying the relevancy of a Manned Military Space Station (MMSS) and subsequently proposing its deployment to capitalize upon the United States' national security interests is the essence and purpose of this group study project. The MMSS is intended to perform a two-fold purpose: (1) facilitate military peacetime operations while simultaneously supporting and promoting civilian space initiatives; and, (2) act as a force multiplier for space and terrestrial force operations in the event of conventional, theater nuclear, and/or strategic nuclear war. Data to support the future value of the MMSS was obtained from individual and group research using unclassified sources such as professional journals, books, US Air Force Staff College reference material, and information from the US Air Force space coordinating staff in Washington, DC. The importance of space to our future and especially of a MMSS by America's national leaders and its people has yet to be fully appreciated and/or realized. The significance of space and its nexus to the United States' national security has been growing dramatically in importance since the launching of the Sputnik in 1957 by Russian. Space, as the forth dimension, cannot and should not be understated in importance as it relates to commercialism, deterrence to war, and to the stability of world order.

  20. Standard data procedures for future space projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, G. V.

    An introduction to the end-to-end data system concept which considers both instrument and data autonomy is presented and future guidelines for packet telemetry and packet telecommand, initiated by a NASA/ESA working group and developed by an international consultative committee for space data systems, coordinated with six space agencies, are discussed. The status of the documents on standard data procedures is examined, with special emphasis given to the document on packet telemetry. Autonomous payload control, which is a pilot project for the study and the demonstration of the new data procedures, is described.

  1. The WPI space glove design project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgin, W. W.; Hoffman, A. H.; Ault, H. K.; Lutz, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) was one of four colleges and universities awarded NASA grants for student design and development of an improved glove for space suits. This paper traces the design, development and testing of the WPI prototype glove. Test results showed that the glove did not significantly limit hand and finger motion when pressurized at 8 psi, except in the spherical grip mode. This project demonstrated that problems originating from space technology provide excellent vehicles for student learning and can generate creative solutions.

  2. A Correlational Study Assessing the Relationships among Information Technology Project Complexity, Project Complication, and Project Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The specific problem addressed in this study was the low success rate of information technology (IT) projects in the U.S. Due to the abstract nature and inherent complexity of software development, IT projects are among the most complex projects encountered. Most existing schools of project management theory are based on the rational systems…

  3. Planning for large construction projects in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses briefly some broad plans for developing the technology needed for large construction projects in space ranging from orbiting solar power stations to large communications antennas. Space construction classes include assembly of modules, deployment of compacted structures, assembly of passive preformed pieces, and fabrication of structures from sheet stock. Technological areas related to structural concepts include (1) analyses for prediction of structural behavior, structural/control interaction, electromagnetic and control performance, and integrated design development; (2) electronics for signal conditioning and data acquisition, power distribution, and signal channel interference and multipaction; (3) concepts for shape control, attitude/pointing control, and orbital transfer and station keeping; and (4) materials and techniques for 30-year dimensional stable composites, thermal control, thin-lightweight structural alloys, and material joining in space. The concept of a power module for the construction operations is discussed along with a concept for a habitability module.

  4. Space processing applications rocket project. SPAR 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassay, R. P. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The Space Processing Applications Rocket Project (SPAR) VIII Final Report contains the engineering report prepared at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as well as the three reports from the principal investigators. These reports also describe pertinent portions of ground-based research leading to the ultimate selection of the flight sample composition, including design, fabrication, and testing, all of which are expected to contribute immeasurably to an improved comprehension of materials processing in space. This technical memorandum is directed entirely to the payload manifest flown in the eighth of a series of SPAR flights conducted at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) and includes the experiments entitled Glass Formation Experiment SPAR 74-42/1R, Glass Fining Experiment in Low-Gravity SPAR 77-13/1, and Dynamics of Liquid Bubbles SPAR Experiment 77-18/2.

  5. Space project IONOSAT- MICRO - goals and realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Lizunov, Georgii; Fedorov, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    The IONOSAT-MICRO project is a first stage of IONOSAT program devoted to the multi-point global monitoring of dynamic processes in the ionosphere. The IONOSAT program is planned to be realized in 2015-2020 with the help of three satellites at coordinated low Earth orbits (LEO). IONOSAT-MICRO is the forerunner project scheduled for launch in 2014 at sun-synchronous orbit with the aim to test the IONOSAT mission scientific postulates and preliminary collection of related space data. The main goal of the IONOSAT-MICRO project is the systematic study of the dynamic response of the ionosphere to the influence "from above" (sun, geomagnetic activity) and "from below" (powerful meteorological, seismic and anthropogenic impacts). More in details, the study of following formations in the ionosphere is foreseen: - Space-temporal structure and global distribution of inhomogeneities in neutral atmosphere and ionosphere; - Global structure and dynamics of quasi-stationary electric currents, electric and magnetic fields; - Wave structures and turbulences at different spatial and temporal scales. To realize such a research, the scientific payload of the MICROSAT spacecraft will provide the measurements of following parameters: - Neutral gas and plasma parameters - concentration, temperature; - DC-ELF-VLF electromagnetic field vectors and ELF-VLF plasma current fluctuations; - Total electron content (TEC); - Spectral content of plasma oscillations. Synchronous experiments with ground support facilities - both active and passive ones - are also foreseen. The IONOSAT-MICRO project will be realized onboard of MICROSAT microsatellite platform, manufactured by Yuzhnoye Design Office with new experimental models of ammonia propulsion system, battery, solar arrays and panels with thermal control coating, the in-flight tests of which are also planned in frames of the project. The composition of the scientific equipment developed by the international team of participants and sensors

  6. Search for complex organic molecules in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    It was 1969 when the first organic molecule in space, H2CO, was discovered. Since then many organic molecules were discovered by using the NRAO 11 m (upgraded later to 12 m), Nobeyama 45 m, IRAM 30 m, and other highly sensitive radio telescopes as a result of close collaboration between radio astronomers and microwave spectroscopists. It is noteworthy that many famous organic molecules such as CH3OH, C2H5OH, (CH3)2O and CH3NH2 were detected by 1975. Organic molecules were found in so-called hot cores where molecules were thought to form on cold dust surfaces and then to evaporate by the UV photons emitted from the central star. These days organic molecules are known to exist not only in hot cores but in hot corinos (a warm, compact molecular clump found in the inner envelope of a class 0 protostar) and even protoplanetary disks. As was described above, major organic molecules were known since 1970s. It was very natural that astronomers considered a relationship between organic molecules in space and the origin of life. Several astronomers challenged to detect glycine and other prebiotic molecules without success. ALMA is expected to detect such important materials to further consider the gexogenous deliveryh hypothesis. In this paper I summarize the history in searching for complex organic molecules together with difficulties in observing very weak signals from larger species. The awfully long list of references at the end of this article may be the most useful part for readers who want to feel the exciting discovery stories.

  7. Planning for the scientific use of the international Space Station complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    Plans for the development of an international Space Station complex in cooperation with Japan, Canada, and the European Space Agency are reviewed. The discussion covers the planned uses of the Space Station, the principal research facilities, allocation of the resources available to the research facilities, and tactical and strategic planning related to the Space Station project. Particular attention is given to problems related to microgravity sciences and approaches to the solutions of these problems.

  8. VLBI2010 in NASA's Space Geodesy Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 20 11 NASA approved the proposal for the Space Geodesy Project (SGP). A major element is developing at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory a prototype of the next generation of integrated stations with co-located VLBI, SLR, GNSS and DORIS instruments as well as a system for monitoring the vector ties. VLBI2010 is a key component of the integrated station. The objectives ofSGP, the role of VLBI20 lOin the context of SGP, near term plans and possible future scenarios will be discussed.

  9. Russian Projects of Space Missions for Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, A. V.

    2006-08-01

    Since 1994 Institute of Astronomy of Russian Academy of Sciences is working on conception of astrometrical instrument of new generation under contract with Russian Space Agency. After HIPPARCOS mission it is obvious that necessary accuracy for modern astrometry is micro-arcseconds. The only way to approach this level is pupil interferometry outside atmosphere. The first Russian project was pair of twin Michelson interferometers with coincided bases. It consisted of 40-cm input telescopes and had baseline 4 meters long; its limiting magnitude was about 20^m and expected accuracy 2-4 mks. As this devise was proposed to be russian-american experiment for International Space Station, and NASA did not support it, the project was not move up. This is why improved conception of slightly diminished arcmeter-interferometer OSIRIS was proposed as national space project, and it is adopted to the Russian Federal Space Program for the period 2012-2015. Input optic of the OSIRIS will be of 20-cm aperture, and baseline will be 200 cm. It seems to be enough to get position accuracy of single measurement about 4-8 mks at arc range from 30 to 105 degrees, and limiting magnitude being 18^m. There are some technical invents that guarantee these parameters. The OSIRIS mission will establish referred to the ICRS inertial celestial reference frame in optic independent of epoch, that leads to new tasks of astrometry. The astrometrical instrument of new generation may be used for positioning of near-Earth probes as well as of ground objects. Using the same technology it became possible to point narrow-field telescope to any target with the same accuracy. A really desired for this aims accuracy is only milliseconds, and just for these applied experiments LIDA project was proposed last year. It will be suitable for bright sources above 12^m and it will measure instant positions with accuracy 1 mas. The LIDA will be low-mass and compact device suitable for launch by conversional rocket of

  10. Space Human Factors Engineering Gap Analysis Project Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudy, Cynthia; Woolford, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Humans perform critical functions throughout each phase of every space mission, beginning with the mission concept and continuing to post-mission analysis (Life Sciences Division, 1996). Space missions present humans with many challenges - the microgravity environment, relative isolation, and inherent dangers of the mission all present unique issues. As mission duration and distance from Earth increases, in-flight crew autonomy will increase along with increased complexity. As efforts for exploring the moon and Mars advance, there is a need for space human factors research and technology development to play a significant role in both on-orbit human-system interaction, as well as the development of mission requirements and needs before and after the mission. As part of the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project within the Human Research Program (HRP), a six-month Gap Analysis Project (GAP) was funded to identify any human factors research gaps or knowledge needs. The overall aim of the project was to review the current state of human factors topic areas and requirements to determine what data, processes, or tools are needed to aid in the planning and development of future exploration missions, and also to prioritize proposals for future research and technology development.

  11. Formal methods demonstration project for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divito, Ben L.

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle program is cooperating in a pilot project to apply formal methods to live requirements analysis activities. As one of the larger ongoing shuttle Change Requests (CR's), the Global Positioning System (GPS) CR involves a significant upgrade to the Shuttle's navigation capability. Shuttles are to be outfitted with GPS receivers and the primary avionics software will be enhanced to accept GPS-provided positions and integrate them into navigation calculations. Prior to implementing the CR, requirements analysts at Loral Space Information Systems, the Shuttle software contractor, must scrutinize the CR to identify and resolve any requirements issues. We describe an ongoing task of the Formal Methods Demonstration Project for Space Applications whose goal is to find an effective way to use formal methods in the GPS CR requirements analysis phase. This phase is currently under way and a small team from NASA Langley, ViGYAN Inc. and Loral is now engaged in this task. Background on the GPS CR is provided and an overview of the hardware/software architecture is presented. We outline the approach being taken to formalize the requirements, only a subset of which is being attempted. The approach features the use of the PVS specification language to model 'principal functions', which are major units of Shuttle software. Conventional state machine techniques form the basis of our approach. Given this background, we present interim results based on a snapshot of work in progress. Samples of requirements specifications rendered in PVS are offered to illustration. We walk through a specification sketch for the principal function known as GPS Receiver State processing. Results to date are summarized and feedback from Loral requirements analysts is highlighted. Preliminary data is shown comparing issues detected by the formal methods team versus those detected using existing requirements analysis methods. We conclude by discussing our plan to complete the remaining

  12. MAGDAS Project at SERC for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University has deployed the MAG-netic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS) at 50 stations along the 210-and 96-degree mag-netic meridians (MM) and the magnetic Dip equator, and three FM-CW radars along the 210-degree MM during the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) period of 2005-2009 (see http://magdas.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/ and http://magdas2.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/). The goal of MAGDAS project is to become the most comprehensive ground-based monitoring system of the earth's magnetic field. It does not compete with space-based observation. Rather, this ground-based network complements observation from space. To properly study solar-terrestrial events, data from both are required. This project intends to get the MAGDAS network fully operational and provide data for studies on space weather. By analyzing these new MAGDAS data, we can perform a real-time monitoring and modeling of the global (e.g. Sq, EEJ) current system and the ambient plasma mass density for understanding the electromagnetic and plasma environment changes in geospace during helio-magnetospheric storms. In order to examine the propagation mechanisms of transient disturbances, i.e., sc/si, Pi 2, and DP2, relations of iono-spheric electric and magnetic fields are investigated by analyzing the MAGDAS magnetic data and the Doppler data of our FM-CW ionospheric radar. A new EE-index (EDst, EU, and EL) was also proposed by SERC for real-time and long-term geo-space monitoring. The basic algorithm to obtain EE-index was constructed by Uozumi et al. (2008). EU and EL mainly represent the range of the EEJ (equatorial electrojet) and CEJ (equatorial counter electrojet) components, respectively. The baseline levels of EU and EL are obtained by averaging the H-component magnetic variations observed at the nightside (LT = 18-06) MAGDAS/CPMN (Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network) stations along the magnetic equator. The base-line value is defined as EDst and its

  13. The NASA OCEAN project--an ocean-space analog

    PubMed

    Chamberland, D

    1996-01-01

    An advanced life support system (ALS) with bioregenerative components may one day be required for long-term, deep space exploration, in extended missions to Mars or in establishing long-term bases on the moon. Intensive research programs on such ALS systems have been ongoing throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) since 1988. Notably, projects have been initiated at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Ames Research Center (ARC), and the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC). The KSC ALS work has been named the "Breadboard Project" because of its approach developing the components and combining them into a breadboard to understanding the bioregenerative ALS picture [also called a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)] in smaller pieces, similar to an electronic "breadboard." The Breadboard Project has been involved for 7 years in the study of higher crops grown in a 113 m3 chamber--the longest operating and largest such closed, controlled growth chamber in the world. This chamber has proven itself to be very successful in growing a wide variety of crops from seedlings to harvest and in helping researchers understand the complex biological cycle of such edible plants in closed, environmentally controlled environments. Because the system's ultimate use will be a more challenging environment, moving a specially designed piece of the system into extreme conditions was an important test. Engineers at KSC developed a compact, portable, functional plant module for testing in the world's only fixed seafloor laboratory at Key Largo, FL. The laboratory, called MarineLab, is operated out of the facilities of the Marine Resources Development Foundation in a lagoon of some 10 m depth. The project was called the OCEAN project (Ocean CELSS Experimental Analog NASA). PMID:11538567

  14. Renyi complexities and information planes: Atomic structure in conjugated spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolín, J.; López-Rosa, S.; Angulo, J. C.

    2009-05-01

    Generalized Renyi complexity measures are defined and numerically analyzed for atomic one-particle densities in both conjugated spaces. These complexities provide, as particular cases, the previously known statistical and Fisher-Shannon complexities. The generalized complexities provide information on the atomic shell structure and shell-filling patterns, allowing to appropriately weight different regions of the electronic cloud.

  15. Quadratic forms of projective spaces over rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, V. M.; Starikova, O. A.

    2006-06-01

    In the passage from fields to rings of coefficients quadratic forms with invertible matrices lose their decisive role. It turns out that if all quadratic forms over a ring are diagonalizable, then in effect this is always a local principal ideal ring R with 2\\in R^*. The problem of the construction of a `normal' diagonal form of a quadratic form over a ring R faces obstacles in the case of indices \\vert R^*:R^{*2}\\vert greater than 1. In the case of index 2 this problem has a solution given in Theorem 2.1 for 1+R^{*2}\\subseteq R^{*2} (an extension of the law of inertia for real quadratic forms) and in Theorem 2.2 for 1+R^2 containing an invertible non-square. Under the same conditions on a ring R with nilpotent maximal ideal the number of classes of projectively congruent quadratic forms of the projective space associated with a free R-module of rank n is explicitly calculated (Proposition 3.2). Up to projectivities, the list of forms is presented for the projective plane over R and also (Theorem 3.3) over the local ring F\\lbrack\\lbrack x,y\\rbrack\\rbrack/\\langle x^{2},xy,y^{2}\\rangle with non-principal maximal ideal, where F=2F is a field with an invertible non-square in 1+F^{2} and \\vert F^{*}:F^{*2}\\vert=2. In the latter case the number of classes of non-diagonalizable quadratic forms of rank 0 depends on one's choice of the field F and is not even always finite; all the other forms make up 21 classes.

  16. James Webb Space Telescope Project (JWST) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Mitra

    2008-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project. The JWST is an infrared telescope designed to collect data in the cosmic dark zone. Specifically, the mission of the JWST is to study the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars and planetary systems. It is a deployable telescope with a 6.5 m diameter, segmented, adjustable primary mirror. outfitted with cryogenic temperature telescope and instruments for infrared performance. The JWST is several times more sensitive than previous telescope and other photographic and electronic detection methods. It hosts a near infrared camera, near infrared spectrometer, mid-infrared instrument and a fine guidance sensor. The JWST mission objection and architecture, integrated science payload, instrument overview, and operational orbit are described.

  17. Autonomous Deep-Space Optical Navigation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This project will advance the Autonomous Deep-space navigation capability applied to Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) system by testing it on hardware, particularly in a flight processor, with a goal of limited testing in the Integrated Power, Avionics and Software (IPAS) with the ARCM (Asteroid Retrieval Crewed Mission) DRO (Distant Retrograde Orbit) Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) scenario. The technology, which will be harnessed, is called 'optical flow', also known as 'visual odometry'. It is being matured in the automotive and SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) applications but has yet to be applied to spacecraft navigation. In light of the tremendous potential of this technique, we believe that NASA needs to design a optical navigation architecture that will use this technique. It is flexible enough to be applicable to navigating around planetary bodies, such as asteroids.

  18. Complexity of Sizing for Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The `fit? of a garment is often considered to be a subjective measure of garment quality. However, some experts attest that a complaint of poor garment fit is a symptom of inadequate or excessive ease, the space between the garment and the wearer. Fit has traditionally been hard to quantify, and space suits are an extreme example, where fit is difficult to measure but crucial for safety and operability. A proper space suit fit is particularly challenging because of NASA?s need to fit an incredibly diverse population (males and females from the 1st to 99th percentile) while developing a minimum number of space suit sizes. Because so few sizes are available, the available space suits must be optimized so that each fits a large segment of the population without compromising the fit of any one wearer.

  19. Space Station Biological Research Project Habitat: Incubator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, G. J.; Kirven-Brooks, M.; Scheller, N. M.

    2001-01-01

    Developed as part of the suite of Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) hardware to support research aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Incubator is a temperature-controlled chamber, for conducting life science research with small animal, plant and microbial specimens. The Incubator is designed for use only on the ISS and is transported to/from the ISS, unpowered and without specimens, in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) of the Shuttle. The Incubator interfaces with the three SSBRP Host Systems; the Habitat Holding Racks (HHR), the Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) and the 2.5 m Centrifuge Rotor (CR), providing investigators with the ability to conduct research in microgravity and at variable gravity levels of up to 2-g. The temperature within the Specimen Chamber can be controlled between 4 and 45 C. Cabin air is recirculated within the Specimen Chamber and can be exchanged with the ISS cabin at a rate of approximately equal 50 cc/min. The humidity of the Specimen Chamber is monitored. The Specimen Chamber has a usable volume of approximately equal 19 liters and contains two (2) connectors at 28v dc, (60W) for science equipment; 5 dedicated thermometers for science; ports to support analog and digital signals from experiment unique sensors or other equipment; an Ethernet port; and a video port. It is currently manifested for UF-3 and will be launched integrated within the first SSBRP Habitat Holding Rack.

  20. Momentum space orthogonal polynomial projection quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, C. R.; Vrinceanu, D.; Marth, C. B.; Gupta, R.

    2016-04-01

    The orthogonal polynomial projection quantization (OPPQ) is an algebraic method for solving Schrödinger’s equation by representing the wave function as an expansion {{\\Psi }}(x)={\\displaystyle \\sum }n{{{Ω }}}n{P}n(x)R(x) in terms of polynomials {P}n(x) orthogonal with respect to a suitable reference function R(x), which decays asymptotically not faster than the bound state wave function. The expansion coefficients {{{Ω }}}n are obtained as linear combinations of power moments {μ }{{p}}=\\int {x}p{{\\Psi }}(x) {{d}}x. In turn, the {μ }{{p}}'s are generated by a linear recursion relation derived from Schrödinger’s equation from an initial set of low order moments. It can be readily argued that for square integrable wave functions representing physical states {{lim}}n\\to ∞ {{{Ω }}}n=0. Rapidly converging discrete energies are obtained by setting Ω coefficients to zero at arbitrarily high order. This paper introduces an extention of OPPQ in momentum space by using the representation {{Φ }}(k)={\\displaystyle \\sum }n{{{\\Xi }}}n{Q}n(k)T(k), where Q n (k) are polynomials orthogonal with respect to a suitable reference function T(k). The advantage of this new representation is that it can help solving problems for which there is no coordinate space moment equation. This is because the power moments in momentum space are the Taylor expansion coefficients, which are recursively calculated via Schrödinger’s equation. We show the convergence of this new method for the sextic anharmonic oscillator and an algebraic treatment of Gross-Pitaevskii nonlinear equation.

  1. Space Sciences Education and Outreach Project of Moscow State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasotkin, S.

    2006-11-01

    sergekras@mail.ru The space sciences education and outreach project was initiated at Moscow State University in order to incorporate modern space research into the curriculum popularize the basics of space physics, and enhance public interest in space exploration. On 20 January 2005 the first Russian University Satellite “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” was launched into circular polar orbit (inclination 83 deg., altitude 940-980 km). The onboard scientific complex “Tatyana“, as well as the mission control and information receiving centre, was designed and developed at Moscow State University. The scientific programme of the mission includes measurements of space radiation in different energy channels and Earth UV luminosity and lightning. The current education programme consists of basic multimedia lectures “Life of the Earth in the Solar Atmosphere” and computerized practice exercises “Space Practice” (based on the quasi-real-time data obtained from “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” satellite and other Internet resources). A multimedia lectures LIFE OF EARTH IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE containing the basic information and demonstrations of heliophysics (including Sun structure and solar activity, heliosphere and geophysics, solar-terrestrial connections and solar influence on the Earth’s life) was created for upper high-school and junior university students. For the upper-university students there a dozen special computerized hands-on exercises were created based on the experimental quasi-real-time data obtained from our satellites. Students specializing in space physics from a few Russian universities are involved in scientific work. Educational materials focus on upper high school, middle university and special level for space physics students. Moscow State University is now extending its space science education programme by creating multimedia lectures on remote sensing, space factors and materials study, satellite design and development, etc. The space

  2. An Overview of the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crues, Edwin Z.; Chung, Victoria I.; Blum, Michael G.; Bowman, James D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) Project, a research and development collaboration between NASA centers which investigates technologies, and processes related to integrated, distributed simulation of complex space systems in support of NASA's Exploration Initiative. In particular, it describes the three major components of DSES: network infrastructure, software infrastructure and simulation development. With regard to network infrastructure, DSES is developing a Distributed Simulation Network for use by all NASA centers. With regard to software, DSES is developing software models, tools and procedures that streamline distributed simulation development and provide an interoperable infrastructure for agency-wide integrated simulation. Finally, with regard to simulation development, DSES is developing an integrated end-to-end simulation capability to support NASA development of new exploration spacecraft and missions. This paper presents the current status and plans for these three areas, including examples of specific simulations.

  3. Space market model development project, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the prototype operations of the Space Business Information Center are presented. A clearinghouse for space business information for members of the U.S. space industry composed of public, private, and academic sectors was conducted. Behavioral and evaluation statistics were recorded from the clearinghouse and the conclusions from these statistics are presented. Business guidebooks on major markets in space business are discussed. Proprietary research and briefings for firms and agencies in the space industry are also discussed.

  4. MAGDAS Project for Space Weather Research and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2009-06-16

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University, is currently deploying a new ground-based magnetometer network of MAGnetic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS), in cooperation with about 30 organizations in the world, in order to understand the complex Sun-Earth system for space weather research and application. SERC will conducts MAGDAS observation at 50 stations in the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) region, and FM-CW radar observation along the 210 deg. magnetic meridian (MM) during the IHY/ILWS/CAWSES periods. This project is actively providing the following space weather monitoring:(1) Global 3-dimensional current system to know electromagnetic coupling of the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, auroral electrojet current, Sq current, and equatorial electrojet current. (2) Plasma mass density along the 210 deg. MM to understand plasma environment change during space storms. (3) Ionospheric electric field intensity with 10-sec sampling at L = 1.26 to understand how the external electric field penetrates into the equatorial ionosphere.

  5. MAGDAS Project for Space Weather Research and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2009-06-01

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University, is currently deploying a new ground-based magnetometer network of MAGnetic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS), in cooperation with about 30 organizations in the world, in order to understand the complex Sun-Earth system for space weather research and application. SERC will conducts MAGDAS observation at 50 stations in the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) region, and FM-CW radar observation along the 210° magnetic meridian (MM) during the IHY/ILWS/CAWSES periods. This project is actively providing the following space weather monitoring: (1) Global 3-dimensional current system to know electromagnetic coupling of the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, auroral electrojet current, Sq current, and equatorial electrojet current. (2) Plasma mass density along the 210° MM to understand plasma environment change during space storms. (3) Ionospheric electric field intensity with 10-sec sampling at L = 1.26 to understand how the external electric field penetrates into the equatorial ionosphere.

  6. Complex networks from space-filling bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, J. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional space-filling bearings are dense packings of disks that can rotate without slip. We consider the entire first family of bearings for loops of four disks and propose a hierarchical construction of their contact network. We provide analytic expressions for the clustering coefficient and degree distribution, revealing bipartite scale-free behavior with a tunable degree exponent depending on the bearing parameters. We also analyze their average shortest path and percolation properties.

  7. Complex networks from space-filling bearings.

    PubMed

    Kranz, J J; Araújo, N A M; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional space-filling bearings are dense packings of disks that can rotate without slip. We consider the entire first family of bearings for loops of four disks and propose a hierarchical construction of their contact network. We provide analytic expressions for the clustering coefficient and degree distribution, revealing bipartite scale-free behavior with a tunable degree exponent depending on the bearing parameters. We also analyze their average shortest path and percolation properties. PMID:26274220

  8. Space life sciences: Programs and projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA space life science activities are outlined. Brief, general descriptions are given of research in the areas of biomedical research, space biology, closed loop life support systems, exobiology, and biospherics.

  9. Some thoughts on the management of large, complex international space ventures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. J.; Kutzer, Ants; Schneider, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Management issues relevant to the development and deployment of large international space ventures are discussed with particular attention given to previous experience. Management approaches utilized in the past are labeled as either simple or complex, and signs of efficient management are examined. Simple approaches include those in which experiments and subsystems are developed for integration into spacecraft, and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project is given as an example of a simple multinational approach. Complex approaches include those for ESA's Spacelab Project and the Space Station Freedom in which functional interfaces cross agency and political boundaries. It is concluded that individual elements of space programs should be managed by individual participating agencies, and overall configuration control is coordinated by level with a program director acting to manage overall objectives and project interfaces.

  10. Activities of NICT space weather project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Ken T.; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Mamoru

    NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) has been in charge of space weather forecast service in Japan for more than 20 years. The main target region of the space weather is the geo-space in the vicinity of the Earth where human activities are dominant. In the geo-space, serious damages of satellites, international space stations and astronauts take place caused by energetic particles or electromagnetic disturbances: the origin of the causes is dynamically changing of solar activities. Positioning systems via GPS satellites are also im-portant recently. Since the most significant effect of positioning error comes from disturbances of the ionosphere, it is crucial to estimate time-dependent modulation of the electron density profiles in the ionosphere. NICT is one of the 13 members of the ISES (International Space Environment Service), which is an international assembly of space weather forecast centers under the UNESCO. With help of geo-space environment data exchanging among the member nations, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide informa-tion on forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. The space weather forecast at NICT is conducted based on the three methodologies: observations, simulations and informatics (OSI model). For real-time or quasi real-time reporting of space weather, we conduct our original observations: Hiraiso solar observatory to monitor the solar activity (solar flare, coronal mass ejection, and so on), domestic ionosonde network, magnetometer HF radar observations in far-east Siberia, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionosonde network (SEALION). Real-time observation data to monitor solar and solar-wind activities are obtained through antennae at NICT from ACE and STEREO satellites. We have a middle-class super-computer (NEC SX-8R) to maintain real-time computer simulations for solar and solar

  11. Space Launch Initiative Propulsion Projects Office Overview Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry; Richards, Steve

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this Space Launch Initiative is for NASA to meet its future space flight needs, including human access to space, using commercial launch vehicles that will improve safety and reliability and reduce cost. The topics include: 1) Second Generation RLV Program Overview; 2) Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Investment Areas; 3) SLI Organizational Summary; 4) Propulsion Projects Overview; 5) Current Propulsion Content; and 6) Critical Needs Roadmap. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  12. Space construction system analysis study: Project systems and missions descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Three project systems are defined and summarized. The systems are: (1) a Solar Power Satellite (SPS) Development Flight Test Vehicle configured for fabrication and compatible with solar electric propulsion orbit transfer; (2) an Advanced Communications Platform configured for space fabrication and compatible with low thrust chemical orbit transfer propulsion; and (3) the same Platform, configured to be space erectable but still compatible with low thrust chemical orbit transfer propulsion. These project systems are intended to serve as configuration models for use in detailed analyses of space construction techniques and processes. They represent feasible concepts for real projects; real in the sense that they are realistic contenders on the list of candidate missions currently projected for the national space program. Thus, they represent reasonable configurations upon which to base early studies of alternative space construction processes.

  13. An Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    The JWST project at the GSFC is responsible for the development, launch, operations and science data processing for the James Webb Space Telescope. The JWST project is currently in phase B with its launch scheduled for August 2011. The project is a partnership between NASA, ESA and CSA. The U.S. JWST team is now fully in place with the recent selection of Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) as the prime contractor for the telescope and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) as the mission operations and science data processing lead. This paper will provide an overview of the current JWST architecture and mission status including technology developments and risks.

  14. An Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Phillip A.; Campbell, Doug; Clampin, Mark; Decker, John; Greenhouse, Matt; Johns, Alan; Menzel, Mike; Smith, Robert; Sullivan, Pam

    2005-01-01

    The JWST project at the GSFC is responsible for the development, launch, operations and science data processing for the James Webb Space Telescope. The JWST project is currently in phase B with its launch scheduled for August 2011. The project is a partnership between NASA, ESA and CSA. The U.S. JWST team is now fully in place with the selection of Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) as the prime contractor for the telescope and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) as the mission operations and science data processing lead. This paper will provide an overview of the current JWST architecture and mission status including technology developments and risks.

  15. Space technology and robotics in school projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villias, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Space-related educational activities is a very inspiring and attractive way to involve students into science courses, present them the variety of STEM careers that they can follow, while giving them at the same time the opportunity to develop various practical and communication skills necessary for their future professional development. As part of a large scale extracurricular course in Space Science, Space Technology and Robotics that has been introduced in our school, our students, divided in smaller groups of 3-4 students in each, try to understand the challenges that current and future space exploration is facing. Following a mixture of an inquiry-based learning methodology and hands-on practical activities related with constructions and experiments, students get a glimpse of the pre-mentioned fields. Our main goal is to gain practical knowledge and inspiration from the exciting field of Space, to attain an adequate level of team spirit and effective cooperation, while developing technical and research data-mining skills. We use the following two approaches: 1. Constructive (Technical) approach Designing and constructing various customized robotic machines, that will simulate the future space exploration vehicles and satellites needed to study the atmosphere, surface and subsurface of planets, moons or other planetary bodies of our solar system that have shown some promising indications for the existence of life, taking seriously into account their special characteristics and known existing conditions (like Mars, Titan, Europa & Enceladus). The STEM tools we use are the following: - LEGO Mindstorms: to construct rovers for surface exploration. - Hydrobots: an MIT's SeaPerch program for the construction of submarine semi-autonomous robots. - CanSats: Arduino-based microsatellites able to receive, record & transmit data. - Space balloons: appropriate for high altitude atmospheric measurements & photography. 2. Scientific approach Conducting interesting physics

  16. Space applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 2: Space projects overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities, and their related ground support functions are studied so that informed decisions can be made on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The space project breakdowns, which are used to identify tasks ('functional elements'), are described. The study method concentrates on the production of a matrix relating space project tasks to pieces of ARAMIS.

  17. A complex reaction time study (Sternberg) in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Uri, John; Moore, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Simple and complex (Sternberg) reaction time studies were flown on three and seven day Shuttle flights in 1985. Three subjects did selftesting with an onboard handheld calculator without difficulty. There was little change in simple reaction time. One subject demonstrated a decrease in the processing rate during space motion sickness while a second exhibited an increase in complex reaction time without a change in processing rate during a period of high work load. The population was too small to demonstrate significant changes. This study demonstrates the ease and practicality of such measurements and indicates the potential value of such studies in space.

  18. Project Explorer - Student experiments aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckbee, E.; Dannenberg, K.; Driggers, G.; Orillion, A.

    1979-01-01

    Project Explorer, a program of high school student experiments in space in a Space Shuttle self-contained payload unit (Getaway Special), sponsored by the Alabama Space and Rocket Center (ASRC) in cooperation with four Alabama universities is presented. Organizations aspects of the project, which is intended to promote public awareness of the space program and encourage space research, are considered, and the proposal selection procedure is outlined. The projects selected for inclusion in the self-contained payload canister purchased in 1977 and expected to be flown on an early shuttle mission include experiments on alloy solidification, electric plating, whisker growth, chick embryo development and human blood freezing, and an amateur radio experiment. Integration support activities planned and underway are summarized, and possible uses for a second payload canister purchased by ASRC are discussed.

  19. 10 Steps to Building an Architecture for Space Surveillance Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyorko, E.; Barnhart, E.; Gans, H.

    Space surveillance is an increasingly complex task, requiring the coordination of a multitude of organizations and systems, while dealing with competing capabilities, proprietary processes, differing standards, and compliance issues. In order to fully understand space surveillance operations, analysts and engineers need to analyze and break down their operations and systems using what are essentially enterprise architecture processes and techniques. These techniques can be daunting to the first- time architect. This paper provides a summary of simplified steps to analyze a space surveillance system at the enterprise level in order to determine capabilities, services, and systems. These steps form the core of an initial Model-Based Architecting process. For new systems, a well defined, or well architected, space surveillance enterprise leads to an easier transition from model-based architecture to model-based design and provides a greater likelihood that requirements are fulfilled the first time. Both new and existing systems benefit from being easier to manage, and can be sustained more easily using portfolio management techniques, based around capabilities documented in the model repository. The resulting enterprise model helps an architect avoid 1) costly, faulty portfolio decisions; 2) wasteful technology refresh efforts; 3) upgrade and transition nightmares; and 4) non-compliance with DoDAF directives. The Model-Based Architecting steps are based on a process that Harris Corporation has developed from practical experience architecting space surveillance systems and ground systems. Examples are drawn from current work on documenting space situational awareness enterprises. The process is centered on DoDAF 2 and its corresponding meta-model so that terminology is standardized and communicable across any disciplines that know DoDAF architecting, including acquisition, engineering and sustainment disciplines. Each step provides a guideline for the type of data to

  20. The Australia Telescope project - Spinoffs for space-related services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, J. W.

    The Australia Telescope (AT) is a multimillion-dollar investment by the Federal Government into the space science of radio astronomy. The project has been officially endorsed by the Bicentennial Authority and is due for completion in 1988. The AT has been designed in Australia to make effective use of Australian resources, and Australian content will be around 80 percent. The project has stimulated the local development of space engineering capabilities, and some of these developments will be outlined in this progress report.

  1. An Open Specification for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, A.; Heuser, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An 'open specification' for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures is under development in the Spacecraft Control Working Group of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astro- nautics. This architecture identifies 5 basic elements incorporated in the design of similar operations systems: Data, System Management, Control Interface, Decision Support Engine, & Space Messaging Service.

  2. Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces: OECD/CELE Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    CELE's International Pilot Project on Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces aims to assist education authorities, schools and others to maximise the use of and investment in learning environments. This article provides an update on the pilot project, which is currently being implemented in Brazil, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal and the United…

  3. The Family Writing Project: Creating Space for Sustaining Teacher Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Marilyn; Lasley, Saralyn; Holmes-Gull, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Family writing projects can change the nature of classroom writing instruction and rejuvenate teachers. Marilyn McKinney, Saralyn Lasley, and Rosemary Holmes-Gull report on their study of one such project in an urban school district. Using the concept of "third space," they describe the influence of this family literacy program on teacher practice.

  4. Space Processing Applications Rocket project SPAR III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F.

    1978-01-01

    This document presented the engineering report and science payload III test report and summarized the experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of five scientific experiments conducted during the third Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight flown by NASA in December 1976. The five individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: Liquid Mixing, Interaction of Bubbles with Solidification Interfaces, Epitaxial Growth of Single Crystal Film, Containerless Processing of Beryllium, and Contact and Coalescence of Viscous Bodies.

  5. Space Processing Applications Rocket project, SPAR 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results are summarized for six materials science experiments conducted during the second space processing applications rocket mission flown by NASA. The individual experiments discussed are: (1) solidification of Pb-Sb eutectic; (2) feasibility of producing closed-cell metal foams; (3) direct observation of dendrite remelting and macrosegregation in castings; (4) agglomeration in immiscible liquids; (5) casting dispersion - strengthened composites at zero gravity; and (6) solidification behavior of Al-In alloys under zero gravity conditions.

  6. Space Processing Applications Rocket project, SPAR 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F. (Compiler); Chassay, R. (Compiler)

    1976-01-01

    The experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of nine scientific experiments conducted during the first Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight are summarized. The nine individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: solidification of Pb-Sb eutectic, feasibility of producing closed-cell metal foams, characterization of rocket vibration environment by measurement of mixing of two liquids, uniform dispersions of crystallization processing, direct observation of solidification as a function of gravity levels, casting thoria dispersion-strengthened interfaces, contained polycrystalline solidification, and preparation of a special alloy for manufacturing of magnetic hard superconductor under zero-g environment.

  7. Strategic Project Management at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Jerome P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes Project Management at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) from a strategic perspective. It develops the historical context of the agency and center's strategic planning process and illustrates how now is the time for KSC to become a center which has excellence in project management. The author describes project management activities at the center and details observations on those efforts. Finally the author describes the Strategic Project Management Process Model as a conceptual model which could assist KSC in defining an appropriate project management process system at the center.

  8. The Complex Case of Fear and Safe Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stengel, Barbara S.

    2010-01-01

    Here I shine light on the concept of and call for safe space and on the implicit argument that seems to undergird both the concept and the call, complicating and problematizing the taken for granted view of this issue with the goal of revealing a more complex dynamic worthy of interpretive attention when determining educational response. I…

  9. Bootstrapping Critical Ising Model on Three Dimensional Real Projective Space.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Given conformal data on a flat Euclidean space, we use crosscap conformal bootstrap equations to numerically solve the Lee-Yang model as well as the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space. We check the rapid convergence of our bootstrap program in two dimensions from the exact solutions available. Based on the comparison, we estimate that our systematic error on the numerically solved one-point functions of the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space is less than 1%. Our method opens up a novel way to solve conformal field theories on nontrivial geometries. PMID:27104697

  10. Bootstrapping Critical Ising Model on Three Dimensional Real Projective Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Given conformal data on a flat Euclidean space, we use crosscap conformal bootstrap equations to numerically solve the Lee-Yang model as well as the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space. We check the rapid convergence of our bootstrap program in two dimensions from the exact solutions available. Based on the comparison, we estimate that our systematic error on the numerically solved one-point functions of the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space is less than 1%. Our method opens up a novel way to solve conformal field theories on nontrivial geometries.

  11. The NASA Space Radiobiology Risk Assessment Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice; Ponomarev, Artem; Patel, Zarana; Kim, Myung-Hee

    The current first phase (2006-2011) has the three major goals of: 1) optimizing the conventional cancer risk models currently used based on the double-detriment life-table and radiation quality functions; 2) the integration of biophysical models of acute radiation syndromes; and 3) the development of new systems radiation biology models of cancer processes. The first-phase also includes continued uncertainty assessment of space radiation environmental models and transport codes, and relative biological effectiveness factors (RBE) based on flight data and NSRL results, respectively. The second phase of the (2012-2016) will: 1) develop biophysical models of central nervous system risks (CNS); 2) achieve comphrensive systems biology models of cancer processes using data from proton and heavy ion studies performed at NSRL; and 3) begin to identify computational models of biological countermeasures. Goals for the third phase (2017-2021) include: 1) the development of a systems biology model of cancer risks for operational use at NASA; 2) development of models of degenerative risks, 2) quantitative models of counter-measure impacts on cancer risks; and 3) indiviudal based risk assessments. Finally, we will support a decision point to continue NSRL research in support of NASA's exploration goals beyond 2021, and create an archival of NSRL research results for continued analysis. Details on near term goals, plans for a WEB based data resource of NSRL results, and a space radiation Wikepedia are described.

  12. Hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xing-yuan Hu, Xiao-peng

    2014-02-15

    This paper investigates hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks. When the complex dynamical networks could be synchronized up to an equilibrium or periodic orbit, a hybrid feedback controller is designed to realize the different component of vector of node could be synchronized up to different desired scaling function in complex dynamical networks with time delay. Hybrid function projective synchronization (HFPS) in complex dynamical networks with constant delay and HFPS in complex dynamical networks with time-varying coupling delay are researched, respectively. Finally, the numerical simulations show the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

  13. Daylighting and Electric Lighting Analysis for Complex Spaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-06-07

    SUPERLITE is a powerful lighting analysis program designed to accurately predict interior illuminance in complex building spaces due to daylight and electric lighting systems. The program enables users to model interior daylight levels for any sun and sky condition in spaces having windows, skylights or other standard fenestration systems. SUPERLITE Version 2.0 includes the capability to calculate electric lighting levels in addition to the daylighting prediction, allowing lighting performance simulation for integrated lighting systems. Themore » program calculates lighting levels on all interior surfaces, as well as on planes that can be arbitrarily positioned to represent work surfaces or other locations of interest. SUPERLITE is intended to be used by researchers and lighting designers who require detailed analysis of the illuminance distribution in architecturally complex spaces.« less

  14. Space Shuttle External Tank Project status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The External Tank Project is reviewed with emphasis on the DDT&E and production phases and the lightweight tank development. It is noted that the DDT&E phase is progressing well with the structural and ground vibration test article programs complete, the propulsion test article program progressing well, and the component qualification and verification testing 92% complete. New tools and facilities are being brought on line to support the increased build rate for the production phase. The lightweight tank, which will provide additional payload in orbit, is progressing to schedule with first delivery in early 1982.

  15. Green Applications for Space Power Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Joel (Principal Investigator)

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft propulsion and power for many decades has relied on Hydrazine monopropellant technology for auxiliary power units (APU), orbital circularization, orbit raising/lowering and attitude control. However, Hydrazine is toxic and therefore requires special ground handling procedures to ensure launch crew safety. The Swedish Company ECAPS has developed a technology based upon the propellant Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN) that offers higher performance, higher density and reduced ground handling support than Hydrazine. This blended propellant is called LMP-103S. Currently, the United States Air Force (USAF) is pursuing a technology based on Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate (HAN, otherwise known as AF-M315E) with industry partners Aerojet and Moog. Based on the advantages offered by these propellants, MSFC should explore powering APU's with these propellants. Due to the availability of space hardware, the principal investigator has found a collection of USAF hardware, that will act as a surrogate, which operates on a Hydrazine derivative. The F-16 fighter jet uses H-70 or 30% diluted Hydrazine for an Emergency Power Unit (EPU) which supplies power to the plane. The PI has acquired two EPU's from planes slated for destruction at the Davis Monthan AFB. This CIF will include a partnership with 2 other NASA Centers who are individually seeking seed funds from their respective organizations: Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). KSC is preparing for future flights from their launch pads that will utilize green propellants and desire a low-cost testbed in which to test and calibrate new leak detection sensors. DFRC has access to F-16's which can be used by MSFC & KSC to perform a ground test that demonstrates emergency power supplied to the jet. Neither of the green propellant alternatives have been considered nor evaluated for an APU application. Work has already been accomplished to characterize and obtain the properties of these 2 propellants

  16. Space Radiation Effects on Inflatable Habitat Materials Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Nichols, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Space Radiation Effects on Inflatable Habitat Materials project provides much needed risk reduction data to assess space radiation damage of existing and emerging materials used in manned low-earth orbit, lunar, interplanetary, and Martian surface missions. More specifically, long duration (up to 50 years) space radiation damage will be quantified for materials used in inflatable structures (1st priority), as well as for habitable composite structures and space suits materials (2nd priority). The data acquired will have relevance for nonmetallic materials (polymers and composites) used in NASA missions where long duration reliability is needed in continuous or intermittent radiation fluxes. This project also will help to determine the service lifetimes for habitable inflatable, composite, and space suit materials.

  17. Current Space Projects of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R.; Acevedo R.; Varela, F.; Otero, S.

    2014-06-01

    Since 2008, with the successful launch of the first Venezuelan telecommunication satellite VENESAT-1, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela became an active player in the international space sector aimed at using space science and technology as a powerful tool to promote the national development. Based on that, through the Bolivarian Agency for Space Activities (ABAE), Venezuela has been implemented several space projects such as the manufacturing and launch of the first Venezuelan remote sensing satellite, the construction of a design center for small satellite technologies, as well as research and development activities related with the estimation of the physical properties of the Earth. This paper presents a brief description of the current space projects that are being developed by Venezuela.

  18. NASA Space Flight Program and Project Management Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blythe, Michael P.; Saunders, Mark P.; Pye, David B.; Voss, Linda D.; Moreland, Robert J.; Symons, Kathleen E.; Bromley, Linda K.

    2014-01-01

    This handbook is a companion to NPR 7120.5E, NASA Space Flight Program and Project Management Requirements and supports the implementation of the requirements by which NASA formulates and implements space flight programs and projects. Its focus is on what the program or project manager needs to know to accomplish the mission, but it also contains guidance that enhances the understanding of the high-level procedural requirements. (See Appendix C for NPR 7120.5E requirements with rationale.) As such, it starts with the same basic concepts but provides context, rationale, guidance, and a greater depth of detail for the fundamental principles of program and project management. This handbook also explores some of the nuances and implications of applying the procedural requirements, for example, how the Agency Baseline Commitment agreement evolves over time as a program or project moves through its life cycle.

  19. Maximally spaced projection sequencing in electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Gage; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) provides 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo with excellent spatial and pO2 resolution. When investigating such physiologic parameters in living animals, the situation is inherently dynamic. Improvements in temporal resolution and experimental versatility are necessary to properly study such a system. Uniformly distributed projections result in efficient use of data for image reconstruction. This has dictated current methods such as equal-solid-angle (ESA) spacing of projections. However, acquisition sequencing must still be optimized to achieve uniformity throughout imaging. An object-independent method for uniform acquisition of projections, using the ESA uniform distribution for the final set of projections, is presented. Each successive projection maximizes the distance in the gradient space between itself and prior projections. This maximally spaced projection sequencing (MSPS) method improves image quality for intermediate images reconstructed from incomplete projection sets, enabling useful real-time reconstruction. This method also provides improved experimental versatility, reduced artifacts, and the ability to adjust temporal resolution post factum to best fit the data and its application. The MSPS method in EPRI provides the improvements necessary to more appropriately study a dynamic system. PMID:26185490

  20. Reducing the complexity of NASA's space communications infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Raymond E.; Liu, Hong; Song, Junehwa

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the range of activities performed during the annual reporting period in support of the NASA Code O Success Team - Lifecycle Effectiveness for Strategic Success (COST LESS) team. The overall goal of the COST LESS team is to redefine success in a constrained fiscal environment and reduce the cost of success for end-to-end mission operations. This goal is more encompassing than the original proposal made to NASA for reducing complexity of NASA's Space Communications Infrastructure. The COST LESS team approach for reengineering the space operations infrastructure has a focus on reversing the trend of engineering special solutions to similar problems.

  1. Discovering Recurring Anomalies in Text Reports Regarding Complex Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zane-Ulman, Brett; Srivastava, Ashok N.

    2005-01-01

    Many existing complex space systems have a significant amount of historical maintenance and problem data bases that are stored in unstructured text forms. For some platforms, these reports may be encoded as scanned images rather than even searchable text. The problem that we address in this paper is the discovery of recurring anomalies and relationships between different problem reports that may indicate larger systemic problems. We will illustrate our techniques on data from discrepancy reports regarding software anomalies in the Space Shuttle. These free text reports are written by a number of different penp!e, thus the emphasis and wording varies considerably.

  2. Near-Space Science: A Ballooning Project to Engage Students with Space beyond the Big Screen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hike, Nina; Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Many students probably know something about space from playing computer games or watching movies and TV shows. Teachers can expose them to the real thing by launching their experiments into near space on a weather balloon. This article describes how to use high-altitude ballooning (HAB) as a culminating project to a chemistry unit on experimental…

  3. Management of Service Projects in Support of Space Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J.

    2009-01-01

    Goal:To provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration . [HRP-47051] Specific Objectives: 1) Develop capabilities, necessary countermeasures, and technologies in support of human space exploration, focusing on mitigating the highest risks to human health and performance. 2) Define and improve human spaceflight medical, environmental, and human factors standards. 3) Develop technologies that serve to reduce medical and environmental risks, to reduce human systems resource requirements (mass, volume, power, data, etc.) and to ensure effective human-system integration across exploration systems. 4) Ensure maintenance of Agency core competencies necessary to enable risk reduction in the following areas: A. Space medicine B. Physiological and behavioral effects of long duration spaceflight on the human body C. Space environmental effects, including radiation, on human health and performance D. Space "human factors" [HRP-47051]. Service projects can form integral parts of research-based project-focused programs to provide specialized functions. Traditional/classic project management methodologies and agile approaches are not mutually exclusive paradigms. Agile strategies can be combined with traditional methods and applied in the management of service projects functioning in changing environments. Creative collaborations afford a mechanism for mitigation of constrained resource limitations.

  4. Improving Space Project Cost Estimating with Engineering Management Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Joseph W.; Roth, Axel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Current space project cost models attempt to predict space flight project cost via regression equations, which relate the cost of projects to technical performance metrics (e.g. weight, thrust, power, pointing accuracy, etc.). This paper examines the introduction of engineering management parameters to the set of explanatory variables. A number of specific engineering management variables are considered and exploratory regression analysis is performed to determine if there is statistical evidence for cost effects apart from technical aspects of the projects. It is concluded that there are other non-technical effects at work and that further research is warranted to determine if it can be shown that these cost effects are definitely related to engineering management.

  5. 2009 ESMD Space Grant Faculty Project Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gloria; Ghanashyam, Joshi; Guo, Jiang; Conrad, James; Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Cross, William

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation Program is the medium by which we will maintain a presence in low Earth orbit, return to the moon for further exploration and develop procedures for Mars exploration. The foundation for its presence and success is built by the many individuals that have given of their time, talent and even lives to help propel the mission and objectives of NASA. The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Faculty Fellows Program is a direct contributor to the success of directorate and Constellation Program objectives. It is through programs such as the ESMD Space Grant program that students are inspired and challenged to achieve the technological heights that will propel us to meet the goals and objectives of ESMD and the Constellation Program. It is through ESMD Space Grant programs that future NASA scientists, engineers, and mathematicians begin to dream of taking America to newer heights of space exploration. The ESMD Space Grant program is to be commended for taking the initiative to develop and implement programs that help solidify the mission of NASA. With the concerted efforts of the Kennedy Space Center educational staff, the 2009 ESMD Space Grant Summer Faculty Fellows Program allowed faculty to become more involved with NASA personnel relating to exploration topics for the senior design projects. The 2009 Project was specifically directed towards NASA's Strategic Educational Outcome 1. In-situ placement of Faculty Fellows at the NASA field Centers was essential; this allowed personal interactions with NASA scientists and engineers. In particular, this was critical to better understanding the NASA problems and begin developing a senior design effort to solve the problems. The Faculty Fellows are pleased that the ESMD Space Grant program is taking interest in developing the Senior Design courses at the university level. These courses are needed to help develop the NASA engineers and scientists of the very near future. It has been a pleasure to be

  6. Understanding Equilibrium: The Study of Complex Systems. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Eleanor; And Others

    The Educational Technology Center (ETC) Complex Systems Project was initiated to explore ways of using computers to help students understand systems which have often proven too complex for most high school students to understand. Preliminary work concentrated on the cognitive processes involved in modeling simple systems. This paper describes an…

  7. The "Support to Precursor Space Situational Awareness Services" (SPA) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, J. L.; Albani, S.; Gallardo, B.; Matute, J.; O'Dwyer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Space activities are increasingly important in areas such as environment, science, navigation and security. Space Situational Awareness (SSA) refers to the knowledge of location and function of space objects and the space environment. The development of an SSA capability will allow the European Union (EU) and its Member States to better use space, strengthening their security and economy. The "Support to Precursor space situational Awareness services" (SPA) project is an FP7 Support Action managed by the European Union Satellite Centre (EUSC) under the full control of EU Member States and implemented with the collaboration of SSA Key Stakeholders. SPA is studying possible SSA Governance and Data Policy models in the EUSC secure environment by experimenting with a number of SSA preliminary services relevant to civilian security and to the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) such as Satellite Over-flight, Satellite Conjunction Warning and Space Re-entry Prediction. The final output of the SPA project will be a report providing recommendations for further development of SSA in Europe, particularly on the technical aspects of its Governance and Data Policy.

  8. The sigma model on complex projective superspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candu, Constantin; Mitev, Vladimir; Quella, Thomas; Saleur, Hubert; Schomerus, Volker

    2010-02-01

    The sigma model on projective superspaces mathbb{C}{mathbb{P}^{S - 1left| S right.}} gives rise to a continuous family of interacting 2D conformal field theories which are parametrized by the curvature radius R and the theta angle θ. Our main goal is to determine the spectrum of the model, non-perturbatively as a function of both parameters. We succeed to do so for all open boundary conditions preserving the full global symmetry of the model. In string theory parlor, these correspond to volume filling branes that are equipped with a monopole line bundle and connection. The paper consists of two parts. In the first part, we approach the problem within the continuum formulation. Combining combinatorial arguments with perturbative studies and some simple free field calculations, we determine a closed formula for the partition function of the theory. This is then tested numerically in the second part. There we extend the proposal of [ arXiv:0908.1081 ] for a spin chain regularization of the mathbb{C}{mathbb{P}^{S - 1left| S right.}} model with open boundary conditions and use it to determine the spectrum at the conformal fixed point. The numerical results are in remarkable agreement with the continuum analysis.

  9. HAL/S programmer's guide. [for space shuttle project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbold, P. M.; Hotz, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The structure and symbology of the HAL/S programming language are described; this language is to be used among the flight software for the space shuttle project. The data declaration, input/output statements, and replace statements are also discussed.

  10. Space radiation hazards to Project Skylab photographic film, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.; Neville, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    The results of a study of space radiation hazards to Project Skylab photographic film are presented. Radiation components include trapped protons, trapped electrons, bremsstrahlung, and galactic cosmic radiation. The shielding afforded by the Skylab cluster is taken into account with a 5000 volume element mathematical model. A preliminary survey of expected proton spectrometer data is reported.

  11. MSFC Skylab student project report. [selected space experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Student Project some 4000 students submitted experiments from which twenty-five national winners were selected. Of these, eleven required special flight hardware, eight were allowed to obtain data using hardware available for professional investigations, and the remaining six were affiliated with researchers in alternate fields, since their proposals could not be accommodated due to complexity or similar incompatibility. The background of the project is elaborated and experiment performance results and evaluations are touched upon.

  12. Generalizing the Boltzmann equation in complex phase space.

    PubMed

    Zadehgol, Abed

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a generalized form of the BGK-Boltzmann equation is proposed, where the velocity, position, and time can be represented by real or complex variables. The real representation leads to the conventional BGK-Boltzmann equation, which can recover the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations. We show that the complex representation yields a different set of equations, and it can also recover the conservation and Navier-Stokes equations, at low Mach numbers, provided that the imaginary component of the macroscopic mass can be neglected. We briefly review the Constant Speed Kinetic Model (CSKM), which was introduced in Zadehgol and Ashrafizaadeh [J. Comp. Phys. 274, 803 (2014)JCTPAH0021-999110.1016/j.jcp.2014.06.053] and Zadehgol [Phys. Rev. E 91, 063311 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.91.063311]. The CSKM is then used as a basis to show that the complex-valued equilibrium distribution function of the present model can be identified with a simple singularity in the complex phase space. The virtual particles, in the present work, are concentrated on virtual "branes" which surround the computational nodes. Employing the Cauchy integral formula, it is shown that certain variations of the "branes," in the complex phase space, do not affect the local kinetic states. This property of the new model, which is referred to as the "apparent jumps" in the present work, is used to construct new models. The theoretical findings have been tested by simulating three benchmark flows. The results of the present simulations are in excellent agreement with the previous results reported by others. PMID:27627421

  13. NASA Space Radiation Risk Project: Overview and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Chappell, Lori J.; George, Kerry A.; Hada, Megumi; Hu, Shaowen; Kidane, Yared H.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Kovyrshina, Tatiana; Norman, Ryan B.; Nounu, Hatem N.; Peterson, Leif E.; Plante, Ianik; Pluth, Janice M.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Scott Carnell, Lisa A.; Slaba, Tony C.; Sridharan, Deepa; Xu, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Risk project is responsible for integrating new experimental and computational results into models to predict risk of cancer and acute radiation syndrome (ARS) for use in mission planning and systems design, as well as current space operations. The project has several parallel efforts focused on proving NASA's radiation risk projection capability in both the near and long term. This presentation will give an overview, with select results from these efforts including the following topics: verification, validation, and streamlining the transition of models to use in decision making; relative biological effectiveness and dose rate effect estimation using a combination of stochastic track structure simulations, DNA damage model calculations and experimental data; ARS model improvements; pathway analysis from gene expression data sets; solar particle event probabilistic exposure calculation including correlated uncertainties for use in design optimization.

  14. Space debris orbit prediction requirements in the CLEANSPACE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnuk, Edwin; Jacquelard, Christophe; Esmiller, Bruno; Speiser, Jochen

    2012-07-01

    Overall CLEANSPACE objective is to define a global architecture (including surveillance, identification and tracking) for an innovative ground-based laser solution which can remove hazardous medium debris around selected space assets. The CLEANSPACE project is realized by an European consortium in the frame of the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), Space theme. The paper, in the first part, will present general information about the CLEANSPACE including the main drivers and requirements. Orbital requirements of space debris which have to be reached in the project will be discussed in the second part of the paper. Proposed systems of removal space debris objects with the use of sequence of laser operations, like the CLEANSPACE system, needs very precise predictions of future space debris orbital positions, on a level even better than 1 meter. Orbit determination, tracking (radar, optical and laser) and orbit prediction have to be performed with accuracy much better than so far. The applied prediction tools have to take into account all perturbation factors which influence object orbit, mainly geopotential effects with arbitrary degree and order spherical harmonic coefficients, luni-solar attractions, solar radiation pressure and atmospheric drag. In our paper we discuss the influence of all important perturbation factors on the space debris orbital motion, taking into account different contemporary force models, in particular, geopotential models, atmospheric models and the Sun and the Moon ephemeris.

  15. Exploration of complex visual feature spaces for object perception

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Daniel D.; Pyles, John A.; Tarr, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The mid- and high-level visual properties supporting object perception in the ventral visual pathway are poorly understood. In the absence of well-specified theory, many groups have adopted a data-driven approach in which they progressively interrogate neural units to establish each unit's selectivity. Such methods are challenging in that they require search through a wide space of feature models and stimuli using a limited number of samples. To more rapidly identify higher-level features underlying human cortical object perception, we implemented a novel functional magnetic resonance imaging method in which visual stimuli are selected in real-time based on BOLD responses to recently shown stimuli. This work was inspired by earlier primate physiology work, in which neural selectivity for mid-level features in IT was characterized using a simple parametric approach (Hung et al., 2012). To extend such work to human neuroimaging, we used natural and synthetic object stimuli embedded in feature spaces constructed on the basis of the complex visual properties of the objects themselves. During fMRI scanning, we employed a real-time search method to control continuous stimulus selection within each image space. This search was designed to maximize neural responses across a pre-determined 1 cm3 brain region within ventral cortex. To assess the value of this method for understanding object encoding, we examined both the behavior of the method itself and the complex visual properties the method identified as reliably activating selected brain regions. We observed: (1) Regions selective for both holistic and component object features and for a variety of surface properties; (2) Object stimulus pairs near one another in feature space that produce responses at the opposite extremes of the measured activity range. Together, these results suggest that real-time fMRI methods may yield more widely informative measures of selectivity within the broad classes of visual features

  16. Space Projects: Improvements Needed in Selecting Future Projects for Private Financing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and NASA jointly selected seven projects for commercialization to reduce NASA's fiscal year 1990 budget request and to help achieve the goal of increasing private sector involvement in space. However, the efforts to privately finance these seven projects did not increase the commercial sector's involvement in space to the extent desired. The General Accounting Office (GAO) determined that the projects selected were not a fair test of the potential of increasing commercial investment in space at an acceptable cost to the government, primarily because the projects were not properly screened. That is, neither their suitability for commercialization nor the economic consequences of seeking private financing for them were adequately evaluated before selection. Evaluations and market tests done after selection showed that most of the projects were not viable candidates for private financing. GAO concluded that projects should not be removed from NASA's budget for commercial development until after careful screening has been done to determine whether adequate commercial demand exists, development risks are commercially acceptable and private financing is found or judged to be highly likely, and the cost effectiveness of such a decision is acceptable. Premature removal of projects from NASA's budget ultimately can cause project delays and increased costs when unsuccessful commercialization candidates must be returned to the budget. NASA also needs to ensure appropriate comparisons of government and private financing options for future commercialization projects.

  17. Space Radiation Cancer Risk Projections and Uncertainties - 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Chappell, Lori J.

    2011-01-01

    Uncertainties in estimating health risks from galactic cosmic rays greatly limit space mission lengths and potential risk mitigation evaluations. NASA limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure-induced death and protects against uncertainties using an assessment of 95% confidence intervals in the projection model. Revisions to this model for lifetime cancer risks from space radiation and new estimates of model uncertainties are described here. We review models of space environments and transport code predictions of organ exposures, and characterize uncertainties in these descriptions. We summarize recent analysis of low linear energy transfer radio-epidemiology data, including revision to Japanese A-bomb survivor dosimetry, longer follow-up of exposed cohorts, and reassessments of dose and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors. We compare these projections and uncertainties with earlier estimates. Current understanding of radiation quality effects and recent data on factors of relative biological effectiveness and particle track structure are reviewed. Recent radiobiology experiment results provide new information on solid cancer and leukemia risks from heavy ions. We also consider deviations from the paradigm of linearity at low doses of heavy ions motivated by non-targeted effects models. New findings and knowledge are used to revise the NASA risk projection model for space radiation cancer risks.

  18. Project LAUNCH: Bringing Space into Math and Science Classrooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauerbach, M.; Henry, D. P.; Schmidt, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Project LAUNCH is a K-12 teacher professional development program, which has been created in collaboration between the Whitaker Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU), and the Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI). Utilizing Space as the overarching theme it is designed to improve mathematics and science teaching, using inquiry based, hands-on teaching practices, which are aligned with Florida s Sunshine State Standards. Many students are excited about space exploration and it provides a great venue to get them involved in science and mathematics. The scope of Project LAUNCH however goes beyond just providing competency in the subject area, as pedagogy is also an intricate part of the project. Participants were introduced to the Conceptual Change Model (CCM) [1] as a framework to model good teaching practices. As the CCM closely follows what scientists call the scientific process, this teaching method is also useful to actively engage institute participants ,as well as their students, in real science. Project LAUNCH specifically targets teachers in low performing, high socioeconomic schools, where the need for skilled teachers is most critical.

  19. Complex organics in space from Solar System to distant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun

    2016-02-01

    Recent observational and experimental evidence for the presence of complex organics in space is reviewed. Remote astronomical observations have detected ˜ 200 gas-phased molecules through their rotational and vibrational transitions. Many classes of organic molecules are represented in this list, including some precursors to biological molecules. A number of unidentified spectral phenomena observed in the interstellar medium are likely to have originated from complex organics. The observations of these features in distant galaxies suggests that organic synthesis had already taken place during the early epochs of the Universe. In the Solar System, almost all biologically relevant molecules can be found in the soluble component of carbonaceous meteorites. Complex organics of mixed aromatic and aliphatic structures are present in the insoluble component of meteorites. Hydrocarbons cover much of the surface of the planetary satellite Titan and complex organics are found in comets and interplanetary dust particles. The possibility that the early Solar System, or even the early Earth, have been enriched by interstellar organics is discussed.

  20. Dot-Projection Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry of Gossamer Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Black, Jonathan T.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Dorrington, Adrian A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the technique of using hundreds or thousands of projected dots of light as targets for photogrammetry and videogrammetry of gossamer space structures. Photogrammetry calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of each target on the structure, and videogrammetry tracks the coordinates versus time. Gossamer structures characteristically contain large areas of delicate, thin-film membranes. Examples include solar sails, large antennas, inflatable solar arrays, solar power concentrators and transmitters, sun shields, and planetary balloons and habitats. Using projected-dot targets avoids the unwanted mass, stiffness, and installation costs of traditional retroreflective adhesive targets. Four laboratory applications are covered that demonstrate the practical effectiveness of white-light dot projection for both static-shape and dynamic measurement of reflective and diffuse surfaces, respectively. Comparisons are made between dot-projection videogrammetry and traditional laser vibrometry for membrane vibration measurements. The paper closes by introducing a promising extension of existing techniques using a novel laser-induced fluorescence approach.

  1. Conceptual planning for Space Station life sciences human research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, Gary R.; Miller, Ladonna J.; Michaud, Roger B.

    1986-01-01

    The Life Sciences Research Facility dedicated laboratory is currently undergoing system definition within the NASA Space Station program. Attention is presently given to the Humam Research Project portion of the Facility, in view of representative experimentation requirement scenarios and with the intention of accommodating the Facility within the Initial Operational Capability configuration of the Space Station. Such basic engineering questions as orbital and ground logistics operations and hardware maintenance/servicing requirements are addressed. Biospherics, calcium homeostasis, endocrinology, exercise physiology, hematology, immunology, muscle physiology, neurosciences, radiation effects, and reproduction and development, are among the fields of inquiry encompassed by the Facility.

  2. Complexity of Fit, with Application to Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Although fitting a garment is often considered more of an art than a science, experts suggest that a subjectively poor fit is a symptom of inappropriate ease, the space between the wearer and the garment. The condition of poor suit fit is a unique problem for the space program and it can be attributed primarily to: a) NASA s policy to accommodate a wide variety of people (males and females from 1st to 99th percentile range and with various shapes and sizes) and b) its requirement to deploy a minimum number of suit sizes for logistical reasons. These factors make the space suit fit difficult to assess, where a wide range of people must be fit by the minimum possible number of suits, and yet, fit is crucial for operability and safety. Existing simplistic sizing scheme do not account for wide variations in shape within a diverse population with very limited sizing options. The complex issue of fit has been addressed by a variety of methods, many of which have been developed by the military, which has always had a keen interest in fitting its diverse population but with a multitude of sizing options. The space program has significantly less sizing options, so a combination of these advanced methods should be used to optimize space suit size and assess space suit fit. Multivariate methods can be used to develop sizing schemes that better reflect the wearer population, and integrated sizing systems can form a compromise between fitting men and women. Range of motion and operability testing can be combined with subjective feedback to provide a comprehensive evaluation of fit. The amount of ease can be tailored using these methods, to provide enough extra room where it is needed, without compromising mobility and comfort. This paper discusses the problem of fit in one of its most challenging applications: providing a safe and comfortable spacesuit that will protect its wearer from the extreme environment of space. It will discuss the challenges and necessity of closely

  3. Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit previews at Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Media gather at the KSC Visitor Complex for the kickoff of the Discovery Channel's Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit, which will open to the public on Saturday, June 17. At the podium is Mike Quattrone, executive vice president and general manager, Discovery Channel. Standing to the left of the podium is Rick Abramson, president and chief operating officer of Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport, Inc., and far left, Jim Jennings, deputy director of Kennedy Space Center. Liberty Bell 7 launched U.S. Air Force Captain Virgil '''Gus''' Grissom July 21, 1961 on a mission that lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds before sinking to the floor of the Atlantic Ocean, three miles deep. It lay undetected for nearly four decades before a Discovery Channel expedition located it and recovered it. The space capsule is now restored and preserved, and part of an interactive exhibit touring science centers and museums in 12 cities throughout the United States until 2003. The exhibit includes hands-on elements such as a capsule simulator, a centrifuge, and ROV pilot.

  4. The Ares Projects: Building America's Future in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program is depending on the Ares Projects to deliver the crew and cargo launch capabilities needed to send human explorers to the Moon and beyond. In 2009, the Ares Projects plan to conduct the first test flight of Ares I, Ares I-X; the first firing of a five-segment development solid rocket motor for the Ares I first stage; building the first integrated Ares I upper stage; continue component testing for the J-2X upper stage engine; and perform more-detailed design studies for the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. Ares I and V will provide the core space launch capabilities needed to continue providing crew and cargo access to the International Space Station (ISS), and to build upon the U.S. history of human spaceflight to the Moon and beyond.

  5. Quantum trajectories in complex phase space: multidimensional barrier transmission.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Robert E; Rowland, Brad A

    2007-07-28

    The quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the action function is approximately solved by propagating individual Lagrangian quantum trajectories in complex-valued phase space. Equations of motion for these trajectories are derived through use of the derivative propagation method (DPM), which leads to a hierarchy of coupled differential equations for the action function and its spatial derivatives along each trajectory. In this study, complex-valued classical trajectories (second order DPM), along which is transported quantum phase information, are used to study low energy barrier transmission for a model two-dimensional system involving either an Eckart or Gaussian barrier along the reaction coordinate coupled to a harmonic oscillator. The arrival time for trajectories to reach the transmitted (product) region is studied. Trajectories launched from an "equal arrival time surface," defined as an isochrone, all reach the real-valued subspace in the transmitted region at the same time. The Rutherford-type diffraction of trajectories around poles in the complex extended Eckart potential energy surface is described. For thin barriers, these poles are close to the real axis and present problems for computing the transmitted density. In contrast, for the Gaussian barrier or the thick Eckart barrier where the poles are further from the real axis, smooth transmitted densities are obtained. Results obtained using higher-order quantum trajectories (third order DPM) are described for both thick and thin barriers, and some issues that arise for thin barriers are examined. PMID:17672677

  6. WUVS spectrographs of World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, Igor; Sachkov, Mikhail; Shustov, Boris M.; Shugarov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    WSO-UV (World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet) project is an international space observatory designed for observations in the UV (115 - 320 nm). It includes a 170 cm aperture telescope capable of high-resolution spectroscopy, long slit low-resolution spectroscopy and deep UV and optical imaging. WUVS - the set of three ultraviolet spectrographs are regarded as the main instrument of «Spektr -UF» space mission. The spectrographs unit includes three channels and is intended for acquisition of spectrums of high (R=50000) and low (R=1000) resolution of the observed objects in the electromagnetic radiation's ultraviolet range (115-310 nm). We present the design philosophy of WUVS and summarize its key characteristics. We shall present the main properties of WUVS new structure and current status of its mockups and prototypes manufacturing.

  7. Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) project: SPAR 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The Space Processing Applications Rocket Project (SPAR) X Final Report contains the compilation of the post-flight reports from each of the Principal Investigators (PIs) on the four selected science payloads, in addition to the engineering report as documented by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This combined effort also describes pertinent portions of ground-based research leading to the ultimate selection of the flight sample composition, including design, fabrication and testing, all of which are expected to contribute to an improved comprehension of materials processing in space. The SPAR project was coordinated and managed by MSFC as part of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) program of the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) of NASA Headquarters. This technical memorandum is directed entirely to the payload manifest flown in the tenth of a series of SPAR flights conducted at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) and includes the experiments entitled, Containerless Processing Technology, SPAR Experiment 76-20/3; Directional Solidification of Magnetic Composites, SPAR Experiment 76-22/3; Comparative Alloy Solidification, SPAR Experiment 76-36/3; and Foam Copper, SPAR Experiment 77-9/1R.

  8. Metallic Material Research in Space under the Frame of the China's Manned Space Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xinghong

    Since 1993 under the frame of the first phase of the China's Manned Space Project (CMSP), onboard the recoverable satellites, Shenzhou series spaceships and some other platforms, many investigations on the effects of microgravity on the metallic materials, such as eutectic alloy, monotectic alloy, metastable alloy, metal matrix composite, wettability couple, diffusion couple and so on, have been conducted. Currently, during the second phase of the CMSP, several pro-grams related to metallic materials, such as single crystalline alloy, multicomponent eutectic alloy, monotectic alloy, metastable alloy, amorphous composite and so on are involved. Fur-thermore, aimed to the future flight opportunities, including the China's space station, a plan of metallic material research in space has been prepared. This presentation will introduce the metallic material research programs in space in China which have been performed, are being prepared and will be arranged in the future flight tasks.

  9. Radio frequency interference protection of communications between the Deep Space Network and deep space flight projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing density of electrical and electronic circuits in Deep Space Station systems for computation, control, and numerous related functions has combined with the extension of system performance requirements calling for higher speed circuitry along with broader bandwidths. This has progressively increased the number of potential sources of radio frequency interference inside the stations. Also, the extension of spectrum usage both in power and frequency as well as the greater density of usage at all frequencies for national and international satellite communications, space research, Earth resource operations and defense, and particularly the huge expansion of airborne electronic warfare and electronic countermeasures operations in the Mojave area have greatly increased the potential number and severity of radio frequency interference incidents. The various facets of this problem and the efforts to eliminate or minimize the impact of interference on Deep Space Network support of deep space flight projects are described.

  10. Supporting Multiple Programs and Projects at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Camiren L.

    2014-01-01

    With the conclusion of the shuttle program in 2011, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had found itself at a crossroads for finding transportation of United States astronauts and experiments to space. The agency would eventually hand off the taxiing of American astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) that orbits in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) about 210 miles above the earth under the requirements of the Commercial Crew Program (CCP). By privatizing the round trip journey from Earth to the ISS, the space agency has been given the additional time to focus funding and resources to projects that operate beyond LEO; however, adding even more stress to the agency, the premature cancellation of the program that would succeed the Shuttle Program - The Constellation Program (CxP) -it would inevitably delay the goal to travel beyond LEO for a number of years. Enter the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, the SLS is under development at NASA's Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, while the Orion Capsule, built by government contractor Lockheed Martin Corporation, has been assembled and is currently under testing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. In its current vision, SLS will take Orion and its crew to an asteroid that had been captured in an earlier mission in lunar orbit. Additionally, this vehicle and its configuration is NASA's transportation to Mars. Engineers at the Kennedy Space Center are currently working to test the ground systems that will facilitate the launch of Orion and the SLS within its Ground Services Development and Operations (GSDO) Program. Firing Room 1 in the Launch Control Center (LCC) has been refurbished and outfitted to support the SLS Program. In addition, the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is the underlying control system for monitoring and launching manned launch vehicles. As NASA finds itself at a junction, so does all of its

  11. Upper Atmosphere Sounding Rocket Projects at Esrange Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Kemi, Stig; Sjolander, Krister; Abrahamsson, Mattias

    Swedish Space Corporation, SSC has a long tradition of developing and launching scientific sounding rockets from Esrange Space Center with the aim to study the different layers of the atmosphere and near space. Now a new era has started with an initiative from the Swedish National Space Board, SNSB. The sounding rocket and atmospheric balloon activities will be vitalised with a national program offering the scientific community yearly rocket launches and balloon flights. The three upcoming sounding rocket missions that have recently started are: O-STATES O STATES (Oxygen transformation in the thermosphere) is a research project at the Meteorological Institute of Stockholm University with Prof. Jörg Gumbel, as responsible researcher. The payload comprises two instrument modules with totally 7 instruments for studying oxygen in its various forms. The payload will be launched twice on two sounding rockets at the same launch campaign, in different atmospheric conditions. This provides a cost-effective mission with a large research exchange. The launches from Esrange Space Center are preliminary scheduled to take place in August 2014 with an apogee of approximately 250 km. SPIDER SPIDER (Small Payloads for Investigation of Disturbances in Electrojet by Rockets) is a research project at Space and Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm with Nicholay Ivchenko as responsible researcher. The mission includes up to 10 subsidiary payloads ejected from the main payload to measure the structure of the electrostatic turbulence in the ionosphere. The measurements take place entirely in the subsidiary payloads, which are completely autonomous and recovered individually after the flight. The launch from Esrange Space Center is preliminary scheduled to take place in March 2015 with a desired apogee of approximately 140 km. LEEWAVES LEEWAVES (Local Excitation and Effects of Waves on Atmospheric Vertical Structure) is a research project at the Meteorological

  12. Complexity Induced Anisotropic Bimodal Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    The "physics of complexity" in space plasmas is the central theme of this exposition. It is demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from the plasma resonances can be the source for the coexistence of nonpropagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes. Non-Gaussian probability distribution functions of the intermittent fluctuations from direct numerical simulations are obtained and discussed. Power spectra and local intermittency measures using the wavelet analyses are presented to display the spottiness of the small-scale turbulent fluctuations and the non-uniformity of coarse-grained dissipation that can lead to magnetic topological reconfigurations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization group is applied to the study of the scaling properties of such type of multiscale fluctuations. Charged particle interactions with both the propagating and nonpropagating portions of the intermittent turbulence are also described.

  13. Discrete Fourier Transform Analysis in a Complex Vector Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative computational strategies for the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) have been developed using analysis of geometric manifolds. This approach provides a general framework for performing DFT calculations, and suggests a more efficient implementation of the DFT for applications using iterative transform methods, particularly phase retrieval. The DFT can thus be implemented using fewer operations when compared to the usual DFT counterpart. The software decreases the run time of the DFT in certain applications such as phase retrieval that iteratively call the DFT function. The algorithm exploits a special computational approach based on analysis of the DFT as a transformation in a complex vector space. As such, this approach has the potential to realize a DFT computation that approaches N operations versus Nlog(N) operations for the equivalent Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation.

  14. Demonstrating artificial intelligence for space systems - Integration and project management issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Edmund C.; Difilippo, Denise M.

    1990-01-01

    As part of its Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project (SADP), NASA has recently demonstrated the Thermal Expert System (TEXSYS). Advanced real-time expert system and human interface technology was successfully developed and integrated with conventional controllers of prototype space hardware to provide intelligent fault detection, isolation, and recovery capability. Many specialized skills were required, and responsibility for the various phases of the project therefore spanned multiple NASA centers, internal departments and contractor organizations. The test environment required communication among many types of hardware and software as well as between many people. The integration, testing, and configuration management tools and methodologies which were applied to the TEXSYS project to assure its safe and successful completion are detailed. The project demonstrated that artificial intelligence technology, including model-based reasoning, is capable of the monitoring and control of a large, complex system in real time.

  15. Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit previews at Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Discovery Channel's Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit, which opens to the public at the KSC Visitor Complex on Saturday, June 17, had a preview for the press today. Liberty Bell 7 launched U.S. Air Force Captain Virgil 'Gus' Grissom July 21, 1961, on a mission that lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds before sinking. The capsule lay undetected for nearly four decades before a Discovery Channel expedition located it and recovered it. Standing in front of the restored Liberty Bell 7 capsule are (left to right) KSC's Deputy Director Jim Jennings; Gunther Wendt, who worked on the Liberty Bell 7 before its launch; Jim Lewis, who piloted the Hunt Club 1 helicopter that rescued Gus Grissom; and Larry Grissom, brother of Gus Grissom. The space capsule, now restored and preserved, is part of an interactive exhibit touring science centers and museums in 12 cities throughout the United States until 2003. The exhibit also includes hands-on elements such as a capsule simulator, a centrifuge, and ROV pilot.

  16. A low complexity reweighted proportionate affine projection algorithm with memory and row action projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianming; Grant, Steven L.; Benesty, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    A new reweighted proportionate affine projection algorithm (RPAPA) with memory and row action projection (MRAP) is proposed in this paper. The reweighted PAPA is derived from a family of sparseness measures, which demonstrate performance similar to mu-law and the l 0 norm PAPA but with lower computational complexity. The sparseness of the channel is taken into account to improve the performance for dispersive system identification. Meanwhile, the memory of the filter's coefficients is combined with row action projections (RAP) to significantly reduce computational complexity. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed RPAPA MRAP algorithm outperforms both the affine projection algorithm (APA) and PAPA, and has performance similar to l 0 PAPA and mu-law PAPA, in terms of convergence speed and tracking ability. Meanwhile, the proposed RPAPA MRAP has much lower computational complexity than PAPA, mu-law PAPA, and l 0 PAPA, etc., which makes it very appealing for real-time implementation.

  17. Dynamic of astrophysical jets in the complex octonion space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2015-06-01

    The paper aims to consider the strength gradient force as the dynamic of astrophysical jets, explaining the movement phenomena of astrophysical jets. J. C. Maxwell applied the quaternion analysis to describe the electromagnetic theory. This encourages others to adopt the complex quaternion and octonion to depict the electromagnetic and gravitational theories. In the complex octonion space, it is capable of deducing the field potential, field strength, field source, angular momentum, torque, force and so forth. As one component of the force, the strength gradient force relates to the gradient of the norm of field strength only, and is independent of not only the direction of field strength but also the mass and electric charge for the test particle. When the strength gradient force is considered as the thrust of the astrophysical jets, one can deduce some movement features of astrophysical jets, including the bipolarity, matter ingredient, precession, symmetric distribution, emitting, collimation, stability, continuing acceleration and so forth. The above results reveal that the strength gradient force is able to be applied to explain the main mechanical features of astrophysical jets, and is the competitive candidate of the dynamic of astrophysical jets.

  18. Metric Projective Geometry, BGG Detour Complexes and Partially Massless Gauge Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gover, A. Rod; Latini, Emanuele; Waldron, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    A projective geometry is an equivalence class of torsion free connections sharing the same unparametrised geodesics; this is a basic structure for understanding physical systems. Metric projective geometry is concerned with the interaction of projective and pseudo-Riemannian geometry. We show that the BGG machinery of projective geometry combines with structures known as Yang-Mills detour complexes to produce a general tool for generating invariant pseudo-Riemannian gauge theories. This produces (detour) complexes of differential operators corresponding to gauge invariances and dynamics. We show, as an application, that curved versions of these sequences give geometric characterizations of the obstructions to propagation of higher spins in Einstein spaces. Further, we show that projective BGG detour complexes generate both gauge invariances and gauge invariant constraint systems for partially massless models: the input for this machinery is a projectively invariant gauge operator corresponding to the first operator of a certain BGG sequence. We also connect this technology to the log-radial reduction method and extend the latter to Einstein backgrounds.

  19. A Project Management Approach to Using Simulation for Cost Estimation on Large, Complex Software Development Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Malone, Linda

    2007-01-01

    It is very difficult for project managers to develop accurate cost and schedule estimates for large, complex software development projects. None of the approaches or tools available today can estimate the true cost of software with any high degree of accuracy early in a project. This paper provides an approach that utilizes a software development process simulation model that considers and conveys the level of uncertainty that exists when developing an initial estimate. A NASA project will be analyzed using simulation and data from the Software Engineering Laboratory to show the benefits of such an approach.

  20. In-space propellant logistics. Volume 4: Project planning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The prephase A conceptual project planning data as it pertains to the development of the selected logistics module configuration transported into earth orbit by the space shuttle orbiter. The data represents the test, implementation, and supporting research and technology requirements for attaining the propellant transfer operational capability for early 1985. The plan is based on a propellant module designed to support the space-based tug with cryogenic oxygen-hydrogen propellants. A logical sequence of activities that is required to define, design, develop, fabricate, test, launch, and flight test the propellant logistics module is described. Included are the facility and ground support equipment requirements. The schedule of activities are based on the evolution and relationship between the R and T, the development issues, and the resultant test program.

  1. Large-viewing-angle electroholography by space projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koki; Obana, Kazuki; Okumura, Toshimichi; Kanaoka, Takumi; Nishikawa, Satoko; Takano, Kunihiko

    2004-06-01

    The specification of hologram image is the full parallax 3D image. In this case we can get more natural 3D image because focusing and convergence are coincident each other. We try to get practical electro-holography system because for conventional electro-holography the image viewing angle is very small. This is due to the limited display pixel size. Now we are developing new method for large viewing angle by space projection method. White color laser is irradiated to single DMD panel ( time shared CGH of RGB three colors ). 3D space screen constructed by very small water particle is used to reconstruct the 3D image with large viewing angle by scattering of water particle.

  2. The Unification of Space Qualified Integrated Circuits by Example of International Space Project GAMMA-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, S. G.; Serdin, O. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.

    The problem of electronic component unification at the different levels (circuits, interfaces, hardware and software) used in space industry is considered. The task of computer systems for space purposes developing is discussed by example of scientific data acquisition system for space project GAMMA-400. The basic characteristics of high reliable and fault tolerant chips developed by SRISA RAS for space applicable computational systems are given. To reduce power consumption and enhance data reliability, embedded system interconnect made hierarchical: upper level is Serial RapidIO 1x or 4x with rate transfer 1.25 Gbaud; next level - SpaceWire with rate transfer up to 400 Mbaud and lower level - MIL-STD-1553B and RS232/RS485. The Ethernet 10/100 is technology interface and provided connection with the previously released modules too. Systems interconnection allows creating different redundancy systems. Designers can develop heterogeneous systems that employ the peer-to-peer networking performance of Serial RapidIO using multiprocessor clusters interconnected by SpaceWire.

  3. Information Presentation: Human Research Program - Space Human Factors and Habitability, Space Human Factors Engineering Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kristina L.; Sandor, Aniko; Thompson, Shelby G.; Kaiser, Mary K.; McCann, Robert S.; Begault, D. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Beutter, B. R.; Wenzel, E. M.; Godfroy, M.; Stone, L. S.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers atJohnson Space Center and Ames Research Center. T

  4. Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

  5. Space modules of Phobos-Grunt complex for prospective interplanetary stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishchuk, G. M.; Pichkhadze, K. M.; Efanov, V. V.; Martynov, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Standardized modules are considered, such as the main propulsion system, space platform, and reusable spacecraft, that were developed within the scope of the Phobos-Grunt project. It is proposed that long-term interplanetary stations for fundamental space research should be created based on these modules. A description is given of the alleged scientific space projects for the medium term.

  6. Complex gas/lift gathering system project in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    A new gas lift and gathering system is located in the Makaraba oil field, Nigeria. It connects 12 wellheads to a flow station by a series of 6-in. pipelines and one 16-in. trunk-line. The complexity of the project was due to the swampy site conditions which necessitated all work being conducted with floating plant, including a specially made laybarge and amphibious swamp buggies.

  7. Pilot Experiments for the i-Space Project by NASDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirei, Yoshihiko; Seki, Masakuni; Shigeta, Tsutomu; Inagaki, Kazunori

    Project")" as part of its research and development into the space infrastructure needed to deal with the materialization of a society with broadband Internet access. fields such as the Internet, education, health, disaster control and the Intelligent Transport System (ITS), using research "the Engineering Test Satellite VIII (ETS-VIII)", "the Wideband Internetworking engineering test and Demonstration Satellite (WINDS)" being researched and developed, and "the Quasi-Zenith Satellite System" which is still being studied. geostationary satellites capable of receiving sounds or data transmitted portably. It will be used for tests and providing evidence for the technical developments needed for communications, broadcasts and measurements in the early 21st century. information needed in an information technology-based society. It will be used not only in Japan, but also in broad areas throughout the Asia-Pacific region. NASDA is now working together with CRL on the research and development of the satellite, with a launch planned for 2005. communications in cities, is also now being studied in preparation for more specific research and development. about each category as mentioned above by utilization of some commercial satellites until these test satellites are launched. is introduced along with the various promotion activities of possible satellite experiments. The topic includes: 1) Abstract of the i-Space Project 2) Instance of the pilot experiments: Development an effective system and application for measures to deal with disasters.

  8. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  9. Space-charge-limited current in DNA-surfactant complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, I.-Ching; Lin, Ting-Yu; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymers have attracted much research attention and been considered as a promising material when being employed in many optoelectronic devices. Since performance of many DNA biopolymer-based devices relies on carrier transport, it is crucial to study the carrier mobility of these DNA-surfactant complexes for practical implement. In this work, we present hole mobility characterization of cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA)-modified DNA biopolymer by using space-charge-limited current (SCLC) method. Devices were fabricated using a sandwich structure with a buffer layer of MoO3 to enhance hole injection and achieve ohmic contact between the anode and the DNA layer. Current-voltage (I-V) curves of the devices were analyzed. A trap-free SCLC behavior can ultimately be achieved and a quadratic dependence in I-V curve was observed. With increasing electric field, a positive field-dependent mobility was demonstrated. The correlation between mobility and temperature was also investigated and a positive relation was found. The characterization results can be further utilized for DNA-based device design and applications.

  10. Space Station Biological Research Project: Reference Experiment Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine (Editor); Wade, Charles (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP), which is the combined efforts of the Centrifuge Facility (CF) and the Gravitational Biology Facility (GBF), is responsible for the development of life sciences hardware to be used on the International Space Station to support cell, developmental, and plant biology research. The SSBRP Reference Experiment Book was developed to use as a tool for guiding this development effort. The reference experiments characterize the research interests of the international scientific community and serve to identify the hardware capabilities and support equipment needed to support such research. The reference experiments also serve as a tool for understanding the operational aspects of conducting research on board the Space Station. This material was generated by the science community by way of their responses to reference experiment solicitation packages sent to them by SSBRP scientists. The solicitation process was executed in two phases. The first phase was completed in February of 1992 and the second phase completed in November of 1995. Representing these phases, the document is subdivided into a Section 1 and a Section 2. The reference experiments contained in this document are only representative microgravity experiments. They are not intended to define actual flight experiments. Ground and flight experiments will be selected through the formal NASA Research Announcement (NRA) and Announcement of Opportunity (AO) experiment solicitation, review, and selection process.

  11. MAGDAS Project for Space Weather during IHY/ISWI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, K.; Group, M.

    2009-05-01

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University has deployed the MAGnetic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS) at 50 stations along the 210- and 96-degree magnetic meridians (MM) and the magnetic Dip equator, and several FM-CW radars along the 210-degree MM during the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) period of 2005-2009 (see http://magdas.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/ and http://magdas2.serc.kyushu-u.ac.jp/). The goal of MAGDAS project is to become the most comprehensive ground-based monitoring system of the earth's magnetic field. It does not compete with space-based observation. Rather, this ground-based network complements observation from space. To properly study solar-terrestrial events, data from both are required. This project intends to get the MAGDAS network fully operational and provide data for studies on space weather. By analyzing these new MAGDAS data, we can perform a real-time monitoring and modeling of the global (e.g. Sq, EEJ) current system and the ambient plasma mass density for understanding the electromagnetic and plasma environment changes in geospace during helio-magnetospheric storms. In order to examine the propagation mechanisms of transient disturbances, i.e., sc/si, Pi 2, and DP2, relations of ionospheric electric and magnetic fields are investigated by analyzing the MAGDAS magnetic data and the Doppler data of our FM-CW ionospheric radar. A new EE-index (EDst, EU, and EL) was also proposed by SERC for real-time and long-term geo-space monitoring. The basic algorithm to obtain EE-index was constructed by Uozumi et al. (2008). EU and EL mainly represent the range of the EEJ (equatorial electrojet) and CEJ (equatorial counter electrojet) components, respectively. The baseline levels of EU and EL are obtained by averaging the H-component magnetic variations observed at the nightside (LT = 18-06) MAGDAS/CPMN (Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network) stations along the magnetic equator. The baseline value is defined as EDst and its

  12. Integrated design and management of complex and fast track projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Dario

    2003-02-01

    Modern scientific and technological projects are increasingly in competition over scientific aims, technological innovation, performance, time and cost. They require a dedicated and innovative organization able to satisfy contemporarily various technical and logistic constraints imposed by the final user, and guarantee the satisfaction of technical specifications, identified on the basis of scientific aims. In order to satisfy all the above, the management has to be strategically innovative and intuitive, by removing, first of all, the bottlenecks that are pointed out, usually only at the end of the projects, as the causes of general dissatisfaction. More than 30 years spent working on complex multidisciplinary systems and 20 years of formative experience in managing contemporarily both scientific, technological and industrial projects have given the author the possibility to study, test and validate strategies for parallel project management and integrated design, merged in a sort of unique optimized task, using the newly-coined word "Technomethodology". The paper highlights useful information to be taken into consideration during project organization to minimize the program deviations from the expected goals and describe some of the basic meanings of this new advanced method that is the key for parallel successful management of multiple and interdisciplinary activities.

  13. Scientific problems addressed by the Spektr-UV space project (world space Observatory—Ultraviolet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarchuk, A. A.; Shustov, B. M.; Savanov, I. S.; Sachkov, M. E.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Wiebe, D. Z.; Shematovich, V. I.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.; Ryabchikova, T. A.; Chugai, N. N.; Ivanov, P. B.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Gomez de Castro, A. I.; Lamzin, S. A.; Piskunov, N.; Ayres, T.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Jeffrey, S.; Zwintz, S. K.; Shulyak, D.; Gérard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.; Fossati, L.; Lammer, H.; Werner, K.; Zhilkin, A. G.; Kaigorodov, P. V.; Sichevskii, S. G.; Ustamuich, S.; Kanev, E. N.; Kil'pio, E. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a review of scientific problems and methods of ultraviolet astronomy, focusing on perspective scientific problems (directions) whose solution requires UV space observatories. These include reionization and the history of star formation in the Universe, searches for dark baryonic matter, physical and chemical processes in the interstellar medium and protoplanetary disks, the physics of accretion and outflows in astrophysical objects, from Active Galactic Nuclei to close binary stars, stellar activity (for both low-mass and high-mass stars), and processes occurring in the atmospheres of both planets in the solar system and exoplanets. Technological progress in UV astronomy achieved in recent years is also considered. The well advanced, international, Russian-led Spektr-UV (World Space Observatory—Ultraviolet) project is described in more detail. This project is directed at creating a major space observatory operational in the ultraviolet (115-310 nm). This observatory will provide an effective, and possibly the only, powerful means of observing in this spectral range over the next ten years, and will be an powerful tool for resolving many topical scientific problems.

  14. Project SPARC: Space-Based Aeroassisted Reusable Craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Future United States' space facilities include a Space Station in low Earth orbit (LEO) and a Geosynchronous Operations Support Center, or GeoShack, in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). One possible mode of transfer between the two orbits is an aerobraking vehicle. When traveling from GEO to LEO, the Earth's atmosphere can be used to aerodynamically reduce the velocity of the vehicle, which reduces the amount of propulsive change in velocity required for the mission. An aerobrake is added to the vehicle for this purpose, but the additional mass increases propellant requirements. This increase must not exceed the amount of propellant saved during the aeropass. The design and development of an aerobraking vehicle that will transfer crew and cargo between the Space Station and GeoShack is examined. The vehicle is referred to as Project SPARC, a SPace-based Aeroassisted Reusable Craft. SPARC consists of a removable 45 ft diameter aerobrake, two modified Pratt and Whitney Advanced Expander Engines with a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen propellant, a removable crew module with a maximum capacity of five, and standard sized payload bays providing a maximum payload capacity of 28,000 lbm. The aerobrake, a rigid, ellipsoidally blunted elliptical cone, provides lift at zero angle-of-attack due to a 73 deg rake angle, and is covered with a flexible multi-layer thermal protection system. Maximum dry mass of the vehicle without payload is 20,535 lbm, and the maximum propellant requirement is 79,753 lbm at an oxidizer to fuel ratio of 6/1. Key advantages of SPARC include its capability to meet mission changes, and its removable aerobrake and crew module.

  15. To Create Space on Earth: The Space Environment Simulation Laboratory and Project Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Lori C.

    2003-01-01

    Few undertakings in the history of humanity can compare to the great technological achievement known as Project Apollo. Among those who witnessed Armstrong#s flickering television image were thousands of people who had directly contributed to this historic moment. Amongst those in this vast anonymous cadre were the personnel of the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) in Houston, Texas. SESL houses two large thermal-vacuum chambers with solar simulation capabilities. At a time when NASA engineers had a limited understanding of the effects of extremes of space on hardware and crews, SESL was designed to literally create the conditions of space on Earth. With interior dimensions of 90 feet in height and a 55-foot diameter, Chamber A dwarfed the Apollo command/service module (CSM) it was constructed to test. The chamber#s vacuum pumping capacity of 1 x 10(exp -6) torr can simulate an altitude greater than 130 miles above the Earth. A "lunar plane" capable of rotating a 150,000-pound test vehicle 180 deg replicates the revolution of a craft in space. To reproduce the temperature extremes of space, interior chamber walls cool to -280F as two banks of carbon arc modules simulate the unfiltered solar light/heat of the Sun. With capabilities similar to that of Chamber A, early Chamber B tests included the Gemini modular maneuvering unit, Apollo EVA mobility unit and the lunar module. Since Gemini astronaut Charles Bassett first ventured into the chamber in 1966, Chamber B has assisted astronauts in testing hardware and preparing them for work in the harsh extremes of space.

  16. The Impact of Early Design Phase Risk Identification Biases on Space System Project Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, John D., Jr.; Eveleigh, Tim; Holzer, Thomas; Sarkani, Shahryar

    2012-01-01

    Risk identification during the early design phases of complex systems is commonly implemented but often fails to result in the identification of events and circumstances that truly challenge project performance. Inefficiencies in cost and schedule estimation are usually held accountable for cost and schedule overruns, but the true root cause is often the realization of programmatic risks. A deeper understanding of frequent risk identification trends and biases pervasive during space system design and development is needed, for it would lead to improved execution of existing identification processes and methods.

  17. Deep Space 2: The Mars Microprobe Project and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Gavit, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe Project, or Deep Space 2 (DS2), is the second of the New Millennium Program planetary missions and is designed to enable future space science network missions through flight validation of new technologies. A secondary goal is the collection of meaningful science data. Two micropenetrators will be deployed to carry out surface and subsurface science. The penetrators are being carried as a piggyback payload on the Mars Polar Lander cruise ring and will be launched in January 1999. The microprobe has no active control, attitude determination, or propulsive systems. It is a single stage from separation until landing and will passively orient itself due to its aerodynamic design. The aeroshell will be made of a nonerosive heat shield material, Silicon impregnated Reusable Ceramic Ablator(SIRCA), developed at Ames Research Center. The aeroshell shatters on impact, at which time the probe separates into an aftbody that remains at the surface and a forebody that penetrates into the subsurface. Each probe has a total mass of up to 3 kg, including the aeroshell. The impact velocity will be about 180 meters per second. The forebody will experience up to 30,000 g's and penetrate between 0.3 and 2 meters, depending on the ice content of the soil. The aftbody deceleration will be up to 80,000 g. The penetrators arrive in December 1999. The landing ellipse latitude range is 73 deg-77 deg S. The longitude will be selected by the Mars Surveyor Project to place the lander on the polar layered deposits in the range of 180 deg -230 deg W. The two micropenetrators are likely to land within 100 km of the Mars Surveyor Lander, on the polar deposits. The likely arrival date is L(sub s) = 256, late southern spring. The nominal mission lasts 2 days. A science team was selected in April 1998.

  18. Deep Space 2: The Mars Microprobe Project and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Gavit, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe Project, or Deep Space 2 (DS2), is the second of the New Millennium Program planetary missions and is designed to enable future space science network missions through flight validation of new technologies. A secondary goal is the collection of meaningful science data. Two micropenetrators will be deployed to carry out surface and subsurface science. The penetrators are being carried as a piggyback payload on the Mars Polar Lander cruise ring and will be launched in January 1999. The microprobe has no active control, attitude determination, or propulsive systems. It is a single stage from separation until landing and will passively orient itself due to its aerodynamic design. The aeroshell will be made of a nonerosive heat shield material, Silicon impregnated Reusable Ceramic Ablator(SIRCA), developed at Ames Research Center. The aeroshell shatters on impact, at which time the probe separates into an aftbody that remains at the surface and a forebody that penetrates into the subsurface. Each probe has a total mass of up to 3 kg, including the aeroshell. The impact velocity will be about 180 meters per second. The forebody will experience up to 30,000 g's and penetrate between 0.3 and 2 meters, depending on the ice content of the soil. The aftbody deceleration will be up to 80,000 g. The penetrators arrive in December 1999. The landing ellipse latitude range is 73 deg-77 deg S. The longitude will be selected by the Mars Surveyor Project to place the lander on the polar layered deposits in the range of 180 deg -230 deg W. The two micropenetrators are likely to land within 100 km of the Mars Surveyor Lander, on the polar deposits. The likely arrival date is Ls = 256, late southern spring. The nominal mission lasts 2 days. A science team was selected in April 1998.

  19. Limited projections laser speckle tomography of complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, N.; Lavinskaya, E.; Takayama, K.

    2006-03-01

    Different approaches are discussed applied to reconstruction of local flow parameters using line-of-sight laser probing. The first one is based on single projection measurement and detailed numerical simulation of flow pattern. The second one is based on multi-projectional line-of-sight measurement and reconstructing local flow parameters by solving inverse integral transforms. Holographic interferometry (HI) and speckle photography (SP) are used for laser probing of complex 3D media under study. Computer-assisted tomography (CAT) approach based on Radon integral transform is described and examples of reconstructed flowfields are given including compressible flows with shock waves. Statistical information about flow studied is extracted as well, and maps of local statistical turbulence parameters are quantitatively determined by using obtained SP-data and a new Erbeck-Merzkirch integral transform.

  20. Systems and Technologies for Space Exploration: the regional project STEPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggiatto, D.; Moncalvo, D.

    The Aerospace technology network of Piemonte represents ˜25% of the italian capacity and handles a comprehensive spectrum of products (aircraft, propulsion, satellites, space station modules, avionics. components, services...). The cooperation between the Comitato Distretto Aerospaziale Piemonte and the European Regional Development Fund 2007-2013 has enabled Regione Piemonte to launch three regional Projects capable to enhance the synergy and competitiveness of the network, among which: STEPS - Sistemi e Tecnologie per l'EsPlorazione Spaziale, a joint development of technologies for robotic and human Space Exploration by 3 large Industries, 27 SMEs, 3 Universities and one public Research Centre. STEPS develops virtual and hardware demonstrators for a range of technologies to do with a Lander's descent and soft landing, and a Rover's surface mobility, of both robotic and manned equipment on Moon and Mars. It also foresees the development of Teleoperations labs and Virtual Reality environments and physical simulations of Moon and Mars surface conditions and ground. Mid-way along STEPS planned development, initial results in several technology domains are available and are presented in this paper.

  1. The read-out ASIC for the Space NUCLEON project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, E.; Voronin, A.; Karmanov, D.; Kudryashov, I.; Podorozhniy, D.; Shumikhin, V.

    2015-04-01

    This paper summarizes the design results for the read-out ASIC for the space NUCLEON project of the Russian Federal Space Agency ROSCOSMOS. The ASIC with a unique high dynamic range (1-40 000 mip) at low power consumption (< 1.5 mW per channel) has been developed. It allows to record signals of relativistic particles and nuclei with charges from Z = 1 up to Z > 50, generated by silicon detectors, having capacitances up to 100 pF. The chip structure includes 32 analog channels, each consisting of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with a p-MOS input transistor (W = 8 mm, L = 0.5 μ m), a shaper (peaking time of 2 us) and a T&H circuit. The ASIC showed a 120 pC dynamic range at a SNR of 2.5 for the particles with minimal ionization energy (1 mip). The chip was fabricated by the 0.35 um CMOS process via Europractice and tested both at lab conditions and in the SPS beam at CERN.

  2. The joint Austro-Soviet space project AUSTROMIR-91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.

    1993-03-01

    After more than 20 years of successful cooperation between Austria and the Soviet Union in the field of unmanned space research, an Austrian cosmonaut Franz Viehbock was launched on 2 October 1991 from Baikonur for a 1-week's stay at the Space Station Mir, thus highlighting this very efficient joint research work. For this flight, out of 34 scientific experiments 14 could be chosen to be performed by the cosmonaut, mainly in the field of life sciences, but also in physics, material science and remote sensing. All of them performed extremely well and the mission can be considered a full success. While final analysis is still underway, preliminary data to be reported in subsequent papers show very interesting results. The responsibility for this project was with the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research, Vienna, which entrusted the Joanneum Research, Graz, with the full operational and technical management, as far as the Austrian side was concerned. The cooperation with the Soviet scientists and engineers was an extremely cordial and efficient one, a fact which - along with the outstanding performance of the crew - contributed very much to the success of the mission.

  3. The Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Spectral Library Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is a Hubble Large Treasury Project, whose aim is to collect high-quality ultraviolet (1150-3100 Å) spectra of bright stars, utilizing the echelle modes of powerful Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; with resolution and signal-to-noise rivaling the best that can be achieved at ground-based observatories in the visible. During HST Cycle 18 (2010-2011), ASTRAL was allocated 146 orbits to record eight representative late-type ("cool") stars, including well-known cosmic denizens like Procyon and Betelgeuse. In Cycle 21 (2013-2014), ASTRAL was awarded an additional 230 orbits to extend the project to the hot side of the H-R diagram: 21 targets covering the O-A spectral types, including household favorites Vega and Sirius. The second part of the program was completed in January 2015. I describe the scientific motivations for observing hot and cool stars in the UV; the unique instrumental characteristics of STIS that enabled a broad survey like ASTRAL; progress in the program to date; and prospects for the future.

  4. The ALTCRISS Project On Board the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Casolino, M.; Altamura, F.; Minori, M.; Picozza, P.; Fuglesang, C.; Galper, A.; Popov, A.; Benghin, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Altcriss project aims to perform a long term survey of the radiation environment on board the International Space Station. Measurements are being performed with active and passive devices in different locations and orientations of the Russian segment of the station. The goal is perform a detailed evaluation of the differences in particle fluence and nuclear composition due to different shielding material and attitude of the station. The Sileye-3/Alteino detector is used to identify nuclei up to Iron in the energy range above approximately equal to 60 MeV/n; a number of passive dosimeters (TLDs, CR39) are also placed in the same location of Sileye-3 detector. Polyethylene shielding is periodically interposed in front of the detectors to evaluate the effectiveness of shielding on the nuclear component of the cosmic radiation. The project was submitted to ESA in reply to the AO the Life and Physical Science of 2004 and was begun in December 2005. Dosimeters and data cards are rotated every six months: up to now three launches of dosimeters and data cards have been performed and have been returned with the end expedition 12 and 13.

  5. MAGDAS Project and Its Application for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, K.; Magdas Group

    One purpose of the Solar Terrestrial Physics STP research is to support human activities in the twenty-first century from an aspect of fundamental study The scientific new aim for the STP society is a creation of new physics 1 couplings of the complex and composite systems and 2 macro-and-micro-scale couplings in the Sun-Earth system The goals for the attainment of the purpose are to construct Network Stations for observations and Modeling Stations for simulation empirical modeling In order to study the complexity in the Sun-Earth system the Space Environment Research Center SERC Kyushu University started to construct a new ground-based magnetometer network in cooperation with about 30 organizations in the world The SERC will conduct the MAGDAS MAG netic D ata A cqusition S ystem observations at 50 stations in the CPMN C ircum-pan P acific M agnetometer N etwork region and the FM-CW radar observations along the 210 r magnetic meridian in order to study dynamics of plasmaspheric changes during spasce storms and substorms electromagnetic responses of magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere to various solar wind changes and penetration mechanisms of DP2-ULF range disturbances from the solar wind into the equatorial ionosphere In the present paper at the first we will introduce our real-time data acquisition and analysis of MAGDAS CPMN system and preliminary results of this system 1 monitoring of the global 3-dimensional current system to know

  6. The complex fabric of public opinion on space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. Roy, Stephanie; C. Gresham, Elaine; Christensen, Carissa Bryce

    2000-07-01

    Survey questions can be useful tools in gauging public interest. An historical analysis of U.S. public opinion on space-related issues presents some valuable results. Space-related poll questions closely track major events in the history of the U.S. space program. Funding questions are consistently asked, although program-related questions are becoming increasingly popular. Support for space funding has remained remarkably stable at approximately 80% since 1965, with only one significant dip in support in the early 1970s. However, responses on funding questions are extremely sensitive to question wording and should be used cautiously. Around 75% of the American public generally approve of the job that NASA is doing. Human space flight wins out over robotic space programs when put head-to-head, although support for a human Mars mission is on the decline. Despite dramatic increases in commercial space activities, in general opinion polls fail to reflect this increasingly dominant sector of the space economy.

  7. Life sciences payloads analyses and technical program planning studies. [project planning of space missions of space shuttles in aerospace medicine and space biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Contractural requirements, project planning, equipment specifications, and technical data for space shuttle biological experiment payloads are presented. Topics discussed are: (1) urine collection and processing on the space shuttle, (2) space processing of biochemical and biomedical materials, (3) mission simulations, and (4) biomedical equipment.

  8. Numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1992-01-01

    This project forms part of the long term computational effort to simulate the time dependent flow over the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle (orbiter, solid rocket boosters (SRB's), external tank (ET), and attach hardware) during its ascent mode for various nominal and abort flight conditions. Due to the limitations of experimental data such as wind tunnel wall effects and the difficulty of safely obtaining valid flight data, numerical simulations are undertaken to supplement the existing data base. This data can then be used to predict the aerodynamic behavior over a wide range of flight conditions. Existing computational results show relatively good overall comparison with experiments but further refinement is required to reduce numerical errors and to obtain finer agreements over a larger parameter space. One of the important goals of this project is to obtain better comparisons between numerical simulations and experiments. In the simulations performed so far, the geometry has been simplified in various ways to reduce the complexity so that useful results can be obtained in a reasonable time frame due to limitations in computer resources. In this project, the finer details of the major components of the Space Shuttle are modeled better by including more complexity in the geometry definition. Smaller components not included in early Space Shuttle simulations will now be modeled and gridded.

  9. Space Research Institute (IKI) Exhibition as an Educational Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Antonenko, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The Exhibition "Space Science: Part and Future" in Space Research Institute (IKI) was opened in 2007 in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the first man-made satellite launch. It covers the latest and the most important findings in space research, shows instruments which are used in space exploration, and presents past, current, and future Russian science missions. Prototypes of space instruments developed by Russian specialists and mockups of spacecraft and spaceships flown to space are displayed, together with information posters, describing space missions, their purposes and results. The Exhibition takes a great part in school space education. Its stuff actively works with schoolchildren, undergraduate students and also makes a great contribution in popularization of space researches. Moreover the possibility to learn about scientific space researches first-hand is priceless. We describe the main parts of the Exhibition and forms of it work and also describe the collaboration with other museums and educational organizations.

  10. High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project Advanced Space-Rated Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2011-01-01

    Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) has an agreement with China National Offshore Oil Corporation New Energy Investment Company, Ltd. (CNOOC), under the United States-China EcoPartnerships Framework, to create a bi-national entity seeking to develop technically feasible and economically viable solutions to energy and environmental issues. Advanced batteries have been identified as one of the initial areas targeted for collaborations. CWRU invited NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) personnel from the Electrochemistry Branch to CWRU to discuss various aspects of advanced battery development as they might apply to this partnership. Topics discussed included: the process for the selection of a battery chemistry; the establishment of an integrated development program; project management/technical interactions; new technology developments; and synergies between batteries for automotive and space operations. Additional collaborations between CWRU and NASA GRC's Electrochemistry Branch were also discussed.

  11. Astrium suborbital spaceplane project: Demand analysis of suborbital space tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, Thierry; Moreau, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    ASTRIUM is preparing the development of a safe and passenger friendly Suborbital Spaceplane, taking off and landing from a standard runway, powered by turbofans and using a rocket engine of proven design to reach 100 km altitude. This vehicle will be able to carry paying passengers to the edge of space and return them safely to their starting point. As a very new potentially adjacent B2C market, Astrium had decided at the beginning of this project to first conduct a full market analysis with the support of a worldwide survey based Research Company (IPSOS) in order to assess reality and credibility of this market. Two campaigns have been done, the first one in 2007 and the second one in 2010 after the international financial crisis. Last one has been also the opportunity to optimize quality of models by focusing in Asia region. This article describes the methodology used for this survey and unveils some results in term of size of this market and typology of the customers.

  12. Knowledge-based navigation of complex information spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.D.; Hammond, K.J.; Young, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    While the explosion of on-line information has brought new opportunities for finding and using electronic data, it has also brought to the forefront the problem of isolating useful information and making sense of large multi-dimension information spaces. We have built several developed an approach to building data {open_quotes}tour guides,{close_quotes} called FINDME systems. These programs know enough about an information space to be able to help a user navigate through it. The user not only comes away with items of useful information but also insights into the structure of the information space itself. In these systems, we have combined ideas of instance-based browsing, structuring retrieval around the critiquing of previously-retrieved examples, and retrieval strategies, knowledge-based heuristics for finding relevant information. We illustrate these techniques with several examples, concentrating especially on the RENTME system, a FINDME system for helping users find suitable rental apartments in the Chicago metropolitan area.

  13. Large Energy Development Projects: Lessons Learned from Space and Politics

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Harrison H.

    2005-04-15

    The challenge to global energy future lies in meeting the needs and aspirations of the ten to twelve billion earthlings that will be on this planet by 2050. At least an eight-fold increase in annual production will be required by the middle of this century. The energy sources that can be considered developed and 'in the box' for consideration as sources for major increases in supply over the next half century are fossil fuels, nuclear fission, and, to a lesser degree, various forms of direct and stored solar energy and conservation. None of these near-term sources of energy will provide an eight-fold or more increase in energy supply for various technical, environmental and political reasons.Only a few potential energy sources that fall 'out of the box' appear worthy of additional consideration as possible contributors to energy demand in 2050 and beyond. These particular candidates are deuterium-tritium fusion, space solar energy, and lunar helium-3 fusion. The primary advantage that lunar helium-3 fusion will have over other 'out of the box' energy sources in the pre-2050 timeframe is a clear path into the private capital markets. The development and demonstration of new energy sources will require several development paths, each of Apollo-like complexity and each with sub-paths of parallel development for critical functions and components.

  14. Space transportation systems, launch systems, and propulsion for the Space Exploration Initiative: Results from Project Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, T.; Hiland, J.; Orletsky, D.; Augenstein, B.; Miller, M.

    1991-01-01

    A number of transportation and propulsion options for Mars exploration missions are analyzed. As part of Project Outreach, RAND received and evaluated 350 submissions in the launch vehicle, space transportation, and propulsion areas. After screening submissions, aggregating those that proposed identical or nearly identical concepts, and eliminating from further consideration those that violated known physical princples, we had reduced the total number of viable submissions to 213. In order to avoid comparing such disparate things as launch vehicles and electric propulsion systems, six broad technical areas were selected to categorize the submissions: space transportation systems; earth-to-orbit (ETO) launch systems; chemical propulsion; nuclear propulsion; low-thrust propulsion; and other. To provide an appropriate background for analyzing the submissions, an extensive survey was made of the various technologies relevant to the six broad areas listed above. We discuss these technologies with the intent of providing the reader with an indication of the current state of the art, as well as the advances that might be expected within the next 10 to 20 years.

  15. Some thoughts on the management of large, complex international space ventures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. J.; Kutzer, Ants; Schneider, W. C.

    The nations of the world have already collaborated on a number of joint space ventures of varying complexities. To name a few of the variations in management arrangements, the schemes have included the utilization of one nation's spacecraft to orbit another's experiment, the launch of another's spacecraft, the development of an offline article (such as the Spacelab), and the cooperative development of the Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom). Today, as the scope of the problems and solutions involved in establishing a permanently manned colony on the Moon and exploring the surface of Mars become clearer, the idea of a major sharing of the enormous tasks among the spacefaring nations seems more and more necessary and, indeed, required. For such a major, complex project, success depends upon the management as much as it does on the technology. If the project is not organized in a logical and workable manner with clear areas of responsibility and with an agreed-to chain of command, it is in as much jeopardy as it is if the resources are not available. It is vital that thought and analysis be put on this aspect of a "Mission from Planet Earth" early, to insure that the project is not divided into an impractical organizational structure and that agreements are not made which are unsound. As an example of the questions to be explored, the lead organization can take many forms. Clearly, there must be a recognized leader to make the many difficult programmatic decisions which will arise. The lead could be assigned to one nation; it could be assigned to a new international group; it could be assigned to a consortium; or granted to a committee. Each has implications and problems to be explored. This paper will open the discussions. It is the intent of this paper to begin the process based upon the authors' experiences in various international projects. It is to arouse interest and discussion not to select a final solution. Final solutions will depend upon capabilities

  16. Space weather in the EU's FP7 Space Theme. Preface to the special issue on "EU-FP7 funded space weather projects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarini, Paola

    2013-11-01

    Technological infrastructures in space and on ground provide services on which modern society and economies rely. Space weather related research is funded under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (FP7) of the European Union in response to the need of protecting such critical infrastructures from the damage which could be caused by extreme space weather events. The calls for proposals published under the topic "Security of space assets from space weather events" of the FP7 Space Theme aimed to improve forecasts and predictions of disruptive space weather events as well as identify best practices to limit the impacts on space- and ground-based infrastructures and their data provision. Space weather related work was also funded under the topic "Exploitation of space science and exploration data", which aims to add value to space missions and Earth-based observations by contributing to the effective scientific exploitation of collected data. Since 2007 a total of 20 collaborative projects have been funded, covering a variety of physical phenomena associated with space weather, from ionospheric disturbances and scintillation, to geomagnetically induced currents at Earth's surface, to coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles. This article provides an overview of the funded projects, touching upon some results and referring to specific websites for a more exhaustive description of the projects' outcomes.

  17. Recent Advances in Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple as small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization-improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accomodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  18. Expanding Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple at small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization- improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accommodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  19. Nature's Way of Making Audacious Space Projects Viable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.

    2011-01-01

    Building a starship within the next 100 years is an audacious goal. To be successful, we need sustained funding that may be difficult to maintain in the face of economic challenges that are poised to arise during these next 100 years. Our species' civilization has only recently reached the classification as (approximately) Type-I on the Kardashev scale; that is, we have spread out from one small locality to become a global species mastering the energy and resources of an entire planet. In the process we discovered the profound truth that the two-dimensional surface of our world is not flat, but has positive curvature and is closed so that its area and resources are finite. It should come as no surprise to a Type I civilization when its planet's resources dWindle; how could they not? Yet we have gone year by year, government by government, making little investment for the time when civilization becomes violent in the unwelcome contractions that must follow, when we are forced too late into the inevitable choice: to remain and diminish on an unhappy world; or to expand into the only dimension remaining perpendicularly outward from the surface into space. Then some day we may become a Type-II civilization, mastering the resources of an entire solar system. Our species cannot continue as we have on this planet for another 100 years. Doubtless it falls on us today, the very time we intended to start building a starship, to make the late choice. We wished this century to be filled with enlightenment and adventure; it could be an age of desperation and war. What a time to begin an audacious project in space! How will we maintain consistent funding for the next 100 years? Fortunately, saving a civilization, mastering a solar system, and doing other great things like building starships amount to mostly the same set of tasks. Recognizing what we must be about during the next 100 years will make it possible to do them all.

  20. Individualized Instruction in Science, Earth Space Project, Learning Activities Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    Learning Activity Packages (LAP) relating to the earth and space are presented for use in sampling a new type of learning for a whole year. Eighteen topics are incorporated into five units: (1) introduction to individualized learning, (2) observation versus interpretation, (3) chemistry in the space age, (4) the space age interdisciplines, and (5)…

  1. Complex Vector Formalism of Harmonic Oscillator in Geometric Algebra: Particle Mass, Spin and Dynamics in Complex Vector Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, K.

    2014-03-01

    Elementary particles are considered as local oscillators under the influence of zeropoint fields. Such oscillatory behavior of the particles leads to the deviations in their path of motion. The oscillations of the particle in general may be considered as complex rotations in complex vector space. The local particle harmonic oscillator is analyzed in the complex vector formalism considering the algebra of complex vectors. The particle spin is viewed as zeropoint angular momentum represented by a bivector. It has been shown that the particle spin plays an important role in the kinematical intrinsic or local motion of the particle. From the complex vector formalism of harmonic oscillator, for the first time, a relation between mass and bivector spin has been derived in the form . Where, is the angular velocity bivector of complex rotations, is the velocity of light. The unit vector acts as an operator on the idempotents and to give the eigen values The constant represents two fold nature of the equation corresponding to particle and antiparticle states. Further the above relation shows that the mass of the particle may be interpreted as a local spatial complex rotation in the rest frame. This gives an insight into the nature of fundamental particles. When a particle is observed from an arbitrary frame of reference, it has been shown that the spatial complex rotation dictates the relativistic particle motion. The mathematical structure of complex vectors in space and spacetime is developed.

  2. Space Launch System Complex Decision-Making Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry; Flores, Tim; Hundley, Jason; Monk, Timothy; Feldman,Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The Space Shuttle program has ended and elements of the Constellation Program have either been cancelled or transitioned to new NASA exploration endeavors. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has worked diligently to select an optimum configuration for the Space Launch System (SLS), a heavy lift vehicle that will provide the foundation for future beyond low earth orbit (LEO) large-scale missions for the next several decades. From Fall 2010 until Spring 2011, an SLS decision-making framework was formulated, tested, fully documented, and applied to multiple SLS vehicle concepts at NASA from previous exploration architecture studies. This was a multistep process that involved performing figure of merit (FOM)-based assessments, creating Pass/Fail gates based on draft threshold requirements, performing a margin-based assessment with supporting statistical analyses, and performing sensitivity analysis on each. This paper focuses on the various steps and methods of this process (rather than specific data) that allowed for competing concepts to be compared across a variety of launch vehicle metrics in support of the successful completion of the SLS Mission Concept Review (MCR) milestone.

  3. PlasmaLab/EkoPlasma - The Future of Complex Plasma Research in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapek, Christina; Fortov, Vladimir; Huber, Peter; Mohr, Daniel; Konopka, Uwe; Lipaev, Andrey; Molotkov, Vladimir; Petrov, Oleg; Zähringer, Erich; Thomas, Hubertus

    2016-07-01

    The PlasmaLab project, a Russian-German cooperation, has the aim to develop a future laboratory for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS). Within the project, a new plasma chamber, the Zyflex chamber, has been developed and is now being prepared to be launched to the ISS in 2020 as a laboratory setup with the name EkoPlasma (Experiment komplex Plasma). The Zyflex chamber is a large, cylindrical plasma chamber with parallel, rf-driven electrodes and a flexible inner geometry. It is designed to extend the accessible experimental parameter range and to allow an independent control of the plasma parameters, therefore increasing the experimental possibilities and expected knowledge gain significantly. Further, a 3D optical diagnostic will allow for the study of particle dynamics in 3D realtime. Possible future research topics include e.g. phase transitions, the dynamics of liquids, phase separation, or turbulence. The experimental setup will be presented, as well as some preliminary results of experiments on earth and in parabolic flights to visualize the possibilities of this new laboratory. This work and some of the authors are funded by DLR/BMWi (FKZ 50WM1441).

  4. Composite of liposome and metal complexes: Toward creating a new chemical reaction space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshiyama, Tomomi; Ohba, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of our research is to construct a novel functional space by fixation of various metal complexes into the liposome space. For the functionalization of liposome surface, we designed lipophilic metal complexes and succeeded in the fixation of various metal complexes such as oxidation catalysts. In addition, reactivities of metal complexes on the liposome surface were optimized by controlling their surrounding environment using various types of phospholipids. Furthermore, we succeeded in the incorporation of coordination polymers in inner water phase of liposomes using antibiotic ion channel, and the composites showed absorption of metal ions through antibiotic ion channels.

  5. Discrete Fourier Transform in a Complex Vector Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An image-based phase retrieval technique has been developed that can be used on board a space based iterative transformation system. Image-based wavefront sensing is computationally demanding due to the floating-point nature of the process. The discrete Fourier transform (DFT) calculation is presented in "diagonal" form. By diagonal we mean that a transformation of basis is introduced by an application of the similarity transform of linear algebra. The current method exploits the diagonal structure of the DFT in a special way, particularly when parts of the calculation do not have to be repeated at each iteration to converge to an acceptable solution in order to focus an image.

  6. Stennis Space Center Salinity Drifter Project. A Collaborative Project with Hancock High School, Kiln, MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalcic, Maria; Turowski, Mark; Hall, Callie

    2010-01-01

    Presentation topics include: importance of salinity of coastal waters, habitat switching algorithm, habitat switching module, salinity estimates from Landsat for Sabine Calcasieu Basin, percent of time inundated in 2006, salinity data, prototyping the system, system as packaged for field tests, salinity probe and casing, opening for water flow, cellular antenna used to transmit data, preparing to launch, system is launched in the Pearl River at Stennis Space Center, data are transmitted to Twitter by cell phone modem every 15 minutes, Google spreadsheet I used to import the data from the Twitter feed and to compute salinity (from conductivity) and display charts of salinity and temperature, results are uploaded to NASA's Applied Science and Technology Project Office Webpage.

  7. Conformal foliations by circles and complex isoparametric functions on Euclidean 3-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, P.

    1998-03-01

    The space of circles in S3 completed to include points is identified with a complex quadric hypersurface [script H] of CP4. A conformal foliation by arcs of circles of a domain in R3 now corresponds to a complex holomorphic curve in [script H]. The space [script H] minus a hyperplane section fibres in a natural way over the space of lines in R3, each fibre consisting of the well known family of circles of Villarceau transformed by a homothety. As a consequence we show that there is a correspondence between harmonic morphisms on the 3-dimensional space forms and demonstrate the existence of a distinguished surface associated to a conformal foliation by arcs of circles.We generalize Cartan's isoparametric functions to complex valued functions and classify all those horizontally conformal complex isoparametric functions defined on domains of R3 with arcs of circles or lines as fibres.

  8. Complex germ method in fock space. II. Asymptotic solutions corresponding to finite-dimensional isotropic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.; Shvedov, O. Yu.

    1995-09-01

    In an earlier paper [1], the authors obtained approximate solutions of second-quantized equations of the form 11232_2005_Article_BF02068746_TeX2GIFE1.gif i\\varepsilon {partial Φ }/{partial t} = Hleft( {sqrt \\varepsilon hat ψ ^ + ,sqrt \\varepsilon hat ψ ^ - } right)Φ (φ is an element of a Fock space, and φ± are creation and annihilation operators) in the limit ɛ→0. The construction of these solutions was based on the expression of the operators φ± in the form 11232_2005_Article_BF02068746_TeX2GIFE2.gif hat ψ ^ ± = {Q mp \\varepsilon δ /δ Q}/{sqrt {2\\varepsilon }} and on the application to the obtained infinite-dimensional analog of the Schrödinger equation of the complex germ method at a point. This gives asymptotic solutions in the Q representation that are concentrated at each fixed instant of time in the neighborhood of a point. In this paper, we consider and generalize to the infinite-dimensional case the complex germ method on a manifold. This gives asymptotic solutions in the Q representation that are concentrated in the neighborhood of certain surfaces that are the projections of isotropic manifolds in the phase space onto the Q plane. The corresponding asymptotic solutions in the Fock representation are constructed. Examples of constructed asymptotic solutions are approximate solutions of the N-particle Schrödinger and Liouville equations ( N˜1/ ɛ), and also quantum-field equations.

  9. Project EGRESS: Earthbound Guaranteed Reentry from Space Station. the Design of an Assured Crew Recovery Vehicle for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Unlike previously designed space-based working environments, the shuttle orbiter servicing the space station will not remain docked the entire time the station is occupied. While an Apollo capsule was permanently available on Skylab, plans for Space Station Freedom call for a shuttle orbiter to be docked at the space station for no more than two weeks four times each year. Consideration of crew safety inspired the design of an Assured Crew Recovery Vehicle (ACRV). A conceptual design of an ACRV was developed. The system allows the escape of one or more crew members from Space Station Freedom in case of emergency. The design of the vehicle addresses propulsion, orbital operations, reentry, landing and recovery, power and communication, and life support. In light of recent modifications in space station design, Project EGRESS (Earthbound Guaranteed ReEntry from Space Station) pays particular attention to its impact on space station operations, interfaces and docking facilities, and maintenance needs. A water-landing medium-lift vehicle was found to best satisfy project goals of simplicity and cost efficiency without sacrificing safety and reliability requirements. One or more seriously injured crew members could be returned to an earth-based health facility with minimal pilot involvement. Since the craft is capable of returning up to five crew members, two such permanently docked vehicles would allow a full evacuation of the space station. The craft could be constructed entirely with available 1990 technology, and launched aboard a shuttle orbiter.

  10. Managing Complex Distance Education Projects in a Telework Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ally, Mohamed; Cleveland-Innes, Marti; Wiseman, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The advances of communication technologies have allowed professionals to work on distance education projects in a telework environment. Managers of these projects must have the skills to manage the projects from a distance. They must be able to select the appropriate team members to work on the project, orient team members, and monitor team…

  11. The dataflow time and space complexity of FFTs

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, A.P. . Computer Science Dept.); Hiromoto, R.E. . Computer Research and Applications)

    1993-07-01

    In this paper the authors analyze the performance of a recursive and an iterative fast Fourier transform algorithm, written in Id and run on MINT, a simulator for the Monsoon dataflow machine. Their complexity measures are: the number of instructions executed, the critical path length of the dataflow graph, and the storage occupancy. Using a set of simple functions, they calibrate loop and divide-and-conquer behavior of Monsoon and compare it with the tagged token dataflow architecture. They discuss the issues in explicit resource management in a functional language, introduce the language features required for this, and show results of their resource managed FFT programs.

  12. A complexity analysis of space-bounded learning algorithms for the constraint satisfaction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bayardo, R.J. Jr.; Miranker, D.P.

    1996-12-31

    Learning during backtrack search is a space-intensive process that records information (such as additional constraints) in order to avoid redundant work. In this paper, we analyze the effects of polynomial-space-bounded learning on runtime complexity of backtrack search. One space-bounded learning scheme records only those constraints with limited size, and another records arbitrarily large constraints but deletes those that become irrelevant to the portion of the search space being explored. We find that relevance-bounded learning allows better runtime bounds than size-bounded learning on structurally restricted constraint satisfaction problems. Even when restricted to linear space, our relevance-bounded learning algorithm has runtime complexity near that of unrestricted (exponential space-consuming) learning schemes.

  13. DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dongran; Pal, Suchetan; Nangreave, Jeanette; Deng, Zhengtao; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-04-14

    We present a strategy to design and construct self-assembling DNA nanostructures that define intricate curved surfaces in three-dimensional (3D) space using the DNA origami folding technique. Double-helical DNA is bent to follow the rounded contours of the target object, and potential strand crossovers are subsequently identified. Concentric rings of DNA are used to generate in-plane curvature, constrained to 2D by rationally designed geometries and crossover networks. Out-of-plane curvature is introduced by adjusting the particular position and pattern of crossovers between adjacent DNA double helices, whose conformation often deviates from the natural, B-form twist density. A series of DNA nanostructures with high curvature—such as 2D arrangements of concentric rings and 3D spherical shells, ellipsoidal shells, and a nanoflask—were assembled.

  14. DNA origami with complex curvatures in three-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongran; Pal, Suchetan; Nangreave, Jeanette; Deng, Zhengtao; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-04-15

    We present a strategy to design and construct self-assembling DNA nanostructures that define intricate curved surfaces in three-dimensional (3D) space using the DNA origami folding technique. Double-helical DNA is bent to follow the rounded contours of the target object, and potential strand crossovers are subsequently identified. Concentric rings of DNA are used to generate in-plane curvature, constrained to 2D by rationally designed geometries and crossover networks. Out-of-plane curvature is introduced by adjusting the particular position and pattern of crossovers between adjacent DNA double helices, whose conformation often deviates from the natural, B-form twist density. A series of DNA nanostructures with high curvature--such as 2D arrangements of concentric rings and 3D spherical shells, ellipsoidal shells, and a nanoflask--were assembled. PMID:21493857

  15. Investigation of onboard quantum time scale for orbital flight of a space radio telescope (the RadioAstron project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Results of observing the operation of instrumentation of the ground-space complex of the Radio-Astron project during space flight conditions of the radio observatory are presented. The technology of quality evaluation of the data received from the space radio telescope (SRT) is considered. The dependence of readings of the onboard frame counter on SRT radial velocity and distance is determined. Technology of constructing a model of the ground-space atomic clocks and onboard quantum time scale based on the results of radio astronomic observations is tested. The method of measurement of the coherent cumulative navigation delay using the onboard quantum time scale is considered. The results of observation of the effect of relativistic and kinematic time dilation onboard the SRT are presented.

  16. Enhancement of Space Plasma Images by Complex Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Vitor Moura; Domingues, Margarete Oliveira; Mendes, Odim; Pagamisse, Aylton; Stenborg, Guillermo Adrian

    2015-10-01

    The Sun is a natural laboratory for plasma processes. A myriad of instruments aboard satellites and on ground record(ed) the plasma emission in different ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum to help understand such processes. In particular, in the outer part of the solar atmosphere, the solar corona, we can observe a multitude of electrodynamical phenomena. There, the faint corona emission and the associated dynamic plasma structures (e.g., coronal mass ejections—CMEs) recorded in white-light images can be used as basis for some insight of this physical scenario. In order to characterize the dynamics and morphology of such structures in a better way, it seems crucial that some features of those images should be enhanced. To deal with this need, a new approach using a complex wavelet transform methodology was developed. With the proposed methodology, we can highlight the plasma ejections improving the identification of those structures.

  17. Appreciating the Complexity of Project Management Execution: Using Simulation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Nathan S.; Watts, Charles A.; Treleven, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    As the popularity and importance of project management increase, so does the need for well-prepared project managers. This article discusses our experiences using a project management simulation in undergraduate and MBA classes to help students better grasp the complexity of project management. This approach gives students hands-on experience with…

  18. Space charges and defect concentration profiles at complex oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkel, Felix; Waser, Rainer; Ramadan, Amr H. H.; De Souza, Roger A.; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Dittmann, Regina

    2016-06-01

    We discuss electronic and ionic defect concentration profiles at the conducting interface between the two wide-band-gap insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (STO). The profiles are deduced from a thermodynamic model considering a local space charge layer (SCL) originating from charge transfer to the interface region, thus combining electronic and ionic reconstruction mechanisms. We show that the electrical potential confining the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface modifies the equilibrium defect concentrations in the SCL. For the n -conducting interface, positively charged oxygen vacancies are depleted within the SCL, while negatively charged strontium vacancies accumulate. Charge compensation within the SCL is achieved by a mixed ionic-electronic interface reconstruction, while the competition between 2DEG and localized ionic defects is controlled by ambient p O2 . The concentration of strontium vacancies increases drastically in oxidizing conditions and exhibits a steep depth profile towards the interface. Accounting for the low cation diffusivity in STO, we also discuss kinetic limitations of cation defect formation and the effect of a partial equilibration of the cation sublattice. We discuss the resulting implications for low temperature transport.

  19. Methods of treating complex space vehicle geometry for charged particle radiation transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current methods of treating complex geometry models for space radiation transport calculations are reviewed. The geometric techniques used in three computer codes are outlined. Evaluations of geometric capability and speed are provided for these codes. Although no code development work is included several suggestions for significantly improving complex geometry codes are offered.

  20. Projected and hidden Markov models for calculating kinetics and metastable states of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Noé, Frank; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Plattner, Nuria

    2013-11-14

    Markov state models (MSMs) have been successful in computing metastable states, slow relaxation timescales and associated structural changes, and stationary or kinetic experimental observables of complex molecules from large amounts of molecular dynamics simulation data. However, MSMs approximate the true dynamics by assuming a Markov chain on a clusters discretization of the state space. This approximation is difficult to make for high-dimensional biomolecular systems, and the quality and reproducibility of MSMs has, therefore, been limited. Here, we discard the assumption that dynamics are Markovian on the discrete clusters. Instead, we only assume that the full phase-space molecular dynamics is Markovian, and a projection of this full dynamics is observed on the discrete states, leading to the concept of Projected Markov Models (PMMs). Robust estimation methods for PMMs are not yet available, but we derive a practically feasible approximation via Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). It is shown how various molecular observables of interest that are often computed from MSMs can be computed from HMMs/PMMs. The new framework is applicable to both, simulation and single-molecule experimental data. We demonstrate its versatility by applications to educative model systems, a 1 ms Anton MD simulation of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor protein, and an optical tweezer force probe trajectory of an RNA hairpin. PMID:24320261

  1. Projected and hidden Markov models for calculating kinetics and metastable states of complex molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noé, Frank; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Plattner, Nuria

    2013-11-01

    Markov state models (MSMs) have been successful in computing metastable states, slow relaxation timescales and associated structural changes, and stationary or kinetic experimental observables of complex molecules from large amounts of molecular dynamics simulation data. However, MSMs approximate the true dynamics by assuming a Markov chain on a clusters discretization of the state space. This approximation is difficult to make for high-dimensional biomolecular systems, and the quality and reproducibility of MSMs has, therefore, been limited. Here, we discard the assumption that dynamics are Markovian on the discrete clusters. Instead, we only assume that the full phase-space molecular dynamics is Markovian, and a projection of this full dynamics is observed on the discrete states, leading to the concept of Projected Markov Models (PMMs). Robust estimation methods for PMMs are not yet available, but we derive a practically feasible approximation via Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). It is shown how various molecular observables of interest that are often computed from MSMs can be computed from HMMs/PMMs. The new framework is applicable to both, simulation and single-molecule experimental data. We demonstrate its versatility by applications to educative model systems, a 1 ms Anton MD simulation of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor protein, and an optical tweezer force probe trajectory of an RNA hairpin.

  2. The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, James H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

  3. Mathematical strategies for filtering complex systems: Regularly spaced sparse observations

    SciTech Connect

    Harlim, J. Majda, A.J.

    2008-05-01

    Real time filtering of noisy turbulent signals through sparse observations on a regularly spaced mesh is a notoriously difficult and important prototype filtering problem. Simpler off-line test criteria are proposed here as guidelines for filter performance for these stiff multi-scale filtering problems in the context of linear stochastic partial differential equations with turbulent solutions. Filtering turbulent solutions of the stochastically forced dissipative advection equation through sparse observations is developed as a stringent test bed for filter performance with sparse regular observations. The standard ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) has poor skill on the test bed and even suffers from filter divergence, surprisingly, at observable times with resonant mean forcing and a decaying energy spectrum in the partially observed signal. Systematic alternative filtering strategies are developed here including the Fourier Domain Kalman Filter (FDKF) and various reduced filters called Strongly Damped Approximate Filter (SDAF), Variance Strongly Damped Approximate Filter (VSDAF), and Reduced Fourier Domain Kalman Filter (RFDKF) which operate only on the primary Fourier modes associated with the sparse observation mesh while nevertheless, incorporating into the approximate filter various features of the interaction with the remaining modes. It is shown below that these much cheaper alternative filters have significant skill on the test bed of turbulent solutions which exceeds ETKF and in various regimes often exceeds FDKF, provided that the approximate filters are guided by the off-line test criteria. The skill of the various approximate filters depends on the energy spectrum of the turbulent signal and the observation time relative to the decorrelation time of the turbulence at a given spatial scale in a precise fashion elucidated here.

  4. Advanced Life Support Project: Crop Experiments at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, John C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Yorio, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Crop production systems provide bioregenerative technologies to complement human crew life support requirements on long duration space missions. Kennedy Space Center has lead NASA's research on crop production systems that produce high value fresh foods, provide atmospheric regeneration, and perform water processing. As the emphasis on early missions to Mars has developed, our research focused on modular, scalable systems for transit missions, which can be developed into larger autonomous, bioregenerative systems for subsequent surface missions. Components of these scalable systems will include development of efficient light generating or collecting technologies, low mass plant growth chambers, and capability to operate in the high energy background radiation and reduced atmospheric pressures of space. These systems will be integrated with air, water, and thermal subsystems in an operational system. Extensive crop testing has been done for both staple and salad crops, but limited data is available on specific cultivar selection and breadboard testing to meet nominal Mars mission profiles of a 500-600 day surface mission. The recent research emphasis at Kennedy Space Center has shifted from staple crops, such as wheat, soybean and rice, toward short cycle salad crops such as lettuce, onion, radish, tomato, pepper, and strawberry. This paper will review the results of crop experiments to support the Exploration Initiative and the ongoing development of supporting technologies, and give an overview of capabilities of the newly opened Space Life Science (SLS) Lab at Kennedy Space Center. The 9662 square m (104,000 square ft) SLS Lab was built by the State of Florida and supports all NASA research that had been performed in Hanger-L. In addition to NASA research, the SLS Lab houses the Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI), responsible for co-managing the facility, and the University of Florida (UF) has established the Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and

  5. On embeddings of almost complex manifolds in almost complex Euclidean spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Scala, Antonio J.; Kasuya, Naohiko; Zuddas, Daniele

    2016-03-01

    We prove that any compact almost complex manifold (M2m , J) of real dimension 2 m admits a pseudo-holomorphic embedding in (R 4 m + 2 , J ˜) for a suitable positive almost complex structure J ˜ . Moreover, we give a necessary and sufficient condition, expressed in terms of the Segre class sm(M , J) , for the existence of an embedding or an immersion in (R4m , J ˜) . We also discuss the pseudo-holomorphic embeddings of an almost complex 4-manifold in (R6 , J ˜) .

  6. War, space, and the evolution of Old World complex societies

    PubMed Central

    Turchin, Peter; Currie, Thomas E.; Turner, Edward A. L.; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    How did human societies evolve from small groups, integrated by face-to-face cooperation, to huge anonymous societies of today, typically organized as states? Why is there so much variation in the ability of different human populations to construct viable states? Existing theories are usually formulated as verbal models and, as a result, do not yield sharply defined, quantitative predictions that could be unambiguously tested with data. Here we develop a cultural evolutionary model that predicts where and when the largest-scale complex societies arose in human history. The central premise of the model, which we test, is that costly institutions that enabled large human groups to function without splitting up evolved as a result of intense competition between societies—primarily warfare. Warfare intensity, in turn, depended on the spread of historically attested military technologies (e.g., chariots and cavalry) and on geographic factors (e.g., rugged landscape). The model was simulated within a realistic landscape of the Afroeurasian landmass and its predictions were tested against a large dataset documenting the spatiotemporal distribution of historical large-scale societies in Afroeurasia between 1,500 BCE and 1,500 CE. The model-predicted pattern of spread of large-scale societies was very similar to the observed one. Overall, the model explained 65% of variance in the data. An alternative model, omitting the effect of diffusing military technologies, explained only 16% of variance. Our results support theories that emphasize the role of institutions in state-building and suggest a possible explanation why a long history of statehood is positively correlated with political stability, institutional quality, and income per capita. PMID:24062433

  7. War, space, and the evolution of Old World complex societies.

    PubMed

    Turchin, Peter; Currie, Thomas E; Turner, Edward A L; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2013-10-01

    How did human societies evolve from small groups, integrated by face-to-face cooperation, to huge anonymous societies of today, typically organized as states? Why is there so much variation in the ability of different human populations to construct viable states? Existing theories are usually formulated as verbal models and, as a result, do not yield sharply defined, quantitative predictions that could be unambiguously tested with data. Here we develop a cultural evolutionary model that predicts where and when the largest-scale complex societies arose in human history. The central premise of the model, which we test, is that costly institutions that enabled large human groups to function without splitting up evolved as a result of intense competition between societies-primarily warfare. Warfare intensity, in turn, depended on the spread of historically attested military technologies (e.g., chariots and cavalry) and on geographic factors (e.g., rugged landscape). The model was simulated within a realistic landscape of the Afroeurasian landmass and its predictions were tested against a large dataset documenting the spatiotemporal distribution of historical large-scale societies in Afroeurasia between 1,500 BCE and 1,500 CE. The model-predicted pattern of spread of large-scale societies was very similar to the observed one. Overall, the model explained 65% of variance in the data. An alternative model, omitting the effect of diffusing military technologies, explained only 16% of variance. Our results support theories that emphasize the role of institutions in state-building and suggest a possible explanation why a long history of statehood is positively correlated with political stability, institutional quality, and income per capita. PMID:24062433

  8. Unmanned space project management: Surveyor and lunar orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloman, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of the management of two major NASA projects, Surveyor and Lunar Orbiter is presented. The analysis reflects the comments and criticisms of many NASA officials who were responsible for various phases of the projects as well as comments by knowledgeable persons outside NASA. Findings are submitted with respect to; (1) environment, (2) role of individuals, (3) teamwork, (4) roles and missions, (5) organization, and (6) cost performance.

  9. Threshold exceedance risk assessment in complex space-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, José M.; Madrid, Ana E.; Romero, José L.

    2015-04-01

    Environmental and health impact risk assessment studies most often involve analysis and characterization of complex spatio-temporal dynamics. Recent developments in this context are addressed, among other objectives, to proper representation of structural heterogeneities, heavy-tailed processes, long-range dependence, intermittency, scaling behavior, etc. Extremal behaviour related to spatial threshold exceedances can be described in terms of geometrical characteristics and distribution patterns of excursion sets, which are the basis for construction of risk-related quantities, such as in the case of evolutionary study of 'hotspots' and long-term indicators of occurrence of extremal episodes. Derivation of flexible techniques, suitable for both the application under general conditions and the interpretation on singularities, is important for practice. Modern risk theory, a developing discipline motivated by the need to establish solid general mathematical-probabilistic foundations for rigorous definition and characterization of risk measures, has led to the introduction of a variety of classes and families, ranging from some conceptually inspired by specific fields of applications, to some intended to provide generality and flexibility to risk analysts under parametric specifications, etc. Quantile-based risk measures, such as Value-at-Risk (VaR), Average Value-at-Risk (AVaR), and generalization to spectral measures, are of particular interest for assessment under very general conditions. In this work, we study the application of quantile-based risk measures in the spatio-temporal context in relation to certain geometrical characteristics of spatial threshold exceedance sets. In particular, we establish a closed-form relationship between VaR, AVaR, and the expected value of threshold exceedance areas and excess volumes. Conditional simulation allows us, by means of empirical global and local spatial cumulative distributions, the derivation of various statistics of

  10. Simulating Coupling Complexity in Space Plasmas: First Results from a new code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, I.; Zank, G. P.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Raeder, J.; Ciardo, G.; Florinski, V. A.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Li, G.; Petrini, F.; Shematovich, V. I.; Winske, D.; Shaikh, D.; Webb, G. M.; Yee, H. M.

    2005-12-01

    The development of codes that embrace 'coupling complexity' via the self-consistent incorporation of multiple physical scales and multiple physical processes in models has been identified by the NRC Decadal Survey in Solar and Space Physics as a crucial necessary development in simulation/modeling technology for the coming decade. The National Science Foundation, through its Information Technology Research (ITR) Program, is supporting our efforts to develop a new class of computational code for plasmas and neutral gases that integrates multiple scales and multiple physical processes and descriptions. We are developing a highly modular, parallelized, scalable code that incorporates multiple scales by synthesizing 3 simulation technologies: 1) Computational fluid dynamics (hydrodynamics or magneto-hydrodynamics-MHD) for the large-scale plasma; 2) direct Monte Carlo simulation of atoms/neutral gas, and 3) transport code solvers to model highly energetic particle distributions. We are constructing the code so that a fourth simulation technology, hybrid simulations for microscale structures and particle distributions, can be incorporated in future work, but for the present, this aspect will be addressed at a test-particle level. This synthesis we will provide a computational tool that will advance our understanding of the physics of neutral and charged gases enormously. Besides making major advances in basic plasma physics and neutral gas problems, this project will address 3 Grand Challenge space physics problems that reflect our research interests: 1) To develop a temporal global heliospheric model which includes the interaction of solar and interstellar plasma with neutral populations (hydrogen, helium, etc., and dust), test-particle kinetic pickup ion acceleration at the termination shock, anomalous cosmic ray production, interaction with galactic cosmic rays, while incorporating the time variability of the solar wind and the solar cycle. 2) To develop a coronal

  11. Project 242: Fission fragments direct heating for space propulsion—Programme synthesis and applications to space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augelli, M.; Bignami, G. F.; Genta, G.

    2013-02-01

    The status and the main results achieved by Project 242 are presented. Project 242 is a programme (funded by ASI—1999/2002 from an idea of Carlo Rubbia) that studied a new concept of space propulsion motor by using direct conversion of the kinetic energy of fission fragments into increasing of enthalpy of a propellant gas. Project 242 studied the application of this propulsion system to a manned mission to Mars. Preliminary results were very satisfactory and it has been observed that a propulsion system with these characteristics could make the mission feasible. Results for other unmanned missions to the outer solar system are also presented.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Degradation Data Used for Ground-Based Durability Projection of Insulation on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Hodermarsky, Janet C.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-based environmental durability tests have indicated that exposing materials in accelerated tests to known spacecraft mission degradation sources predicted by an environmental model does not simulate the extent of damage that occurs in the space environment. The reasons for this may include the complex nature of the space environment, which is not simulated completely in any ground-based facility, the extreme differences in exposure rates in space and in ground tests, and inaccuracies in environmental models. One approach to overcoming the difficulties in simulating the space environment using ground-based testing is to calibrate the facility using data from actual space-exposed materials to determine exposure levels required to replicate degraded properties observed in space. Research was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a ground-to-space correlation method that determines the durability of Teflon-based insulation for the International Space Station (ISS) by using data obtained in a ground facility and degraded Teflon thermal insulation retrieved from the Hubble Space Telescope.

  13. A configuration space toolkit for automated spatial reasoning: Technical results and LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1997-02-01

    A robot`s configuration space (c-space) is the space of its kinematic degrees of freedom, e.g., the joint-space of an arm. Sets in c-space can be defined that characterize a variety of spatial relationships, such as contact between the robot and its environment. C-space techniques have been fundamental to research progress in areas such as motion planning and physically-based reasoning. However, practical progress has been slowed by the difficulty of implementing the c-space abstraction inside each application. For this reason, we proposed a Configuration Space Toolkit of high-performance algorithms and data structures meeting these needs. Our intent was to develop this robotics software to provide enabling technology to emerging applications that apply the c-space abstraction, such as advanced motion planning, teleoperation supervision, mechanism functional analysis, and design tools. This final report presents the research results and technical achievements of this LDRD project. Key results and achievements included (1) a hybrid Common LISP/C prototype that implements the basic C-Space abstraction, (2) a new, generic, algorithm for constructing hierarchical geometric representations, and (3) a C++ implementation of an algorithm for fast distance computation, interference detection, and c-space point-classification. Since the project conclusion, motion planning researchers in Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center have been using the CSTk libcstk.so C++ library. The code continues to be used, supported, and improved by projects in the ISRC.

  14. Youth Initiatives and Projects on Human Rights and Ethics in Space Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, W.; Delegates, Sgs

    2002-01-01

    The `Declaration of Human Rights in Outer Space' project was initiated at the Space Generation Forum (SGF), at UNISPACE-III in 1999. These projects are being further developed at the Space Generation Summit (SGS), an event at World Space Congress (WSC) that will unite international students and young professionals to develop a youth vision and strategy for the peaceful uses of space. SGS, endorsed by the United Nations, will take place from October 11- 13th, during which the 200 delegates will discuss ongoing youth space activities, particularly those stemming from the UNISPACE-III/SGF and taken forward by the Space Generation Advisory Council. Delegates will address a variety of topics with the goal of devising new recommendations according to the theme, 'Accelerating Our Pace in Space'. The material presented here and in other technical sessions throughout WSC includes the findings of these discussions. In this paper, we present the work of the SGS delegates relating to ethical issues arising in space activities, and we discuss plans to organize a space ethics conference. This international and inter-generational event would aim to develop a vision and series of recommendations for how the space sector should proceed with regard to ethical issues. We present also the results of the Space Generation Summit with regards to initiating a declaration of human rights in space.

  15. Space Solar Cell Research and Development Projects at Emcore Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharps, Paul; Aiken,Dan; Stan, Mark; Cornfeld, Art; Newman, Fred; Endicter, Scott; Girard, Gerald; Doman, John; Turner, Michele; Sandoval, Annette; Fatemi, Navid

    2007-01-01

    The GaInP2/InGaAs/Ge triple junction device lattice matched to germanium has achieved the highest power conversion efficiency and the most commercial success for space applications [1]. What are the practical performance limits of this technology? In this paper we will describe what we consider to be the practical performance limits of the lattice matched GaInP2/InGaAs/Ge triple junction cell. In addition, we discuss the options for next generation space cell performance.

  16. Project Mercury: Man-In-Space Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [Report of the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences United States Senate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The purpose of this staff study, made at the request of the chairman, is to serve members of the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences as a source of basic information on Project Mercury, the man-in-space program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The study is largely derived from unclassified information released by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and testimony concerning Project Mercury given during hearings before this committee. The program descriptions are based upon current program planning. Since this is a highly advanced research and development program, the project is obviously subject to changes that may result from future developments and accomplishments characteristic of such research activities. Certain information with respect to revised schedules, obtained on a classified basis by the committee during inspection trips, is necessarily omitted. The appendixes to the study include information that may prove helpful on various aspects of space flight and exploration. Included are unofficial comments and observations relating to Russia's manned space flight activities and also a complete chronology of all satellites, lunar probes, and space probes up to the present.

  17. SVD-GFD scheme to simulate complex moving body problems in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Yu, P.; Yeo, K. S.; Khoo, B. C.

    2010-03-01

    The present paper presents a hybrid meshfree-and-Cartesian grid method for simulating moving body incompressible viscous flow problems in 3D space. The method combines the merits of cost-efficient and accurate conventional finite difference approximations on Cartesian grids with the geometric freedom of generalized finite difference (GFD) approximations on meshfree grids. Error minimization in GFD is carried out by singular value decomposition (SVD). The Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) form of the Navier-Stokes equations on convecting nodes is integrated by a fractional-step projection method. The present hybrid grid method employs a relatively simple mode of nodal administration. Nevertheless, it has the geometrical flexibility of unstructured mesh-based finite-volume and finite element methods. Boundary conditions are precisely implemented on boundary nodes without interpolation. The present scheme is validated by a moving patch consistency test as well as against published results for 3D moving body problems. Finally, the method is applied on low-Reynolds number flapping wing applications, where large boundary motions are involved. The present study demonstrates the potential of the present hybrid meshfree-and-Cartesian grid scheme for solving complex moving body problems in 3D.

  18. Overview of the NASA Advanced In-Space Propulsion Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In FY11, NASA established the Enabling Technologies Development and Demonstration (ETDD) Program, a follow on to the earlier Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) within the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Objective: Develop, mature and test enabling technologies for human space exploration.

  19. [Earth and Space Sciences Project Services for NASA HPCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkey, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  20. Multi-Element Integrated Project Planning at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullon, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This presentation demonstrates how the ASRC Scheduling team developed working practices to support multiple NASA and ASRC Project Managers using the enterprise capabilities of Primavera P6 and P6 Web Access. This work has proceeded as part of Kennedy Ground Systems' preparation for its transition from the Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program. The presenters will cover Primavera's enterprise-class capabilities for schedule development, integrated critical path analysis, and reporting, as well as advanced Primavera P6 Web Access tools and techniques for communicating project status.

  1. Quantum Dynamics in Phase Space using Projected von Neumann Bases.

    PubMed

    Machnes, Shai; Assémat, Elie; Larsson, Henrik R; Tannor, David J

    2016-05-19

    We describe the mathematical underpinnings of the biorthogonal von Neumann method for quantum mechanical simulations (PvB). In particular, we present a detailed discussion of the important issue of nonorthogonal projection onto subspaces of biorthogonal bases, and how this differs from orthogonal projection. We present various representations of the Schrödinger equation in the reduced basis and discuss their relative merits. We conclude with illustrative examples and a discussion of the outlook and challenges ahead for the PvB representation. PMID:26977715

  2. Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx): a new EU FP7-SPACE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, M. L.; Génot, V.; Kallio, E.; Alexeev, I.; Modolo, R.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; André, N.; Gangloff, M.; Schmidt, W.; Belenkaya, E.; Topf, F.; Stoeckler, R.

    2011-10-01

    A new FP7-SPACE project Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx) has been started in June 2011. It will create an interactive framework for exploitation of space missions' data. Data analysis and visualization will be based on the advanced computational models of the planetary environments. The project infrastructure will enable joint interconnected operation of spacecraft data bases and the scientific modelling tools, serving to better understanding of related physical phenomena.

  3. Status Update on the James Webb Space Telescope Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.6 m), cold <50 K), infrared (IR)-optimized space observatory that will be launched in approx.2018. The observatory will have four instruments covering 0.6 to 28 micron, including a multi-object spectrograph, two integral field units, and grisms optimized for exoplanets. I will review JWST's key science themes, as well as exciting new ideas from the recent JWST Frontiers Workshop. I will summarize the technical progress and mission status. Recent highlights: All mirrors have been fabricated, polished, and gold-coated; the mirror is expected to be diffraction-limited down to a wavelength of 2 microns. The MIRI instrument just completed its cryogenic testing. STScI has released exposure time calculators and sensitivity charts to enable scientists to start thinking about how to use JWST for their science.

  4. Status Update on the James Webb Space Telescope Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large (6.6 m), cold (<50 K), infrared (IR)-optimized space observatory that will be launched in approx.2018. The observatory will have four instruments covering 0.6 to 28 micron, including a multi-object spectrograph, two integral fie ld units, and grisms optimized for exoplanets. I will review JWST's k ey science themes, as well as exciting new ideas from the recent JWST Frontiers Workshop. I will summarize the technical progress and miss ion status. Recent highlights: All mirrors have been fabricated, polished, and gold-coated; the mirror is expected to be diffraction-limite d down to a wavelength of 2 micron. The MIRI instrument just complete d its cryogenic testing. STScI has released exposure time calculators and sensitivity charts to enable scientists to start thinking about how to use JWST for their science.

  5. G-090, Another Undergraduate Space Research Project at USU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jason

    1998-10-01

    Utah State University has for years been a forerunner in the NASA Get Away Special (GAS) Program. USU flew the first GAS payload, G-001, aboard the Space Shuttle in 1982 and has since flown more GAS payloads than any other university in the world. The tenth payload, G-090, flew on STS-91, aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on June 2, 1998. G-090 flew three high school and one elementary school out reach experiments. The experiments studied: 1) bubble formation, temperature gradients, and bubble motion of boiling water in microgravity; 2) the synthesis of phosphate ions from ore; 3) the crystal growth of solutions commonly found in the human body; and 4) the effects of microgravity on microwave popcorn. All payload phases from science themes to engineering and from management to production were conducted entirely by undergraduate students at USU.

  6. Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) project SPAR 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The postflight reports of each of the Principal Investigators of three selected science payloads are presented in addition to the engineering report as documented by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Pertinent portions of ground-based research leading to the ultimate selection of the flight sample composition are described including design, fabrication and testing. Containerless processing technology, containerless processing bubble dynamics, and comparative alloy solidification are the experiments discussed.

  7. Biodigester Feasibility and Design for Space and Earth Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald; Shutts, Stacy (Principal Investigator); Bacon, John; Ewert, Michael; Paul, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biodigesters harness and utilize byproducts, and are a valuable technology for waste conversion and advanced exploration closed loops targets (6.1.a-E), including that of human waste. On Mars and at JSC, this could lead to growing food and to more sustainable uses of waste. It is critical to understand biogas generation rates, odor management of the effluent, and nutrient viability. Improved efficiency and reliance on this renewable energy source can become feasible for deep space missions.

  8. Advanced Solid State Lighting for AES Deep Space Hab Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbert, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    The advanced Solid State Lighting (SSL) assemblies augmented 2nd generation modules under development for the Advanced Exploration Systems Deep Space Habitat in using color therapy to synchronize crew circadian rhythms. Current RGB LED technology does not produce sufficient brightness to adequately address general lighting in addition to color therapy. The intent is to address both through a mix of white and RGB LEDs designing for fully addressable alertness/relaxation levels as well as more dramatic circadian shifts.

  9. [PHYSIOLAB project for CASSIOPEE: the space cardiovascular exploratory laboratory].

    PubMed

    Louisy, F

    1996-01-01

    The French Health Defense Service is concerned by the finalization and the implementation of the PHYSIOLAB laboratory. In July 1996, PHYSIOLAB will participate to the french--russian mission CASSIOPEE. It is a functional exploratory laboratory which will support a programm of scientific experiments whose aim is to better understand cardiovascular deconditioning under weightlessness and to implement medical monitoring of cosmonauts during next french-russian space missions. In this paper, functional and scientific aims, and structure of PHYSIOLAB are described. PMID:11539483

  10. Investigating the feasibility of Visualising Complex Space Weather Data in a CAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughlin, S.; Habash Krause, L.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of visualising complex space weather data in a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE). Space weather is increasingly causing disruptions on Earth, such as power outages and disrupting communication to satellites. We wanted to display this space weather data within the CAVE since the data from instruments, models and simulations are typically too complex to understand on their own, especially when they are of 7 dimensions. To accomplish this, I created a VTK to NetCDF converter. NetCDF is a science data format, which stores array oriented scientific data. The format is maintained by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and is used extensively by the atmospheric and space communities.

  11. STS-4 crew meets with Space Shuttle student involvement project participant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    STS-4 crew Commander Thomas K. Mattingly, II, and Pilot Henry W. Hartsfield meets with Space Shuttle student involvement project participant Amy M. Kussi of Hill Junior High School in Long Beach, California. They met during a press conference at the Johnson Space Center.

  12. Fall 2015 NASA Internship, and Space Radiation Health Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patience, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This fall, I was fortunate enough to have been able to participate in an internship at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. I was placed into the Human Health & Performance Directorate, where I was specifically tasked to work with Dr. Zarana Patel, researching the impacts of cosmic level radiation on human cells. Using different laboratory techniques, we were able to examine the cells to see if any damage had been done due to radiation exposure, and if so, how much damage was done. Cell culture samples were exposed at different doses, and fixed at different time points so that we could accumulate a large pool of quantifiable data. After examining quantifiable results relative to the impacts of space radiation on the human body at the cellular and chromosomal level, researchers can defer to different areas of the space program that have to do with astronaut safety, and research and development (extravehicular mobility unit construction, vehicle design and construction, etc.). This experience has been very eye-opening, and I was able to learn quite a bit. I learned some new laboratory techniques, and I did my best to try and learn new ways to balance such a hectic work and school schedule. I also learned some very intimate thing about working at NASA; I learned that far more people want to watch you succeed, rather than watch you fail, and I also learned that this is a place that is alive with innovators and explorers - people who have a sole purpose of exploring space for the betterment of humanity, and not for any other reason. It's truly inspiring. All of these experiences during my internship have impacted me in a really profound way, so much that my educational and career goals are completely different than when I started. I started out as a biotechnology major, and I discovered recently toward the end of the internship, that I don't want to work in a lab, nor was I as enthralled by biological life sciences as a believed myself to be. Taking that all into

  13. Dedication of the Early Space Education and Conference Center at KSC Visitor Complex.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the opening of the Early Space Education and Conference Center, KSC Visitor Complex, the facility is dedicated to Dr.Kurt H. Debus, who served as the first director of the John F. Kennedy Space Center, 1962-1974. Attending the dedication are (left to right) Delaware North President Rick Abramson, Ute Debus, Center Director Roy Bridges and Sigi Debus Northcutt. Ute and Sigi are the daughters of Dr. Debus.

  14. A multi-element cosmological model with a complex space-time topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardashev, N. S.; Lipatova, L. N.; Novikov, I. D.; Shatskiy, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    Wormhole models with a complex topology having one entrance and two exits into the same space-time of another universe are considered, as well as models with two entrances from the same space-time and one exit to another universe. These models are used to build a model of a multi-sheeted universe (a multi-element model of the "Multiverse") with a complex topology. Spherical symmetry is assumed in all the models. A Reissner-Norström black-hole model having no singularity beyond the horizon is constructed. The strength of the central singularity of the black hole is analyzed.

  15. Min-Max Spaces and Complexity Reduction in Min-Max Expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubert, Stephane; McEneaney, William M.

    2012-06-15

    Idempotent methods have been found to be extremely helpful in the numerical solution of certain classes of nonlinear control problems. In those methods, one uses the fact that the value function lies in the space of semiconvex functions (in the case of maximizing controllers), and approximates this value using a truncated max-plus basis expansion. In some classes, the value function is actually convex, and then one specifically approximates with suprema (i.e., max-plus sums) of affine functions. Note that the space of convex functions is a max-plus linear space, or moduloid. In extending those concepts to game problems, one finds a different function space, and different algebra, to be appropriate. Here we consider functions which may be represented using infima (i.e., min-max sums) of max-plus affine functions. It is natural to refer to the class of functions so represented as the min-max linear space (or moduloid) of max-plus hypo-convex functions. We examine this space, the associated notion of duality and min-max basis expansions. In using these methods for solution of control problems, and now games, a critical step is complexity-reduction. In particular, one needs to find reduced-complexity expansions which approximate the function as well as possible. We obtain a solution to this complexity-reduction problem in the case of min-max expansions.

  16. ELECTRICAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT A COMPLEX WIDE TEAMING INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    GRAY BJ

    2007-11-26

    This paper describes the results of a year-long project, sponsored by the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) and designed to improve overall electrical safety performance throughout Department of Energy (DOE)-owned sites and laboratories. As evidenced by focused metrics, the Project was successful primarily due to the joint commitment of contractor and DOE electrical safety experts, as well as significant support from DOE and contractor senior management. The effort was managed by an assigned project manager, using classical project-management principles that included execution of key deliverables and regular status reports to the Project sponsor. At the conclusion of the Project, the DOE not only realized measurable improvement in the safety of their workers, but also had access to valuable resources that will enable them to do the following: evaluate and improve electrical safety programs; analyze and trend electrical safety events; increase electrical safety awareness for both electrical and non-electrical workers; and participate in ongoing processes dedicated to continued improvement.

  17. Space Science Projects. LC Science Tracer Bullet No. TB-89-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Constance, Comp.

    This publication aims to assist elementary and secondary school students and teachers in planning, preparing and executing projects in the space sciences. Sources in other areas of science and on science fairs themselves are listed in "Science Fair Projects" (LC Science Tracer Bullet 88-4). This compilation is not intended to be a comprehensive…

  18. El Paso/Yslete schools Get-Away Special Space Shuttle student projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azar, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    Student projects for the Get Away Special (GAS) space shuttle program were summarized. Experimental topics included: seed germination, shrimp growth, liquid lasers, planaria regeneration, fluid dynamics (wicking), soil molds, antibiotics, crystallization, the symbiosis of yeast and fungi, and the performance of electronic chips. A brief experimental design is included for each project.

  19. Project LOCOST: Laser or Chemical Hybrid Orbital Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Alan; Kost, Alicia; Lampshire, Gregory; Larsen, Rob; Monahan, Bob; Wright, Geoff

    1990-01-01

    A potential mission in the late 1990s is the servicing of spacecraft assets located in GEO. The Geosynchronous Operations Support Center (GeoShack) will be supported by a space transfer vehicle based at the Space Station (SS). The vehicle will transport cargo between the SS and the GeoShack. A proposed unmanned, laser or chemical hybrid orbital space transfer vehicle (LOCOST) can be used to efficiently transfer cargo between the two orbits. A preliminary design shows that an unmanned, laser/chemical hybrid vehicle results in the fuel savings needed while still providing fast trip times. The LOCOST vehicle receives a 12 MW laser beam from one Earth orbiting, solar pumped, iodide Laser Power Station (LPS). Two Energy Relay Units (ERU) provide laser beam support during periods of line-of-sight blockage by the Earth. The baseline mission specifies a 13 day round trip transfer time. The ship's configuration consist of an optical train, one hydrogen laser engine, two chemical engines, a 18 m by 29 m box truss, a mission-flexible payload module, and propellant tanks. Overall vehicle dry mass is 8,000 kg. Outbound cargo mass is 20,000 kg, and inbound cargo mass is 6,000 kg. The baseline mission needs 93,000 kg of propellants to complete the scenario. Fully fueled, outbound mission mass is 121,000 kg. A regeneratively cooled, single plasma, laser engine design producing a maximum of 768 N of thrust is utilized along with two traditional chemical engines. The payload module is designed to hold 40,000 kg of cargo, though the baseline mission specifies less. A proposed design of a laser/chemical hybrid vehicle provides a trip time and propellant efficient means to transport cargo from the SS to a GeoShack. Its unique, hybrid propulsion system provides safety through redundancy, allows baseline missions to be efficiently executed, while still allowing for the possibility of larger cargo transfers.

  20. Telescience Testbed Pilot Project - Evaluation environment for Space Station operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiskerchen, Michael J.; Leiner, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of the Telescience Testbed Pilot Program (TTPP) are discussed. The purpose of the TTPP, which involves 15 universities in cooperation with various NASA centers, is to demonstrate the utility of a user-oriented rapid prototyping testbed approach to developing and refining science requirements and validation concepts and approaches for the information systems of the Space Station era and beyond. It is maintained that the TTPP provides an excellent environment, with low programmatic schedule and budget risk, for testing and evaluating new operations concepts and technologies.

  1. MAGDAS project and its application for space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, K.; Magdas Group

    We introduce a real-time MAGnetic Data Acquisition System of Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network, i.e. MAGDAS/CPMN for space weather study and application, and its preliminary results. By using this system, we will conduct real-time monitoring and modeling of (1) global 3-dimensional current system, (2) plasma mass density, and (3) penetrating process of polar electric fields into the equatorial ionosphere, in order to understand electromagnetic and plasma environment changes in the geospace during the period of ILWS/CAWSES/IHY.

  2. Insurance and indemnification implications of future space projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, John E.

    1987-01-01

    NASA options regarding insurance and indemnification policies as they relate to NASA customers and contractors are described. The foundation for the discussion is the way in which NASA is planning to return the Space Shuttle fleet to safe flight as well as current U.S. policy concerning future uses of the Shuttle fleet. Issues discussed include: the nature of the Shuttle manifest; the policy regarding property damage or destruction; insurance against liability to third parties; the reduction of the scope of the risk to be insured; NASA as the insurer; a sharing arrangement between the user and NASA; and contractors and subcontractors involved in Shuttle operations.

  3. Performance projections for laser beam power to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Darryl P.

    1992-01-01

    We examine the requirements placed on an adaptive-optics system used to compensate atmospheric effects in propagating high-power lasers from ground to space. The particular application involves energy transfer from a ground station to a satellite. Our analysis explores performance associated with various beacon configurations, including satellite-based beacons, beacons in the lead-ahead direction, and synthetic beacons. Other system parameters are adjusted as well, including number of actuators in the deformable mirror and bandwidth of the servo system. We show that with an optimized system design it is possible to achieve collection efficiencies of 10-50 percent over zenith angles as great as 70 deg.

  4. Space processing applications rocket project SPAR 4, engineering report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, F. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    The materials processing experiments in space, conducted on the SPAR 4 Black Brant VC rocket, are described and discussed. The SPAR 4 payload configuration, the rocket performance, and the flight sequence are reported. The results, analyses, and anomalies of the four experiments are discussed. The experiments conducted were the uniform dispersions of crystallization processing, the contained polycrstalline solidification in low gravity, the containerless processing of ferromagnetic materials, and the containerless processing technology. The instrumentation operations, payload power relay anomaly, relay postflight operational test, and relay postflight shock test are reported.

  5. The Spectrum of Citizen Science Projects in Astronomy and Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B. J. H.; Day, B.; Gay, P. L.; Jacoby, S. H.; Raddick, M. J.; Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    Citizen science projects are gaining in popularity and are seen by some as a paradigm shift that will benefit participants, extend scientific research, and improve public understanding of how science is done. All projects engage nonspecialists in observations, measurements, or classifications that further some aspect of scientific activity. In astronomy and space science, there is a range of involvement from passive to active, and differences in how necessary the citizen scientists are to the scientific goals of the project. Some projects are dealing with scientific questions that could not be investigated effectively and efficiently without the aid of large numbers of human volunteers. We will conduct a panel discussion of the lessons learned from several current citizen science projects in astronomy and space science. We will also engage session participants in round table discussions of future citizen science projects, especially in light of the large data sets becoming available online and access to educational telescopes.

  6. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections

    PubMed Central

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once ‘observed’ as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be ‘purified’ into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics. PMID:25300692

  7. 340 waste handling complex: Deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stordeur, R.T.

    1998-06-25

    This document provides an overview of the strategy for deactivating the 340 Waste Handling Complex within Hanford`s 300 Area. The plan covers the period from the pending September 30, 1998 cessation of voluntary radioactive liquid waste (RLW) transfers to the 340 Complex, until such time that those portions of the 340 Complex that remain active beyond September 30, 1998, specifically, the Retention Process Sewer (RPS), can also be shut down and deactivated. Specific activities are detailed and divided into two phases. Phase 1 ends in 2001 after the core RLW systems have been deactivated. Phase 2 covers the subsequent interim surveillance of deactivated and stand-by components during the period of continued RPS operation, through the final transfer of the entire 340 Complex to the Environmental Restoration Contractor. One of several possible scenarios was postulated and developed as a budget and schedule planning case.

  8. Evolution and structural organization of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex and the mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging (MIB) complex.

    PubMed

    Huynen, Martijn A; Mühlmeister, Mareike; Gotthardt, Katherina; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Brandt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the distribution of mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex proteins and mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging complex (MIB) proteins over (sub)complexes and over species. The MICOS proteins are associated with the formation and maintenance of mitochondrial cristae. Indeed, the presence of MICOS genes in genomes correlates well with the presence of cristae: all cristae containing species have at least one MICOS gene and cristae-less species have none. Mic10 is the most widespread MICOS gene, while Mic60 appears be the oldest one, as it originates in the ancestors of mitochondria, the proteobacteria. In proteobacteria the gene occurs in clusters with genes involved in heme synthesis while the protein has been observed in intracellular membranes of the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In contrast, Mic23 and Mic27 appear to be the youngest MICOS proteins, as they only occur in opisthokonts. The remaining MICOS proteins, Mic10, Mic19, Mic25 and Mic12, the latter we show to be orthologous to human C19orf70/QIL1, trace back to the root of the eukaryotes. Of the remaining MIB proteins, also DNAJC11 shows a high correlation with the presence of cristae. In mitochondrial protein complexome profiles, the MIB complex occurs as a defined complex and as separate subcomplexes, potentially reflecting various assembly stages. We find three main forms of the complex: A) The MICOS complex, containing all the MICOS proteins, B) a membrane bridging subcomplex, containing in addition SAMM50, MTX2 and the previously uncharacterized MTX3, and C) the complete MIB complex containing in addition DNAJC11 and MTX1. PMID:26477565

  9. Applications of the complexity space to the General Probabilistic Divide and Conquer Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Raffi, L. M.; Romaguera, S.; Schellekens, M. P.

    2008-12-01

    Schellekens [M. Schellekens, The Smyth completion: A common foundation for denotational semantics and complexity analysis, in: Proc. MFPS 11, in: Electron. Notes Theor. Comput. Sci., vol. 1, 1995, pp. 535-556], and Romaguera and Schellekens [S. Romaguera, M. Schellekens, Quasi-metric properties of complexity spaces, Topology Appl. 98 (1999) 311-322] introduced a topological foundation to obtain complexity results through the application of Semantic techniques to Divide and Conquer Algorithms. This involved the fact that the complexity (quasi-metric) space is Smyth complete and the use of a version of the Banach fixed point theorem and improver functionals. To further bridge the gap between Semantics and Complexity, we show here that these techniques of analysis, based on the theory of complexity spaces, extend to General Probabilistic Divide and Conquer schema discussed by Flajolet [PE Flajolet, Analytic analysis of algorithms, in: W. Kuich (Ed.), 19th Internat. Colloq. ICALP'92, Vienna, July 1992; Automata, Languages and Programming, in: Lecture Notes in Comput. Sci., vol. 623, 1992, pp. 186-210]. In particular, we obtain a general method which is useful to show that for several recurrence equations based on the recursive structure of General Probabilistic Divide and Conquer Algorithms, the associated functionals have a unique fixed point which is the solution for the corresponding recurrence equation.

  10. PCB-Caulk Replacement Project Johnson Space Center Houston, TX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, William M.; Stanch, Penney M.; Molenda, William

    2011-01-01

    Wet method reduced exposure by minimizing overall respirable particulate release. Dry method didn't introduce delays for primer/caulk application. Removed caulks came in many forms, from dry powdery to tarry sticky. Varying textures were not sampled or packaged differently. During the course of the project, EPA modified recommended practices to include full containment for exterior caulk removal. Changes are ongoing. Initial recommendations were directed to school buildings. EPA is researching risks due to caulk. Exposure guidance lacking except for 2 of 209 PCB congeners. Work was safely completed on schedule and under budget.

  11. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113: Project cost estimate. Preliminary design report. Volume IV

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This document contains Volume IV of the Preliminary Design Report for the Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113 which is the Project Cost Estimate and construction schedule. The estimate was developed based upon Title 1 material take-offs, budgetary equipment quotes and Raytheon historical in-house data. The W-113 project cost estimate and project construction schedule were integrated together to provide a resource loaded project network.

  12. Art & Space: the webbing projects of Eva Petrič

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrič, E.; Schlacht, I. L.; Foing, B.

    2015-10-01

    Art is considered a form of communication often related to the perception of personal emotion of the artist. Space is the most extreme environment that a human could approach, this environment affects the human body and the individual's personal perception with metamorphosis created by factors such as, isolation, radiation and difference of gravity. This alteration of the perception could be viewed as a potentiality from artists to acquire and communicate new emotions. To investigate the capacity of an artist to come faster and closer to emotions and to communicate their feeling, a mission simulation has been performed in the ExoLab module [1] from ILEWG [A] on the 29th of April 2015.

  13. University Partnering for Operational Support (UPOS) Space Environmental Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, S. S.; Meng, C. I.; McMorrow, D. J.

    2002-05-01

    UPOS provides a mechanism for DOD warfighters to partner directly with university scientists, exploit near term science and technology advances, and solve operational readiness problems. By working directly with the warfighter, university researchers are able to understand operational requirements and focus research efforts to solve real world problems. Allowing the developers of the new technology solutions to work directly with users shortens the cycle time for bringing new ideas to the field and provides an effective mechanism to fine tune the products. This presentation will summarize some of the many successful products UPOS has recently produced, such as an operational auroral boundary and particle precipitation nowcasting product, and discuss some of the many products that are currently being worked such as the HF propagation modeling product and the space weather effects on GPS guided munitions product.

  14. Enhancing the Design Process for Complex Space Systems through Early Integration of Risk and Variable-Fidelity Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri; Osburg, Jan

    2005-01-01

    An important enabler of the new national Vision for Space Exploration is the ability to rapidly and efficiently develop optimized concepts for the manifold future space missions that this effort calls for. The design of such complex systems requires a tight integration of all the engineering disciplines involved, in an environment that fosters interaction and collaboration. The research performed under this grant explored areas where the space systems design process can be enhanced: by integrating risk models into the early stages of the design process, and by including rapid-turnaround variable-fidelity tools for key disciplines. Enabling early assessment of mission risk will allow designers to perform trades between risk and design performance during the initial design space exploration. Entry into planetary atmospheres will require an increased emphasis of the critical disciplines of aero- and thermodynamics. This necessitates the pulling forward of EDL disciplinary expertise into the early stage of the design process. Radiation can have a large potential impact on overall mission designs, in particular for the planned nuclear-powered robotic missions under Project Prometheus and for long-duration manned missions to the Moon, Mars and beyond under Project Constellation. This requires that radiation and associated risk and hazards be assessed and mitigated at the earliest stages of the design process. Hence, RPS is another discipline needed to enhance the engineering competencies of conceptual design teams. Researchers collaborated closely with NASA experts in those disciplines, and in overall space systems design, at Langley Research Center and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This report documents the results of this initial effort.

  15. Project SOLWIND: Space radiation exposure. [evaluation of particle fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A special orbital radiation study was conducted for the SOLWIND project to evaluate mission-encountered energetic particle fluxes. Magnetic field calculations were performed with a current field model, extrapolated to the tentative spacecraft launch epoch with linear time terms. Orbital flux integrations for circular flight paths were performed with the latest proton and electron environment models, using new improved computational methods. Temporal variations in the ambient electron environment are considered and partially accounted for. Estimates of average energetic solar proton fluences are given for a one year mission duration at selected integral energies ranging from E greater than 10 to E greater than 100 MeV; the predicted annual fluence is found to relate to the period of maximum solar activity during the next solar cycle. The results are presented in graphical and tabular form; they are analyzed, explained, and discussed.

  16. National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) JSC Summer Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, Forrest Ryan

    2014-01-01

    This project optimized the calorie content in a breakfast meal replacement bar for the Advanced Food Technology group. Use of multivariable optimization yielded the highest weight savings possible while simultaneously matching NASA Human Standards nutritional guidelines. The scope of this research included the study of shelf-life indicators such as water activity, moisture content, and texture analysis. Key metrics indicate higher protein content, higher caloric density, and greater mass savings as a result of the reformulation process. The optimization performed for this study demonstrated wide application to other food bars in the Advanced Food Technology portfolio. Recommendations for future work include shelf life studies on bar hardening and overall acceptability data over increased time frames and temperature fluctuation scenarios.

  17. AMPS sciences objectives and philosophy. [Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas-in-Space project on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle will open a new era in the exploration of earth's near-space environment, where the weight and power capabilities of Spacelab and the ability to use man in real time add important new features. The Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas-in-Space project (AMPS) is conceived of as a facility where flexible core instruments can be flown repeatedly to perform different observations and experiments. The twin thrusts of remote sensing of the atmosphere below 120 km and active experiments on the space plasma are the major themes. They have broader implications in increasing our understanding of plasma physics and of energy conversion processes elsewhere in the universe.

  18. Molecular basis of the dynamic structure of the TIM23 complex in the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Jaremko, Łukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-10-01

    The presequence translocase TIM23 is a highly dynamic complex in which its subunits can adopt multiple conformations and undergo association-dissociation to facilitate import of proteins into mitochondria. Despite the importance of protein-protein interactions in TIM23, little is known about the molecular details of these processes. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we characterized the dynamic interaction network of the intermembrane space domains of Tim23, Tim21, Tim50, and Tom22 at single-residue level. We show that Tim23(IMS) contains multiple sites to efficiently interact with the intermembrane space domain of Tim21 and to bind to Tim21, Tim50, and Tom22. In addition, we reveal the atomic details of the dynamic Tim23(IMS)-Tim21(IMS) complex. The combined data support a central role of the intermembrane space domain of Tim23 in the formation and regulation of the presequence translocase. PMID:25263020

  19. New Directions of Research in Complex Plasmas on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Ivlev, A. V.; Hagl, T.; Rothermel, H.; Khrapak, S. A.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Schwabe, M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Raeth, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Petrov, O. F.; Tokarev, V. I.; Malenchenko, Y. I.; Turin, M. V.; Vinogradov, P. V.; Yurchikhin, F. N.

    2008-09-07

    PK-3 Plus is the second generation laboratory for investigations of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station. Compared to its pre-cursor PKE-Nefedov, operational 2001-2005, it has an advanced hardware and software. Improved diagnostics and especially a much better homogeneity of the complex plasma allow more detailed investigations, helping to understand the fundamentals of complex plasmas. Typical investigations are performed to observe the structure of homogeneous and isotropic complex plasmas and instabilities occurring at high particle densities. In addition, the new setup allows the tuning of the interaction potential between the microparticles by using external ac electric fields. Thus, we are able to initiate electrorheological phenomena in complex plasma fluids in the PK-3 Plus laboratory, and observe the phase transition from a normal fluid to a string fluid state at the individual particle level for the first time. Such new possibilities open up new directions of research under microgravity conditions.

  20. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote earth field sensing magnetometer and servo control building; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils are 42-foot in diameter and a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils accommodates spacecraft access to the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  1. Starfleet Deferred: Project Orion in the 1962 Air Force Space Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziarnick, B.

    Project Orion, the Cold War American program (1957-1965) studying nuclear pulse propulsion for space applications, has long interested space enthusiasts for what it was and what it might have been, but it has long been believed that neither the United States government nor the US Air Force took the program very seriously. However, recently declassified US Air Force documents shed more light on the classified history of Project Orion. Far from being ignored by Air Force leadership, through the efforts of the Strategic Air Command, Air Force leaders like General Curtis LeMay were convinced that Project Orion should be funded as a major weapons system. The high water mark of Project Orion was the 1962 Air Force Space Program proposal by the Air Force Chief of Staff to devote almost twenty percent of the Air Force space budget from 1962-1967 to Orion development before the program was cancelled by the civilian Secretary of the Air Force under pressure from the Department of Defense. This paper details the history of Project Orion in the 1962 Air Force Space Program proposal, and concludes with a few lessons learned for use by modern interstellar advocates.

  2. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground-testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  3. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalosky, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  4. Ion Propulsion Development Projects in US: Space Electric Rocket Test I to Deep Space 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The historical background and characteristics of the experimental flights of ion propulsion systems and the major ground-based technology demonstrations are reviewed. The results of the first successful ion engine flight in 1964, Space Electric Rocket Test (SERT) I, which demonstrated ion beam neutralization, are discussed along with the extended operation of SERT II starting in 1970. These results together with the technologies employed on the early cesium engine flights, the applications technology satellite series, and the ground-test demonstrations, have provided the evolutionary path for the development of xenon ion thruster component technologies, control systems, and power circuit implementations. In the 1997-1999 period, the communication satellite flights using ion engine systems and the Deep Space 1 flight confirmed that these auxiliary and primary propulsion systems have advanced to a high level of flight readiness.

  5. Space and surface power for the space exploration initiative: Results from project outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipbaugh, C.; Solomon, K.; Gonzales, D.; Juncosa, M.; Bauer, T.; Salter, R.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis and evaluations of the Space and Surface Power panel, one of eight panels created by RAND to screen and analyze submissions to the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) Outreach Program, is documented. In addition to managing and evaluating the responses, or submissions, to this public outreach program, RAND conducted its own analysis and evaluation relevent to SEI mission concepts, systems, and technologies. The Power panel screened and analyzed submissions for which a substantial portion of the concepts involved power generation sources, transmission, distribution, thermal management, and handling of power (including conditioning, conversion, packaging, and enhancements in system components). A background discussion of the areas the Power panel covered and the issues the reviewers considered pertinent to the analysis of power submissions are presented. An overview of each of the highest-ranked submissions and then a discussion of these submissions is presented. The results of the analysis is presented.

  6. An Extensible Space-Based Coordination Approach for Modeling Complex Patterns in Large Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Eva; Mordinyi, Richard; Schreiber, Christian

    Coordination is frequently associated with shared data spaces employing Linda coordination. But in practice, communication between parallel and distributed processes is carried out with message exchange patterns. What, actually, do shared data spaces contribute beyond these? In this paper we present a formal representation for a definition of shared spaces by introducing an "extensible tuple model", based on existing research on Linda coordination, some Linda extensions, and virtual shared memory. The main enhancements of the extensible tuple model comprise: means for structuring of spaces, Internet- compatible addressing of resources, more powerful coordination capabilities, a clear separation of user data and coordination information, support of symmetric peer application architectures, and extensibility through programmable aspects. The advantages of the extensible tuple model (XTM) are that it allows for a specification of complex coordination patterns.

  7. Ground Deformation Measurement with SAR Interferometry - Exupéry Project WP2 Space Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Xiaoying; Eineder, Michael; Minet, Christian

    2010-05-01

    As one of major natural hazards volcanic unrest and volcanic eruption are gaining more attention nowadays. The Exupéry project aimed at setting-up an Early Response System (VFRS) for volcanic activity was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Within Work Package 2 'Space Based Observations' SAR interferometry is used for monitoring the ground deformation. In comparison with conventional monitoring techniques like GPS the surface changes can be directly detected by using 2 SAR images from different acquisition times and an external DEM. Persistent scatterer SAR interferometry (PSI) method is applied by using a stack of interferograms with common master image. Instead of whole SAR scene only the coherent scatterers during whole acquisition duration are selected and its phase measurements are used to estimate modelled parameters such as deformation velocity, DEM error and atmospheric distortions. In mountainous area backscatterers are decorrelated during the time because of vegetation. To ensure the coherence corner reflector (CR) is used to get stable backscattering. To test the whole system a campaign was carried out during April to August 2009. Two CRs were installed for TerraSAR-X satellite on the test site Lagoa do Fogo volcano. During the campaign 11 strip-map scenes were gathered consequently. Post-processed interferograms as well as the coherence maps were delivered to database center in Hannover and would be published in project website. Time series analysis with coherent scatterers from the stacking was applied in order to detect complex deformation from mountainous area. The CRs were successfully detected in SAR image and will be used as reference points in PSI processing. At the end the interferograms computed from different wavelengths will be compared in this area.

  8. 14 CFR 1259.201 - Types of Space Grant program and project awards-regular and special.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... awards-regular and special. 1259.201 Section 1259.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND... Awards § 1259.201 Types of Space Grant program and project awards—regular and special. (a) A regular... cost if funded by another Federal entity. (b) A special Space Grant program or project award may...

  9. Kaczmarz Iterative Projection and Nonuniform Sampling with Complexity Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Kaczmarz's alternating projection method has been widely used for solving mostly over-determined linear system of equations A x = b in various fields of engineering, medical imaging, and computational science. Because of its simple iterative nature with light computation, this method was successfully applied in computerized tomography. Since tomography generates a matrix A with highly coherent rows, randomized Kaczmarz algorithm is expected to provide faster convergence as it picks a row for each iteration at random, based on a certain probability distribution. Since Kaczmarz's method is a subspace projection method, the convergence rate for simple Kaczmarz algorithm was developed in terms of subspace angles. This paper provides analyses of simple and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms and explains the link between them. New versions of randomization are proposed that may speed up convergence in the presence of nonuniform sampling, which is common in tomography applications. It is anticipated that proper understanding of sampling and coherence with respect to convergence and noise can improve future systems to reduce the cumulative radiation exposures to the patient. Quantitative simulations of convergence rates and relative algorithm benchmarks have been produced to illustrate the effects of measurement coherency and algorithm performance, respectively, under various conditions in a real-time kernel. PMID:27066496

  10. AN INTRODUCTION TO THE CHANDRA CARINA COMPLEX PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Povich, Matthew S.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Montmerle, Thierry; Oey, M. S.; Smith, Nathan; Remage Evans, Nancy; Wang Junfeng; Wolk, Scott J.; Naze, Yael; Parkin, E. R.; Preibisch, Thomas; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Cohen, David H.

    2011-05-01

    The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant H II regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60 ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this special issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.

  11. Decompositions of the polyhedral product functor with applications to moment-angle complexes and related spaces.

    PubMed

    Bahri, A; Bendersky, M; Cohen, F R; Gitler, S

    2009-07-28

    This article gives a natural decomposition of the suspension of a generalized moment-angle complex or partial product space which arises as the polyhedral product functor described below. The introduction and application of the smash product moment-angle complex provides a precise identification of the stable homotopy type of the values of the polyhedral product functor. One direct consequence is an analysis of the associated cohomology. For the special case of the complements of certain subspace arrangements, the geometrical decomposition implies the homological decomposition in earlier work of others as described below. Because the splitting is geometric, an analogous homological decomposition for a generalized moment-angle complex applies for any homology theory. Implied, therefore, is a decomposition for the Stanley-Reisner ring of a finite simplicial complex, and natural generalizations. PMID:19620727

  12. Aerogel Use as a Skin Protective Liner In Space Suits and Prosthetic Limbs Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke Bennett

    2014-01-01

    Existing materials for prosthetic liners tend to be thick and airtight, causing perspiration to accumulate inside the liner and potentially causing infection and injury. The purpose of this project was to examine the suitability of aerogel for prosthetic liner applications for use in space suits and orthopedics. Three tests were performed on several types of aerogel to assess the properties of each material, and our initial findings demonstrated that these materrials would be excellent candidates for liner applications for prosthetics and space suits. The project is currently on hold until additional funding is obtained for application testing at the VH Hospitals in Tampa

  13. Future Development Of The Flerov Laboratory Accelerator Complex (Project DRIBs-III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbekian, G. G.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Popeko, A. G.

    2010-04-01

    Future development of the FLNR accelerator complex (project DRIBs-III) includes modernization of existing cyclotrons, construction of a new experimental hall, creation of a new high current cyclotron and of next generation experimental set-ups. Realization of the project is planned for 2010-2016.

  14. Community Learning Campus: It Takes a Simple Message to Build a Complex Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    Education Canada asked Tom Thompson, president of Olds College and a prime mover behind the Community Learning Campus (CLC): What were the lessons learned from this unusually ambitious education project? Thompson mentions six lessons he learned from this complex project which include: (1) Dream big, build small, act now; (2) Keep a low profile at…

  15. Express Payload Project - A new method for rapid access to Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhran, Mark L.; Timm, Marc G.

    1993-01-01

    The deployment and permanent operation of Space Station Freedom will enable researchers to enter a new era in the 21st century, in which continuous on-orbit experimentation and observation become routine. In support of this objective, the Space Station Freedom Program Office has initiated the Express Payload Project. The fundamental project goal is to reduce the marginal cost associated with small payload development, integration, and operation. This is to be accomplished by developing small payload accommodations hardware and a new streamlined small payload integration process. Standardization of small payload interfaces, certification of small payload containers, and increased payload developer responsibility for mission success are key aspects of the Express Payload Project. As the project progresses, the principles will be applied to both pressurized payloads flown inside the station laboratories and unpressurized payloads attached to the station external structures. The increased access to space afforded by Space Station Freedom and the Express Payload Project has the potential to significantly expand the scope, magnitude, and success of future research in the microgravity environment.

  16. A Review of NASA's Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Patrick, Marshall C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Exploration (RHESE) project develops the advanced technologies required to produce radiation hardened electronics, processors, and devices in support of the requirements of NASA's Constellation program. Over the past year, multiple advancements have been made within each of the RHESE technology development tasks that will facilitate the success of the Constellation program elements. This paper provides a brief review of these advancements, discusses their application to Constellation projects, and addresses the plans for the coming year.

  17. AGN Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. I. Hubble Space Telescope Spectroscopy of NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Bradley M.; Agn Storm Team

    2015-01-01

    Beginning in 2014 February, we obtained 170 HST COS ultraviolet spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 at an approximately daily cadence as part of a large reverberation-mapping program whose goals are (1) to determine the geometry and kinematics of the broad emission-line region and (2) to measure the central black hole mass. This is the largest UV reverberation program that has ever been undertaken, and it has been supported by optical ground-based imaging and spectroscopy and by space-based observations with Swift, Chandra, and Spitzer. The UV continuum and broad emission lines varied strongly during the course of this campaign, and individual 'events' were well-resolved in time, with the variations of the strong emission lines (Lyman alpha and C IV 1549) lagging behind those in the UV continuum with delays of 5 - 6 days. We report here on the initial results of this program.

  18. Space Shuttle photographic/television analysis project - An overview of image analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, Christine L.; Rovinelli, Elizabeth R.; Pitts, David E.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle photographic and television analysis project (SSPTAP) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is described. The films and videos of every Space Shuttle launch and landing are scrutinized for information on the vehicle's condition and performance which can only be obtained by photographic means when necessary. On-orbit video is used to assess problems. The photographic information is used with various other data sources to develop feasible scenarios for particular events. The data and methods used to analyze the state of the Shuttle launch vehicle are analyzed, and examples are given of some of the studies that have been conducted.

  19. Space Weather Studies Using Ground-based Experimental Complex in Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryakunova, O.; Yakovets, A.; Monstein, C.; Nikolayevskiy, N.; Zhumabayev, B.; Gordienko, G.; Andreyev, A.; Malimbayev, A.; Levin, Yu.; Salikhov, N.; Sokolova, O.; Tsepakina, I.

    2015-12-01

    Kazakhstan ground-based experimental complex for space weather study is situated near Almaty. Results of space environment monitoring are accessible via Internet on the web-site of the Institute of Ionosphere (http://www.ionos.kz/?q=en/node/21) in real time. There is a complex database with hourly data of cosmic ray intensity, geomagnetic field intensity, and solar radio flux at 10.7 cm and 27.8 cm wavelengths. Several studies using those data are reported. They are an estimation of speed of a coronal mass ejection, a study of large scale traveling distrubances, an analysis of geomagnetically induced currents using the geomagnetic field data, and a solar energetic proton event on 27 January 2012.

  20. The Human Space Life Sciences Critical Path Roadmap Project: A Strategy for Human Space Flight through Exploration-Class Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    The product of the critical path roadmap project is an integrated strategy for mitigating the risks associated with human exploration class missions. It is an evolving process that will assure the ability to communicate the integrated critical path roadmap. Unlike previous reports, this one will not sit on a shelf - it has the full support of the JSC Space and Life Sciences Directorate (SA) and is already being used as a decision making tool (e.g., budget and investigation planning for Shuttle and Space Station mission). Utility of this product depends on many efforts, namely: providing the required information (completed risk data sheets, critical question information, technology data). It is essential to communicate the results of the critical path roadmap to the scientific community - this meeting is a good opportunity to do so. The web site envisioned for the critical path roadmap will provide the capability to communicate to a broader community and to track and update the system routinely.

  1. A Hardware Model Validation Tool for Use in Complex Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Misty Dawn; Gundy-Burlet, Karen L.; Limes, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the many technological hurdles that must be overcome in future missions is the challenge of validating as-built systems against the models used for design. We propose a technique composed of intelligent parameter exploration in concert with automated failure analysis as a scalable method for the validation of complex space systems. The technique is impervious to discontinuities and linear dependencies in the data, and can handle dimensionalities consisting of hundreds of variables over tens of thousands of experiments.

  2. Launch Complex 39A, SWMU 008, Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Report, Kennedy Space Center, FL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    This Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Report (OMMR) presents the findings, observations, and results from Year 1 operation of the air sparging (AS) groundwater interim measure (IM) for High-Concentration Plumes (HCPs) and Low-Concentration Plumes (LCPs) within the perimeter fence line at Launch Complex 39A (LC39A) located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The objective of the LC39A groundwater IM is to actively decrease concentrations of trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC) in groundwater in the HCP and LCP within the pad perimeter fence line via AS to levels less than Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) Groundwater Cleanup Target Levels (GCTLs). The objective was developed because LC39A is currently being leased to Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX), and the original IM for monitored natural attenuation (MNA) over an extended period of time was not suitable for future planned site use.

  3. Using Brain Imaging to Track Problem Solving in a Complex State Space

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John R.; Fincham, Jon M.; Schneider, Darryl W.; Yang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how behavioral and imaging data can be combined with a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to track participants’ trajectories through a complex state space. Participants completed a problem-solving variant of a memory game that involved 625 distinct states, 24 operators, and an astronomical number of paths through the state space. Three sources of information were used for classification purposes. First, an Imperfect Memory Model was used to estimate transition probabilities for the HMM. Second, behavioral data provided information about the timing of different events. Third, multivoxel pattern analysis of the imaging data was used to identify features of the operators. By combining the three sources of information, an HMM algorithm was able to efficiently identify the most probable path that participants took through the state space, achieving over 80% accuracy. These results support the approach as a general methodology for tracking mental states that occur during individual problem-solving episodes. PMID:22209783

  4. Complex Neurological and Oto-Neurological Remote Care: From Space Station to Clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchbanks, Robert J.; Good, Edward F.

    2013-02-01

    The main aim of this paper is to highlight the synergy between the remote care requirements for NASA and community/rural based medicine. It demonstrates the appropriateness of applying similar health-care models for space-based medicine, as for ‘2020 vision’ community-based medicine, and the common use of screening devices with telemedicine capabilities. There is a requirement to diagnose and manage complex cases remotely and the need to empower on-site medically trained personnel to undertake the physiological measurements and decision-making. For space exploration at greater distances, the telemedicine systems will require additional sophistication to support autonomous crew medical diagnosis and interventions.1 Non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement is a priority both for terrestrial and space medicine. Arguably it is the most important neurological physiological measurement yet to be mastered and to be routinely used.

  5. Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry Area (SWMU# 107) Annual Long-Term Monitoring Report (Year 1) Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jill W.; Towns, Crystal

    2015-01-01

    This document has been prepared by Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. (Geosyntec) to present and discuss the findings of the 2014 and 2015 Long-Term Monitoring (LTM) activities that were completed at the Launch Complex 39 (LC39) Observation Gantry Area (OGA) located at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida (Site). The remainder of this report includes: (i) a description of the Site location; (ii) summary of Site background and previous investigations; (iii) description of field activities completed as part of the annual LTM program at the Site; (iv) groundwater flow evaluation; (v) presentation and discussion of field and analytical results; and (vi) conclusions and recommendations. Applicable KSC Remediation Team (KSCRT) Meeting minutes are included in Attachment A. This Annual LTM Letter Report was prepared by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for NASA under contract number NNK12CA13B, Delivery Order NNK13CA39T project number PCN ENV2188.

  6. System Safety in Early Manned Space Program: A Case Study of NASA and Project Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Frederick D.; Pitts, Donald

    2005-01-01

    This case study provides a review of National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA's) involvement in system safety during research and evolution from air breathing to exo-atmospheric capable flight systems culminating in the successful Project Mercury. Although NASA has been philosophically committed to the principals of system safety, this case study points out that budget and manpower constraints-as well as a variety of internal and external pressures can jeopardize even a well-designed system safety program. This study begins with a review of the evolution and early years of NASA's rise as a project lead agency and ends with the lessons learned from Project Mercury.

  7. Research in human performance related to space: A compilation of three projects/proposals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasson, Scott M.

    1989-01-01

    Scientific projects were developed in order to maximize performance in space and assure physiological homeostatis upon return. Three projects that are related to this common goal were either initiated or formulated during the Faculty Fellowship Summer Program. The projects were entitled: (1) Effect of simulated weightlessness (bed rest) on muscle performance and morphology; (2) Effect of submaximal eccentric muscle contractions on muscle injury, soreness and performance: A grant proposal; and (3) Correlation between isolated joint dynamic muscle strength to end-effector strength of the push and pull extravehicular activity (EVA) ratchet maneuver. The purpose is to describe each of these studies in greater detail.

  8. Individualized Instruction in Science, Earth-Space Project, Self-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    As a supplement to Learning Activity Packages (LAP) of the earth-space project, this manual presents self-directed activities especially designed for individualized instruction. Besides an introduction to LAP characteristics, sets of instructions are given in connection with the metric system, the earth's dimensions, indirect evidence for atomic…

  9. Science Students Creating Hybrid Spaces When Engaging in an Expo Investigation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramnarain, Umesh; de Beer, Josef

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the experiences of three 9th-grade South African students (13-14 years) in doing open science investigation projects for a science expo. A particular focus of this study was the manner in which these students merge the world of school science with their social world to create a hybrid space by appropriating knowledge…

  10. Construction of quantum caps in projective space PG( r, 4) and quantum codes of distance 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruihu; Fu, Qiang; Guo, Luobin; Li, Xueliang

    2016-02-01

    Constructions of quantum caps in projective space PG( r, 4) by recursive methods and computer search are discussed. For each even n satisfying n≥282 and each odd z satisfying z≥275, a quantum n-cap and a quantum z-cap in PG(k-1, 4) with suitable k are constructed, and [[n,n-2k,4

  11. Applying of interactive methods for astronomy education in a school project "International space colony TANHGRA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeva, Veselka S.

    Several interactive methods, applied in the astronomy education during creation of the project about a colony in the Space, are presented. The methods Pyramid, Brainstorm, Snow-slip (Snowball) and Aquarium give the opportunity for schooler to understand and learn well a large packet of astronomical knowledge.

  12. Advanced space power requirements and techniques. Task 1: Mission projections and requirements. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop projections of the NASA, DoD, and civil space power requirements for the 1980-1995 time period; (2) identify specific areas of application and space power subsystem type needs for each prospective user; (3) document the supporting and historical base, including relevant cost related measures of performance; and (4) quantify the benefits of specific technology projection advancements. The initial scope of the study included: (1) construction of likely models for NASA, DoD, and civil space systems; (2) generation of a number of future scenarios; (3) extraction of time phased technology requirements based on the scenarios; and (4) cost/benefit analyses of some of the technologies identified.

  13. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  14. Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Key Project: the Birth and Death of Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Backman, Dana

    1999-01-01

    This program was designed to continue to analyze observations of stars thought to be forming protoplanets, using the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory, ISO, as one of NASA Key Projects with ISO. A particular class of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) discovered stars, known after the prototype, Vega, are principal targets for these observations aimed at examining the evidence for processes involved in forming, or failing to form, planetary systems around other stars. In addition, this program continued to provide partial support for related science in the WIRE, SOFIA and Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) projects, plus approved ISO supplementary time observations under programs MCREE1 29 and VEGADMAP. Their goals include time dependent changes in SWS spectra of Long Period Variable stars and PHOT P32 mapping experiments of recognized protoplanetary disk candidate stars.

  15. ES EPO Seeks SS EPO for Mutual Benefit: Earth Science Outreach Projects Seek Space Science Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Phelps, C. S.; Alston, E. J.; Costulis, P. K.; Moore, S. W.; Sepulveda, R.; Oots, P. C.

    2005-05-01

    In the recent transformation, NASA has reunited the Earth and Space Science groups into a unified Science Mission Directorate. Our team has developed and operates several Earth Science Education and Public Outreach projects through the former NASA Earth Science Enterprise. Starting in 1997, we developed the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL; http://scool.larc.nasa.gov) project, as a way to involve K-12 students in scientifically useful data collection and analysis for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), a high priority instrument in the Earth Observing System. Recently, we initiated the MY NASA DATA project (http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov) to help overcome the barriers for use of real data, particularly relating to atmospheric science, in the K-12 classroom. In the process of interacting with students and teachers through these projects, we quickly learned that they consider Space Science to go hand in hand with Earth Science in the educational setting. In the S'COOL Project, we regularly field student questions relating to Space Science topics - so far in 2005, they amount to about one in ten of the questions we have received. In the MY NASA DATA project, when showing teachers how to explore scientific data about the Earth, we regularly hear "How can I get this kind of data for Mars?" or "Can I get this kind of information about other Planets?". To date, we have responded to these queries by linking or pointing people to other websites. With the continued development of the MY NASA DATA project, we are now seeking a more active connection to the Space Science EPO community, to benefit both our K-12 audience and yours. One of the prime audiences for MY NASA DATA is teachers and students in Middle or High School Earth Science classes. Besides Meteorology, this class also covers Geology and Oceanography. NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC), of which our Atmospheric Science Data Center is one, hold data on those topics that

  16. Environmental complexity and feeding enrichment can mitigate effects of space constraints in captive callitrichids.

    PubMed

    Sha, John Chih Mun; Ismail, Rubiah; Marlena, Diana; Lee, Jia Ling

    2016-04-01

    Non-human primates housed in zoos and laboratories often exhibit reduced activity and this poses welfare concerns. We examined the effects of enclosure types of differing size and environmental complexity on the activities of two species of callitrichids. We found that cotton-top tamarins housed in an enclosure of larger size and more environmental complexity showed higher activity levels, which was mainly contributed by more feeding/foraging activity. By contrast, Goeldi's monkeys housed in an enclosure of larger size and more environmental complexity showed lower activity levels, which was mainly contributed by less locomotory activity. In both species, off-exhibit groups housed in smaller enclosures did not show significantly less locomotory activity which would have been expected, as larger availability spaces should allow more opportunities for locomotion. Furthermore, the feeding enrichment had significant effects on increased feeding/foraging activity for both cotton-top tamarins and Goeldi's monkeys, irrespective of enclosure type. These results suggested that environmental complexity (or application of feeding enrichment) that provided more opportunities for natural foraging could have a larger effect on overall activity levels compared with larger enclosure sizes that should provide more locomotion opportunities. More importantly, it showed that even when enclosure space and complexity were limited, increased opportunities for foraging through the application of enrichment could increase species-typical behaviours. Such inexpensive, easy to implement enrichment methods should be applied to provide more complex environments for captive non-human primates, particularly in situations where there are logistical and/or cost constraints to the modification of physical exhibits. PMID:26025915

  17. EPR & Klein Paradoxes in Complex Hamiltonian Dynamics and Krein Space Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payandeh, Farrin

    2015-07-01

    Negative energy states are applied in Krein space quantization approach to achieve a naturally renormalized theory. For example, this theory by taking the full set of Dirac solutions, could be able to remove the propagator Green function's divergences and automatically without any normal ordering, to vanish the expected value for vacuum state energy. However, since it is a purely mathematical theory, the results are under debate and some efforts are devoted to include more physics in the concept. Whereas Krein quantization is a pure mathematical approach, complex quantum Hamiltonian dynamics is based on strong foundations of Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equations and therefore on classical dynamics. Based on complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi theory, complex spacetime is a natural consequence of including quantum effects in the relativistic mechanics, and is a bridge connecting the causality in special relativity and the non-locality in quantum mechanics, i.e. extending special relativity to the complex domain leads to relativistic quantum mechanics. So that, considering both relativistic and quantum effects, the Klein-Gordon equation could be derived as a special form of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Characterizing the complex time involved in an entangled energy state and writing the general form of energy considering quantum potential, two sets of positive and negative energies will be realized. The new states enable us to study the spacetime in a relativistic entangled “space-time” state leading to 12 extra wave functions than the four solutions of Dirac equation for a free particle. Arguing the entanglement of particle and antiparticle leads to a contradiction with experiments. So, in order to correct the results, along with a previous investigation [1], we realize particles and antiparticles as physical entities with positive energy instead of considering antiparticles with negative energy. As an application of modified descriptions for entangled (space

  18. [Prospect of the Advanced Life Support Program Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center in USA].

    PubMed

    Guo, S S; Ai, W D

    2001-04-01

    The Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center in NASA of USA was focused on the development of the bioregenerative life support components, crop plants for water, air, and food production and bioreactors for recycling of wastes. The keystone of the Breadboard Project was the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), which was supported by 15 environmentally controlled chambers and several laboratory facilities holding a total area of 2150 m2. In supporting the Advanced Life Support Program (ALS Program), the Project utilizes these facilities for large-scale testing of components and development of required technologies for human-rated test-beds at Johnson Space Center in NASA, in order to enable a Lunar and a Mars mission finally. PMID:11808572

  19. Training Physics Students for Space Careers: Introduction to the Balloon Payload Projects at UL Lafayette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerman, W. A.; Mazzino, L.; Fontenot, R.; Giovinazzo, P.; Malespin, C.

    2006-12-01

    In January 2004, the President set goals for the space program in the 21st century. This renewed sense of direction means that a whole new generation of scientists and engineers will be needed to support space- based science and technology. Declining enrollments in science, mathematics, and space related engineering programs are well documented in the United States. These enrollment reductions are also observed at Louisiana colleges and universities, which are starting to recover from last year's hurricanes. Since 2003, physics students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (UL Lafayette) have participated in two balloon payload projects sponsored by the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium (LaSPACE). In 2004-2005, physics students at UL Lafayette attended an informal ballooning course to design and build a student-directed payload for launch at the NASA National Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, Texas in May 2005. In 2006, students participated in the High Altitude Student Payload (HASP) program to measure cosmic ray intensities using traditional film and absorbers. This 10 kg payload flew from Fort Sumner, New Mexico in early September 2006. This presentation will discuss our participation in both balloon projects. Emphasis will be placed on highlighting the "hands-on" and step-by-step approach used to provide students with practical space related skills.

  20. How Robust Is Your Project? From Local Failures to Global Catastrophes: A Complex Networks Approach to Project Systemic Risk.

    PubMed

    Ellinas, Christos; Allan, Neil; Durugbo, Christopher; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Current societal requirements necessitate the effective delivery of complex projects that can do more while using less. Yet, recent large-scale project failures suggest that our ability to successfully deliver them is still at its infancy. Such failures can be seen to arise through various failure mechanisms; this work focuses on one such mechanism. Specifically, it examines the likelihood of a project sustaining a large-scale catastrophe, as triggered by single task failure and delivered via a cascading process. To do so, an analytical model was developed and tested on an empirical dataset by the means of numerical simulation. This paper makes three main contributions. First, it provides a methodology to identify the tasks most capable of impacting a project. In doing so, it is noted that a significant number of tasks induce no cascades, while a handful are capable of triggering surprisingly large ones. Secondly, it illustrates that crude task characteristics cannot aid in identifying them, highlighting the complexity of the underlying process and the utility of this approach. Thirdly, it draws parallels with systems encountered within the natural sciences by noting the emergence of self-organised criticality, commonly found within natural systems. These findings strengthen the need to account for structural intricacies of a project's underlying task precedence structure as they can provide the conditions upon which large-scale catastrophes materialise. PMID:26606518

  1. EpiCollect+: linking smartphones to web applications for complex data collection projects

    PubMed Central

    Aanensen, David M.; Huntley, Derek M.; Menegazzo, Mirko; Powell, Chris I.; Spratt, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have described the development of the generic mobile phone data gathering tool, EpiCollect, and an associated web application, providing two-way communication between multiple data gatherers and a project database. This software only allows data collection on the phone using a single questionnaire form that is tailored to the needs of the user (including a single GPS point and photo per entry), whereas many applications require a more complex structure, allowing users to link a series of forms in a linear or branching hierarchy, along with the addition of any number of media types accessible from smartphones and/or tablet devices (e.g., GPS, photos, videos, sound clips and barcode scanning). A much enhanced version of EpiCollect has been developed (EpiCollect+). The individual data collection forms in EpiCollect+ provide more design complexity than the single form used in EpiCollect, and the software allows the generation of complex data collection projects through the ability to link many forms together in a linear (or branching) hierarchy. Furthermore, EpiCollect+ allows the collection of multiple media types as well as standard text fields, increased data validation and form logic. The entire process of setting up a complex mobile phone data collection project to the specification of a user (project and form definitions) can be undertaken at the EpiCollect+ website using a simple ‘drag and drop’ procedure, with visualisation of the data gathered using Google Maps and charts at the project website. EpiCollect+ is suitable for situations where multiple users transmit complex data by mobile phone (or other Android devices) to a single project web database and is already being used for a range of field projects, particularly public health projects in sub-Saharan Africa. However, many uses can be envisaged from education, ecology and epidemiology to citizen science. PMID:25485096

  2. EpiCollect+: linking smartphones to web applications for complex data collection projects.

    PubMed

    Aanensen, David M; Huntley, Derek M; Menegazzo, Mirko; Powell, Chris I; Spratt, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have described the development of the generic mobile phone data gathering tool, EpiCollect, and an associated web application, providing two-way communication between multiple data gatherers and a project database. This software only allows data collection on the phone using a single questionnaire form that is tailored to the needs of the user (including a single GPS point and photo per entry), whereas many applications require a more complex structure, allowing users to link a series of forms in a linear or branching hierarchy, along with the addition of any number of media types accessible from smartphones and/or tablet devices (e.g., GPS, photos, videos, sound clips and barcode scanning). A much enhanced version of EpiCollect has been developed (EpiCollect+). The individual data collection forms in EpiCollect+ provide more design complexity than the single form used in EpiCollect, and the software allows the generation of complex data collection projects through the ability to link many forms together in a linear (or branching) hierarchy. Furthermore, EpiCollect+ allows the collection of multiple media types as well as standard text fields, increased data validation and form logic. The entire process of setting up a complex mobile phone data collection project to the specification of a user (project and form definitions) can be undertaken at the EpiCollect+ website using a simple 'drag and drop' procedure, with visualisation of the data gathered using Google Maps and charts at the project website. EpiCollect+ is suitable for situations where multiple users transmit complex data by mobile phone (or other Android devices) to a single project web database and is already being used for a range of field projects, particularly public health projects in sub-Saharan Africa. However, many uses can be envisaged from education, ecology and epidemiology to citizen science. PMID:25485096

  3. World, We Have Problems: Simulation for Large Complex, Risky Projects, and Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfrey, Priscilla

    2010-01-01

    Prior to a spacewalk during the NASA STS/129 mission in November 2009, Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) correspondent William Harwood reported astronauts, "were awakened again", as they had been the day previously. Fearing something not properly connected was causing a leak, the crew, both on the ground and in space, stopped and checked everything. The alarm proved false. The crew did complete its work ahead of schedule, but the incident reminds us that correctly connecting hundreds and thousands of entities, subsystems and systems, finding leaks, loosening stuck valves, and adding replacements to very large complex systems over time does not occur magically. Everywhere major projects present similar pressures. Lives are at - risk. Responsibility is heavy. Large natural and human-created disasters introduce parallel difficulties as people work across boundaries their countries, disciplines, languages, and cultures with known immediate dangers as well as the unexpected. NASA has long accepted that when humans have to go where humans cannot go that simulation is the sole solution. The Agency uses simulation to achieve consensus, reduce ambiguity and uncertainty, understand problems, make decisions, support design, do planning and troubleshooting, as well as for operations, training, testing, and evaluation. Simulation is at the heart of all such complex systems, products, projects, programs, and events. Difficult, hazardous short and, especially, long-term activities have a persistent need for simulation from the first insight into a possibly workable idea or answer until the final report perhaps beyond our lifetime is put in the archive. With simulation we create a common mental model, try-out breakdowns of machinery or teamwork, and find opportunity for improvement. Lifecycle simulation proves to be increasingly important as risks and consequences intensify. Across the world, disasters are increasing. We anticipate more of them, as the results of global warming

  4. Representation of Perceptual Color Space in Macaque Posterior Inferior Temporal Cortex (the V4 Complex).

    PubMed

    Bohon, Kaitlin S; Hermann, Katherine L; Hansen, Thorsten; Conway, Bevil R

    2016-01-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus is thought to represent color using two populations of cone-opponent neurons [L vs M; S vs (L + M)], which establish the cardinal directions in color space (reddish vs cyan; lavender vs lime). How is this representation transformed to bring about color perception? Prior work implicates populations of glob cells in posterior inferior temporal cortex (PIT; the V4 complex), but the correspondence between the neural representation of color in PIT/V4 complex and the organization of perceptual color space is unclear. We compared color-tuning data for populations of glob cells and interglob cells to predictions obtained using models that varied in the color-tuning narrowness of the cells, and the color preference distribution across the populations. Glob cells were best accounted for by simulated neurons that have nonlinear (narrow) tuning and, as a population, represent a color space designed to be perceptually uniform (CIELUV). Multidimensional scaling and representational similarity analyses showed that the color space representations in both glob and interglob populations were correlated with the organization of CIELUV space, but glob cells showed a stronger correlation. Hue could be classified invariant to luminance with high accuracy given glob responses and above-chance accuracy given interglob responses. Luminance could be read out invariant to changes in hue in both populations, but interglob cells tended to prefer stimuli having luminance contrast, regardless of hue, whereas glob cells typically retained hue tuning as luminance contrast was modulated. The combined luminance/hue sensitivity of glob cells is predicted for neurons that can distinguish two colors of the same hue at different luminance levels (orange/brown). PMID:27595132

  5. Representation of Perceptual Color Space in Macaque Posterior Inferior Temporal Cortex (the V4 Complex)

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Hermann, Katherine L.; Hansen, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The lateral geniculate nucleus is thought to represent color using two populations of cone-opponent neurons [L vs M; S vs (L + M)], which establish the cardinal directions in color space (reddish vs cyan; lavender vs lime). How is this representation transformed to bring about color perception? Prior work implicates populations of glob cells in posterior inferior temporal cortex (PIT; the V4 complex), but the correspondence between the neural representation of color in PIT/V4 complex and the organization of perceptual color space is unclear. We compared color-tuning data for populations of glob cells and interglob cells to predictions obtained using models that varied in the color-tuning narrowness of the cells, and the color preference distribution across the populations. Glob cells were best accounted for by simulated neurons that have nonlinear (narrow) tuning and, as a population, represent a color space designed to be perceptually uniform (CIELUV). Multidimensional scaling and representational similarity analyses showed that the color space representations in both glob and interglob populations were correlated with the organization of CIELUV space, but glob cells showed a stronger correlation. Hue could be classified invariant to luminance with high accuracy given glob responses and above-chance accuracy given interglob responses. Luminance could be read out invariant to changes in hue in both populations, but interglob cells tended to prefer stimuli having luminance contrast, regardless of hue, whereas glob cells typically retained hue tuning as luminance contrast was modulated. The combined luminance/hue sensitivity of glob cells is predicted for neurons that can distinguish two colors of the same hue at different luminance levels (orange/brown). PMID:27595132

  6. Modeling Semantic Emotion Space Using a 3D Hypercube-Projection: An Innovative Analytical Approach for the Psychology of Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, Radek; Lačev, Alek; Balcar, Karel; Kuška, Martin; Tavel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The widely accepted two-dimensional circumplex model of emotions posits that most instances of human emotional experience can be understood within the two general dimensions of valence and activation. Currently, this model is facing some criticism, because complex emotions in particular are hard to define within only these two general dimensions. The present theory-driven study introduces an innovative analytical approach working in a way other than the conventional, two-dimensional paradigm. The main goal was to map and project semantic emotion space in terms of mutual positions of various emotion prototypical categories. Participants (N = 187; 54.5% females) judged 16 discrete emotions in terms of valence, intensity, controllability and utility. The results revealed that these four dimensional input measures were uncorrelated. This implies that valence, intensity, controllability and utility represented clearly different qualities of discrete emotions in the judgments of the participants. Based on this data, we constructed a 3D hypercube-projection and compared it with various two-dimensional projections. This contrasting enabled us to detect several sources of bias when working with the traditional, two-dimensional analytical approach. Contrasting two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections revealed that the 2D models provided biased insights about how emotions are conceptually related to one another along multiple dimensions. The results of the present study point out the reductionist nature of the two-dimensional paradigm in the psychological theory of emotions and challenge the widely accepted circumplex model. PMID:27148130

  7. Space flight risk data collection and analysis project: Risk and reliability database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    The focus of the NASA 'Space Flight Risk Data Collection and Analysis' project was to acquire and evaluate space flight data with the express purpose of establishing a database containing measurements of specific risk assessment - reliability - availability - maintainability - supportability (RRAMS) parameters. The developed comprehensive RRAMS database will support the performance of future NASA and aerospace industry risk and reliability studies. One of the primary goals has been to acquire unprocessed information relating to the reliability and availability of launch vehicles and the subsystems and components thereof from the 45th Space Wing (formerly Eastern Space and Missile Command -ESMC) at Patrick Air Force Base. After evaluating and analyzing this information, it was encoded in terms of parameters pertinent to ascertaining reliability and availability statistics, and then assembled into an appropriate database structure.

  8. Space flight risk data collection and analysis project: Risk and reliability database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The focus of the NASA 'Space Flight Risk Data Collection and Analysis' project was to acquire and evaluate space flight data with the express purpose of establishing a database containing measurements of specific risk assessment - reliability - availability - maintainability - supportability (RRAMS) parameters. The developed comprehensive RRAMS database will support the performance of future NASA and aerospace industry risk and reliability studies. One of the primary goals has been to acquire unprocessed information relating to the reliability and availability of launch vehicles and the subsystems and components thereof from the 45th Space Wing (formerly Eastern Space and Missile Command -ESMC) at Patrick Air Force Base. After evaluating and analyzing this information, it was encoded in terms of parameters pertinent to ascertaining reliability and availability statistics, and then assembled into an appropriate database structure.

  9. Technical needs and research opportunities provided by projected aeronautical and space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of the present task is to identify the enabling and supporting technologies for projected aeronautical and space systems. A detailed examination was made of the technical needs in the structures, dynamics and materials areas required for the realization of these systems. Also, the level of integration required with other disciplines was identified. The aeronautical systems considered cover the broad spectrum of rotorcraft; subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aircraft; extremely high-altitude aircraft; and transatmospheric vehicles. The space systems considered include space transportation systems; spacecrafts for near-earth observation; spacecrafts for planetary and solar exploration; and large space systems. A monograph is being compiled which summarizes the results of this study. The different chapters of the monograph are being written by leading experts from governmental laboratories, industry and universities.

  10. Software Transition Project Retrospectives and the Application of SEL Effort Estimation Model and Boehm's COCOMO to Complex Software Transition Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Justin

    1995-01-01

    The Multimission Image Processing Subsystem (MIPS) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has managed transitions of application software sets from one operating system and hardware platform to multiple operating systems and hardware platforms. As a part of these transitions, cost estimates were generated from the personal experience of in-house developers and managers to calculate the total effort required for such projects. Productivity measures have been collected for two such transitions, one very large and the other relatively small in terms of source lines of code. These estimates used a cost estimation model similar to the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) Effort Estimation Model. Experience in transitioning software within JPL MIPS have uncovered a high incidence of interface complexity. Interfaces, both internal and external to individual software applications, have contributed to software transition project complexity, and thus to scheduling difficulties and larger than anticipated design work on software to be ported.

  11. Ion transport in complex layered graphene-based membranes with tuneable interlayer spacing

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi; Jiang, Gengping; Garvey, Christopher J.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simon, George P.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Li, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the transport properties of ions confined in nanoporous carbon is generally difficult because of the stochastic nature and distribution of multiscale complex and imperfect pore structures within the bulk material. We demonstrate a combined approach of experiment and simulation to describe the structure of complex layered graphene-based membranes, which allows their use as a unique porous platform to gain unprecedented insights into nanoconfined transport phenomena across the entire sub–10-nm scales. By correlation of experimental results with simulation of concentration-driven ion diffusion through the cascading layered graphene structure with sub–10-nm tuneable interlayer spacing, we are able to construct a robust, representative structural model that allows the establishment of a quantitative relationship among the nanoconfined ion transport properties in relation to the complex nanoporous structure of the layered membrane. This correlation reveals the remarkable effect of the structural imperfections of the membranes on ion transport and particularly the scaling behaviors of both diffusive and electrokinetic ion transport in graphene-based cascading nanochannels as a function of channel size from 10 nm down to subnanometer. Our analysis shows that the range of ion transport effects previously observed in simple one-dimensional nanofluidic systems will translate themselves into bulk, complex nanoslit porous systems in a very different manner, and the complex cascading porous circuities can enable new transport phenomena that are unattainable in simple fluidic systems. PMID:26933689

  12. Sensorimotor restriction affects complex movement topography and reachable space in the rat motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Budri, Mirco; Lodi, Enrico; Franchi, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) studies with 500 ms of current pulses suggest that the forelimb area of the motor cortex is organized into several spatially distinct functional zones that organize movements into complex sequences. Here we studied how sensorimotor restriction modifies the extent of functional zones, complex movements, and reachable space representation in the rat forelimb M1. Sensorimotor restriction was achieved by means of whole-forelimb casting of 30 days duration. Long-duration ICMS was carried out 12 h and 14 days after cast removal. Evoked movements were measured using a high-resolution 3D optical system. Long-term cast caused: (i) a reduction in the number of sites where complex forelimb movement could be evoked; (ii) a shrinkage of functional zones but no change in their center of gravity; (iii) a reduction in movement with proximal/distal coactivation; (iv) a reduction in maximal velocity, trajectory and vector length of movement, but no changes in latency or duration; (v) a large restriction of reachable space. Fourteen days of forelimb freedom after casting caused: (i) a recovery of the number of sites where complex forelimb movement could be evoked; (ii) a recovery of functional zone extent and movement with proximal/distal coactivation; (iii) an increase in movement kinematics, but only partial restoration of control rat values; (iv) a slight increase in reachability parameters, but these remained far below baseline values. We pose the hypothesis that specific aspects of complex movement may be stored within parallel motor cortex re-entrant systems. PMID:25565987

  13. Simulating the daylight performance of fenestration systems and spaces of arbitrary complexity: The IDC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.

    1993-04-01

    A new method to simulate the daylight performance of fenestration systems and spaces is presented. This new method, named IDC (Integration of Directional Coefficients), allows the simulation of the daylight performance of fenestration systems and spaces of arbitrary complexity, under any sun, sky, and ground conditions. The IDC method is based on the combination of scale model photometry and computer-based simulation. Physical scale models are used to experimentally determine a comprehensive set of 'directional illuminance coefficients' at reference points of interest, which are then used in analytical, computer-based routines, to determine daylight factors or actual daylight illuminance values under any sun, sky, and ground conditions. The main advantage of the IDC method is its applicability to any optically complex environment. Moreover, the computer-based analytical routines are fast enough to allow for hourly simulation of the daylight performance over the course of an entire year. However, the method requires appropriate experimental facilities for the determination of the Directional Coefficients. The IDC method has been implemented and used successfully in inter-validation procedures with various daylight simulation computer programs. Currently, it is used to simulate the daylight performance of fenestration systems that incorporate optically complex components, such as Venetian blinds, optically treated light shelves and light pipes.

  14. Autonomous space processor for orbital debris advanced design project in support of solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Mitchell, Dominique; Taft, Brett; Chinnock, Paul; Kutz, Bjoern

    1992-01-01

    This paper is regarding a project in the Advanced Design Program at the University of Arizona. The project is named the Autonomous Space Processor for Orbital Debris (ASPOD) and is a NASA/Universities Space Research Association (USRA) sponsored design project. The development of ASPOD and the students' abilities in designing and building a prototype spacecraft are the ultimate goals of this project. This year's focus entailed the development of a secondary robotic arm and end-effector to work in tandem with an existent arm in the removal of orbital debris. The new arm features the introduction of composite materials and a linear drive system, thus producing a light-weight and more accurate prototype. The main characteristic of the end-effector design is that it incorporates all of the motors and gearing internally, thus not subjecting them to the harsh space environment. Furthermore, the arm and the end-effector are automated by a control system with positional feedback. This system is composed of magnetic and optical encoders connected to a 486 PC via two servo-motor controller cards. Programming a series of basic routines and sub-routines has allowed the ASPOD prototype to become more autonomous. The new system is expected to perform specified tasks with a positional accuracy of 0.5 cm.

  15. Space Projects and Research by Kids (SPARK): A Web Based Research Journal for Middle School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, S. S.; Pertzborn, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Project SPARK is designed to facilitate opportunities for upper elementary and middle school students to develop the necessary skills to conduct investigations that focus on the subjects of astronomy, space exploration, and earth remote sensing. This program actively engages students in conducting their own research project to acquire increased understanding and content knowledge in the space sciences. While the development of scientific inquiry skills and content literacy is the primary focus, students also enhance their critical thinking, analytical, technological and communications skills. As in the professional science community, the web based SPARK Journal presents an avenue for students to effectively communicate the results of their investigations and work to classmates as well as the "global learning community" via the world wide web. Educational outreach staff at the Sapce Science and Engineering Center have developed active partnerships with teachers and schools throughout Wisconsin to facilitate the development of standards based curriculum and research projects focusing on current topics in the space sciences. Student research projects and activities arising from these initiatives were submitted in the Spring and Fall of 1998 for inclusion in SPARK, Volume 1. The second volume of SPARK will be published in Spring, 1999. Support for the development of this journal was provided by the NASA/IDEAS Program.

  16. Mars Atmospheric In Situ Resource Utilization Projects at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, A. C.; Hintze, P. E.; Caraccio, A. J.; Bayliss, J. A.; Karr, L. J.; Paley, M. S.; Marone, M. J.; Gibson, T. L.; Surma, J. M.; Mansell, J. M.; Lunn, G. M.; Devor, R. W.; Berggren, M.

    2016-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars, which is approximately 95% carbon dioxide (CO2), is a rich resource for the human exploration of the red planet, primarily by the production of rocket propellants and oxygen for life support. Three recent projects led by NASA's Kennedy Space Center have been investigating the processing of CO2. The first project successfully demonstrated the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module (APM), which freezes CO2 with cryocoolers and combines sublimated CO2 with hydrogen to make methane and water. The second project absorbs CO2 with Ionic Liquids and electrolyzes it with water to make methane and oxygen, but with limited success so far. A third project plans to recover up to 100% of the oxygen in spacecraft respiratory CO2. A combination of the Reverse Water Gas Shift reaction and the Boudouard reaction eventually fill the reactor up with carbon, stopping the process. A system to continuously remove and collect carbon is under construction.

  17. Mars Atmospheric In Situ Resource Utilization Projects at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Hintze, Paul; Meier, Anne; Bayliss, Jon; Karr, Laurel; Paley, Steve; Marone, Matt; Gibson, Tracy; Surma, Jan; Mansell, Matt; Lunn, Griffin; Devor, Robert; Berggren, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars, which is 96 percent carbon dioxide (CO2), is a rich resource for the human exploration of the red planet, primarily by the production of rocket propellants and oxygen for life support. Three recent projects led by NASAs Kennedy Space Center have been investigating the processing of CO2. The first project successfully demonstrated the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module (APM), which freezes CO2 with cryocoolers and combines sublimated CO2 with hydrogen to make methane and water. The second project absorbs CO2 with Ionic Liquids and electrolyzes it with water to make methane and oxygen, but with limited success so far. A third project plans to recover up to 100 of the oxygen in spacecraft respiratory CO2. A combination of the Reverse Water Gas Shift reaction and the Boudouard reaction eventually fill the reactor up with carbon, stopping the process. A system to continuously remove and collect carbon has been tested with encouraging results.

  18. Riemannian mean and space-time adaptive processing using projection and inversion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam; Barbaresco, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    The estimation of the covariance matrix from real data is required in the application of space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to an airborne ground moving target indication (GMTI) radar. A natural approach to estimation of the covariance matrix that is based on the information geometry has been proposed. In this paper, the output of the Riemannian mean is used in inversion and projection algorithms. It is found that the projection class of algorithms can yield very significant gains, even when the gains due to inversion-based algorithms are marginal over standard algorithms. The performance of the projection class of algorithms does not appear to be overly sensitive to the projected subspace dimension.

  19. Project EGRESS: The design of an assured crew return vehicle for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Keeping preliminary studies by NASA in mind, an Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) was developed. The system allows the escape of one or more crew members from Space Station Freedom in case of emergency. The design of the vehicle addresses propulsion, orbital operations, reentry, landing and recovery, power and communication, and life support. In light of recent modifications in Space Station design, Project EGRESS (Earthbound Guaranteed ReEntry from Space Station) pays particular attention to its impact on Space Station operations, interfaces and docking facilities, and maintenance needs. A water landing, medium lift vehicle was found to best satisfy project goals of simplicity and cost efficiency without sacrificing the safety and reliability requirements. With a single vehicle, one injured crew member could be returned to Earth with minimal pilot involvement. Since the craft is capable of returning up to five crew members, two such permanently docked vehicles would allow full evacuation of the Space Station. The craft could be constructed entirely with available 1990 technology and launched aboard a shuttle orbiter.

  20. Cortical and medullary somatosensory projections to the cochlear nuclear complex in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A; Künzle, H

    1997-01-17

    Various tracer substances were injected into the spinal cord, the dorsal column nuclei, the trigeminal nuclear complex and the somatosensory cortex in Madagascan hedgehog tenrecs. With the exception of the cases injected exclusively into the spinal cord all injections gave rise to sparse, but distinct anterograde projections to the cochlear nuclear complex, particularly the granular cell domain within and outside of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. Among these cochlear afferents the projection from the primary somatosensory cortex is the most remarkable because the hedgehog tenrec has one of the lowest encephalisation indices among mammals and a similar cortico-cochlear connection has not been demonstrated so far in other species. PMID:9121680

  1. Managing Complexity - Developing the Node Control Software For The International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald B.

    2000-01-01

    On December 4th, 1998 at 3:36 AM STS-88 (the space shuttle Endeavor) was launched with the "Node 1 Unity Module" in its payload bay. After working on the Space Station program for a very long time, that launch was one of the most beautiful sights I had ever seen! As the Shuttle proceeded to rendezvous with the Russian American module know as Zarya, I returned to Houston quickly to start monitoring the activation of the software I had spent the last 3 years working on. The FGB module (also known as "Zarya"), was grappled by the shuttle robotic arm, and connected to the Unity module. Crewmembers then hooked up the power and data connections between Zarya and Unity. On December 7th, 1998 at 9:49 PM CST the Node Control Software was activated. On December 15th, 1998, the Node-l/Zarya "cornerstone" of the International Space Station was left on-orbit. The Node Control Software (NCS) is the first software flown by NASA for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS Program is considered the most complex international engineering effort ever undertaken. At last count some 18 countries are active partners in this global venture. NCS has performed all of its intended functions on orbit, over 200 miles above us. I'll be describing how we built the NCS software.

  2. How Robust Is Your Project? From Local Failures to Global Catastrophes: A Complex Networks Approach to Project Systemic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ellinas, Christos; Allan, Neil; Durugbo, Christopher; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Current societal requirements necessitate the effective delivery of complex projects that can do more while using less. Yet, recent large-scale project failures suggest that our ability to successfully deliver them is still at its infancy. Such failures can be seen to arise through various failure mechanisms; this work focuses on one such mechanism. Specifically, it examines the likelihood of a project sustaining a large-scale catastrophe, as triggered by single task failure and delivered via a cascading process. To do so, an analytical model was developed and tested on an empirical dataset by the means of numerical simulation. This paper makes three main contributions. First, it provides a methodology to identify the tasks most capable of impacting a project. In doing so, it is noted that a significant number of tasks induce no cascades, while a handful are capable of triggering surprisingly large ones. Secondly, it illustrates that crude task characteristics cannot aid in identifying them, highlighting the complexity of the underlying process and the utility of this approach. Thirdly, it draws parallels with systems encountered within the natural sciences by noting the emergence of self-organised criticality, commonly found within natural systems. These findings strengthen the need to account for structural intricacies of a project’s underlying task precedence structure as they can provide the conditions upon which large-scale catastrophes materialise. PMID:26606518

  3. A novel design project for space solar power station (SSPS-OMEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yiqun; Duan, Baoyan; Wang, Dongxu; Li, Xun

    2016-04-01

    The space solar power station (SSPS) capable of providing earth with primary power has been researched for 50 years. The SSPS is a tremendous design involving optics, mechanics, electromagnetism, thermology, control, and other disciplines. This paper presents a novel design project for SSPS named OMEGA. The space segment of the proposed GEO-based SSPS is composed of four main parts, such as spherical solar power collector, hyperboloid photovoltaic (PV) cell array, power management and distribution (PMAD) and microwave transmitting antenna. Principle of optics, structure configuration, wired and wireless power transmissions are presented.

  4. Space Station Furnace Facility Preliminary Project Implementation Plan (PIP). Volume 2, Appendix 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkey, John K.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is an advanced facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom and will consist of Core equipment and various sets of Furnace Module (FM) equipment in a three-rack configuration. This Project Implementation Plan (PIP) document was developed to satisfy the requirements of Data Requirement Number 4 for the SSFF study (Phase B). This PIP shall address the planning of the activities required to perform the detailed design and development of the SSFF for the Phase C/D portion of this contract.

  5. The Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project - Catalyst for Space Station advanced automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healey, Kathleen J.

    1988-01-01

    The Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project (SADP) was initiated by NASA to address the advanced automation needs for the Space Station program. The application of advanced automation to the Space Station's operations management system (OMS) is discussed. The SADP's future goals and objectives are discussed with respect to OMS functional requirements, design, and desired evolutionary capabilities. Major technical challenges facing the designers, developers, and users of the OMS are identified in order to guide the definition of objectives, plans, and scenarios for future SADP demonstrations, and to focus the efforts on the supporting research.

  6. Space Radiation Cancer Risk Projections for Exploration Missions: Uncertainty Reduction and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Badhwar, Gautam; Saganti, Premkumar; Schimmerling, Walter; Wilson, John; Peterson, Leif; Dicello, John

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we discuss expected lifetime excess cancer risks for astronauts returning from exploration class missions. For the first time we make a quantitative assessment of uncertainties in cancer risk projections for space radiation exposures. Late effects from the high charge and energy (HZE) ions present in the galactic cosmic rays including cancer and the poorly understood risks to the central nervous system constitute the major risks. Methods used to project risk in low Earth orbit are seen as highly uncertain for projecting risks on exploration missions because of the limited radiobiology data available for estimating HZE ion risks. Cancer risk projections are described as a product of many biological and physical factors, each of which has a differential range of uncertainty due to lack of data and knowledge. Monte-Carlo sampling from subjective error distributions represents the lack of knowledge in each factor to quantify risk projection overall uncertainty. Cancer risk analysis is applied to several exploration mission scenarios. At solar minimum, the number of days in space where career risk of less than the limiting 3% excess cancer mortality can be assured at a 95% confidence level is found to be only of the order of 100 days.

  7. Projecting technology change to improve space technology planning and systems management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walk, Steven Robert

    2011-04-01

    Projecting technology performance evolution has been improving over the years. Reliable quantitative forecasting methods have been developed that project the growth, diffusion, and performance of technology in time, including projecting technology substitutions, saturation levels, and performance improvements. These forecasts can be applied at the early stages of space technology planning to better predict available future technology performance, assure the successful selection of technology, and improve technology systems management strategy. Often what is published as a technology forecast is simply scenario planning, usually made by extrapolating current trends into the future, with perhaps some subjective insight added. Typically, the accuracy of such predictions falls rapidly with distance in time. Quantitative technology forecasting (QTF), on the other hand, includes the study of historic data to identify one of or a combination of several recognized universal technology diffusion or substitution patterns. In the same manner that quantitative models of physical phenomena provide excellent predictions of system behavior, so do QTF models provide reliable technological performance trajectories. In practice, a quantitative technology forecast is completed to ascertain with confidence when the projected performance of a technology or system of technologies will occur. Such projections provide reliable time-referenced information when considering cost and performance trade-offs in maintaining, replacing, or migrating a technology, component, or system. This paper introduces various quantitative technology forecasting techniques and illustrates their practical application in space technology and technology systems management.

  8. DisVis: quantifying and visualizing accessible interaction space of distance-restrained biomolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    van Zundert, G.C.P.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present DisVis, a Python package and command line tool to calculate the reduced accessible interaction space of distance-restrained binary protein complexes, allowing for direct visualization and quantification of the information content of the distance restraints. The approach is general and can also be used as a knowledge-based distance energy term in FFT-based docking directly during the sampling stage. Availability and implementation: The source code with documentation is freely available from https://github.com/haddocking/disvis. Contact: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26026169

  9. Kinetic Rate Kernels via Hierarchical Liouville-Space Projection Operator Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Yan, YiJing

    2016-05-19

    Kinetic rate kernels in general multisite systems are formulated on the basis of a nonperturbative quantum dissipation theory, the hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) formalism, together with the Nakajima-Zwanzig projection operator technique. The present approach exploits the HEOM-space linear algebra. The quantum non-Markovian site-to-site transfer rate can be faithfully evaluated via projected HEOM dynamics. The developed method is exact, as evident by the comparison to the direct HEOM evaluation results on the population evolution. PMID:26757138

  10. Efficient embedding of complex networks to hyperbolic space via their Laplacian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Mier, Pablo; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2016-07-01

    The different factors involved in the growth process of complex networks imprint valuable information in their observable topologies. How to exploit this information to accurately predict structural network changes is the subject of active research. A recent model of network growth sustains that the emergence of properties common to most complex systems is the result of certain trade-offs between node birth-time and similarity. This model has a geometric interpretation in hyperbolic space, where distances between nodes abstract this optimisation process. Current methods for network hyperbolic embedding search for node coordinates that maximise the likelihood that the network was produced by the afore-mentioned model. Here, a different strategy is followed in the form of the Laplacian-based Network Embedding, a simple yet accurate, efficient and data driven manifold learning approach, which allows for the quick geometric analysis of big networks. Comparisons against existing embedding and prediction techniques highlight its applicability to network evolution and link prediction.

  11. Structural Mechanism behind Distinct Efficiency of Oct4/Sox2 Proteins in Differentially Spaced DNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Yesudhas, Dhanusha; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 2 (Sox2) proteins induce various transcriptional regulators to maintain cellular pluripotency. Most Oct4/Sox2 complexes have either 0 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(0bp)) or 3 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(3bp)) separation between their DNA-binding sites. Results from previous biochemical studies have shown that the complexes separated by 0 base pairs are associated with a higher pluripotency rate than those separated by 3 base pairs. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculations to determine the binding free energy and per-residue free energy for the Oct4/Sox2(0bp) and Oct4/Sox2(3bp) complexes to identify structural differences that contribute to differences in induction rate. Our MD simulation results showed substantial differences in Oct4/Sox2 domain movements, as well as secondary-structure changes in the Oct4 linker region, suggesting a potential reason underlying the distinct efficiencies of these complexes during reprogramming. Moreover, we identified key residues and hydrogen bonds that potentially facilitate protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Consequently, our results confess that differential spacing of the Oct4/Sox2 DNA binding sites can determine the magnitude of transcription of the targeted genes during reprogramming. PMID:26790000

  12. Quantum trajectories in complex space: one-dimensional stationary scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-04-21

    One-dimensional time-independent scattering problems are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The equation for the local approximate quantum trajectories near the stagnation point of the quantum momentum function is derived, and the first derivative of the quantum momentum function is related to the local structure of quantum trajectories. Exact complex quantum trajectories are determined for two examples by numerically integrating the equations of motion. For the soft potential step, some particles penetrate into the nonclassical region, and then turn back to the reflection region. For the barrier scattering problem, quantum trajectories may spiral into the attractors or from the repellers in the barrier region. Although the classical potentials extended to complex space show different pole structures for each problem, the quantum potentials present the same second-order pole structure in the reflection region. This paper not only analyzes complex quantum trajectories and the total potentials for these examples but also demonstrates general properties and similar structures of the complex quantum trajectories and the quantum potentials for one-dimensional time-independent scattering problems. PMID:18433189

  13. Structural Mechanism behind Distinct Efficiency of Oct4/Sox2 Proteins in Differentially Spaced DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yesudhas, Dhanusha; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 2 (Sox2) proteins induce various transcriptional regulators to maintain cellular pluripotency. Most Oct4/Sox2 complexes have either 0 base pairs (Oct4/Sox20bp) or 3 base pairs (Oct4/Sox23bp) separation between their DNA-binding sites. Results from previous biochemical studies have shown that the complexes separated by 0 base pairs are associated with a higher pluripotency rate than those separated by 3 base pairs. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculations to determine the binding free energy and per-residue free energy for the Oct4/Sox20bp and Oct4/Sox23bp complexes to identify structural differences that contribute to differences in induction rate. Our MD simulation results showed substantial differences in Oct4/Sox2 domain movements, as well as secondary-structure changes in the Oct4 linker region, suggesting a potential reason underlying the distinct efficiencies of these complexes during reprogramming. Moreover, we identified key residues and hydrogen bonds that potentially facilitate protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Consequently, our results confess that differential spacing of the Oct4/Sox2 DNA binding sites can determine the magnitude of transcription of the targeted genes during reprogramming. PMID:26790000

  14. Space debris removal by ground-based lasers: main conclusions of the European project CLEANSPACE.

    PubMed

    Esmiller, Bruno; Jacquelard, Christophe; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Wnuk, Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Studies show that the number of debris in low Earth orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Specifically, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground-based laser solution which can remove, at low expense and in a nondestructive way, hazardous debris around selected space assets appears as a highly promising answer. This solution is studied within the framework of the CLEANSPACE project which is part of the FP7 space program. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks, and to establish a roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the main conclusions of the CLEANSPACE project. PMID:25402937

  15. Final report on LDRD project 52722 : radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Karpen, Gary D.; Montano, Victoria A.

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project 'Radiation Hardened Optoelectronic Components for Space-Based Applications.' The aim of this LDRD has been to investigate the radiation hardness of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodiodes by looking at both the effects of total dose and of single-event upsets on the electrical and optical characteristics of VCSELs and photodiodes. These investigations were intended to provide guidance for the eventual integration of radiation hardened VCSELs and photodiodes with rad-hard driver and receiver electronics from an external vendor for space applications. During this one-year project, we have fabricated GaAs-based VCSELs and photodiodes, investigated ionization-induced transient effects due to high-energy protons, and measured the degradation of performance from both high-energy protons and neutrons.

  16. Bidding for Complex Projects: Evidence from Italian Government's Acquisitions of IT Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, Gian Luigi; Dini, Federico; Zampino, Roberto

    Public buyers are often mandated by law to adopt competitive procedures to ensure transparency and promote full competition. Recent economic literature, however, suggests that open competition can perform poorly in allocating complex projects. In exploring the determinants of bidding behavior in tenders for complex IT services, we find results that appear consistent with theory. Our analysis shows that price and quality are linked in a puzzling way: high quality is associated with low prices. We also find that quality proposals are mainly explained by suppliers’ experience. Results suggest that scoring rules at the basis of the tendering process might fail to appropriately incorporate buyers’ complex price/quality preferences.

  17. Progress update of NASA's free-piston Stirling space power converter technology project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudenhoefer, James E.; Winter, Jerry M.; Alger, Donald

    1992-01-01

    A progress update is presented of the NASA LeRC Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Converter Technology Project. This work is being conducted under NASA's Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The goal of the CSTI High Capacity Power Element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space initiatives. Efforts are focused upon increasing system power output and system thermal and electric energy conversion efficiency at least five fold over current SP-100 technology, and on achieving systems that are compatible with space nuclear reactors. This paper will discuss progress toward 1050 K Stirling Space Power Converters. Fabrication is nearly completed for the 1050 K Component Test Power Converter (CTPC); results of motoring tests of the cold end (525 K), are presented. The success of these and future designs is dependent upon supporting research and technology efforts including heat pipes, bearings, superalloy joining technologies, high efficiency alternators, life and reliability testing, and predictive methodologies. This paper will compare progress in significant areas of component development from the start of the program with the Space Power Development Engine (SPDE) to the present work on CTPC.

  18. Progress update of NASA's free-piston Stirling space power converter technology project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudenhoefer, James E.; Winter, Jerry M.; Alger, Donald

    1992-08-01

    A progress update is presented of the NASA LeRC Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Converter Technology Project. This work is being conducted under NASA's Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The goal of the CSTI High Capacity Power Element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space initiatives. Efforts are focused upon increasing system power output and system thermal and electric energy conversion efficiency at least five fold over current SP-100 technology, and on achieving systems that are compatible with space nuclear reactors. This paper will discuss progress toward 1050 K Stirling Space Power Converters. Fabrication is nearly completed for the 1050 K Component Test Power Converter (CTPC); results of motoring tests of the cold end (525 K), are presented. The success of these and future designs is dependent upon supporting research and technology efforts including heat pipes, bearings, superalloy joining technologies, high efficiency alternators, life and reliability testing, and predictive methodologies. This paper will compare progress in significant areas of component development from the start of the program with the Space Power Development Engine (SPDE) to the present work on CTPC.

  19. 51-D astronauts Griggs and Hoffman with toys for use in Toys in Space Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Astronaut David Griggs, 51-D mission specialist, monitors the behavior of a pink plastic flipping toy, nicknamed 'Rat Stuff.' Behind the toy are mock-ups of the middeck lockers. The small toy is part of the 'Toys in Space' project for NASA's STS 51-E mission (26475); Astronaut Jeff A. Hoffman, 51-D mission specialist, goes through a one-G simulation of operation of a friction-powered toy car in NASA's one-G Shuttle trainer at JSC (26476).

  20. Apollo-Soyuz test project - The American-Soviet space enterprise. [review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1975-01-01

    The preflight mission plan of the Apollo-Soyuz project is summarized, and the scientific experiments planned for the flight are described. Emphasis is on coupling procedures and docking modules. Experiments discussed comprise astronomical studies, geophysical studies, bioscientific studies, and application-oriented studies. The unique gravity-free space environment will provide favorable conditions for uniform materials construction. In addition, biological electrophoresis investigations in a perturbation-free medium will have substantial scientific contributions to make.

  1. The TERESA project: from space research to ground tele-echography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieyres, Pierre; Poisson, Gerard; Courreges, Fabien; Merigeaux, Olivier; Arbeille, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasound examinations represent one of the major diagnostic modalities of future healthcare. They are currently used to support medical space research but require a high skilled operator for both probe positioning on the patient's skin and image interpretation. TERESA is a tele-echography project that proposes a solution to bring astronauts and remotely located patients on ground quality ultrasound examinations despite the lack of a specialist at the location of the wanted medical act.

  2. The Projection of Space Radiation Environments with a Solar Cycle Statistical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    2006-01-01

    A solar cycle statistical model has been developed to project sunspot numbers which represent the variations in the space radiation environment. The resultant projection of sunspot numbers in near future were coupled to space-related quantities of interest in radiation protection, such as the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) deceleration potential (f) and the mean occurrence frequency of solar particle event (SPE). Future GCR fluxes have been derived from a predictive model, in which GCR temporal dependence represented by f was derived from GCR flux and ground-based Climax neutron monitor rate measurements over the last four decades. Results showed that the point dose equivalent inside a typical spacecraft in interplanetary radiation fields was influenced by solar modulation up to a factor of three. One important characteristic of sporadic SPEs is their mean frequency of occurrence, which is dependent on solar activity. Projections of future mean frequency of SPE occurrence were estimated from a power law function of sunspot number. Furthermore, the cumulative probabilities of SPE during short-period missions were defined with the continuous database of proton fluences of SPE. The analytic representation of energy spectra of SPE was constructed by the Weibull distribution for different event sizes. The representative exposure level at each event size was estimated for the guideline of protection systems for astronauts during future space exploration missions.

  3. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Project Overview, Near-term Products and Mission Applicability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John; Anderson, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Project, funded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), is continuing to invest in propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. This overview provides development status, near-term mission benefits, applicability, and availability of in-space propulsion technologies in the areas of aerocapture, electric propulsion, advanced chemical thrusters, and systems analysis tools. Aerocapture investments improved (1) guidance, navigation, and control models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells, 2) atmospheric models for Earth, Titan, Mars and Venus, and 3) models for aerothermal effects. Investments in electric propulsion technologies focused on completing NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system. The project is also concluding its High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAC) mid-term product specifically designed for a low-cost electric propulsion option. The primary chemical propulsion investment is on the high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost. The project is also delivering products to assist technology infusion and quantify mission applicability and benefits through mission analysis and tools. In-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for flagship destinations currently under evaluation, as well as having broad applicability to future Discovery and New Frontiers mission solicitations.

  4. The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Project, Products, and Mission Applicability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric; Liou, Larry; Dankanich, John; Munk, Michelle M.; Kremic, Tibor

    2009-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Project, funded by NASA s Science Mission Directorate (SMD), is continuing to invest in propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. This overview provides development status, near-term mission benefits, applicability, and availability of in-space propulsion technologies in the areas of aerocapture, electric propulsion, advanced chemical thrusters, and systems analysis tools. Aerocapture investments improved: guidance, navigation, and control models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; atmospheric models for Earth, Titan, Mars, and Venus; and models for aerothermal effects. Investments in electric propulsion technologies focused on completing NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6 to 7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system. The project is also concluding its High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAC) mid-term product specifically designed for a low-cost electric propulsion option. The primary chemical propulsion investment is on the high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost. The project is also delivering products to assist technology infusion and quantify mission applicability and benefits through mission analysis and tools. In-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for flagship destinations currently under evaluation, as well as having broad applicability to future Discovery and New Frontiers mission solicitations.

  5. NASA Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project - Development of Space Station automation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, John S.; Brown, Richard; Friedland, Peter; Wong, Carla M.; Bates, William

    1987-01-01

    A 1984 Congressional expansion of the 1958 National Aeronautics and Space Act mandated that NASA conduct programs, as part of the Space Station program, which will yield the U.S. material benefits, particularly in the areas of advanced automation and robotics systems. Demonstration programs are scheduled for automated systems such as the thermal control, expert system coordination of Station subsystems, and automation of multiple subsystems. The programs focus the R&D efforts and provide a gateway for transfer of technology to industry. The NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology is responsible for directing, funding and evaluating the Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project, which will include simulated interactions between novice personnel and astronauts and several automated, expert subsystems to explore the effectiveness of the man-machine interface being developed. Features and progress on the TEXSYS prototype thermal control system expert system are outlined.

  6. Project for the Space Science in Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, M.; Oberst, J.; Malinnikov, V.; Shingareva, K.; Grechishchev, A.; Karachevtseva, I.; Konopikhin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction: Based on the proposal call of the Government of Russian Federation 40 of international scientists came to Russia for developing and support-ing research capabilities of national educational institutions. Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK) and invited scientist Prof. Dr. Jurgen Oberst were awarded a grant to establish a capable research facility concerned with Planetary Geodesy, Cartography and Space Exploration. Objectives: The goals of the project are to build laboratory infrastructure, and suitable capability for MIIGAiK to participate in the planning, execution and analyses of data from future Russian planetary mis-sions and also to integrate into the international science community. Other important tasks are to develop an attractive work place and job opportunities for planetary geodesy and cartography students. For this purposes new MIIGAiK Extraterrestrial Laboratory (MExLab) was organized. We involved professors, researchers, PhD students in to the projects of Moon and planets exploration at the new level of Russian Space Science development. Main results: MExLab team prepare data for upcom-ing Russian space missions, such as LUNA-GLOB and LUNA-RESOURSE. We established cooperation with Russian and international partners (IKI, ESA, DLR, and foreign Universities) and actively participated in international conferences and workshops. Future works: For the future science development we investigated the old Soviet Archives and received the access to the telemetry data of the Moon rovers Lunokhod-1 and Lunokhod-2. That data will be used in education purposes and could be the perfect base for the analysis, development and support in new Russian and international missions and especially Moon exploration projects. MExLab is open to cooperate and make the consortiums for science projects for the Moon and planets exploration. Acknowledgement: Works are funded by the Rus-sian Government (Project name: "Geodesy, cartography and the

  7. Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wight, R.H.

    1997-05-30

    This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

  8. Hydrogen disposal investigation for the Space Shuttle launch complex at Vandenberg Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Terry J.; Elliott, George

    1987-01-01

    The concern of an overpressure condition on the aft end of the Space Shuttle caused by ignition of unburned hydrogen being trapped in the Space Shuttle Main Engine exhaust duct at the Vandenberg AFB launch complex has been investigated for fifteen months. Approximately twenty-five concepts have been reviewed, with four concepts being thoroughly investigated. The four concepts investigated were hydrogen burnoff ignitors (ignitors located throughout the exhaust duct to continuously ignite any unburned hydrogen), jet mixing (utilizing large volumes of high pressure air to ensure complete combustion of the hydrogen), steam inert (utilizing flashing hot water to inert the duct with steam) and open duct concept (design an open duct or above grade J-deflector to avoid trapping hydrogen gas). Extensive studies, analyses and testing were performed at six test sites with technical support from twenty-two major organizations. In December 1986, the Air Force selected the steam inert concept to be utilized at the Vandenberg launch complex and authorized the design effort.

  9. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M.

    2015-11-01

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  10. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A. El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M. E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  11. Gas Cromatography In Solar System Exploration:decoding Complex Chromatograms Recovered From Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrogrande, M. C.; Tellini, I.; Dondi, F.; Felinger, A.; Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Vidal-Madjar, C.

    GC plays a predominant role in solar system explorations: it has been applied to space research related to exobiology: i.e., Cassini-Huygens mission devoted to characterize chemical composition of TitanSs atmosphere [2], Rosetta mission to investigate the nucleus of comet p/Wirtamen (COSAC experiments) [1]. GC analysis of planetary atmosphere is a difficult analytical task because of the unknown and low level of an- alytes present in the sample, the high degree of automatization required, the strong constraints due to the flight (short analysis time, low power consumption, high accu- racy and reliability under extreme space conditions). In these circumstances the use of a signal processing procedure is practically mandatory to efficiently extract useful in- formation from the raw chromatogram ­ i.e. to decode the complex chromatogram to determine the number of components, the separation efficiency and the retention pat- tern. In this work a chemometric approach based on the Fourier analysis is applied to complex chromatograms related to space research: from the autocovariance function (ACVF) computed on the digitized chromatogram, the chromatographic parameters ­ number of components, peak shape parameters, retention pattern ­ can be estimated [3-7]. The procedure, originally developed for constant peak width [3], was extended to variable peak width [4], in order to describe chromatograms obtained in isother- mal conditions, i.e., analysis condition compatible with space flight constraints. The chemometric procedure was applied to chromatograms of standard mixtures repre- sentative of planetary atmospheres ­ hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds with carbon atom number ranging from 2 to 8 ­ obtained in flight simulating conditions ­ isothermal or pseudo-isothermal conditions. Both the simplified graphic procedure, based on the assumption of constant peak width [3], and the complete approach de- veloped for variable peak width [4], were applied and the results

  12. Space applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 4: Application of ARAMIS capabilities to space project functional elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities and their related ground support functions are studied, so that informed decisions can be made on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The specific tasks which will be required by future space project tasks are identified and the relative merits of these options are evaluated. The ARAMIS options defined and researched span the range from fully human to fully machine, including a number of intermediate options (e.g., humans assisted by computers, and various levels of teleoperation). By including this spectrum, the study searches for the optimum mix of humans and machines for space project tasks.

  13. Numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The following papers are presented: (1) numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the Integrated Space Shuttle vehicle; (2) a generalized scheme for 3-D hyperbolic grid generation; (3) collar grids for intersecting geometric components within the Chimera overlapped grid scheme; and (4) application of the Chimera overlapped grid scheme to simulation of Space Shuttle ascent flows.

  14. Optimized image acquisition for breast tomosynthesis in projection and reconstruction space

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Baker, Jay A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-11-15

    Breast tomosynthesis has been an exciting new development in the field of breast imaging. While the diagnostic improvement via tomosynthesis is notable, the full potential of tomosynthesis has not yet been realized. This may be attributed to the dependency of the diagnostic quality of tomosynthesis on multiple variables, each of which needs to be optimized. Those include dose, number of angular projections, and the total angular span of those projections. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of these acquisition parameters on the overall diagnostic image quality of breast tomosynthesis in both the projection and reconstruction space. Five mastectomy specimens were imaged using a prototype tomosynthesis system. 25 angular projections of each specimen were acquired at 6.2 times typical single-view clinical dose level. Images at lower dose levels were then simulated using a noise modification routine. Each projection image was supplemented with 84 simulated 3 mm 3D lesions embedded at the center of 84 nonoverlapping ROIs. The projection images were then reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm at different combinations of acquisition parameters to investigate which of the many possible combinations maximizes the performance. Performance was evaluated in terms of a Laguerre-Gauss channelized Hotelling observer model-based measure of lesion detectability. The analysis was also performed without reconstruction by combining the model results from projection images using Bayesian decision fusion algorithm. The effect of acquisition parameters on projection images and reconstructed slices were then compared to derive an optimization rule for tomosynthesis. The results indicated that projection images yield comparable but higher performance than reconstructed images. Both modes, however, offered similar trends: Performance improved with an increase in the total acquisition dose level and the angular span. Using a constant dose level and angular

  15. Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.

    2012-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced, 6-meter-long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and aboveground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall-of-potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the grounding impedance of the downconductors, an Earth Ground Clamp (EGC) (a stakeless device for measuring grounding impedance) and an Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model of the LPS are used. The EGC is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor, and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding resistance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the EGC measurements.

  16. Virtual prototype interface for the Air Force Manned SpacePlane project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.; Lewis, John; Johnson, Troy D.

    1998-08-01

    The advent of requirements for worldwide deployment of space assets in support of Air Force operational missions has resulted in the need for a Manned SpacePlane (MSP) that can perform these missions with minimal preflight preparation and little, if any, in-orbit support from a mission control center. Because successful mission accomplishment will depend almost completely upon the MSP crew and the on-board capabilities of the spaceplane, the MSP user interface is a crucial component of successful mission accomplishment. In recognition of this fact, the USAF Phillips Laboratory in conjunction with USAF Space Command initiated the Virtual SpacePlane (VSP) project. To function effectively as an MSP interface development platform, the VSP must demonstrate the capability to simulate anticipated MSP missions and portray the MSP in operation throughout its entire flight regime, from takeoff through space operations and on to recovery via a horizontal landing at an airfield. Therefore, we architected, designed, and implemented a complete VSP that can be used to simulate anticipated Manned SpacePlane missions. The primary objective of the VSP is to be a virtual prototype for user interface design and development, the VSP software architecture and design facilities uncovering, refining and validating MSP user interface requirements. The Virtual SpacePlane reuses software components developed for the Virtual Cockpit and Solar System Modeler (SM) distributed virtual environment (DVE) applications, the Common Object Database (CODB) architecture, and Information Pod (Pod) interface tools developed in our labs. The Virtual Cockpit and Solar System Modeler supplied baseline interface components and tools, 3D graphical models, vehicle motion dynamics models, and DVE communication capabilities. Because we knew that the VSP's requirements would expand and evolve over the life of the project, we use the CODB architecture to facilitate our use of Rapid Evolutionary and Exploratory

  17. Decoding of complex isothermal chromatograms recovered from space missions : identification of molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrogrande, M. C.; Tellini, I.; Pasti, L.; Dondi, F.; Szopa, C.; Sternberg, R.; Vidal-Madjar, C.

    2003-04-01

    In the scientific payloads of current or future space probes, gas chromatography (GC) plays a predominant role to separate and identify the chemical species present in the complex environments investigated (Titan, comets, Mars). Specific requirements are imposed by flight conditions: the strongest constraint concerns energy saving imposing temperature and pressure limitations, so that isothermal GC separations are the only ones compatible with flight constrains. The low separation performance obtained under isothermal conditions results in an increase in signal involving and peak overlapping, usually present in separations of multicomponent mixtures as planetary atmospheres are. In this case, it is mandatory to use a mathematical approach to deconvolve incompletely resolved peaks and to interpret the chromatogram, in order to extract all the analytical information hidden in it, that is “ decoding ” the complex chromatogram. In this paper a chemometric approach based on the Fourier analysis is reported. It is based on the computation of Autocovariance Function (ACVF) on the experimental chromatogram. ACVF plot constitutes a fingerprint of the chromatogram since, in contrast with the original chromatogram very crowded of peaks, it retains in a simpler plot all the information on the nature and relative abundance of the compounds present in the mixture. From ACVF plot, information on the atmosphere complexity, as well as on the separation system, can be easily extracted: the number of components present in the sample can be estimated and the performance of the analytical separation can be evaluated. In order to identify the presence of an ordered retention pattern a time axis transformation is proposed, since isothermal GC chromatograms look inhomogeneous and disordered with peak density decreasing at higher retention times. The time axis is transformed into a new scale based on the retention times of n-alkanes. The order introduced into the chromatogram by

  18. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuolo, M.; Giraudo, M.; Musenich, R.; Calvelli, V.; Ambroglini, F.; Burger, W. J.; Battiston, R.

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield - a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S).

    PubMed

    Vuolo, M; Giraudo, M; Musenich, R; Calvelli, V; Ambroglini, F; Burger, W J; Battiston, R

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield--a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat. PMID:26948010

  20. The Feed Materials Program of the Manhattan Project: A Foundational Component of the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2014-12-01

    The feed materials program of the Manhattan Project was responsible for procuring uranium-bearing ores and materials and processing them into forms suitable for use as source materials for the Project's uranium-enrichment factories and plutonium-producing reactors. This aspect of the Manhattan Project has tended to be overlooked in comparison with the Project's more dramatic accomplishments, but was absolutely vital to the success of those endeavors: without appropriate raw materials and the means to process them, nuclear weapons and much of the subsequent cold war would never have come to pass. Drawing from information available in Manhattan Engineer District Documents, this paper examines the sources and processing of uranium-bearing materials used in making the first nuclear weapons and how the feed materials program became a central foundational component of the postwar nuclear weapons complex.

  1. SpaceScience@Home: Authentic Research Projects that Use Citizen Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B. J. H.

    2008-06-01

    In recent years, several space science research projects have enlisted the help of large numbers of non-professional volunteers, ``citizen scientists'', to aid in performing tasks that are critical to a project, but require more person-time (or computing time) than a small professional research team can practically perform themselves. Examples of such projects include SETI@home, which uses time from volunteers computers to process radio-telescope observation looking for signals originating from extra-terrestrial intelligences; Clickworkers, which asks volunteers to review images of the surface of Mars to identify craters; Spacewatch, which used volunteers to review astronomical telescopic images of the sky to identify streaks made by possible Near Earth Asteroids; and Stardust@home, which asks volunteers to review ``focus movies'' taken of the Stardust interstellar dust aerogel collector to search for possible impacts from interstellar dust particles. We shall describe these and other similar projects and discuss lessons learned from carrying out such projects, including the educational opportunities they create.

  2. Twenty Years of Rad-Hard K14 SPAD in Space Projects.

    PubMed

    Michálek, Vojtěch; Procházka, Ivan; Blažej, Josef

    2015-01-01

    During last two decades, several photon counting detectors have been developed in our laboratory. One of the most promising detector coming from our group silicon K14 Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) is presented with its valuable features and space applications. Based on the control electronics, it can be operated in both gated and non-gated mode. Although it was designed for photon counting detection, it can be employed for multiphoton detection as well. With respect to control electronics employed, the timing jitter can be as low as 20 ps RMS. Detection efficiency is about 40%in range of 500 nm to 800 nm. The detector including gating and quenching circuitry has outstanding timing stability. Due to its radiation resistivity, the diode withstands 100 krad gamma ray dose without parameters degradation. Single photon detectors based on K14 SPAD were used for planetary altimeter and atmospheric lidar in MARS92/96 and Mars Surveyor '98 space projects, respectively. Recent space applications of K14 SPAD comprises LIDAR and mainly time transfer between ground stations and artificial satellites. These include Laser Time Transfer, Time Transfer by Laser Link, and European Laser Timing projects. PMID:26213945

  3. Twenty Years of Rad-Hard K14 SPAD in Space Projects

    PubMed Central

    Michálek, Vojtěch; Procházka, Ivan; Blažej, Josef

    2015-01-01

    During last two decades, several photon counting detectors have been developed in our laboratory. One of the most promising detector coming from our group silicon K14 Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) is presented with its valuable features and space applications. Based on the control electronics, it can be operated in both gated and non-gated mode. Although it was designed for photon counting detection, it can be employed for multiphoton detection as well. With respect to control electronics employed, the timing jitter can be as low as 20 ps RMS. Detection efficiency is about 40 % in range of 500 nm to 800 nm. The detector including gating and quenching circuitry has outstanding timing stability. Due to its radiation resistivity, the diode withstands 100 krad gamma ray dose without parameters degradation. Single photon detectors based on K14 SPAD were used for planetary altimeter and atmospheric lidar in MARS92/96 and Mars Surveyor ’98 space projects, respectively. Recent space applications of K14 SPAD comprises LIDAR and mainly time transfer between ground stations and artificial satellites. These include Laser Time Transfer, Time Transfer by Laser Link, and European Laser Timing projects. PMID:26213945

  4. Developing integrated parametric planning models for budgeting and managing complex projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etnyre, Vance A.; Black, Ken U.

    1988-01-01

    The applicability of integrated parametric models for the budgeting and management of complex projects is investigated. Methods for building a very flexible, interactive prototype for a project planning system, and software resources available for this purpose, are discussed and evaluated. The prototype is required to be sensitive to changing objectives, changing target dates, changing costs relationships, and changing budget constraints. To achieve the integration of costs and project and task durations, parametric cost functions are defined by a process of trapezoidal segmentation, where the total cost for the project is the sum of the various project cost segments, and each project cost segment is the integral of a linearly segmented cost loading function over a specific interval. The cost can thus be expressed algebraically. The prototype was designed using Lotus-123 as the primary software tool. This prototype implements a methodology for interactive project scheduling that provides a model of a system that meets most of the goals for the first phase of the study and some of the goals for the second phase.

  5. Composite pattern structured light projection for human computer interaction in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Chun; Hassebrook, Laurence G.; Lau, Daniel L.; Yalla, Veera Ganesh

    2005-05-01

    Interacting with computer technology while wearing a space suit is difficult at best. We present a sensor that can interpret body gestures in 3-Dimensions. Having the depth dimension allows simple thresholding to isolate the hands as well as use their positioning and orientation as input controls to digital devices such as computers and/or robotic devices. Structured light pattern projection is a well known method of accurately extracting 3-Dimensional information of a scene. Traditional structured light methods require several different patterns to recover the depth, without ambiguity and albedo sensitivity, and are corrupted by object motion during the projection/capture process. The authors have developed a methodology for combining multiple patterns into a single composite pattern by using 2-Dimensional spatial modulation techniques. A single composite pattern projection does not require synchronization with the camera so the data acquisition rate is only limited by the video rate. We have incorporated dynamic programming to greatly improve the resolution of the scan. Other applications include machine vision, remote controlled robotic interfacing in space, advanced cockpit controls and computer interfacing for the disabled. We will present performance analysis, experimental results and video examples.

  6. Environmental Assessment for Central Campus Complex John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankert, Donald

    2013-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the Proposed Action to consolidate multiple facilities in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Industrial Area by constructing two new buildings in the existing headquarters area between NASA Parkway, 3rd Street, C Avenue, and D Avenue. Under the Proposed Action, the historic Headquarters Building will be demolished and a new building will be constructed closer to the Operations and Checkout Building by centering it on D A venue (Hunton Brady Architects, P A and Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. 2011). This option was selected from a group of 15 initial sketches as the most viable option during a Central Campus Complex Siting Study completed in February 2011. A No-Action Alternative is also presented in which no demolition or construction of new facilities would occur. Implementing the Proposed Action will have major impacts to cultural resources, while the remaining environmental impacts will be minor.

  7. Computational Methodologies for Real-Space Structural Refinement of Large Macromolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Goh, Boon Chong; Hadden, Jodi A; Bernardi, Rafael C; Singharoy, Abhishek; McGreevy, Ryan; Rudack, Till; Cassidy, C Keith; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    The rise of the computer as a powerful tool for model building and refinement has revolutionized the field of structure determination for large biomolecular systems. Despite the wide availability of robust experimental methods capable of resolving structural details across a range of spatiotemporal resolutions, computational hybrid methods have the unique ability to integrate the diverse data from multimodal techniques such as X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy into consistent, fully atomistic structures. Here, commonly employed strategies for computational real-space structural refinement are reviewed, and their specific applications are illustrated for several large macromolecular complexes: ribosome, virus capsids, chemosensory array, and photosynthetic chromatophore. The increasingly important role of computational methods in large-scale structural refinement, along with current and future challenges, is discussed. PMID:27145875

  8. Automated identification of mitochondrial regions in complex intracellular space by texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan D.

    2014-01-01

    Automated processing and quantification of biological images have been rapidly increasing the attention of researchers in image processing and pattern recognition because the roles of computerized image and pattern analyses are critical for new biological findings and drug discovery based on modern high-throughput and highcontent image screening. This paper presents a study of the automated detection of regions of mitochondria, which are a subcellular structure of eukaryotic cells, in microscopy images. The automated identification of mitochondria in intracellular space that is captured by the state-of-the-art combination of focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope imaging reported here is the first of its type. Existing methods and a proposed algorithm for texture analysis were tested with the real intracellular images. The high correction rate of detecting the locations of the mitochondria in a complex environment suggests the effectiveness of the proposed study.

  9. Space Shuttle Main Engine Quantitative Risk Assessment: Illustrating Modeling of a Complex System with a New QRA Software Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Christian

    1998-01-01

    During 1997, a team from Hernandez Engineering, MSFC, Rocketdyne, Thiokol, Pratt & Whitney, and USBI completed the first phase of a two year Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) of the Space Shuttle. The models for the Shuttle systems were entered and analyzed by a new QRA software package. This system, termed the Quantitative Risk Assessment System(QRAS), was designed by NASA and programmed by the University of Maryland. The software is a groundbreaking PC-based risk assessment package that allows the user to model complex systems in a hierarchical fashion. Features of the software include the ability to easily select quantifications of failure modes, draw Event Sequence Diagrams(ESDs) interactively, perform uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, and document the modeling. This paper illustrates both the approach used in modeling and the particular features of the software package. The software is general and can be used in a QRA of any complex engineered system. The author is the project lead for the modeling of the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs), and this paper focuses on the modeling completed for the SSMEs during 1997. In particular, the groundrules for the study, the databases used, the way in which ESDs were used to model catastrophic failure of the SSMES, the methods used to quantify the failure rates, and how QRAS was used in the modeling effort are discussed. Groundrules were necessary to limit the scope of such a complex study, especially with regard to a liquid rocket engine such as the SSME, which can be shut down after ignition either on the pad or in flight. The SSME was divided into its constituent components and subsystems. These were ranked on the basis of the possibility of being upgraded and risk of catastrophic failure. Once this was done the Shuttle program Hazard Analysis and Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) were used to create a list of potential failure modes to be modeled. The groundrules and other criteria were used to screen

  10. Patterns of patient safety culture: a complexity and arts-informed project of knowledge translation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gail J; Tregunno, Deborah; Gray, Julia; Ginsberg, Liane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe patterns of patient safety culture that emerged from an innovative collaboration among health services researchers and fine arts colleagues. The group engaged in an arts-informed knowledge translation project to produce a dramatic expression of patient safety culture research for inclusion in a symposium. Scholars have called for a deeper understanding of the complex interrelationships among structure, process and outcomes relating to patient safety. Four patterns of patient safety culture--blinding familiarity, unyielding determination, illusion of control and dismissive urgency--are described with respect to how they informed creation of an arts-informed project for knowledge translation. PMID:22273559

  11. Generalized Projective Synchronization between Two Complex Networks with Time-Varying Coupling Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mei; Zeng, Chang-Yan; Tian, Li-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Generalized projective synchronization (GPS) between two complex networks with time-varying coupling delay is investigated. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, a nonlinear controller and adaptive updated laws are designed. Feasibility of the proposed scheme is proven in theory. Moreover, two numerical examples are presented, using the energy resource system and Lü's system [Physica A 382 (2007) 672] as the nodes of the networks. GPS between two energy resource complex networks with time-varying coupling delay is achieved. This study can widen the application range of the generalized synchronization methods and will be instructive for the demand-supply of energy resource in some regions of China.

  12. Small Project Rapid Integration and Test Environment (SPRITE) An Innovation Space for Small Projects Design, Development, Integration, and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ashley; Rackoczy, John; Heater, Daniel; Sanders, Devon; Tashakkor, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few years interest in the development and use of small satellites has rapidly gained momentum with universities, commercial, and government organizations. In a few years we may see networked clusters of dozens or even hundreds of small, cheap, easily replaceable satellites working together in place of the large, expensive and difficult-to-replace satellites now in orbit. Standards based satellite buses and deployment mechanisms, such as the CubeSat and Poly Pico-satellite Orbital Deployer (P-POD), have stimulated growth in this area. The use of small satellites is also proving to be a cost effective capability in many areas traditionally dominated by large satellites, though many challenges remain. Currently many of these small satellites undergo very little testing prior to flight. As these small satellites move from technology demonstration and student projects toward more complex operational assets, it is expected that the standards for verification and validation will increase.

  13. A Laplace operator and harmonics on the quantum complex vector space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorgov, N. Z.; Klimyk, A. U.

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this article is to study the q-Laplace operator and q-harmonic polynomials on the quantum complex vector space generated by elements zi,wi, i=1,2,…,n, on which the quantum group GLq(n) [or Uq(n)] acts. The q-harmonic polynomials are defined as solutions of the equation Δqp=0, where p is a polynomial in zi,wi, i=1,2,…,n, and the q-Laplace operator Δq is determined in terms of q-derivatives. The q-Laplace operator Δq commutes with the action of GLq(n). The projector Hm,m':Am,m'→Hm,m' is constructed, where Am,m' and Hm,m' are the spaces of homogeneous (of degree m in zi and of degree m' in wi) polynomials and homogeneous q-harmonic polynomials, respectively. By using these projectors, a q-analog of the classical zonal spherical and associated spherical harmonics are constructed. They constitute an orthogonal basis of Hm,m'. A q-analog of separation of variables is given. The quantum algebra Uq(gln), acting on Hm,m', determines an irreducible representation of Uq(gln). This action is explicitly constructed. The results of the article lead to the dual pair (Uq(sl2),Uq(gln)) of quantum algebras.

  14. Thorough exploration of complex environments with a space-based potential field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenealy, Alina; Primiano, Nicholas; Keyes, Alex; Lyons, Damian M.

    2015-01-01

    Robotic exploration, for the purposes of search and rescue or explosive device detection, can be improved by using a team of multiple robots. Potential field navigation methods offer natural and efficient distributed exploration algorithms in which team members are mutually repelled to spread out and cover the area efficiently. However, they also suffer from field minima issues. Liu and Lyons proposed a Space-Based Potential Field (SBPF) algorithm that disperses robots efficiently and also ensures they are driven in a distributed fashion to cover complex geometry. In this paper, the approach is modified to handle two problems with the original SBPF method: fast exploration of enclosed spaces, and fast navigation of convex obstacles. Firstly, a "gate-sensing" function was implemented. The function draws the robot to narrow openings, such as doors or corridors that it might otherwise pass by, to ensure every room can be explored. Secondly, an improved obstacle field conveyor belt function was developed which allows the robot to avoid walls and barriers while using their surface as a motion guide to avoid being trapped. Simulation results, where the modified SPBF program controls the MobileSim Pioneer 3-AT simulator program, are presented for a selection of maps that capture difficult to explore geometries. Physical robot results are also presented, where a team of Pioneer 3-AT robots is controlled by the modified SBPF program. Data collected prior to the improvements, new simulation results, and robot experiments are presented as evidence of performance improvements.

  15. Rapid Cost Assessment of Space Mission Concepts through Application of Complexity Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Craig; Cutts, James; Balint, Tibor; Hall, James B.

    2008-01-01

    In 2005, the Solar System Exploration Strategic Roadmap Conmrittee (chartered by NASA to develop the roadmap for Solar System Exploration Missions for the coming decades) found itself posed with the difficult problem of sorting through several mission concepts and determining their relative costs. While detailed mission studies are the normal approach to costing, neither the budget nor schedule allotted to the conmrittee could support such studies. Members of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) supporting the conmrittee were given the challenge of developing a semi-quantitative approach that could provide the relative costs of these missions, without requiring an in depth study of the missions. In response to this challenge, a rapid cost assessment methodology based on a set of mission cost/complexity indexes was developed. This methodology also underwent two separate validations, one comparing its results when applied to historical missions, and another comparing its estimates against those of veteran space mission managers. Remarkably good agreement was achieved, suggesting that this approach provides an effective early indication of space mission costs.

  16. NASA systems autonomy demonstration project: Advanced automation demonstration of Space Station Freedom thermal control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Jeffrey; Bull, John; Healey, Kathleen J.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project (SADP) was initiated in response to Congressional interest in Space station automation technology demonstration. The SADP is a joint cooperative effort between Ames Research Center (ARC) and Johnson Space Center (JSC) to demonstrate advanced automation technology feasibility using the Space Station Freedom Thermal Control System (TCS) test bed. A model-based expert system and its operator interface were developed by knowledge engineers, AI researchers, and human factors researchers at ARC working with the domain experts and system integration engineers at JSC. Its target application is a prototype heat acquisition and transport subsystem of a space station TCS. The demonstration is scheduled to be conducted at JSC in August, 1989. The demonstration will consist of a detailed test of the ability of the Thermal Expert System to conduct real time normal operations (start-up, set point changes, shut-down) and to conduct fault detection, isolation, and recovery (FDIR) on the test article. The FDIR will be conducted by injecting ten component level failures that will manifest themselves as seven different system level faults. Here, the SADP goals, are described as well as the Thermal Control Expert System that has been developed for demonstration.

  17. End-to-End Data System Architecture for the Space Station Biological Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mian, Arshad; Scimemi, Sam; Adeni, Kaiser; Picinich, Lou; Ramos, Rubin (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) Is developing hardware referred to as the "facility" for providing life sciences research capability on the International Space Station. This hardware includes several biological specimen habitats, habitat holding racks, a centrifuge and a glovebox. An SSBRP end to end data system architecture has been developed to allow command and control of the facility from the ground, either with crew assistance or autonomously. The data system will be capable of handling commands, sensor data, and video from multiple cameras. The data will traverse through several onboard and ground networks and processing entities including the SSBRP and Space Station onboard and ground data systems. A large number of onboard and ground (,entities of the data system are being developed by the Space Station Program, other NASA centers and the International Partners. The SSBRP part of the system which includes the habitats, holding racks, and the ground operations center, User Operations Facility (UOF) will be developed by a multitude of geographically distributed development organizations. The SSBRP has the responsibility to define the end to end data and communications systems to make the interfaces manageable and verifiable with multiple contractors with widely varying development constraints and schedules. This paper provides an overview of the SSBRP end-to-end data system. Specifically, it describes the hardware, software and functional interactions of individual systems, and interface requirements among various entities of the end-to-end system.

  18. X-37 Flight Demonstrator Project: Capabilities for Future Space Transportation System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The X-37 Approach and Landing Vehicle (ALTV) is an automated (unmanned) spacecraft designed to reduce technical risk in the descent and landing phases of flight. ALTV mission requirements and Orbital Vehicle (OV) technology research and development (R&D) goals are formulated to validate and mature high-payoff ground and flight technologies such as Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). It has been more than three decades since the Space Shuttle was designed and built. Real-world hardware experience gained through the multitude of X-37 Project activities has expanded both Government and industry knowledge of the challenges involved in developing new generations of spacecraft that can fulfill the Vision for Space Exploration.

  19. The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Project's Current Products and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Dankanich, John; Munk, Michelle M.; Pencil, Eric; Liou, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 2001, the objective of the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project has been developing and delivering in-space propulsion technologies that enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for future NASA flagship and sample return missions currently under consideration, as well as having broad applicability to future Discovery and New Frontiers mission solicitations. This paper provides status of the technology development, applicability, and availability of in-space propulsion technologies that recently completed, or will be completing within the next year, their technology development and are ready for infusion into missions. The paper also describes the ISPT project s future focus on propulsion for sample return missions. The ISPT technologies completing their development are: 1) the high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost; 2) NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system; and 3) aerocapture technologies which include thermal protection system (TPS) materials and structures, guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; and atmospheric and aerothermal effect models. The future technology development areas for ISPT are: 1) Planetary Ascent Vehicles (PAV); 2) multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV) needed for sample return missions from many different destinations; 3) propulsion for Earth Return Vehicles (ERV) and transfer stages, and electric propulsion for sample return and low cost missions; 4) advanced propulsion technologies for sample return; and 5) Systems/Mission Analysis focused on sample return propulsion.

  20. Project Based Learning experiences in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; del Cura, Juan M.; Ezquerro, José M.; Lapuerta, Victoria; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the innovation activities performed in the field of space education since the academic year 2009/10 at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the Spanish User Support and Operations Center (E-USOC), the center assigned by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations of scientific experiments on board the International Space Station. These activities have been integrated within the last year of the UPM Aerospace Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite using demonstrator satellites. In parallel, the students participate in a Project Based Learning (PBL) training process in which they work in groups to develop the conceptual design of a space mission. One student in each group takes the role of project manager, another one is responsible for the mission design and the rest are each responsible for the design of one of the satellite subsystems. A ground station has also been set up with the help of students developing their final thesis, which will allow future students to perform training sessions and learn how to communicate with satellites, how to receive telemetry and how to process the data. Several surveys have been conducted along two academic years to evaluate the impact of these techniques in engineering learning. The surveys evaluate the acquisition of specific and generic competences, as well as the students' degree of satisfaction with respect to the use of these learning methodologies. The results of the surveys and the perception of the lecturers show that PBL encourages students' motivation and improves their results. They not only acquire better technical training, but also improve their transversal skills. It is also pointed out that this methodology requires more dedication from lecturers than traditional methods.

  1. Some properties of dark matter field in the complex octonion space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The paper aims to consider the electromagnetic adjoint-field in the complex octonion space as the dark matter field, describing some properties of the dark matter, especially the origin, particle category, existence region, force and so forth. Since Maxwell applied the algebra of quaternions to depict the electromagnetic theory, some scholars adopt the complex quaternion and octonion to study the physics property of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. In the paper, by means of the octonion operator, it is found that the gravitational field accompanies with one adjoint-field, whose property is partly similar to that of electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field accompanies with another adjoint-field, whose feature is partly similar to that of gravitational field. As a result, the electromagnetic adjoint-field can be chosen as one candidate of the dark matter field. According to the electromagnetic adjoint-field, it is able to predict a few properties of the dark matter, for instance, the particle category, interaction intensity, interaction distance, existence region and so forth. The study reveals that the dark matter particle and the gravitational resource will be influenced by the gravitational strength and force. The dark matter field is capable of making a contribution to physics quantities of gravitational field, including the angular momentum, torque, energy, force and so on. Further, there may be comparatively more chances to discover the dark matter in some regions with the ultrastrong field strength, surrounding the neutral star, white dwarf, galactic nucleus, black hole, astrophysical jet and so on.

  2. Efficient embedding of complex networks to hyperbolic space via their Laplacian

    PubMed Central

    Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Mier, Pablo; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    The different factors involved in the growth process of complex networks imprint valuable information in their observable topologies. How to exploit this information to accurately predict structural network changes is the subject of active research. A recent model of network growth sustains that the emergence of properties common to most complex systems is the result of certain trade-offs between node birth-time and similarity. This model has a geometric interpretation in hyperbolic space, where distances between nodes abstract this optimisation process. Current methods for network hyperbolic embedding search for node coordinates that maximise the likelihood that the network was produced by the afore-mentioned model. Here, a different strategy is followed in the form of the Laplacian-based Network Embedding, a simple yet accurate, efficient and data driven manifold learning approach, which allows for the quick geometric analysis of big networks. Comparisons against existing embedding and prediction techniques highlight its applicability to network evolution and link prediction. PMID:27445157

  3. Goniospectrometric space: identifiable presentation of spectral goniometric data for complex diffractive samples.

    PubMed

    Rogelj, Nina; Penttinen, Niko; Čekada, Miha; Gunde, Marta Klanjšek

    2016-03-10

    Optical security takes advantage of complex gonioapparent effects of diffractive samples having strong angular and spectral dependence of reflected light. However, resolving the full angular and spectral properties of these kinds of targets might be a tremendous task. Preferably, one would like to measure a more limited number of illumination-viewing directions, using a multiangle goniometer, and still reveal the complex and unique properties of the target. In this study, we use a method for converting the full angular reflection data into reduced goniospectrometric space and further on into an xDNA graph, which we find to show good potential as a fingerprint for gonioapparent surfaces when limited measurement geometries are available. For the evaluation of the xDNA graph, we use two goniometric devices with a 45° incident angle illumination, a high-resolution bidirectional spectrometer, and a portable multiangle goniometer. This study tests the xDNA graph by evaluating the effects of geometry count and spectral resolution in goniometric measurements and further finds that the xDNA graph indeed works best with a reduced count of geometries and is not sensitive to lowered spectral resolution. PMID:26974801

  4. Efficient embedding of complex networks to hyperbolic space via their Laplacian.

    PubMed

    Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Mier, Pablo; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    The different factors involved in the growth process of complex networks imprint valuable information in their observable topologies. How to exploit this information to accurately predict structural network changes is the subject of active research. A recent model of network growth sustains that the emergence of properties common to most complex systems is the result of certain trade-offs between node birth-time and similarity. This model has a geometric interpretation in hyperbolic space, where distances between nodes abstract this optimisation process. Current methods for network hyperbolic embedding search for node coordinates that maximise the likelihood that the network was produced by the afore-mentioned model. Here, a different strategy is followed in the form of the Laplacian-based Network Embedding, a simple yet accurate, efficient and data driven manifold learning approach, which allows for the quick geometric analysis of big networks. Comparisons against existing embedding and prediction techniques highlight its applicability to network evolution and link prediction. PMID:27445157

  5. Automation and robotics for the Space Exploration Initiative: Results from Project Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, D.; Criswell, D.; Heer, E.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 52 submissions were received in the Automation and Robotics (A&R) area during Project Outreach. About half of the submissions (24) contained concepts that were judged to have high utility for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) and were analyzed further by the robotics panel. These 24 submissions are analyzed here. Three types of robots were proposed in the high scoring submissions: structured task robots (STRs), teleoperated robots (TORs), and surface exploration robots. Several advanced TOR control interface technologies were proposed in the submissions. Many A&R concepts or potential standards were presented or alluded to by the submitters, but few specific technologies or systems were suggested.

  6. Ada compiler evaluation on the Space Station Freedom Software Support Environment project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the work in progress to select the Ada compilers for the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) Software Support Environment (SSE) project. The purpose of the SSE Ada compiler evaluation team is to establish the criteria, test suites, and benchmarks to be used for evaluating Ada compilers for the mainframes, workstations, and the realtime target for flight- and ground-based computers. The combined efforts and cooperation of the customer, subcontractors, vendors, academia and SIGAda groups made it possible to acquire the necessary background information, benchmarks, test suites, and criteria used.

  7. Monitoring the Communication Channel from Puschshino to Moscow in the Project of Space Radio Telescope "radioastron"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumsky, D. V.; Isaev, E. A.; Samodurov, V. A.; Isaev, K. A.

    The need for transmission and storage of large amounts of scientific data in the project space radio telescope "Radioastron" required us to organize a reliable communication channel between the tracking station in Pushchino and treatment centers in Moscow. Network management data requires us to an integrated approach and covers the organization secure access to manage network devices, timely replacement of equipment and software upgrades, backups, as well as documentation of the network infrastructure. The reliability of the channel is highly dependent on continuous monitoring of network and server equipment and communication lines.

  8. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety fuels program. Progress report, February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Maraman, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are: General-Purpose Heat Source Development and Space Nuclear Safety and Fuels. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work.

  9. Space Weathering of S-Complex Asteroids in the UV/Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Faith; Hendrix, Amanda

    2015-08-01

    In the inner Solar System, space weathering affects spectra of Solar System bodies by darkening and reddening their surface materials, as well as degrading absorption features, at VNIR wavelengths. At UV/VIS wavelengths, a bluing of the spectral reflectance and, in some cases, a spectral reversal is observed. These effects are well documented for the Moon, where they are apparent in spectra of natural lunar soils, but not seen in spectra of powdered lunar rock samples. The cause of this weathering is likely grain coatings caused by vapor deposition of submicroscopic iron, through solar wind irradiation, micrometeorite or heavy ion bombardment of the bodies’ surfaces. Space weathering has been proposed as the source of spectral differences between ordinary chondrite meteorites and their proposed parent bodies, S-complex asteroids. Our work has shown that the effect in the UV/blue spectral region for S-complex asteroids is consistent with the addition of iron or iron-bearing minerals. Opaque materials (e.g., ilmenite) are dominated by surface scattering, controlled by Fresnel reflection, and are therefore spectrally flat over a wide range of wavelengths. Thus, compared to non-opaque mafic silicate minerals, opaque, iron-bearing minerals can be relatively bright at FUV-NUV wavelengths. In the 150-450 nm range, the non-opaques experience a decrease in brightness as they transition from reflectance dominated by volume scattering to reflectance dominated by surface scattering, while opaques are spectrally flat. Therefore, in the 150-450 nm range, we expect surfaces consisting of iron-bearing opaques to be less spectrally red and potentially brighter than surfaces with lower amounts of iron-bearing minerals. Modeling of the effects of the addition of small amounts of npFe0 to both a theoretical combination of minerals and a terrestrial basalt shows that the addition of 0.0001% npFe0 affects the reflectance at UV/blue wavelengths, while the addition of 0.01% is required

  10. A Strategy for Autogeneration of Space Shuttle Ground Processing Simulation Models for Project Makespan Estimations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael G.; Wyrick, Roberta; O'Neill, Dale E.

    2005-01-01

    Space Shuttle Processing is a complicated and highly variable project. The planning and scheduling problem, categorized as a Resource Constrained - Stochastic Project Scheduling Problem (RC-SPSP), has a great deal of variability in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) process flow from one flight to the next. Simulation Modeling is a useful tool in estimation of the makespan of the overall process. However, simulation requires a model to be developed, which itself is a labor and time consuming effort. With such a dynamic process, often the model would potentially be out of synchronization with the actual process, limiting the applicability of the simulation answers in solving the actual estimation problem. Integration of TEAMS model enabling software with our existing schedule program software is the basis of our solution. This paper explains the approach used to develop an auto-generated simulation model from planning and schedule efforts and available data.

  11. Enabling technologies for space exploration systems: The STEPS project results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messidoro, Piero; Perino, Maria Antonietta; Boggiatto, Dario

    2013-05-01

    The project STEPS (Sistemi e Tecnologie per l'EsPlorazione Spaziale) is a joint development of technologies and systems for Space Exploration supported by Regione Piemonte, the European Regional Development Fund (E.R.D.F.) 2007-2013, Thales Alenia Space Italia (TAS-I), SMEs, Universities and public Research Centres belonging to the network "Comitato Distretto Aerospaziale del Piemonte" the Piedmont Aerospace District (PAD) in Italy. The project first part terminated in May 2012 with a final demonstration event that summarizes the technological results of research activities carried-out during a period the three years and half. The project developed virtual and hardware demonstrators for a range of technologies for the descent, soft landing and surface mobility of robotic and manned equipment for Moon and Mars exploration. The two key hardware demonstrators—a Mars Lander and a Lunar Rover—fit in a context of international cooperation for the exploration of Moon and Mars, as envisaged by Space Agencies worldwide. The STEPS project included also the development and utilization of a system of laboratories equipped for technology validation, teleoperations, concurrent design environments, and virtual reality simulation of the Exploration Systems in typical Moon and Mars environments. This paper presents the reached results in several technology domains like: vision-based GNC for the last portion of Mars Entry, Descent and Landing sequence, Hazard avoidance and complete spacecraft autonomy; Autonomous Rover Navigation, based on the determination of the terrain morphology by a stereo camera; Mobility and Mechanisms providing an Integrated Ground Mobility System, Rendezvous and Docking equipment, and protection from Environment effects; innovative Structures such as Inflatable, Smart and Multifunction Structures, an Active Shock Absorber for safe landing, balance restoring and walking; Composite materials Modelling and Monitoring; Human-machine interface features of a

  12. Electric Propulsion Requirements and Mission Analysis Under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudzinski, Leonard a.; Pencil, Eric J.; Dankanich, John W.

    2007-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology Project (ISPT) is currently NASA's sole investment in electric propulsion technologies. This project is managed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the NASA Headquarters Science Mission Directorate (SMD). The objective of the electric propulsion project area is to develop near-term and midterm electric propulsion technologies to enhance or enable future NASA science missions while minimizing risk and cost to the end user. Systems analysis activities sponsored by ISPT seek to identify future mission applications in order to quantify mission requirements, as well as develop analytical capability in order to facilitate greater understanding and application of electric propulsion and other propulsion technologies in the ISPT portfolio. These analyses guide technology investments by informing decisions and defining metrics for technology development to meet identified mission requirements. This paper discusses the missions currently being studied for electric propulsion by the ISPT project, and presents the results of recent electric propulsion (EP) mission trades. Recent ISPT systems analysis activities include: an initiative to standardize life qualification methods for various electric propulsion systems in order to retire perceived risk to proposed EP missions; mission analysis to identify EP requirements from Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship classes of missions; and an evaluation of system requirements for radioisotope-powered electric propulsion. Progress and early results of these activities is discussed where available.

  13. Quantification for complex assessment: uncertainty estimation in final year project thesis assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Sung

    2013-12-01

    A quantitative method for estimating an expected uncertainty (reliability and validity) in assessment results arising from the relativity between four variables, viz examiner's expertise, examinee's expertise achieved, assessment task difficulty and examinee's performance, was developed for the complex assessment applicable to final year project thesis assessment including peer assessment. A guide map can be generated by the method for finding expected uncertainties prior to the assessment implementation with a given set of variables. It employs a scale for visualisation of expertise levels, derivation of which is based on quantified clarities of mental images for levels of the examiner's expertise and the examinee's expertise achieved. To identify the relevant expertise areas that depend on the complexity in assessment format, a graphical continuum model was developed. The continuum model consists of assessment task, assessment standards and criterion for the transition towards the complex assessment owing to the relativity between implicitness and explicitness and is capable of identifying areas of expertise required for scale development.

  14. Technology Transfer--Bridging Space and Society. The Students of the Technology Transfer Design Project Team (ISU Summer Session 1997).

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Strategies, policies and methods by which technologies can he cross-fertilized between the space and non-space sectors were examined by students of the design project "Technology Transfer--Bridging Space and Society". This project was undertaken by students attending the 1997 10th Anniversary Summer Session Program of the International Space University. General issues relating to transfer of technology were discussed including definitions and mechanisms (push, pull, interactive and pro-active). As well as looking at case studies and the impact of national policies on space agencies, the design project also sought to look at technology transfer on a country-by-country basis, selecting various countries for scrutiny and reporting on their technology transfer status. The project report shows how transfer of technology varies between nations and when analyzed with the case studies identifies the general strategies, policies and methods in use and how they can he improved. Finally, the report seeks to recommend certain issues to governments, space agencies and industrial organizations to facilitate the transfer of technology. These include the development of a generic metrics system and the implementation of better appropriate procedures and mechanisms for a positive diffusion process between space and non-space sectors. PMID:11541148

  15. Etoile Project : Social Intelligent ICT-System for very large scale education in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgine, P.; Johnson, J.

    2009-04-01

    The project will devise new theory and implement new ICT-based methods of delivering high-quality low-cost postgraduate education to many thousands of people in a scalable way, with the cost of each extra student being negligible (< a few Euros). The research will create an in vivo laboratory of one to ten thousand postgraduate students studying courses in complex systems. This community is chosen because it is large and interdisciplinary and there is a known requirement for courses for thousand of students across Europe. The project involves every aspect of course production and delivery. Within this the research focused on the creation of a Socially Intelligent Resource Mining system to gather large volumes of high quality educational resources from the internet; new methods to deconstruct these to produce a semantically tagged Learning Object Database; a Living Course Ecology to support the creation and maintenance of evolving course materials; systems to deliver courses; and a ‘socially intelligent assessment system'. The system will be tested on one to ten thousand postgraduate students in Europe working towards the Complex System Society's title of European PhD in Complex Systems. Étoile will have a very high impact both scientifically and socially by (i) the provision of new scalable ICT-based methods for providing very low cost scientific education, (ii) the creation of new mathematical and statistical theory for the multiscale dynamics of complex systems, (iii) the provision of a working example of adaptation and emergence in complex socio-technical systems, and (iv) making a major educational contribution to European complex systems science and its applications.

  16. Crop Production for Advanced Life Support Systems - Observations From the Kennedy Space Center Breadboard Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Peterson, B. V.; Goins, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The use of plants for bioregenerative life support for space missions was first studied by the US Air Force in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive testing was also conducted from the 1960s through the 1980s by Russian researchers located at the Institute of Biophysics in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, and the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. NASA initiated bioregenerative research in the 1960s (e.g., Hydrogenomonas) but this research did not include testing with plants until about 1980, with the start of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program. The NASA CELSS research was carried out at universities, private corporations, and NASA field centers, including Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The project at KSC began in 1985 and was called the CELSS Breadboard Project to indicate the capability for plugging in and testing various life support technologies; this name has since been dropped but bioregenerative testing at KSC has continued to the present under the NASA s Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. A primary objective of the KSC testing was to conduct pre-integration tests with plants (crops) in a large, atmospherically closed test chamber called the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Test protocols for the BPC were based on observations and growing procedures developed by university investigators, as well as procedures developed in plant growth chamber studies at KSC. Growth chamber studies to support BPC testing focused on plant responses to different carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, different spectral qualities from various electric lamps, and nutrient film hydroponic culture techniques.

  17. Reconstruction and rendering of microcalcifications from two mammogram views by modified projective grid space (MPGS).

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Rong; Chung, Pau-Choo; Lee, Tong-Yee; Yang, Sheng-Chih; Lee, San-Kan

    2006-03-01

    Mammograms taken by two views: cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) views provide only 2D projections of the microcalcifications, which lack the depth information. Thus, envisioning the relative lesion location from mammograms is a challenge for radiologists. To assist radiologists in locating and rendering lesion tissues, a modified projective grid space (MPGS) scheme is proposed to reconstruct 3D microcalcifications. The MPGS scheme reconstructs 3D microcalcifications in a unique space defined by corresponding points and the epipoles retrieved from the fundamental matrix of the CC and MLO views. Since only corresponding points of images are required in the proposed MPGS scheme, we can avoid the difficulty associated with most reconstruction approaches that require prior complicated calibration of X-ray machine. Considering the deformation of the breast, a new method based on the concept of bundle adjustment is proposed to rectify the 3D locations of reconstructed microcalcifications by uncompressed breast model reconstructed from the real patient body using MPGS scheme with iterative closest point (ICP). Then, the reconstructed microcalcifications are augmented in the real patient body model to show their relative positions. PMID:16500078

  18. Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project Y-12 National Security Complex Site Report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    This report has been prepared to summarize the findings of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) Mass Balance Project and to support preparation of associated U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) site reports. The project was conducted in support of DOE efforts to assess the potential for health and environmental issues resulting from the presence of transuranic (TRU) elements and fission products in recycled uranium (RU) processed by DOE and its predecessor agencies. The United States government used uranium in fission reactors to produce plutonium and tritium for nuclear weapons production. Because uranium was considered scarce relative to demand when these operations began almost 50 years ago, the spent fuel from U.S. fission reactors was processed to recover uranium for recycling. The estimated mass balance for highly enriched RU, which is of most concern for worker exposure and is the primary focus of this project, is summarized in a table. A discrepancy in the mass balance between receipts and shipments (plus inventory and waste) reflects an inability to precisely distinguish between RU and non-RU shipments and receipts involving the Y-12 Complex and Savannah River. Shipments of fresh fuel (non-RU) and sweetener (also non-RU) were made from the Y-12 Complex to Savannah River along with RU shipments. The only way to distinguish between these RU and non-RU streams using available records is by enrichment level. Shipments of {le}90% enrichment were assumed to be RU. Shipments of >90% enrichment were assumed to be non-RU fresh fuel or sweetener. This methodology using enrichment level to distinguish between RU and non-RU results in good estimates of RU flows that are reasonably consistent with Savannah River estimates. Although this is the best available means of distinguishing RU streams, this method does leave a difference of approximately 17.3 MTU between receipts and shipments. Slightly depleted RU streams received by the Y-12 Complex from ORGDP and

  19. Operational evaluation of the EXEMSI project. Experimental Campaign for the European Manned Space Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Kass, J R; Ellmers, F; Schiemann, J

    1996-01-01

    In general the EXEMSI project has proved to be very successful mission. It has demonstrated that it is indeed possible to perform a major and useful project in a short time and on a moderate budget. In addition to achieving the scientific objectives, this simulation project provided valuable experience in the training of members of chamber crew and ground control crew for their tasks. It covered all aspects of a mission from call for experiment proposals, crew selection and training, integration and testing of the facility and its equipment, to daily monitoring and managing of the mission, and finally post-isolation data collection and evaluation. These other activities were accomplished by a small team of experts in the astoundingly short time of 8 months. What was lacking in manpower, time and funds, was more than made up for by enthusiasm, expertise, team spirit, hard work and long hours well beyond the call of duty of all those involved. In addition to the specific and technological objectives reached, many lessons learned in this operation have been identified, which could help to improve future missions. The experience has shown pitfalls to be avoided in future mission, as well as points where some small increase in effort can make a considerable difference. With the prospect of long-term manned spaceflights looming in the near future and the ever increasing costs of such endeavors, the possibilities offered by running simulated missions on the ground should be seriously considered. Such simulations permit the study of scientific and operational aspects of a space mission prior to its actual implementation. A ground based simulation of an extended space mission may be run at a fraction of the cost of an in-orbit precursor mission of even one-week duration. However, careful planning of the simulation mission is required so that it may yield relevant information and useful experience. Lessons learned from the EXEMSI project should be taken into account in such

  20. Status and Mission Applicability of NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Munk, Michelle M.; Dankanich, John; Pencil, Eric; Liou, Larry

    2009-01-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project develops propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. Since 2001, the ISPT project developed and delivered products to assist technology infusion and quantify mission applicability and benefits through mission analysis and tools. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for flagship destinations currently under evaluation, as well as having broad applicability to future Discovery and New Frontiers mission solicitations. This paper provides status of the technology development, near-term mission benefits, applicability, and availability of in-space propulsion technologies in the areas of advanced chemical thrusters, electric propulsion, aerocapture, and systems analysis tools. The current chemical propulsion investment is on the high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost. Investments in electric propulsion technologies focused on completing NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system, and the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAC) thruster, which is a mid-term product specifically designed for a low-cost electric propulsion option. Aerocapture investments developed a family of thermal protections system materials and structures; guidance, navigation, and control models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; atmospheric models for Earth, Titan, Mars and Venus; and models for aerothermal effects. In 2009 ISPT started the development of propulsion technologies that would enable future sample return missions. The paper describes the ISPT project's future focus on propulsion for sample return missions. The future technology development areas for ISPT is: Planetary Ascent Vehicles (PAV), with a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) being the initial development focus; multi-mission technologies for Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEV) needed

  1. The NASA Space Place: A Plethora of Games, Projects, and Fun Facts for Celebrating Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, N. J.; Fisher, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    out activities to tie in with the IYA April topic, Galaxies and the Distant Universe. The infrared Spitzer Space Telescope, as well as the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) spacecraft are strongly represented on The Space Place web site, with interactive games, images, and crafts that explore the wonders of and latest discoveries about galaxies. In addition, in our mailings and other partner communications throughout the year, we will feature special activities and projects on spaceplace.nasa.gov, and suggest ways to use these resources in IYA-related events.

  2. Projection- vs. selection-based model reduction of complex hydro-ecological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galelli, S.; Giuliani, M.; Castelletti, A.; Alsahaf, A.

    2014-12-01

    Projection-based model reduction is one of the most popular approaches used for the identification of reduced-order models (emulators). It is based on the idea of sampling from the original model various values, or snapshots, of the state variables, and then using these snapshots in a projection scheme to find a lower-dimensional subspace that captures the majority of the variation of the original model. The model is then projected onto this subspace and solved, yielding a computationally efficient emulator. Yet, this approach may unnecessarily increase the complexity of the emulator, especially when only a few state variables of the original model are relevant with respect to the output of interest. This is the case of complex hydro-ecological models, which typically account for a variety of water quality processes. On the other hand, selection-based model reduction uses the information contained in the snapshots to select the state variables of the original model that are relevant with respect to the emulator's output, thus allowing for model reduction. This provides a better trade-off between fidelity and model complexity, since the irrelevant and redundant state variables are excluded from the model reduction process. In this work we address these issues by presenting an exhaustive experimental comparison between two popular projection- and selection-based methods, namely Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and Dynamic Emulation Modelling (DEMo). The comparison is performed on the reduction of DYRESM-CAEDYM, a 1D hydro-ecological model used to describe the in-reservoir water quality conditions of Tono Dam, an artificial reservoir located in western Japan. Experiments on two different output variables (i.e. chlorophyll-a concentration and release water temperature) show that DEMo allows obtaining the same fidelity as POD while reducing the number of state variables in the emulator.

  3. Project SMART at the University of New Hampshire: Integrating Space and Environmental Sciences Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V.; Rock, B.; Farrugia, C.; Smith, C.; Kucharek, H.; Puhl-Quinn, P.; Vasquez, B.; Raeder, J.; Dorelli, J.

    2004-12-01

    We present an overview of the Science and Mathematics Achievement through Research Training (SMART) program at the University of New Hampshire. This academic program, designed for high school sophomores and juniors, emphasizes multidisciplinary development through active involvement in scientific research. Students with diverse backgrounds meet over a four week period in the summer at research centers across the University, and are given the opportunity to explore in depth fields of science that are not generally offered in high school curricula. Fields of study include Space Science, Biotechnology, Environmental Sciences, and Chemistry. The program includes interdisciplinary lectures, demonstrations, field trips, and "hands on" research experience. Our statistics from previous years of Project SMART indicate that typically more than 50% of the enrollees are women. Student research in Space Science this summer has involved several NASA flight missions (Wind, ACE, Cluster) and computer simulations. Environmental Science research topics focused on aquatic and terrestrial studies, many involving remote sensing analysis and image processing methods. The knowledge students gained was tied together in the form of research posters they presented on the last day of the program and defended in a public viewing to other researchers, friends, and families. We present examples of cross-disciplinary studies integrating concepts from both Space and Environmental Sciences and of student-generated research.

  4. Fiber optic projection-imaging system for shape measurement in confined space.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lujie; Bavigadda, Viswanath; Kofidis, Theodoros; Howe, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-based projection-imaging system is proposed for shape measurement in confined space. Owing to the flexibility of imaging fibers, the system can be used in special scenarios that are difficult for conventional experimental setups. Three experiments: open space, closed space, and underwater are designed to demonstrate the strength and weakness of the system. It is shown that when proper alignment is possible, relatively high accuracy can be achieved; the error is less than 2% of the overall height of a specimen. In situations where alignment is difficult, significantly increased error is observed. The error is in the form of gross-scale geometrical distortion; for example, flat surface is reconstructed with curvature. In addition, the imaging fibers may introduce fine-scale noise into phase measurement, which has to be suppressed by smoothing filters. Based on results and analysis, it is found that although a fiber-based system has its unique strength, existing calibration and processing methods for fringe patterns have to be modified to overcome its drawbacks so as to accommodate wider applications. PMID:24688368

  5. Fiber Optic Projection-Imaging System for Shape Measurement in Confined Space

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lujie; Bavigadda, Viswanath; Kofidis, Theodoros; Howe, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-based projection-imaging system is proposed for shape measurement in confined space. Owing to the flexibility of imaging fibers, the system can be used in special scenarios that are difficult for conventional experimental setups. Three experiments: open space, closed space, and underwater are designed to demonstrate the strength and weakness of the system. It is shown that when proper alignment is possible, relatively high accuracy can be achieved; the error is less than 2% of the overall height of a specimen. In situations where alignment is difficult, significantly increased error is observed. The error is in the form of gross-scale geometrical distortion; for example, flat surface is reconstructed with curvature. In addition, the imaging fibers may introduce fine-scale noise into phase measurement, which has to be suppressed by smoothing filters. Based on results and analysis, it is found that although a fiber-based system has its unique strength, existing calibration and processing methods for fringe patterns have to be modified to overcome its drawbacks so as to accommodate wider applications. PMID:24688368

  6. Science Students Creating Hybrid Spaces when Engaging in an Expo Investigation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramnarain, Umesh; de Beer, Josef

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the experiences of three 9th-grade South African students (13-14 years) in doing open science investigation projects for a science expo. A particular focus of this study was the manner in which these students merge the world of school science with their social world to create a hybrid space by appropriating knowledge and resources of the school and home. Within this hybrid space they experienced a deeper, more meaningful and authentic engagement in science practical work. This hybrid space redefined the landscape of the science learning experience for these students, as they could derive the twofold benefit of appropriating support when necessary and at the same time maintain their autonomy over the investigation. For South Africa and quite probably other countries; these findings serve as a guideline as to how opportunities can be created for students to do open science investigations, against prevailing school factors such as large classes, a lack of physical resources, the lack of time for practical work and the demands of syllabus coverage.

  7. Space Science Projects. LC Science Tracer Bullet. TB 06-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Loretta, Comp.

    2006-01-01

    Space science, or the space sciences, are fields of science that are concerned with the study or utilization of outer space. There are several major fields of space science including astronomy, exobiology, space transport, and space exploration and colonization. In addition, space sciences impact or are related to many other fields, from the…

  8. Point-in-convex polygon and point-in-convex polyhedron algorithms with O(1) complexity using space subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Vaclav

    2016-06-01

    There are many space subdivision and space partitioning techniques used in many algorithms to speed up computations. They mostly rely on orthogonal space subdivision, resp. using hierarchical data structures, e.g. BSP trees, quadtrees, octrees, kd-trees, bounding volume hierarchies etc. However in some applications a non-orthogonal space subdivision can offer new ways for actual speed up. In the case of convex polygon in E2 a simple Point-in-Polygon test is of the O(N) complexity and the optimal algorithm is of O(log N) computational complexity. In the E3 case, the complexity is O(N) even for the convex polyhedron as no ordering is defined. New Point-in-Convex Polygon and Point-in-Convex Polyhedron algorithms are presented based on space subdivision in the preprocessing stage resulting to O(1) run-time complexity. The presented approach is simple to implement. Due to the principle of duality, dual problems, e.g. line-convex polygon, line clipping, can be solved in a similarly.

  9. The design and implementation of the Technical Facilities Controller (TFC) for the Goldstone deep space communications complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, D. A.; Menninger, F. J.; Gorman, T.; Glenn, P.

    1988-01-01

    The Technical Facilities Controller is a microprocessor-based energy management system that is to be implemented in the Deep Space Network facilities. This system is used in conjunction with facilities equipment at each of the complexes in the operation and maintenance of air-conditioning equipment, power generation equipment, power distribution equipment, and other primary facilities equipment. The implementation of the Technical Facilities Controller was completed at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex and is now operational. The installation completed at the Goldstone Complex is described and the utilization of the Technical Facilities Controller is evaluated. The findings will be used in the decision to implement a similar system at the overseas complexes at Canberra, Australia, and Madrid, Spain.

  10. Rapid Cost Assessment of Space Mission Concepts Through Application of Complexity-Based Cost Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Craig E.; Cutts, James; Balint, Tibor; Hall, James B.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of a rapid cost assessment models for evaluation of exploration missions through the application of complexity based cost indices. In Fall of 2004, NASA began developing 13 documents, known as "strategic roadmaps," intended to outline a strategy for space exploration over the next 30 years. The Third Strategic Roadmap, The Strategic Roadmap for Solar System Exploration, focused on strategy for robotic exploration of the Solar System. Development of the Strategic Roadmap for Solar System Exploration led to the investigation of a large variety of missions. However, the necessity of planning around scientific inquiry and budgetary constraints made it necessary for the roadmap development team to evaluate potential missions not only for scientific return but also cost. Performing detailed cost studies for each of the large number of missions was impractical given the time constraints involved and lack of detailed mission studies; so a method of rapid cost assessment was developed by us to allow preliminary analysis. It has been noted that there is a strong correlation between complexity and cost and schedule of planetary missions. While these correlations were made after missions had been built and flown (successfully or otherwise), it seemed likely that a similar approach could provide at least some relative cost ranking. Cost estimation relationships (CERs) have been developed based on subsystem design choices. These CERs required more detailed information than available, forcing the team to adopt a more high level approach. Costing by analogy has been developed for small satellites, however, planetary exploration missions provide such varying spacecraft requirements that there is a lack of adequately comparable missions that can be used for analogy.

  11. Accomplishments of the Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) RBCC Project at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, J. Craig (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the NASA / Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) project is to advance and develop Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) technologies. The ART project began in 1996 as part of the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP). The project is composed of several activities including RBCC engine ground testing, tool development, vehicle / mission studies, and component testing / development. The major contractors involved in the ART project are Aerojet and Rocketdyne. A large database of RBCC ground test data was generated for the air-augmented rocket (AAR), ramjet, scramjet, and ascent rocket modes of operation for both the Aerojet and Rocketdyne concepts. Transition between consecutive modes was also demonstrated as well as trajectory simulation. The Rocketdyne freejet tests were conducted at GASL in the Flight Acceleration Simulation Test (FAST) facility. During a single test, the FAST facility is capable of simulating both the enthalpy and aerodynamic conditions over a range of Mach numbers in a flight trajectory. Aerojet performed freejet testing in the Pebble Bed facility at GASL as well as direct-connect testing at GASL. Aerojet also performed sea-level static (SLS) testing at the Aerojet A-Zone facility in Sacramento, CA. Several flight-type flowpath components were developed under the ART project. Aerojet designed and fabricated ceramic scramjet injectors. The structural design of the injectors will be tested in a simulated scramjet environment where thermal effects and performance will be assessed. Rocketdyne will be replacing the cooled combustor in the A5 rig with a flight-weight combustor that is near completion. Aerojet's formed duct panel is currently being fabricated and will be tested in the SLS rig in Aerojet's A-Zone facility. Aerojet has already successfully tested a cooled cowl panel in the same facility. In addition to MSFC, other NASA centers have contributed to the ART project as well. Inlet testing

  12. Non-Markovian quantum dynamics: correlated projection superoperators and Hilbert space averaging.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Gemmer, Jochen; Michel, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    The time-convolutionless (TCL) projection operator technique allows a systematic analysis of the non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems. We present a class of projection superoperators that project the states of the total system onto certain correlated system-environment states. It is shown that the application of the TCL technique to this class of correlated superoperators enables the nonperturbative treatment of the dynamics of system-environment models for which the standard approach fails in any finite order of the coupling strength. We demonstrate further that the correlated superoperators correspond to the idea of a best guess of conditional quantum expectations, which is determined by a suitable Hilbert-space average. The general approach is illustrated by means of the model of a spin that interacts through randomly distributed couplings with a finite reservoir consisting of two energy bands. Extensive numerical simulations of the full Schrödinger equation of the model reveal the power and efficiency of the method. PMID:16486248

  13. Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx): a new EU FP7-SPACE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, M. L.; Genot, V. N.; Kallio, E. J.; Alexeev, I. I.; Modolo, R.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; André, N.; Gangloff, M.; Schmidt, W.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Topf, F.; Stoeckler, R.

    2011-12-01

    The FP7-SPACE project Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx) has started in June 2011. It will create an interactive framework for exploitation of space missions' data. Data analysis and visualization will be based on the advanced computational models of the planetary environments. Specifically, the 'modeling sector' of IMPEx is formed of four well established numerical codes and their related computational infrastructures: 1) 3D hybrid modeling platform HYB for the study of planetary plasma environments, hosted at FMI; 2) an alternative 3D hybrid modeling platform, hosted at LATMOS; 3) MHD modelling platform GUMICS for 3D terrestrial magnetosphere, hosted at FMI; and 4) the global 3D Paraboloid Magnetospheric Model for simulation of magnetospheres of different Solar System objects, hosted at SINP. Modelling results will be linked to the corresponding experimental data from space and planetary missions via several online tools: 1/ AMDA (Automated Multi-Dataset Analysis, http://cdpp-amda.cesr.fr/) which provides cross-linked visualization and operation of experimental and numerical modelling data, 2/ 3DView which will propose 3D visualization of spacecraft trajectories in simulated and observed environments, and 3/ "CLWeb" software which enables computation of various micro-scale physical products (spectra, distribution functions, etc.). In practice, IMPEx is going to provide an external user with an access to an extended set of space and planetary missions' data and powerful, world leading computing models, equipped with advanced visualization tools. Via its infrastructure, IMPEx will bring the data and models outside of the mission teams and specialized modelling groups making them accessible and useful for a broad planetary science community.

  14. Mentoring Undergraduate Students through the Space Shuttle Hitchhiker GoldHELOX Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. Ward; Barnes, Jonathan; Roming, Peter; Durfee, Dallin; Campbell, Branton; Turley, Steve; Eastman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the late 1980s a team of four BYU undergraduate students designed a space-based telescope to image the sun in soft x-rays from 171-181 Angstroms to gain information on microflares and their relation to the corona-chromosphere transition region. The telescope used a near-normal incidence multi-layered mirror imaging onto film through a micro-channel plate. The system was capable of 1.0 sec time resolution and 2.5 arcsec spatial resolution. Aided by a NASA grant in 1991, a system was built and successfully tested in 1998 at Marshall Space Flight Center. Originally designed to be deployed from a Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister in the bay of a space shuttle, the good results of this test elevated GoldHelox to greater-priority Hitchhiker status. Even so technical and procedural difficulties delayed a launch until after 2003. Unfortunately after the Columbia re-entry break-up in February 2003, the Hitchhiker program was cancelled and the GoldHelox project ended.Well over 200 undergraduate students worked on GoldHelox. Many of these have since earned advanced degrees in a variety of technical fields. Several have gone on to work in the space industry, becoming NASA scientists and engineers with one becoming a PI on the Swift satellite. The broad range of talent on the team has included students majoring in physics, astronomy, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, manufacturing engineering, design engineering, business and even English majors who have written technical and public relations documents. We report on lessons learned and the pitfalls and successes of this unique mentoring experience.

  15. A Lanczos eigenvalue method on a parallel computer. [for large complex space structure free vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostic, Susan W.; Fulton, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Eigenvalue analyses of complex structures is a computationally intensive task which can benefit significantly from new and impending parallel computers. This study reports on a parallel computer implementation of the Lanczos method for free vibration analysis. The approach used here subdivides the major Lanczos calculation tasks into subtasks and introduces parallelism down to the subtask levels such as matrix decomposition and forward/backward substitution. The method was implemented on a commercial parallel computer and results were obtained for a long flexible space structure. While parallel computing efficiency is problem and computer dependent, the efficiency for the Lanczos method was good for a moderate number of processors for the test problem. The greatest reduction in time was realized for the decomposition of the stiffness matrix, a calculation which took 70 percent of the time in the sequential program and which took 25 percent of the time on eight processors. For a sample calculation of the twenty lowest frequencies of a 486 degree of freedom problem, the total sequential computing time was reduced by almost a factor of ten using 16 processors.

  16. Research on lossless compression of true color RGB image with low time and space complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, ShuLin; Xie, ChengJun; Xu, Lin

    2008-12-01

    Eliminating correlated redundancy of space and energy by using a DWT lifting scheme and reducing the complexity of the image by using an algebraic transform among the RGB components. An improved Rice Coding algorithm, in which presents an enumerating DWT lifting scheme that fits any size images by image renormalization has been proposed in this paper. This algorithm has a coding and decoding process without backtracking for dealing with the pixels of an image. It support LOCO-I and it can also be applied to Coder / Decoder. Simulation analysis indicates that the proposed method can achieve a high image compression. Compare with Lossless-JPG, PNG(Microsoft), PNG(Rene), PNG(Photoshop), PNG(Anix PicViewer), PNG(ACDSee), PNG(Ulead photo Explorer), JPEG2000, PNG(KoDa Inc), SPIHT and JPEG-LS, the lossless image compression ratio improved 45%, 29%, 25%, 21%, 19%, 17%, 16%, 15%, 11%, 10.5%, 10% separately with 24 pieces of RGB image provided by KoDa Inc. Accessing the main memory in Pentium IV,CPU2.20GHZ and 256MRAM, the coding speed of the proposed coder can be increased about 21 times than the SPIHT and the efficiency of the performance can be increased 166% or so, the decoder's coding speed can be increased about 17 times than the SPIHT and the efficiency of the performance can be increased 128% or so.

  17. Status of the Space-Rated Lithium-Ion Battery Advanced Development Project in Support of the Exploration Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), along with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Johnson Space Center (JSC), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and industry partners, is leading a space-rated lithium-ion advanced development battery effort to support the vision for Exploration. This effort addresses the lithium-ion battery portion of the Energy Storage Project under the Exploration Technology Development Program. Key discussions focus on the lithium-ion cell component development activities, a common lithium-ion battery module, test and demonstration of charge/discharge cycle life performance and safety characterization. A review of the space-rated lithium-ion battery project will be presented highlighting the technical accomplishments during the past year.

  18. Performance Assessment of Baseline Cells for the High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneidegger, Brianne T.

    2012-01-01

    The Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration (ETDD) Program High Efficiency Space Power Systems (HESPS) Project, formerly the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) Energy Storage Project is tasked with developing advanced lithium-ion cells for future NASA Exploration missions. Under this project, components under development via various in-house and contracted efforts are delivered to Saft America for scale-up and integration into cells. Progress toward meeting project goals will be measured by comparing the performance to these cells with cells of a similar format with Saft s state-of-the-art aerospace chemistry. This report discusses the results of testing performed on the first set of baseline cells delivered by Saft to the NASA Glenn Research Center. This build is a cylindrical "DD" geometry with a 10 Ah nameplate capacity. Testing is being performed to establish baseline cell performance at conditions relevant to ETDD HESPS Battery Key Performance Parameter (KPP) goals including various temperatures, rates, and cycle life conditions. Data obtained from these cells will serve as a performance baseline for future cell builds containing optimized ETDD HESPSdeveloped materials. A test plan for these cells was developed to measure cell performance against the high energy cell KPP goals. The goal for cell-level specific energy of the high energy technology is 180 Wh/kg at a C/10 discharge rate and 0 C. The cells should operate for at least 2000 cycles at 100 percent DOD with 80 percent capacity retention. Baseline DD cells delivered 152 Wh/kg at 20 C. This number decreased to 143.9 Wh/kg with a 0 C discharge. This report provides performance data and summarizes results of the testing performed on the DD cells.

  19. Project Aryavarta: A Novel approach in Innovative and energy efficient space transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadawala, Rushi; Chokshi, Poojan; Verma, Rajeev

    With the advancement of technology, there is a growing interest about other planets and so it would be necessary to shift the scientific analysis activities from the earth's orbit to that of other planets. The main aim of project ARYAVARTA is to shift a satellite orbit from one planet to another with the help of an Unmanned Space Vehicle (USV). For example, to shift scientific activities economically to other planets, we need to change the orbit of the satellite from earth to that of the other planet instead of sending separate space probes, as that would entail comparatively much higher cost. A solar powered USV is one that will be having ion propulsion system along with solar propulsion system. The USV, placed in rocket boosters, will be externally launched like a space shuttle to enable it to go beyond the atmospheric limit of the earth with sufficient escape velocity. Xenon cylinders attached to the USV will provide ion propulsion for furthering the mission. The USV will then be attached to the satellite revolving in the orbit of the earth. The satellite which is attached to the USV will be de-orbited with the help of xenon engines, and will be shifted to another orbit of another planet/satellite. Electricity generated by solar panels, made from multicrystalline solar cells, of the USV will be stored in the USV to help the mission/operational requirements. With the help of multireflectors, the reflected solar rays will be re-concentrated to the solar panel and hence, power efficiency will increase more than twice. Solar-electromagnetic propulsion would make such a mission possible because an ion engine can run almost continuously and outperform any chemical rocket for such long flights. This project will help to achieve higher efficiency with great economy, and eliminate the need for sending extra space probes for any other mission. As xenon engine occupies lesser room than conventional engines, more compact instruments will emerge ahead resulting in the

  20. The MY NASA DATA Project: Tools and a Collaboration Space for Knowledge Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Diones, D. D.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.; Phelps, C. S.

    2006-05-01

    The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is charged with serving a wide user community that is interested in its large data holdings in the areas of Aerosols, Clouds, Radiation Budget, and Tropospheric Chemistry. Most of the data holdings, however, are in large files with specialized data formats. The MY NASA DATA (mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov) project began in 2004, as part of the NASA Research, Education, and Applications Solutions Network (REASoN), in order to open this important resource to a broader community including K-12 education and citizen scientists. MY NASA DATA (short for Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and earth science for Teachers and Amateurs) consists of a web space that collects tools, lesson plans, and specially developed documentation to help the target audience more easily use the vast collection of NASA data about the Earth System. The core piece of the MY NASA DATA project is the creation of microsets (both static and custom) that make data easily accessible. The installation of a Live Access Server (LAS) greatly enhanced the ability for teachers, students, and citizen scientists to create and explore custom microsets of Earth System Science data. The LAS, which is an open source software tool using emerging data standards, also allows the MY NASA DATA team to make available data on other aspects of the Earth System from collaborating data centers. We are currently working with the Physical Oceanography DAAC at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to bring in several parameters describing the ocean. In addition, MY NASA DATA serves as a central space for the K-12 community to share resources. The site already includes a dozen User-contributed lesson plans. This year we will be focusing on the Citizen Science portion of the site, and will be welcoming user-contributed project ideas, as well as reports of completed projects. An e-mentor network has also been created to involve a wider community in

  1. Earth observations for the space radar laboratory mission: Report on the student challenge awards project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Jobea; Holt, Benjamin; Schier, Marguerite; Connors, Vickie; Godwin, Linda; Jones, Tom; Campbell, Alicyn; Dean, Freedom; Garrett, Timothy; Hartley, Hillary

    1994-01-01

    The Challenge Awards are designed to provide a unique perspective to students gifted in the arts and humanities from which to understand scientific endeavor by giving students an opportunity to participate in an ongoing research project. In the graduate program, seven students who had participated in previous Challenge Awards programs were selected to help develop the tools for Earth observations for the astronauts on the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL) missions. The goal of the Challenge Awards program was to prepare a training manual for the astronauts on the SRL missions. This paper describes the observations to be made by the astronauts on the SRL missions. The emphasis is on the dynamic seasonal features of the Earth's surface and atmosphere which justify the need for more than one flight of the SRL. Complete notebooks of the sites, global seasonal patterns, examples of radar and the Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites data, and shuttle photographs have been given to each of the SRL crews.

  2. Freedom is an international partnership. [foreign contributions to NASA Space Station project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohrs, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Space Station Freedom (SSF) project initiated in 1984 is a collaborative one among the U.S., Japan, Canada, and the 10 nations participating in ESA. The SSF partners have over the last six years defined user requirements, decided on the hardware to be manufactured, and constructed a framework for long-term cooperation. SSF will be composed of user elements furnished by the foreign partners and a U.S.-supplied infrastructure encompassing the truss assembly, electrical power system, and crew living quarters. The U.S. will also furnish a lab and a polar-orbit platform; ESA, a second lab and the coorbiting Free-Flying Laboratory, as well as a second polar platform. Japan's Japanese Experiment Module shall include an Exposed Facility and an Experimental Logistics module. Canada will contribute the Mobile Servicing System robotic assembler/maintainer for the whole of SFF.

  3. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Project's Trajectory and Mission Design Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankanich, John

    2010-10-01

    The In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project, funded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), is continuing to invest in propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions by increasing performance while reducing mission cost, risk, and trip times. One of the technology areas of funding is systems analysis and mission design tools. These tools are necessary to increase awareness with the user community and to assist in the technology infusion. The primary tools investments include low-thrust trajectory tools such as MALTO and Mystic, generalized optimization tools such as Copernicus and OTIS, and an Aerocapture / Entry Vehicle design tool, the multidisciplinary tool for Systems Analysis of Planetary Entry, Descent, and Landing (SAPE). Tool demonstration, capabilities, and availability is presented.

  4. The Space Geodesy Project and Radio Frequency Interference Characterization and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Hilliard M.; Beaudoin, C.; Corey, B. E.; Tourain, C. L.; Petrachenko, B.; Dickey, John

    2013-01-01

    The Space Geodesy Project (SGP) development by NASA is an effort to co-locate the four international geodetic techniques Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) into one tightly referenced campus and coordinated reference frame analysis. The SGP requirement locates these stations within a small area to maintain line-of-sight and frequent automated survey known as the vector tie system. This causes a direct conflict with the new broadband VLBI technique. Broadband means 2-14 GHz, and RFI susceptibility at -80 dBW or higher due to sensitive RF components in the front end of the radio receiver.

  5. The plasmasphere during a space weather event: first results from the PLASMON project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, János; Clilverd, Mark A.; Heilig, Balázs; Vellante, Massimo; Manninen, Jyrki; Rodger, Craig J.; Collier, Andrew B.; Jørgensen, Anders M.; Reda, Jan; Holzworth, Robert H.; Friedel, Reinhard; Simon-Wedlund, Mea

    2013-06-01

    The results of the first 18 months of the PLASMON project are presented. We have extended our three, existing ground-based measuring networks, AWDANet (VLF/whistlers), EMMA/SANSA (ULF/FLRs), and AARDDVARK (VLF/perturbations on transmitters’ signal), by three, eight, and four new stations, respectively. The extended networks will allow us to achieve the four major scientific goals, the automatic retrieval of equatorial electron densities and density profiles of the plasmasphere by whistler inversion, the retrieval of equatorial plasma mass densities by EMMA and SANSA from FLRs, developing a new, data assimilative model of plasmasphere and validating the model predictions through comparison of modeled REP losses with measured data by AARDDVARK network. The first results on each of the four objectives are presented through a case study on a space weather event, a dual storm sudden commencement which occurred on August 3 and 4, 2010.

  6. Recommendations for Exploration Space Medicine from the Apollo Medical Operations Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, R. a.; Davis, J. R.; Duncan, J. M.; Polk, J. D.; Jones, J. A.; Gillis, D. B.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: A study was requested in December, 2005 by the Space Medicine Division at the NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC) to identify Apollo mission issues relevant to medical operations that had impact to crew health and/or performance. The objective was to use this new information to develop medical requirements for the future Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM), Lunar Habitat, and Advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suits that are currently being developed within the exploration architecture. Methods: Available resources pertaining to medical operations on the Apollo 7 through 17 missions were reviewed. Ten categories of hardware, systems, or crew factors were identified in the background research, generating 655 data records in a database. A review of the records resulted in 280 questions that were then posed to surviving Apollo crewmembers by mail, face-to-face meetings, or online interaction. Response analysis to these questions formed the basis of recommendations to items in each of the categories. Results: Thirteen of 22 surviving Apollo astronauts (59%) participated in the project. Approximately 236 pages of responses to the questions were captured, resulting in 107 recommendations offered for medical consideration in the design of future vehicles and EVA suits based on the Apollo experience. Discussion: The goals of this project included: 1) Develop or modify medical requirements for new vehicles; 2) create a centralized database for future access; and 3) take this new knowledge and educate the various directorates at NASA-JSC who are participating in the exploration effort. To date, the Apollo Medical Operations recommendations are being incorporated into the exploration mission architecture at various levels and a centralized database has been developed. The Apollo crewmembers input has proved to be an invaluable resource, prompting ongoing collaboration as the requirements for the future exploration missions continue

  7. The Habitat Demonstration Unit Project: A Modular Instrumentation System for a Deep Space Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Yim, Hester; Williamsn, Robert M.; Hafermalz, Scott; Wagner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is focused on developing human exploration capabilities in low Earth orbit (LEO), expanding to near Earth asteroids (NEA), and finally to Mars. Habitation is a crucial aspect of human exploration, and a current focus of NASA activities. The Habitation Demonstration Unit (HDU) is a project focused on developing an autonomous habitation system that enables human exploration of space by providing engineers and scientists with a test bed to develop, integrate, test, and evaluate habitation systems. A critical feature of the HDU is the instrumentation system, which monitors key subsystems within the habitat. The following paper will discuss the HDU instrumentation system performance and lessons learned during the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RaTS). In addition, this paper will discuss the evolution of the instrumentation system to support the 2011 Deep Space Habitat configuration, the challenges, and the lessons learned of implementing this configuration. In 2010, the HDU was implemented as a pressurized excursion module (PEM) and was tested at NASA s D-RaTS in Arizona [1]. For this initial configuration, the instrumentation system design used features that were successful in previous habitat instrumentation projects, while also considering challenges, and implementing lessons learned [2]. The main feature of the PEM instrumentation system was the use of a standards-based wireless sensor node (WSN), implementing an IEEE 802.15.4 protocol. Many of the instruments were connected to several WSNs, which wirelessly transmitted data to the command and data handling system via a mesh network. The PEM instrumentation system monitored the HDU during field tests at D-RaTS, and the WSN data was later analyzed to understand the performance of this system. In addition, several lessons learned were gained from the field test experience, which fed into the instrumentation design of the next generation of the HDU.

  8. New idea of geomagnetic monitoring through ENA detection from the International Space Station: ENAMISS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Anna; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Orsini, Stefano; Rubini, Alda; Evangelista, Yuri; Mura, Alessandro; Rispoli, Rosanna; Vertolli, Nello; Carrubba, Elisa; Donati, Alessandro; Di Lellis, Andrea Maria; Plainaki, Christina; Lazzarotto, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) in the Earth's environment has been proven to be a successful technique able to provide detailed information on the ring current plasma population at energies below 100 keV. Indeed, the existing space weather databases usually include a good coverage of Sun and solar wind monitoring. The global imaging of the Earth's magnetosphere/ ionosphere is usually obtained by the high-latitudes monitoring of aurorae, ground magnetic field variations and high-latitude radio emissions. The equatorial magnetic field variations on ground, from which the geomagnetic indices like Dst, Sym-H and Asym-H are derived, include the effects of all current systems (i.e. ring current, Chapman -Ferraro current, tails currents, etc...) providing a kind of global information. Nevertheless, the specific information related to the ring current cannot be easily derived from such indices. Only occasional local plasma data are available by orbiting spacecraft. ENA detection is the only way to globally view the ring current populations. Up-to-now this technique has been used mainly from dedicated high altitude polar orbiting spacecraft, which do not allow a continuous and systematic monitoring, and a discrimination of the particle latitude distribution. The Energetic Neutral Atoms Monitor on the International space Station (ENAMISS) project intends to develop an ENA imager and install it on the ISS for continuous monitoring of the spatially distributed ring current plasma population. ISS is the ideal platform to perform continuous ENA monitoring since its particular low altitude and medium/low latitude orbit allows wide-field ENA images of various magnetospheric regions. The calibrated ENA data, the deconvolved ion distributions and ad-hoc ENA-based new geomagnetic indices will be freely distributed to the space weather community. Furthermore, new services based on plasma circulation models, spacecraft surface charging models and radiation dose models

  9. Space-based laser-powered orbital transfer vehicle (Project SLICK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The project SLICK (Space Laser Interorbital Cargo Kite) involves conceptual designs of reusable space-based laser-powered orbital transfer vehicle (LOTV) for ferrying 16,000 kg cargo primarily between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). The power of LOTV is beamed by a single 32-MW solar-pumped iodide laser orbiting the Earth at an altitude of one Earth radius. The laser engine selected for the LOTV is based on a continuous-wave, steady-state propulsion scheme and uses an array of seven discrete plasmas in a flow of hydrogen propellant. Both all-propulsive and aerobraked LOTV configurations were analyzed and developed. The all-propulsive vehicle uses a rigid 11.5-m aperture primary mirror and its engine produces a thrust of 2000 N at a specific impulse of 1500 sec. For the LEO-to-GEO trip, the payload ratio, m(sub payload/m(sub propellant)+m(sub dry vehicle) = 1.19 and the trip time is about 6 days. The aerobraked version uses a lightweight, retractable wrapped-rib primary mirror which is folded for aerobraking and a 20-m-diameter inflatable-ballute aeroshield which is jettisoned after aeromaneuver. Lifecycle cost analysis shows that the aerobraked configuration may have an economic advantage over the all-propulsive configuration as long as the cost of launching the propellant to LEO is higher than about $500/kg in current dollars.

  10. Projected performance of III-V epitaxial multijunction solar cells in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The monolithic epitaxial multijunction stack, to be fabricated from III-V quaternary alloys, has been analyzed for use in space with a detailed computer model. AlGaInAs and AlGaAsSb three-junction cells, each having an AlAsSb window, were modeled as functions of temperature, concentration, minority carrier diffusion length, etc., as were AlGaAs/GaAs and AlGaAsSb/InP two-junction cells. Cell efficiencies for one expected operating point in space (50 suns, 125 C) were around 20% for the two-junction cells and around 23-24% for the three-junction cells, using projected minority carrier diffusion lengths of 1.5 microns. Longer diffusion lengths in the III-V alloys (approaching those of GaAs) would allow the three-junction cells to reach 30% efficiency, if such conditions as 100 suns, 50 C can be achieved. The major technological challenges facing the high-efficiency multijunction cell are summarized and discussed in light of the modeling results.

  11. Use of Projectional Phase Space Data to Infer a 4D Particle Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Celata, C M; Staples, J W

    2002-05-15

    We consider beams which are described by a 4D transverse distribution f(x, y, x', y'), where x' {triple_bond} p{sub x}/p{sub z} and z is the axial coordinate. A two-slit scanner is commonly employed to measure, over a sequence of shots, a 2D projection of such a beam's phase space, e.g., f(x, x'). Another scanner might yield f(y, y') or, using crossed slits, f(x, y). A small set of such 2D scans does not uniquely specify f(x, y, x', y'). We have developed ''tomographic'' techniques to synthesize a ''reasonable'' set of particles in a 4D phase space having 2D densities consistent with the experimental data. These techniques are described in a separate document [A. Friedman, et. al., submitted to Phys. Rev. ST-AB, 2002]. Here we briefly summarize one method and describe progress in validating it, using simulations of the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  12. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Fuel Cell Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Fuel cell research focused on proton exchange membranes (PEM), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Specific technologies included aircraft fuel cell reformers, new and improved electrodes, electrolytes, interconnect, and seals, modeling of fuel cells including CFD coupled with impedance spectroscopy. Research was conducted on new materials and designs for fuel cells, along with using embedded sensors with power management electronics to improve the power density delivered by fuel cells. Fuel cell applications considered were in-space operations, aviation, and ground-based fuel cells such as; powering auxiliary power units (APUs) in aircraft; high power density, long duration power supplies for interplanetary missions (space science probes and planetary rovers); regenerative capabilities for high altitude aircraft; and power supplies for reusable launch vehicles.

  13. Evaluation of a Terminal Area In-Trail Approach Spacing, Project and Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelden, Stephen; Johnson, Walter (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    Reported here are the results of work completed as a precursor to Distributed Air Ground (DAG), Concept Element 11 (CE11) research. CE11 is a NASA, Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) concept initiated to promote research on in-trail merging and spacing during approach in the terminal area environment, such that improvements to the National Air Space (NAS) may be realized. A description of the project concept, results of a preliminary study, and a literature review are presented. In terms of conclusions, study results, and reference material respectively: 1) the concept is supported as being significant to NAS capacity improvement, 2) the preliminary study indicated that having more than one downstream, in-trail aircraft present on a CDTI during approach may be advantageous, and that flying traditional Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STAR) utilizing advanced decision support tools (DST) may be complicated by wake turbulence considerations, a lack of vertical awareness on the part of the flight crew, and the 'step-down' nature of many terminal area approaches, and 3) the results of a literature review are presented for future reference.

  14. Deep Space Network-Wide Portal Development: Planning Service Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doneva, Silviya

    2011-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is an international network of antennas that supports interplanetary spacecraft missions and radio and radar astronomy observations for the exploration of the solar system and the universe. DSN provides the vital two-way communications link that guides and controls planetary explorers, and brings back the images and new scientific information they collect. In an attempt to streamline operations and improve overall services provided by the Deep Space Network a DSN-wide portal is under development. The project is one step in a larger effort to centralize the data collected from current missions including user input parameters for spacecraft to be tracked. This information will be placed into a principal repository where all operations related to the DSN are stored. Furthermore, providing statistical characterization of data volumes will help identify technically feasible tracking opportunities and more precise mission planning by providing upfront scheduling proposals. Business intelligence tools are to be incorporated in the output to deliver data visualization.

  15. The Kinelite Project: a new powerful motion analyser for Spacelab and space station.

    PubMed

    Venet, M; Pinard, H; McIntyre, J; Berthoz, A; Lacquaniti, F

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the Kinelite Project is to develop a space qualified motion analysis system to be used in space by the scientific community, mainly to support neuroscience protocols. The measurement principle of the Kinelite is to determine, by triangulation mean, the 3D position of small, lightweight, reflective markers positioned at the different points of interest. The scene is illuminated by Infra Red flashes and the reflected light is acquired by up to 8 precalibrated and synchronized CCD cameras. The main characteristics of the system are: Camera field of view: 45 degrees; Number of cameras: 2 to 8; Acquisition frequency: 25, 50, 100, or 200 Hz; CCD format: 256 x 256; Number of markers: up to 64; 3D accuracy: 2mm; Main dimensions: 45 cm x 45 cm x 30 cm; Mass: 23 kg; Power consumption: less than 200 W. The Kinelite will first fly aboard the NASA Spacelab; it will be used, during the NEUROLAB mission (4/98), to support the "Frames of References and Internal Models" (Principal Investigator: Pr. A. Berthoz, Co Investigators: J. McIntyre, F. Lacquaniti). PMID:11541931

  16. Operational Space-Assisted Irrigation Advisory Services: Overview Of And Lessons Learned From The Project DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osann Jochum, M. A.; Demeter Partners

    2006-08-01

    The project DEMETER (DEMonstration of Earth observation TEchnologies in Routine irrigation advisory services) was dedicated to assessing and demonstrating improvements introduced by Earth observation (EO) and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in farm and Irrigation Advisory Service (IAS) day-to-day operations. The DEMETER concept of near-real-time delivery of EO-based irrigation scheduling information to IAS and farmers has proven to be valid. The operationality of the space segment was demonstrated for Landsat 5-TM in the Barrax pilot zone during the 2004 and 2005 irrigation campaigns. Extra-fast image delivery and quality controlled operational processing make the EO-based crop coefficient maps available at the same speed and quality as ground-based data (point samples), while significantly extending the spatial coverage and reducing service cost. Leading-edge online analysis and visualization tools provide easy, intuitive access to the information and personalized service to users. First feedback of users at IAS and farmer level is encouraging. The paper gives an overview of the project and its main achievements.

  17. On the Organisation of World Ships and Other Gigascale Interstellar Space Exploration Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyssens, F.; Driesen, M.; Wouters, K.

    The development and deployment of world ships or other feats of interstellar exploration will without doubt require orders of magnitude more resources than needed for current or past megaprojects (Apollo, Iter, LHC,...). Question is how enough resources for such gigaprojects can be found in a scenario assuming limited, moderate economic growth throughout the next centuries, i.e. without human population and productivity continuing to grow exponentially, and without extreme events such as economic collapse or singularity.Three defining features of gigascale space projects are identified, which should be recognized to the fullest: their almost absolute nonprofit character, their massive cost in terms of time and resources and their non-urgency leading to procrastina- tion. It will be argued that the best chance of getting a world ship or another interstellar project started in this generation is to establish an international network of non governmental organizations (NGOs) focused on private and public fundraising for interstellar exploration and supporting a bottom-up societal movement, similar to e.g. the WWF. It will be shown that this path can reduce the massive barriers to entry as well as the level of governmental support needed.

  18. Remote sensing and GIS technology in the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raup, B.; Kaab, Andreas; Kargel, J.S.; Bishop, M.P.; Hamilton, G.; Lee, E.; Paul, F.; Rau, F.; Soltesz, D.; Khalsa, S.J.S.; Beedle, M.; Helm, C.

    2007-01-01

    Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) is an international consortium established to acquire satellite images of the world's glaciers, analyze them for glacier extent and changes, and to assess these change data in terms of forcings. The consortium is organized into a system of Regional Centers, each of which is responsible for glaciers in their region of expertise. Specialized needs for mapping glaciers in a distributed analysis environment require considerable work developing software tools: terrain classification emphasizing snow, ice, water, and admixtures of ice with rock debris; change detection and analysis; visualization of images and derived data; interpretation and archival of derived data; and analysis to ensure consistency of results from different Regional Centers. A global glacier database has been designed and implemented at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (Boulder, CO); parameters have been expanded from those of the World Glacier Inventory (WGI), and the database has been structured to be compatible with (and to incorporate) WGI data. The project as a whole was originated, and has been coordinated by, the US Geological Survey (Flagstaff, AZ), which has also led the development of an interactive tool for automated analysis and manual editing of glacier images and derived data (GLIMSView). This article addresses remote sensing and Geographic Information Science techniques developed within the framework of GLIMS in order to fulfill the goals of this distributed project. Sample applications illustrating the developed techniques are also shown. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Duality in Phase Space and Complex Dynamics of an Integrated Pest Management Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Baoyin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    Fragmented habitat patches between which plants and animals can disperse can be modeled as networks with varying degrees of connectivity. A predator-prey model with network structures is proposed for integrated pest management (IPM) with impulsive control actions. The model was analyzed using numerical methods to investigate how factors such as the impulsive period, the releasing constant of natural enemies and the mode of connections between the patches affect pest outbreak patterns and the success or failure of pest control. The concept of the cluster as defined by Holland and Hastings is used to describe variations in results ranging from global synchrony when all patches have identical fluctuations to n-cluster solutions with all patches having different dynamics. Heterogeneity in the initial densities of either pest or natural enemy generally resulted in a variety of cluster oscillations. Surprisingly, if n > 1, the clusters fall into two groups one with low amplitude fluctuations and the other with high amplitude fluctuations (i.e. duality in phase space), implying that control actions radically alter the system's characteristics by inducing duality and more complex dynamics. When the impulsive period is small enough, i.e. the control strategy is undertaken frequently, the pest can be eradicated. As the period increases, the pest's dynamics shift from a steady state to become chaotic with periodic windows and more multicluster oscillations arise for heterogenous initial density distributions. Period-doubling bifurcation and periodic halving cascades occur as the releasing constant of the natural enemy increases. For the same ecological system with five differently connected networks, as the randomness of the connectedness increases, the transient duration becomes smaller and the probability of multicluster oscillations appearing becomes higher.

  20. The NASA/DOE space nuclear propulsion project plan—FY 1991 status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John S.

    1992-01-01

    NASA and the DOE have initiated critical technology development for nuclear rocket propulsion systems for U.S. Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) human and robotic missions to the Moon and to Mars. This paper summarizes the activities of the interagency project planning team in FY 1990 and 1991, and summarizes the project plan. The project plan includes evolutionary technology development for both nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems. The NEP development expands upon the SP-100 technology, being developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power, as a foundation from which to develop more powerful, lighter systems for interplanetary probes, lunar and Mars cargo vehicles, and lunar and Mars human-piloted vehicles. Similarly, the NTP technology development plan expands upon the substantial NERVA data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s for solid core thermal reactors, by improving nuclear fules to permit higher operating temperatures (with appropriate safety and reliability margins), and ultimately, to upgrade the system to liquid or gaseous core concepts. Thus, a logical, step-wise program is planned that will have systems ready for initial unmanned flight by about 2008, will include robotic lunar missions to gain operational experience prior to manned flight, and will then proceed to a manned lunar mission that will simulate a full-up Mars mission. Mars robotic missions are planned to begin in about 2011-2012, with the first manned Mars mission in about 2014. System upgrades are expected to evolve that will result in shorter trips times, improved payload capabilities, or enhanced safety and reliability.

  1. Exploring the complexity of inquiry learning in an open-ended problem space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Jody

    Data-gathering and problem identification are key components of scientific inquiry. However, few researchers have studied how students learn these skills because historically this required a time-consuming, complicated method of capturing the details of learners' data-gathering processes. Nor are classroom settings authentic contexts in which students could exhibit problem identification skills parallel to those involved in deconstructing complex real world situations. In this study of middle school students, because of my access to an innovative technology, I simulated a disease outbreak in a virtual community as a complicated, authentic problem. As students worked through the curriculum in the virtual world, their time-stamped actions were stored by the computer in event-logs. Using these records, I tracked in detail how the student scientists made sense of the complexity they faced and how they identified and investigated the problem using science-inquiry skills. To describe the degree to which students' data collection narrowed and focused on a specific disease over time, I developed a rubric and automated the coding of records in the event-logs. I measured the ongoing development of the students' "systematicity" in investigating the disease outbreak. I demonstrated that coding event-logs is an effective yet non-intrusive way of collecting and parsing detailed information about students' behaviors in real time in an authentic setting. My principal research question was "Do students who are more thoughtful about their inquiry prior to entry into the curriculum demonstrate increased systematicity in their inquiry behavior during the experience, by narrowing the focus of their data-gathering more rapidly than students who enter with lower levels of thoughtfulness about inquiry?" My sample consisted of 403 middle-school students from public schools in the US who volunteered to participate in the River City Project in spring 2008. Contrary to my hypothesis, I found

  2. ProteoPlex: stability optimization of macromolecular complexes by sparse-matrix screening of chemical space.

    PubMed

    Chari, Ashwin; Haselbach, David; Kirves, Jan-Martin; Ohmer, Juergen; Paknia, Elham; Fischer, Niels; Ganichkin, Oleg; Möller, Vanessa; Frye, Jeremiah J; Petzold, Georg; Jarvis, Marc; Tietzel, Michael; Grimm, Clemens; Peters, Jan-Michael; Schulman, Brenda A; Tittmann, Kai; Markl, Jürgen; Fischer, Utz; Stark, Holger

    2015-09-01

    Molecular machines or macromolecular complexes are supramolecular assemblies of biomolecules with a variety of functions. Structure determination of these complexes in a purified state is often tedious owing to their compositional complexity and the associated relative structural instability. To improve the stability of macromolecular complexes in vitro, we present a generic method that optimizes the stability, homogeneity and solubility of macromolecular complexes by sparse-matrix screening of their thermal unfolding behavior in the presence of various buffers and small molecules. The method includes the automated analysis of thermal unfolding curves based on a biophysical unfolding model for complexes. We found that under stabilizing conditions, even large multicomponent complexes reveal an almost ideal two-state unfolding behavior. We envisage an improved biochemical understanding of purified macromolecules as well as a substantial boost in successful macromolecular complex structure determination by both X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:26237227

  3. Final report: A Broad Research Project in the Sciences of Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    2000-02-01

    Previous DOE support for ''A Broad Research Program in the Sciences of Complexity'' permitted the Santa Fe Institute to initiate new collaborative research within its Integrative Core activities as well as to host visitors to participate in research on specific topics that serve as motivation and testing-ground for the study of general principles of complex systems. The critical aspect of this support is its effectiveness in seeding new areas of research. Indeed, this Integrative Core has been the birthplace of dozens of projects that later became more specifically focused and then won direct grant support independent of the core grants. But at early stages most of this multidisciplinary research was unable to win grant support as individual projects--both because it did not match well with existing grant program guidelines, and because the amount of handing needed was often too modest to justify a formal proposal to an agency. In fact, one of the attributes of core support has been that it permitted SFI to encourage high-risk activities because the cost was quite low. What is significant is how many of those initial efforts have been productive in the SFI environment. Many of SFI'S current research foci began with a short visit from a researcher new to the SFI community, or as small working groups that brought together carefully selected experts from a variety of fields. As mentioned above, many of the ensuing research projects are now being supported by other funding agencies or private foundations. Some of these successes are described.

  4. Drilling through the largest magma chamber on Earth: Bushveld Igneous Complex Drilling Project (BICDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbull, R. B.; Ashwal, L. D.; Webb, S. J.; Veksler, I. V.

    2015-05-01

    A scientific drilling project in the Bushveld Igneous Complex in South Africa has been proposed to contribute to the following scientific topics of the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP): large igneous provinces and mantle plumes, natural resources, volcanic systems and thermal regimes, and deep life. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from eight countries met in Johannesburg to exchange ideas about the scientific objectives and a drilling strategy to achieve them. The workshop identified drilling targets in each of the three main lobes of the Bushveld Complex, which will integrate existing drill cores with new boreholes to establish permanently curated and accessible reference profiles of the Bushveld Complex. Coordinated studies of this material will address fundamental questions related to the origin and evolution of parental Bushveld magma(s), the magma chamber processes that caused layering and ore formation, and the role of crust vs. mantle in the genesis of Bushveld granites and felsic volcanic units. Other objectives are to study geophysical and geodynamic aspects of the Bushveld intrusion, including crustal stresses and thermal gradient, and to determine the nature of deep groundwater systems and the biology of subsurface microbial communities.

  5. "SP.ACE" 2013-2015: ASGARD Balloon and BIFROST Parabolic Flights: Latest Developments in Hands-On Space Education Projects for Secondary School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Schrijver, E.; Chameleva, H.; Degroote, C.; D'Haese, Z.; Paice, C.; Plas, H.; Van den Bossche, A.; Vander Donckt, L.; Vander Vost, J.

    2015-09-01

    Flight opportunities on high-altitude ASGARD balloons offered to secondary schools worldwide since 20 1 1 have led to an ever more rapidly increasing number of project proposals. The introduction of beginners' and ‘advanced classes of experiments is hoped to draw in even larger numbers of interested school teams. Furthermore, and in cooperation with ESERO (European Space Education Resources Office), workshops and documentation are being prepared to introduce teachers and students alike to the world of microcontrollers and sensors. A student parabolic flight programme called BIFROST (Brussels' Initiative to provide Flight Research Opportunities to STudents) was initiated to meet the rising demand for hands-on space education projects and the desire to cover the widest possible range of scientific and/or technical domains, which essentially calls for a variety of flight platforms: cansats, balloons and parabolic flight.

  6. Publications of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, January through December 1974. [deep space network, Apollo project, information theory, and space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formalized technical reporting is described and indexed, which resulted from scientific and engineering work performed, or managed, by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The five classes of publications included are technical reports, technical memorandums, articles from the bimonthly Deep Space Network Progress Report, special publications, and articles published in the open literature. The publications are indexed by author, subject, and publication type and number.

  7. Burning Plastics Investigated in Space for Unique US/Russian Cooperative Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that fires in the low-gravity environment of Earth-orbiting spacecraft are different from fires on Earth. The flames lack the familiar upward plume, which is the result of gravitational buoyancy. These flames, however, are strongly influenced by minor airflow currents. A recent study conducted in low gravity (microgravity) on the Russian orbital station Mir used burning plastic rods mounted in a small chamber with a controllable fan to expose the flame to airflows of different velocities. In this unique project, a Russian scientific agency, the Keldysh Research Center, furnished the apparatus and directed the Mir tests, while the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field provided the test materials and the project management. Reference testing and calibrations in ground laboratories were conducted jointly by researchers at Keldysh and at the NASA Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility. Multiple samples of three different plastics were burned in the tests: Delrin, a common material for valve bodies; PMMA, a plastic "glass"; and polyethylene, a familiar material for containers and films. Each burned with a unique spherical or egg-shaped flame that spread over the rod. The effect of varying the airflow was dramatic. At the highest airflow attainable in the combustion chamber, nearly 10 cm/sec (a typical ventilation breeze), the flames were bright and strong. As airflow velocity decreased, the flames became shorter but wider. In addition, the flames became less bright, and for PMMA and polyethylene, they showed two colors, a bright part decreasing in volume and a nearly invisible remainder (see the photographs). Finally, at a very low velocity, the flames extinguished. For the plastics tested, this minimum velocity was very low, around 0.3 to 0.5 cm/sec. This finding confirms that at least a slight airflow is required to maintain a flame in microgravity for these types of materials.

  8. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue: Results from the first space weather citizen science project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, L.; Scott, C.; Owens, M.; Lockwood, M.; Tucker-Hood, K.; Thomas, S.; Crothers, S.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R.; Lintott, C.; Simpson, R.; O'Donnell, J.; Smith, A. M.; Waterson, N.; Bamford, S.; Romeo, F.; Kukula, M.; Owens, B.; Savani, N.; Wilkinson, J.; Baeten, E.; Poeffel, L.; Harder, B.

    2014-12-01

    Solar Stormwatch was the first space weather citizen science project, the aim of which is to identify and track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the Heliospheric Imagers aboard the STEREO satellites. The project has now been running for approximately 4 years, with input from >16,000 citizen scientists, resulting in a data set of >38,000time-elongation profiles of CME trajectories, observed over 18 preselected position angles. We present our method for reducing this data set into a CME catalogue. The resulting catalogue consists of 144 CMEs over the period January 2007 to February 2010, of which 110 were observed by STEREO-A and 77 were observed by STEREO-B. For each CME, the time-elongation profiles generated by the citizen scientists are averaged into a consensus profile along each position angle that the event was tracked. We consider this catalogue to be unique, being at present the only citizen science-generated CME catalogue, tracking CMEs over an elongation range of 4° out to a maximum of approximately 70°. Using single spacecraft fitting techniques, we estimate the speed, direction, solar source region, and latitudinal width of each CME. This shows that at present, the Solar Stormwatch catalogue (which covers only solar minimum years) contains almost exclusively slow CMEs, with a mean speed of approximately 350 km s-1. The full catalogue is available for public access at www.met.reading.ac.uk/~spate/solarstormwatch. This includes, for each event, the unprocessed time-elongation profiles generated by Solar Stormwatch, the consensus time-elongation profiles, and a set of summary plots, as well as the estimated CME properties.

  9. Integration and Testing Challenges of Small Satellite Missions: Experiences from the Space Technology 5 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauerwein, Timothy A.; Gostomski, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 5(ST5) payload was successfully carried into orbit on an OSC Pegasus XL launch vehicle, which was carried aloft and dropped from the OSC Lockheed L-1011 from Vandenberg Air Force Base March 22,2006, at 9:03 am Eastern time, 6:03 am Pacific time. In order to reach the completion of the development and successful launch of ST 5, the systems integration and test(I&T) team determined that a different approach was required to meet the project requirements rather than the standard I&T approach used for single, room-sized satellites. The ST5 payload, part of NASA's New Millennium Program headquartered at JPL, consisted of three micro satellites (approximately 30 kg each) and the Pegasus Support Structure (PSS), the system that connected the spacecrafts to the launch vehicle and deployed the spacecrafts into orbit from the Pegasus XL launch vehicle. ST5 was a technology demonstration payload, intended to test six (6) new technologies for potential use for future space flights along with demonstrating the ability of small satellites to perform quality science. The main technology was a science grade magnetometer designed to take measurements of the earth's magnetic field. The three spacecraft were designed, integrated, and tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with integration and environmental testing occurring in the Bldg. 7-1 0-15-29. The three spacecraft were integrated and tested by the same I&T team. The I&T Manager determined that there was insufficient time in the schedule to perform the three I&T spacecraft activities in series used standard approaches. The solution was for spacecraft #1 to undergo integration and test first, followed by spacecraft #2 and #3 simultaneously. This simultaneous integration was successful for several reasons. Each spacecraft had a Lead Test Conductor who planned and coordinated their spacecraft through its integration and test activities. One team of engineers and technicians executed the integration of all

  10. Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos; Mata, Angel

    2011-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulation installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced. 6-meter-1ong vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping. enclosures, raceways. and. cable trays. within 7.62 meters of. counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B.

  11. Low-complexity camera digital signal imaging for video document projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Shih-Chang; Tsai, Po-Shien

    2011-04-01

    We present high-performance and low-complexity algorithms for real-time camera imaging applications. The main functions of the proposed camera digital signal processing (DSP) involve color interpolation, white balance, adaptive binary processing, auto gain control, and edge and color enhancement for video projection systems. A series of simulations demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve good image quality while keeping computation cost and memory requirements low. On the basis of the proposed algorithms, the cost-effective hardware core is developed using Verilog HDL. The prototype chip has been verified with one low-cost programmable device. The real-time camera system can achieve 1270 × 792 resolution with the combination of extra components and can demonstrate each DSP function.

  12. Mobile phone usage in complex urban systems: a space-time, aggregated human activity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranos, Emmanouil; Nijkamp, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The present study aims to demonstrate the importance of digital data for investigating space-time dynamics of aggregated human activity in urban systems. Such dynamics can be monitored and modelled using data from mobile phone operators regarding mobile telephone usage. Using such an extensive dataset from the city of Amsterdam, this paper introduces space-time explanatory models of aggregated human activity patterns. Various modelling experiments and results are presented, which demonstrate that mobile telephone data are a good proxy of the space-time dynamics of aggregated human activity in the city.

  13. An FP7 "Space" project: Aphorism "Advanced PRocedures for volcanic and Seismic Monitoring"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Iorio, A., Sr.; Stramondo, S.; Bignami, C.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.

    2014-12-01

    APHORISM project proposes the development and testing of two new methods to combine Earth Observation satellite data from different sensors, and ground data. The aim is to demonstrate that this two types of data, appropriately managed and integrated, can provide new improved GMES products useful for seismic and volcanic crisis management. The first method, APE - A Priori information for Earthquake damage mapping, concerns the generation of maps to address the detection and estimate of damage caused by a seism. The use of satellite data to investigate earthquake damages is not an innovative issue. We can find a wide literature and projects concerning such issue, but usually the approach is only based on change detection techniques and classifications algorithms. The novelty of APE relies on the exploitation of a priori information derived by InSAR time series to measure surface movements, shake maps obtained from seismological data, and vulnerability information. This a priori information is then integrated with change detection map to improve accuracy and to limit false alarms. The second method deals with volcanic crisis management. The method, MACE - Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation, concerns the exploitation of GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit) sensor platform, LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellite sensors and ground measures to improve the ash detection and retrieval and to characterize the volcanic ash clouds. The basic idea of MACE consists of an improvement of volcanic ash retrievals at the space-time scale by using both the LEO and GEO estimations and in-situ data. Indeed the standard ash thermal infrared retrieval is integrated with data coming from a wider spectral range from visible to microwave. The ash detection is also extended in case of cloudy atmosphere or steam plumes. APE and MACE methods have been defined in order to provide products oriented toward the next ESA Sentinels satellite missions.The project is funded under the European Union FP7

  14. Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on space and astronomy. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMS and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; offers professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  15. E-Learning — Innovative Pedagogical Project in the Higher Education to Promote and Support Space Sciences and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegyi, S.; Bérczi, Sz.; Kereszturi, A.; Hargitai, H.

    2011-03-01

    The Pécs University’s e-Learning method of presentations represents a new online up-to-date system for the new web oriented student generation in sciences and mathematics, focusing on space sciences and technology, in accord with NASA STEM project.

  16. The Collaborative Theatre-Making Project: A Space to Challenge, Explore and Re-Imagine Accepted Mythologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinty, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    This short case study gives insight into a theatre-making project with young lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-identified people. The author reflects on the capacity of collaborative arts practice to open discussion around identity and allow space to re-imagine lived experience through metaphor and mythology. She focuses on the central role of the…

  17. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. II - Data calibration and absorption-line selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Saxe, David H.; Weymann, Ray J.; Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1993-01-01

    We present the observational and data processing aspects of the Hubble Space Telescope Quasar Absorption Line Key Project. Topics discussed include the observational technique, calibration of the data, software that simulates the data, the automated procedure used to identify and characterize the absorption features, and the determination of the sensitivity limits of the survey.

  18. Project ASTRAL: All-sky Space Telescope to Record Afterglow Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarevsky, G.; Bisnovaty-Kogan, G.; Pozanenko, A.; Beskin, G. M.; Bondar, S.; Rumyantsev, V.

    ASTRAL is a project incorporating wide-field optical telescopes on board a small satellite (FedSat or SMEX type) dedicated to the whole-sky detection of a variety of rapid astronomical phenomena, particularly optical flashes associated with gamma ray bursts (GRB). Those flashes only visible optically (so called orphans), as well as those which could precede associated GRBs, cannot be detected in the current triggering mode of the world wide GRB Coordinates Network (GCN). Hence ASTRAL would have a unique opportunity to trigger a follow-up multi-frequency study via GCN. ASTRAL consists of a set of 13 wide-field cameras, each with FOV = 70°, equipped with 4096 × 4096 CCDs. The detection method is based on comparison of sky images with the reference image. Supernovae, novae and nova-like explosions, fast variable AGNs, flare stars, and even new comets would be promptly detected as well. Thus ASTRAL would be an original working prototype of the prospective major space mission to monitor on-line all the sky, a high priority instrument of 21st Century astrophysics. See http://www.atnf.csiro.au/people/Gregory.Tsarevsky for details.

  19. Parametric Cost Modeling of Space Missions Using the Develop New Projects (DMP) Implementation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Leigh; Hihn, Jairus; Roust, Kevin; Warfield, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a parametric cost model that has been built at JPL to estimate costs of future, deep space, robotic science missions. Due to the recent dramatic changes in JPL business practices brought about by an internal reengineering effort known as develop new products (DNP), high-level historic cost data is no longer considered analogous to future missions. Therefore, the historic data is of little value in forecasting costs for projects developed using the DNP process. This has lead to the development of an approach for obtaining expert opinion and also for combining actual data with expert opinion to provide a cost database for future missions. In addition, the DNP cost model has a maximum of objective cost drivers which reduces the likelihood of model input error. Version 2 is now under development which expands the model capabilities, links it more tightly with key design technical parameters, and is grounded in more rigorous statistical techniques. The challenges faced in building this model will be discussed, as well as it's background, development approach, status, validation, and future plans.

  20. Voxel Advanced Digital-Manufacturing for Earth and Regolith in Space Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Mueller, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    A voxel is a discrete three-dimensional (3D) element of material that is used to construct a larger 3D object. It is the 3D equivalent of a pixel. This project will conceptualize and study various approaches in order to develop a proof of concept 3D printing device that utilizes regolith as the material of the voxels. The goal is to develop a digital printer head capable of placing discrete self-aligning voxels in additive layers in order to fabricate small parts that can be given structural integrity through a post-printing sintering or other binding process. The quicker speeds possible with the voxel 3D printing approach along with the utilization of regolith material as the substrate will advance the use of this technology to applications for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), which is key to reducing logistics from Earth to Space, thus making long-duration human exploration missions to other celestial bodies more possible.

  1. Project first and eye on the sky: strategies for teaching space science in the early grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglierani, R.; Hawkins, I.

    Elementary educators typically have only limited opportunity to teach substantive science units. This is due, in great part, to the current primary focus on literacy and mathematics instruction in the early grades. It is not surprising then, that the time and resources allocated to science teaching are significantly less than those allocated to language arts and mathematics. The integration of elementary science curricula with language arts provides one means of addressing the challenge of maintaining a robust science presence in the elementary classroom. Project FIRST's Eye on the Sky suggests a model for the successful integration of science instruction with language arts through inquiry-based learning. The model has been adopted by other Education/Public Outreach efforts, most recently, the Cassini- Huygens Mission and the Space Telescope Institute. We will present Eye on the Sky: Our Star the Sun, a suite of integrated, inquiry-based lessons designed specifically for K-4 students and discuss data showing the program's impact on the user audience. These materials offer an exciting opportunity to explore the dynamic Sun and share research discoveries of NASA's Sun-Earth Connection with the elementary education community. The lessons were developed and tested by UC Berkeley educators and NASA scientists in partnership with classroom teachers. We will review the program components and examine the benefits and challenges inherent in implementing such a program in the elementary school setting.

  2. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Maraman, W.J.

    1980-02-01

    Studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of LASL are presented. The three programs involved are: general-purpose heat source development; space nuclear safety; and fuels program. Three impact tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of a high temperature reentry pulse and the use of CBCF on impact performance. Additionally, two /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ pellets were encapsulated in Ir-0.3% W for impact testing. Results of the clad development test and vent testing are noted. Results of the environmental tests are summarized. Progress on the Stirling isotope power systems test and the status of the improved MHW tests are indicated. The examination of the impact failure of the iridium shell of MHFT-65 at a fuel pass-through continued. A test plan was written for vibration testing of the assembled light-weight radioisotopic heater unit. Progress on fuel processing is reported.

  3. Quantum correlations and dynamics from classical random fields valued in complex Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-08-15

    One of the crucial differences between mathematical models of classical and quantum mechanics (QM) is the use of the tensor product of the state spaces of subsystems as the state space of the corresponding composite system. (To describe an ensemble of classical composite systems, one uses random variables taking values in the Cartesian product of the state spaces of subsystems.) We show that, nevertheless, it is possible to establish a natural correspondence between the classical and the quantum probabilistic descriptions of composite systems. Quantum averages for composite systems (including entangled) can be represented as averages with respect to classical random fields. It is essentially what Albert Einstein dreamed of. QM is represented as classical statistical mechanics with infinite-dimensional phase space. While the mathematical construction is completely rigorous, its physical interpretation is a complicated problem. We present the basic physical interpretation of prequantum classical statistical field theory in Sec. II. However, this is only the first step toward real physical theory.

  4. Deep Space Network turbo decoder infusion: enhanced performance and lower decoder complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, F.; Andrews, K.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the effort to deploy turbo decoders in the Deep Space Network to service missions launching in 2003 and later, and the implications of these new capabilities for the design of future missions.

  5. A parameter database for large scientific projects: application to the Gaia space astrometry mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perryman, Michael; de Bruijne, Jos; Lammers, Uwe

    2008-10-01

    The parallel development of many aspects of a complex space science mission like Gaia, which includes numerous participants in ESA, industrial companies, and a large and active scientific collaboration throughout Europe, makes keeping track of the many design changes, instrument and operational parameters, and numerical values for the data analysis and simulations, a challenging but crucially important problem. A comprehensive, easily-accessible, up-to-date, and definitive compilation of a large range of numerical quantities is required, and the Gaia parameter database has been established to satisfy these needs. The database is a centralised repository containing, besides mathematical, physical, and astronomical constants, many satellite and subsystem design parameters. Version control provides both a ‘live’ version with the most recent parameters, as well as previous ‘reference’ versions of the full database contents. Query results are formatted by default in HTML, while an important feature is that data can also be retrieved as Java, ANSI-C, C++, Ruby, or XML structures for direct inclusion into software codes, such that all collaborating scientists can use the retrieved database parameters and values directly linked to computational routines.

  6. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W.; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold architecture, porosity, and cellular interactions. The proposed projection stereolithography (PSL) platform can be used to design intricate 3D tissue scaffolds that can be engineered to mimic the microarchitecture of tissues, based on computer aided design (CAD). The PSL system was developed, programmed and optimized to fabricate 3D scaffolds using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA). Variation of the structure and prepolymer concentration enabled tailoring the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A dynamic cell seeding method was utilized to improve the coverage of the scaffold throughout its thickness. The results demonstrated that the interconnectivity of pores allowed for uniform human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) distribution and proliferation in the scaffolds, leading to high cell density and confluency at the end of the culture period. Moreover, immunohistochemistry results showed that cells seeded on the scaffold maintained their endothelial phenotype, demonstrating the biological functionality of the microfabricated GelMA scaffolds. PMID:22365811

  7. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-05-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold architecture, porosity, and cellular interactions. The proposed projection stereolithography (PSL) platform can be used to design intricate 3D tissue scaffolds that can be engineered to mimic the microarchitecture of tissues, based on computer aided design (CAD). The PSL system was developed, programmed and optimized to fabricate 3D scaffolds using gelatin methacrylate (GelMA). Variation of the structure and prepolymer concentration enabled tailoring the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A dynamic cell seeding method was utilized to improve the coverage of the scaffold throughout its thickness. The results demonstrated that the interconnectivity of pores allowed for uniform human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) distribution and proliferation in the scaffolds, leading to high cell density and confluency at the end of the culture period. Moreover, immunohistochemistry results showed that cells seeded on the scaffold maintained their endothelial phenotype, demonstrating the biological functionality of the microfabricated GelMA scaffolds. PMID:22365811

  8. The radioisotope complex project "RIC-80" at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panteleev, V. N.; Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Moroz, F. V.; Molkanov, P. L.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-12-01

    The high current cyclotron C-80 capable of producing 40-80 MeV proton beams with a current of up to 200 μA has been constructed at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. One of the main goals of the C-80 is the production of a wide spectrum of medical radionuclides for diagnostics and therapy. The project development of the radioisotope complex RIC-80 (radioisotopes at the cyclotron C-80) at the beam of C-80 has been completed. The RIC-80 complex is briefly discussed in this paper. The combination of the mass-separator with the target-ion source device, available at one of the new target stations for on-line or semi on-line production of a high purity separated radioisotopes, is explored in greater detail. The results of target and ion source tests for a mass-separator method for the production of high purity radioisotopes 82Sr and 223,224Ra are also presented.

  9. The radioisotope complex project “RIC-80” at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Panteleev, V. N. Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Moroz, F. V.; Molkanov, P. L.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-12-15

    The high current cyclotron C-80 capable of producing 40-80 MeV proton beams with a current of up to 200 μA has been constructed at Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. One of the main goals of the C-80 is the production of a wide spectrum of medical radionuclides for diagnostics and therapy. The project development of the radioisotope complex RIC-80 (radioisotopes at the cyclotron C-80) at the beam of C-80 has been completed. The RIC-80 complex is briefly discussed in this paper. The combination of the mass-separator with the target-ion source device, available at one of the new target stations for on-line or semi on-line production of a high purity separated radioisotopes, is explored in greater detail. The results of target and ion source tests for a mass-separator method for the production of high purity radioisotopes {sup 82}Sr and {sup 223,224}Ra are also presented.

  10. Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project Ku-Band and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  11. Ku- and Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna for the Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Birr, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to increase data rates and flexibility and decrease costs by using space-based communications assets for telemetry during launches and landings. Phase 1 used standard S-band antennas with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System to obtain a baseline performance. The selection process and available resources for Phase 2 resulted in a Ku-band phased array antenna system. Several development efforts are under way for a Ka-band phased array antenna system for Phase 3. Each phase includes test flights to demonstrate performance and capabilities. Successful completion of this project will result in a set of communications requirements for the next generation of launch vehicles.

  12. Stereoscopic 3D Projections with MITAKA An Important Tool to Get People Interested in Astronomy and Space Science in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Nemoto; Shoichi, Itoh; Hidehiko, Agata; Mario, Zegarra; Jose, Ishitsuka; Edwin, Choque; Adita, Quispe; Tsunehiko, Kato

    2014-02-01

    National Astronomical Observatory of Japan has developed space simulation software "Mitaka". By using Mitaka on two PCs and two projectors with polarizing filter, and look through polarized glasses, we can enjoy space travel in three dimensions. Any one can download Mitaka from anywhere in the world by Internet. But, it has been prepared only Japanese and English versions now. We improved a Mitaka Spanish version, and now we are making projections for local people. The experience of the universe in three dimensions is a very memorable for people, and it has become an opportunity to get interested in astronomy and space sciences. A 40 people capacity room, next o to our Planetarium, has been conditioned for 3D projections; also a portable system is available. Due to success of this new outreach system more 3D show rooms will be implemented within the country.

  13. Validation of LAIC model within the framework of ISSI project "Multi-instrument space-borne observations and validation of the physical model of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere-Magnetosphere Coupling"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, Sergey; Ouzounov, Dimitar; Laic Team

    2015-04-01

    A new international project to study the complex chain of interactions of different layers of atmosphere and near-Earth space plasma in presence of ionization sources and atmosphere loading by aerosol and dust, was initiated with the support of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern. The Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) concept initially created to understand the pre-earthquake phenomena in atmosphere and ionosphere, demonstrated its universality and ability to explain other natural phenomena involving atmosphere-ionosphere coupling from below such as tropical cyclones, thunderstorm activity, dust storms, volcano eruptions etc. The project aim, defined within the frame of the ISSI projects, can advance the Multi-instrument space-borne observations for studying the Earth Geospace environment. The currently project development utilizes multi-instrument ground and space-born observations collected all over the world to explore the variety of natural phenomena. First results show, that our planet environment could be regarded as an open complex system where interactions between different layers of atmosphere play important role in its thermodynamics and electrodynamics. Holistic approach to the geospheres interaction gives the new insight of our near-planet environment.

  14. The Complex Spin State of 103P-Hartley 2: Kinematics and Orientation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Thomas, Peter; Li, Jian-Yang; Williams, Jade; Carcich, Brian; A'Hearn, Michael F.; McLaughlin, Stephanie; Farnham, Tony; McFadden, Lucy; Lisse, Carey M.; Collins, Steven; Besse, Sebastien; Klaasen, Kenneth; Sunshine, Jessica; Meech, Karen J.; Lindler, Don

    2013-01-01

    We derive the spin state of the nucleus of Comet 103P/Hartley 2, its orientation in space, and its short-term temporal evolution from a mixture of observations taken from the DIXI (Deep Impact Extended Investigation) spacecraft and radar observations. The nucleus is found to spin in an excited long-axis mode (LAM) with its rotational angular momentum per unit mass, M, and rotational energy per unit mass, E, slowly decreasing while the degree of excitation in the spin increases through perihelion passage. M is directed toward (RA, Dec; J2000) = 8+/-+/- 4 deg., 54 +/- 1 deg. (obliquity = 48 +/- 1 deg.). This direction is likely changing, but the change is probably <6 deg. on the sky over the approx. 81.6 days of the DIXI encounter. The magnitudes of M and E at closest approach (JD 2455505.0831866 2011-11-04 13:59:47.310) are 30.0 +/- 0.2 sq. m/s and (1.56 +/- 0.02) X 10(exp -3) sq. m /sq. s respectively. The period of rotation about the instantaneous spin vector, which points in the direction (RA, Dec; J2000) = 300 +/- 3.2deg., 67 +/- 1.3 deg. at the time of closest approach, was 14.1 +/- 0.3 h. The instantaneous spin vector circulates around M, inclined at an average angle of 33.2 +/- 1.3 deg. with an average period of 18.40 +/- 0.13 h at the time of closest approach. The period of roll around the principal axis of minimum inertia (''long'' axis) at that time is 26.72 +/- 0.06 h. The long axis is inclined to M by approx. 81.2 +/- 0.6 deg. on average, slowly decreasing through encounter. We infer that there is a periodic nodding motion of the long axis with half the roll period, i.e., 13.36+/- 0.03 h, with amplitude of 1 again decreasing through encounter. The periodic variability in the circulation and roll rates during a cycle was at the 2% and 10-14% level respectively. During the encounter there was a secular lengthening of the circulation period of the long axis by 1.3 +/- 0.2 min/d, in agreement with ground-based estimates, while the period of roll around the

  15. The Cauchy Problem in Local Spaces for the Complex Ginzburg-Landau EquationII. Contraction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginibre, J.; Velo, G.

    We continue the study of the initial value problem for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (with a > 0, b > 0, g>= 0) in initiated in a previous paper [I]. We treat the case where the initial data and the solutions belong to local uniform spaces, more precisely to spaces of functions satisfying local regularity conditions and uniform bounds in local norms, but no decay conditions (or arbitrarily weak decay conditions) at infinity in . In [I] we used compactness methods and an extended version of recent local estimates [3] and proved in particular the existence of solutions globally defined in time with local regularity of the initial data corresponding to the spaces Lr for r>= 2 or H1. Here we treat the same problem by contraction methods. This allows us in particular to prove that the solutions obtained in [I] are unique under suitable subcriticality conditions, and to obtain for them additional regularity properties and uniform bounds. The method extends some of those previously applied to the nonlinear heat equation in global spaces to the framework of local uniform spaces.

  16. The HYTHIRM Project: Flight Thermography of the Space Shuttle During the Hypersonic Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Tomek, Deborah M.; Berger, Karen T.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Splinter, Scott C.; Krasa, Paul W.; Schwartz, Richard J.; Gibson, David M.; Tietjen, Alan B.; Tack, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a NASA Langley led endeavor sponsored by the NASA Engineering Safety Center, the Space Shuttle Program Office and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate to demonstrate a quantitative thermal imaging capability. A background and an overview of several multidisciplinary efforts that culminated in the acquisition of high resolution calibrated infrared imagery of the Space Shuttle during hypervelocity atmospheric entry is presented. The successful collection of thermal data has demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining remote high-resolution infrared imagery during hypersonic flight for the accurate measurement of surface temperature. To maximize science and engineering return, the acquisition of quantitative thermal imagery and capability demonstration was targeted towards three recent Shuttle flights - two of which involved flight experiments flown on Discovery. In coordination with these two Shuttle flight experiments, a US Navy NP-3D aircraft was flown between 26-41 nautical miles below Discovery and remotely monitored surface temperature of the Orbiter at Mach 8.4 (STS-119) and Mach 14.7 (STS-128) using a long-range infrared optical package referred to as Cast Glance. This same Navy aircraft successfully monitored the Orbiter Atlantis traveling at approximately Mach 14.3 during its return from the successful Hubble repair mission (STS-125). The purpose of this paper is to describe the systematic approach used by the Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements team to develop and implement a set of mission planning tools designed to establish confidence in the ability of an imaging platform to reliably acquire, track and return global quantitative surface temperatures of the Shuttle during entry. The mission planning tools included a pre-flight capability to predict the infrared signature of the Shuttle. Such tools permitted optimization of the hardware configuration to increase signal-to-noise and to maximize the available

  17. A Space-Time Adaptive Method for Simulating Complex Cardiac Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, E. M.; Greenside, H. S.; Henriquez, C. S.

    2000-03-01

    A new space-time adaptive mesh refinement algorithm (AMRA) is presented and analyzed which, by automatically adding and deleting local patches of higher-resolution Cartesian meshes, can simulate quantitatively accurate models of cardiac electrical dynamics efficiently in large domains. We find in two space dimensions that the AMRA is able to achieve a factor of 5 speedup and a factor of 5 reduction in memory while achieving the same accuracy compared to a code based on a uniform space-time mesh at the highest resolution of the AMRA method. We summarize applications of the code to the Luo-Rudy 1 cardiac model in large two- and three-dimensional domains and discuss the implications of our results for understanding the initiation of arrhythmias.

  18. Technical Report: Final project report for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Complex Matter

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Cheville; D. R. Grischkowsky

    2007-02-08

    This project designed characterization techniques for thin films of complex matter and other materials in the terahertz spectral region extending from approximately 100 GHz to 4000 GHz (4 THz) midway between radio waves and light. THz has traditionally been a difficult region of the spectrum in which to conduct spectroscopic measurements. The “THz gap” arises from the nature of the sources and detectors used in spectroscopy both at the optical (high frequency) side and electronic (low frequency) side of the gap. To deal with the extremely rapid oscillations of the electric field in this frequency region this research project adapted techniques from both the electronics and optics technologies by fabricating microscopic antennas and driving them with short optical pulses. This research technique creates nearly single cycle pulses with extremely broad spectral bandwidth that are able to cover the THz spectral range with a single measurement. The technique of THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has seen increasing use and acceptance in laboratories over the past fifteen years. However significant technical challenges remain in order to allow THz-TDS to be applied to measurement of solid materials, particularly thin films and complex matter. This project focused on the development and adaptation of time domain THz measurement techniques to investigate the electronic properties of complex matter in the terahertz frequency region from 25 GHz to beyond 5 THz (<1 inv. cm to >165 inv. cm). This project pursued multiple tracks in adapting THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to measurement of complex matter. The first, and most important, is development of a reliable methods to characterize the complex dielectric constant of thin films with high accuracy when the wavelength of the THz radiation is much longer than the thickness of the film. We have pursued several techniques for measurement of thin films. The most promising of these are waveguide spectroscopy and

  19. Promoting North-South partnership in space data use and applications: Case study - East African countries space programs/projects new- concepts in document management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlimandago, S.

    This research paper have gone out with very simple and easy (several) new concepts in document management for space projects and programs which can be applied anywhere both in the developing and developed countries. These several new concepts are and have been applied in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda and found out to bear very good results using simple procedures. The intergral project based its documentation management approach from the outset on electronic document sharing and archiving. The main objective of having new concepts was to provide a faster and wider availability of the most current space information to all parties rather than creating a paperless office. Implementation of the new concepts approach required the capturing of documents in an appropriate and simple electronic format at source establishing new procedures for project wide information sharing and the deployment of a new generation of simple procedure - WEB - based tools. Key success factors were the early adoption of Internet technologies and simple procedures for improved information flow new concepts which can be applied anywhere both in the developed and the developing countries.

  20. Personal Active Dosimeter for Space: the Light Observer for Radiation Environment (LORE) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio

    Long permanence in space outside the protections of the Earth magnetic shield and atmosphere (during long journeys, and on the Moon or/and Mars) requires a careful monitoring of absorbed doses by each astronaut. This is of paramount importance for transient and cumulative effects mostly due to Solar Particle Events. Alarming features and the possibility of monitoring absorbed dose also discriminating the kind of incoming radiation will be needed. Stemming from our large experience in detector building, in modelling, in designing of the supporting electronic, from our payloads flown on satellites, MIR Station and ISS (Nina, Mita, SilEye, SilEye2, Alteino, Pamela, ALTEA) we are developping a personal active dosimeter with alarming and wireless features. The goal is a small object able to measure charged and neutral ionizing radiation (the possibility to insert a miniaturized gamma detector will be investigated) The device will feature portability (cigarette-box dimensions, rechargeable batteries), sensitivity to ions (H to above Fe), to hard X-rays, and possibly to gamma with the ability to detect and count neutrons. Flash memories should contain pre loaded tables and the real Time code to perform the real time operations and risk thresholds so to activate an alarm if/when needed. Whenever in range, the device will connect wirelessly to the main computer and send there the raw and pre-analyzed data for a complete monitoring and possible more sophisticated analyses. The two major novelties and challenges in this project are the miniaturization of the device, including the firmware, and the definition of the transfer function and of its uncertainties, linking measured data with real flux data. This will require the proper balancing among size, radiation discrimination ability and uncertainty minimization.