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Sample records for complex thermal barrier

  1. Thermal barrier research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1990-03-07

    The thermal barrier region in the TARA device is a complex arrangement combining ion-plugging by sloshing ions with an ECRH-generated thermal barrier plasma. An axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio magnetic field, adjacent to the central cell, provides the confinement of the thermal barrier plasma and sloshing ions. This paper discusses research being done in this thermal barrier region.

  2. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  3. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  4. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.; Leibert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A coating system which contains a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating is applied to metal surfaces such as turbine blades and provides both low thermal conductivity and improved adherence when exposed to high temperature gases or liquids. The bond coating contains NiCrAlY and the thermal barrier coating contains a reflective oxide. The reflective oxides ZrO2-Y2O3 and ZrO2-MgO have demonstrated significant utility in high temperature turbine applications.

  5. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature oxidation resistant, thermal barrier coating system is disclosed for a nickel cobalt, or iron base alloy substrate. An inner metal bond coating contacts the substrate, and a thermal barrier coating covers the bond coating. NiCrAlR, FeCrAlR, and CoCrAlR alloys are satisfactory as bond coating compositions where R=Y or Yb. These alloys contain, by weight, 24.9-36.7% chromium, 5.4-18.5% aluminum, and 0.05 to 1.55% yttrium or 0.05 to 0.53% ytterbium. The coatings containing ytterbium are preferred over those containing yttrium. An outer thermal barrier coating of partial stabilized zirconium oxide (zirconia) which is between 6% and 8%, by weight, of yttrium oxide (yttria) covers the bond coating. Partial stabilization provides a material with superior durability. Partially stabilized zirconia consists of mixtures of cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases.

  6. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  7. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  8. Segmented Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The article has a macro-segmented thermal barrier coating due to the presence of a pattern of three-dimensional features. The features may be a series of raised ribs formed on the substrate surface and being spaced from 0.05 inches to 0.30 apart. The ribs have a width ranging from 0.005 inches to 0.02 inches, and a height ranging from 25% to 100% of the thickness of the barrier coating. Alternately, the features may be a similar pattern of grooves formed in the surface of the substrate. Other embodiments provide segmentation by grooves or ribs in the bond coat or alternately grooves formed in the thermal barrier layer.

  9. Thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  10. Thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne

    2010-06-22

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  11. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  12. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  13. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains papers from the 1997 Thermal Barrier Coatings Workshop, sponsored by the TBC Interagency Coordination Committee. The Workshop was held in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, May 19-21, 1997. The papers cover the topics of heat transfer and conductivity of thermal barrier coatings, failure mechanisms and characterization of the coatings as well as characterization of coating deposition methods. Speakers included research, development and user groups in academia, industry and government.

  14. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor description (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard power or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increase upon being exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicates that if these coatings reach a temperature above

  15. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicate that if these coatings reach a temperature above 1100 C

  16. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    SciTech Connect

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

    1995-12-31

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications.

  17. Alumina-Enhanced Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marnell; Leiser, Dan; Goldstein, Howard

    1989-01-01

    Rigid, fibrous ceramic tile material called "alumina-enhanced thermal barrier" (AETB) extends temperature capability of insulating materials. Material has obvious potential for terrestrial use in kilns, furnaces, heat engines, and other applications in which light weight and high operating temperature are specified. Three kinds of ceramic fibers are blended, molded, and sintered to make refractory tiles.

  18. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Nagaraj, B.A.; Moore, C.S.

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC`s is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings.

  19. Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Krauss, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The project examined the effectiveness of studying the creep behavior of thermal barrier coating system through the use of a general purpose, large strain finite element program, NIKE2D. Constitutive models implemented in this code were applied to simulate thermal-elastic and creep behavior. Four separate ceramic-bond coat interface geometries were examined in combination with a variety of constitutive models and material properties. The reason for focusing attention on the ceramic-bond coat interface is that prior studies have shown that cracking occurs in the ceramic near interface features which act as stress concentration points. The model conditions examined include: (1) two bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion curves; (2) the creep coefficient and creep exponent of the bond coat for steady state creep; (3) the interface geometry; and (4) the material model employed to represent the bond coat, ceramic, and superalloy base.

  20. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    A methodology is established to predict thermal barrier coating life in a environment similar to that experienced by gas turbine airfoils. Experiments were conducted to determine failure modes of the thermal barrier coating. Analytical studies were employed to derive a life prediction model. A review of experimental and flight service components as well as laboratory post evaluations indicates that the predominant mode of TBC failure involves thermomechanical spallation of the ceramic coating layer. This ceramic spallation involves the formation of a dominant crack in the ceramic coating parallel to and closely adjacent to the topologically complex metal ceramic interface. This mechanical failure mode clearly is influenced by thermal exposure effects as shown in experiments conducted to study thermal pre-exposure and thermal cycle-rate effects. The preliminary life prediction model developed focuses on the two major damage modes identified in the critical experiments tasks. The first of these involves a mechanical driving force, resulting from cyclic strains and stresses caused by thermally induced and externally imposed mechanical loads. The second is an environmental driving force based on experimental results, and is believed to be related to bond coat oxidation. It is also believed that the growth of this oxide scale influences the intensity of the mechanical driving force.

  1. Pratt & Whitney thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, N.; Marcin, J.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems. The operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic with fewer transients-compared with those for aircraft gas turbine engines. Therefore, creep rather than thermal fatigue, becomes primary life-limiting for hot section components. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the program. TBCs allow surface temperatures to increase without compromising the structural properties of the alloy. TBCs typically consist of a ceramic insulating layer, deposited onto the substrate with an intervening metallic layer, which imparts oxidation protection to the substrate and provides a surface to which the ceramic layer can adhere.

  2. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    SciTech Connect

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  3. Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used extensively in modern gas turbine engines to thermally insulate air-cooled metallic components from the hot gases in the engine. These coatings typically consist of a zirconia-yttria ceramic that has been applied by either plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition. Future engines will rely even more heavily on TBCs and will require materials that have even higher temperature capability with improved insulation (i.e., lower thermal conductivity even after many hours at high temperature). This report discusses new TBCs that have been developed with these future requirements in mind. The Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is funding this effort, which has been conducted primarily at Glenn with contractor support (GE and Howmet) for physical vapor deposition. As stated, the new TBC not only had to be more insulating but the insulation had to persist even after many hours of exposure-that is, the new TBC had to have both lower conductivity and improved sintering resistance. A new type of test rig was developed for this task. This new test approach used a laser to deliver a known high heat flux in an essentially uniform pattern to the surface of the coating, thereby establishing a realistic thermal gradient across its thickness. This gradient was determined from surface and backside pyrometry; and since the heat flux and coating thickness are known, this permitted continuous monitoring of thermal conductivity. Thus, this laser rig allowed very efficient screening of candidate low-conductivity, sinter-resistant TBCs. The coating-design approach selected for these new low-conductivity TBCs was to identify oxide dopants that had the potential to promote the formation of relatively large and stable groupings of defects known as defect clusters. This approach was used because it was felt that such clusters would reduce conductivity while enhancing stability. The approach proved to be

  4. Overview of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonushonis, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of delamination mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings has been developed for diesel applications through nondestructive evaluation, structural analysis modeling and engine evaluation of various thermal barrier coatings. This knowledge has resulted in improved thermal barrier coatings which survive abusive cyclic fatigue tests in high output diesel engines. Significant efforts are still required to improve the plasma spray processing capability and the economics for complex geometry diesel engine components. Data obtained from advanced diesel engines on the effect of thermal barrier coatings on engine fuel economy and emission has not been encouraging. Although the underlying metal component temperatures have been reduced through the use of thermal barrier coating, engine efficiency and emission trends have not been promising.

  5. Metallic seal for thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is particularly concerned with sealing thermal barrier coating systems of the type in use and being contemplated for use in diesel and other internal combustion engines. The invention also would find application in moderately high temperature regions of gas turbine engines and any other application employing a thermal barrier coating at moderate temperatures. Ni-35Cr-6Al-1Y, Ni-35Cr-6Al-1Yb, or other metallic alloy denoted as MCrAlx is applied over a zirconia-based thermal barrier overlayer. The close-out layer is glass-bead preened to densify its surface. This seals and protects the thermal barrier coating system.

  6. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  7. Microlaminate composites as thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishna, M. C.; Doerr, H. J.; Deshpandey, C. V.; Bunshah, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    Thick multiple-layered Ni/NiCoCrAlY and Ti/CoCrAlY microlaminate composites are explored as thermal barrier coatings. The method of fabrication of these laminates and the measurement technique used to determine thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of these coatings are discussed. Results indicate that the thermal conductivity of the laminate composite perpendicular to the laminate plane decreases with increasing number of interfaces; the drop in thermal conductivity is likely to be associated with interfaces which act as a barrier to the transfer of heat across them; the variation in thermal conductivity with the number of interfaces is not linear.

  8. Thermal barrier coating evaluation needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    A 0.025 cm (0.010 in) thick thermal barrier coating (TBC) applied to turbine airfoils in a research gas turbine engine provided component temperature reductions of up to 190 C. These impressive temperature reductions can allow increased engine operating temperatures and reduced component cooling to achieve greater engine performance without sacrificing component durability. The significant benefits of TBCs are well established in aircraft gas turbine engine applications and their use is increasing. TBCs are also under intense development for use in the Low Heat Rejection (LHR) diesel engine currently being developed and are under consideration for use in utility and marine gas turbines. However, to fully utilize the benefits of TBCs it is necessary to accurately characterize coating attributes that affect the insulation and coating durability. The purpose there is to discuss areas in which nondestructive evaluation can make significant contributions to the further development and full utilization of TBCs for aircraft gas turbine engines and low heat rejection diesel engines.

  9. Porosity determination of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Roode, Mark; Beardsley, Brad

    1988-01-01

    Coating porosity is believed to be a critical factor for the thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A number of different techniques have been used to determine the porosities of thermal barrier coatings for diesel applications as part of a NASA/DOE sponsored study. A comparison is made between methods based on water immersion, optical microscopy, eddy current thickness measurements, and Archimedes principle for TBC porosity determination.

  10. Overview of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonushonis, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of delamination mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings has been developed for diesel engine applications through rig tests, structural analysis modeling, nondestructive evaluation, and engine evaluation of various thermal barrier coatings. This knowledge has resulted in improved thermal barrier coatings which survive abusive cyclic fatigue tests in high output diesel engines. Although much conflicting literature now exists regarding the impact of thermal barrier coatings on engine performance and fuel consumption, the changes in fuel consumption appear to be less than a few percent and can be negative for state-of-the-art diesel engines. The ability of the thermal barrier coating to improve fuel economy tends to be dependent on a number of factors including the fuel injection system, combustion chamber design, and the initial engine fuel economy. Limited investigations on state-of-the-art diesel engines have indicated that the surface connected porosity and coating surface roughness may influence engine fuel economy. Current research efforts on thermal barrier coatings are primarily directed at reducing in-cylinder heat rejection, thermal fatigue protection of underlying metal surfaces and a possible reduction in diesel engine emissions. Significant efforts are still required to improve the plasma spray processing capability and the economics for complex geometry diesel engine components.

  11. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  12. Resilient thermal barrier for high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Abrasion-resistant thermal barrier, consisting of two layers of woven fabric or braided sleeving with bulk insulation sandwiched between, shows excellent resilience even after compression at temperatures above 980C.

  13. Reusable Thermal Barrier for Insulation Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladee, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Filler composed of resilient, heat-resistant materials. Thermal barrier nestles snugly in gap between two tiles with minimal protrusion beyond faces of surrounding tiles. When removed from gap, barrier springs back to nearly original shape. Developed for filling spaces between tiles on Space Shuttle, also used in furnaces and kilns.

  14. Corrosion-resistant ceramic thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two-layer thermal barrier coating, consisting of metal-CrA1Y bond coating and calcium silicate ceramic outer layer, greatly improves resistance of turbine parts to hot corrosion from fuel and air impurities. Both layers can be plasma sprayed, and ceramic layer may be polished to reduce frictional losses. Ceramic provides thermal barrier, so parts operate cooler metal temperatures, coolant flow can be reduced, or gas temperatures increased. Lower grade fuels also can be used.

  15. Thermal Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and fracture behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings has been investigated under high heat flux and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating crack propagation is studied under laser heat flux cyclic thermal loading, and is correlated with dynamic fatigue and strength test results. The coating stress response and inelasticity, fatigue and creep interactions, and interface damage mechanisms during dynamic thermal fatigue processes are emphasized.

  16. A design perspective on thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soechting, Friedrich O.

    1995-01-01

    This technical paper addresses the challenges for maximizing the benefit of thermal barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The perspective is from a customer's viewpoint, a turbine airfoil designer, who is continuously challenged to increase the turbine inlet temperature capability for new products while maintaining cooling flow levels or even reducing them. This is a fundamental requirement to achieve increased engine thrust levels. Developing advanced material systems for the turbine flowpath airfoils is one approach to solve this challenge; such as high temperature nickel based superalloys or thermal barrier coatings to insulate the metal airfoils from the hot flowpath environment. The second approach is to increase the cooling performance of the turbine airfoil, which enables increased flowpath temperatures and reduced cooling flow levels. Thermal barrier coatings have been employed in jet engine applications for almost 30 years. The initial application was on augmentor liners to provide thermal protection during afterburner operation. However, the production use of thermal barrier coating in the turbine section has only occurred in the past 15 years. The application was limited to stationary parts, and only recently incorporated on the rotating turbine blades. This lack of endorsement of thermal barrier coatings resulted from the poor initial durability of these coatings in high heat flux environments. Significant improvements have been made to enhance spallation resistance and erosion resistance which has resulted in increased reliability of these coatings in turbine applications.

  17. A design perspective on thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soechting, F. O.

    1995-01-01

    This technical paper addresses the challenges for maximizing the benefit of thermal barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The perspective is from a customer's viewpoint, a turbine airfoil designer, who is continuously challenged to increase the turbine inlet temperature capability for new products while maintaining cooling flow levels or even reducing them. This is a fundamental requirement to achieve increased engine thrust levels. Developing advanced material systems for the turbine flowpath airfoils is one approach to solve this challenge, for example, high temperature nickel based superalloys or thermal barrier coatings to insulate the metal airfoil from the hot flowpath environment. The second approach is to increase the cooling performance of the turbine airfoil, which enables increased flowpath temperatures and reduced cooling flow levels. Thermal barrier coatings have been employed in jet engine applications for almost 30 years. The initial application was on augmenter lines to provide thermal protection during afterburner operation. However, the production use of thermal barrier coating in the turbine section has only occurred in the past 15 years. The application was limited to stationary parts, and only recently incorporated on the rotating turbine blades. This lack of endorsement of thermal barrier coatings resulted from the poor initial durability of these coatings in high heat flux environments. Significant improvements have been made to enhance spallation resistance and erosion resistance which has resulted in increased reliability of these coatings in turbine applications.

  18. A design perspective on thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soechting, F. O.

    1999-12-01

    This article addresses the challenges for maximizing the benefit of thermal barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The perspective is from the viewpoint of a customer, a turbine airfoil designer who is continuously challenged to increase the turbine inlet temperature capability for new products while maintaining cooling flow levels or even reducing them. This is a fundamental requirement for achieving increased engine thrust levels. Developing advanced material systems for the turbine flowpath airfoils, such as high-temperature nickel-base superalloys or thermal barrier coatings to insulate the metal airfoils from the hot flowpath environment, is one approach to solve this challenge. The second approach is to increase the cooling performance of the turbine airfoil, which enables increased flowpath temperatures and reduced cooling flow levels. Thermal barrier coatings have been employed in jet engine applications for almost 30 years. The initial application was on augmentor liners to provide thermal protection during afterburner operation. However, the production use of thermal barrier coatings in the turbine section has only occurred in the past 15 years. The application was limited to stationary parts and only recently incorporated on the rotating turbine blades. This lack of endorsement of thermal barrier coatings resulted from the poor initial duratbility of these coatings in high heat flux environments. Significant improvements have been made to enhance spallation resistance and erosion resistance, which has resulted in increased reliability of these coatings in turbine applications.

  19. A design perspective on thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Soechting, F.O.

    1995-10-01

    This technical paper addresses the challenges for maximizing the benefit of thermal barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The perspective is from a customer`s viewpoint, a turbine airfoil designer, who is continuously challenged to increase the turbine inlet temperature capability for new products while maintaining cooling flow levels or even reducing them. This is a fundamental requirement to achieve increased engine thrust levels. Developing advanced material systems for the turbine flowpath airfoils is one approach to solve this challenge; such as high temperature nickel based superalloys or thermal barrier coatings to insulate the metal airfoils from the hot flowpath environment. The second approach is to increase the cooling performance of the turbine airfoil, which enables increased flowpath temperatures and reduced cooling flow levels. Thermal barrier coatings have been employed in jet engine applications for almost 30 years. The initial application was on augmentor liners to provide thermal protection during afterburner operation. However, the production use of thermal barrier coating in the turbine section has only occurred in the past 15 years. The application was limited to stationary parts, and only recently incorporated on the rotating turbine blades. This lack of endorsement of thermal barrier coatings resulted from the poor initial durability of these coatings in high heat flux environments. Significant improvements have been made to enhance spallation resistance and erosion resistance which has resulted in increased reliability of these coatings in turbine applications.

  20. Thermal barrier and gas seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, J. O.; Surbat, M.

    1980-01-01

    Resilient baglike seal tolerates thousand-degree temperatures and accommodates small changes in gap size without losing gas-barrier properties; at same time, it maintains smooth aerodynamic surface across gap. Seal includes alumina filler backed by metal plate. Alumina-filled envelope is easily handled and installed, and can be used in high-temperature industrial processes like coal gasification and liquefaction.

  1. Thick thermal barrier coatings for diesel components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonushonis, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    An engineered thick thermal barrier coating consisting of multiple layers of zirconia and CoCrAlY with a zirconia top layer and having a system thermal conductance less than 410 w/m(exp 2)K exceeded the 100 hour engine durability goals set forth in this program. The thermal barrier coatings were intact at the test conclusion. Back to back single cylinder research engine tests were conducted with watercooled, metal hardware and oil-cooled, thermal barrier coating insulated hardware to determine apparent heat release and fuel economy. Apparent heat release data revealed that the insulated engine had a shorter ignition delay and a longer combustion duration than the metal engine. The insulated engine fuel economy was approximately two percent worse on average for this series of tests. There was no attempt to optimize engine efficiency of the insulated engine by modifying the engine timing, coating, or other techniques.

  2. Thermal Conductivity and Sintering Behavior of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings, having significantly reduced long-term thermal conductivities, are being developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  3. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi, J. T.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this program is to establish a methodology to predict Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) life on gas turbine engine components. The approach involves experimental life measurement coupled with analytical modeling of relevant degradation modes. The coating being studied is a flight qualified two layer system, designated PWA 264, consisting of a nominal ten mil layer of seven percent yttria partially stabilized zirconia plasma deposited over a nominal five mil layer of low pressure plasma deposited NiCoCrAlY. Thermal barrier coating degradation modes being investigated include: thermomechanical fatigue, oxidation, erosion, hot corrosion, and foreign object damage.

  4. The Effect of Core Configuration on Thermal Barrier Thermal Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Bott, Robert H.; Druesedow, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barriers and seals are integral components in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of nearly all aerospace vehicles. They are used to minimize heat transfer through interfaces and gaps and protect underlying temperature-sensitive components. The core insulation has a significant impact on both the thermal and mechanical properties of compliant thermal barriers. Proper selection of an appropriate core configuration to mitigate conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer through the thermal barrier is challenging. Additionally, optimization of the thermal barrier for thermal performance may have counteracting effects on mechanical performance. Experimental evaluations have been conducted to better understand the effect of insulation density on permeability and leakage performance, which can significantly impact the resistance to convective heat transfer. The effect of core density on mechanical performance was also previously investigated and will be reviewed. Simple thermal models were also developed to determine the impact of various core parameters on downstream temperatures. An extended understanding of these factors can improve the ability to design and implement these critical TPS components.

  5. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70's by Dr,. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also to provide protection. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the thermal barrier coatings will be to reduce thermal fatigue as the engine peak cylinder pressure will nearly be doubled. As the coatings result in higher available energy in the exhaust gas, efficiency gains are achieved through use of this energy by turbochargers, turbocompounding or thermoelectric generators.

  6. Thermal conductivity of a zirconia thermal barrier coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slifka, A. J.; Filla, B. J.; Phelps, J. M.; Bancke, G.; Berndt, C. C.

    1998-03-01

    The conductivity of a thermal-barrier coating composed of atmospheric plasma sprayed 8 mass percent yttria partially stabilized zirconia has been measured. This coating was sprayed on a substrate of 410 stainless steel. An absolute, steady-state measurement method was used to measure thermal conductivity from 400 to 800 K. The thermal conductivity of the coating is 0.62 W/(m·K). This measurement has shown to be temperature independent.

  7. Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2002-01-01

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

  8. Thermal Barrier Coatings. Abstracts and figures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Thermal Barrier Coatings Workshop was held May 21 and 22, 1985, at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Six sessions covered Failure Mechanisms and Life Modeling, Effects of Oxidation and Creep, Phase Stability and Microstructural Aspects, Nondestructive and Analytical Assessment, Coating Development, and Alternative Applications.

  9. Thermographic measurement of thermal barrier coating thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Steven M.; Hou, Yu L.; Lhota, James R.; Wang, David; Ahmed, Tasdiq

    2005-03-01

    Flash thermography is widely used to inspect Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) during manufacturing and maintenance for defects such as delamination or contamination. However, attempts to use thermography to quantify TBC thickness have been less successful. In conventional thermographic NDT applications, the sample surface is opaque to an incident light pulse, and highly emissive in the infrared. The situation is more complex in TBC's, as the coatings are translucent to visible light and near-IR radiation (including the IR component of the flash). Furthermore, TBC's are translucent to the mid-IR wavelengths at which many IR cameras operate. Thus, in the absolute worst case, the flash pulse does not heat the coating, and the camera does not see the coating. Although the latter problem can be mitigated by judicious choice of camera wavelength, it must also be recognized that both the heating and cooling mechanisms in a flash-heated TBC are different from the usual thermography model, where transit time of a heat pulse from the sample surface to a layer interface is an indicator of coating thickness. The resulting time sequence is processed using the Thermographic Signal Reconstruction to generate thickness maps which are accurate to an accuracy of a few percent of the actual coating thickness.

  10. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Clarke

    2006-07-31

    The third year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings has been devoted to two principal topics: (i) continuing the assessment of the long-term, thermal cycle stability of the Eu{sup 3+} doped 8YSZ temperature sensor coatings, and (ii) improving the fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. Following the earlier, preliminary findings, it has been found that not only is the luminescence from the sensors not affected by prolonged thermal cycling, even after 195 hours at 1425 C, but the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature remains unchanged. As the temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future, our findings indicate that the Eu{sup 3+} doped thermal barrier coating sensors are very robust and have the potential of being stable throughout the life of coatings. Investigation of Eu{sup 3+} doped coatings prepared by plasma-spraying exhibited the same luminescence characteristics as those prepared by electron-beam evaporation. This is of major significance since thermal barrier coatings can be prepared by both process technologies. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  11. To Develop Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Zhao, Weixun; Wang, Ping; Wei, Zheng

    Advanced turbine engines require the application of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to provide still higher reliability, thermal insulation effect and longer lifetime under harsh operating conditions. TBCs with nanostructure proved to be promising to deliver the desired property and performance. To exploit full potentials of the current widely used yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), nano-sized YSZ powders were developed and used as the ceramic source material. By controlling the deposition processes, novel TBCs with outstanding nanostructure such as nano-sized grains and pores were produced by atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), respectively. The incorporated nanostructure in TBCs resulted in substantial increase in thermal barrier effect and their lifetime. The long-term microstructure stability of the nanocoating was also investigated.

  12. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  13. Delamination-Indicating Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2007-01-01

    The risk of premature failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), typically composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), compromises the reliability of TBCs used to provide thermal protection for turbine engine components. Unfortunately, TBC delamination proceeds well beneath the TBC surface and cannot be monitored by visible inspection. Nondestructive diagnostic tools that could reliably probe the subsurface damage state of TBCs would alleviate the risk of TBC premature failure by indicating when the TBC needs to be replaced before the level of TBC damage threatens engine performance or safety. To meet this need, a new coating design for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that are self-indicating for delamination has been successfully implemented by incorporating a europium-doped luminescent sublayer at the base of a TBC composed of YSZ. The luminescent sublayer has the same YSZ composition as the rest of the TBC except for the addition of low-level europium doping and therefore does not alter TBC performance.

  14. Thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. C.; Phucharoen, W.; Miller, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) for advanced gas turbine blades have been under intensive development during the last several years. This investigation is intended to achieve a clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria TBCs, involving a nickle-chromium-aluminum bond coat. The near term objectives are to study the stress states in a relatively simple model TBC subjected to steady state thermal loading. The resulting thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation have been primary targets for the study. The finite element approach and the effects of thermal mismatch and oxidation are described. A proposed mechanism for oxidation induced coating failure is also presented.

  15. Failure mechanisms of thermal barrier systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used in turbines for propulsion and power generation. The benefit results from their ability to sustain high thermal gradients in the presence of adequate backside cooling. Lowering the temperature of the metal substrate prolongs the life of the component: whether from environmental attack, creep rupture, or fatigue. Thermal barrier systems exhibit multiple failure mechanisms, depends on the deposition methods of the TBCs, chemical composition of the bond coats, and their working environments. Some of the most prevalent are studied in this thesis. There are two types of thermal barrier systems based on the chemical composition of the bond coats: Pt-aluminide and NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Ratcheting happens the most in the systems with Pt-aluminide bond coats; while edge delamination is considered a possible failure mechanism for the systems with NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Ratcheting is motivated by displacement instability in the thermally grown oxide (TGO). Interactions between cracks induced in TBCs upon thermal cycling have been calculated. Cracks that converge from neighboring imperfections exhibit a minimum energy release rate prior to coalescence. Equating this minimum to the toughness of the TBC provides a criterion for coalescence and failure. Imposing this criterion allows the change in crack length upon cycling and the number of cycles to failure to be ascertained. This simulation capability is used to explore various influences on durability. Samples with NiCoCrAlY bond coat are studied after subjected to thermal cycling in a burner rig. In each case, a dominant delamination has been identified, that extends primarily along the interface between the TGO and the bond coat. Calculations of the delamination energy release rate, upon comparison with the interface toughness, reveals a critical TGO thickness, (h tgo)c ≈ 3mum, comparable to that found experimentally.

  16. JT90 thermal barrier coated vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Graziani, R. A.; Sinko, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    The technology of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings applied to turbine vane platforms in modern high temperature commercial engines was advanced to the point of demonstrated feasibility for application to commercial aircraft engines. The three thermal barrier coatings refined under this program are zirconia stabilized with twenty-one percent magnesia (21% MSZ), six percent yttria (6% YSZ), and twenty percent yttria (20% YSZ). Improvement in thermal cyclic endurance by a factor of 40 times was demonstrated in rig tests. A cooling system evolved during the program which featured air impingement cooling for the vane platforms rather than film cooling. The impingement cooling system, in combination with the thermal barrier coatings, reduced platform cooling air requirements by 44% relative to the current film cooling system. Improved durability and reduced cooling air requirements were demonstrated in rig and engine endurance tests. Two engine tests were conducted, one of 1000 cycles and the other of 1500 cycles. All three coatings applied to vanes fabricated with the final cooling system configuration completed the final 1500 cycle engine endurance test. Results of this test clearly demonstrated the durability of the 6% YSZ coating which was in very good condition after the test. The 21% MSZ and 20% YSZ coatings had numerous occurrences of significant spalling in the test.

  17. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70's by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also provide protection. Roy Kamo introduced thermal barrier coatings in his 'Adiabatic Diesel Engine' in the late 70's. Kamo's concept was to eliminate the engine block water cooling system and reduce heat losses. Roy reported significant performance improvements in his thermally insulated engine at the SAE Congress in 1982. Kamo's work stimulates major programs with insulated engines, particularly in Europe. Most of the major diesel engine manufacturers conducted some level of test with insulated combustion chamber components. They initially ran into increased fuel consumption. The German engine consortium had Prof. Woschni of the Technical Institute in Munich. Woschni conducted testing with pistons with air gaps to provide the insulation effects. Woschni indicated the hot walls of the insulated engine created a major increase in heat transfer he refers to as 'convection vive.' Woschni's work was a major factor in the abrupt curtailment of insulated diesel engine work in continental Europe. Ricardo in the UK suggested that combustion should be reoptimized for the hot-wall effects of the insulated combustion chamber and showed under a narrow range of conditions fuel economy could be improved. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the

  18. Vacuum application of thermal barrier plasma coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. R.; Mckechnie, T. N.

    1988-01-01

    Coatings are presently applied to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine blades for protection against the harsh environment realized in the engine during lift off-to-orbit. High performance nickel, chromium, aluminum, and yttrium (NiCrAlY) alloy coatings, which are applied by atmospheric plasma spraying, crack and spall off because of the severe thermal shock experienced during start-up and shut-down of the engine. Ceramic coatings of yttria stabilized zirconia (ZrO2-Y2O3) were applied initially as a thermal barrier over coating to the NiCrAlY but were removed because of even greater spalling. Utilizing a vacuum plasma spraying process, bond coatings of NiCrAlY were applied in a low pressure atmosphere of argon/helium, producing significantly improved coating-to-blade bonding. The improved coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles, cycling between 1700 and -423 F. The current atmospheric plasma NiCrAlY coatings spalled during 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2-Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the vacuum plasma process. The improved thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles without spalling. Hot firing in an SSME turbine engine is scheduled for the blades. Tooling was installed in preparation for vacuum plasma spray coating other SSME hardware, e.g., the titanium main fuel valve housing (MFVH) and the fuel turbopump nozzle/stator.

  19. Lower-Conductivity Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2003-01-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) that have both initial and post-exposure thermal conductivities lower than those of yttria-stabilized zirconia TBCs have been developed. TBCs are thin ceramic layers, generally applied by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition, that are used to insulate air-cooled metallic components from hot gases in gas turbine and other heat engines. Heretofore, yttria-stabilized zirconia (nominally comprising 95.4 atomic percent ZrO2 + 4.6 atomic percent Y2O3) has been the TBC material of choice. The lower-thermal-conductivity TBCs are modified versions of yttria-stabilized zirconia, the modifications consisting primarily in the addition of other oxides that impart microstructural and defect properties that favor lower thermal conductivity.

  20. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Susan M.; Nissley, David M.; Sheffler, Keith D.; Cruse, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    A thermal barrier coated (TBC) turbine component design system, including an accurate TBC life prediction model, is needed to realize the full potential of available TBC engine performance and/or durability benefits. The objective of this work, which was sponsored in part by NASA, was to generate a life prediction model for electron beam - physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) zirconia TBC. Specific results include EB-PVD zirconia mechanical and physical properties, coating adherence strength measurements, interfacial oxide growth characteristics, quantitative cyclic thermal spallation life data, and a spallation life model.

  1. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  2. Thermal-barrier production and indentification in a tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Grubb, D.P.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Clauser, J.F.; Coensgen, F.H.; Correll, D.L.; Cummins, W.F.; Damm, C.C.; Foote, J.H.; Goodman, R.K.; Hill, D.N.; Hooper,Jr., E.B.; Hornady, R.S.; Hunt, A.L.; Kerr, R.G.; Leppelmeier, G.W.; Marilleau, J.; Moller, J.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Nexsen, W.E.; Pickles, W.L.; Porter, G.D.; Poulsen, P.; Silver, E.H.; Simonen, T.C.; Stallard, B.W.; Turner, W.C.; Hsu, W.L.; Yu, T.L.; Barter, J.D.; Christensen, T.; Dimonte, G.; Romesser, T.W.; Ellis, R.F.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.J.; Berzins, L.V.; Carter, M.R.; Clower, C.A.; Failor, B.H.; Falabella, S.; Flammer, M.; Nash, T.

    1984-08-20

    In thermal-barrier experiments in the tandem mirror experiment upgrade axial confinement times of 50 to 100 ms have been achieved. During enhanced confinement we measured the thermal-barrier potential profile using a neutral-particle-beam probe. The experimental data agree qualitatively and quantitatively with the theory of thermal-barrier formation in a tandem mirror.

  3. Thick thermal barrier coatings for diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beardsley, M. B.

    1995-01-01

    Caterpillar's approach to applying Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBC's) to diesel engine combustion chambers has been to use advanced modeling techniques to predict engine conditions and combine this information with fundamental property evaluation of TTBC systems to predict engine performance and TTBC stress states. Engine testing has been used to verify the predicted performance of the TTBC systems and provide information on failure mechanisms. The objective of Caterpillar's subcontract with ORNL is to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating systems. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of TTBC's to diesel engines. Areas of TTBC technology being examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coat composition; coating design, microstructure, and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC 'aging' effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Methods to evaluate the reliability and durability of TTBC's have been developed that attempt to understand the fundamental strength of TTBC's for particular stress states.

  4. Thick thermal barrier coatings for diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beardsley, M. Brad

    1995-01-01

    Caterpillar's approach to applying thick thermal barrier coatings (TTBC's) to diesel engine combustion chambers has been to use advanced modeling techniques to predict engine conditions and combine this information with fundamental property evaluation of TTBC systems to predict engine performance and TTBC stress states. Engine testing has been used to verify the predicted performance of the TTBC systems and provide information on failure mechanisms. The objective Caterpillar's program to date has been to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating systems. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impeded the application of TTBC's to diesel engines. Areas of TTBC technology being examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coat composition; coating design, microstructure, and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC 'aging' effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Methods to evaluate the reliability and durability of TTBC's have been developed that attempt to understand the fundamental strength of TTBC's for particular stress states.

  5. Inspecting thermal barrier coatings by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, Paolo G.; Marinetti, Sergio; Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Vavilov, Vladimir P.; Cernuschi, Federico; Robba, Daniele

    2003-04-01

    As far as power generation is concerned, coating technologies find the main and more advanced applications. Nowadays, superalloys available for manufacturing hot path components in gas turbine like combustion liners, blades and vanes can not sustain temperatures up to 1100°C. In order to guarantee a significative temperature drop ceramic thermal barrier coatings are deposited onto the metallic core. The thickness of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) ranges from a few hundreds microns up to 1 millimetre or more, depending on component and deposition technique (mainly Air Plasma Spray or Electron Beam Physical Vapour Deposition). The structural integrity of both the substrate and the coating and their mutual adhesion is a key point because any loss of the protective layer exposes the bulk material to an extremely aggressive environment in terms of oxidation and temperature. Therefore, TBC must be tested for detecting of defects during both quality control and periodic in-service inspections. Because of the key role played by thickness and low thermal diffusivity of TBC in the decreasing of the substrate material temperature, both delaminations and thickness variation must be detected and classified. Pulsed Thermography has been successfully applied to this application field. Nevertheless, the procedure gives ambiguous results when thickness or thermal properties change in a continuous way within the thermal barrier. In this paper, a specific study on the detection performances of NDE techniques is presented, even when a non-uniform TBC thickness is superimposed to the disbonding defect. Tests performed at workshop on real and specifically manufactured components are reported. Dedicated processing algorithms improving the test reliability and effectiveness are presented as well. Tests on real components on the field are also reported.

  6. Piezospectroscopic characterization of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Michael John

    The predicted frequency shifts for polycrystalline ceramics have been estimated from single crystal phonon deformation potentials (PDPs) and secular equations by averaging over all crystal orientations. The mean peak shifts of non-, doubly- and triply-degenerate Raman peaks are dependent only upon the mean hydrostatic stress (the trace of the stress tensor) within the polycrystal. Deviatoric stresses will produce splitting of doubly-degenerate peaks. Predicted shifts are presented for all crystal classes and compared to experimentally measured shifts of polycrystalline alumina. Piezospectroscopy is then demonstrated on thermal barrier coatings. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which consist of a zirconia top coating overlaying a metallic bond coating, act as thermal barriers which protect superalloy hardware from high temperatures common in gas turbine engines. At high temperatures an oxide scale (predominantly Al2O3) forms at the interface between the top coating and the bond coating. The roles of oxidation and interfacial roughness on the spallation of TBC systems produced by air plasma spraying (APS) and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) were investigated with emphasis on using piezospectroscopy for in situ stress measurement. Piezospectroscopic measurements confirmed the presence of tensile stresses normal to the interface at the peaks of bond coating asperities in APS TBCs. These tensile stresses caused cracking at the interface that preferentially swelled the scale in convex regions. Object oriented finite element (OOF) modeling showed that this cracking and regrowth of the scale during thermal cycling produces tensile stresses normal to the interface in the zirconia. This in turn results in the formation of cracks in the zirconia, which eventually link up to cause spallation of the coating. Failure in EB-PVD TBCs after isothermal oxidation was associated with the formation of a suspended oxide in the first few hours of heating. Cracking

  7. Prolonging thermal barrier coated specimen life by thermal cycle management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.; Poolos, N. P.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings applied to the heated side of engine components such as seals, combustor, and blades of a gas turbine offer a potential increase in efficiency through the use of higher gas temperatures or less cooling air or benefits arising from extended component life by reducing component metal temperatures. The considered investigation has the objective to show that while a thermal barrier coated (TBC) specimen can be brought to a fixed temperature using various fuel-air ratio (F/A) values, lower calculated stresses are associated with lower (F/A) values. This implies that control of (F/A) values (i.e., rates of heat input) during the starting transient and to a lesser extent during shutdown and operation, offers a potential method of improving TBC lifetime through thermal cycle management.

  8. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Demasi, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology was established to predict thermal barrier coating life in an environment simulative of that experienced by gas turbine airfoils. Specifically, work is being conducted to determine failure modes of thermal barrier coatings in the aircraft engine environment. Analytical studies coupled with appropriate physical and mechanical property determinations are being employed to derive coating life prediction model(s) on the important failure mode(s). An initial review of experimental and flight service components indicates that the predominant mode of TBC failure involves thermomechanical spallation of the ceramic coating layer. This ceramic spallation involves the formation of a dominant crack in the ceramic coating parallel to and closely adjacent to the metal-ceramic interface. Initial results from a laboratory test program designed to study the influence of various driving forces such as temperature, thermal cycle frequency, environment, and coating thickness, on ceramic coating spalling life suggest that bond coat oxidation damage at the metal-ceramic interface contributes significantly to thermomechanical cracking in the ceramic layer. Low cycle rate furnace testing in air and in argon clearly shows a dramatic increase of spalling life in the non-oxidizing environments.

  9. Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications

    DOEpatents

    Scharman, Alan J.; Yonushonis, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

  10. Failure Mechanism for Thermal Fatigue of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giolli, C.; Scrivani, A.; Rizzi, G.; Borgioli, F.; Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L.

    2009-06-01

    Thick thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), consisting of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat and yttria-partially stabilized zirconia top coat with different porosity values, were produced by air plasma spray (APS). The thermal fatigue resistance limit of the TBCs was tested by furnace cycling tests (FCT) according to the specifications of an original equipment manufacturer (OEM). The morphology, residual stresses, and micromechanical properties (microhardness, indentation fracture toughness) of the TBC systems before and after FCT were analyzed. The thermal fatigue resistance increases with the amount of porosity in the top coat. The compressive in-plane stresses increase in the TBC systems after thermal cycling; nevertheless the increasing rate has a trend contrary to the porosity level of top coat. The data suggest that the spallation happens at the TGO/top coat interface. The failure mechanism of thick TBCs was found to be similar to that of conventional thin TBC systems made by APS.

  11. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the apparent thermal conductivity of the coating to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature and the scattering and absorption properties of the coating material. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can also be derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. The model prediction is found to have good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Thermal expansion mismatch and plasticity in thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, George C.; Phucharoen, Woraphat; Miller, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The basic objective of this investigation is the quantitative determination of stress states in a model thermal barrier coating (TBC) as it cools in the air to 600 C from an assumed stress-free state at 700 C. This model is intended to represent a thin plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria ceramic layer with a nickel chromium-aluminum-yttrium bond coat on a cylindrical substrate made of nickel-based superalloys typically found in gas turbines.

  13. Investigation of the Mechanical Performance of Compliant Thermal Barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Bott, Robert J.; Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2011-01-01

    Compliant thermal barriers play a pivotal role in the thermal protection systems of advanced aerospace vehicles. Both the thermal properties and mechanical performance of these barriers are critical in determining their successful implementation. Due to the custom nature of many thermal barriers, designers of advanced spacecraft have little guidance as to the design, selection, and implementation of these elements. As part of an effort to develop a more fundamental understanding of the interrelationship between thermal barrier design and performance, mechanical testing of thermal barriers was conducted. Two different types of thermal barriers with several core insulation density levels ranging from 62 to 141 kg/cu m were investigated. Room-temperature compression tests were conducted on samples to determine load performance and assess thermal barrier resiliency. Results showed that the loading behavior of these thermal barriers was similar to other porous, low-density, compliant materials, such as elastomeric foams. Additionally, the insulation density level had a significant non-linear impact on the stiffness and peak loads of the thermal barriers. In contrast, neither the thermal barrier type nor the level of insulation density significantly influenced the room-temperature resiliency of the samples.

  14. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillery, R. V.; Pilsner, B. H.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first report of the first phase of a 3-year program. Its objectives are to determine the predominant modes of degradation of a plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system, then to develop and verify life prediction models accounting for these degradation modes. The first task (Task I) is to determine the major failure mechanisms. Presently, bond coat oxidation and bond coat creep are being evaluated as potential TBC failure mechanisms. The baseline TBC system consists of an air plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 top coat, a low pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coat, and a Rene'80 substrate. Pre-exposures in air and argon combined with thermal cycle tests in air and argon are being utilized to evaluate bond coat oxidation as a failure mechanism. Unexpectedly, the specimens pre-exposed in argon failed before the specimens pre-exposed in air in subsequent thermal cycles testing in air. Four bond coats with different creep strengths are being utilized to evaluate the effect of bond coat creep on TBC degradation. These bond coats received an aluminide overcoat prior to application of the top coat to reduce the differences in bond coat oxidation behavior. Thermal cycle testing has been initiated. Methods have been selected for measuring tensile strength, Poisson's ratio, dynamic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion both of the bond coat and top coat layers.

  15. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillery, R. V.

    1984-01-01

    In order to fully exploit thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on turbine components and achieve the maximum performance benefit, the knowledge and understanding of TBC failure mechanisms must be increased and the means to predict coating life developed. The proposed program will determine the predominant modes of TBC system degradation and then develop and verify life prediction models accounting for those degradation modes. The successful completion of the program will have dual benefits: the ability to take advantage of the performance benefits offered by TBCs, and a sounder basis for making future improvements in coating behavior.

  16. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

  17. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2014-04-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2014), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. In this project, the focus is to develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments.

  18. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2012-10-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DEFOA- 0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed Durability Test Rig.

  19. Improving thermal barrier coatings by laser remelting.

    PubMed

    Múnez, C J; Gómez-García, J; Sevillano, F; Poza, P; Utrilla, M V

    2011-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are extensively used to protect metallic components in applications where the operating conditions include aggressive environment at high temperatures. These coatings are usually processed by thermal spraying techniques and the resulting microstructure includes thin and large splats, associated with the deposition of individual droplets, with porosity between splats. This porosity reduces the oxidation and corrosion resistance favouring the entrance of aggressive species during service. To overcome this limitation, the top coat could be modified by laser glazing reducing surface roughness and sealing open porosity. ZrO2(Y2O3) top coat and NiCrAlY bond coating were air plasma sprayed onto an Inconel 600 Ni base alloy. The top coat was laser remelted and a densified ceramic layer was induced in the top surface of the ceramic coating. This layer inhibited the ingress of aggressive species and delayed bond coat oxidation. PMID:22400250

  20. Development of metal based thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Il

    In this work, metal-based thermal barrier coatings (MBTBCs) have been produced, using high frequency induction plasma spraying (IPS) of iron-based nanostructured alloy powders. Important advances have been made over recent years to the development of ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for internal combustion engines application, but they are not yet applied in mass production situations. Besides the important economic considerations, the reliability of ceramic: TBCs is also an issue, being associated with the difficulty of predicting their "in-service" lifetime. Through engineering of the nano/amorphous structure of MBTBCs, their thermal conductivity can be made as low as those of ceramic-based TBCs, with reduced mean free paths of the electrons/phonons scattering. In this work, nano/amorphous structured coatings were deposited by IPS using the following spray parameters: spraying distance (210 ˜ 270 mm), plasma gas composition (Ar/N2), IPS torch power (24kW), and powder feed-rate (16g/min.). The structure and properties of the deposited layers were characterized through SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) observations. The thermal diffusivity (alpha) properties of the MBTBCs were measured using a laser flash method. Density (rho) and specific heat (Cp) of the MBTBCs were also measured, and their thermal conductivity (k) calculated (k =alpharhoCp). The thermal conductivity of MBTBCs was found to be as low as 1.99 W/m/K. The heat treatment study showed that crystal structure changes, and grain size growth from a few nanometers to tenth of nanometers occurred at 550°C under static exposure conditions. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of MBTBCs was 13E-6/K, which is close to the TEC of cast iron and thus, closer to the TEC values of aluminium alloys than are conventional TBCs. Fracture toughness of MBTBCs has also been assessed by use of Vickers hardness tests, with a 500 g load for 15 s, and the results show that there are no measurable crack

  1. Complex quantum trajectories for barrier scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Bradley Allen

    We have directed much attention towards developing quantum trajectory methods which can accurately predict the transmission probabilities for a variety of quantum mechanical barrier scattering processes. One promising method involves solving the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the Derivative Propagation Method (DPM). We present this method, termed complex valued DPM (CVDPM(n)). CVDPM(n) has been successfully employed in the Lagrangian frame to accurately compute transmission probabilities on 'thick' one dimensional Eckart and Gaussian potential surfaces. CVDPM(n) is able to reproduce accurate results with a much lower order of approximation than is required by real valued quantum trajectory methods, from initial wave packet energies ranging from the tunneling case (Eo = 0) to high energy cases (twice the barrier height). We successfully extended CVDPM(n) to two-dimensional problems (one translational degree of freedom representing an Eckart or Gaussian barrier coupled to a vibrational degree of freedom) in the Lagrangian framework with great success. CVDPM helps to explain why barrier scattering from "thick" barriers is a much more well posed problem than barrier scattering from "thin" barriers. Though results in these two cases are in very good agreement with grid methods, the search for an appropriate set of initial conditions (termed an 'isochrone) from which to launch the trajectories leads to a time-consuming search problem that is reminiscent of the root-searching problem from semi-classical dynamics. In order to circumvent the isochrone problem, we present CVDPM(n) equations of motion which are derived and implemented in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian frame for a metastable potential as well as the Eckart and Gaussian surfaces. In this way, the isochrone problem can be circumvented but at the cost of introducing other computational difficulties. In order to understand why CVDPM may give better transmission probabilities than real valued

  2. Combination Thermal Barrier And Wear Coatings For Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingart, Mike; Moller, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Thermal-barrier layers covered with self-lubricating surface layers. Zirconia thermal-barrier coat applied to surface of combustion chamber in engine by plasma-arc spraying. Then PS-200 plasma-arc sprayed onto zirconia. Self-lubricating coat prevents sliding contact between thermal barrier and piston ring, effectively preventing both wear and production of additional heat via friction. Other combinations of thermal-barrier and self-lubricating, wear-resistant coating materials used as long as two materials adhere to each other, applied by use of similar or compatible processes, have similar coefficients of thermal expansion, sufficiently strong at high temperatures, and affordable.

  3. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  4. Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (20) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating (20) consists essentially of a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula consisting essentially of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements selected from La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof; where B is selected from the group of elements selected from Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof; n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

  5. Cold Sprayed Intermetallic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchinsky, Evgeny

    Conventional thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of a duplex structure with a metallic bond coat and a ceramic heat-isolative topcoat. Several recent research activities are concentrated on the development of improved multilayer bond coat and TBC materials. This study represents an investigation performed for the aluminum based bond coats, especially those with reduced thermal conductivities. Using alternative TBC materials, such as metal alloys and intermetallics, their processing methods can be further optimized to achieve the best thermal physical parameters. One example is the ten-layer system in which cold sprayed aluminum based intermetallics are synthesized. These systems demonstrated improved heat insulation and thermal fatigue capabilities compared to conventional TBC. The microstructures and properties of the laminar coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD; micromechanical and durability tests were performed to define the structure and coating formation mechanisms. Application prospects for HCCI engines are discussed. Fuel energy can be utilized more efficiently with the concept of low heat rejection engines with applied TBC.

  6. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  7. Thermal Properties, Thermal Shock, and Thermal Cycling Behavior of Lanthanum Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Lu, Zhe; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) coatings are newly proposed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems which exhibit lower thermal conductivity and potentially higher thermal stability compared to other traditional thermal barrier systems. In this work, La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) single-layer and double-layer TBC systems were deposited using the air plasma spray technique. Thermal properties of the coatings were measured. Furnace heat treatment and jet engine thermal shock tests were implemented to evaluate coating performance during thermal cycling. The measured average thermal conductivity of porous La2Zr2O7 coating ranged from 0.59 to 0.68 W/m/K in the temperature range of 297 K to 1172 K (24 °C to 899 °C), which was approximately 25 pct lower than that of porous 8YSZ (0.84 to 0.87 W/m/K) in the same temperature range. The coefficients of thermal expansion values of La2Zr2O7 were approximately 9 to 10 × 10-6/K from 400 K to 1600 K (127 °C to 1327 °C), which were about 10 pct lower than those of porous 8YSZ. The double-layer coating system consisting of the porous 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 layers had better thermal shock resistance and thermal cycling performance than those of single-layer La2Zr2O7 coating and double-layer coating with dense 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 coatings. This study suggests that porous 8YSZ coating can be employed as a buffer layer in La2Zr2O7-based TBC systems to improve the overall coating durability during service.

  8. Thermal Properties, Thermal Shock, and Thermal Cycling Behavior of Lanthanum Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Lu, Zhe; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) coatings are newly proposed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems which exhibit lower thermal conductivity and potentially higher thermal stability compared to other traditional thermal barrier systems. In this work, La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt pct yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) single-layer and double-layer TBC systems were deposited using the air plasma spray technique. Thermal properties of the coatings were measured. Furnace heat treatment and jet engine thermal shock tests were implemented to evaluate coating performance during thermal cycling. The measured average thermal conductivity of porous La2Zr2O7 coating ranged from 0.59 to 0.68 W/m/K in the temperature range of 297 K to 1172 K (24 °C to 899 °C), which was approximately 25 pct lower than that of porous 8YSZ (0.84 to 0.87 W/m/K) in the same temperature range. The coefficients of thermal expansion values of La2Zr2O7 were approximately 9 to 10 × 10-6/K from 400 K to 1600 K (127 °C to 1327 °C), which were about 10 pct lower than those of porous 8YSZ. The double-layer coating system consisting of the porous 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 layers had better thermal shock resistance and thermal cycling performance than those of single-layer La2Zr2O7 coating and double-layer coating with dense 8YSZ and La2Zr2O7 coatings. This study suggests that porous 8YSZ coating can be employed as a buffer layer in La2Zr2O7-based TBC systems to improve the overall coating durability during service.

  9. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  10. Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coating includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX, and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer, or a diameter of less than 5 microns. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate, and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of die invention, a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  11. Thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine and diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Bailey, M. Murray

    1989-01-01

    The present state of development of thin thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines and thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines is assessed. Although current thermal barrier coatings are flying in certain gas turbine engines, additional advances will be needed for future engines. Thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines have advanced to the point where they are being seriously considered for the next generation of engine. Since coatings for truck engines is a young field of inquiry, continued research and development efforts will be required to help bring this technology to commercialization.

  12. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas-Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padture, Nitin P.; Gell, Maurice; Jordan, Eric H.

    2002-04-01

    Hundreds of different types of coatings are used to protect a variety of structural engineering materials from corrosion, wear, and erosion, and to provide lubrication and thermal insulation. Of all these, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have the most complex structure and must operate in the most demanding high-temperature environment of aircraft and industrial gas-turbine engines. TBCs, which comprise metal and ceramic multilayers, insulate turbine and combustor engine components from the hot gas stream, and improve the durability and energy efficiency of these engines. Improvements in TBCs will require a better understanding of the complex changes in their structure and properties that occur under operating conditions that lead to their failure. The structure, properties, and failure mechanisms of TBCs are herein reviewed, together with a discussion of current limitations and future opportunities.

  13. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Neumann, J. F.; Liu, A.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for turbine airfoils in high-performance engines represent an advanced materials technology with both performance and durability benefits. The foremost TBC benefit is the reduction of heat transferred into air-cooled components, which yields performance and durability benefits. This program focuses on predicting the lives of two types of strain-tolerant and oxidation-resistant TBC systems that are produced by commercial coating suppliers to the gas turbine industry. The plasma-sprayed TBC system, composed of a low-pressure plasma-spray (LPPS) or an argon shrouded plasma-spray (ASPS) applied oxidation resistant NiCrAlY (or CoNiCrAlY) bond coating and an air-plasma-sprayed yttria (8 percent) partially stabilized zirconia insulative layer, is applied by Chromalloy, Klock, and Union Carbide. The second type of TBC is applied by the electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process by Temescal.

  14. EMBEDDED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Clarke

    2004-12-16

    In this first year of the program we have focused on the selection of rare-earth dopants for luminescent sensing in thermal barrier coating materials, the effect of dopant concentration on several of the luminescence characteristics and initial fabrication of one type of embedded sensor, the ''red-line'' sensor. We have initially focused on erbium as the lanthanide dopant for luminescence doping of yttria-stabilized zirconia and europium as the lanthanide for luminescence doping of gadolinium zirconate. The latter exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 1100 C. A buried layer, ''red-line'' sensor in an electron-beam deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with erbium has been demonstrated and exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 400 C.

  15. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

    2005-08-23

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

  16. Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.; Sloan, Kelly M.; Vance, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

  17. Thermal barrier coatings via directed vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, Derek Duane

    A thermal barrier coating (TBC) "system" is used to thermally protect turbine engine blades and vanes from the hot gases in gas turbine engines. TBC systems are multilayer coatings composed of a porous, insulating yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top layer which provides thermal protection, a thermally grown alumina oxide (TGO) layer which provides oxidation and hot corrosion protection and an underlying aluminide (nickel or platinum) bond layer which is used to form the TGO layer. Here, an electron beam-directed vapor deposition (DVD) approach is explored as a method for producing the YSZ top layer of TBC systems. Using this approach, an experimental investigation of the effect of process conditions on the coating morphology was undertaken. The coating morphology was effected by the substrate temperature, the evaporation/deposition rate, the chamber pressure and the carrier gas jet speed and density. In order to link the process parameters to more fundamental growth parameters vapor transport in the DVD process chamber was modeled using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach and the coating assembly was simulated using Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). The result of this experimental and simulation based study was the determination that three requirements had to be met to form porous, columnar coatings using DVD: the presence of pore nucleation sites in the form of asperities on the substrate surface, a significant amount of oblique vapor species arrivals onto the substrate resulting in flux shadowing at the asperities and a vapor species surface mobility which is low enough to limit surface diffusion on the substrate during growth. By controlling the angle of incidence distribution and the vapor species surface mobility using changes in the carrier gas properties and the chamber pressure, the nucleation characteristics of the intercolumnar pores could be altered. Using such approaches, along with substrate manipulation, an effort was made to tailor the

  18. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batakis, A. P.; Vogan, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to generate data and develop analytical techniques to predict the performance and reliability of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments. A finite element model was used to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of coating systems in rocket thrust chambers. Candidate coating systems (using a copper substrate, NiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2.8Y2O3 ceramic overcoat) were selected for detailed study based on photomicrographic evaluations of experimental test specimens. The effects of plasma spray application parameters on the material properties of these coatings were measured and the effects on coating performance evaluated using the finite element model. Coating design curves which define acceptable operating envelopes for seleted coating systems were constructed based on temperature and strain limitations. Spray gun power levels was found to have the most significant effect on coating structure. Three coating systems were selected for study using different power levels. Thermal conductivity, strain tolerance, density, and residual stress were measured for these coatings. Analyses indicated that extremely thin coatings ( 0.02 mm) are required to accommodate the high heat flux of a rocket thrust chamber and ensure structural integrity.

  19. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi, J.; Sheffler, K.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop an integrated life prediction model accounting for all potential life-limiting Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) degradation and failure modes including spallation resulting from cyclic thermal stress, oxidative degradation, hot corrosion, erosion, and foreign object damage (FOD). The mechanisms and relative importance of the various degradation and failure modes will be determined, and the methodology to predict predominant mode failure life in turbine airfoil application will be developed and verified. An empirically based correlative model relating coating life to parametrically expressed driving forces such as temperature and stress will be employed. The two-layer TBC system being investigated, designated PWA264, currently is in commercial aircraft revenue service. It consists of an inner low pressure chamber plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY metallic bond coat underlayer (4 to 6 mils) and an outer air plasma-sprayed 7 w/o Y2O3-ZrO2 (8 to 12 mils) ceramic top layer.

  20. Optical Diagnostics for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Spuckler, C. M.; Bencic, T. J.; Martin, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    The translucent nature of ceramic oxide thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provides an opportunity to employ optical probes to monitor temperature gradients and buried damage propagation within the coating. An important advantage of noncontact optical diagnostics is that they are amendable to health monitoring of TBCs in service. In this paper, two optical diagnostic approaches, operating in different wavelength regimes, are discussed. The first approach is the use of mid-infrared reflectance (MIR) to monitor the progression of TBC delamination produced by thermal cycling. This approach takes advantage of the maximum transparency of the TBCs at mid-infrared wavelengths, in particular, between 3 and 5 microns. Recent progress in extending the MIR method to a more practical visual inspection tool will be presented. A second approach, using visible wavelengths, is the embedding of thermographic phosphors within the TBC to add sensing functions to the coating that can provide depth-selective information about temperature gradients and TBC integrity. Emphasis will be given to the use of fluorescence decay time measurements to provide temperature readings from a thermographic phosphor layer residing beneath the TBC.

  1. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillery, R. V.; Pilsner, B. H.; Cook, T. S.; Kim, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    This is the second annual report of the first 3-year phase of a 2-phase, 5-year program. The objectives of the first phase are to determine the predominant modes of degradation of a plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system and to develop and verify life prediction models accounting for these degradation modes. The primary TBC system consists of an air plasma sprayed ZrO-Y2O3 top coat, a low pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coat, and a Rene' 80 substrate. Task I was to evaluate TBC failure mechanisms. Both bond coat oxidation and bond coat creep have been identified as contributors to TBC failure. Key property determinations have also been made for the bond coat and the top coat, including tensile strength, Poisson's ratio, dynamic modulus, and coefficient of thermal expansion. Task II is to develop TBC life prediction models for the predominant failure modes. These models will be developed based on the results of thermmechanical experiments and finite element analysis. The thermomechanical experiments have been defined and testing initiated. Finite element models have also been developed to handle TBCs and are being utilized to evaluate different TBC failure regimes.

  2. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  3. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillery, R. V.; Pilsner, B. H.; Mcknight, R. L.; Cook, T. S.; Hartle, M. S.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes work performed to determine the predominat modes of degradation of a plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system and to develop and verify life prediction models accounting for these degradation modes. The primary TBC system consisted of a low pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coat, an air plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 top coat, and a Rene' 80 substrate. The work was divided into 3 technical tasks. The primary failure mode to be addressed was loss of the zirconia layer through spalling. Experiments showed that oxidation of the bond coat is a significant contributor to coating failure. It was evident from the test results that the species of oxide scale initially formed on the bond coat plays a role in coating degradation and failure. It was also shown that elevated temperature creep of the bond coat plays a role in coating failure. An empirical model was developed for predicting the test life of specimens with selected coating, specimen, and test condition variations. In the second task, a coating life prediction model was developed based on the data from Task 1 experiments, results from thermomechanical experiments performed as part of Task 2, and finite element analyses of the TBC system during thermal cycles. The third and final task attempted to verify the validity of the model developed in Task 2. This was done by using the model to predict the test lives of several coating variations and specimen geometries, then comparing these predicted lives to experimentally determined test lives. It was found that the model correctly predicts trends, but that additional refinement is needed to accurately predict coating life.

  4. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings have attracted increased attention for diesel engine applications. The advantages of using the ceramic coatings include a potential increase in efficiency and power density and a decrease in maintenance cost. Zirconia-based ceramics are the most important coating materials for such applications because of their low thermal conductivity, relatively high thermal expansivity and excellent mechanical properties. However, durability of thick thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) under severe temperature cycling encountered in engine conditions, remains a major question. The thermal transients associated with the start/stop and no-load/full-load engine cycle, and with the in-cylinder combustion process, generate thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and thermal high cycle fatigue (HCF) in the coating system. Therefore, the failure mechanisms of thick TBCs are expected to be quite different from those of thin TBCs under these temperature transients. The coating failure is related not only to thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation of the bond coats and substrates, but also to the steep thermal stress gradients induced in the coating systems. Although it has been reported that stresses generated by thermal transients can initiate surface and interface cracks in a coating system, the mechanisms of the crack propagation and of coating failure under the complex LCF and HCF conditions are still not understood. In this paper, the thermal fatigue behavior of an yttria partially stabilized zirconia coating system under simulated LCF and HCF engine conditions is investigated. The effects of LCF and HCF on surface crack initiation and propagation are also discussed.

  5. Extending Our Understanding of Compliant Thermal Barrier Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demange, Jeffrey J.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal barriers and seals are integral components in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of nearly all aerospace vehicles. They are used to minimize the flow of hot gases through interfaces and protect underlying temperature-sensitive components and systems. Although thermal barriers have been used extensively on many aerospace vehicles, the factors affecting their thermal and mechanical performance are not well-understood. Because of this, vehicle TPS designers are often left with little guidance on how to properly design and optimize these barriers. An ongoing effort to better understand thermal barrier performance and develop models and design tools is in progress at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Testing has been conducted to understand the degree to which insulation density influences structural performance and permeability. In addition, the development of both thermal and mechanical models is ongoing with the goal of providing an improved ability to design and implement these critical TPS components.

  6. Oxidation behavior of a thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings, consisting of a plasma sprayed calcium silicate ceramic layer and a CoCrAlY or NiCrAlY bond coat, were applied on B-1900 coupons and cycled hourly in air in a rapid-response furnace to maximum temperatures of 1030, 1100, or 1160 C. Eight specimens were tested for each of the six conditions of bond-coat composition and temperature. Specimens were removed from test at the onset of failure, which was taken to be the formation of a fine surface crack visible at 10X magnification. Specimens were weighed periodically, and plots of weight gain vs time indicate that weight is gained at a parabolic rate after an initial period where weight was gained at a much greater rate. The high initial oxidation rate is thought to arise from the initially high surface area in the porous bond coat. Specimen life (time to first crack) was found to be a strong function of temperature. However, while test lives varied greatly with time, the weight gain at the time of specimen failure was quite insensitive to temperature. This indicates that there is a critical weight gain at which the coating fails when subjected to this test.

  7. Degradation mechanisms of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in corrosive environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, S. K.; Bratton, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical as well as thermal-mechanical interactions between the ceramics and gas turbine combustion gases/condensates are found to play critical roles in the degradation of porous plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings. The detailed degradation mechanisms of several state-of-the-art ceramic thermal barrier coatings, including several zirconia compositions and a calcium silicate, in corrosive environments are examined in this paper. Approaches to extend coating lifetime are also described.

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Ceramic Thermal Barrier and Environmental Barrier Coating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Bansal, Narottam P.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal barrier and environmental barrier coatings (TBC's and EBC's) have been developed to protect metallic and Si-based ceramic components in gas turbine engines from high temperature attack. Zirconia-yttria based oxides and (Ba,Sr)Al2Si2O8(BSAS)/mullite based silicates have been used as the coating materials. In this study, thermal conductivity values of zirconia-yttria- and BSAS/mullite-based coating materials were determined at high temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. During the laser conductivity test, the specimen surface was heated by delivering uniformly distributed heat flux from a high power laser. One-dimensional steady-state heating was achieved by using thin disk specimen configuration (25.4 mm diam and 2 to 4 mm thickness) and the appropriate backside air-cooling. The temperature gradient across the specimen thickness was carefully measured by two surface and backside pyrometers. The thermal conductivity values were thus determined as a function of temperature based on the 1-D heat transfer equation. The radiation heat loss and laser absorption corrections of the materials were considered in the conductivity measurements. The effects of specimen porosity and sintering on measured conductivity values were also evaluated.

  9. NASA thermal barrier coatings: Summary and update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepka, F. S.

    1978-01-01

    A durable, two-layer, plasma-sprayed coating consisting of a ceramic layer over a metallic layer was developed that has the potential of insulating hot engine parts and thereby reducing metal temperatures and coolant flow requirements and/or permitting use of less costly and complex cooling configurations and materials. The results are summarized of analytical and experimental investigations of the coatings on flat metal specimens, turbine vanes and blades, and combustor liners. Discussed are results of investigations to determine coating adherence and durability, coating thermal, strength and fatigue properties, and chemical reactions of the coating with oxides and sulfates. Also presented are the effect of the coating on aerodynamic performance of a turbine vane, measured vane and combustor liner temperatures with and without the coating, and predicted turbine metal temperatures and coolant flow reductions potentially possible with the coating. Included also are summaries of some current research related to the coating and potential applications for the coating.

  10. Interface Science of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2009-01-01

    The drive for greater efficiency in propulsion and industrial/power production machinery has pushed metallurgy to develop ever better alloys and taken existing metallic components to their reliability threshold. Nowhere is that better illustrated than in turbine engine materials. The nickel-based superalloys currently in use for the most demanding areas of the engines melt at 1230-1315 aC and yet see combustion environments >1600 aC. The result is that these components require thermal protection to avoid failure from phenomena such as melting, creep, oxidation, thermal fatigue, and so on [1]. The stakes are high as the equipment must remain reliable for thousands of take-offs and landings for aircraft turbine engines, and up to 40,000 hours of operation in power generating land-based gas turbines [2, 3]. One of the most critical items that see both the greatest temperatures and experience the highest stresses is the hot-section turbine blades. Two strategies have been adopted to help the superalloy turbine blades survive the demanding environment: Active air cooling and ceramic thermal protection coatings, which together can reduce metal surface temperatures by >300 aC.[2]. The combination of turbine blade external film cooling and internal air cooling requires an exceptionally complex structure with flow passages and sets of small holes in the blades where air bled from a matching stage of the compressor is directed over the surface. Stecura [4] was among the first to describe a successful coating system, and today s the ceramic insulating layer alone is credited with reducing metal temperatures as much as 165 aC [1, 5].

  11. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  12. Metallographic techniques for evaluation of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of ceramic thermal barrier coatings is strongly dependent on the amount and shape of the porosity in the coating. Current metallographic techniques do not provide polished surfaces that are adequate for a repeatable interpretation of the coating structures. A technique recently developed at NASA-Lewis for preparation of thermal barrier coating sections combines epoxy impregnation, careful sectioning and polishing, and interference layering to provide previously unobtainable information on processing-induced porosity. In fact, increased contrast and less ambiguous structure developed by the method make automatic quantitative metallography a viable option for characterizing thermal barrier coating structures.

  13. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Clarke

    2005-11-09

    In the second year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings, our research has focused three topics: (1) Eu{sup 3+} doping for temperature sensing, (2) the effect of long-term, high-temperature aging on the characteristics of the luminescence from the Eu{sup 3+} ions of 8YSZ materials, (3) construction of a fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. It has been demonstrated that the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature is identical for electron-beam evaporated Eu-doped YSZ coatings as for bulk ceramics of the same composition. Experiments indicate that the luminescence lifetime method of measuring temperatures is sensitive up to 1150 C for both Eu-doped YSZ coatings and Eu-doped Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, the technique is sensitive up to 1250 C for the composition Eu{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The luminescence spectra Eu-doped YSZ are insensitive to long-term aging at high-temperatures, even to 195 hours at 1425 C, except for a small frequency shift that is probably too small in measure except with instruments of the highest spectral resolution. The temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, experiments are on-going to explore longer term exposures. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  14. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2011-12-31

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This proposal will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; we will perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; we will perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and we will demonstrate our new Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed High Temperature/High Pressure Durability Test Rig under real syngas product compositions.

  15. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  16. Optical Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Mark Steven

    The high temperature properties of ceramic materials make them suitable for the extreme environments of gas combustion powered turbines. They are instrumental in providing thermal insulation for the metallic turbine components from the combustion products. Also, the addition of specific rare earth elements to ceramics creates materials with temperature diagnostic applications. Laser based methods have been applied to these ceramic coatings to predict their remaining thermal insulation service life and to explore their high temperature diagnostic capabilities. A method for cleaning thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) contaminated during engine operation has been developed using laser ablation. Surface contamination on the turbine blades hinders nondestructive remaining life prediction using photo luminescence piezospectroscopy (PLPS). Real time monitoring of the removed material is employed to prevent damage to the underlying coating. This method relies on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to compute the cross correlation coefficient between the spectral emissions of a sample TBC that is contaminated and a reference clean TBC. It is possible to remove targeted contaminants and cease ablation when the top surface of the TBC has been reached. In collaboration with this work, Kelley's thesis [1] presents microscopy images and PLPS measurements indicating the integrity of the TBC has been maintained during the removal of surface contaminants. Thermographic phosphors (TGP) have optical emission properties when excited by a laser that are temperature dependent. These spectral and temporal properties have been investigated and utilized for temperature measurement schemes by many previous researchers. The compounds presented in this dissertation consist of various rare earth (Lanthanide) elements doped into a host crystal lattice. As the temperature of the lattice changes, both the time scale for vibrational quenching and the distribution of energy among atomic energy

  17. Effect of an Opaque Reflecting Layer on the Thermal Behavior of a Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    A parametric study using a two-flux approximation of the radiative transfer equation was performed to examine the effects of an opaque reflective layer on the thermal behavior of a typical semitransparent thermal barrier coating on an opaque substrate. Some ceramic materials are semitransparent in the wavelength ranges where thermal radiation is important. Even with an opaque layer on each side of the semitransparent thermal barrier coating, scattering and absorption can have an effect on the heat transfer. In this work, a thermal barrier coating that is semitransparent up to a wavelength of 5 micrometers is considered. Above 5 micrometers wavelength, the thermal barrier coating is opaque. The absorption and scattering coefficient of the thermal barrier was varied. The thermal behavior of the thermal barrier coating with an opaque reflective layer is compared to a thermal barrier coating without the reflective layer. For a thicker thermal barrier coating with lower convective loading, which would be typical of a combustor liner, a reflective layer can significantly decrease the temperature in the thermal barrier coating and substrate if the scattering is weak or moderate and for strong scattering if the absorption is large. The layer without the reflective coating can be about as effective as the layer with the reflective coating if the absorption is small and the scattering strong. For low absorption, some temperatures in the thermal barrier coating system can be slightly higher with the reflective layer. For a thin thermal barrier coating with high convective loading, which would be typical of a blade or vane that sees the hot sections of the combustor, the reflective layer is not as effective. The reflective layer reduces the surface temperature of the reflective layer for all conditions considered. For weak and moderate scattering, the temperature of the TBC-substrate interface is reduced but for strong scattering, the temperature of the substrate is increased

  18. Thermal barrier coating on high temperature industrial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N.; Stoner, B. L.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal barrier coating used was a yttria stabilized zirconia material with a NiCrAlY undercoat, and the base engine used to establish improvements was the P&WA FT50A-4 industrial gas turbine engine. The design benefits of thermal barrier coatings include simplified cooling schemes and the use of conventional alloys in the engine hot section. Cooling flow reductions and improved heating rates achieved with thermal barrier coating result in improved performance. Economic benefits include reduced power production costs and reduced fuel consumption. Over the 30,000 hour life of the thermal barrier coated parts, fuel savings equivalent to $5 million are projected and specific power (megawatts/mass of engine airflow) improvements on the order of 13% are estimated.

  19. MODELING OF CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITED ZIRCONIA FOR THERMAL BARRIER AND ENVIRONMENTAL BARRIER COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L; Xu, W.; Qiu, S.

    2003-04-22

    Thermal and environmental barrier coatings are important components of current and future energy systems. Such coatings--applied to hot, metallic surfaces in combustors, heat exchanger and turbines--increase the allowable operating temperature and increase the efficiency of the energy system. Because of its low thermal conductivity and high thermal expansion yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the material of choice for protection of structural components in many high temperature applications. Current coating application methods have their drawbacks, however. Air plasma spray (APS) is a relatively low-cost process and is suitable for large and relatively complex shapes. It is difficult to produce uniform, relatively thin coatings with this process, however, and the coatings do not exhibit the columnar microstructure that is needed for reliable, long-term performance. The electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process does produce the desirable microstructure, however, the capital cost of these systems is very high and the line-of-sight nature of the process limits coating uniformity and the ability to coat large and complex shapes. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process also produces the desirable columnar microstructure and--under proper conditions--can produce uniform coatings over complex shapes. The overall goal of this project--a joint effort of the University of Louisville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)--is to develop the YSZ CVD process for application of thermal barrier coatings for fossil energy systems. Last year's report described our initial efforts toward developing a model for the process and for ORNL's bench-scale reactor. This model provides an understanding of the transport and kinetics phenomena that control the deposition process and ultimately will provide a tool for fullscale reactor design and optimization. Our overall research approach is: validate the 3-D computer model using experimental results at ORNL, use the

  20. An analytical solution for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Mingqing; Yu, Boming; Zhang, Duanming

    2002-08-01

    In this paper, an analytical expression for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier is derived based on the electrical analogy technique and on the cylindrical filament-square packing array unit cell model (C-S model). The present analytical expressions both with and without thermal barrier between fibre and matrix are presented. The present theoretical predictions without thermal barrier are found to be in excellent agreement with the existing analytical model and nomogram from the finite difference method (FDM), and in good agreement with existing experimental data. Furthermore, the present analytical predictions with thermal barrier can best fit the experimental data and can provide a higher accuracy than the finite element method (FEM). The validity of the present analytical solution is thus verified for transverse thermal conductivities of unidirectional fibre composites with thermal barrier.

  1. Ceramic thermal-barrier coatings for cooled turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Stepka, F. S.

    1976-01-01

    Ceramic thermal-barrier coatings on hot engine parts have the potential to reduce metal temperatures, coolant requirements, cost, and complexity of the cooling configuration, and to increase life, turbine efficiency and gas temperature. Coating systems consisting of a plasma-sprayed layer of zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia or calcia over a thin alloy bond coat have been developed, their potential analyzed and their durability and benefits evaluated in a turbojet engine. The coatings on air-cooled rotating blades were in good condition after completing as many as 500 two-minute cycles of engine operation between full power at a gas temperature of 1644 K and flameout, or as much as 150 hours of steady-state operation on cooled vanes and blades at gas temperatures as high as 1644 K witn 35 start and stop cycles. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria-stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  2. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. PMID:26008742

  3. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  4. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  5. Thermal High- and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Thick Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings have received increasing attention for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications because of their ability to provide thermal insulation to engine components. However, the durability of these coatings under the severe thermal cycling conditions encountered in a diesel engine (ref. 1) still remains a major issue. In this research at the NASA Lewis Research Center, a high-power laser was used to investigate the thermal fatigue behavior of a yttria-stabilized zirconia coating system under simulated diesel engine conditions. The mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, and of coating failure under complex thermal low-cycle fatigue (LCF, representing stop/start cycles) and thermal high-cycle fatigue (HCF, representing operation at 1300 rpm) are described. Continuous wave and pulse laser modes were used to simulate pure LCF and combined LCF/HCF, respectively (ref. 2). The LCF mechanism was found to be closely related to the coating sintering and creep at high temperatures. These creep strains in the ceramic coating led to a tensile stress state during cooling, thus providing the major driving force for crack growth under LCF conditions. The combined LCF/HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation, and accelerated crack growth than did the pure LCF test. HCF thermal loads also facilitated lateral crack branching and ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations. HCF is associated with the cyclic stresses originating from the high-frequency temperature fluctuation at the ceramic coating surface. The HCF thermal loads act on the crack by a wedging mechanism (ref. 1), resulting in continuous crack growth at temperature. The HCF stress intensity factor amplitude increases with the interaction depth and temperature swing, and decreases with the crack depth. HCF damage also increases with the thermal expansion coefficient and the Young's modulus of the ceramic coating (refs. 1 and 3).

  6. A study on thermal barrier coatings including thermal expansion mismatch and bond coat oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, George C.; Phucharoen, Woraphat; Miller, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation deals with a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) intended for high temperature applications to advanced gas turbine blades. Typically, this type of coating system consists of a zirconia-yttria ceramic layer with a nickel-chromium-aluminum bond coat on a superalloy substrate. The problem on hand is a complex one due to the fact that bond coat oxidation and thermal mismatch occur in the TBC. Cracking in the TBC has also been experimentally illustrated. A clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of the TBC is investigated. The stress states in a model thermal barrier coating as it cools down in air is studied. The powerful finite element method was utilized to model a coating cylindrical specimen. Four successively refined finite element models were developed. Some results obtained using the first two models have been reported previously. The major accomplishment is the successful development of an elastic TBC finite element model known as TBCG with interface geometry between the ceramic layer and the bond coat. An equally important milestone is the near-completion of the new elastic-plastic TBC finite element model called TBCGEP which yielded initial results. Representative results are presented.

  7. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  8. Effects of plasma spray parameters on two layer thermal barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1981-01-01

    The power level and the type of arc gas used during plasma spraying of a two layer thermal barrier system (TBS) were found to affect the life of the system. Life at 1095 C in a cyclic furnace test was improved by about 140 percent by increasing the power during plasma spray applications of the bond and thermal barrier coatings. This improvement is due to increases in the densities of the bond and thermal barrier coatings by 3 and 5 percent, respectively. These increases in densities are equivalent to about 45 and 30 percent reduction in mean porosities, respectively. The addition of hydrogen to the argon arc gas had the same effect as the reduction in power level and caused a reduction in TBS life.

  9. Thermal-barrier coatings for utility gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of thermal barrier coatings for use in utility gas turbines was assessed. Pressurized passage and ambient pressure doped fuel burner rig tests revealed that thermal barrier coatings are not resistant to dirty combustion environments. However, present thermal barrier coatings, such as duplex partially stabilized zirconia and duplex Ca2SiO4 have ample resistance to the thermo-mechanical stress and temperature levels anticipated for heavy duty gas turbines firing clean fuel as revealed by clean fuel pressurized passage and ambient pressure burner rig tests. Thus, it is appropriate to evaluate such coatings on blades, vanes and combustors in the field. However, such field tests should be backed up with adequate effort in the areas of coating application technology and design analysis so that the field tests yield unequivocal results.

  10. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  11. Thermal property measurement for thermal barrier coatings using pulsed thermal imaging - multilayer analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. G.; Tao, N.

    2016-02-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are extensively used on hot gas-path components in gas turbines to improve engine performance and extend component life. TBC thermal properties, specifically the thermal conductivity and heat capacity (the product of density and specific heat), are important parameters in these applications. These TBC properties are usually measured by destructive methods with specially prepared TBC samples. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have been developed in recently years that can measure TBC properties on natural TBC samples. However, many have limitations when examining TBCs on engine components. One exception is the pulsed thermal imaging - multilayer analysis (PTI-MLA) method, which can be applied to essentially any TBC samples with one or more coating layers and can determine TBC property distributions over the entire TBC surface. This paper describes its basic theories and implementations and discusses its potential applications to all areas of TBC studies.

  12. Evaluation of the hot corrosion behavior of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Miller, R. A.; Gedwill, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Calcium silicate and yttria-stabilized ZrO2/(M-Cr-Al-Y) thermal barrier coating systems on air-cooled specimens were exposed to sodium- plus vanadium-doped Mach 0.3 combustion gases. The thermal barrier coating endurance was determined to be a strong inverse function of the ceramic coating thickness. Coating system durability was increased through the use of Ni-Cr-Al-Y and Co-Cr-Al-Y bond coatings with high chromium and aluminum contents. Chemical and electron microprobe analyses supported the predictions of condensate compositions and the determination of their roles in causing spalling of the ceramic coatings.

  13. Atlas V Launch Incorporated NASA Glenn Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    In the Spring of 2002, Aerojet experienced a major failure during a qualification test of the solid rocket motor that they were developing for the Atlas V Enhanced Expendable Launch Vehicle. In that test, hot combustion gas reached the O-rings in the nozzle-to-case joint and caused a structural failure that resulted in loss of the nozzle and aft dome sections of the motor. To improve the design of this joint, Aerojet decided to incorporate three braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The thermal barriers were used to block the searing-hot 5500 F pressurized gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-rings that seal the joint. Glenn originally developed the thermal barriers for the nozzle joints of the space shuttle solid rocket motors, and Aerojet decided to use them on the basis of the results of several successful ground tests of the thermal barriers in the shuttle rockets. Aerojet undertook an aggressive schedule to redesign the rocket nozzle-to-case joint with the thermal barriers and to qualify it in time for a launch planned for the middle of 2003. They performed two successful qualification tests (Oct. and Dec. 2002) in which the Glenn thermal barriers effectively protected the O-rings. These qualification tests saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in development costs and put the Lockheed-Martin/Aerojet team back on schedule. On July 17, 2003, the first flight of an Atlas V boosted with solid rocket motors successfully launched a commercial satellite into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Aero-jet's two 67-ft solid rocket boosters performed flawlessly, with each providing thrust in excess of 250,000 lbf. Both motors incorporated three Glenn-developed thermal barriers in their nozzle-to-case joints. The Cablevision satellite launched on this mission will be used to provide direct-to-home satellite television programming for the U.S. market starting in late 2003. The Atlas V is a product of the

  14. Evaluation of hot corrosion behavior of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Miller, R. A.; Gedwill, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Calcium silicate and yttria stabilized zirconia/MCrAlY thermal barrier coating systems on air-cooled specimens were exposed to sodium plus vanadium doped Mach 0.3 combustion gases. Thermal barrier coating endurance was determined to be a strong inverse function of ceramic coating thickness. Coating system durability was increased through the use of higher Cr + Al NiCrAl and CoCrAlY bond coatings. Chemical and electron microprobe analyses supported the predictions of condensate compositions and the determination of their roles in causing spalling of the ceramic coatings.

  15. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for commercial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Sheffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the short history, current status, and future prospects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines. Particular attention is given to plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized (7 wt pct Y2O3) zirconia systems. Recent advances include improvements in the spallation life of thermal barrier coatings, improved bond coat composition and spraying techniques, and improved component design. The discussion also covers field experience, life prediction modeling, and future directions in ceramic coatings in relation to gas turbine engine design.

  16. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Research and development into thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines is reviewed critically. The type of coating systems developed for aircraft applications are found to be preferred for clear fuel electric utility applications. These coating systems consists of a layer of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria ceramic over a layer of MCrAly bond coat. They are not recommended for use when molten salts are presented. Efforts to understand coating degradation in dirty environments and to develop corrosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  17. Multicomponent, Rare-Earth-Doped Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2005-01-01

    Multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type thermal-barrier coating materials have been developed in an effort to obtain lower thermal conductivity, greater phase stability, and greater high-temperature capability, relative to those of the prior thermal-barrier coating material of choice, which is yttria-partially stabilized zirconia. As used here, "thermal-barrier coatings" (TBCs) denotes thin ceramic layers used to insulate air-cooled metallic components of heat engines (e.g., gas turbines) from hot gases. These layers are generally fabricated by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition of the TBC materials onto the metal components. A TBC as deposited has some porosity, which is desirable in that it reduces the thermal conductivity below the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the fully dense form of the material. Undesirably, the thermal conductivity gradually increases because the porosity gradually decreases as a consequence of sintering during high-temperature service. Because of these and other considerations such as phase transformations, the maximum allowable service temperature for yttria-partially stabilized zirconia TBCs lies in the range of about 1,200 to 1,300 C. In contrast, the present multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type TBCs can withstand higher temperatures.

  18. Depth-Penetrating Luminescence Thermography of Thermal- Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    A thermographic method has been developed for measuring temperatures at predetermined depths within dielectric material layers . especially thermal-barrier coatings. This method will help satisfy a need for noncontact measurement of through-the-thickness temperature gradients for evaluating the effectiveness of thermal- barrier coatings designed to prevent overheating of turbine blades, combustor liners, and other engine parts. Heretofore, thermography has been limited to measurement of surface and near-surface temperatures. In the thermographic method that is the immediate predecessor of the present method, a thermographic phosphor is applied to the outer surface of a thermal barrier coating, luminescence in the phosphor is excited by illuminating the phosphor at a suitable wavelength, and either the time dependence of the intensity of luminescence or the intensities of luminescence spectral lines is measured. Then an emissivity-independent surface-temperature value is computed by use of either the known temperature dependence of the luminescence decay time or the known temperature dependence of ratios between intensities of selected luminescence spectral lines. Until now, depth-penetrating measurements have not been possible because light of the wavelengths needed to excite phosphors could not penetrate thermal-barrier coating materials to useful depths. In the present method as in the method described above, one exploits the temperature dependence of luminescence decay time. In this case, the phosphor is incorporated into the thermal-barrier coat at the depth at which temperature is to be measured. To be suitable for use in this method, a phosphor must (1) exhibit a temperature dependence of luminescence decay time in the desired range, (2) be thermochemically compatible with the thermal-barrier coating, and (3) exhibit at least a minor excitation spectral peak and an emission spectral peak, both peaks being at wavelengths at which the thermal-barrier coating is

  19. Development and Fatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. Durability of the coating systems remains a critical issue with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Thermal conductivity increase and coating degradation due to sintering and phase changes are known to be detrimental to coating performance. There is a need to characterize the coating thermal fatigue behavior and temperature limit, in order to potentially take full advantage of the current coating capability. In this study, thermal conductivity and cyclic fatigue behaviors of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings were evaluated under high temperature, large thermal gradient and thermal cycling conditions. The coating degradation and failure processes were assessed by real-time monitoring of the coating thermal conductivity under the test conditions. The ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation driving forces and failure modes under the cyclic thermal loads will be discussed in light of the high temperature mechanical fatigue and fracture testing results.

  20. Significance of thermal contact resistance in two-layer, thermal-barrier-coated turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Gaugler, E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper studies calculated and measured metal wall temperatures of uncoated vanes and the same vanes coated with a thermal barrier coating system of NiCrAlY bond and yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic. It is shown that thermal contact between layers is negligible. The significance of data scatter and of published ceramic thermal conductivity values is discussed.

  1. Transient thermography testing of unpainted thermal barrier coating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptaszek, Grzegorz; Cawley, Peter; Almond, Darryl; Pickering, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This paper has investigated the effects of uneven surface discolouration of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) and of its IR translucency on the thermal responses observed by using mid and long wavelength IR cameras. It has been shown that unpainted blades can be tested satisfactorily by using a more powerful flash heating system and a long wavelength IR camera. The problem of uneven surface emissivity can be overcome by applying 2nd derivative processing of the log-log surface cooling curves.

  2. Microstructural aspects of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, T. E.; Suhr, D. S.; Keller, R. J.; Lanteri, V.; Heuer, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Various combination of plasma-sprayed bond coatings and zirconia ceramic coatings on a nickel-based superalloy substrate were tested by static thermal exposure at 1200 C and cyclic thermal exposure to 1000 C. The bond coats were based on Ni-Cr-Al alloys with additions of rare earth elements and Si. The ceramic coats were various ZrO2-Y2O3 compositions, of which the optimum was found to be ZrO2-8.9 wt percent Y2O3. Microstructural analysis showed that resistance to cracking during thermal exposure is strongly related to deleterious phase changes. Zones depleted of Al formed at the bond coat/ceramic coat interface due to oxidation and at the bond coat/substrate interface due to interdiffusion, leading eventually to breakdown of the bond coat. The 8.9 percent Y2O3 coating performed best because the as-sprayed metastable tetragonal phase converted slowly into the low-Y2O3 tetragonal plus high-Y2O3 cubic-phase mixture, so that the deleterious monoclinic phase was inhibited from forming. Failure appeared to start with the formation of circumferential cracks in the zirconia, probably due to compressive stresses during cooling, followed by the formation of radial cracks due to tensile stresses during heating. Cracks appeared to initiate at the Al2O3 scale/bond coat interface and propagate through the zirconia coating. Comparisons were made with the behavior of bulk ZrO2-Y2O3 and the relationship between the microstructure of the tetragonal phase and the phase diagram. A separate investigation was also made of the ZrO2-Al2O3 interface.

  3. Evaluation of Oxidation Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method based on the technique of dilatometry has been established to quantitatively evaluate the interfacial damage due to the oxidation in a thermal barrier coating system. Strain isolation and adhesion coefficients have been proposed to characterize the thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance based on its thermal expansion behavior. It has been found that, for a thermal barrier coating system consisting of ZrO2-8%Y2O3/FeCrAlY/4140 steel substrate, the oxidation of the bond coat and substrate significantly reduced the ceramic coating adherence, as inferred from the dilatometry measurements. The in-situ thermal expansion measurements under 30 deg C to 700 deg C thermal cycling in air showed that the adhesion coefficient, A(sub i) decreased by 25% during the first 35 oxidation cycles. Metallography showed that delamination occurred at both the ceramic/bond coat and bond coat/substrate interfaces. In addition, the strain isolation effect has been improved by increasing the FeCrAlY bond coat thickness. The strain isolation coefficient, Si, increased from about 0.04 to 0.25, as the bond coat thickness changed from 0.1 mm to 1.0 mm. It may be possible to design optimum values of strain isolation and interface adhesion coefficients to achieve the best TBC performance.

  4. Development of Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced multi-component, low conductivity oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities and improved thermal stability due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  5. Thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Levine, S. R.; Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements in gas turbine performance are approaching the limits imposed by alloy properties and excessive cooling air requirements. Thin ceramic coatings can increase the difference between gas temperature and metal temperature by several hundred degrees. Thus, they are potentially a major step forward in surface protection. These coatings offer the potential to reduce fuel consumption by permitting reduced coolant flow or higher turbine inlet temperature or to improve durability by reducing metal temperatures and transient thermal stresses. At NASA Lewis, in-house and contractual programs are in place to bring this promising technology to engine readiness in the early 1980's. Progress towards this goal is summarized in this paper.

  6. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Subscale rocket thrust chamber tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and durability of thin yttria stabilized zirconium oxide coatings applied to the thrust chamber hot-gas side wall. The fabrication consisted of arc plasma spraying the ceramic coating and bond coat onto a mandrell and then electrodepositing the copper thrust chamber wall around the coating. Chambers were fabricated with coatings .008, and .005 and .003 inches thick. The chambers were thermally cycled at a chamber pressure of 600 psia using oxygen-hydrogen as propellants and liquid hydrogen as the coolant. The thicker coatings tended to delaminate, early in the cyclic testing, down to a uniform sublayer which remained well adhered during the remaining cycles. Two chambers with .003 inch coatings were subjected to 1500 thermal cycles with no coating loss in the throat region, which represents a tenfold increase in life over identical chambers having no coatings. An analysis is presented which shows that the heat lost to the coolant due to the coating, in a rocket thrust chamber design having a coating only in the throat region, can be recovered by adding only one inch to the combustion chamber length.

  7. Ceramic Thermal Barriers For Dirty-Fuel Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Report discusses performances of ceramic thermal-barrier coating materials for use in electric-utility gas-turbine engines. Variations of standard coating evaluated in search for coating resistant to dirty fuel. Variations included alterations of level of yttria, replacement of yttria by other stabilizers, controlling surface density (by plasma spray processing, infiltration, laser glazing, or sputtering), and interface treatments.

  8. Llandoverian to Ludlovian barrier reef complex in southeast Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, C.W. )

    1989-08-01

    Subsurface exploration in the Michigan basin established that a carbonate bank and barrier reef complex prograded basinward during the late Wenlockian to early Ludlovian, but the corresponding Niagaran Series is generally undifferentiated. In southeast Wisconsin the series is well exposed; thus, a better record of depositional history is available. Until now, reefs in the Racine formation of southeast Wisconsin (upper Wenlockian through lower Ludlovian) were interpreted as patch reefs built landward of the barrier complex. However, the following criteria are consistent with an extension of Michigan's northern barrier complex beneath Lake Michigan to southeast Wisconsin: (1) Ubiquitous presence of reef facies along a southwest to northeast trend. This trend is coincident with thickening and a facies change indicative of a deep to shallow water transition, (2) similarity in depositional sequence of the overlying Salina Group in Wisconsin and Michigan. The Salina sediments surround, but are absent over, structures interpreted as pinnacle reefs and form a feather edge against the thicker belt interpreted as a barrier complex. Hence, the Racine reefs are reinterpreted as a barrier complex. Hence, the Racine reefs are reinterpreted as a barrier and pinnacle reef complex. Similar facies changes are also present in older formations. Intraformational truncation surfaces in the underlying Waukesha Dolomite (upper Llandoverian to lower Wenlockian) clearly indicate the presence of a nearby carbonate slope. Therefore, the carbonate buildup originated prior to the Wenlockian and migrated further basinward than previously believed.

  9. Sand effects on thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walock, Michael; Barnett, Blake; Ghoshal, Anindya; Murugan, Muthuvel; Swab, Jeffrey; Pepi, Marc; Hopkins, David; Gazonas, George; Kerner, Kevin

    Accumulation and infiltration of molten/ semi-molten sand and subsequent formation of calcia-magnesia-alumina-silicate (CMAS) deposits in gas turbine engines continues to be a significant problem for aviation assets. This complex problem is compounded by the large variations in the composition, size, and topology of natural sands, gas generator turbine temperatures, thermal barrier coating properties, and the incoming particulate's momentum. In order to simplify the materials testing process, significant time and resources have been spent in the development of synthetic sand mixtures. However, there is debate whether these mixtures accurately mimic the damage observed in field-returned engines. With this study, we provide a direct comparison of CMAS deposits from both natural and synthetic sands. Using spray deposition techniques, 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings are deposited onto bond-coated, Ni-superalloy discs. Each sample is coated with a sand slurry, either natural or synthetic, and exposed to a high temperature flame for 1 hour. Test samples are characterized before and after flame exposure. In addition, the test samples will be compared to field-returned equipment. This research was sponsored by the US Army Research Laboratory, and was accomplished under Cooperative Agreement # W911NF-12-2-0019.

  10. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Propulsion Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments, and extend component lifetimes. For future high performance engines, the development of advanced ceramic barrier coating systems will allow these coatings to be used to simultaneously increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling requirements, thereby leading to significant improvements in engine power density and efficiency. In order to meet future engine performance and reliability requirements, the coating systems must be designed with increased high temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved thermal stress and erosion resistance. In this paper, ceramic coating design and testing considerations will be described for high temperature and high-heat-flux engine applications in hot corrosion and oxidation, erosion, and combustion water vapor environments. Further coating performance and life improvements will be expected by utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, and improved processing techniques, in conjunction with modeling and design tools.

  11. Computational design and experimental validation of new thermal barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shengmin

    2015-03-31

    The focus of this project is on the development of a reliable and efficient ab initio based computational high temperature material design method which can be used to assist the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) bond-coat and top-coat design. Experimental evaluations on the new TBCs are conducted to confirm the new TBCs’ properties. Southern University is the subcontractor on this project with a focus on the computational simulation method development. We have performed ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics simulation on screening the top coats and bond coats for gas turbine thermal barrier coating design and validation applications. For experimental validations, our focus is on the hot corrosion performance of different TBC systems. For example, for one of the top coatings studied, we examined the thermal stability of TaZr2.75O8 and confirmed it’s hot corrosion performance.

  12. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  13. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition comprising a base oxide, a primary stabilizer oxide, and at least one dopant oxide is disclosed. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. The base oxide is selected from the group consisting of zirconia and hafnia and combinations thereof. The primary stabilizing oxide is selected from the group consisting of yttria, dysprosia, erbia and combinations thereof. The dopant or group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants are selected from the group consisting of rare earth metal oxides, transitional metal oxides, alkaline earth metal oxides and combinations thereof. The dopant or dopants preferably have ionic radii different from those of the primary stabilizer and/or the base oxides.

  14. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  15. Ruthenium-containing bond coats for thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, B.; Cao, F.; Murphy, K. S.; Levi, C. G.; Pollock, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    Bond coats for zirconia-based thermal barrier coating systems applied to nickel-based superalloys are typically composed of the B2 NiAl phase. Since RuAl has the same B2 crystal structure but a melting point 400°C higher than NiAl, ruthenium-modified aluminide bond coats could provide improved system temperature capability. Creep experiments on ternary Al-Ni-Ru alloys demonstrate greatly improved creep properties with increasing ruthenium content. Processing paths for ruthenium-modified NiAl-based bond coatings have been established within the bounds of commercially available coating systems. The oxidation resistance of ruthenium-modified bond coats during thermal cycling has been examined, and potential thermal barrier coating system implications are discussed.

  16. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  17. Development and Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. Durability of the coating systems remains a critical issue with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Thermal conductivity increase and coating degradation due to sintering and phase changes are known to be detrimental to coating performance. There is a need to characterize the coating behavior and temperature limits, in order to potentially take full advantage of the current coating capability, and also accurately assess the benefit gained from advanced coating development. In this study, thermal conductivity behavior and cyclic durability of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings were evaluated under laser heat-flux simulated high temperature, large thermal gradient and thermal cycling conditions. The coating degradation and failure processes were assessed by real-time monitoring of the coating thermal conductivity under the test conditions. The ceramic coating crack propagation driving forces and resulting failure modes will be discussed in light of high temperature mechanical fatigue and fracture testing results.

  18. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  19. Thermal Cyclic Behavior of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings Investigated Under High-Heat-Flux Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) have been developed to protect silicon-carbide- (SiC) based ceramic components in gas turbine engines from high-temperature environmental attack. With continuously increasing demands for significantly higher engine operating temperature, future EBC systems must be designed for both thermal and environmental protection of the engine components in combustion gases. In particular, the thermal barrier functions of EBC's become a necessity for reducing the engine-component thermal loads and chemical reaction rates, thus maintaining the required mechanical properties and durability of these components. Advances in the development of thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TBC's and EBC's, respectively) will directly impact the successful use of ceramic components in advanced engines. To develop high-performance coating systems, researchers must establish advanced test approaches. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux technique was employed to investigate the thermal cyclic behavior of TBC's and EBC's on SiC-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite substrates (SiC/SiC) under high thermal gradient and thermal cycling conditions. Because the laser heat flux test approach can monitor the coating's real-time thermal conductivity variations at high temperature, the coating thermal insulation performance, sintering, and delamination can all be obtained during thermal cycling tests. Plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3) thermal barrier and barium strontium aluminosilicate-based environmental barrier coatings (BSAS/BSAS+mullite/Si) on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were investigated in this study. These coatings were laser tested in air under thermal gradients (the surface and interface temperatures were approximately 1482 and 1300 C, respectively). Some coating specimens were also subject to alternating furnace cycling (in a 90-percent water vapor environment at 1300 C) and laser thermal gradient cycling tests

  20. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  1. Quantum trajectories in complex phase space: multidimensional barrier transmission.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Robert E; Rowland, Brad A

    2007-07-28

    The quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the action function is approximately solved by propagating individual Lagrangian quantum trajectories in complex-valued phase space. Equations of motion for these trajectories are derived through use of the derivative propagation method (DPM), which leads to a hierarchy of coupled differential equations for the action function and its spatial derivatives along each trajectory. In this study, complex-valued classical trajectories (second order DPM), along which is transported quantum phase information, are used to study low energy barrier transmission for a model two-dimensional system involving either an Eckart or Gaussian barrier along the reaction coordinate coupled to a harmonic oscillator. The arrival time for trajectories to reach the transmitted (product) region is studied. Trajectories launched from an "equal arrival time surface," defined as an isochrone, all reach the real-valued subspace in the transmitted region at the same time. The Rutherford-type diffraction of trajectories around poles in the complex extended Eckart potential energy surface is described. For thin barriers, these poles are close to the real axis and present problems for computing the transmitted density. In contrast, for the Gaussian barrier or the thick Eckart barrier where the poles are further from the real axis, smooth transmitted densities are obtained. Results obtained using higher-order quantum trajectories (third order DPM) are described for both thick and thin barriers, and some issues that arise for thin barriers are examined. PMID:17672677

  2. Behavior of nanoporous thermal barrier coatings under cyclic thermal loading. Computer-aided simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, D. D.; Panin, S. V.; Maksimov, P. V.; Panin, V. E.; Berto, F.

    2015-10-01

    The work presents the development of new algorithms for calculating the fraction of thermal energy dissipated during the irradiation on the inner surface of pores. On the basis of these algorithms, the simulation of heat transfer in three-layered systems was carried out taking into account the dissipation of thermal energy in specimens having different porosity. We have performed quantitative estimates of the portion of dissipating thermal energy and its influence on the distribution of thermal stresses in thermal barrier coating systems. It was demonstrated that the presence of pores with a large internal surface area in the intermediate layer material enables two-fold decrease of the internal thermal stresses.

  3. Behavior of nanoporous thermal barrier coatings under cyclic thermal loading. Computer-aided simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, D. D. Maksimov, P. V.; Panin, S. V. Panin, V. E.; Berto, F.

    2015-10-27

    The work presents the development of new algorithms for calculating the fraction of thermal energy dissipated during the irradiation on the inner surface of pores. On the basis of these algorithms, the simulation of heat transfer in three-layered systems was carried out taking into account the dissipation of thermal energy in specimens having different porosity. We have performed quantitative estimates of the portion of dissipating thermal energy and its influence on the distribution of thermal stresses in thermal barrier coating systems. It was demonstrated that the presence of pores with a large internal surface area in the intermediate layer material enables two-fold decrease of the internal thermal stresses.

  4. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, June 1, 1996--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-07

    An improved thermal barrier coating system with good reliability and thermal performance is described. The report discusses the coating process, manufacturing, repair, deposition, and microstructure of the coatings.

  5. Spectral Properties of Dy-Doped Thermal Barrier Sensor Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Moore, Danielle; Heyes, Andrew; Nichols, John R.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained the excitation (484, 497 and 585 nm) and emission (355, 367 and 385 nm) spectra and measured the fluorescence decay lifetimes for partially Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings doped with 2mol% Dy2O3, as a function of coating depth for thicknesses ranging from 30 to 200 μm. In principle, these coatings can function not only as thermal protection barriers for turbomachinery blades and vanes, but also as remotely interrogated self-sensors for use in determining in situ wear rates during operation. This is done by varying the excitation wavelength and observing the fluorescence decay times and related parameters.

  6. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  8. Phase composition and residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsofen, S. Ya.; Ryabenko, B. V.; Ashmarin, A. A.; Molostov, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    The phase composition and the residual stresses in multilayer thermal barrier coatings, which consist of an external ZrO2-8Y2O3 ceramic layer, an intermediate gradient (metal ceramic) layer, and a transient metallic NiCrAlY sublayer, are studied. It is shown that an increase in the specific volume of the metallic sublayer as a result of the formation of thermal growing oxide Al2O3 generates high compressive stresses in this sublayer. The ceramic layer undergoes tensile stresses in this case. A method is proposed to estimate the stresses in gradient coatings from X-ray diffraction results.

  9. Thermophysical and Thermomechanical Properties of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, the issue of coating durability under high temperature cyclic conditions is still of major concern. The coating failure is closely related to thermal stresses and oxidation in the coating systems. Coating shrinkage cracking resulting from ceramic sintering and creep at high temperatures can further accelerate the coating failure process. The purpose of this paper is to address critical issues such as ceramic sintering and creep, thermal fatigue and their relevance to coating life prediction. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes of the coating thermal conductivity and elastic modulus, fatigue and creep interactions, and resulting failure mechanisms during the simulated engine tests. Detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the thermal barrier coating systems provide a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  10. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings with improved corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, J.T.; Courtright, E.L.

    1987-02-01

    A method for limiting the ingress of corrosive species into physical vapor deposited zirconia thermal barrier coatings by inserting dense ceramic sealing layers into the usual columnar (segmented) ceramic microstructure has been examined. The concept was evaluated by sputtering a series of ZrO/sub 2/-2OY/sub 2/O/sub 3/ deposits onto In792 substrates coated with a CoCrAlY bondlayer.

  11. In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-01-13

    A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

  12. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  13. Thermal barrier coatings: Burner rig hot corrosion test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Stecura, S.; Gedwill, M. A.; Zaplatynsky, I.; Levine, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    A Mach 0.3 burner rig test program was conducted to examine the sensitivity of thermal barrier coatings to Na and V contaminated combustion gases simulating potential utility gas turbine environments. Coating life of the standard ZrO2-12Y2O3/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y NASA thermal barrier coating system which was developed for aircraft gas turbines was significantly reduced in such environments. Two thermal barrier coating systems, Ca2SiO4/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y and ZrO2-8Y2O3/Ni-16.4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y and a less insulative cermet coating system, 50 volume percent MgO-50 volume percent Ni-19.6Cr-17.1Al-0.97Y/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y, were identified as having much improved corrosion resistance compared to the standard coating.

  14. Modeling Oxidation Induced Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Freborg, A. M.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, William J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) in gas turbines has increased dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the need for component protection from ever increasing service temperatures. Oxidation of the bond coat has been identified as an important contributing factor to spallation of the ceramic top coat during service. Additional variables found to influence TBC thermal cycle life include bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers, and modulus of elasticity. The purpose of this work was to characterize the effects of oxidation on the stress states within the TBC system, as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with other factors affecting TBC life.

  15. Influence of High Cycle Thermal Loads on Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) and High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In the present study, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, as well as of coating failure, under thermal loads which simulate engine conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. In general, surface vertical cracks initiate early and grow continuously under LCF and HCF cyclic stresses. It is found that in the absence of interfacial oxidation, the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. Experiments show that the HCF cycles are very damaging to the coating systems. The combined LCF and HCF tests produced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. It is suggested that the HCF component cannot only accelerate the surface crack initiation, but also interact with the LCF by contributing to the crack growth at high temperatures. The increased LCF stress intensity at the crack tip due to the HCF component enhances the subsequent LCF crack growth. Conversely, since a faster HCF crack growth rate will be expected with lower effective compressive stresses in the coating, the LCF cycles also facilitate the HCF crack growth at high temperatures by stress relaxation process. A surface wedging model has been proposed to account for the HCF crack growth in the coating system. This mechanism predicts that HCF damage effect increases with increasing temperature swing, the thermal expansion coefficient and the elastic modulus of the ceramic coating, as well as the HCF interacting depth. A good agreement has been found between the analysis and experimental evidence.

  16. Damage Accumulation and Failure of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings under Thermal Gradient Cyclic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, rober A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. A fundamental understanding of the sintering and thermal cycling induced delamination of thermal barrier coating systems under engine-like heat flux conditions will potentially help to improve the coating temperature capability. In this study, a test approach is established to emphasize the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity, which can initially increase under the steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and later decrease under the thermal gradient cyclic test due to coating cracking and delamination. Thermal conductivity prediction models have been established for a ZrO2-(7- 8wt%)Y2O3 model coating system in terms of heat flux, time, and testing temperatures. The coating delamination accumulation is then assessed based on the observed thermal conductivity response under the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The coating thermal gradient cycling associated delaminations and failure mechanisms under simulated engine heat-flux conditions will be discussed in conjunction with the coating sintering and fracture testing results.

  17. Phase of thermal emission spectroscopy for properties measurements of delaminating thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fengling; Bennett, Ted D.

    2005-11-01

    Phase of thermal emission spectroscopy is developed for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coating (TBC) in the presence of thermal contact resistance between the coating and the substrate. In this method, a TBC sample is heated using a periodically modulated laser and the thermal emission from the coating is collected using an infrared detector. The phase difference between the heating signal and the emission signal is measured experimentally. A mathematical model is developed to predict the phase difference between the laser and the measured emission, which considers the coating properties and the thermal contact resistance of the interface. An electron-beam physical vapor deposition thermal barrier coating with local regions delaminated by laser shock is characterized using this technique. The measurements are made on two regions of the coating, one where good thermal contact between the coating and substrate exists and the other where the interface has been damaged by laser shock. The results for the thermal properties and thermal contact resistance of the interface are presented and compared.

  18. Phase of thermal emission spectroscopy for properties measurements of delaminating thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Fengling; Bennett, Ted D.

    2005-11-15

    Phase of thermal emission spectroscopy is developed for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coating (TBC) in the presence of thermal contact resistance between the coating and the substrate. In this method, a TBC sample is heated using a periodically modulated laser and the thermal emission from the coating is collected using an infrared detector. The phase difference between the heating signal and the emission signal is measured experimentally. A mathematical model is developed to predict the phase difference between the laser and the measured emission, which considers the coating properties and the thermal contact resistance of the interface. An electron-beam physical vapor deposition thermal barrier coating with local regions delaminated by laser shock is characterized using this technique. The measurements are made on two regions of the coating, one where good thermal contact between the coating and substrate exists and the other where the interface has been damaged by laser shock. The results for the thermal properties and thermal contact resistance of the interface are presented and compared.

  19. Influence of Microstructure on Thermal Properties of Axial Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Curry, Nicholas; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Joshi, Shrikant; Vilemova, Monika; Pala, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    Suspension plasma spraying is a relatively new thermal spaying technique to produce advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and enables production of coatings with a variety of structures—highly dense, highly porous, segmented, or columnar. This work investigates suspension plasma-sprayed TBCs produced using axial injection with different process parameters. The influence of coating microstructure on thermal properties was of specific interest. Tests carried out included microstructural analysis, phase analysis, determination of porosity, and pore size distribution, as well as thermal diffusivity/conductivity measurements. Results showed that axial suspension plasma spraying process makes it possible to produce various columnar-type coatings under different processing conditions. Significant influence of microstructural features on thermal properties of the coatings was noted. In particular, the process parameter-dependent microstructural attributes, such as porosity, column density, and crystallite size, were shown to govern the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the coating.

  20. Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Thick and Porous Thermal Barrier Coatings Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivani, A.; Rizzi, G.; Bardi, U.; Giolli, C.; Miranda, M. Muniz; Ciattini, S.; Fossati, A.; Borgioli, F.

    2007-12-01

    High-temperature thermal fatigue causes the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. This paper addresses the development of thick TBCs, focusing on the microstructure and the porosity of the yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) coating, regarding its resistance to thermal fatigue. Thick TBCs, with different porosity levels, were produced by means of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat and YPSZ top coat, both had been sprayed by air plasma spray. The thermal fatigue resistance of new TBC systems and the evolution of the coatings before and after thermal cycling was then evaluated. The limit of thermal fatigue resistance increases depending on the amount of porosity in the top coat. Raman analysis shows that the compressive in-plane stress increases in the TBC systems after thermal cycling, nevertheless the increasing rate has a trend which is contrary to the porosity level of top coat.

  1. Internal Radiation Effects in Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Using thermal barrier coatings on combustor liners, turbine vanes, and rotating blades is important for reducing metal temperatures in current and advanced aircraft engines. Zirconia is a common coating material, and it is partially transparent to thermal radiation. Radiation becomes more significant as temperatures are raised for higher efficiency in advanced engines. Calculations are often made with radiation effects neglected inside the coating. The effect of radiation is illustrated here, where an analytical procedure is provided by using the two-flux method for the radiative contribution. A detailed study was made of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for diesel engines, and a two-flux analysis was developed for radiation in semitransparent multilayer composites. These efforts provide the basis for the present analysis where illustrative solutions are obtained for typical conditions in an aircraft engine. The formulation and solution of the exact spectral radiative transfer equations including large scattering, as is characteristic of zirconia, are rather complicated. The two-flux method is used here to provide a simplified method.

  2. Alternatives to Silicon Rubber Thermal Barrier in RSRM Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Totman, Peter D.; Prince, Andrew; Frost, Doug; Himebaugh, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Thiokol Propulsion encountered a situation where gas path can form in the Filler material in joints between the phenolic in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor nozzle. An investigation determined that the method for injecting the filler material into the joint created a pressurized pocket of air that forced its way to the surface while the filler was curing. The path that the air took remained open some situations leaving a path for hot gas to get deep into the joint. The condition that created the gas path has been corrected by modifications to the manufacturing process, but a design solution that would reduce processing time is being pursued. A strip of open cell installed deep into the joint, can serve as a barrier to the Filler material. Testing indicates that the foam eliminates the pressure pocket, and does not prevent detection of leakage of the o-ring seals during leak test. Open cell foam does not have thermal resistance capability and mechanical structure, which would be required in the event of a gas path. A replacement to open cell foam is now being considered. Braided carbon fiber rope has the permeability characteristics of foam and it has thermal resistance characteristics as well. Braided carbon fiber rope (BCFR) has been tested in simulated joints in subscale rocket motor. Results of the testing indicate that braided carbon fiber rope can significantly reduce gas temperature by as much es 3000 F in a nozzle joint configuration. BCFR can be installed as a barrier to stop the joint filler material or it can used as the thermal barrier alone.

  3. Thermal lattice Boltzmann method for complex microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Haruka; Kaneda, Masayuki; Suga, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-01

    A methodology to simulate thermal fields in complex microflow geometries is proposed. For the flow fields, the regularized multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied coupled with the diffusive-bounce-back boundary condition for wall boundaries. For the thermal fields, the regularized lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model is applied. For the thermal wall boundary condition, a newly developed boundary condition, which is a mixture of the diffuse scattering and constant temperature conditions, is applied. The proposed set of schemes is validated by reference data in the Fourier flows and square cylinder flows confined in a microchannel. The obtained results confirm that it is essential to apply the regularization to the thermal LBM for avoiding kinked temperature profiles in complex thermal flows. The proposed wall boundary condition is successful to obtain thermal jumps at the walls with good accuracy.

  4. Development of a Enhanced Thermal Barrier for RSRM Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P. H.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber rope is being considered as replacement for the RTV thermal barrier that is currently used to protect o-rings in RSRM nozzle joints, Performance requirements include its ability to cool propellant gases filter slag and particulates, and conform to various joint assembly conditions as well as dynamic flight motion. Testing has shown its superior heat resistance, even in oxidative and corrosive environments. Testing has also demonstrated excellent performance of this system in sub-scale motors. Cold flow testing, has demonstrated its ability to conform to motor dynamics. Manufacture and assembly testing have demonstrated the ease of gland machining as well as assembly in a full-scale nozzle.

  5. Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Johnsen, B. P.; Nagy, A.

    1997-03-01

    Mechanical test data for thermal barrier coatings, including modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data, are reviewed in support of the development of durability models for heat engine applica-tions. The materials include 7 and 8 wt % yttria partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) as well as a cermet ma-terial (PSZ +10 wt % NiCoCrAlY). Both air plasma sprayed and electron beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

  6. TBCs for better engine efficiency. [thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    State-of-the-art thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) developed for aircraft engines can achieve both hot-section component operating temperature reductions and superior oxidation resistance. Such TBCs typically consist of two layers: a metallic, often NiCrAlY 'bond' inner layer in contact with the superalloy structural component, and an outer, insulating ceramic layer. A ceramic frequently used in this role due to its high durability is plasma-sprayed ZrO2, partially stabilized with 6-8 wt pct Y2O3. TBCs can also be useful in nonaircraft gas turbines, which frequently use highly contaminated fuels.

  7. Highly defective oxides as sinter resistant thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2005-08-16

    A thermal barrier coating material formed of a highly defective cubic matrix structure having a concentration of a stabilizer sufficiently high that the oxygen vacancies created by the stabilizer interact within the matrix to form multi-vacancies, thereby improving the sintering resistance of the material. The concentration of stabilizer within the cubic matrix structure is greater than that concentration of stabilizer necessary to give the matrix a peak ionic conductivity value. The concentration of stabilizer may be at least 30 wt. %. Embodiments include a cubic matrix of zirconia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % yttria, and a cubic matrix of hafnia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % gadolinia.

  8. Development of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings Using a High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, high temperature capability thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity, which initially rises under the steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and later drops under the cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on damage accumulation and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The external radiation resistance of the coating is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser- heated intense radiation-flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature may be derived.

  9. Significance of thermal contact resistance in two-layer thermal-barrier-coated turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of thermal contact resistance between layers in heat transfer through two layer, plasma sprayed, thermal barrier coatings applied to turbine vanes was investigated. Results obtained with a system of NiCrAlY bond and yttria stabilized zirconia ceramic show that thermal contact resistance between layers is negligible. These results also verified other studies which showed that thermal contact resistance is negligible for a different coating system of NiCr bond calcia stabilized zirconia ceramic. The zirconia stabilized ceramic thermal conductivity data scatter presented in the literature is ?20 to -10 percent about a curve fit of the data. More accurate predictions of heat transfer and metal wall temperatures are obtained when the thermal conductivity values are used at the ?20 percent level.

  10. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  11. Thermal transitions and barrier properties of olefinic nanocomposites.

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D. J.; Leyva, A. A.; Chemical Engineering

    2005-01-11

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the thermal transitions of smectite organoclays and their dispersions in olefinic systems, which included paraffinic waxes and polyethylene. The organoclays, with treatment on both the basal and edge surfaces, produced nanocscale dispersions without the aid of external coupling agents or compatibilizers. In addition to DSC measurements, the nanocomposites were further characterized using X-ray diffraction and oxygen transmission. The DSC measurements indicated that a clay/wax nanocomposite phase was generated with melt/freeze transition temperatures that were different from those of the individual components, while X-ray data indicated that the nanocomposite phase was in equilibrium with an intercalate phase. Barrier improvement of over 300x was observed and ascribed to a tortuosity effect resulting from dispersed clay platelets having a high aspect ratio and strong cohesion between the wax and the organoclay surface. Available data indicate that the barrier enhancement decreases as the difference between the freezing points of the organoclay and the wax widens. The cause of poor barrier performance in polyolefin systems is traced to the large difference in recrystallization temperatures, such that when the polymer begins to crystallize the surface of the organoclay is still in a liquid state, which leads to phase separation.

  12. Optical Diagnostics for High-Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments, such as in jet turbine engines. Taking advantage of the translucent nature of TBCs, optical diagnostics have been developed that can provide an informed assessment of TBC health that will allow mitigating action to be taken before TBC degradation threatens performance or safety. In particular, rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers have been integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence that monitors TBC erosion, delamination, and temperature gradients. Erosion monitoring of TBC-coated specimens is demonstrated by utilizing visible luminescence that is excited from a sublayer that is exposed by erosion. TBC delamination monitoring is achieved in TBCs with a base rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayer by the reflectance-enhanced increase in luminescence produced in regions containing buried delamination cracks. TBC temperature monitoring is demonstrated using the temperature-dependent decay time for luminescence originating from the specific coating depth associated with a rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayer. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers is discussed, including co-doping strategies to produce more penetrating near-infrared luminescence. It is demonstrated that integration of the rare-earth-doped sublayers is achieved with no reduction in TBC life. In addition, results for multilayer TBCs designed to also perform as radiation barriers are also presented.

  13. Further industrial tests of ceramic thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Levine, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center made technical assistance arrangements (contracts) with several commercial organizations under which Lewis designed plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coatings (TBC) for their products. Lewis was then furnished with the test conditions and evaluations of coating usefulness. The coating systems were developed and sprayed at Lewis. All of the systems incorporated a two-layer, ceramic-bond coating concept. Coating thickness and chemical composition were varied to fit three applications: the leading edges of first-stage turbine vanes for an advanced gas turbine engine; the flame impingement surfaces of a combustor transition section; and diesel engine valves and head surfaces. The TBC incorporated yytria-stabilized zirconia, which lowered metal temperatures, protected metal parts, and increased metal part life. In some cases metal burning, melting, and warping were eliminated. Additional benefits were realized from these endeavors: hands-on experience with thermal-barrier coatings was provided to industry; the success of these endeavors encourages these and other organizations to accelerate the implementation of TBC technology.

  14. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  15. Development of Thermal Barriers For Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Joints in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors are sealed by O-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket that reach pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. To provide protection for the O-rings, the motors are insulated with either phenolic or rubber insulation. Gaps in the joints leading up to the O-rings are filled with polysulfide joint-fill compounds as an additional level of protection. The current RSRM nozzle-to-case joint design incorporating primary, secondary, and wiper O-rings experiences gas paths through the joint-fill compound to the innermost wiper O-ring in about one out of every seven motors. Although this does not pose a safety hazard to the motor, it is an undesirable condition that NASA and rocket manufacturer Thiokol want to eliminate. Each nozzle-to-case joint gas path results in extensive reviews and evaluation before flights can be resumed. Thiokol and NASA Marshall are currently working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design that has been used successfully in the field and igniter joint. They are also planning to incorporate the NASA Glenn braided carbon fiber thermal barrier into the joint. The thermal barrier would act as an additional level of protection for the O-rings and allow the elimination of the joint-fill compound from the joint.

  16. Thermal barrier coating life-prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Neumann, J.; Liu, A.

    1986-01-01

    The program focuses on predicting the lives of two types of strain-tolerant and oxidation-resistant thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems that are produced by commercial coating suppliers to the gas turbine industry. The plasma-sprayed TBC system, composed of a low-pressure plasma-spray (LPPS) or an argon shrouded plasma-spray (ASPS) applied oxidation resistant NiCrAlY or (CoNiCrAlY) bond coating and an air-plasma-sprayed yttria partially stabilized zirconia insulative layer, is applied by both Chromalloy, Klock, and Union Carbide. The second type of TBS is applied by the electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process by Temescal. The second year of the program was focused on specimen procurement, TMC system characterization, nondestructive evaluation methods, life prediction model development, and TFE731 engine testing of thermal barrier coated blades. Materials testing is approaching completion. Thermomechanical characterization of the TBC systems, with toughness, and spalling strain tests, was completed. Thermochemical testing is approximately two-thirds complete. Preliminary materials life models for the bond coating oxidation and zirconia sintering failure modes were developed. Integration of these life models with airfoil component analysis methods is in progress. Testing of high pressure turbine blades coated with the program TBS systems is in progress in a TFE731 turbofan engine. Eddy current technology feasibility was established with respect to nondestructively measuring zirconia layer thickness of a TBC system.

  17. MNASA as a Test for Carbon Fiber Thermal Barrier Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Paul; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A carbon fiber rope thermal barrier is being evaluated as a replacement for the conventional room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) thermal barrier that is currently used to protect o-rings in Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle joints. Performance requirements include its ability to cool any incoming, hot propellant gases that fill and pressurize the nozzle joints, filter slag and particulates, and to perform adequately in various joint assembly conditions as well as dynamic flight motion. Modified National Aeronautics and Space Administration (MNASA) motors, with their inherent and unique ability to replicate select RSRM internal environment features, were an integral step in the development path leading to full scale RSRM static test demonstration of the carbon fiber rope (CFR) joint concept. These 1/4 scale RSRM motors serve to bridge the gap between the other classes of subscale test motors (extremely small and moderate duration, or small scale and short duration) and the critical asset RSRM static test motors. A series of MNASA tests have been used to demonstrate carbon fiber rope performance and have provided rationale for implementation into a full-scale static motor and flight qualification.

  18. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  19. Microcracks Characterization for Thermal Barrier Coatings at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, J. J.; Wu, W.; Lin, C. C.; Zeng, Y.; Wang, H.; Zheng, X. B.

    2013-08-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), used in gas turbine blades, are exposed to oxidation and thermal fatigue conditions. The characterization of TBCs was often performed in laboratory experiments, therefore, its detail failure mechanism is not quite obvious. For better understanding of the phenomenon, it is recommended to observe it under the condition simulating the real service conditions of gas turbines. In the present work, ZrO2 coatings were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), equipped with a heating system, was used to study the in situ microstructure change of TBCs at service temperature at which the aircraft is operated. The bond coat (BC) layer's thickening process and thermally grown oxide (TGO) generation along with the cracks growth are revealed. Moreover, the influence of the service temperature and holding time on the failure mechanism of TBCs is discussed. The crack healing produced during the coating re-melting reaction is observed, and it is the key factor to increase the thermal conductivity of the coating.

  20. Thermal Control Technologies for Complex Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal control is a generic need for all spacecraft. In response to ever more demanding science and exploration requirements, spacecraft are becoming ever more complex, and hence their thermal control systems must evolve. This paper briefly discusses the process of technology development, the state-of-the-art in thermal control, recent experiences with on-orbit two-phase systems, and the emerging thermal control technologies to meet these evolving needs. Some "lessons learned" based on experience with on-orbit systems are also presented.

  1. Thermal Radiation Effects Analyzed in Translucent Composite and Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic parts and coatings are needed to withstand high temperatures in advanced aircraft engines. In hot environments, such as in the combustion chambers of these engines, infrared and visible radiation can penetrate into some ceramics and heat them internally. The internal temperatures depend on radiative effects combined with heat conduction, and on convection and radiation at the material boundaries. Since engine temperatures are high, radiant emission can be large from within translucent parts and coatings, and this must be included in the analysis. Transient and steady-state behavior are both important. During a transient, radiant penetration provides more rapid internal heating than conduction alone, and the temperature distributions are usually considerably different than for steady-state conditions; this can produce transient thermal stresses. Analytical and numerical methods are being used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to predict transient temperatures and heat flows in translucent materials. A transient analysis was done for a composite of two translucent layers. The layer refractive indices were larger than 1, producing internal reflections at the boundaries and at the internal interface. In addition, steady-state results were computed for a two-layer composite with one layer opaque. The results were used to assess the importance of internal radiation in a zirconia thermal barrier coating on a cooled metal wall. Since the radiative transfer equations are rather complex, especially when internal scattering is included, approximate methods are being investigated that might be convenient for computer design programs. An approximate two-flux method was used and verified by comparisons with solutions that used exact radiative transfer relations. The two-flux equations include scattering without increasing solution difficulty.

  2. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  3. Failure of PVD/plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeria, V.; Andritschky, M.; Gruhn, H.; Mallener, W.; Buchkremer, H.; Stoever, D.

    1995-12-31

    ZrO{sub 2}7Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} plasma sprayed coatings (PS top coating) were applied on high temperature Ni-based alloys precoated by Physical Vapor Deposition with a thin, dense, stabilized zirconia coating (PVD bond coat). The PS coatings were applied by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (APS) and Inert gas Plasma Spraying (IPS at 2 bar) for different substrate temperatures. The thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were tested by furnace isothermal cycling and flame thermal cycling at maximum temperatures between 1,000 C and 1,150 C. The temperature gradients within the duplex PVD/PS thermal barrier coatings during the thermal cycling process were modeled using an unsteady heat transfer program. This modeling enables the authors to calculate the transient thermal strains and stresses which contribute to a better understanding of the failure mechanisms of the TBC during thermal cycling. They have also studied experimentally the adherence and failure modes of these coating systems during this high temperature testing. The TBC failure mechanism during thermal cycling is discussed in the light of coating transient stresses and substrate oxidation.

  4. Failure of physical vapor deposition/plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings during thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, V.; Andritschky, M.; Gruhn, H.; Malléner, W.; Buchkremer, H. P.; Stöver, D.

    2000-06-01

    ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 plasma-sprayed (PS) coatings were applied on high-temperature Ni-based alloys precoated by physical vapor deposition with a thin, dense, stabilized zirconia coating (PVD bond coat). The PS coatings were applied by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and inert gas plasma spraying (IPS) at 2 bar for different substrate temperatures. The thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were tested by furnace isothermal cycling and flame thermal cycling at maximum temperatures between 1000 and 1150 °C. The temperature gradients within the duplex PVD/PS thermal barrier coatings during the thermal cycling process were modeled using an unsteady heat transfer program. This modeling enables calculation of the transient thermal strains and stresses, which contributes to a better understanding of the failure mechanisms of the TBC during thermal cycling. The adherence and failure modes of these coating systems were experimentally studied during the high-temperature testing. The TBC failure mechanism during thermal cycling is discussed in light of coating transient stresses and substrate oxidation.

  5. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  6. Analytical investigation of thermal barrier coatings on advanced power generation gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical investigation of present and advanced gas turbine power generation cycles incorporating thermal barrier turbine component coatings was performed. Approximately 50 parametric points considering simple, recuperated, and combined cycles (including gasification) with gas turbine inlet temperatures from current levels through 1644K (2500 F) were evaluated. The results indicated that thermal barriers would be an attractive means to improve performance and reduce cost of electricity for these cycles. A recommended thermal barrier development program has been defined.

  7. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating. [protecting gas turbines and other engine parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates.

  8. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  9. Similarity tests of turbine vanes, effects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, H. J.

    1980-04-01

    The role of material thermal conductivity was analyzed for its effect on the thermal performance of air-cooled gas turbine components coated with a ceramic thermal barrier material when tested at reduced temperatures and pressures. It is shown that the thermal performance can be evaluated reliably at reduced gas and coolant conditions; however, thermal conductivity corrections are required for the data at reduced conditions. Corrections for a ceramic thermal barrier coated vane are significantly different than for an uncoated vane. Comparison of uncorrected test data, therefore, would show erroneously that the thermal barrier coating was ineffective. When thermal conductivity corrections are applied to the test data these data are then shown to be representative of engine data and also show that the thermal barrier coating increases the vane cooling effectiveness by 12.5 percent.

  10. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  11. Analytical investigation of thermal barrier coatings for advanced power generation combustion turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical evaluation was conducted to determine quantitatively the improvement potential in cycle efficiency and cost of electricity made possible by the introduction of thermal barrier coatings to power generation combustion turbine systems. The thermal barrier system, a metallic bond coat and yttria stabilized zirconia outer layer applied by plasma spray techniques, acts as a heat insulator to provide substantial metal temperature reductions below that of the exposed thermal barrier surface. The study results show the thermal barrier to be a potentially attractive means for improving performance and reducing cost of electricity for the simple, recuperated, and combined cycles evaluated.

  12. Thermal barrier coatings for gas-turbine engine applications.

    PubMed

    Padture, Nitin P; Gell, Maurice; Jordan, Eric H

    2002-04-12

    Hundreds of different types of coatings are used to protect a variety of structural engineering materials from corrosion, wear, and erosion, and to provide lubrication and thermal insulation. Of all these, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have the most complex structure and must operate in the most demanding high-temperature environment of aircraft and industrial gas-turbine engines. TBCs, which comprise metal and ceramic multilayers, insulate turbine and combustor engine components from the hot gas stream, and improve the durability and energy efficiency of these engines. Improvements in TBCs will require a better understanding of the complex changes in their structure and properties that occur under operating conditions that lead to their failure. The structure, properties, and failure mechanisms of TBCs are herein reviewed, together with a discussion of current limitations and future opportunities. PMID:11951028

  13. Waste Package Outer Barrier Stress Due to Thermal Expansion with Various Barrier Gap Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    M. M. Lewis

    2001-11-27

    The objective of this activity is to determine the tangential stresses of the outer shell, due to uneven thermal expansion of the inner and outer shells of the current waste package (WP) designs. Based on the results of the calculation ''Waste Package Barrier Stresses Due to Thermal Expansion'', CAL-EBS-ME-000008 (ref. 10), only tangential stresses are considered for this calculation. The tangential stresses are significantly larger than the radial stresses associated with thermal expansion, and at the WP outer surface the radial stresses are equal to zero. The scope of this activity is limited to determining the tangential stresses the waste package outer shell is subject to due to the interference fit, produced by having two different shell coefficients of thermal expansions. The inner shell has a greater coefficient of thermal expansion than the outer shell, producing a pressure between the two shells. This calculation is associated with Waste Package Project. The calculations are performed for the 21-PWR (pressurized water reactor), 44-BWR (boiling water reactor), 24-BWR, 12-PWR Long, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF - Short (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel), 2-MCO/2-DHLW (multi-canister overpack), and Naval SNF Long WP designs. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the types of WPs considered in this calculation. This calculation is performed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for SR (Ref.7). The calculation is documented, reviewed, and approved in accordance with AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref.1).

  14. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Jr., William S.; Pickering, J. Larry; Black, William E.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal barrier/core support for the fuel core of a nuclear reactor having a metallic cylinder secured to the reactor vessel liner and surrounded by fibrous insulation material. A top cap is secured to the upper end of the metallic cylinder that locates and orients a cover block and post seat. Under normal operating conditions, the metallic cylinder supports the entire load exerted by its associated fuel core post. Disposed within the metallic cylinder is a column of ceramic material, the height of which is less than that of the metallic cylinder, and thus is not normally load bearing. In the event of a temperature excursion beyond the design limits of the metallic cylinder and resulting in deformation of the cylinder, the ceramic column will abut the top cap to support the fuel core post.

  15. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  16. Thermal barrier coatings for aircraft engines: history and directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1997-03-01

    Thin thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for protecting aircraft turbine section airfoils are examined. The discussion focuses on those advances that led first to TBC use for component life extension and more re-cently as an integral part of airfoil design. Development has been driven by laboratory rig and furnace testing, corroborated by engine testing and engine field experience. The technology has also been sup-ported by performance modeling to demonstrate benefits and life modeling for mission analysis. Factors that have led to the selection of current state-of-the-art plasma-sprayed and physical-vapor-deposited zirconia-yttria/MCrAlX TBCs are emphasized, as are observations fundamentally related to their behav-ior. Current directions in research into TBCs and recent progress at NASA are also noted.

  17. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  18. Mechanical behavior of thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.; Phucharoen, W.; Chang, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will enable turbine components to operate at higher temperatures and lower cooling gas flow rates; thereby improving their efficiency. Future developments are limited by precise knowledge of the material properties and failure mechanisms of the coating system. Details of this nature are needed for realistic modeling of the coating system which will, in turn, promote advancements in coating technology. Complementary experiments and analytical modeling which were undertaken in order to define and measure the important failure processes for plasma-sprayed coatings are presented. The experimental portion includes two different tests which were developed to measure coating properties. These are termed tensile adhesion and acoustic emission tests. The analytical modeling section details a finite element method which was used to calculate the stress distribution in the coating system. Some preliminary results are presented.

  19. Deposition stress effects on thermal barrier coating burner rig life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  20. Thermal Barrier/Seal for Extreme Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Phelps, Jack; Bauer, Paul; Bond, Bruce; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors, as found on the Space Shuttle, are fabricated in segments for manufacturing considerations, bolted together, and sealed using conventional Viton O-ring seals. Similarly the nine large solid rocket motor nozzles are assembled from several different segments, bolted together, and sealed at six joint locations using conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases are generally kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic or rubber insulation. Joint-fill compounds, including RTV (room temperature vulcanized compound) and polysulfide filler, are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flow-path to the O-rings. Normally these two stages of protection are enough to prevent a direct flow-path of the 900-psi hot gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. However, in the current design 1 out of 15 Space Shuttle solid rocket motors experience hot gas effects on the Joint 6 wiper (sacrificial) O-rings. Also worrisome is the fact that joints have experienced heat effects on materials between the RTV and the O-rings, and in two cases O-rings have experienced heat effects. These conditions lead to extensive reviews of the post-flight conditions as part of the effort to monitor flight safety. We have developed a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier to replace the joint fill compounds in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzles to reduce the incoming 5500 F combustion gas temperature and permit only cool (approximately 100 F) gas to reach the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. Implementation of this thermal barrier provides more robust, consistent operation with shorter turn around times between Shuttle launches.

  1. Assessment of variations in thermal cycle life data of thermal barrier coated rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1981-01-01

    The reported study had the purpose to examine variations in cyclic life and in adhesive/cohesive coating strength. Possible effects of heating rate, stress reversal, temperature level, and ceramic deposition methods on coating life were also investigated. Life cycle data for 22 thermal barrier coated rods were examined and found to be statistically modeled by normal or log-normal distributions. The sample mean was 1330 cycles with a standard deviation of 520 cycles. Adhesive/cohesive pulloff strength data for 20 thermal barrier coated flat head piston specimens were taken. The average pulloff stress was 9 MPa with a standard deviation of 4.2 MPa. It was found that variations in heating rate can produce significant variations in the life cycle data.

  2. Algorithmic complexity of thermal ratchet motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J. R.; Family, F.; Arizmendi, C. M.

    1998-12-01

    Thermal ratchets are Brownian models where time-correlated fluctuations coming from a nonequilibrium bath interacting with a spatial asymmetry are sufficient conditions to give rise to transport. The nonequilibrium bath acts as a source of negentropy (physical information). In order to quantitate the transfer of information that occurs in thermal ratchet motion, the Kolmogorov information entropy or algorithmic complexity is investigated. The complexity is measured in terms of the average number of bits per time unit necessary to specify the sequence generated by the system.

  3. Ultrafast thermal plasma physical vapor deposition of yttria-stabilized zirconia for novel thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Heji; Eguchi, Keisuke; Kambara, Makoto; Yoshida, Toyonobu

    2006-03-01

    This research aims to develop advanced thermal plasma spraying technology for the next-generation thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with a high power hybrid plasma spraying system. By using thermal plasma physical vapor deposition (TP-PVD), various functional structured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were deposited. Parameters, such as powder feeding rate, hydrogen gas concentration, and total mass flow rate of the plasma gas, were optimized, and their influences on the evaporation of YSZ powder were investigated. Ultrafast deposition of a thick coating was achieved at a rate of over 150 μm/min. The deposited porous coating has a low thermal conductivity of 0.7W/mK and the dense coating with interlaced t' domains possesses a high nanohardness of 27.85 GPa and a high reflectance. These characteristics show that the TP-PVD technique is a very valuable process for manufacturing novel TBCs.

  4. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In this paper, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in a ZrO2-8wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating, under simulated engine thermal LCF and HCF conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. Experiments showed that the combined LCF-HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. Lateral crack branching and the ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations were also facilitated by HCF thermal loads, even in the absence of severe interfacial oxidation. Fatigue damage at crack wake surfaces, due to such phenomena as asperity/debris contact induced cracking and splat pull-out bending during cycling, was observed especially for the combined LCF-HCF tests. It is found that the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. The failure associated with HCF process, however, is mainly associated with a surface wedging mechanism. The interaction between the LCF, HCF and ceramic coating creep, and the relative importance of LCF and HCF in crack propagation are also discussed based on the experimental evidence.

  5. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In this paper, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in a ZrO2-8wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating, under simulated engine thermal LCF and HCF conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. Experiments showed that the combined LCF/HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. Lateral crack branching and the ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations were also facilitated by HCF thermal loads, even in the absence of severe interfacial oxidation. Fatigue damages at crack wake surfaces, due to such phenomena as asperity/debris contact induced cracking and splat pull-out bending during cycling, were observed especially for the combined LCF/HCF tests. It is found that the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. The failure associated with HCF process, however, is mainly associated with a surface wedging mechanism. The interaction between the LCF, HCF and ceramic coating creep, and the relative importance of LCF and HCF in crack propagation are also discussed based on the experimental evidence.

  6. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  7. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  8. Oxidation and degradation of thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, James Allen

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which consist of an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating overlaid with a thermally-insulating Ysb2Osb3-stabilized ZrOsb2 (YSZ) top coating, are used to protect superalloy hardware in gas turbine engines. Spallation of the YSZ is accelerated by growth of an interfacial Alsb2Osb3 scale at high temperatures. The mechanisms of oxidation-related degradation are not well understood for air plasma-sprayed (APS) TBCs, whereas Alsb2Osb3 thermomechanical failure is the dominant degradation mode in electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) TBCs. This work investigated the isothermal oxidation and thermocyclic degradation of various TBC systems; with particular emphasis on the growth kinetics, microstructures, flaw content, fracture behavior and micro-mechanical properties of the Alsb2Osb3 interfacial scales. The isothermal oxidation kinetics of plasma-sprayed NiCrAlY were not influenced by the presence of an APS YSZ top coating (at 1150sp°C). However, the isothermal oxidation rate constants of NiCoCrAlY bond coatings were accelerated by a factor of 2 (at 950, 1050 and 1150sp°C) when overlaid with a commercial EB-PVD TBC. Thermocyclic failure of APS TBCs occurred by progressive YSZ fracture and crack link-up. Severe fracture and buckling of the interfacial Alsb2Osb3 during thermal cycling did not induce rapid failure of APS TBCs. Evaluation of the interfacial Alsb2Osb3 scale microstructures (on APS TBCs) after thermal cycling revealed the following: thermocyclic damage occurred by both oxide-metal delamination and by internal fracture; Alsb2Osb3 scale crack healing by sintering occurred at 1150sp°C; surfaces with a sharp radius of curvature induced less Alsb2Osb3 damage than gradually convex surfaces; scale grain boundary void growth was accelerated by thermal cycling; and higher void contents were observed in scales which formed on convex surfaces. There were no significant changes in the hardness or Young's modulus of the Alsb2

  9. Thermal barrier coating life-prediction model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, T. E.; Neumann, J.

    1985-01-01

    Life predictions are made for two types of strain-tolerant and oxidation-resistant Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) systems produced by commercial coating suppliers to the gas turbine industry. The plasma-sprayed TBC system, composed of a low-pressure plasma spray (LPPS) applied oxidation-resistant NiCrAlY bond coating and an air-plasma-sprayed yttria (8 percent) partially stabilized zirconia insulative layer, is applied by both Chromalloy and Klock. The second type of TBC is applied by the electron-beam/physical vapor deposition process by Temescal. Thermomechanical and thermochemical testing of the program TBCs is in progress. A number of the former tests has been completed. Fracture mechanics data for the Chromalloy plasma-sprayed TBC system indicate that the cohesive toughness of the zirconia layer is increased by thermal cycling and reduced by high temperature exposure at 1150 C. Eddy current technology feasibility has been established with respect to nondestructively measuring zirconia layer thickness of a TBC system. High pressure turbine blades have been coated with program TBC systems for a piggyback test in a TFE731-5 turbofan factory engine test. Data from this test will be used to validate the TBC life models.

  10. Degradation of thermal barrier coated superalloy component during service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han-Sang; Kim, Doo-Soo; Jung, Jine-sung; Yoo, Keun-Bong

    2009-07-01

    The time dependent degradation of first-stage blades for gas turbine was investigated. First, Two used blades were prepared from the operating facilities, and their operating hours were 25,000 and 52,000 hrs, respectively. Microstructural comparison of coating surfaces showed that exposure to the environment increased thickness of TGO (Thermally Grown Oxide) and β depletion region, and then debonding and spallation of TBC (Thermal Barrier Coating) occurred finally. In the case of substrate, Ni-based superalloy, the shape and size of γ' were changed with increasing operating time. Especially, in the leading and trailing edges of blades, the size of γ' was bigger and the shape was more elliptic than other region. It can be thought that the leading and trailing edges of blades can be the starting point of degradation in first-stage blades. Second, TBC failed blade used for 22,000 hrs was prepared and compared with other two blades. Large interfacial cracks were formed between top and bond coat, and TGO was not uniform and continuous. The chemical composition analysis on bond coat showed that low chromium content is responsible for the formation not only of Al oxide but also of Co, Cr, Ni oxides.

  11. MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Mathur

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

  12. A software tool to design thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrus, Gregory; Ferguson, B. Lynn

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes work completed for a NASA Phase 1 SBIR program which demonstrated the feasibility of developing a software tool to aid in the design of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. Toward this goal, three tasks were undertaken and completed. Task 1 involved the development of a database containing the pertinent thermal and mechanical property data for the top coat, bond coat and substrate materials that comprise a TBC system. Task 2 involved the development of an automated set-up program for generating two dimensional (2D) finite element models of TBC systems. Most importantly, task 3 involved the generation of a rule base to aid in the design of a TBC system. These rules were based on a factorial design of experiments involving FEM results and were generated using a Yates analysis. A previous study had indicated the suitability and benefit of applying finite element analysis to perform computer based experiments to decrease but not eliminate physical experiments on TBC's. This program proved feasibility by expanding on these findings by developing a larger knowledgebase and developing a procedure to extract rules to aid in TBC design.

  13. A software tool to design thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrus, G.; Ferguson, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes work completed for a NASA Phase 1 SBIR program which demonstrated the feasibility of developing a software tool to aid in the design of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. Toward this goal, three tasks were undertaken and completed. Task 1 involved the development of a database containing the pertinent thermal and mechanical property data for the top coat, bond coat and substrate materials that comprise a TBC system. Task 2 involved the development of an automated set-up program for generating two dimensional (2D) finite element models of TBC systems. Most importantly, Task 3 involved the generation of a rule base to aid in the design of a TBC system. These rules were based on a factorial design of experiments involving FEM results, and were generated using a Yates analysis. A previous study has indicated the suitability and benefit of applying finite element analysis to perform computer based experiments to decrease but not eliminate physical experiments on TBC's. This program proved feasibility by expanding on these findings by developing a larger knowledge base and developing a procedure to extract rules to aid in TBC design.

  14. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi, Jeanine T.; Ortiz, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this program was to establish a methodology to predict thermal barrier coating (TBC) life on gas turbine engine components. The approach involved experimental life measurement coupled with analytical modeling of relevant degradation modes. Evaluation of experimental and flight service components indicate the predominant failure mode to be thermomechanical spallation of the ceramic coating layer resulting from propagation of a dominant near interface crack. Examination of fractionally exposed specimens indicated that dominant crack formation results from progressive structural damage in the form of subcritical microcrack link-up. Tests conducted to isolate important life drivers have shown MCrAlY oxidation to significantly affect the rate of damage accumulation. Mechanical property testing has shown the plasma deposited ceramic to exhibit a non-linear stress-strain response, creep and fatigue. The fatigue based life prediction model developed accounts for the unusual ceramic behavior and also incorporates an experimentally determined oxide rate model. The model predicts the growth of this oxide scale to influence the intensity of the mechanic driving force, resulting from cyclic strains and stresses caused by thermally induced and externally imposed mechanical loads.

  15. Feasibility Assessment of Thermal Barrier Seals for Extreme Transient Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The assembly joints of modem solid rocket motor cases are generally sealed using conventional O-ring type seals. The 5500+ F combustion gases produced by rocket motors are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic insulation. Special compounds are used to fill insulation gaps leading up to the seals to prevent a direct flowpath to them. Design criteria require that the seals should not experience torching or charring during operation, or their sealing ability would be compromised. On limited occasions, NASA has observed charring of the primary O-rings of the Space Shuttle solid rocket nozzle assembly joints due to parasitic leakage paths opening up in the gap-fill compounds during rocket operation. NASA is investigating different approaches for preventing torching or charring of the primary O-rings. One approach is to implement a braided rope seal upstream of the primary O-ring to serve as a thermal barrier that prevents the hot gases from impinging on the O-ring seals. This paper presents flow, resiliency, and thermal resistance for several types of NASA rope seals braided out of carbon fibers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the seals when exposed to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Rope seals braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over six minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Room and high temperature flow tests are presented for the carbon seals for different amounts of linear compression. Room temperature compression tests were performed to assess seal resiliency and unit preloads as a function of compression. The thermal barrier seal was tested in a subscale "char" motor test in which the seal sealed an intentional defect in the gap insulation. Temperature measurements indicated that the seal blocked 2500 F combustion gases on the upstream side with very little temperature

  16. Relation of thermal conductivity with process induced anisotropic void system in EB-PVD PYSZ thermal barrier coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Renteria, A. F.; Saruhan, B.; Ilavsky, J.; German Aerospace Center

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by Electron-beam physical deposition (EB-PVD) protect the turbine blades situated at the high pressure sector of the aircraft and stationary turbines. It is an important task to uphold low thermal conductivity in TBCs during long-term service at elevated temperatures. One of the most promising methods to fulfil this task is to optimize the properties of PYSZ-based ,TBC by tailoring its microstructure. Thermal conductivity of the EB-PVD produced PYSZ TBCs is influenced mainly by the size, shape, orientation and volume of the various types of porosity present in the coatings. These pores can be classified as open (inter-columnar and between feather arms gaps) and closed (intra-columnar pores). Since such pores are located within the three-dimensionally deposited columns and enclose large differences in their sizes, shapes, distribution and anisotropy, the accessibility for their characterization is very complex and requires the use of sophisticated methods. In this work, three different EB-PVD TBC microstructures were manufactured by varying the process parameters, yielding various characteristics of their pores. The corresponding thermal conductivities in as-coated state and after ageing at 1100C/1h and 100h were measured via Laser Flash Analysis Method (LFA). The pore characteristics and their individual effect on the thermal conductivity are analysed by USAXS which is supported by subsequent modelling and LFA methods, respectively. Evident differences in the thermal conductivity values of each microstructure were found in as-coated and aged conditions. In summary, broader columns introduce higher values in thermal conductivity. In general, thermal conductivity increases after ageing for all three investigated microstructures, although those with initial smaller pore surface area show smaller changes.

  17. Relation of Thermal Conductivity with Process Induced Anisotropic Void Systems in EB-PVD PYSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Renteria, A. Flores; Saruhan-Brings, B.; Ilavsky, J.

    2008-03-03

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by Electron-beam physical deposition (EB-PVD) protect the turbine blades situated at the high pressure sector of the aircraft and stationary turbines. It is an important task to uphold low thermal conductivity in TBCs during long-term service at elevated temperatures. One of the most promising methods to fulfil this task is to optimize the properties of PYSZ-based TBC by tailoring its microstructure. Thermal conductivity of the EB-PVD produced PYSZ TBCs is influenced mainly by the size, shape, orientation and volume of the various types of porosity present in the coatings. These pores can be classified as open (inter-columnar and between feather arms gaps) and closed (intra-columnar pores). Since such pores are located within the three-dimensionally deposited columns and enclose large differences in their sizes, shapes, distribution and anisotropy, the accessibility for their characterization is very complex and requires the use of sophisticated methods. In this work, three different EB-PVD TBC microstructures were manufactured by varying the process parameters, yielding various characteristics of their pores. The corresponding thermal conductivities in as-coated state and after ageing at 11000C/1h and 100h were measured via Laser Flash Analysis Method (LFA). The pore characteristics and their individual effect on the thermal conductivity are analysed by USAXS which is supported by subsequent modelling and LFA methods, respectively. Evident differences in the thermal conductivity values of each microstructure were found in as-coated and aged conditions. In summary, broader columns introduce higher values in thermal conductivity. In general, thermal conductivity increases after ageing for all three investigated microstructures, although those with initial smaller pore surface area show smaller changes.

  18. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  19. Multiple surface fracture of ceramic thermal barrier coatings under transient thermal loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yoshimi Ruth

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the thermal fracture process in multi-layer ceramic coatings subjected to concentrated thermal loads. This was accomplished by investigating the crack initiation and propagation process using experimental and analytical means. Controlled experiments were developed where specimens were heated and cooled under a concentrated thermal load. The appearance of multiple surface cracks was observed as damage progressed. In some cases crack deflection along the interface was also observed. These cracks were modeled and studied analytically mainly by numerical methods. The analysis showed that the presence of multiple surface cracks was beneficial in preventing the initiation of interface cracks; thus, delaying spalling. Three methods of maximizing coating life were considered, including, minimization of the peak stresses, the minimization of strain energy release rate, and the maximization of surface crack formation. The models were then used to conduct a parametric study that investigated the effects of geometry and material properties on the thermal fracture characteristics of the multi-layer coatings. One application of this research is ceramic thermal barrier coatings which are used in diesel engines to provide thermal protection for the metal parts. A better understanding of the fracture process would provide designers with the necessary tools to develop a coating with a longer life. The research results could also be applied to other multi-layer material system subjected to thermal loads.

  20. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  1. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Sheffler, Keith D.; Nissley, David M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to generate a life prediction model for electron-beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) zirconia thermal barrier coating (TBC) on gas turbine engine components. Specific activities involved in development of the EB-PVD life prediction model included measurement of EB-PVD ceramic physical and mechanical properties and adherence strength, measurement of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth kinetics, generation of quantitative cyclic thermal spallation life data, and development of a spallation life prediction model. Life data useful for model development was obtained by exposing instrumented, EB-PVD ceramic coated cylindrical specimens in a jet fueled burner rig. Monotonic compression and tensile mechanical tests and physical property tests were conducted to obtain the EB-PVD ceramic behavior required for burner rig specimen analysis. As part of that effort, a nonlinear constitutive model was developed for the EB-PVD ceramic. Spallation failure of the EB-PVD TBC system consistently occurred at the TGO-metal interface. Calculated out-of-plane stresses were a small fraction of that required to statically fail the TGO. Thus, EB-PVD spallation was attributed to the interfacial cracking caused by in-plane TGO strains. Since TGO mechanical properties were not measured in this program, calculation of the burner rig specimen TGO in-plane strains was performed by using alumina properties. A life model based on maximum in-plane TGO tensile mechanical strain and TGO thickness correlated the burner rig specimen EB-PVD ceramic spallation lives within a factor of about plus or minus 2X.

  2. Thermal Properties of Oxides With Magnetoplumbite Structure for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Oxides having magnetoplumbite structure are promising candidate materials for applications as high temperature thermal barrier coatings because of their high thermal stability, high thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity. In this study, powders of LaMgAl11O19, GdMgAl11O19, SmMgAl11O19, and Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxides were synthesized by citric acid sol-gel method and hot pressed into disk specimens. The thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) of these oxide materials were measured from room temperature to 1500 C. The average CTE value was found to be approx.9.6x10(exp -6)/C. Thermal conductivity of these magnetoplumbite-based oxide materials was also evaluated using steady-state laser heat flux test method. The effects of doping on thermal properties were also examined. Thermal conductivity of the doped Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 composition was found to be lower than that of the undoped GdMgAl11O19. In contrast, thermal expansion coefficient was found to be independent of the oxide composition and appears to be controlled by the magnetoplumbite crystal structure. Thermal conductivity testing of LaMgAl11O19 and LaMnAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxide coatings plasma sprayed on NiCrAlY/Rene N5 superalloy substrates indicated resistance of these coatings to sintering even at temperatures as high as 1600 C.

  3. Development of non-destructive inspection method for the performance of thermal barrier coating.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, M; Takahashi, T

    2001-05-01

    This paper shows that our proprietary non-destructive inspection method can be used to effectively measure the thermal barrier performance of the thermal barrier coating used to coat gas turbine hot parts by the results of numerical analysis and laboratory experiments. PMID:11460665

  4. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  5. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivathsa, B.; Das, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  6. Failure Mechanisms and Life Prediction of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings under Thermal Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zju, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) will play an increasingly important role in gas turbine engines because of their ability to further raise engine temperatures. However, the issue of coating durability is of major concern under high-heat-flux conditions. In particular, the accelerated coating delamination crack growth under the engine high heat-flux conditions is not well understood. In this paper, a laser heat flux technique is used to investigate the coating delamination crack propagation under realistic temperature-stress gradients and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating delamination mechanisms are investigated under various thermal loading conditions, and are correlated with coating dynamic fatigue, sintering and interfacial adhesion test results. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the crack initiation and propagation driving forces for coating failure under high-heat-flux test conditions.

  7. Sintering Characteristics of Multilayered Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Gradient and Isothermal High Temperature Annealing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Amarendra K.; Schmitt, Michael P.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides have most of the relevant attributes for use as next generation thermal barrier coatings such as phase stability, low sintering kinetics and low thermal conductivity. One of the issues with the pyrochlore oxides is their lower toughness and therefore higher erosion rate compared to the current state-of-the-art TBC material, yttria (6 to 8 wt%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In this work, sintering characteristics were investigated for novel multilayered coating consisted of alternating layers of pyrochlore oxide viz Gd2Zr2O7 and t' low k (rare earth oxide doped YSZ). Thermal gradient and isothermal high temperature (1316 C) annealing conditions were used to investigate sintering and cracking in these coatings. The results are then compared with that of relevant monolayered coatings and a baseline YSZ coating.

  8. Analysis of Thermal Radiation Effects on Temperatures in Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are important, and in some instances a necessity, for high temperature applications such as combustor liners, and turbine vanes and rotating blades for current and advanced turbine engines. Some of the insulating materials used for coatings, such as zirconia that currently has widespread use, are partially transparent to thermal radiation. A translucent coating permits energy to be transported internally by radiation, thereby increasing the total energy transfer and acting like an increase in thermal conductivity. This degrades the insulating ability of the coating. Because of the strong dependence of radiant emission on temperature, internal radiative transfer effects are increased as temperatures are raised. Hence evaluating the significance of internal radiation is of importance as temperatures are increased to obtain higher efficiencies in advanced engines.

  9. Two-layer thermal barrier coating for turbine airfoils - furnace and burner rig test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, two-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system was developed which has the potential for protecting high temperature air-cooled gas turbine components. Of those coatings initially examined, the most promising system consisted of a Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.6Y (in wt%) thermal barrier coating (about 0.005 to 0.010 cm thick) and a ZrO2-12Y2O3 (in wt%) thermal barrier coating (about 0.025 to 0.064 cm thick). This thermal barrier substantially lowered the metal temperature of an air-cooled airfoil. The coating withstood 3,200 cycles (80 sec at 1,280 C surface temperature) and 275 cycles (1 hr at 1,490 C surface temperature) without cracking or spalling. No separation of the thermal barrier from the bond coating or the bond coating from the substrate was observed.

  10. Effect of Bond Coat Materials on Thermal Fatigue Failure of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Satoshi; Okazaki, Masakazu; Sakaguchi, Motoki; Matsubara, Hideaki

    Effect of MCrAlY bond coat alloy systems on thermal fatigue failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was investigated, where the TBC specimen consisted of Ni-based superalloy IN738LC substrate, bond coat, and 8 wt.% Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) top coat. The top coat was fabricated by EB-PVD method with 250 μm in thickness. Three kinds of MCrAlY alloys were studied as the bond coat material. Employing the originally developed test equipment, thermal fatigue tests were carried out, by applying thermal cycles between 400 and 950°C in air. Special attention was paid not only to the failure life of the TBC specimen, but also the underlying failure mechanisms. The experimental results clearly demonstrated that the effect of MCrAlY bond coat alloys on the thermal fatigue life was very significant. Some discussions were made on the experimental results based on the measurements of mechanical and metallurgical properties of the bond coat alloys: i.e., elastic stiffness, thermal expansion coefficient and high temperature oxidation resistance.