Science.gov

Sample records for complexes electronic resource

  1. Electronic Resource Management and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Kimberly R.

    2015-01-01

    We have now reached a tipping point at which electronic resources comprise more than half of academic library budgets. Because of the increasing work associated with the ever-increasing number of e-resources, there is a trend to distribute work throughout the library even in the presence of an electronic resources department. In 2013, the author…

  2. Electronic Resources: Implications for Collection Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Genevieve S., Ed.

    This book shows librarians the strengths and weaknesses of electronic resources and the implications these resources have on collection management. It helps librarians incorporate electronic resources into their collections. The book examines the history of electronic resources in document collections and analyzes the gains and losses libraries…

  3. Electronic Resources: A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Bradley L.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the impact of electronic technology on libraries and scholarship. Focuses on some of the challenges of using electronic resources in research libraries, which include cost of acquiring electronic formats and the effect such expenditures have on other library services and collection development practices. Explores how electronic resources…

  4. Implementing CORAL: An Electronic Resource Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A 2010 electronic resource management survey conducted by Maria Collins of North Carolina State University and Jill E. Grogg of University of Alabama Libraries found that the top six electronic resources management priorities included workflow management, communications management, license management, statistics management, administrative…

  5. Electronic Resource Management Systems in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogg, Jill E.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic resource management (ERM) systems have inundated the library marketplace. Both integrated library systems (ILS) vendors and subscription agents are now offering products and service enhancements that claim to help libraries efficiently manage their electronic resources. Additionally, some homegrown and open-source solutions have emerged…

  6. Major Electronic Resources for World History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Linda K.

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that when students are researching for papers using electronic resources, the best place for them to start is at websites developed by universities in order to guarantee that the information is reliable. Offers a site that enables students to evaluate the legitimacy of websites and provides three reputable world history websites. (CMK)

  7. Electronic Resources: Selection and Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattie, Ling-yuh W., Ed.; Cox, Bonnie Jean, Ed.

    This book is a baseline guide for professionals and library school students on issues that concern the selection and bibliographic control of electronic resources, from both conceptual and pragmatic standpoints. The book includes the following articles: (1) "Foreward" (Lois Mai Chan); (2) "Introduction" (Ling-yuh W. (Miko) Pattie and Bonnie Jean…

  8. Reviewing the Electronic Resources & Libraries Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    The third Electronic Resources & Libraries (ER&L) conference gathered at Georgia Institute of Technology's Global Learning and Conference Center in Atlanta, Georgia, March 18-21, 2008. Over 360 attendees, from six countries and from 80% of the United States, represented their libraries and organizations resulting in a diverse and informative…

  9. Herding Cats: Options for Organizing Electronic Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vellucci, Sherry L.

    1996-01-01

    Examines strengths and weaknesses of organizational systems developed to organize and access electronic resources available via the Internet. Highlights include library online catalogs; cataloging rules and MARC records; text encoding initiative (TEI) headers; the Internet union catalog; browsing lists; robot-generated indexes; a core data set of…

  10. Resource Letter CS-1: Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.

    2011-08-01

    A complex system is a system composed of many interacting parts, often called agents, which displays collective behavior that does not follow trivially from the behaviors of the individual parts. Examples include condensed-matter systems, ecosystems, stock markets and economies, biological evolution, and indeed the whole of human society. Substantial progress has been made in the quantitative understanding of complex systems, particularly since the 1980s, using a combination of basic theory, much of it derived from physics, and computer simulation. The subject is a broad one, drawing on techniques and ideas from a wide range of areas. Here, I give a selection of introductory resources, ranging from classic papers to recent books and reviews.

  11. Making sense of the electronic resource marketplace: trends in health-related electronic resources.

    PubMed Central

    Blansit, B D; Connor, E

    1999-01-01

    Changes in the practice of medicine and technological developments offer librarians unprecedented opportunities to select and organize electronic resources, use the Web to deliver content throughout the organization, and improve knowledge at the point of need. The confusing array of available products, access routes, and pricing plans makes it difficult to anticipate the needs of users, identify the top resources, budget effectively, make sound collection management decisions, and organize the resources effectively and seamlessly. The electronic resource marketplace requires much vigilance, considerable patience, and continuous evaluation. There are several strategies that librarians can employ to stay ahead of the electronic resource curve, including taking advantage of free trials from publishers; marketing free trials and involving users in evaluating new products; watching and testing products marketed to the clientele; agreeing to beta test new products and services; working with aggregators or republishers; joining vendor advisory boards; benchmarking institutional resources against five to eight competitors; and forming or joining a consortium for group negotiating and purchasing. This article provides a brief snapshot of leading biomedical resources; showcases several libraries that have excelled in identifying, acquiring, and organizing electronic resources; and discusses strategies and trends of potential interest to biomedical librarians, especially those working in hospital settings. PMID:10427421

  12. Making sense of the electronic resource marketplace: trends in health-related electronic resources.

    PubMed

    Blansit, B D; Connor, E

    1999-07-01

    Changes in the practice of medicine and technological developments offer librarians unprecedented opportunities to select and organize electronic resources, use the Web to deliver content throughout the organization, and improve knowledge at the point of need. The confusing array of available products, access routes, and pricing plans makes it difficult to anticipate the needs of users, identify the top resources, budget effectively, make sound collection management decisions, and organize the resources effectively and seamlessly. The electronic resource marketplace requires much vigilance, considerable patience, and continuous evaluation. There are several strategies that librarians can employ to stay ahead of the electronic resource curve, including taking advantage of free trials from publishers; marketing free trials and involving users in evaluating new products; watching and testing products marketed to the clientele; agreeing to beta test new products and services; working with aggregators or republishers; joining vendor advisory boards; benchmarking institutional resources against five to eight competitors; and forming or joining a consortium for group negotiating and purchasing. This article provides a brief snapshot of leading biomedical resources; showcases several libraries that have excelled in identifying, acquiring, and organizing electronic resources; and discusses strategies and trends of potential interest to biomedical librarians, especially those working in hospital settings. PMID:10427421

  13. Complex Moving Parts: Assessment Systems and Electronic Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Martha J.; Robertson, Royce L.

    2013-01-01

    The largest college within an online university of over 50,000 students invested significant resources in translating a complex assessment system focused on continuous improvement and national accreditation into an effective and efficient electronic portfolio (ePortfolio). The team building the system needed a model to address problems met…

  14. Checklist Manifesto for Electronic Resources: Getting Ready for the Fiscal Year and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore; Fu, Li; Miller, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Organization of electronic resources workflow is critical in the increasingly complicated and complex world of library management. A simple organizational tool that can be readily applied to electronic resources management (ERM) is the use of checklists. Based on the principles discussed in The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right, the…

  15. From Tedious to Timely: Screencasting to Troubleshoot Electronic Resource Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Thompson, Carole

    2010-01-01

    The shift from traditional print materials to electronic resources, in conjunction with the rise in the number of distance education programs, has left many electronic resource librarians scrambling to keep up with the resulting inundation of electronic resource problems. When it comes to diagnosing these problems, words do not always convey all…

  16. Electronic properties of complex nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen

    Nanostructured materials have brought an unprecedented opportunity for advancement in many fields of human endeavor and in applications. Nanostructures are a new research field which may revolutionize people's everyday life. In the Thesis, I have used theoretical methods including density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamic simulations (MD) and tight-binding methods to explore the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of various nanomaterials. In all this, I also paid attention to potential applications of these findings. First, I will briefly introduce the scientific background of this Thesis, including the motivation for the study of a boron enriched aluminum surface, novel carbon foam structures and my research interest in 2D electronics. Then I will review the computational techniques I used in the study, mostly DFT methods. In Chapter 3, I introduce an effective way to enhance surface hardness of aluminum by boron nanoparticle implantation. Using boron dimers to represent the nanoparticles, the process of boron implantation is modeled in a molecular dynamics simulation of bombarding the aluminum surface by energetic B 2 molecules. Possible metastable structures of boron-coated aluminum surface are identified. Within these structures, I find that boron atoms prefer to stay in the subsurface region of aluminum. By modeling the Rockwell indentation process, boron enriched aluminum surface is found to be harder than the pristine aluminum surface by at least 15%. In Chapter 4, I discuss novel carbon structures, including 3D carbon foam and related 2D slab structures. Carbon foam contains both sp 2 and sp3 hybridized carbon atoms. It forms a 3D honeycomb lattice with a comparable stability to fullerenes, suggesting possible existence of such carbon foam structures. Although the bulk 3D foam structure is semiconducting, an sp2 terminated carbon surface could maintain a conducting channel even when passivated by hydrogen. To promote the experimental

  17. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  18. "Have I Learnt It?" Evaluating Skills for Resource-based Study Using Electronic Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Janet; Heap, Nick; Mason, Robin

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of electronic information resources and information literacy in higher education focuses on the information handling skills students need and the factors influencing their acquisition in two networked resource-based courses at the United Kingdom Open University. Offers guidelines for course designers incorporating electronic resources.…

  19. Development of Electronic Resources across Networks in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratchatavorn, Phandao

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the development of electronic resources across library networks in Thailand to meet user needs, particularly electronic journals. Topics include concerns about journal access; limited budgets for library acquisitions of journals; and sharing resources through a centralized database system that allows Web access to journals via Internet…

  20. Using Electronic Resources to Support Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chen-Chi; Jong, Ay; Huang, Fu-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Students acquire skills in problem solving and critical thinking through the process as well as team work on problem-based learning courses. Many courses have started to involve the online learning environment and integrate these courses with electronic resources. Teachers use electronic resources in their classes. To overcome the problem of the…

  1. What Faculty Think: A Survey on Electronic Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Millie

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, ebrary surveyed 906 faculty from around the world, asking them how they used electronic resources. This article, focusing on the responses of faculty to a few survey questions, finds some expected and surprising attitudes that faculty have about electronic resources for their own and students' research. (Contains 2 notes.)

  2. The Role of the Acquisitions Librarian in Electronic Resources Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerantz, Sarah B.

    2010-01-01

    With the ongoing shift to electronic formats for library resources, acquisitions librarians, like the rest of the profession, must adapt to the rapidly changing landscape of electronic resources by keeping up with trends and mastering new skills related to digital publishing, technology, and licensing. The author sought to know what roles…

  3. Functional complexity in correlated electron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, A. R.

    2002-05-01

    We outline several themes which have now emerged in both organic and inorganic correlated electronic materials: the prevalence of intrinsic complexity realized in the coexistence or competition among broken-symmetry ground states; the origin of landscapes in coupled spin, charge and lattice (orbital) degrees-of-freedom; the importance of co-existing short- and long-range forces; and the importance of multiscale complexity for key material properties, including hierarchies of functional, connected scales, coupled intrinsic inhomogeneities in spin, charge and lattice, consequent intrinsic multiple timescales, and the importance of multifunctional “electro-elastic” materials.

  4. Complexity in Strongly Correlated Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dagotto, Elbio R

    2005-01-01

    A wide variety of experimental results and theoretical investigations in recent years have convincingly demonstrated that several transition metal oxides and other materials have dominant states that are not spatially homogeneous. This occurs in cases in which several physical interactions - spin, charge, lattice, and/or orbital - are simultaneously active. This phenomenon causes interesting effects, such as colossal magnetoresistance, and it also appears crucial to understand the high-temperature superconductors. The spontaneous emergence of electronic nanometer-scale structures in transition metal oxides, and the existence of many competing states, are properties often associated with complex matter where nonlinearities dominate, such as soft materials and biological systems. This electronic complexity could have potential consequences for applications of correlated electronic materials, because not only charge (semiconducting electronic), or charge and spin (spintronics) are of relevance, but in addition the lattice and orbital degrees of freedom are active, leading to giant responses to small perturbations. Moreover, several metallic and insulating phases compete, increasing the potential for novel behavior.

  5. Electronic resources preferred by pediatric hospitalists for clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Tieder, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is little research on pediatric hospitalists' use of evidence-based resources. The aim of this study was to determine the electronic resources that pediatric hospitalists prefer. Methods Using a web-based survey, the authors determined hospitalists' preferred electronic resources, as well as their attitudes toward lifelong learning, practice, and experience characteristics. Results One hundred sixteen hospitalists completed the survey. The most preferred resource for general information, patient handouts, and treatment was UpToDate. Online search engines were ranked second for general information and patient handouts. Conclusions Pediatric hospitalists tend to utilize less rigorous electronic resources such as UpToDate and Google. These results can set a platform for discussing the quality of resources that pediatric hospitalists use. PMID:26512215

  6. Electronic Media: A Motif for Shared Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, Stanley L.; Johnson, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of trade and industrial education supervisors from 10 states determined the degree of use of electronic education methods. Instructors in these states used presentation software and web-based exercises most often; fewer used video, CD-ROM, and distance technologies; 70% had been taught electronic presentation methods in preservice or…

  7. Improving Electronic Resources through Holistic Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusik, James P.; Vargas, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    To establish a more direct link between its collections and the educational goals of Saint Xavier University, the Byrne Memorial Library has adopted a "holistic" approach to collection development. This article examines how traditional budget practices influenced the library's selection of resources and describes how holistic collection…

  8. Integrating Electronic Resources into the Library Catalog: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Gail; Aldana, Lynda

    2001-01-01

    Describes a project at the University of Mississippi Libraries to catalog purchased electronic resources so that access to these resources is available only via the Web-based library catalog. Discusses collaboration between cataloging and systems personnel; and describes the MARC catalog record field that contains the information needed to locate…

  9. Using XML technologies to organize electronic reference resources.

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Rocha, Roberto A

    2005-01-01

    Provision of access to reference electronic resources to clinicians is becoming increasingly important. We have created a framework for librarians to manage access to these resources at an enterprise level, rather than at the individual hospital libraries. We describe initial project requirements, implementation details, and some preliminary results. PMID:16779278

  10. Integrating Print and Electronic Resources: Joyner Library's "Pirate Source"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nall, Clark; Lewis, Janice Steed

    2005-01-01

    Valuable information in print is often neglected because of the rapid proliferation of electronic resources and the bias of many library users against print sources. At Joyner Library, it was decided to construct an interactive subject guide database that included resources in all formats to offer users a convenient starting point for research and…

  11. Interweaving Knowledge Resources to Address Complex Environmental Health Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Beth Ellen; Suk, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex problems do not respect academic disciplinary boundaries. Environmental health research is complex and often moves beyond these boundaries, integrating diverse knowledge resources to solve such challenges. Here we describe an evolving paradigm for interweaving approaches that integrates widely diverse resources outside of traditional academic environments in full partnerships of mutual respect and understanding. We demonstrate that scientists, social scientists, and engineers can work with government agencies, industry, and communities to interweave their expertise into metaphorical knowledge fabrics to share understanding, resources, and enthusiasm. Objective Our goal is to acknowledge and validate how interweaving research approaches can contribute to research-driven, solution-oriented problem solving in environmental health, and to inspire more members of the environmental health community to consider this approach. Discussion The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program (SRP), as mandated by Congress, has evolved to become a program that reaches across a wide range of knowledge resources. SRP fosters interweaving multiple knowledge resources to develop innovative multidirectional partnerships for research and training. Here we describe examples of how motivation, ideas, knowledge, and expertise from different people, institutions, and agencies can integrate to tackle challenges that can be as complex as the resources they bring to bear on it. Conclusions By providing structure for interweaving science with its stakeholders, we are better able to leverage resources, increase potential for innovation, and proactively ensure a more fully developed spectrum of beneficial outcomes of research investments. Citation Anderson BE, Naujokas MF, Suk WA. 2015. Interweaving knowledge resources to address complex environmental health challenges. Environ Health Perspect 123:1095–1099

  12. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Complex Electronics (CE) are now programmed to perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. Many of the methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to CE development. For instance, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. Since CE devices are obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications in the development of these devices. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE) is a research project that looks at using standardized S/W Assurance/Engineering practices to provide an assurance framework for development activities. Tools such as checklists, best practices and techniques can be used to detect missing requirements and bugs earlier in the development cycle creating a development process for CE that will be more easily maintained, consistent and configurable based on the device used.

  13. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Complex Electronics (CE) now perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. Many methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to CE development. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. With CE devices obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications in the development of these devices. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE) is a research project that used standardized S/W Assurance/Engineering practices to provide an assurance framework for development activities. Tools such as checklists, best practices and techniques were used to detect missing requirements and bugs earlier in the development cycle creating a development process for CE that was more easily maintained, consistent and configurable based on the device used.

  14. Filling the Assurance Gap on Complex Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to Complex Electronics (CE) development. CE are now programmed to perform tasks that were previously handled by software, such as communication protocols. For example, the James Webb Space Telescope will use Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), which can have over a million logic gates, to send telemetry. System-on-chip (SoC) devices, another type of complex electronics, can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. Since CE devices are obscuring the hardware/software boundary, mature software methodologies have been proposed, with slight modifications, to develop these devices. By using standardized S/W Engineering methods such as checklists, missing requirements and bugs can be detected earlier in the development cycle, thus creating a development process for CE that can be easily maintained and configurable based on the device used.

  15. Electron collisions with hydrogen-bonded complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T. C.; Sanchez, S. d'A.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.

    2011-12-15

    We investigated elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the hydrogen-bonded formic-acid dimer, formamide dimer, and formic-acid-formamide complex. We focused on how the {pi}{sup *} shape resonances of the isolated monomers are affected when bonded to another molecule. The scattering cross sections were computed with the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange-plus-polarization approximations, for energies ranging from 1 to 6 eV. The present results support the existence of two low-lying {pi}{sup *} shape resonances for the formic-acid dimer, as suggested in previous theoretical and experimental studies. We also found low-lying {pi}{sup *} shape resonances for the formamide dimer and for the formic-acid-formamide complex. For the dimers, the presence of a center of inversion is key to understanding how these resonances arise from linear combinations of the {pi}{sup *} anion states of the respective monomers. For the formic-acid-formamide complex, the resonances are more localized on each unit, lying at lower energies with respect to the isolated monomers. The present results suggest that if there is no delocalization of the {pi}{sup *} resonances over the pair for hydrogen-bonded molecules, then their positions would lie below those of the units.

  16. Direct electronic probing of biological complexes formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Magliulo, Maria; Manoli, Kyriaki; Giordano, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Functional bio-interlayer organic field - effect transistors (FBI-OFET), embedding streptavidin, avidin and neutravidin as bio-recognition element, have been studied to probe the electronic properties of protein complexes. The threshold voltage control has been achieved modifying the SiO2 gate diaelectric surface by means of the deposition of an interlayer of bio-recognition elements. A threshold voltage shift with respect to the unmodified dielectric surface toward more negative potential values has been found for the three different proteins, in agreement with their isoelectric points. The relative responses in terms of source - drain current, mobility and threshold voltage upon exposure to biotin of the FBI-OFET devices have been compared for the three bio-recognition elements.

  17. A Complex Systems Model Approach to Quantified Mineral Resource Appraisal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.; Bultman, M.W.; Fisher, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    For federal and state land management agencies, mineral resource appraisal has evolved from value-based to outcome-based procedures wherein the consequences of resource development are compared with those of other management options. Complex systems modeling is proposed as a general framework in which to build models that can evaluate outcomes. Three frequently used methods of mineral resource appraisal (subjective probabilistic estimates, weights of evidence modeling, and fuzzy logic modeling) are discussed to obtain insight into methods of incorporating complexity into mineral resource appraisal models. Fuzzy logic and weights of evidence are most easily utilized in complex systems models. A fundamental product of new appraisals is the production of reusable, accessible databases and methodologies so that appraisals can easily be repeated with new or refined data. The data are representations of complex systems and must be so regarded if all of their information content is to be utilized. The proposed generalized model framework is applicable to mineral assessment and other geoscience problems. We begin with a (fuzzy) cognitive map using (+1,0,-1) values for the links and evaluate the map for various scenarios to obtain a ranking of the importance of various links. Fieldwork and modeling studies identify important links and help identify unanticipated links. Next, the links are given membership functions in accordance with the data. Finally, processes are associated with the links; ideally, the controlling physical and chemical events and equations are found for each link. After calibration and testing, this complex systems model is used for predictions under various scenarios.

  18. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  19. From the Inside Out: An Organizational View of Electronic Resources and Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Jennifer A.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses electronic resources and collection development. Topics include how electronic resources are changing the world of access to information; how and why scholars and research libraries use electronic resources; digitization initiatives; knowledge and learning via the Web; archiving electronic resources; and building collections versus…

  20. Think Locally: A Prudent Approach to Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson-Sundell, Nat

    2011-01-01

    A few articles have drawn some amount of attention specifically to the local causes of the success or failure of electronic resource management system (ERMS) implementations. In fact, it seems clear that local conditions will largely determine whether any given ERMS implementation will succeed or fail. This statement might seem obvious, but the…

  1. Redesign of Library Workflows: Experimental Models for Electronic Resource Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Karen

    This paper explores the potential for and progress of a gradual transition from a highly centralized model for cataloging to an iterative, collaborative, and broadly distributed model for electronic resource description. The purpose is to alert library managers to some experiments underway and to help them conceptualize new methods for defining,…

  2. Electronic Commerce Resource Centers. An Industry--University Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulledge, Thomas R.; Sommer, Rainer; Tarimcilar, M. Murat

    1999-01-01

    Electronic Commerce Resource Centers focus on transferring emerging technologies to small businesses through university/industry partnerships. Successful implementation hinges on a strategic operating plan, creation of measurable value for customers, investment in customer-targeted training, and measurement of performance outputs. (SK)

  3. What Is the Future of Electronic Resource Management Systems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Bonnie; King, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    In a time of constant change, sometimes it is worthwhile to ruminate on the future and how things ought to be. "Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship" wanted to capture some of these ruminations from around the field in a new column called "E-Opinions from the Field" where readers are asked to send in their thoughts on a topic and respond…

  4. Technical Communicator: A New Model for the Electronic Resources Librarian?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulseberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This article explores whether technical communicator is a useful model for electronic resources (ER) librarians. The fields of ER librarianship and technical communication (TC) originated and continue to develop in relation to evolving technologies. A review of the literature reveals four common themes for ER librarianship and TC. While the…

  5. Student Satisfaction with Electronic Library Resources at Wayne State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Robert P.; Powell, Ronald R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of student satisfaction with electronic library resources other than the online catalog at Wayne State University. Undertaken in Fall Term 2000 as a class project for a marketing course, a student team designed, administered, and analyzed a survey of a random sample of students. Almost 40% of the…

  6. Providing Access to Electronic Information Resources in Further Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banwell, Linda; Ray, Kathryn; Coulson, Graham; Urquhart, Christine; Lonsdale, Ray; Armstrong, Chris; Thomas, Rhian; Spink, Sin; Yeoman, Alison; Fenton, Roger; Rowley, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to provide a baseline for future studies on the provision and support for the use of digital or electronic information services (EIS) in further education. The analysis presented is based on a multi-level model of access, which encompasses access to and availability of information and communication technology (ICT) resources,…

  7. Electronic Resources: Access and Usage at Ashesi University College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadzie, Perpetua S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Sets out to investigate the use of electronic resources by students and faculty of Ashesi University, Ghana, in order to determine the level of use, the type of information accessed and the effectiveness of the library's communication tools for information research. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire-based survey was utilized.…

  8. Evaluating the appropriateness of electronic information resources for learning

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Nathanial S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current US medical students have begun to rely on electronic information repositories—such as UpToDate, AccessMedicine, and Wikipedia—for their pre-clerkship medical education. However, it is unclear whether these resources are appropriate for this level of learning due to factors involving information quality, level of evidence, and the requisite knowledgebase. This study evaluated appropriateness of electronic information resources from a novel perspective: amount of mental effort learners invest in interactions with these resources and effects of the experienced mental effort on learning. Methods Eighteen first-year medical students read about three unstudied diseases in the above-mentioned resources (a total of fifty-four observations). Their eye movement characteristics (i.e., fixation duration, fixation count, visit duration, and task-evoked pupillary response) were recorded and used as psychophysiological indicators of the experienced mental effort. Post reading, students' learning was assessed with multiple-choice tests. Eye metrics and test results constituted quantitative data analyzed according to the repeated Latin square design. Students' perceptions of interacting with the information resources were also collected. Participants' feedback during semi-structured interviews constituted qualitative data and was reviewed, transcribed, and open coded for emergent themes. Results Compared to AccessMedicine and Wikipedia, UpToDate was associated with significantly higher values of eye metrics, suggesting learners experienced higher mental effort. No statistically significant difference between the amount of mental effort and learning outcomes was found. More so, descriptive statistical analysis of the knowledge test scores suggested similar levels of learning regardless of the information resource used. Conclusions Judging by the learning outcomes, all three information resources were found appropriate for learning. UpToDate, however, when used

  9. E-Resources Management: How We Positioned Our Organization to Implement an Electronic Resources Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn; Sanders, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The Information Services Division (ISD) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) positioned itself to successfully implement an electronic resources management system. This article highlights the ISD's unique ability to "team" across the organization to realize a common goal, develop leadership qualities in support of…

  10. Complex wet-environments in electronic-structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisicaro, Giuseppe; Genovese, Luigi; Andreussi, Oliviero; Marzari, Nicola; Goedecker, Stefan

    The computational study of chemical reactions in complex, wet environments is critical for applications in many fields. It is often essential to study chemical reactions in the presence of an applied electrochemical potentials, including complex electrostatic screening coming from the solvent. In the present work we present a solver to handle both the Generalized Poisson and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) method has been implemented for the Generalized Poisson and the linear regime of the Poisson-Boltzmann, allowing to solve iteratively the minimization problem with some ten iterations. On the other hand, a self-consistent procedure enables us to solve the Poisson-Boltzmann problem. The algorithms take advantage of a preconditioning procedure based on the BigDFT Poisson solver for the standard Poisson equation. They exhibit very high accuracy and parallel efficiency, and allow different boundary conditions, including surfaces. The solver has been integrated into the BigDFT and Quantum-ESPRESSO electronic-structure packages and it will be released as a independent program, suitable for integration in other codes. We present test calculations for large proteins to demonstrate efficiency and performances. This work was done within the PASC and NCCR MARVEL projects. Computer resources were provided by the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) under Project ID s499. LG acknowledges also support from the EXTMOS EU project.

  11. Analysis of empty responses from electronic resources in infobutton managers

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jie; Hulse, Nathan C.; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Infobuttons provide context-aware educational materials to both providers and patients and are becoming an important element in modern electronic health records (EHR) and patient health records (PHR). However, the content from different electronic resources (e-resource) as responses from infobutton manager has not been fully analyzed and evaluated. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically analyzing responses from infobutton manager. A tool is implemented to retrieve and analyze responses from infobutton manager. To test the tool, we extracted and sampled common and uncommon concepts from EHR usage data in Intermountain Healthcare’s enterprise data warehouse. From the output of the tool, we evaluate infobutton performance by multiple categories, including against the most and less common used concepts, grouped by different modules in patient portal, by different e-resources, and by type of access (standardized Health Level Seven (HL7) vs not). Based on the results of our evaluation, we provide suggestions for further enhancements of infobuttons to the current implementation, including suggesting accessing priorities of e-resources and encouraging the use of the HL7 standard. PMID:26958221

  12. Analysis of empty responses from electronic resources in infobutton managers.

    PubMed

    Long, Jie; Hulse, Nathan C; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Infobuttons provide context-aware educational materials to both providers and patients and are becoming an important element in modern electronic health records (EHR) and patient health records (PHR). However, the content from different electronic resources (e-resource) as responses from infobutton manager has not been fully analyzed and evaluated. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically analyzing responses from infobutton manager. A tool is implemented to retrieve and analyze responses from infobutton manager. To test the tool, we extracted and sampled common and uncommon concepts from EHR usage data in Intermountain Healthcare's enterprise data warehouse. From the output of the tool, we evaluate infobutton performance by multiple categories, including against the most and less common used concepts, grouped by different modules in patient portal, by different e-resources, and by type of access (standardized Health Level Seven (HL7) vs not). Based on the results of our evaluation, we provide suggestions for further enhancements of infobuttons to the current implementation, including suggesting accessing priorities of e-resources and encouraging the use of the HL7 standard. PMID:26958221

  13. Single Molecule Electron Transfer Process of Ruthenium Complexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-03-01

    Transition metal complexes such as ruthenium complexes, having metal-to-ligand charge transfer states, are extensively used in solar energy conversion and electron transfer in biological systems and at interfaces. The dynamics of metal-to-ligand charge transfer and subsequent intermolecular, intramolecular, and interfacial electron transfer processes can be highly complex and inhomogeneous, especially when molecules are involved in interactions and perturbations from heterogeneous local environments and gated by conformation fluctuations. We have employed the single-molecule spectroscopy, a powerful approach for inhomogeneous systems to study the electron transfer dynamics of ruthenium complexes. We have applied a range of statistical analysis methods to reveal nonclassical photon emission behavior of the single ruthenium complex, i.e., photon antibunching, and photophysical ground-state recovering dynamics on a microsecond time scale. The use of photon antibunching to measure phosphorescence lifetimes and single-molecule electron transfer dynamics at room temperature is demonstrated.

  14. Internal switches modulating electron tunneling currents in respiratory complex III.

    PubMed

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2016-06-01

    In different X-ray crystal structures of bc1 complex, some of the key residues of electron tunneling pathways are observed in different conformations; here we examine their relative importance in modulating electron transfer and propose their possible gating function in the Q-cycle. The study includes inter-monomeric electron transfer; here we provide atomistic details of the reaction, and discuss the possible roles of inter-monomeric electronic communication in bc(1) complex. Binding of natural ligands or inhibitors leads to local conformational changes which propagate through protein and control the conformation of key residues involved in the electron tunneling pathways. Aromatic-aromatic interactions are highly utilized in the communication network since the key residues are aromatic in nature. The calculations show that there is a substantial change of the electron transfer rates between different redox pairs depending on the different conformations acquired by the key residues of the complex. PMID:26874053

  15. Fingerprinting Electronic Molecular Complexes in Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Nirmalraj, Peter; La Rosa, Andrea; Thompson, Damien; Sousa, Marilyne; Martin, Nazario; Gotsmann, Bernd; Riel, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the electronic framework of an organic molecule under practical conditions is essential if the molecules are to be wired in a realistic circuit. This demands a clear description of the molecular energy levels and dynamics as it adapts to the feedback from its evolving chemical environment and the surface topology. Here, we address this issue by monitoring in real-time the structural stability and intrinsic molecular resonance states of fullerene (C60)-based hybrid molecules in the presence of the solvent. Energetic levels of C60 hybrids are resolved by in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy with an energy resolution in the order of 0.1 eV at room-temperature. An ultra-thin organic spacer layer serves to limit contact metal-molecule energy overlap. The measured molecular conductance gap spread is statistically benchmarked against first principles electronic structure calculations and used to quantify the diversity in electronic species within a standard population of molecules. These findings provide important progress towards understanding conduction mechanisms at a single-molecular level and in serving as useful guidelines for rational design of robust nanoscale devices based on functional organic molecules. PMID:26743542

  16. Fingerprinting Electronic Molecular Complexes in Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalraj, Peter; La Rosa, Andrea; Thompson, Damien; Sousa, Marilyne; Martin, Nazario; Gotsmann, Bernd; Riel, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the electronic framework of an organic molecule under practical conditions is essential if the molecules are to be wired in a realistic circuit. This demands a clear description of the molecular energy levels and dynamics as it adapts to the feedback from its evolving chemical environment and the surface topology. Here, we address this issue by monitoring in real-time the structural stability and intrinsic molecular resonance states of fullerene (C60)-based hybrid molecules in the presence of the solvent. Energetic levels of C60 hybrids are resolved by in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy with an energy resolution in the order of 0.1 eV at room-temperature. An ultra-thin organic spacer layer serves to limit contact metal-molecule energy overlap. The measured molecular conductance gap spread is statistically benchmarked against first principles electronic structure calculations and used to quantify the diversity in electronic species within a standard population of molecules. These findings provide important progress towards understanding conduction mechanisms at a single-molecular level and in serving as useful guidelines for rational design of robust nanoscale devices based on functional organic molecules.

  17. Fingerprinting Electronic Molecular Complexes in Liquid.

    PubMed

    Nirmalraj, Peter; La Rosa, Andrea; Thompson, Damien; Sousa, Marilyne; Martin, Nazario; Gotsmann, Bernd; Riel, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the electronic framework of an organic molecule under practical conditions is essential if the molecules are to be wired in a realistic circuit. This demands a clear description of the molecular energy levels and dynamics as it adapts to the feedback from its evolving chemical environment and the surface topology. Here, we address this issue by monitoring in real-time the structural stability and intrinsic molecular resonance states of fullerene (C60)-based hybrid molecules in the presence of the solvent. Energetic levels of C60 hybrids are resolved by in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy with an energy resolution in the order of 0.1 eV at room-temperature. An ultra-thin organic spacer layer serves to limit contact metal-molecule energy overlap. The measured molecular conductance gap spread is statistically benchmarked against first principles electronic structure calculations and used to quantify the diversity in electronic species within a standard population of molecules. These findings provide important progress towards understanding conduction mechanisms at a single-molecular level and in serving as useful guidelines for rational design of robust nanoscale devices based on functional organic molecules. PMID:26743542

  18. Analysis of Human Resources Management Strategy in China Electronic Commerce Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Fang

    The paper discussed electronic-commerce's influence on enterprise human resources management, proposed and proved the human resources management strategy which electronic commerce enterprise should adopt from recruitment strategy to training strategy, keeping talent strategy and other ways.

  19. Geothermal resources and energy complex use in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalova, V.

    2009-04-01

    Geothermal energy use is the perspective way to clean sustainable development of the world. Russia has rich high and low temperature geothermal resources and makes good steps in their use. In Russia the geothermal resources are used predominantly for heat supply both heating of several cities and settlements on Northern Caucasus and Kamchatka with a total number of the population 500000. Besides in some regions of country the deep heat is used for greenhouses of common area 465000 m2. Most active the hydrothermal resources are used in Krasnodar territory, Dagestan and on Kamchatka. The approximately half of extracted resources is applied for heat supply of habitation and industrial puttings, third - to a heating of greenhouses, and about 13 % - for industrial processes. Besides the thermal waters are used approximately on 150 health resorts and 40 factories on bottling mineral water. The most perspective direction of usage of low temperature geothermal resources is the use of heat pumps. This way is optimal for many regions of Russia - in its European part, on Ural and others. The electricity is generated by some geothermal power plants (GeoPP) only in the Kamchatka Peninsula and Kuril Islands. At present three stations work in Kamchatka: Pauzhetka GeoPP (11MW e installed capacity) and two Severo-Mutnovka GeoPP ( 12 and 50 MWe). Moreover, another GeoPP of 100 MVe is now under preparation in the same place. Two small GeoPP are in operation in Kuril's Kunashir Isl, and Iturup Isl, with installed capacity of 2,б MWe and 6 MWe respectively. There are two possible uses of geothermal resources depending on structure and properties of thermal waters: heat/power and mineral extraction. The heat/power direction is preferable for low mineralized waters when valuable components in industrial concentration are absent, and the general mineralization does not interfere with normal operation of system. When high potential geothermal waters are characterized by the high

  20. Electronic Resources and Mission Creep: Reorganizing the Library for the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachokas, George

    2009-01-01

    The position of electronic resources librarian was created to serve as a specialist in the negotiation of license agreements for electronic resources, but mission creep has added more functions to the routine work of electronic resources such as cataloging, gathering information for collection development, and technical support. As electronic…

  1. Effects of Electronic Information Resources Skills Training for Lecturers on Pedagogical Practices and Research Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhukuvhani, Crispen; Chiparausha, Blessing; Zuvalinyenga, Dorcas

    2012-01-01

    Lecturers use various electronic resources at different frequencies. The university library's information literacy skills workshops and seminars are the main sources of knowledge of accessing electronic resources. The use of electronic resources can be said to have positively affected lecturers' pedagogical practices and their work in general. The…

  2. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... palate - resources Colon cancer - resources Cystic fibrosis - resources Depression - resources Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - ...

  3. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - resources Gastrointestinal disorders - resources Hearing impairment - resources ...

  4. Assessing Ongoing Electronic Resource Purchases: Linking Tools to Synchronize Staff Workflows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jeffrey D.; Major, Colleen; O'Neal, Nada; Tofanelli, John

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing electronic resource purchases represent a substantial proportion of collections budgets. Recognizing the necessity of systematic ongoing assessment with full selector engagement, Columbia University Libraries appointed an Electronic Resources Assessment Working Group to promote the inclusion of such resources within our current culture of…

  5. Synthesis, electronic, photoacoustic and electron spin resonance investigations on some tetrathiocyanate binuclear mixed-metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir

    Complexes of the type M 1M 2(SCN) 4xL[M 1 = Ni(II); M 2 = Cd(II) and Hg(II) and L = pyridine, morpholine, dioxan, benzo(f)quinoline, 2,2'-bipyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine N, N'-dioxide, isonicotinic acid hydrazide and 1,10-phenanthroline: x = 2 or 4] have been synthesized and characterized by chemical analysis, magnetic susceptibility, infrared, electronic and photoacoustic (PAS) spectra as well as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral studies in the solid and solution state. The different coordination sites have been investigated in these ligands towards metal coordination and the behaviour of thiocyanate anions studied. Electron spin resonance spectral data for copper complexes show the distorted octahedral stereochemistry around copper(II) in these complexes. The parameters such as g∥, g⊥, A∥, A⊥, < g>, < A> and α 2 calculated for the copper complexes from their ESR spectra indicate the presence of unpaired electron in d x2- y2 or d z2 orbitals. The photoacoustic and electronic spectra of these complexes were studied in the solid state to see the nature of thiocyanate and overall symmetry of the complexes. The results on electronic and photoacoustic spectral studies are in good agreement with ESR data.

  6. Quantum simulations of small electron-hole complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.A.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.D.

    1984-09-01

    The Green's Function Monte Carlo method is applied to the calculation of the binding energies of electron-hole complexes in semiconductors. The quantum simulation method allows the unambiguous determination of the ground state energy and the effects of band anisotropy on the binding energy. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Glycan complexity dictates microbial resource allocation in the large intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of the human gut microbiota, which impacts on the health of the host, is controlled by complex dietary carbohydrates and members of the Bacteroidetes phylum are the major contributors to the degradation of complex dietary carbohydrates. The extent to which complex dietary carbohydrates...

  8. Proton-coupled electron transfer with photoexcited metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-07-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a crucial role in many enzymatic reactions and is relevant for a variety of processes including water oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and carbon dioxide reduction. Much of the research on PCET has focused on transfers between molecules in their electronic ground states, but increasingly researchers are investigating PCET between photoexcited reactants. This Account describes recent studies of excited-state PCET with d(6) metal complexes emphasizing work performed in my laboratory. Upon photoexcitation, some complexes release an electron and a proton to benzoquinone reaction partners. Others act as combined electron-proton acceptors in the presence of phenols. As a result, we can investigate photoinduced PCET involving electron and proton transfer in a given direction, a process that resembles hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT). In other studies, the photoexcited metal complexes merely serve as electron donors or electron acceptors because the proton donating and accepting sites are located on other parts of the molecular PCET ensemble. We and others have used this multisite design to explore so-called bidirectional PCET which occurs in many enzymes. A central question in all of these studies is whether concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) can compete kinetically with sequential electron and proton transfer steps. Short laser pulses can trigger excited-state PCET, making it possible to investigate rapid reactions. Luminescence spectroscopy is a convenient tool for monitoring PCET, but unambiguous identification of reaction products can require a combination of luminescence spectroscopy and transient absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, in some cases, distinguishing between PCET photoproducts and reaction products formed by simple photoinduced electron transfer (ET) (reactions that don't include proton transfer) is tricky. Some of the studies presented here deal directly with this important problem. In one case study we

  9. Integrated optimal allocation model for complex adaptive system of water resources management (I): Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Liu, Dedi; Chen, Lu; Ye, Yushi

    2015-12-01

    Due to the adaption, dynamic and multi-objective characteristics of complex water resources system, it is a considerable challenge to manage water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. An integrated optimal allocation model is proposed for complex adaptive system of water resources management. The model consists of three modules: (1) an agent-based module for revealing evolution mechanism of complex adaptive system using agent-based, system dynamic and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II methods, (2) an optimal module for deriving decision set of water resources allocation using multi-objective genetic algorithm, and (3) a multi-objective evaluation module for evaluating the efficiency of the optimal module and selecting the optimal water resources allocation scheme using project pursuit method. This study has provided a theoretical framework for adaptive allocation, dynamic allocation and multi-objective optimization for a complex adaptive system of water resources management.

  10. Electronic Safety Resource Tools -- Supporting Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Barilo, Nick F.

    2014-09-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program conducted a planning session in Los Angeles, CA on April 1, 2014 to consider what electronic safety tools would benefit the next phase of hydrogen and fuel cell commercialization. A diverse, 20-person team led by an experienced facilitator considered the question as it applied to the eight most relevant user groups. The results and subsequent evaluation activities revealed several possible resource tools that could greatly benefit users. The tool identified as having the greatest potential for impact is a hydrogen safety portal, which can be the central location for integrating and disseminating safety information (including most of the tools identified in this report). Such a tool can provide credible and reliable information from a trustworthy source. Other impactful tools identified include a codes and standards wizard to guide users through a series of questions relating to application and specific features of the requirements; a scenario-based virtual reality training for first responders; peer networking tools to bring users from focused groups together to discuss and collaborate on hydrogen safety issues; and a focused tool for training inspectors. Table ES.1 provides results of the planning session, including proposed new tools and changes to existing tools.

  11. Controlling user access to electronic resources without password

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Fred Hewitt

    2015-06-16

    Described herein are devices and techniques for remotely controlling user access to a restricted computer resource. The process includes pre-determining an association of the restricted computer resource and computer-resource-proximal environmental information. Indicia of user-proximal environmental information are received from a user requesting access to the restricted computer resource. Received indicia of user-proximal environmental information are compared to associated computer-resource-proximal environmental information. User access to the restricted computer resource is selectively granted responsive to a favorable comparison in which the user-proximal environmental information is sufficiently similar to the computer-resource proximal environmental information. In at least some embodiments, the process further includes comparing user-supplied biometric measure and comparing it with a predetermined association of at least one biometric measure of an authorized user. Access to the restricted computer resource is granted in response to a favorable comparison.

  12. The electronic spectra of mu-peroxodicobalt(III) complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskowski, Vincent M.

    1987-01-01

    Problems found in the determination of the electronic spectra of mu-peroxodicobalt(III) complexes are considered, and the common formation of different mu-peroxocomplexes upon oxygenation of Co(II)-ligand solutions is discussed. Three classes of spectra have been identified: (1) planar single bridged complexes; (2) nonplanar single-bridged complexes with a dihedral angle near 145 deg; and (3) dibridged mu-OH(-),O2(2-) complexes with a dihedral angle near 60 deg. All of the peroxide ligand-to-metal charge-transfer spectra are found to be consistent with a simple model that assumes a sinusoidal dependence of pi-asterisk O2(2-) energies and sigma-overlaps upon the dihedral angle.

  13. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  14. Electron Capture Dissociation of Trivalent Metal Ion-Peptide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Donald, William A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2013-02-01

    With electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions, trivalent metal ions readily adduct to small peptides resulting in formation of predominantly (peptide + MT - H)2+, where MT = La, Tm, Lu, Sm, Ho, Yb, Pm, Tb, or Eu, for peptides with molecular weights below ~1000 Da, and predominantly (peptide + MT)3+ for larger peptides. ECD of (peptide + MT - H)2+ results in extensive fragmentation from which nearly complete sequence information can be obtained, even for peptides for which only singly protonated ions are formed in the absence of the metal ions. ECD of these doubly charged complexes containing MT results in significantly higher electron capture efficiency and sequence coverage than peptide-divalent metal ion complexes that have the same net charge. Formation of salt-bridge structures in which the metal ion coordinates to a carboxylate group are favored even for (peptide + MT)3+. ECD of these latter complexes for large peptides results in electron capture by the protonation site located remotely from the metal ion and predominantly c/ z fragments for all metals, except Eu3+, which undergoes a one electron reduction and only loss of small neutral molecules and b/ y fragments are formed. These results indicate that solvation of the metal ion in these complexes is extensive, which results in the electrochemical properties of these metal ions being similar in both the peptide environment and in bulk water.

  15. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that ismore » not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.« less

  16. Electronic Resource Management 2.0: Using Web 2.0 Technologies as Cost-Effective Alternatives to an Electronic Resource Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Designed to assist with the management of e-resources, electronic resource management (ERM) systems are time- and fund-consuming to purchase and maintain. Questions of system compatibility, data population, and workflow design/redesign can be difficult to answer; sometimes those answers are not what we'd prefer to hear. The two primary functions…

  17. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  18. Glycan complexity dictates microbial resource allocation in the large intestine.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Artur; Briggs, Jonathon A; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Tryfona, Theodora; Terrapon, Nicolas; Lowe, Elisabeth C; Baslé, Arnaud; Morland, Carl; Day, Alison M; Zheng, Hongjun; Rogers, Theresa E; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R; Yadav, Madhav P; Henrissat, Bernard; Martens, Eric C; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J; Bolam, David N

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbiota is controlled primarily through the degradation of complex dietary carbohydrates, but the extent to which carbohydrate breakdown products are shared between members of the microbiota is unclear. We show here, using xylan as a model, that sharing the breakdown products of complex carbohydrates by key members of the microbiota, such as Bacteroides ovatus, is dependent on the complexity of the target glycan. Characterization of the extensive xylan degrading apparatus expressed by B. ovatus reveals that the breakdown of the polysaccharide by the human gut microbiota is significantly more complex than previous models suggested, which were based on the deconstruction of xylans containing limited monosaccharide side chains. Our report presents a highly complex and dynamic xylan degrading apparatus that is fine-tuned to recognize the different forms of the polysaccharide presented to the human gut microbiota. PMID:26112186

  19. Glycan complexity dictates microbial resource allocation in the large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Briggs, Jonathon A.; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Tryfona, Theodora; Terrapon, Nicolas; Lowe, Elisabeth C.; Baslé, Arnaud; Morland, Carl; Day, Alison M.; Zheng, Hongjun; Rogers, Theresa E.; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R.; Yadav, Madhav P.; Henrissat, Bernard; Martens, Eric C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbiota is controlled primarily through the degradation of complex dietary carbohydrates, but the extent to which carbohydrate breakdown products are shared between members of the microbiota is unclear. We show here, using xylan as a model, that sharing the breakdown products of complex carbohydrates by key members of the microbiota, such as Bacteroides ovatus, is dependent on the complexity of the target glycan. Characterization of the extensive xylan degrading apparatus expressed by B. ovatus reveals that the breakdown of the polysaccharide by the human gut microbiota is significantly more complex than previous models suggested, which were based on the deconstruction of xylans containing limited monosaccharide side chains. Our report presents a highly complex and dynamic xylan degrading apparatus that is fine-tuned to recognize the different forms of the polysaccharide presented to the human gut microbiota. PMID:26112186

  20. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K{sub 1}RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K{sub 1}RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D{sub 2}-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C{sub 2h}-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D{sub 2}-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C{sub 2h}-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments

  1. Electron Transfer Reactions in Colloidal Quantum Dot-Ligand Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris-Cohen, Adam Joshua

    This thesis describes a quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of colloidal II-VI quantum dot (QD)-ligand complexes and transient absorption experiments analyzing the rates of electron transfer reactions in these complexes functionalized with redox active ligands. Chemical analysis reveals that phosphonate impurities in the surfactants used to synthesize CdSe QDs are the dominant ligands on the surface of the QDs, and these phosphonate impurities cause size-dependent Cd-enrichment of the QD surface. A study of the adsorption equilibrium of solution-phase CdS quantum dots and acid-derivatized viologen ligands (V2+) reveals that the structure of the surfaces of the QDs depends on the concentration of the QDs. A new model based on the Langmuir isotherm that treats both the number of adsorbed ligands per QD and the number of available binding sites per QD as binomially-distributed quantities is described. Transient absorption spectroscopy of solution-phase mixtures of colloidal CdS QDs and V2+ indicates electron transfer occurs from the conduction band of the QD to the LUMO of V2+. The rate constant for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) is independent of the number of methylene groups in the alkyl chain on the acid-derivatized viologen. The insensitivity of the electron transfer rate constant to the length of the functional groups on the viologen suggests a van der Waals (vdW) pathway for PET, where the electron bypasses the alkylcarboxylate and tunnels through the orbitals of the QD and of the bipyridinium core. The rate of PET from colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to oxo-centered triruthenium clusters (Ru 3O) depends on the structure of the chemical headgroup by which the Ru3O clusters adsorb to the QDs. Complexes comprising QDs and Ru 3O clusters adsorbed through a pyridine-4-carboxylic acid ligand have a PET rate constant of (4.9 ± 0.9)×109 s -1 whereas complexes comprising QDs and Ru3O clusters adsorbed through a 4-mercaptopyridine ligand have an

  2. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K1RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D2- and C2h-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K1RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D2-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C2h-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D2-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C2h-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments than the other two on the opposite side, which leads to the largely enhanced

  3. Achieving Resource Conservation in Electronic Waste Management: A Review of Options Available to Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidi Nnorom, Innocent; Osibanjo, Oladele; Onyedikachi Nnorom, Stanley

    Large quantities of waste electronic devices (e-waste) at their end-of-life, generated internally or imported illegally from developed countries, are currently being managed in the developing countries, through low-end means such as crude backyard recycling and disposal at unlined landfills or open dumps. The extension of the lifespan of electronic devices through reuse options such as repair, reconditioning and remanufacturing should be a priority in the management of electronic waste in developing countries considering the near absence of state-of-the-art recycling facilities in these countries. Life extension through product and component reuse is especially critical to electronic products because in recent years, electronics have increased in technological complexity, with new product innovations and ever shortening product life expectancy. For many products, environmentalists assume that reuse is environmentally beneficial because it replaces the manufacturing and purchase of new goods. However, on the contrary, manufacturers may oppose this type of reuse for the same reason. There is an urgent need to control the trans-boundary movement of electronic scrap especially to countries without established recycling facilities. Importations of secondhand electronics make such devices available to those who cannot afford new products. However, an international method of testing and certification is needed to ensure that exported secondhand devices are functional. Establishment of formal recycling facilities for e-waste in the developing countries will ensure resource reutilization with both economical and ecological gains. This study reviews options available in working towards eco-efficient management of e-waste in developing countries in the light of the present low-end management practices.

  4. Directory of Electronic Information Resources: A Feasibility Study. Technical Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engle, Mary; Lynch, Clifford

    This paper provides an overview of a University of California (UC) study of the issues involved in creating an online directory of electronic information resources available to the university community. For the purposes of the study, electronic information resources include bibliographic and other databases available at or through UC libraries and…

  5. Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachaluba, Sarah Buck; Brady, Jessica Evans; Critten, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on quantitative and qualitative research examining humanities scholars' understandings of the advantages and disadvantages of print versus electronic information resources. It explores how humanities' faculty members at Florida State University (FSU) use print and electronic resources, as well as how they perceive these…

  6. One-Stop Shopping: Presenting Disparate Electronic Resources through a Single Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briden, Judi; Reeb, Brenda; Zhang, Allison

    The Electronic Resources Team at the University of Rochester (New York) River Campus Libraries pursued the concept of one-stop shopping as a component of their new integrated library system Voyager, which debuted in January 1997. Faced with a growing variety of electronic resources with no single guide to their existence and access, the Team dealt…

  7. Using a Decision Grid Process to Build Consensus in Electronic Resources Cancellation Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foudy, Gerri; McManus, Alesia

    2005-01-01

    Many libraries are expending an increasing part of their collections budgets on electronic resources. At the same time many libraries, especially those which are state funded, face diminishing budgets and high rates of inflation for serials subscriptions in all formats, including electronic resources. Therefore, many libraries need to develop ways…

  8. What Do Libraries Really Do with Electronic Resources? The Practice in 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorten, Jay

    2005-01-01

    One hundred fourteen academic libraries in the United States and Canada are surveyed for the organization of electronic resources within their home page and their cataloguing practice. The majority provide access to databases, electronic resources, subject guides, ready reference, and their own catalogue both on their home page and within their…

  9. Electron-Atom Ionization Calculations using Propagating Exterior Complex Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Philip

    2007-10-01

    The exterior complex scaling method (Science 286 (1999) 2474), pioneered by Rescigno, McCurdy and coworkers, provided highly accurate ab initio solutions for electron-hydrogen collisions by directly solving the time-independent Schr"odinger equation in coordinate space. An extension of this method, propagating exterior complex scaling (PECS), was developed by Bartlett and Stelbovics (J. Phys. B 37 (2004) L69, J. Phys. B 39 (2006) R379) and has been demonstrated to provide computationally efficient and accurate calculations of ionization and scattering cross sections over a large range of energies below, above and near the ionization threshold. An overview of the PECS method for three-body collisions and the computational advantages of its propagation and iterative coupling techniques will be presented along with results of: (1) near-threshold ionization of electron-hydrogen collisions and the Wannier threshold laws, (2) scattering cross section resonances below the ionization threshold, and (3) total and differential cross sections for electron collisions with excited targets and hydrogenic ions from low through to high energies. Recently, the PECS method has been extended to solve four-body collisions using time-independent methods in coordinate space and has initially been applied to the s-wave model for electron-helium collisions. A description of the extensions made to the PECS method to facilitate these significantly more computationally demanding calculations will be given, and results will be presented for elastic, single-excitation, double-excitation, single-ionization and double-ionization collisions.

  10. Strategic Planning for Electronic Resources Management: A Case Study at Gustavus Adolphus College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulseberg, Anna; Monson, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Electronic resources, the tools we use to manage them, and the needs and expectations of our users are constantly evolving; at the same time, the roles, responsibilities, and workflow of the library staff who manage e-resources are also in flux. Recognizing a need to be more intentional and proactive about how we manage e-resources, the…

  11. Use and Users of Electronic Library Resources: An Overview and Analysis of Recent Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2003-01-01

    This Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) report summarizes and analyzes more than 200 recent research publications that focus on the use of electronic library resources (digital libraries and digital resources) and were published between 1995 and 2003. Eight major ongoing studies (each with multiple publications) are identified as…

  12. The Relevancy of Graduate Curriculum to Human Resource Professionals' Electronic Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoell, Robert C.; Henry, Gordon O.

    2003-01-01

    Electronic communications of human resource professionals and the content of 23 university human resource management courses were categorized using the Human Resource Certification Institute's body of knowledge. Differences between proportion of topics discussed and topics covered in curricula suggest some topics are over- or undertaught.…

  13. Electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry of metallo-supramolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowska, Malgorzata A; Hotze, Anna C G; Hannon, Michael J; Cooper, Helen J

    2010-02-01

    The electron capture dissociation (ECD) of metallo-supramolecular dinuclear triple-stranded helicate Fe(2)L(3)(4+) ions was determined by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Initial electron capture by the di-iron(II) triple helicate ions produces dinuclear double-stranded complexes analogous to those seen in solution with the monocationic metal centers Cu(I) or Ag(I). The gas-phase fragmentation behavior [ECD, collision-induced dissociation (CID), and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD)] of the di-iron double-stranded complexes, (i.e., MS(3) of the ECD product) was compared with the ECD, CID, and IRMPD of the Cu(I) and Ag(I) complexes generated from solution. The results suggest that iron-bound dimers may be of the form Fe(I)(2)L(2)(2+) and that ECD by metallo-complexes allows access, in the gas phase, to oxidation states and coordination chemistry that cannot be accessed in solution. PMID:20004114

  14. Developing integrated methods to address complex resource and environmental issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionThis circular provides an overview of selected activities that were conducted within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Integrated Methods Development Project, an interdisciplinary project designed to develop new tools and conduct innovative research requiring integration of geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and remote-sensing expertise. The project was supported by the USGS Mineral Resources Program, and its products and acquired capabilities have broad applications to missions throughout the USGS and beyond.In addressing challenges associated with understanding the location, quantity, and quality of mineral resources, and in investigating the potential environmental consequences of resource development, a number of field and laboratory capabilities and interpretative methodologies evolved from the project that have applications to traditional resource studies as well as to studies related to ecosystem health, human health, disaster and hazard assessment, and planetary science. New or improved tools and research findings developed within the project have been applied to other projects and activities. Specifically, geophysical equipment and techniques have been applied to a variety of traditional and nontraditional mineral- and energy-resource studies, military applications, environmental investigations, and applied research activities that involve climate change, mapping techniques, and monitoring capabilities. Diverse applied geochemistry activities provide a process-level understanding of the mobility, chemical speciation, and bioavailability of elements, particularly metals and metalloids, in a variety of environmental settings. Imaging spectroscopy capabilities maintained and developed within the project have been applied to traditional resource studies as well as to studies related to ecosystem health, human health, disaster assessment, and planetary science. Brief descriptions of capabilities and laboratory facilities and summaries of some

  15. "Not" a One-Size-Fits-All Solution: Lessons Learned from Implementing an Electronic Resources Management System in Three Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Auraria Library purchased Innovative Interfaces, Inc.'s Millennium Electronic Resources Management (ERM) to manage data about acquisitions, licensing, troubleshooting, and usage statistics of electronic resources. After 3 days of implementation, the software vendor enabled resources records to display. As a result, the electronic resources team…

  16. On Convergence of Development Costs and Cost Models for Complex Spaceflight Instrument Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Patel, Umeshkumar D.; Kasa, Robert L.; Hestnes, Phyllis; Brown, Tammy; Vootukuru, Madhavi

    2008-01-01

    Development costs of a few recent spaceflight instrument electrical and electronics subsystems have diverged from respective heritage cost model predictions. The cost models used are Grass Roots, Price-H and Parametric Model. These cost models originated in the military and industry around 1970 and were successfully adopted and patched by NASA on a mission-by-mission basis for years. However, the complexity of new instruments recently changed rapidly by orders of magnitude. This is most obvious in the complexity of representative spaceflight instrument electronics' data system. It is now required to perform intermediate processing of digitized data apart from conventional processing of science phenomenon signals from multiple detectors. This involves on-board instrument formatting of computational operands from row data for example, images), multi-million operations per second on large volumes of data in reconfigurable hardware (in addition to processing on a general purpose imbedded or standalone instrument flight computer), as well as making decisions for on-board system adaptation and resource reconfiguration. The instrument data system is now tasked to perform more functions, such as forming packets and instrument-level data compression of more than one data stream, which are traditionally performed by the spacecraft command and data handling system. It is furthermore required that the electronics box for new complex instruments is developed for one-digit watt power consumption, small size and that it is light-weight, and delivers super-computing capabilities. The conflict between the actual development cost of newer complex instruments and its electronics components' heritage cost model predictions seems to be irreconcilable. This conflict and an approach to its resolution are addressed in this paper by determining the complexity parameters, complexity index, and their use in enhanced cost model.

  17. How Students Combine Resources to Build Understanding of Complex Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    The field of Physics Education Research (PER) seeks to investigate how students learn physics and how instructors can help students learn more effectively. The process by which learners create understanding about a complex physics concept is an active area of research. My study explores this process, using solar cells as the context. To understand…

  18. [HYGIENIC REGULATION OF THE USE OF ELECTRONIC EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES IN THE MODERN SCHOOL].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, M I; Aleksandrova, I E; Sazanyuk, Z I; Voronova, B Z; Lashneva, L P; Shumkova, T V; Berezina, N O

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of academic studies with the use a notebook computer and interactive whiteboard on the functional state of an organism of schoolchildren. Using a complex of hygienic and physiological methods of the study we established that regulation of the computer activity of students must take into account not only duration but its intensity either. Design features of a notebook computer were shown both to impede keeping the optimal working posture in primary school children and increase the risk offormation of disorders of vision and musculoskeletal system. There were established the activating influence of the interactive whiteboard on performance activities and favorable dynamics of indices of the functional state of the organism of students under keeping optimal density of the academic study and the duration of its use. There are determined safety regulations of the work of schoolchildren with electronic resources in the educational process. PMID:26856144

  19. Radio Resource Allocation on Complex 4G Wireless Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psannis, Kostas E.

    2015-09-01

    In this article we consider the heuristic algorithm which improves step by step wireless data delivery over LTE cellular networks by using the total transmit power with the constraint on users’ data rates, and the total throughput with the constraints on the total transmit power as well as users’ data rates, which are jointly integrated into a hybrid-layer design framework to perform radio resource allocation for multiple users, and to effectively decide the optimal system parameter such as modulation and coding scheme (MCS) in order to adapt to the varying channel quality. We propose new heuristic algorithm which balances the accessible data rate, the initial data rates of each user allocated by LTE scheduler, the priority indicator which signals delay- throughput- packet loss awareness of the user, and the buffer fullness by achieving maximization of radio resource allocation for multiple users. It is noted that the overall performance is improved with the increase in the number of users, due to multiuser diversity. Experimental results illustrate and validate the accuracy of the proposed methodology.

  20. Progression in Complexity: Contextualizing Sustainable Marine Resources Management in a 10th Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo-Torija, Beatriz; Jimenez-Aleixandre, Maria-Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable management of marine resources raises great challenges. Working with this socio-scientific issue in the classroom requires students to apply complex models about energy flow and trophic pyramids in order to understand that food chains represent transfer of energy, to construct meanings for sustainable resources management through…

  1. Electron Microscopic Studies of the Antigen-Antibody Complex

    PubMed Central

    Easty, G. C.; Mercer, E. H.

    1958-01-01

    Electron micrographs of the ferritin antibody (rabbit) and ferritin (horse) complex have been obtained. The high iron content of the ferritin molecule (23 per cent Fe) allows its molecules to be recognized within the particles of precipitate. Three methods of visualizing the molecular distribution have been developed: (a) small particles of the precipitated complex have been dried on to electron microscope grids and either examined directly or first shadowed with metal and then examined, (b) the precipitate has been centrifuged to a plug which was embedded and thin sections cut from it for examination, (c) the bands formed by allowing antibody and antigen to diffuse together in agar gels have been fixed, embedded and sectioned. All methods have yielded pictures of the distribution of the ferritin within the complex which are broadly similar to what might have been expected from a somewhat irregular lattice as pictured in the Marrack-Heidelberger Lattice Theory. The antibody molecules are not clearly defined but appear as a halo of low density enveloping the ferritin clusters. The distance, centre to centre, between the ferritin molecules is variable, but is, on the average, in the range 200–400 Å. This is greater than the ferritin-ferritin contact distance (100 Å) and is thought to mean that the ferritin molecules are bridged by antibody molecules as pictured in the Lattice Theory. The bands produced in the gel-diffusion test contain islands of ferritin-antibody complex. When equivalent concentrations of reagents are used a single band of precipitate is formed. When excess of either antigen or antibody is used multiple bands of precipitate are formed which contain islands of ferritin antibody complex indistinguishable from those formed in the single band at equivalent concentrations, providing direct evidence for the formation of multiple bands from a single antigen. Ferritin-ferritin contacts have been observed within the complex. Under all the conditions of

  2. Cryo electron microscopy to determine the structure of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Carroni, Marta; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-02-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a structural molecular and cellular biology technique that has experienced major advances in recent years. Technological developments in image recording as well as in processing software make it possible to obtain three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution that were formerly obtained only by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. In parallel, cryo-electron tomography has also benefitted from these technological advances, so that visualization of irregular complexes, organelles or whole cells with their molecular machines in situ has reached subnanometre resolution. Cryo-EM can therefore address a broad range of biological questions. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of the principles and current state of the cryo-EM field. PMID:26638773

  3. Electron transfer dissociation of dipositive uranyl and plutonyl coordination complexes.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniel; Rutkowski, Philip X; Shuh, David K; Bray, Travis H; Gibson, John K; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    Reported here is a comparison of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) of solvent-coordinated dipositive uranyl and plutonyl ions generated by electrospray ionization. Fundamental differences between the ETD and CID processes are apparent, as are differences between the intrinsic chemistries of uranyl and plutonyl. Reduction of both charge and oxidation state, which is inherent in ETD activation of [An(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4) ](2+) , [An(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4) ](2) , [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(5) ](2+) and [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(5) ](2+) (An = U or Pu), is accompanied by ligand loss. Resulting low-coordinate uranyl(V) complexes add O(2) , whereas plutonyl(V) complexes do not. In contrast, CID of the same complexes generates predominantly doubly-charged products through loss of coordinating ligands. Singly-charged CID products of [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4,5) ](2+) , [U(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4,5) ](2+) and [Pu(VI) O(2) (CH(3) CN)(4) ](2+) retain the hexavalent metal oxidation state with the addition of hydroxide or acetone enolate anion ligands. However, CID of [Pu(VI) O(2) (CH(3) COCH(3) )(4) ](2+) generates monopositive plutonyl(V) complexes, reflecting relatively more facile reduction of Pu(VI) to Pu(V). PMID:22223415

  4. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Hyunjin

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  5. Electronic properties of hydrogen-related complexes in pure semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1990-07-01

    Hydrogen has been shown to activate the neutral impurities carbon, silicon and oxygen in ultra-pure germanium and form shallow level complexes. The double acceptors beryllium and zinc in silicon and germanium, as well as the triple acceptor copper in germanium, can be partially passivated, leading to single hole acceptors. The study of the electronic level spectrum of the single carrier bound to these centers at low temperatures has provided much information on symmetry and composition. Most centers reveal a symmetry axis along (111) and are static. In some cases hydrogen has been found to tunnel between equivalent real space positions. Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS) has been the most important tool for the study of the optical transitions of the hole (electron) in these hydrogen containing complexes. This photoconductivity technique combines high sensitivity with high resolution and permits the study of shallow acceptors or donors present at concentrations as low as 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3}. Even lower limits may be attained under favorable circumstances. 51 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Interactive Printouts Integrating Multilingual Multimedia and Sign Language Electronic Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanev, Kamen; Barneva, Reneta P.; Brimkov, Valentin E.; Kaneva, Dimitrina

    2010-01-01

    In this article we outline our previous implementations of multilingual multimedia dictionaries and discuss possibilities for adding new functionalities and expanding their coverage. Independently developed sign language dictionary resources are further explored and considered for inclusion in an integrated multilingual multimedia dictionary with…

  7. The Role of Habitat Complexity in Community Development Is Mediated by Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel S.; Johnston, Emma L.; Clark, Graeme F.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat complexity strongly affects the structure and dynamics of ecological communities, with increased complexity often leading to greater species diversity and abundance. However, habitat complexity changes as communities develop, and some species alter their environment to themselves provide habitat for other species. Most experimental studies manipulate basal substrate complexity, and while the importance of complexity likely changes during community development, few studies have examined the temporal dynamics of this variable. We used two experiments to quantify the importance of basal substrate complexity to sessile marine invertebrate community development through space and time. First, we compared effects of substrate complexity at 70 sites across ten estuaries. Sites differed in recruitment and community development rates, and after three months provided spatial variation in community development stage. Second, we tested for effects of substrate complexity at multiple times at a single site. In both experiments, complexity affected marine sessile invertebrate community composition in the early stages of community development when resource availability was high. Effects of complexity diminished through time as the amount of available space (the primary limiting resource) declined. Our work suggests the presence of a bare-space threshold, at which structural complexity of the basal substrate is overwhelmed by secondary biotic complexity. This threshold will be met at different times depending on local recruitment and growth rates and is likely to vary with productivity gradients. PMID:25054325

  8. Controlling collective dynamics in complex minority-game resource-allocation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji-Qiang; Huang, Zi-Gang; Dong, Jia-Qi; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Resource allocation takes place in various kinds of real-world complex systems, such as traffic systems, social services institutions or organizations, or even ecosystems. The fundamental principle underlying complex resource-allocation dynamics is Boolean interactions associated with minority games, as resources are generally limited and agents tend to choose the least used resource based on available information. A common but harmful dynamical behavior in resource-allocation systems is herding, where there are time intervals during which a large majority of the agents compete for a few resources, leaving many other resources unused. Accompanying the herd behavior is thus strong fluctuations with time in the number of resources being used. In this paper, we articulate and establish that an intuitive control strategy, namely pinning control, is effective at harnessing the herding dynamics. In particular, by fixing the choices of resources for a few agents while leaving the majority of the agents free, herding can be eliminated completely. Our investigation is systematic in that we consider random and targeted pinning and a variety of network topologies, and we carry out a comprehensive analysis in the framework of mean-field theory to understand the working of control. The basic philosophy is then that, when a few agents waive their freedom to choose resources by receiving sufficient incentives, the majority of the agents benefit in that they will make fair, efficient, and effective use of the available resources. Our work represents a basic and general framework to address the fundamental issue of fluctuations in complex dynamical systems with significant applications to social, economical, and political systems.

  9. A Study on Developing Evaluation Criteria for Electronic Resources in Evaluation Indicators of Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noh, Younghee

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to improve the current state of electronic resource evaluation in libraries. While the use of Web DB, e-book, e-journal, and other e-resources such as CD-ROM, DVD, and micro materials is increasing in libraries, their use is not comprehensively factored into the general evaluation of libraries and may diminish the reliability of…

  10. Managing Selection for Electronic Resources: Kent State University Develops a New System to Automate Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Kent State University has developed a centralized system that manages the communication and work related to the review and selection of commercially available electronic resources. It is an automated system that tracks the review process, provides selectors with price and trial information, and compiles reviewers' feedback about the resource. It…

  11. Internest food sharing within wood ant colonies: resource redistribution behavior in a complex system

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elva J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Resource sharing is an important cooperative behavior in many animals. Sharing resources is particularly important in social insect societies, as division of labor often results in most individuals including, importantly, the reproductives, relying on other members of the colony to provide resources. Sharing resources between individuals is therefore fundamental to the success of social insects. Resource sharing is complicated if a colony inhabits several spatially separated nests, a nesting strategy common in many ant species. Resources must be shared not only between individuals in a single nest but also between nests. We investigated the behaviors facilitating resource redistribution between nests in a dispersed-nesting population of wood ant Formica lugubris. We marked ants, in the field, as they transported resources along the trails between nests of a colony, to investigate how the behavior of individual workers relates to colony-level resource exchange. We found that workers from a particular nest “forage” to other nests in the colony, treating them as food sources. Workers treating other nests as food sources means that simple, pre-existing foraging behaviors are used to move resources through a distributed system. It may be that this simple behavioral mechanism facilitates the evolution of this complex life-history strategy. PMID:27004016

  12. Growing an Electronic Library: Resources, Utility, Marketing and Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, David; Dugdale, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development of the ResIDe Electronic Library at the University of the West of England, Bristol. Analyzes potential of the system to increase economy, efficiency and effectiveness in library services and relates it to how the needs of sponsors and students can be met. (Author/LRW)

  13. Adapting Practice-Based Intervention Research to Electronic Environments: Opportunities and Complexities at Two Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Stille, Christopher J.; Lockhart, Steven A.; Maertens, Julie A.; Madden, Christi A.; Darden, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Primary care practice-based research has become more complex with increased use of electronic health records (EHRs). Little has been reported about changes in study planning and execution that are required as practices change from paper-based to electronic-based environments. We describe the evolution of a pediatric practice-based intervention study as it was adapted for use in the electronic environment, to enable other practice-based researchers to plan efficient, effective studies. Methods: We adapted a paper-based pediatric office-level intervention to enhance parent-provider communication about subspecialty referrals for use in two practice-based research networks (PBRNs) with partially and fully electronic environments. We documented the process of adaptation and its effect on study feasibility and efficiency, resource use, and administrative and regulatory complexities, as the study was implemented in the two networks. Results: Considerable time and money was required to adapt the paper-based study to the electronic environment, requiring extra meetings with institutional EHR-, regulatory-, and administrative teams, and increased practice training. Institutional unfamiliarity with using EHRs in practice-based research, and the consequent need to develop new policies, were major contributors to delays. Adapting intervention tools to the EHR and minimizing practice disruptions was challenging, but resulted in several efficiencies as compared with a paper-based project. In particular, recruitment and tracking of subjects and data collection were easier and more efficient. Conclusions: Practice-based intervention research in an electronic environment adds considerable cost and time at the outset of a study, especially for centers unfamiliar with such research. Efficiencies generated have the potential of easing the work of study enrollment, subject tracking, and data collection. PMID:25848633

  14. Iron Hill (Powderhorn) carbonatite complex, Gunnison County, CO - A potential source of several uncommon mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, B. S.; Lowers, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Iron Hill (Powderhorn) carbonatite complex is a 31-kM2 (12-sq mile) alkalic intrusion located about 35 km (22 miles) south-southwest of Gunnison, CO. The intrusion has been well studied and described because of its classic petrology and architecture ofa carbonatite-alkalic complex. The complex is also noteworthy because it contains enrichments of titanium, rare earth elements, thorium, niobium (columbium), vanadium and deposits of vermiculite and nepheline syenite. In particular, the complex is thought to host the largest titanium and niobium resources in the United States, although neither has been developed. It may be economic to extract multiple resources from this complex with a well-coordinated mine and mill plan.

  15. The electronic encapsulation of knowledge in hydraulics, hydrology and water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Michael B.

    The rapidly developing practice of encapsulating knowledge in electronic media is shown to lead necessarily to the restructuring of the knowledge itself. The consequences of this for hydraulics, hydrology and more general water-resources management are investigated in particular relation to current process-simulation, real-time control and advice-serving systems. The generic properties of the electronic knowledge encapsulator are described, and attention is drawn to the manner in which knowledge 'goes into hiding' through encapsulation. This property is traced in the simple situations of pure mathesis and in the more complex situations of taxinomia using one example each from hydraulics and hydrology. The consequences for systems architectures are explained, pointing to the need for multi-agent architectures for ecological modelling and for more general hydroinformatics systems also. The relevance of these developments is indicated by reference to ongoing projects in which they are currently being realised. In conclusion, some more general epistemological aspects are considered within the same context. As this contribution is so much concerned with the processes of signification and communication, it has been partly shaped by the theory of semiotics, as popularised by Eco ( A Theory of Semiotics, Indiana University, Bloomington, 1977).

  16. Assurance of Complex Electronics. What Path Do We Take?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to Complex Electronics (CE) development. CE are now programmed to perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. For instance, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of "software-like" bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. Since CE devices are obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications to develop these devices. By using standardized S/W Engineering methods such as checklists, missing requirements and "bugs" can be detected earlier in the development cycle, thus creating a development process for CE that will be easily maintained and configurable based on the device used.

  17. Reliable Modeling of the Electronic Spectra of Realistic Uranium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tecmer, Pawel; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; De Jong, Wibe A.; Visscher, Lucas

    2013-07-21

    We present an EOMCCSD (equation of motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles) study of excited states of the small [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ model systems as well as the larger UV IO2(saldien) complex. In addition, the triples contribution within the EOMCCSDT and CR-EOMCCSD(T) (completely renormalized EOMCCSD with non-iterative triples) approaches for the [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ systems as well as the active-space variant of the CR-EOMCCSD(T) method | CREOMCCSd(t) | for the UV IO2(saldien) molecule are investigated. The coupled cluster data was employed as benchmark to chose the "best" appropriate exchange--correlation functional for subsequent time-dependent density functional (TD-DFT) studies on the transition energies for closed-shell species. Furthermore, the influence of the saldien ligands on the electronic structure and excitation energies of the [UO2]+ molecule is discussed. The electronic excitations as well as their oscillator dipole strengths modeled with TD-DFT approach using the CAM-B3LYP exchange{correlation functional for the [UV O2(saldien)]- with explicit inclusion of two DMSOs are in good agreement with the experimental data of Takao et al. [Inorg. Chem. 49, 2349-2359, (2010)].

  18. Reliable modeling of the electronic spectra of realistic uranium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecmer, Paweł; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; de Jong, Wibe A.; Visscher, Lucas

    2013-07-01

    We present an EOMCCSD (equation of motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles) study of excited states of the small [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ model systems as well as the larger UVIO2(saldien) complex. In addition, the triples contribution within the EOMCCSDT and CR-EOMCCSD(T) (completely renormalized EOMCCSD with non-iterative triples) approaches for the [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ systems as well as the active-space variant of the CR-EOMCCSD(T) method—CR-EOMCCSd(t)—for the UVIO2(saldien) molecule are investigated. The coupled cluster data were employed as benchmark to choose the "best" appropriate exchange-correlation functional for subsequent time-dependent density functional (TD-DFT) studies on the transition energies for closed-shell species. Furthermore, the influence of the saldien ligands on the electronic structure and excitation energies of the [UO2]+ molecule is discussed. The electronic excitations as well as their oscillator dipole strengths modeled with TD-DFT approach using the CAM-B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for the [UVO2(saldien)]- with explicit inclusion of two dimethyl sulfoxide molecules are in good agreement with the experimental data of Takao et al. [Inorg. Chem. 49, 2349 (2010), 10.1021/ic902225f].

  19. High-performance electron tomography of complex biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José-Jesús; Lawrence, Albert F; Roca, Javier; García, Inmaculada; Ellisman, Mark H; Carazo, José-María

    2002-01-01

    We have evaluated reconstruction methods using smooth basis functions in the electron tomography of complex biological specimens. In particular, we have investigated series expansion methods, with special emphasis on parallel computation. Among the methods investigated, the component averaging techniques have proven to be most efficient and have generally shown fast convergence rates. The use of smooth basis functions provides the reconstruction algorithms with an implicit regularization mechanism, very appropriate for noisy conditions. Furthermore, we have applied high-performance computing (HPC) techniques to address the computational requirements demanded by the reconstruction of large volumes. One of the standard techniques in parallel computing, domain decomposition, has yielded an effective computational algorithm which hides the latencies due to interprocessor communication. We present comparisons with weighted back-projection (WBP), one of the standard reconstruction methods in the areas of computational demand and reconstruction quality under noisy conditions. These techniques yield better results, according to objective measures of quality, than the weighted backprojection techniques after a very few iterations. As a consequence, the combination of efficient iterative algorithms and HPC techniques has proven to be well suited to the reconstruction of large biological specimens in electron tomography, yielding solutions in reasonable computation times. PMID:12160697

  20. Cost of Electronic Reference Resources and LCM: The Library Costing Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Views assessment of "Costs of Electronic Reference Resources" both in a general descriptive framework and within the context of a specific model for costing of library operations and services called LCM, the Library Costing Model. Examples of costing data uses are provided, and categories of costs are related to types of electronic reference…

  1. Where Do Electronic Books Fit in the College Research Arsenal of Resources?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbier, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Student use of electronic books has become an accepted supplement to traditional resources. Student use and satisfaction was monitored through an online course discussion board. Increased use of electronic books indicate this service is an accepted supplement to the print book collection.

  2. Electronic Information Resources in Undergraduate Education: An Exploratory Study of Opportunities for Student Learning and Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Liz

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative interview-based study examines lecturer perspectives on the roles of electronic information resources in undergraduate education. Highlights include electronic academic libraries; changes toward more constructivist approaches to learning; information quality on the Web; plagiarism; information use; information literacy; and…

  3. Signatures of infinity: Nonergodicity and resource scaling in prediction, complexity, and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutchfield, James P.; Marzen, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a simple analysis of the structural complexity of infinite-memory processes built from random samples of stationary, ergodic finite-memory component processes. Such processes are familiar from the well known multiarm Bandit problem. We contrast our analysis with computation-theoretic and statistical inference approaches to understanding their complexity. The result is an alternative view of the relationship between predictability, complexity, and learning that highlights the distinct ways in which informational and correlational divergences arise in complex ergodic and nonergodic processes. We draw out consequences for the resource divergences that delineate the structural hierarchy of ergodic processes and for processes that are themselves hierarchical.

  4. The electron transfer complex between nitrous oxide reductase and its electron donors.

    PubMed

    Dell'acqua, Simone; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2011-12-01

    Identifying redox partners and the interaction surfaces is crucial for fully understanding electron flow in a respiratory chain. In this study, we focused on the interaction of nitrous oxide reductase (N(2)OR), which catalyzes the final step in bacterial denitrification, with its physiological electron donor, either a c-type cytochrome or a type 1 copper protein. The comparison between the interaction of N(2)OR from three different microorganisms, Pseudomonas nautica, Paracoccus denitrificans, and Achromobacter cycloclastes, with their physiological electron donors was performed through the analysis of the primary sequence alignment, electrostatic surface, and molecular docking simulations, using the bimolecular complex generation with global evaluation and ranking algorithm. The docking results were analyzed taking into account the experimental data, since the interaction is suggested to have either a hydrophobic nature, in the case of P. nautica N(2)OR, or an electrostatic nature, in the case of P. denitrificans N(2)OR and A. cycloclastes N(2)OR. A set of well-conserved residues on the N(2)OR surface were identified as being part of the electron transfer pathway from the redox partner to N(2)OR (Ala495, Asp519, Val524, His566 and Leu568 numbered according to the P. nautica N(2)OR sequence). Moreover, we built a model for Wolinella succinogenes N(2)OR, an enzyme that has an additional c-type-heme-containing domain. The structures of the N(2)OR domain and the c-type-heme-containing domain were modeled and the full-length structure was obtained by molecular docking simulation of these two domains. The orientation of the c-type-heme-containing domain relative to the N(2)OR domain is similar to that found in the other electron transfer complexes. PMID:21739254

  5. Resource-constrained complexity-scalable video decoding via adaptive B-residual computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Sharon S.; Zhong, Zhun

    2002-01-01

    As media processing gradually migrates from hardware to software programmable platforms, the number of media processing functions added on the media processor grow even faster than the ever-increasing media processor power can support. Computational complexity scalable algorithms become powerful vehicles for implementing many time-critical yet complexity-constrained applications, such as MPEG2 video decoding. In this paper, we present an adaptive resource-constrained complexity scalable MPEG2 video decoding scheme that makes a good trade-off between decoding complexity and output quality. Based on the available computational resources and the energy level of B-frame residuals, the scalable decoding algorithm selectively decodes B-residual blocks to significantly reduce system complexity. Furthermore, we describe an iterative procedure designed to dynamically adjust the complexity levels in order to achieve the best possible output quality under a given resource constraint. Experimental results show that up to 20% of total computational complexity reduction can be obtained with satisfactory output visual quality.

  6. A framework for unravelling the complexities of unsustainable water resource use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermody, Brian; Bierkens, Marc; Wassen, Martin; Dekker, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The majority of unsustainable water resource use is associated with food production, with the agricultural sector accounting for up to 70% of total freshwater use by humans. Water resource use in food production emerges as a result of dynamic interactions between humans and their environment in importing and exporting regions as well as the physical and socioeconomic trade infrastructure linking the two. Thus in order to understand unsustainable water resource use, it is essential to understand the complex socioecological food production and trade system. We present a modelling framework of the food production and trade system that facilitates an understanding of complex socioenvironmental processes that lead to unsustainable water resource use. Our framework is based on a coupling of the global hydrological model PC Raster Global Water Balance (PCR-GLOBWB) with a multi-agent socioeconomic food production and trade network. In our framework, agents perceive environmental conditions. They make food supply decisions based upon those perceptions and the heterogeneous socioeconomic conditions in which they exist. Agent decisions modify land and water resources. Those environmental changes feedback to influence decision making further. The framework presented has the potential to go beyond a diagnosis of the causes of unsustainable water resource and provide pathways towards a sustainable food system in terms of water resources.

  7. Visualization of macromolecular complexes using cryo-electron microscopy with FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Grassucci, Robert A; Taylor, Derek; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    This protocol details the steps used for visualizing the frozen-hydrated grids as prepared following the accompanying protocol entitled ‘Preparation of macromolecular complexes for visualization using cryo-electron microscopy.’ This protocol describes how to transfer the grid to the microscope using a standard cryo-transfer holder or, alternatively, using a cryo-cartridge loading system, and how to collect low-dose data using an FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscope. This protocol also summarizes and compares the various options that are available in data collection for three-dimensional (3D) single-particle reconstruction. These options include microscope settings, choice of detectors and data collection strategies both in situations where a 3D reference is available and in the absence of such a reference (random-conical and common lines). PMID:18274535

  8. Electronic textbooks as a professional resource after dental school.

    PubMed

    Bates, Michael L; Strother, Elizabeth A; Brunet, Darlene P; Gallo, John R

    2012-05-01

    In two previous studies of dental students' attitudes about the VitalSource Bookshelf, a digital library of dental textbooks, students expressed negative opinions about owning and reading electronic textbooks. With the assumption that dentists would find the digital textbooks useful for patient care, the authors surveyed recent graduates to determine if their attitude toward the VitalSource Bookshelf had changed. A brief survey was sent to 119 alumni from the classes of 2009 and 2010 of one U.S. dental school. Forty-seven (39.5 percent) completed the questionnaire. Eighteen respondents (48.3 percent) reported using the e-textbooks often or sometimes. The twenty-nine dentists who said they have not used the collection since graduation reported preferring print books or other online sources or having technical problems when downloading the books to a new computer. Only five respondents selected the VitalSource Bookshelf as a preferred source of professional information. Most of the respondents reported preferring to consult colleagues (37.8 percent), the Internet (20 percent), or hardcopy books (17.8 percent) for information. When asked in an open-ended question to state their opinion of the Bookshelf, nineteen (42.2 percent) responded positively, but almost one-third of these only liked the search feature. Six respondents reported that they never use the program. Twenty-two said they have had technical problems with the Bookshelf, including fifteen who have not been able to install it on a new computer. Many of them said they have not followed up with either the dental school or VitalSource support services to overcome this problem. Our study suggests that dentists, similar to dental students, dislike reading electronic textbooks, even with the advantage of searching a topic across more than sixty dental titles. PMID:22550109

  9. Cryo-Electron Tomography for Structural Characterization of Macromolecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Julia; Heumann, John; Hoenger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is an emerging 3-D reconstruction technology that combines the principles of tomographic 3-D reconstruction with the unmatched structural preservation of biological material embedded in vitreous ice. Cryo-ET is particularly suited to investigating cell-biological samples and large macromolecular structures that are too polymorphic to be reconstructed by classical averaging-based 3-D reconstruction procedures. This unit aims to make cryo-ET accessible to newcomers and discusses the specialized equipment required, as well as the relevant advantages and hurdles associated with sample preparation by vitrification and cryo-ET. Protocols describe specimen preparation, data recording and 3-D data reconstruction for cryo-ET, with a special focus on macromolecular complexes. A step-by-step procedure for specimen vitrification by plunge freezing is provided, followed by the general practicalities of tilt-series acquisition for cryo-ET, including advice on how to select an area appropriate for acquiring a tilt series. A brief introduction to the underlying computational reconstruction principles applied in tomography is described, along with instructions for reconstructing a tomogram from cryo-tilt series data. Finally, a method is detailed for extracting small subvolumes containing identical macromolecular structures from tomograms for alignment and averaging as a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminate missing wedge effects inherent in tomographic reconstructions. PMID:21842467

  10. Electronic Energy transfer in light-harvesting antenna complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Nejad, Hoda

    The studies presented in this thesis explore electronic energy transfer (EET) in light-harvesting antenna complexes and investigate the role of quantum coherence in EET. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated in three distinct length scales and a different formulation of the exciton transport problem is applied at each scale. These scales include: the scale of a molecular dimer, the scale of a single protein and the scale of a molecular aggregate. The antenna protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545) isolated from the photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS4 is specifically studied in two chapters of this thesis. It is found that formation of small aggregates delocalizes the excitation across chromophores of adjacent proteins, and that this delocalization has a dramatic effect in enhancing the rate of energy transfer between pigments. Furthermore, we investigate EET from a donor to an acceptor via an intermediate site and observe that interference of coherent pathways gives a finite correction to the transfer rate that is sensitively dependent on the nature of the vibrational interactions in the system. The statistical fluctuations of a system exhibiting EET are investigated in the final chapter. The techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics are applied to investigate the steady-state of a typical system exhibiting EET that is perturbed out of equilibrium due to its interaction with a fluctuating bath.

  11. We're All in This Together: Library Faculty and Staff and Their Reporting of Electronic Resource Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Anita; Williams, Sarah C.

    2010-01-01

    Libraries continue to shift budgets toward obtaining more electronic resources. Electronic resources can develop problems at any time when a library offers access. Staff collaboration is vital in ensuring availability to those resources. Partnering with areas in the library that work most closely with patrons can help share the load of the…

  12. Integrated optimal allocation model for complex adaptive system of water resources management (II): Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Liu, Dedi; Chen, Lu; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Climate change, rapid economic development and increase of the human population are considered as the major triggers of increasing challenges for water resources management. This proposed integrated optimal allocation model (IOAM) for complex adaptive system of water resources management is applied in Dongjiang River basin located in the Guangdong Province of China. The IOAM is calibrated and validated under baseline period 2010 year and future period 2011-2030 year, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the proposed model can make a trade-off between demand and supply for sustainable development of society, economy, ecology and environment and achieve adaptive management of water resources allocation. The optimal scheme derived by multi-objective evaluation is recommended for decision-makers in order to maximize the comprehensive benefits of water resources management.

  13. Resource utilization in children with tuberous sclerosis complex and associated seizures: a retrospective chart review study.

    PubMed

    Lennert, Barb; Farrelly, Eileen; Sacco, Patricia; Pira, Geraldine; Frost, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Seizures are a hallmark manifestation of tuberous sclerosis complex, yet data characterizing resource utilization are lacking. This retrospective chart review was performed to assess the economic burden of tuberous sclerosis complex with neurologic manifestations. Demographic and resource utilization data were collected for 95 patients for up to 5 years after tuberous sclerosis complex diagnosis. Mean age at diagnosis was 3.1 years, with complex partial and infantile spasms as the most common seizure types. In the first 5 years post-diagnosis, 83.2% required hospitalization, 30.5% underwent surgery, and the majority of patients (90.5%) underwent ≥3 testing procedures. In 79 patients with a full 5 years of data, hospitalizations, intensive care unit stays, diagnostic testing, and rehabilitation services decreased over the 5-year period. Resource utilization is cost-intensive in children with tuberous sclerosis complex and associated seizures during the first few years following diagnosis. Improving seizure control and reducing health care costs in this population remain unmet needs. PMID:22772159

  14. Cage electron-hydroxyl complex state as electron donor in mayenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraishi, M.; Kojima, K. M.; Miyazaki, M.; Yamauchi, I.; Okabe, H.; Koda, A.; Kadono, R.; Matsuishi, S.; Hosono, H.

    2016-03-01

    It is inferred from the chemical shift of muon spin rotation (μ SR ) spectra that muons implanted in pristine (fully oxidized) mayenite, [Ca12Al14O32] 2 +[□5O2 -] (C12A7, with □ referring to the vacant cage), are bound to O2 - at the cage center to form OMu- (where Mu represents muonium, a muonic analog of the H atom). However, an isolated negatively charged state (Mu-, an analog of H-) becomes dominant when the compound approaches the state of electride [Ca12Al14O32] 2 +[□42 e-] as a result of the reduction process. Moreover, the OMu- state in the pristine specimen exhibits depolarization of paramagnetic origin at low temperatures (below ˜30 K), indicating that OMu- accompanies a loosely bound electron in the cage that can be thermally activated. This suggests that interstitial muons (and hence H) forming a "cage electron-hydroxyl" complex can serve as electron donors in C12A7.

  15. A survey of the use of electronic scientific information resources among medical and dental students

    PubMed Central

    Romanov, Kalle; Aarnio, Matti

    2006-01-01

    Background To evaluate medical and dental students' utilization of electronic information resources. Methods A web survey sent to 837 students (49.9% responded). Results Twenty-four per cent of medical students and ninteen per cent of dental students searched MEDLINE 2+ times/month for study purposes, and thiry-two per cent and twenty-four per cent respectively for research. Full-text articles were used 2+ times/month by thirty-three per cent of medical and ten per cent of dental students. Twelve per cent of respondents never utilized either MEDLINE or full-text articles. In multivariate models, the information-searching skills among students were significantly associated with use of MEDLINE and full-text articles. Conclusion Use of electronic resources differs among students. Forty percent were non-users of full-text articles. Information-searching skills are correlated with the use of electronic resources, but the level of basic PC skills plays not a major role in using these resources. The student data shows that adequate training in information-searching skills will increase the use of electronic information resources. PMID:16684347

  16. Disseminating Context-Specific Access to Online Knowledge Resources within Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fiol, Guilherme Del; Curtis, Clayton; Cimino, James J.; Iskander, Andrew; Kalluri, Aditya S.D.; Jing, Xia; Hulse, Nathan C.; Long, Jie; Overby, Casey L.; Schardt, Connie; Douglas, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians’ patient care information needs are frequent and largely unmet. Online knowledge resources are available that can help clinicians meet these information needs. Yet, significant barriers limit the use of these resources within the clinical workflow. Infobuttons are clinical decision support tools that use the clinical context (e.g., institution, user, patient) within electronic health record (EHR) systems to anticipate clinicians’ questions and provide automated links to relevant information in knowledge resources. This paper describes OpenInfobutton (www.openinfobutton.org): a standards-based, open source Web service that was designed to disseminate infobutton capabilities in multiple EHR systems and healthcare organizations. OpenInfobutton has been successfully integrated with 38 knowledge resources at 5 large healthcare organizations in the United States. We describe the OpenInfobutton architecture, knowledge resource integration, and experiences at five large healthcare organizations. PMID:23920641

  17. Considering Point-of-Care Electronic Medical Resources in Lieu of Traditional Textbooks for Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Hale, LaDonna S; Wallace, Michelle M; Adams, Courtney R; Kaufman, Michelle L; Snyder, Courtney L

    2015-09-01

    Selecting resources to support didactic courses is a critical decision, and the advantages and disadvantages must be carefully considered. During clinical rotations, students not only need to possess strong background knowledge but also are expected to be proficient with the same evidence-based POC resources used by clinicians. Students place high value on “real world” learning and therefore may place more value on POC resources that they know practicing clinicians use as compared with medical textbooks. The condensed nature of PA education requires students to develop background knowledge and information literacy skills over a short period. One way to build that knowledge and those skills simultaneously is to use POC resources in lieu of traditional medical textbooks during didactic training. Electronic POC resources offer several advantages over traditional textbooks and should be considered as viable options in PA education. PMID:26309211

  18. Lunar Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 μm size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  19. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: COMPLEX ROLE OF SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSIONS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 {mu}m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  20. Lunary Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Crave, P. D.; LeClair, A.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEES). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/ planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEES discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  1. Spectroscopic and dynamical differences between exciplex and electronically excited EDA complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, B. T.; Okajima, S.; Lim, E. C.

    1986-02-01

    We demonstrate here that the electronically excited electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex can be different from the corresponding exciplex even in the absence of viscosity constraints that prevent the attainment of preferred donor-acceptor orientation.

  2. Charge-transfer complex versus σ-complex formed between TiO2 and bis(dicyanomethylene) electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Nagata, Morio; Hanaya, Minoru

    2015-11-01

    A novel group of organic-inorganic hybrid materials is created by the combination of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with bis(dicyanomethylene) (TCNX) electron acceptors. The TiO2-TCNX complex is produced by the nucleophilic addition reaction between a hydroxy group on the TiO2 surface and TCNX, with the formation of a σ-bond between them. The nucleophilic addition reaction generates a negatively-charged diamagnetic TCNX adsorbate that serves as an electron donor. The σ-bonded complex characteristically shows visible-light absorption due to interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions. In this paper, we report on another kind of complex formation between TiO2 and TCNX. We have systematically studied the structures and visible-light absorption properties of the TiO2-TCNX complexes, with changing the electron affinity of TCNX. We found that TCNX acceptors with lower electron affinities form charge-transfer complexes with TiO2 without the σ-bond formation. The charge-transfer complexes show strong visible-light absorption due to interfacial electronic transitions with little charge-transfer nature, which are different from the ICT transitions in the σ-bond complexes. The charge-transfer complexes induce efficient light-to-current conversions due to the interfacial electronic transitions, revealing the high potential for applications to light-energy conversions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the formation of the two kinds of complexes is selectively controlled by the electron affinity of TCNX. PMID:26418266

  3. Mitochondrial electron transfer chain complexes inhibition by different organochalcogens.

    PubMed

    Puntel, Robson L; Roos, Daniel H; Seeger, Rodrigo Lopes; Rocha, João B T

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the cell toxicology and death decision. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of three organocompounds (ebselen [Ebs], diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)(2)] and diphenyl ditelluride [(PhTe)(2)]) on mitochondrial complexes (I, II, I-III, II-III and IV) activity from rat liver and kidney to determine their potential role as molecular targets of organochalcogens. All studied organochalcogens caused a statistically significant inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I activity. Ebs and (PhTe)(2) caused a statistically significant inhibition of the mitochondrial complex II activity in both hepatic and renal membranes. Hepatic mitochondrial complex II activity was practically unchanged by (PhSe)(2), whereas it significantly inhibited renal complex II activity. Mitochondrial complex IV activity was practically unchanged by the organochalcogens. Furthermore, organochalcogens inhibited the mitochondrial respiration supported by complex I or complex II substrates. The inhibitory effect of Ebs, (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2) on mitochondrial complex I was prevented by NADH, but it was not prevented by catalase (CAT) and/or superoxide dismutase (SOD). Additionally, the organochalcogens-induced inhibition of complex I and II was completely reversed by reduced glutathione (GSH). In conclusion, Ebs, (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2) were more effective inhibitors of renal and hepatic mitochondrial complex I than complex II, whereas complexes III and IV were little modified by these compounds. Taking into account the presented results, we suggest that organochalcogen-induced mitochondrial complexes I and II inhibition can be mediated by their thiol oxidation activity, i.e., Ebs, (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2) can oxidize critical thiol groups from mitochondrial complexes I and II. So, mitochondrial dysfunction can be considered an important factor in the toxicity of Ebs, (PhSe)(2) and (PhTe)(2). PMID:23103426

  4. Complex Study of Electronic States and Spectra of 3-Nitroformazans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, R. R.; Drozdova, A. K.; Petunin, P. V.; Postnikov, P. S.; Trusova, M. E.; Cherepanov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of electronic states and the absorption spectra of 3-nitroformazan molecules was conducted. The results of the study show that the first electron transition is σ→π-transition, and the second one is π→π-transition. The energies of the transitions calculated using methods RI-CC2 and TDDFT correlate well with the experimental measurements. The dependence of the first electron transition wavenumber on the degree of electron donating and accepting of substitutituents was studied using empirical constants. High correlation between the constants of Hammett, Braun, and wavenumbers (TDDFT) of the first electron transition shows that the description of electronic states of the studied 3-nitroformazans is correct.

  5. The Acquisition and Management of Electronic Resources: Can Use Justify Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Shona L.; Hawamdeh, Suliman

    2010-01-01

    As library collections increasingly become digital, libraries are faced with many challenges regarding the acquisition and management of electronic resources. Some of these challenges include copyright and fair use, the first-sale doctrine, licensing versus ownership, digital preservation, long-term archiving, and, most important, the issue of…

  6. Electronic Resources and Academic Libraries, 1980-2000: A Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ruth H.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, academic collection development specialists have dealt with changes, brought about by decreasing purchasing power and the growing importance of electronic resources. Throughout, collection managers have rethought their efforts and revised criteria for selection of materials in new formats while maintaining traditional…

  7. A Survey of the Use of Electronic Resources at Seven Universities in Wuhan, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Liyi; Ye, Pinghao; Liu, Qihua

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on users' information behaviour in China, a topic which has not been researched extensively. The aim is to help producers and providers collect and develop more electronic resources. Design/methodology/approach: The study investigates users' information behaviour at seven "211 Project" universities…

  8. Oklahoma Library Technology Network (OLTN) Electronic Resources for Elementary Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol, Comp.

    This document describes Oklahoma Library Technology Network electronic resources for elementary age children. The first section provides a history of Oklahoma statewide shared databases. Oklahoma statewide information database contacts are listed in the second section. The third section presents information on InfoTrac Kid's Edition Online…

  9. Managing Electronic Resources: A Survey of Current Practices in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Beth Hansen

    This document reports results of an online survey that examined practices and procedures in the management of electronic resources in 65 academic library reference departments. Responses are related to: (1) student population; (2) library use by community people; (3) number of public access workstations, workstations with World Wide Web access,…

  10. Implementation of an Electronic Resource Assessment System in an Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a library with useful information about selection criteria for an electronic resource assessment system and practical assistance on how to implement efficiently such a system. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on literature review, desk research, and implementation experience.…

  11. A Mid-infrared Digital Electronic Camera System for Assessing Natural Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water strongly absorbs mid-infrared (1300-2500 nm) radiation, resulting in this region of the spectrum being sensitive to the water content within features. Little information is available on using an electronic digital camera filtered to this region of the spectrum to assess natural resources. Th...

  12. Use of Electronic Information Resources among Research Scholars in the Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amjad, Anam; Ahmed, Shamshad; Bin Naeem, Salman

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the use of electronic resources among academic scholars of The Islamia University of Bahawalpur (IUB), Punjab, Pakistan. A quantitative survey was found most convenient and useful for this study. The total population of the study was 169 research students in IUB. The response rate was 79% and 133 utilizable responses were coded…

  13. What Do Community College Libraries Do with Electronic Resources? The Practice in 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorten, Jay

    2004-01-01

    One hundred fourteen community college libraries in the United States and Canada are surveyed for the organization of electronic resources within their home page and their cataloguing practice. The majority provide access to databases, ready reference, and their own catalogue both on their home page and within their web site. They do not usually…

  14. Defining the Electronic and Geometric Structure of One-Electron Oxidized Copper–Bis-phenoxide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Storr, Tim; Verma, Pratik; Pratt, Russell C.; Wasinger, Erik C.; Shimazaki, Yuichi; Stack, T. Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    The geometric and electronic structure of an oxidized Cu complex ([CuSal]+; Sal = N, N′-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) with a non-innocent salen ligand has been investigated both in the solid state and in solution. Integration of information from UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, electrochemistry, resonance Raman spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations provides critical insights into the nature of the localization/delocalization of the oxidation locus. In contrast to the analogous Ni derivative [NiSal]+ (Storr, T.; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 5198), which exists solely in the Ni(II) ligand-radical form, the locus of oxidation is metal-based for [CuSal]+, affording exclusively a Cu(III) species in the solid state (4–300 K). Variable-temperature solution studies suggest that [CuSal]+ exists in a reversible spin-equilibrium between a ligand-radical species [Cu(II)Sal•]+ (S = 1) and the high-valent metal form [Cu(III)Sal]+ (S = 0), indicative of nearly isoenergetic species. It is surprising that a bis-imine–bis-phenolate ligation stabilizes the Cu(III) oxidation state, and even more surprising that in solution a spin equilibrium occurs without a change in coordination number. The oxidized tetrahydrosalen analogue [CuSalred]+ (Salred = N, N′-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylhydroxybenzyl)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) exists as a temperature-invariant Cu(II)–ligand-radical complex in solution, demonstrating that ostensibly simple variations of the ligand structure affect the locus of oxidation in Cu–bis-phenoxide complexes. PMID:18939830

  15. Power resource management and low-power remote wireless RF electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas; Degrood, Kevin; Lee, Kang; Gans, Eric; Walter, Kevin

    2009-05-01

    Battery power resource management becomes a critical issue in the case of self-powered remote wireless RF electronics, where the basic parameter is time of system operation before battery recharging or battery replacement. In such cases, very often related to physical protection against antitampering (AT), proper theoretical modeling of a battery driven power supply in the context of a given digital electronic system is of utmost importance. Such modeling should include various types of batteries (primary and secondary), various self-discharge processes in different temperatures, and even energy harvesting, the latter to supply power for long-term content, low-power electronic subsystems. In this paper we analyze simple modeling of resource power management, including variations of all of these parameters and energy harvesting.

  16. Identifying and evaluating electronic learning resources for use in adult-gerontology nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Belza, Basia; Baker, Margaret; Christianson, Phyllis; Doorenbos, Ardith; Nguyen, Huong

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing existing curricula to meet newly published adult-gerontology advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) competencies in an efficient manner presents a challenge to nurse educators. Incorporating shared, published electronic learning resources (ELRs) in existing or new courses may be appropriate in order to assist students in achieving competencies. The purposes of this project were to (a) identify relevant available ELR for use in enhancing geriatric APRN education and (b) to evaluate the educational utility of identified ELRs based on established criteria. A multilevel search strategy was used. Two independent team members reviewed identified ELR against established criteria to ensure utility. Only resources meeting all criteria were retained. Resources were found for each of the competency areas and included formats such as podcasts, Web casts, case studies, and teaching videos. In many cases, resources were identified using supplemental strategies and not through traditional search or search of existing geriatric repositories. Resources identified have been useful to advanced practice educators in improving lecture and seminar content in a particular topic area and providing students and preceptors with additional self-learning resources. Addressing sustainability within geriatric APRN education is critical for sharing of best practices among educators and for sustainability of teaching and related resources. PMID:24720944

  17. EPR, mass, IR, electronic, and magnetic studies on copper(II) complexes of semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gupta, Lokesh Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Copper(II) complexes having the general composition Cu(L) 2X 2 [where L = isopropyl methyl ketone semicarbazone (LLA), isopropyl methyl ketone thiosemicarbazone (LLB), 4-aminoacetophenone semicarbazone (LLC), and 4-aminoacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (LLD) and X = Cl -, 1/2SO 42-] have been synthesized. All the Cu(II) complexes reported here have been characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic moment susceptibility, EI mass, 1H NMR, IR, EPR, and electronic spectral studies. All the complexes were found to have magnetic moments corresponding to one unpaired electrons. The possible geometries of the complexes were assigned on the basis of EPR, electronic, and infrared spectral studies.

  18. Electronic structure and driving forces in β-cyclodextrin: Diclofenac inclusion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Diana; Morari, C.

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the geometry and electronic structure for complexes of β-cyclodextrin with diclofenac using DFT calculations. The effect of solvent is explicitly taken into account. This investigation allows us to draw meaningful conclusions upon the stability of the complex and the nature of the driving forces leading to the complexation process. In particular we emphasize the role of the water, by pointing out the changes in the solvent's electronic structure for different docking geometries.

  19. PhysioBank, PhysioToolkit, and PhysioNet: components of a new research resource for complex physiologic signals.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, A L; Amaral, L A; Glass, L; Hausdorff, J M; Ivanov, P C; Mark, R G; Mietus, J E; Moody, G B; Peng, C K; Stanley, H E

    2000-06-13

    The newly inaugurated Research Resource for Complex Physiologic Signals, which was created under the auspices of the National Center for Research Resources of the National Institutes of Health, is intended to stimulate current research and new investigations in the study of cardiovascular and other complex biomedical signals. The resource has 3 interdependent components. PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiological signals and related data for use by the biomedical research community. It currently includes databases of multiparameter cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and from patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including life-threatening arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, sleep apnea, neurological disorders, and aging. PhysioToolkit is a library of open-source software for physiological signal processing and analysis, the detection of physiologically significant events using both classic techniques and novel methods based on statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics, the interactive display and characterization of signals, the creation of new databases, the simulation of physiological and other signals, the quantitative evaluation and comparison of analysis methods, and the analysis of nonstationary processes. PhysioNet is an on-line forum for the dissemination and exchange of recorded biomedical signals and open-source software for analyzing them. It provides facilities for the cooperative analysis of data and the evaluation of proposed new algorithms. In addition to providing free electronic access to PhysioBank data and PhysioToolkit software via the World Wide Web (http://www.physionet. org), PhysioNet offers services and training via on-line tutorials to assist users with varying levels of expertise. PMID:10851218

  20. Bit by Bit: A Series of Trends, Tools, and Initiatives Are Aimed at Improving Electronic Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Electronic resources are more prominent than ever in library collections, yet they resist easy management. A range of tools and cooperative efforts are emerging to improve the management and evaluation of electronic resources. Initiatives are underway to standardize and automate the harvesting of usage statistics and e-journal title and holdings…

  1. Electron microscopic morphometry of isolated rat brain porosome complex.

    PubMed

    Zhvania, Mzia G; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Qsovreli, Mariam G; Okuneva, Vera G; Surmava, Arkadi G; Lordkipanidze, Tamar G

    2015-11-01

    Porosomes are the universal secretory portals at the cell plasma membrane where secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse via the kiss-and-run mechanism of cellular secretion, to release intravesicular cargo to the outside of the cell. During last two decades discovery of porosome and a great volume of work from different laboratories provide molecular insights on the structure, function, and composition of the porosome complex, especially the neuronal porosome. In rat neurons 12-17 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein porosomes present at presynaptic membrane. They possess a central plug and sometimes are with docked synaptic vesicles. Although earlier studies have greatly progressed our understanding of the morphology and the proteome and limited lipidome of the neuronal porosome complex, the current study was carried out to determine the morphology of the bare protein backbone of the neuronal porosome complex. Results from our study demonstrate that although the eight-fold symmetry of the immunoisolated porosome is maintained, and the central plug is preserved in the isolated structures, there is a loss in the average size of the porosome complex, possibly due to a loss of lipids from the complex. PMID:26119463

  2. Modified electronic population analysis for transition-metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Noell, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    A modification to the Mulliken electronic population analysis designed primarily for use on transition-metal systems is presented. All terms arising from the metal basis functions including diagonal terms are repartioned between the metal and the ligands. This reapportionment is an attempt to reflect more accurately the actual electron density in well-defined areas of space, which characterize the metal and the ligand. This modified analysis appears to yield more reasonable charge assignments than a conventional Mulliken analysis. The cost of the analysis is negligible in comparison with that of calculating the wave function.

  3. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: The role of 4f electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Yang Dongsheng; Liu Yang

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  4. Interface for electronic data capture systems for clinical trials by optimal utilization of available hospital resources.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sashank; Khan, Anzalee; Kaushik, Saurabh; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    We describe Clinical Trials System (CTS), an innovative EDC system utilizing data from existing hospital-based electronic databases that supports information gathering and storing for various clinical trials. The complexities of designing electronic clinical trials systems and their ideal features are outlined. CTS optimally utilizes existing electronic databases in a well-organized and easy-to-reference format. CTS is currently incorporated within a large psychiatric center, allowing easy sharing of information and data among multidisciplinary clinical and research teams. PMID:18999083

  5. A survey of electronic drug information resources and identification of problems associated with the differing vocabularies used to key them.

    PubMed Central

    Gnassi, J. A.; Barnett, G. O.

    1993-01-01

    Drug information resources are increasingly becoming electronically available. They differ in scope, granularity, and purpose. These considerations have shaped the selection of dissimilar drug name keys, complicating access. An abbreviated and simplified historical context of the development of official controlled vocabularies and their relationships is followed by a review of the kinds of information available in several electronic drug information resources. The key vocabularies used are discussed with examples. Problems using the differing terms of the resource vocabularies are identified. PMID:8130551

  6. Tuning ground states and excitations in complex electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.

    1996-09-01

    Modern electronic materials are characterized by a great variety of broken-symmetry ground states and excitations. Their control requires understanding and tuning underlying driving forces of spin-charge-lattice coupling, critical to macroscopic properties and applications. We report representative model calculations which demonstrate some of the richness of the phenomena and the challenges for successful microscopic modeling.

  7. A giant, complex fronto-ethmoidal ivory osteoma: Surgical technique in a resource-limited practice

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Amos Olufemi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Unlike small and medium size fronto-ethmoidal osteomas which are amenable to surgical excision through limited craniofacial openings, giant lesions require extensive and complex craniofacial dissection, and post lesionectomy reconstruction using an array of modern-day surgical adjuncts. This is a report of our surgical technique for the successful and esthetically fair operative resection of a giant fronto-ethmoidal osteoma in a difficult practice setting. Case Description: A 32-year-old Nigerian lady harbored a giant complex fronto-ethmoidal ivory osteoma. Deploying our understanding of modern-day advanced microsurgical anatomy and technique of skull base surgery, but under severe resource limitations, a radical total surgical resection was performed and an esthetically fair post lesionectomy reconstruction was achieved. The patient remains tumor-free in 20 months, so far, of postoperative follow-up. Conclusions: Even under severe resource limitations, inventive adaptations of modern-day skull base surgery techniques can facilitate hitherto unusual functional and esthetically successful resection of giant osteomas of the fronto-ethmoidal sinus complex. PMID:21245944

  8. Electronic spectroscopy of I2-Xe complexes in solid Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulkko, Eero; Ahokas, Jussi; Lindgren, Johan; Myllyperkiö, Pasi; Pettersson, Mika

    2012-05-01

    In the present work, we have studied ion-pair states of matrix-isolated I2 with vacuum-UV absorption and UV-vis-NIR emission, where the matrix environment is systematically changed by mixing Kr with Xe, from pure Kr to a more polarizable Xe host. Particular emphasis is put on low doping levels of Xe that yield a binary complex I2-Xe, as verified by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements. Associated with interaction of I2 with Xe we can observe strong new absorption in vacuum-UV, redshifted 2400 cm-1 from the X → D transition of I2. Observed redshift can be explained by symmetry breaking of ion-pair states within the I2-Xe complex. Systematic Xe doping of Kr matrices shows that at low doping levels, positions of I2 ion-pair emissions are not significantly affected by complexation with Xe, but simultaneous increase of emissions from doubly spin-excited states indicates non-radiative relaxation to valence states. At intermediate doping levels ion-pair emissions shift systematically to red due to change in the average polarizability of the environment. We have conducted spectrally resolved ultrafast pump-probe ion-pair emission studies with pure and Xe doped Kr matrices, in order to reveal the influence of Xe to I2 dynamics in solid Kr. Strikingly, relaxed emission from the ion-pair states shows no indication of complex presence. It further indicates that the complex escapes detection due to a non-radiative relaxation.

  9. Electronic spectroscopy of I(2)-Xe complexes in solid Krypton.

    PubMed

    Hulkko, Eero; Ahokas, Jussi; Lindgren, Johan; Myllyperkiö, Pasi; Pettersson, Mika

    2012-05-01

    In the present work, we have studied ion-pair states of matrix-isolated I(2) with vacuum-UV absorption and UV-vis-NIR emission, where the matrix environment is systematically changed by mixing Kr with Xe, from pure Kr to a more polarizable Xe host. Particular emphasis is put on low doping levels of Xe that yield a binary complex I(2)-Xe, as verified by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements. Associated with interaction of I(2) with Xe we can observe strong new absorption in vacuum-UV, redshifted 2400 cm(-1) from the X → D transition of I(2). Observed redshift can be explained by symmetry breaking of ion-pair states within the I(2)-Xe complex. Systematic Xe doping of Kr matrices shows that at low doping levels, positions of I(2) ion-pair emissions are not significantly affected by complexation with Xe, but simultaneous increase of emissions from doubly spin-excited states indicates non-radiative relaxation to valence states. At intermediate doping levels ion-pair emissions shift systematically to red due to change in the average polarizability of the environment. We have conducted spectrally resolved ultrafast pump-probe ion-pair emission studies with pure and Xe doped Kr matrices, in order to reveal the influence of Xe to I(2) dynamics in solid Kr. Strikingly, relaxed emission from the ion-pair states shows no indication of complex presence. It further indicates that the complex escapes detection due to a non-radiative relaxation. PMID:22583243

  10. Progression in Complexity: Contextualizing Sustainable Marine Resources Management in a 10th Grade Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Torija, Beatriz; Jiménez-Aleixandre, María-Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable management of marine resources raises great challenges. Working with this socio-scientific issue in the classroom requires students to apply complex models about energy flow and trophic pyramids in order to understand that food chains represent transfer of energy, to construct meanings for sustainable resources management through discourse, and to connect them to actions and decisions in a real-life context. In this paper we examine the process of elaboration of plans for resources management in a marine ecosystem by 10th grade students (15-16 year) in the context of solving an authentic task. A complete class ( N = 14) worked in a sequence about ecosystems. Working in small groups, the students made models of energy flow and trophic pyramids, and used them to solve the problem of feeding a small community for a long time. Data collection included videotaping and audiotaping of all of the sessions, and collecting the students' written productions. The research objective is to examine the process of designing a plan for sustainable resources management in terms of the discursive moves of the students across stages in contextualizing practices, or different degrees of complexity (Jiménez-Aleixandre & Reigosa International Journal of Science Education, 14(1): 51-61 2006), understood as transformations from theoretical statements to decisions about the plan. The analysis of students' discursive moves shows how the groups progressed through stages of connecting different models, between them and with the context, in order to solve the task. The challenges related to taking this sustainability issue to the classroom are discussed.

  11. Towards Intelligent Dynamic Deployment of Mobile Sensors in Complex Resource-Bounded Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, B M; Hanley, W G

    2007-05-08

    Decision-making in the face of uncertainty requires an understanding of the probabilistic mechanisms that govern the complex behavior of these systems. This issue applies to many domains: financial investments, disease control, military planning and homeland security. In each of these areas, there is a practical need for efficient resource-bounded reasoning capabilities to support optimal decision-making. Specifically, given a highly complex system, with numerous random variables and their dynamic interactions, how do we monitor such a system and detect crucial events that might impact our decision making process? More importantly, how do we perform this reasoning efficiently--to an acceptable degree of accuracy in real time--when there are only limited computational power and sensory capabilities? These questions encapsulate nontrivial key issues faced by many high-profile Laboratory missions: the problem of efficient inference and dynamic sensor deployment for risk/uncertainty reduction. By leveraging solid ideas such as system decomposition into loosely coupled subsystems and smart resource allocation among these subsystems, we can parallelize inference and data acquisition for faster and improved computational performance. In this report, we propose technical approaches for developing algorithmic tools to enable future scientific and engineering endeavors to better achieve the optimal use of limited resources for maximal return of information on a complex system. The result of the proposed research effort will be an efficient reasoning framework that would enable mobile sensors to work collaboratively as teams of adaptive and responsive agents, whose joint goal is to gather useful information that would assist in the inference process.

  12. Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics of the Acetylene - Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Shan-Shan

    The structures, intermolecular forces and excited state dynamics of acetylene(A) cdot Ar complex are investigated by combination of laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy pairwise potential model calculations. Acetylene is linear in the X state while trans-bent in the (A) state. Although only one structure has been known to exist for the acetylene(X) cdot Ar complex, two isomeric structures are determined for the acetylene(A) cdot Ar complex from the rotational band shape analysis of the fluorescence excitation spectra. One of the isomers has the argon sitting in the molecular plane of C _2H_2 (A), 3.77 A away from the center-of-mass of acetylene, the other has the argon 3.71 A above the plane on the C_2 axis. Formulas useful for calculating axis switching angles in non-planar molecules have been derived and applied to the two isomeric structures. It was found that despite the acetylene geometry change from the (X) to the (A) state, the axis switching effect is negligible for the complex spectral calculation. A pair potential model with parameters directly extracted from the ones calculated for ethene (X) cdot Ar is able to produce the two structures. Based on the structures and the calculated potential surface, three of the vdW frequencies are assigned to be: upsilon_{rm stretch } = 28 cm^{-1} for the out-of-plane isomer, upsilon_ {rm bend1} = 11 cm^ {-1} (the in-plane bend) and upsilon_{rm bend2} = 8.5 cm^{-1} (the out -of-plane bend) for the in-plane isomer. The existence of the two isomers allowed the study of the orientation dependence in intersystem crossing (ISC) of acetylene(S _1) induced by interaction with argon. Similar ISC lifetimes (~100 ns) were observed for the two isomers, suggesting that the pi and pi^* orbitals are equally susceptible to spin-changing interactions with Ar.

  13. Electrostatic effects on electron-transfer kinetics in the cytochrome f-plastocyanin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, G M; Cramer, W A; Krishtalik, L I

    1997-01-01

    In a complex of two electron-transfer proteins, their redox potentials can be shifted due to changes in the dielectric surroundings and the electrostatic potentials at each center caused by the charged residues of the partner. These effects are dependent on the geometry of the complex. Three different docking configurations (DCs) for intracomplex electron transfer between cytochrome f and plastocyanin were studied, defined by 1) close contact of the positively charged region of cytochrome f and the negatively charged regions of plastocyanin (DC1) and by (2, 3) close contact of the surface regions adjacent to the Fe and Cu redox centers (DC2 and DC3). The equilibrium energetics for electron transfer in DC1-DC3 are the same within approximately +/-0.1 kT. The lower reorganization energy for DC2 results in a slightly lower activation energy for this complex compared with DC1 and DC3. The long heme-copper distance (approximately 24 A) in the DC1 complex drastically decreases electronic coupling and makes this complex much less favorable for electron transfer than DC2 or DC3. DC1-like complexes can only serve as docking intermediates in the pathway toward formation of an electron-transfer-competent complex. Elimination of the four positive charges arising from the lysine residues in the positive patch of cytochrome f, as accomplished by mutagenesis, exerts a negligible effect (approximately 3 mV) on the redox potential difference between cyt f and PC. PMID:9414237

  14. Potential resource and toxicity impacts from metals in waste electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seung H; Lee, Dae Sung; Lim, Seong-Rin

    2016-04-01

    As a result of the continuous release of new electronic devices, existing electronic devices are quickly made obsolete and rapidly become electronic waste (e-waste). Because e-waste contains a variety of metals, information about those metals with the potential for substantial environmental impact should be provided to manufacturers, recyclers, and disposers to proactively reduce this impact. This study assesses the resource and toxicity (i.e., cancer, noncancer, and ecotoxicity) potentials of various heavy metals commonly found in e-waste from laptop computers, liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors, LCD TVs, plasma TVs, color cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs, and cell phones and then evaluates such potentials using life cycle impact-based methods. Resource potentials derive primarily from Cu, Sb, Ag, and Pb. Toxicity potentials derive primarily from Pb, Ni, and Hg for cancer toxicity; from Pb, Hg, Zn, and As for noncancer toxicity; and from Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn for ecotoxicity. Therefore, managing these heavy metals should be a high priority in the design, recycling, and disposal stages of electronic devices. PMID:27017840

  15. Opening a Can of wERMS: Texas A&M University's Experiences in Implementing Two Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Price, Apryl; Smith, Jane; Barrett, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, Texas A&M University (TAMU) has searched for a way to administer its electronic subscriptions as well as the electronic subscriptions shared among the TAMU System. In this article, we address our attempts to implement an effective electronic resource management system (ERMS), both for subscriptions on the main campus and…

  16. Electronic and chiroptical properties of chiral cycloiridiated complexes bearing helicenic NHC ligands.

    PubMed

    Hellou, Nora; Jahier-Diallo, Claire; Baslé, Olivier; Srebro-Hooper, Monika; Toupet, Loïc; Roisnel, Thierry; Caytan, Elsa; Roussel, Christian; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Autschbach, Jochen; Mauduit, Marc; Crassous, Jeanne

    2016-07-28

    The first helicene-NHC-iridium complexes have been prepared in enantiopure forms. Their stereochemical, electronic, and chiroptical features were characterized experimentally and via first-principles calculations, highlighting the helical and iridium-centered chirality. PMID:27354241

  17. Postgraduate medical students’ acceptance and understanding of scientific information databases and electronic resources

    PubMed Central

    Azami, Mohammad; Khajouei, Reza; Rakhshani, Safiyeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The significance and validity of web-based scientific databases are increasing dramatically in the scientific community. Moreover, a great number of students use these resources without having sufficient and accurate knowledge and understanding. In order for students to use these databases and electronic resources optimally, identifying the factors that affect the understanding and acceptance of these resources seems necessary. The aim of this study was to determine postgraduate medical students’ acceptance and understanding of these resources. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 311 postgraduate medical students from Kerman University of Medical Science (KMU) in 2013. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire, and the data were analyzed using SPSS. In order to design the model (i.e., the interaction between study variables and to determine the relationships between them in an integrated pattern), LISREL version 8.7 and a structural equation model were used. Descriptive statistics and t-tests also were used in data analysis. Results The results showed that the average components of the perception of usefulness, perception of ease of use, attitude towards use, decision to use, using to perform duties, and using to increase knowledge were 4.31, 4.14, 4.24, 16.27, 20.85, and 16.13 respectively. Accordingly, the average of all these indicators was significantly higher than the assumed amount (p < 0.01). Moreover, the results obtained from factor analysis and the structural equation model indicated that the model of the present study fit the data perfectly. Conclusions Based on the findings of this study, the more these databases are considered useful and easy to use, the more they are used. Therefore, designers of databases and electronic resources can design systems that are both useful and easy to learn by considering the components of the research model. PMID:27123213

  18. Protein−Protein Interaction Regulates the Direction of Catalysis and Electron Transfer in a Redox Enzyme Complex

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Duncan G.; Marritt, Sophie; Firer-Sherwood, Mackenzie A.; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David J.; Evans, Stephen D.; Elliott, Sean J.; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2013-06-25

    Protein−protein complexes are fundamental to life where they are key to processes ranging from central metabolism to cell signaling. Transient protein−protein interactions generally underpin the electron-transfer (ET) pathways of respiration.1 One of the many well-characterized examples of a transient ET complex is that between cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase.2−5 The interaction between these partner proteins is weak and dynamic. This ensures the frequent exchange of partner proteins as required to support electron flux in cases where the sole function of one of the proteins is to shuttle electrons between redox partners.1 While it is generally assumed that such transient protein−protein interactions are specific, for Paracoccus denitrificans it has recently been shown that seven proteins in a respiratory network interact in a seemingly ill-defined manner. This results in an intricate electron-transfer network that may be better suited to successful colonization of habitats with changing resources.

  19. Unveiling the complex electronic structure of amorphous metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Århammar, C.; Pietzsch, Annette; Bock, Nicolas; Holmström, Erik; Araujo, C. Moyses; Gråsjö, Johan; Zhao, Shuxi; Green, Sara; Peery, T.; Hennies, Franz; Amerioun, Shahrad; Föhlisch, Alexander; Schlappa, Justine; Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Wallace, Duane C.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous materials represent a large and important emerging area of material’s science. Amorphous oxides are key technological oxides in applications such as a gate dielectric in Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor devices and in Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon and TANOS (TaN-Al2O3-Si3N4-SiO2-Silicon) flash memories. These technologies are required for the high packing density of today’s integrated circuits. Therefore the investigation of defect states in these structures is crucial. In this work we present X-ray synchrotron measurements, with an energy resolution which is about 5–10 times higher than is attainable with standard spectrometers, of amorphous alumina. We demonstrate that our experimental results are in agreement with calculated spectra of amorphous alumina which we have generated by stochastic quenching. This first principles method, which we have recently developed, is found to be superior to molecular dynamics in simulating the rapid gas to solid transition that takes place as this material is deposited for thin film applications. We detect and analyze in detail states in the band gap that originate from oxygen pairs. Similar states were previously found in amorphous alumina by other spectroscopic methods and were assigned to oxygen vacancies claimed to act mutually as electron and hole traps. The oxygen pairs which we probe in this work act as hole traps only and will influence the information retention in electronic devices. In amorphous silica oxygen pairs have already been found, thus they may be a feature which is characteristic also of other amorphous metal oxides.

  20. Gd(III) complexes for electron-electron dipolar spectroscopy: Effects of deuteration, pH and zero field splitting.

    PubMed

    Garbuio, Luca; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Häussinger, Daniel; Yulikov, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    Spectral parameters of Gd(III) complexes are intimately linked to the performance of the Gd(III)-nitroxide or Gd(III)-Gd(III) double electron-electron resonance (DEER or PELDOR) techniques, as well as to that of relaxation induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) spectroscopy with Gd(III) ions. These techniques are of interest for applications in structural biology, since they can selectively detect site-to-site distances in biomolecules or biomolecular complexes in the nanometer range. Here we report relaxation properties, echo detected EPR spectra, as well as the magnitude of the echo reduction effect in Gd(III)-nitroxide DEER for a series of Gadolinium(III) complexes with chelating agents derived from tetraazacyclododecane. We observed that solvent deuteration does not only lengthen the relaxation times of Gd(III) centers but also weakens the DEER echo reduction effect. Both of these phenomena lead to an improved signal-to-noise ratios or, alternatively, longer accessible distance range in pulse EPR measurements. The presented data enrich the knowledge on paramagnetic Gd(III) chelate complexes in frozen solutions, and can help optimize the experimental conditions for most types of the pulse measurements of the electron-electron dipolar interactions. PMID:26342680

  1. Gd(III) complexes for electron-electron dipolar spectroscopy: Effects of deuteration, pH and zero field splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuio, Luca; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Häussinger, Daniel; Yulikov, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    Spectral parameters of Gd(III) complexes are intimately linked to the performance of the Gd(III)-nitroxide or Gd(III)-Gd(III) double electron-electron resonance (DEER or PELDOR) techniques, as well as to that of relaxation induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) spectroscopy with Gd(III) ions. These techniques are of interest for applications in structural biology, since they can selectively detect site-to-site distances in biomolecules or biomolecular complexes in the nanometer range. Here we report relaxation properties, echo detected EPR spectra, as well as the magnitude of the echo reduction effect in Gd(III)-nitroxide DEER for a series of Gadolinium(III) complexes with chelating agents derived from tetraazacyclododecane. We observed that solvent deuteration does not only lengthen the relaxation times of Gd(III) centers but also weakens the DEER echo reduction effect. Both of these phenomena lead to an improved signal-to-noise ratios or, alternatively, longer accessible distance range in pulse EPR measurements. The presented data enrich the knowledge on paramagnetic Gd(III) chelate complexes in frozen solutions, and can help optimize the experimental conditions for most types of the pulse measurements of the electron-electron dipolar interactions.

  2. Application of models for exchange of electronic documents in complex administrative services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavev, Victor

    2015-11-01

    The report presents application of models for exchange of electronic documents between different administrations in government and business sectors. It shows the benefits of implementing electronic exchange of documents between different local offices of one administration in government sector such as a municipality and the way it is useful for implementing complex administrative services.

  3. Application of models for exchange of electronic documents in complex administrative services

    SciTech Connect

    Glavev, Victor

    2015-11-30

    The report presents application of models for exchange of electronic documents between different administrations in government and business sectors. It shows the benefits of implementing electronic exchange of documents between different local offices of one administration in government sector such as a municipality and the way it is useful for implementing complex administrative services.

  4. Near-infrared-induced electron transfer of an uranyl macrocyclic complex without energy transfer to dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christina M; Ohkubo, Kei; Ho, I-Ting; Zhang, Zhan; Ishida, Masatoshi; Fang, Yuanyuan; Lynch, Vincent M; Kadish, Karl M; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    Photoexcitation of dichloromethane solutions of an uranyl macrocyclic complex with cyclo[1]furan[1]pyridine[4]-pyrrole () at the near-infrared (NIR) band (1177 nm) in the presence of electron donors and acceptors resulted in NIR-induced electron transfer without producing singlet oxygen via energy transfer. PMID:25791126

  5. Electron-atom scattering resonances: Complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method for B-shape resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsednee, Tsogbayar; Yeager, Danny L.

    2015-06-01

    We develop the complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator (CMCSTEP) technique for the theoretical determination of resonance parameters with electron-atom-molecule systems including open-shell and highly correlated (nondynamical correlation) atoms and molecules. The multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method developed and implemented by Yeager and his coworkers in real space gives very accurate and reliable ionization potentials and electron affinities. The CMCSTEP method uses a complex-scaled multiconfigurational self-consistent field state as an initial state along with a dilated Hamiltonian where all of the electronic coordinates are scaled by a complex factor. We apply the CMCSTEP and the related M1 methods to get the B-shape resonance parameters using 14 s 11 p and 14 s 11 p 5 d basis sets with 1 s 2 s 2 p 3 s , 1 s 2 s 2 p 3 s 3 p , 1 s 2 s 2 p 3 d , 2 s 2 p 3 s 3 p , 2 s 2 p 3 d , and 2 s 2 p 3 s 3 p 3 d complete active spaces. The CMCSTEP and M1 resonance positions and widths are obtained for the 1 s22 s22 p21D , 1 s22 s 2 p33D , and 1 s 2 s22 p33D , 3S , and 3P shape resonances.

  6. Propentdyopent: the scaffold of a heme metabolite as an electron reservoir in transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, R; Chang, T M; Astashkin, A V; Lincoln, K M; Tomat, E

    2016-05-01

    The dipyrrin-1,9-dione scaffold of heme metabolite propendyopent coordinates late transition metals (Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) forming homoleptic, pseudo-tetrahedral complexes. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies reveal that the monoanionic, bidentate ligands behave as electron reservoirs as the complexes reversibly host one or two ligand-based radicals. PMID:27109437

  7. Sequential Energy and Electron Transfer in Polynuclear Complex Sensitized TiO2 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandeep; Kar, Prasenjit; Banerjee, Tanmay; Das, Amitava; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2012-06-01

    Polynuclear-polypyridyl complexes exhibit a directional energy-transfer property that can improve their photosensitization activity. In the present work, the energy-transfer process is explored in a trinuclear Ru2(∧)Os1 complex using transient absorption spectroscopy. This study reveals an efficient excitation energy transfer from the terminal (Ru(II) complex) to the core (Os(II) complex) region in the ultrafast time domain (400 fs-40 ps). The excitation energy funnel is useful in improving the functionalized core activity. This is evidenced in an interfacial electron-transfer study of Ru2(∧)Os1, Ru2(∧)Ru1, and Os1 complex sensitized TiO2 nanoparticle (TiO2 NP) systems. The intramolecular energy transfer causes sequential excitation of the core part of the Ru2(∧)Os1 complex, which leads to multiexponential electron injection into TiO2 NP. Besides this, the electronic coupling between the metal ion centers stabilizes the positive charge within the trinuclear complex, which results in a slow charge recombination reaction. This study shows that polynuclear complexes can be very useful for their panchromatic effects, unidirectional energy- and electron-transfer properties. PMID:26285635

  8. Data Mining Approaches for Modeling Complex Electronic Circuit Design Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Yongjin; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Wang, Gi-Nam

    2008-01-01

    A printed circuit board (PCB) is an essential part of modern electronic circuits. It is made of a flat panel of insulating materials with patterned copper foils that act as electric pathways for various components such as ICs, diodes, capacitors, resistors, and coils. The size of PCBs has been shrinking over the years, while the number of components mounted on these boards has increased considerably. This trend makes the design and fabrication of PCBs ever more difficult. At the beginning of design cycles, it is important to estimate the time to complete the steps required accurately, based on many factors such as the required parts, approximate board size and shape, and a rough sketch of schematics. Current approach uses multiple linear regression (MLR) technique for time and cost estimations. However, the need for accurate predictive models continues to grow as the technology becomes more advanced. In this paper, we analyze a large volume of historical PCB design data, extract some important variables, and develop predictive models based on the extracted variables using a data mining approach. The data mining approach uses an adaptive support vector regression (ASVR) technique; the benchmark model used is the MLR technique currently being used in the industry. The strengths of SVR for this data include its ability to represent data in high-dimensional space through kernel functions. The computational results show that a data mining approach is a better prediction technique for this data. Our approach reduces computation time and enhances the practical applications of the SVR technique.

  9. Stoichiometry-Control of Electronic Transport at Complex Oxide Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat

    2014-03-01

    Employing the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach to grow NdTiO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures - a polar/nonpolar system sharing many similarities with LaAlO3/SrTiO3 with an added functionality of NdTiO3 being an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator- we will present a detailed film growth and transport study as a function of cation stoichiometry in NdTiO3. Irrespective of the cation stoichiometry (measured by high resolution x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), films grew in an atomic layer-by-layer fashion as evidenced by the reflection high-energy electron diffraction intensity oscillations, and films showed a temperature dependent metal-to-insulator (M-I) type behavior. Remarkably, TMI was found to increase irrespective of whether films were Nd- or Ti-rich. Furthermore, hall measurement of a 3.5 nm NdTiO3 film grown on 3 nm SrTiO3 layer on LSAT substrate revealed n type carrier density, 3 x 1014 cm-2 for stoichiometric samples, which would be consistent with the interface conduction due to an interfacial polar discontinuity effect. Using detailed temperature dependent magneto-transport measurements, we will present a comprehensive study of correlation between film stoichiometry, interface conduction, and transport mechanisms.

  10. Metal complex-based electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, C. Michael; Sapp, Shawn A.; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Contado, Cristiano; Caramori, Stefano

    2006-03-28

    This present invention provides a metal-ligand complex and methods for using and preparing the same. In particular, the metal-ligand complex of the present invention is of the formula: L.sub.a-M-X.sub.b where L, M, X, a, and b are those define herein. The metal-ligand complexes of the present invention are useful in a variety of applications including as electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells and related photoelectrochromic devices.

  11. On The Electronic Structure of[1Fe] Fe-S Complexes From Anionic Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xin; Wang, Xue B.; Fu, Youjun; Wang, Lai S.

    2003-03-21

    The electronic structure of a series of Fe-S complexes, Fe(SCN)(3)(-), Fe(SCN)(4)(-), Na+[Fe(SCN)(4)(2-)], Fe(SCH3)(3)(-), Fe(SCH3)(4)(-), Na+[Fe(S-2-o-xyl)(2)(2-)], and Fe(S-2-o-xyl)(2)(-) (where S-2-o-xyl= o-xylene-alpha,alpha'- dithiolate), was investigated in the gas phase using photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy. Spectral features due to detachment from metal d orbitals or ligand orbitals were distinguished by comparing with the spectrum of a d(0) complex, Sc(SCN)(4)(-). A weak threshold feature was observed in the spectra of all ferrous complexes due to detachment of the minority spin Fe 3d electron[Fe-II (3d(6)) --> Fe-III (3d(5))]. The spin majority Fe 3d electron signals were observed at much higher binding energies, revealing directly the''inverted level scheme'' for these[1Fe] Fe-S complexes based on previous spin polarized calculations. The''inverted level scheme'' is shown to be a general feature of the electronic structures of the[1Fe] Fe-S complexes, independent o f the oxidation state and coordination number. Information about the gas-phase redox potentials and reorganization energies upon oxidation of the ferrous complexes is obtained from the adiabatic and vertical detachment energies of the minority Fe 3d electron.

  12. Relationship between gallium pyramidalization in L·GaCl3 complexes and the electronic ligand properties.

    PubMed

    El-Hellani, Ahmad; Monot, Julien; Tang, Shun; Guillot, Régis; Bour, Christophe; Gandon, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    Six new molecular GaCl3 adducts of electron rich compounds of the carbone (carbodiphosphorane, tetraaminoallene) and cyclic alkyl amino carbene (CAAC) families have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The sum of their Cl-Ga-Cl angles has been compared to those of 20 other complexes exhibiting various oxygen-, nitrogen-, phosphorus-, and carbon-donor ligands for which good quality X-ray analyses have been reported. The pyramidalization of the GaCl3 moiety in L·GaCl3 complexes has been checked against the computed antisymmetric stretching of the Ga-Cl bonds. It has also been compared to the symmetric stretching of the C-O bonds of the corresponding L·Ni(CO)3 complexes (Tolman Electronic Parameter). On this basis, a relationship between the pyramidalization observed in the gallium complexes and the electronic ligand properties has been established. PMID:24070393

  13. Determining the level of awareness of the physicians in using the variety of electronic information resources and the effecting factors

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Ahmad; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Moradi, Salimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Understanding of the medical society's from the types of information resources for quick and easy access to information is an imperative task in medical researches and management of the treatment. The present study was aimed to determine the level of awareness of the physicians in using various electronic information resources and the factors affecting it. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive survey. The data collection tool was a researcher-made questionnaire. The study population included all the physicians and specialty physicians of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and numbered 350. The sample size based on Morgan's formula was set at 180. The content validity of the tool was confirmed by the library and information professionals and the reliability was 95%. Descriptive statistics were used including the SPSS software version 19. Results: On reviewing the need of the physicians to obtain the information on several occasions, the need for information in conducting the researches was reported by the maximum number of physicians (91.9%) and the usage of information resources, especially the electronic resources, formed 65.4% as the highest rate with regard to meeting the information needs of the physicians. Among the electronic information databases, the maximum awareness was related to Medline with 86.5%. Among the various electronic information resources, the highest awareness (43.3%) was related to the E-journals. The highest usage (36%) was also from the same source. The studied physicians considered the most effective deterrent in the use of electronic information resources as being too busy and lack of time. Conclusion: Despite the importance of electronic information resources for the physician's community, there was no comprehensive knowledge of these resources. This can lead to less usage of these resources. Therefore, careful planning is necessary in the hospital libraries in order to

  14. A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinsuke; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Kida, Akiko; Kameya, Takashi

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) as secondary metal resources. > The content and the total amount of metals in specific equipment are both important. > We categorized 21 EEE types from contents and total amounts of various metals. > Important equipment types as secondary resources were listed for each metal kind. > Collectability and possible collection systems of various EEE types were discussed. - Abstract: End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) has recently received attention as a secondary source of metals. This study examined characteristics of end-of-life EEE as secondary metal resources to consider efficient collection and metal recovery systems according to the specific metals and types of EEE. We constructed an analogy between natural resource development and metal recovery from end-of-life EEE and found that metal content and total annual amount of metal contained in each type of end-of-life EEE should be considered in secondary resource development, as well as the collectability of the end-of-life products. We then categorized 21 EEE types into five groups and discussed their potential as secondary metal resources. Refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and CRT TVs were evaluated as the most important sources of common metals, and personal computers, mobile phones, and video games were evaluated as the most important sources of precious metals. Several types of small digital equipment were also identified as important sources of precious metals; however, mid-size information and communication technology (ICT) equipment (e.g., printers and fax machines) and audio/video equipment were shown to be more important as a source of a variety of less common metals. The physical collectability of each type of EEE was roughly characterized by unit size and number of end-of-life products generated annually. Current collection systems in Japan were examined and potentially appropriate collection methods

  15. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Hexachloroplatinate-Nucleobase Complexes: Nucleobase Excited State Decay Observed via Delayed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ~1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 2- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 2-∙thymine and PtCl6 2-∙adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes [Sen et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 11626, 2015]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 2-∙nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes, is attributed to onephoton excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a timescale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  16. Reactivity of seventeen- and nineteen-valence electron complexes in organometallic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, Albert E.; Tyler, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A guideline to the reactivity of 17- and 19-valence electron species in organometallic chemistry is proposed which the authors believe will supersede all others. The thesis holds that the reactions of 17-electron metal radicals are associatively activated with reactions proceeding through a 19-valence electron species. The disparate reaction chemistry of the 17-electron metal radicals are unified in terms of this associative reaction pathway, and the intermediacy of 19-valence electron complexes in producing the observed products is discussed. It is suggested that related associatively activated pathways need to be considered in some reactions that are thought to occur by more conventional routes involving 16- and 18-electron intermediates. The basic reaction chemistry and electronic structures of these species are briefly discussed.

  17. Treatment of complex infantile haemangioma in a resource-poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Natawidjaja, Ronald; Wang, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Infantile haemangiomas affect approximately 5% of the population and usually do not require treatment. However, complex cutaneous haemangiomas can cause disabling disfigurement, while haemangiomas in the brain, airway or gastrointestinal tract can cause life-threatening complications. Although children with infantile haemangiomas are often first brought to general practitioners and paediatricians by parents for care, they are thought of as a surgical problem and usually referred to specialty care. We present a case of an infant from a resource-poor setting in rural Indonesia with disfiguring facial haemangiomas, as well as a probable airway haemangioma causing stridor at rest. The infant was treated with oral propranolol with marked involution of the cutaneous haemangioma, resolution of stridor and increase in weight. PMID:25053694

  18. Complex Dynamics in a Model of Common Fishery Resource Harvested by Multiagents with Heterogeneous Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, En-Guo

    In this paper, we formulate a dynamical model of common fishery resource harvested by multiagents with heterogeneous strategy: profit maximizers and gradient learners. Special attention is paid to the problem of heterogeneity of strategic behaviors. We mainly study the existence and the local stability of non-negative equilibria for the model through mathematical analysis. We analyze local bifurcations and complex dynamics such as coexisting attractors by numerical simulations. We also study the local and global dynamics of the exclusive gradient learners as a special case of the model. We discover that when adjusting the speed to be slightly high, the increasing ratio of gradient learners may lead to instability of the fixed point and makes the system sink into complicated dynamics such as quasiperiodic or chaotic attractor. The results reveal that gradient learners with high adjusting speed may ultimately be more harmful to the sustainable use of fish stock than the profit maximizers.

  19. Combining gas phase electron capture and IRMPD action spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of a metastable reduced organometallic complex containing a non-innocent ligand.

    PubMed

    Katari, Madanakrishna; Payen de la Garanderie, Eleonore; Nicol, Edith; Steinmetz, Vincent; van der Rest, Guillaume; Carmichael, Duncan; Frison, Gilles

    2015-10-21

    Combining electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry and infrared multiple photon dissociation action spectroscopy allows the formation, selection and characterisation of reduced metal complexes containing non-innocent ligands. Zinc complexes containing diazafluorenone ligands have been studied and the localisation of the single electron on the metal atom in the mono-ligated complex has been demonstrated. PMID:26051020

  20. Impact of Knowledge Resources Linked to an Electronic Health Record on Frequency of Unnecessary Tests and Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Kenneth; Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Nowacki, Amy; Hickner, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic knowledge resources have the potential to rapidly provide answers to clinicians' questions. We sought to determine clinicians' reasons for searching these resources, the rate of finding relevant information, and the perceived clinical impact of the information they retrieved. Methods: We asked general internists, family…

  1. Navigating a strange and complex environment: experiences of Sudanese refugee women using a new nutrition resource

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Cynthia A; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Henshaw, Christena Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background Refugees experience dietary changes as part of the daily challenges they face resettling in a new country. Sudanese women seek to care and feed their families, but face language barriers in the marketplace, limited access to familiar foods, and forced new food choices. This study aimed to understand the acceptability of a purse-sized nutrition resource, “The Market Guide”, which was developed to help recently immigrated Sudanese refugee women identify and purchase healthy foods and navigate grocery stores. Methods Eight women participated in a focus group, four of whom were also observed during accompanied grocery store visits. Individual interviews were conducted with four health care workers at the resettlement center to gather perceptions about the suitability of The Market Guide. Focus groups and interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Data from field notes and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory for preliminary open codes, followed by selective and theoretical coding. Results The Market Guide was of limited use to Sudanese women. Their response to this resource revealed the struggles of women acculturating during their first year in Calgary, Canada. We discovered the basic social process, “Navigating through a strange and complex environment: learning ways to feed your family.” Language, transportation, and an unfamiliar marketplace challenged women and prevented them from exercising their customary role of “knowing” which foods were “safe and good” for their families. The nutrition resource fell short of informing food choices and purchases, and we discovered that “learning to feed your family” is a relational process where trusted persons, family, and friends help navigate dietary acculturation. Conclusion Emergent theory based on the basic social process may help health care professionals consider relational learning when planning health promotion and nutrition activities with Sudanese families. PMID:24790470

  2. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy of the nuclear pore complex with molecular resolution.

    PubMed

    Löschberger, Anna; Franke, Christian; Krohne, Georg; van de Linde, Sebastian; Sauer, Markus

    2014-10-15

    Here, we combine super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy with scanning electron microscopy to map the position of proteins of nuclear pore complexes in isolated Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes with molecular resolution in both imaging modes. We use the periodic molecular structure of the nuclear pore complex to superimpose direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images with a precision of <20 nm on electron micrographs. The correlative images demonstrate quantitative molecular labeling and localization of nuclear pore complex proteins by standard immunocytochemistry with primary and secondary antibodies and reveal that the nuclear pore complex is composed of eight gp210 (also known as NUP210) protein homodimers. In addition, we find subpopulations of nuclear pore complexes with ninefold symmetry, which are found occasionally among the more typical eightfold symmetrical structures. PMID:25146397

  3. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    PubMed

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks. PMID:26073739

  4. Mathematical model and software complex for computer simulation of field emission electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Konstantin

    2015-03-10

    The software complex developed in MATLAB allows modelling of function of diode and triode structures based on field emission electron sources with complex sub-micron geometry, their volt-ampere characteristics, calculating distribution of electric field for educational and research needs. The goal of this paper is describing the physical-mathematical model, calculation methods and algorithms the software complex is based on, demonstrating the principles of its function and showing results of its work. For getting to know the complex, a demo version with graphical user interface is presented.

  5. Rare Earth Complex as Electron Trapper and Energy Transfer Ladder for Efficient Red Iridium Complex Based Electroluminescent Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Li, Leijiao; Jiang, Yunlong; Cui, Rongzhen; Li, Yanan; Zhao, Xuesen; Zhang, Hongjie

    2015-07-29

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrated the new functions of trivalent rare earth complex in improving the electroluminescent (EL) performances of iridium complex by codoping trace Eu(TTA)3phen (TTA = thenoyltrifluoroacetone, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) into a light-emitting layer based on PQ2Ir(dpm) (iridium(III)bis(2-phenylquinoly-N,C(2'))dipivaloylmethane). Compared with a reference device, the codoped devices displayed higher efficiencies, slower efficiency roll-off, higher brightness, and even better color purity. Experimental results demonstrated that Eu(TTA)3phen molecules function as electron trappers due to its low-lying energy levels, which are helpful in balancing holes and electrons and in broadening recombination zone. In addition, the matched triplet energy of Eu(TTA)3phen is instrumental in facilitating energy transfer from host to emitter. Finally, highly efficient red EL devices with the highest current efficiency, power efficiency and brightness up to 58.98 cd A(-1) (external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 21%), 61.73 lm W(-1) and 100870 cd m(-2), respectively, were obtained by appropriately decreasing the doping concentration of iridium complex. At certain brightness of 1000 cd m(-2), EL current efficiency up to 51.94 cd A(-1) (EQE = 18.5%) was retained. Our investigation extends the application of rare earth complexes in EL devices and provides a chance to improve the device performances. PMID:26173649

  6. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  7. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  8. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment.

  9. Influence of Electron-Withdrawing Substituents on the Electronic Structure of Oxidized Ni and Cu Salen Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Linus; Herasymchuk, Khrystyna; Thomas, Fabrice; Storr, Tim

    2015-06-15

    Nickel (Ni(Sal(CF3))) and copper (Cu(Sal(CF3))) complexes of an electron-poor salen ligand were prepared, and their one-electron oxidized counterparts were studied using an array of spectroscopic and theoretical methods. The electrochemistry of both complexes exhibited quasi-reversible redox processes at higher potentials in comparison to the M(Sal(R)) (R = (t)Bu, OMe, NMe2) analogues, in line with the electron-withdrawing nature of the para-CF3 substituent. Chemical oxidation, monitored by ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy, afforded their corresponding one-electron oxidized products. Ligand-based oxidation was observed for [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•), as evidenced by sharp NIR transitions in the UV-vis-NIR spectrum and a broad isotropic signal at g = 2.067 by solution electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Such sharp NIR transitions observed for [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•) are indicative of a delocalized electronic structure, which is in good agreement with electrochemical measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In addition, the increased Lewis acidity of [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•), evident from the EPR g-value and DFT calculations, was further quantified by the binding affinity of axial ligands to [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•). For [Cu(Sal(CF3))](+), an intense ligand-to-metal charge transfer band at 18 700 cm(-1) in the UV-vis-NIR spectrum was observed, which is diagnostic for the formation of a Cu(III) species [J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 15448-15459]. The Cu(III) character for [Cu(Sal(CF3))](+) is further confirmed by (19)F NMR analysis. Taken together, these results show that the electron-deficient salen ligand H2Sal(CF3) increases the Lewis acidity of the coordinating metal center. PMID:26016716

  10. Electron transfer between the QmoABC membrane complex and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Américo G; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C

    2016-04-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (AprAB) is a key enzyme in the sulfate reduction pathway that catalyzes the reversible two electron reduction of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) to sulfite and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). The physiological electron donor for AprAB is proposed to be the QmoABC membrane complex, coupling the quinone-pool to sulfate reduction. However, direct electron transfer between these two proteins has never been observed. In this work we demonstrate for the first time direct electron transfer between the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 QmoABC complex and AprAB. Cyclic voltammetry conducted with the modified Qmo electrode and AprAB in the electrolyte solution presented the Qmo electrochemical signature with two additional well-defined one electron redox processes, attributed to the AprAB FAD redox behavior. Moreover, experiments performed under catalytic conditions using the QmoABC modified electrode, with AprAB and APS in solution, show a catalytic current peak develop in the cathodic wave, attributed to substrate reduction, and which is not observed in the absence of QmoABC. Substrate dependence conducted with different electrode preparations (with and without immobilized Qmo) demonstrated that the QmoABC complex is essential for efficient electron delivery to AprAB, in order to sustain catalysis. These results confirm the role of Qmo in electron transfer to AprAB. PMID:26768116

  11. Electrostatic effects on proton coupled electron transfer in oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S; Gunner, M R

    2013-05-23

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton coupled electron transfer in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced multiconformer continuum electrostatics (MCCE) model, parametrized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKa's and oxidation midpoint potentials (E(m)'s) match experimental values for eight complexes, indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKa's of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6](2+/3+) (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2](3-) (2, P = 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato), [Mn2(IV,IV)(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2](4+) (3, terpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2](4+) (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKa's of μ-oxo bridges and Mn E(m)'s in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4] (5, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7), and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8). The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5 ± 0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the E(m)'s by ligand substituents, such as found in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where proton coupled electron transfer plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms. PMID:23570540

  12. Knowledge and use of electronic information resources by medical sciences faculty at The University of the West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Shamin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to determine faculty's knowledge of electronic resources, access to a computer, use of electronic resources (both number and frequency) available at the Medical Sciences Library (MSL), and the areas of training needed and to identify areas for further research. Methods: A survey was administered to faculty in medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, and veterinary sciences at The University of the West Indies. The questions covered computer literacy, computer access and location, knowledge and use of electronic resources, and training needs. Results: The response rate was 70%, of whom 97% were computer users. Seventy-three percent used computers daily, and 82% felt that their computer literacy level was average or beyond. Overall, it was found that faculty had high awareness of the electronic resources made available by the MSL but low use of MSL-specific resources supporting the suggested problem of underutilization. Many respondents felt that e-resources were important, and, though many felt that they were competent users, 83% were self-taught and many still expressed a need for training. Over 60% felt that a workshop with a hands-on component was the preferred format for training. It was recommended that there be greater promotion of the library's e-resources. PMID:15685270

  13. Review of material recovery from used electric and electronic equipment-alternative options for resource conservation.

    PubMed

    Friege, Henning

    2012-09-01

    For waste from electric and electronic equipment, the WEEE Directive stipulates the separate collection of electric and electronic waste. As to new electric and electronic devices, the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive bans the use of certain chemicals dangerous for man and environment. From the implementation of the WEEE directive, many unsolved problems have been documented: poor collection success, emission of dangerous substances during collection and recycling, irretrievable loss of valuable metals among others. As to RoHS, data from the literature show a satisfying success. The problems identified in the process can be reduced to some basic dilemmas at the borders between waste management, product policy and chemical safety. The objectives of the WEEE Directive and the specific targets for use and recycling of appliances are not consistent. There is no focus on scarce resources. Extended producer responsibility is not sufficient to guarantee sustainable waste management. Waste management reaches its limits due to problems of implementation but also due to physical laws. A holistic approach is necessary looking at all branch points and sinks in the stream of used products and waste from electric and electronic equipment. This may be done with respect to the general rules for sustainable management of material streams covering the three dimensions of sustainable policy. The relationships between the players in the field of electric and electronic devices have to be taken into account. Most of the problems identified in the implementation process will not be solved by the current amendment of the WEEE Directive. PMID:22993131

  14. Geometric and Electronic Structure of a Peroxomanganese(III) Complex Supported by a Scorpionate Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Colmer, Hannah E.; Geiger, Robert A.; Leto, Domenick F.; Wijeratne, Gayan B.; Day, Victor W.; Jackson, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    A monomeric MnII complex has been prepared with the facially-coordinating TpPh2 ligand, (TpPh2 = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)borate). The X-ray crystal structure shows three coordinating solvent molecules resulting in a six-coordinate complex with Mn-ligand bond lengths that are consistent with a high-spin MnII ion. Treatment of this MnII complex with excess KO2 at room temperature resulted in the formation of a MnIII-O2 complex that is stable for several days at ambient conditions, allowing for the determination of the X-ray crystal structure of this intermediate. The electronic structure of this peroxomanganese(III) adduct was examined by using electronic absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature variable-field (VTVH) MCD spectroscopies. Density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent (TD)-DFT, and multireference ab initio CASSCF/NEVPT2 calculations were used to assign the electronic transitions and further investigate the electronic structure of the peroxomanganese(III) species. The lowest ligand-field transition in the electronic absorption spectrum of the MnIII-O2 complex exhibits a blue shift in energy compared to other previously characterized peroxomanganese(III) complexes that results from a large axial bond elongation, reducing the metal-ligand covalency and stabilizing the σ-antibonding Mn dz2 MO that is the donor MO for this transition. PMID:25312785

  15. Generation of a large amount of energetic electrons in complex-structure bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiancai; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wen, Meng; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Wenpeng; Yu, Yahong; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2010-02-01

    By means of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we found that when the focus size of a laser pulse is much larger than the plasma wavelength and when the laser power is hundreds of times larger than the critical power required for relativistic self-focusing, a large complex bubble is formed. The transversal size of the bubble depends on the laser spot size. Owing to the large bubble size, a bunch of electrons with the total charge in the range of a few tens of nano-Coulombs is trapped and accelerated in the bubble. When the plasma density is 2×1019 cm-3, the charge of the energetic electron bunch with energy above 5 MeV exceeds 45 nC with a laser spot size of 60 μm. Electrons continuously self-injected into such a complex bubble serve as an effective source of high-charge electron bunches.

  16. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John; MacDonald, Ian

    1980-01-01

    Presents a guide to resources on television drama available to teachers for classroom use in television curriculum. Lists American and British television drama videorecordings of both series and individual presentations and offers a bibliography of "one-off" single fiction plays produced for British television. (JMF)

  17. Visualizing Macromolecular Complexes with In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Wong, Peony C. K.; Chiu, Po-Lin; Dutrow, Gavin H.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-11-01

    A central focus of biological research is understanding the structure/function relationship of macromolecular protein complexes. Yet conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques are limited to static observations. Here we present the first direct images of purified macromolecular protein complexes using in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results establish the capability of this technique for visualizing the interface between biology and nanotechnology with high fidelity while also probing the interactions of biomolecules within solution. This method represents an important advancement towards allowing future high-resolution observations of biological processes and conformational dynamics in real-time.

  18. Electron Bihole Complex Formation in Neutralization of Ne{sup +} on LiF(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Khemliche, H.; Villette, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Momeni, A.; Roncin, P.

    2001-06-18

    Neutralization of low keV Ne{sup +} ions at a LiF(001) surface is studied in a grazing incidence geometry. The combination of energy loss and electron spectroscopy in coincidence reveals two neutralization channels of comparable importance. Besides the Auger process, the Ne{sup +} neutralization can proceed via peculiar target excitation, corresponding to the formation of an electron bihole complex termed trion.

  19. Registration for electronic resources - challenges for part-time post qualifying students in the UK.

    PubMed

    Walton, G; Ray, K

    2001-09-01

    This article considers how part-time post qualifying nursing students can be supported in their learning both in the clinical setting and at their university. It assesses, using the University of Northumbria as a case study, the most effective processes that enable part-time post qualifying nursing students to have access to electronic sources of information (EIS). The move to electronic delivery of services to users has made the systems more complex, with the issue of authentication becoming increasingly important. It becomes vital that the users of these systems experience a seamless process in connecting to EIS. Findings suggest that the current systems at Northumbria are sufficiently flexible to ensure that, in most cases, part-time post qualifying nursing students receive their passwords and IDs at the correct time. Problems are experienced in ensuring the students receive concise and useful documentation, as well as information skills training to meet their specific needs. PMID:19036252

  20. a Theoretical Search for AN Electronic Spectrum of the He-BeO Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adrian; Heaven, Michael

    2014-06-01

    The surprisingly high dissociation energy of the He-Be bond in the He-BeO complex was first reported 25 years ago. Following which, a number of theoretical studies have investigated similar closed shell helium containing complexes. However, despite these investigations, a complex containing a strong He-X bond has thus far eluded experimental detection. In this work, potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states of the He-BeO complex have been calculated employing high level CASSCF+MRCI+Q methodologies and utilizing extended basis sets. Several excited states show strong interactions between helium and BeO lying in Franck-Condon accessible windows of electronic transitions arising from the vibrationless electronic ground state. It is hoped that the conclusions of this study will result in the observation an electronic spectrum of this long hypothesized strongly bound complex in the near future. W. Koch, J. R. Collins and G. Frenking, Chem. Phys. Lett. 1986, 132 330-333.

  1. Electronic structure and luminescence of tellurium (IV) halide complexes with guanidine and caesium cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotsenko, A. A.; Shcheka, O. L.; Vovna, V. I.; Korochentsev, V. V.; Mirochnik, A. G.; Sedakova, T. V.

    2016-04-01

    The present paper continues a series of publications on the investigation of complex compounds of s2 ions and their properties. The structure of the valence levels of Cs2TeX6, (HGu)2TeCl6 complexes (where X = Cl, Br; HGu+ - guanidinium) is examined, the orbital nature of luminescence excitation is established, and the relationship of properties with the electronic structure is determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT).

  2. Wind Resource Assessment in Complex Terrain with a High-Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Karin; Serafin, Stefano; Grubišić, Vanda; Dorninger, Manfred; Zauner, Rudolf; Fink, Martin

    2014-05-01

    A crucial step in planning new wind farms is the estimation of the amount of wind energy that can be harvested in possible target sites. Wind resource assessment traditionally entails deployment of masts equipped for wind speed measurements at several heights for a reasonably long period of time. Simplified linear models of atmospheric flow are then used for a spatial extrapolation of point measurements to a wide area. While linear models have been successfully applied in the wind resource assessment in plains and offshore, their reliability in complex terrain is generally poor. This represents a major limitation to wind resource assessment in Austria, where high-altitude locations are being considered for new plant sites, given the higher frequency of sustained winds at such sites. The limitations of linear models stem from two key assumptions in their formulation, the neutral stratification and attached boundary-layer flow, both of which often break down in complex terrain. Consequently, an accurate modeling of near-surface flow over mountains requires the adoption of a NWP model with high horizontal and vertical resolution. This study explores the wind potential of a site in Styria in the North-Eastern Alps. The WRF model is used for simulations with a maximum horizontal resolution of 800 m. Three nested computational domains are defined, with the innermost one encompassing a stretch of the relatively broad Enns Valley, flanked by the main crest of the Alps in the south and the Nördliche Kalkalpen of similar height in the north. In addition to the simulation results, we use data from fourteen 10-m wind measurement sites (of which 7 are located within valleys and 5 near mountain tops) and from 2 masts with anemometers at several heights (at hillside locations) in an area of 1600 km2 around the target site. The potential for wind energy production is assessed using the mean wind speed and turbulence intensity at hub height. The capacity factor is also evaluated

  3. Atomic and Molecular Complex Resonances from Real Eigenvalues Using Standard (Hermitian) Electronic Structure Calculations.

    PubMed

    Landau, Arie; Haritan, Idan; Kaprálová-Žd'ánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2016-05-19

    Complex eigenvalues, resonances, play an important role in a large variety of fields in physics and chemistry. For example, in cold molecular collision experiments and electron scattering experiments, autoionizing and predissociative metastable resonances are generated. However, the computation of complex resonance requires modifications of standard electronic structure codes and methods, which are not always straightforward, in addition, application of complex codes requires more computational efforts. Here we show how resonance eigenvalues, positions and widths, can be calculated using the standard, widely used, electronic-structure packages. Our method enables the calculations of the complex resonance eigenvalues by using analytical continuation procedures (such as Padé). The key point in our approach is the existence of narrow analytical passages from the real axis to the complex energy plane. In fact, the existence of these analytical passages relies on using finite basis sets. These passages become narrower as the basis set becomes more complete, whereas in the exact limit, these passages to the complex plane are closed. As illustrative numerical examples we calculated the autoionization Feshbach resonances of helium, hydrogen anion, and hydrogen molecule. We show that our results are in an excellent agreement with the results obtained by other theoretical methods and with available experimental results. PMID:26677725

  4. Bush animal attacks: management of complex injuries in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Though animal-related injuries and fatalities have been documented throughout the world, the variety of attacks by wild animals native to rural East Africa are less commonly described. Given the proximity of our northwestern Tanzania hospital to Lake Victoria, Lake Tanganyika, and the Serengeti National Park, and presentation of several patients attacked by bush animals and suffering a variety of complex injuries, we sought to report the pattern of attacks and surgical management in a resource-limited setting. Materials and methods Four patients who were admitted to the northwestern Tanzania tertiary referral hospital, Bugando Medical Centre (BMC), in 2010-2011 suffered attacks by different bush animals: hyena, elephant, crocodile, and vervet monkey. These patients were triaged as trauma patients in the Casualty Ward, then admitted for inpatient monitoring and treatment. Their outcomes were followed to discharge. Results The age and gender of the patients attacked was variable, though all but the pediatric patient were participating in food gathering or guarding activities in rural locations at the time of the attacks. All patients required surgical management of their injuries, which included debridement and closure of wounds, chest tube insertion, amputation, and external fixation of an extremity fracture. All patients survived and were discharged home. Discussion Though human injuries secondary to encounters with undomesticated animals such as cows, moose, and camel are reported, they often are indirect traumas resulting from road traffic collisions. Snake attacks are well documented and common. However, this series of unique bush animal attacks describes the initial and surgical management of human injuries in the resource-limited setting of the developing world. Conclusion Animal attacks are common throughout the world, but their pattern may vary in Africa throughout jungle and bush environmental settings. It is important to understand the

  5. Does Leisure Time as a Stress Coping Resource Increase Affective Complexity? Applying the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA).

    PubMed

    Qian, Xinyi Lisa; Yarnal, Careen M; Almeida, David M

    2013-01-01

    Affective complexity, a manifestation of psychological well-being, refers to the relative independence between positive and negative affect (PA, NA). According to the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA), stressful situations lead to highly inverse PA-NA relationship, reducing affective complexity. Meanwhile, positive events can sustain affective complexity by restoring PA-NA independence. Leisure, a type of positive events, has been identified as a coping resource. This study used the DMA to assess whether leisure time helps restore affective complexity on stressful days. We found that on days with more leisure time than usual, an individual experienced less negative PA-NA relationship after daily stressful events. The finding demonstrates the value of leisure time as a coping resource and the DMA's contribution to coping research. PMID:24659826

  6. A major light rare-earth element (LREE) resource in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, southern Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Horton, Forrest; Buttleman, Kim; Scott, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise in world demand for the rare-earth elements (REEs) has expanded the search for new REE resources. We document two types of light rare-earth element (LREE)-enriched rocks in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of southern Afghanistan: type 1 concordant seams of khanneshite-(Ce), synchysite-(Ce), and parisite-(Ce) within banded barite-strontianite alvikite, and type 2 igneous dikes of coarse-grained carbonatite, enriched in fluorine or phosphorus, containing idiomorphic crystals of khanneshite-(Ce) or carbocernaite. Type 1 mineralized barite-strontianite alvikite averages 22.25 wt % BaO, 4.27 wt % SrO, and 3.25 wt % ∑ LREE2O3 (sum of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd oxides). Type 2 igneous dikes average 14.51 wt % BaO, 5.96 wt % SrO, and 3.77 wt % ∑ LREE2O3. A magmatic origin is clearly indicated for the type 2 LREE-enriched dikes, and type 1 LREE mineralization probably formed in the presence of LREE-rich hydrothermal fluid. Both types of LREE mineralization may be penecontemporaneous, having formed in a carbonate-rich magma in the marginal zone of the central vent, highly charged with volatile constituents (i.e., CO2, F, P2O5), and strongly enriched in Ba, Sr, and the LREE. Based on several assumptions, and employing simple geometry for the zone of LREE enrichment, we estimate that at least 1.29 Mt (million metric tonnes) of LREE2O3 is present in this part of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex.

  7. Generation and accretion of electrons in complex plasmas with cylindrical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an analytical model for the physical understanding of the charging of cylindrical dust particles in an open complex plasma system. Two different mechanisms, viz., thermionic emission and photoelectric emission have been considered for the electron generation from the charged cylindrical dust particles; the corresponding expressions for the rate of emission of electrons and their mean energy have been derived. A simple approach has been adopted to derive the expression for the rate of electron accretion to the dust particle. Further a new expression for the mean energy associated with the accreted electrons due to cylindrical dust particle has been derived and presented. An interesting comparison of results obtained in the case of spherical and cylindrical dust particles has also been made. Using these expressions, a formalism has been developed for the electronic processes in an illuminated dust cloud with cylindrical particles, on the basis of charge neutrality condition and number and energy balance of electrons; the charge carried by the cylindrical dust particles, electron temperature, and electron density corresponding to a given situation have been determined. The limitation of the applicability of the theory, viz., that the mean free path of an electron for accretion by dust particles be less than the dimension of the dust cloud has been pointed out.

  8. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of electronically exicted polychromophoric ruthenium(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bignozzi, C.A.; Argazzi, R.; Chiorboli, C.; Scandola, F. ); Dyer, R.B. ); Schoonover, J.R.; Meyer, T.J )

    1994-04-13

    The metal to ligand charge-transfer excited states of the polychromophoric complexes [(NC)-(bpy)[sub 2]Ru[sup II](CN)Ru[sup II](bpy)[sub 2](CN)][sup +], [(NC)(bpy)[sub 2]Ru[sup II](CN)Ru[sup II](phen)[sub 2](CN)][sup +], [(NC)(phen)[sub 2]Ru[sup II](CN)Ru[sup II](bpy)[sub 2](CN)][sup +], [(NC)(bpy)[sub 2]Ru[sup II](CN)Ru[sup II](bpy)[sub 2](NC)Ru[sup II](bpy)[sub 2](CN)][sup 2+], and [NC(bpy)[sub 2]Ru[sup II](CN)Ru[sup II](dcb)[sub 2](NC)Ru(bpy)[sub 2](CN)][sup 2[minus

  9. PGSB/MIPS Plant Genome Information Resources and Concepts for the Analysis of Complex Grass Genomes.

    PubMed

    Spannagl, Manuel; Bader, Kai; Pfeifer, Matthias; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology; formerly MIPS-Munich Institute for Protein Sequences) has been involved in developing, implementing and maintaining plant genome databases for more than a decade. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable datasets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, e.g., from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and analyzed. In addition, genomes from both model and crop plants form a scaffold for comparative genomics, assisted by specialized tools such as the CrowsNest viewer to explore conserved gene order (synteny) between related species on macro- and micro-levels.The genomes of many economically important Triticeae plants such as wheat, barley, and rye present a great challenge for sequence assembly and bioinformatic analysis due to their enormous complexity and large genome size. Novel concepts and strategies have been developed to deal with these difficulties and have been applied to the genomes of wheat, barley, rye, and other cereals. This includes the GenomeZipper concept, reference-guided exome assembly, and "chromosome genomics" based on flow cytometry sorted chromosomes. PMID:26519405

  10. Resource allocation for reliability of a complex system with aging components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson-cook, Christine M; Graves, Todd L; Hamada, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    To assess the reliability of a complex system, many different types of data may be available. Full-system tests are the most direct measure of reliability, but may be prohibitively expensive or difficult to obtain. Other less direct measures, such as component or section level tests, may be cheaper to obtain and more readily available. Using a single Bayesian analysis, multiple sources of data can be combined to give component and system reliability estimates. Resource allocation looks to develop methods to predict which new data would most improve the precision of the estimate of system reliability, in order to maximally improve understanding. In this paper, we consider a relatively simple system with different types of data from the components and system. We present a methodology for assessing the relative improvement in system reliability estimation for additional data from the various types. Various metrics for comparing improvement and a response surface approach to modeling the relationship between improvement and the additional data are presented.

  11. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-08-03

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented.

  12. 77 FR 50726 - Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics Used in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1209, ``Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' The DG-1209 is proposed Revision 1 of RG 1.172, dated September 1997. This revision endorses, with clarifications, the......

  13. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Dessent, Caroline E. H. E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ thymine and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to

  14. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-28

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O{sub 2} adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N{sub 4} chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O{sub 2} adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O{sub 2} on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d{sub z{sup 2}}, d{sub xy}, d{sub xz}, and d{sub yz}) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O{sub 2} adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  15. Spatial Complexity Due to Bulk Electronic Liquid Crystals in Superconducting Dy-Bi2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Erica; Phillabaum, Benjamin; Dahmen, Karin

    2012-02-01

    Surface probes such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) have detected complex electronic patterns at the nanoscale in many high temperature superconductors. In cuprates, the pattern formation is associated with the pseudogap phase, a precursor to the high temperature superconducting state. Rotational symmetry breaking of the host crystal (i.e. from C4 to C2) in the form of electronic nematicity has recently been proposed as a unifying theme of the pseudogap phase [Lawler Nature 2010]. However, the fundamental physics governing the nanoscale pattern formation has not yet been identified. Here we use universal cluster properties extracted from STM studies of cuprate superconductors to identify the funda- mental physics controlling the complex pattern formation. We find that due to a delicate balance between disorder, interactions, and material anisotropy, the rotational symmetry breaking is fractal in nature, and that the electronic liquid crystal extends throughout the bulk of the material.

  16. Plastics disassembly versus bulk recycling: engineering design for end-of-life electronics resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Rios, Pedro; Stuart, Julie Ann; Grant, Ed

    2003-12-01

    Annual plastic flows through the business and consumer electronics manufacturing supply chain include nearly 3 billion lb of high-value engineering plastics derived from petroleum. The recovery of resource value from this stream presents critical challenges in areas of materials identification and recycling process design that demand new green engineering technologies applied together with life cycle assessment and ecological supply chain analysis to create viable plastics-to-plastics supply cycles. The sustainable recovery of potentially high-value engineering plastics streams requires that recyclers either avoid mixing plastic parts or purify later by separating smaller plastic pieces created in volume reduction (shredding) steps. Identification and separation constitute significant barriers in the plastics-to-plastics recycling value proposition. In the present work, we develop a model that accepts randomly arriving electronic products to study scenarios by which a recycler might identify and separate high-value engineering plastics as well as metals. Using discrete eventsimulation,we compare current mixed plastics recovery with spectrochemical plastic resin identification and subsequent sorting. Our results show that limited disassembly with whole-part identification can produce substantial yields in separated streams of recovered engineering thermoplastics. We find that disassembly with identification does not constitute a bottleneck, but rather, with relatively few workers, can be configured to pull the process and thus decrease maximum staging space requirements. PMID:14700333

  17. Electron transfer reactions of osmium(II) complexes with phenols and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Velayudham, Murugesan; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-07-01

    Three [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes (NN = polypyridine) with ligands of varying hydrophobicity were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectral techniques. The geometry of the molecules are optimized by DFT calculations. The interaction between [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes and phenolate ion in ground state is confirmed by absorption spectral study and the binding constant values are in the range of 3-740 M-1. The photoinduced electron transfer reaction of these [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes with phenols and phenolic acids at pH 12.5 leads to the formation of phenoxyl radical confirmed through transient absorption spectral study. Binding constants and electron transfer rate constants within the [Os(NN)3]2+-phenolate ion adduct account for the change for the overall quenching constant with the change of structure of reactants.

  18. SAGES: A Suite of Freely-Available Software Tools for Electronic Disease Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sheri L.; Feighner, Brian H.; Loschen, Wayne A.; Wojcik, Richard A.; Skora, Joseph F.; Coberly, Jacqueline S.; Blazes, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations. PMID:21572957

  19. Managing complex research datasets using electronic tools: A meta-analysis exemplar

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sharon A.; Martin, Ellen E.; Garcia, Theresa J.; Winter, Mary A.; García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Adama; Cuevas, Heather E.; Sumlin, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analyses of broad scope and complexity require investigators to organize many study documents and manage communication among several research staff. Commercially available electronic tools, e.g., EndNote, Adobe Acrobat Pro, Blackboard, Excel, and IBM SPSS Statistics (SPSS), are useful for organizing and tracking the meta-analytic process, as well as enhancing communication among research team members. The purpose of this paper is to describe the electronic processes we designed, using commercially available software, for an extensive quantitative model-testing meta-analysis we are conducting. Specific electronic tools improved the efficiency of (a) locating and screening studies, (b) screening and organizing studies and other project documents, (c) extracting data from primary studies, (d) checking data accuracy and analyses, and (e) communication among team members. The major limitation in designing and implementing a fully electronic system for meta-analysis was the requisite upfront time to: decide on which electronic tools to use, determine how these tools would be employed, develop clear guidelines for their use, and train members of the research team. The electronic process described here has been useful in streamlining the process of conducting this complex meta-analysis and enhancing communication and sharing documents among research team members. PMID:23681256

  20. Managing complex research datasets using electronic tools: a meta-analysis exemplar.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon A; Martin, Ellen E; Garcia, Theresa J; Winter, Mary A; García, Alexandra A; Brown, Adama; Cuevas, Heather E; Sumlin, Lisa L

    2013-06-01

    Meta-analyses of broad scope and complexity require investigators to organize many study documents and manage communication among several research staff. Commercially available electronic tools, for example, EndNote, Adobe Acrobat Pro, Blackboard, Excel, and IBM SPSS Statistics (SPSS), are useful for organizing and tracking the meta-analytic process as well as enhancing communication among research team members. The purpose of this article is to describe the electronic processes designed, using commercially available software, for an extensive, quantitative model-testing meta-analysis. Specific electronic tools improved the efficiency of (a) locating and screening studies, (b) screening and organizing studies and other project documents, (c) extracting data from primary studies, (d) checking data accuracy and analyses, and (e) communication among team members. The major limitation in designing and implementing a fully electronic system for meta-analysis was the requisite upfront time to decide on which electronic tools to use, determine how these tools would be used, develop clear guidelines for their use, and train members of the research team. The electronic process described here has been useful in streamlining the process of conducting this complex meta-analysis and enhancing communication and sharing documents among research team members. PMID:23681256

  1. Ultrafast Spectroscopic Signatures of Coherent Electron-Transfer Mechanisms in a Transition Metal Complex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenkun; Giokas, Paul G; Cheshire, Thomas P; Williams, Olivia F; Dirkes, David J; You, Wei; Moran, Andrew M

    2016-07-28

    The prevalence of ultrafast electron-transfer processes in light-harvesting materials has motivated a deeper understanding of coherent reaction mechanisms. Kinetic models based on the traditional (equilibrium) form of Fermi's Golden Rule are commonly employed to understand photoinduced electron-transfer dynamics. These models fail in two ways when the electron-transfer process is fast compared to solvation dynamics and vibrational dephasing. First, electron-transfer dynamics may be accelerated if the photoexcited wavepacket traverses the point of degeneracy between donor and acceptor states in the solvent coordinate. Second, traditional kinetic models fail to describe electron-transfer transitions that yield products which undergo coherent nuclear motions. We address the second point in this work. Transient absorption spectroscopy and a numerical model are used to investigate coherent back-electron-transfer mechanisms in a transition metal complex composed of titanium and catechol, [Ti(cat)3](2-). The transient absorption experiments reveal coherent wavepacket motions initiated by the back-electron-transfer process. Model calculations suggest that the vibrationally coherent product states may originate in either vibrational populations or coherences of the reactant. That is, vibrational coherence may be produced even if the reactant does not undergo coherent nuclear motions. The analysis raises a question of broader significance: can a vibrational population-to-coherence transition (i.e., a nonsecular transition) accelerate electron-transfer reactions even when the rate is slower than vibrational dephasing? PMID:27362388

  2. Electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of endohedral fullerene containing electron donoracceptor complexes utilized in organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerikheirabadi, Fatemeh

    Organic Donor-Acceptor complexes form the main component of the organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs). The open circuit voltage of OPVs is directly related to the charge transfer excited state energies of these complexes. Currently a large number of different molecular complexes are being tested for their efficiency in photovoltaic devices. In this work, density functional theory as implemented in the NRLMOL code is used to investigate the electronic structure and related properties of these donor-acceptor complexes. The charge transfer excitation energies are calculated using the perturbative delta self-consistent field method recently developed in our group as the standard time dependent density functional approaches fail to accurately provide them. The model photovoltaics systems analyzed are as follows: Sc3N C 80--ZnTPP, Y3 N C80-- ZnTPP and Sc3 N C80-- ZnPc. In addition, a thorough analysis of the isolated donor and acceptor molecules is also provided. The studied acceptors are chosen from a class of fullerenes named trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes. These molecules have shown to possess advantages as acceptors such as long lifetimes of the charge-separated states.

  3. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  4. Electronic structures and magnetic/optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Shintaro; Suzuki, Atsushi; Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic / optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes were studied by quantum calculations using density functional theory. Effects of central metal and expansion of π orbital on aromatic ring as conjugation system on the electronic structures, magnetic, optical properties and vibration modes of infrared and Raman spectra of metal phthalocyanines were investigated. Electron and charge density distribution and energy levels near frontier orbital and excited states were influenced by the deformed structures varied with central metal and charge. The magnetic parameters of chemical shifts in 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR), principle g-tensor, A-tensor, V-tensor of electric field gradient and asymmetry parameters derived from the deformed structures with magnetic interaction of nuclear quadruple interaction based on electron and charge density distribution with a bias of charge near ligand under crystal field.

  5. Solar resource assessment in complex orography: a comparison of available datasets for the Trentino region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiti, Lavinia; Giovannini, Lorenzo; Zardi, Dino

    2015-04-01

    The accurate assessment of the solar radiation available at the Earth's surface is essential for a wide range of energy-related applications, such as the design of solar power plants, water heating systems and energy-efficient buildings, as well as in the fields of climatology, hydrology, ecology and agriculture. The characterization of solar radiation is particularly challenging in complex-orography areas, where topographic shadowing and altitude effects, together with local weather phenomena, greatly increase the spatial and temporal variability of such variable. At present, approaches ranging from surface measurements interpolation to orographic down-scaling of satellite data, to numerical model simulations are adopted for mapping solar radiation. In this contribution a high-resolution (200 m) solar atlas for the Trentino region (Italy) is presented, which was recently developed on the basis of hourly observations of global radiation collected from the local radiometric stations during the period 2004-2012. Monthly and annual climatological irradiation maps were obtained by the combined use of a GIS-based clear-sky model (r.sun module of GRASS GIS) and geostatistical interpolation techniques (kriging). Moreover, satellite radiation data derived by the MeteoSwiss HelioMont algorithm (2 km resolution) were used for missing-data reconstruction and for the final mapping, thus integrating ground-based and remote-sensing information. The results are compared with existing solar resource datasets, such as the PVGIS dataset, produced by the Joint Research Center Institute for Energy and Transport, and the HelioMont dataset, in order to evaluate the accuracy of the different datasets available for the region of interest.

  6. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/− 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 104 and 108 CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  7. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  8. Disentangling Electronic and Vibrational Coherence in the Phycocyanin-645 Light-Harvesting Complex.

    PubMed

    Richards, G H; Wilk, K E; Curmi, P M G; Davis, J A

    2014-01-01

    Energy transfer between chromophores in photosynthesis proceeds with near-unity quantum efficiency. Understanding the precise mechanisms of these processes is made difficult by the complexity of the electronic structure and interactions with different vibrational modes. Two-dimensional spectroscopy has helped resolve some of the ambiguities and identified quantum effects that may be important for highly efficient energy transfer. Many questions remain, however, including whether the coherences observed are electronic and/or vibrational in nature and what role they play. We utilize a two-color, four-wave mixing experiment with control of the wavelength and polarization to selectively excite specific coherence pathways. For the light-harvesting complex PC645, from cryptophyte algae, we reveal and identify specific contributions from both electronic and vibrational coherences and determine an excited-state structure based on two strongly coupled electronic states and two vibrational modes. Separation of the coherence pathways also uncovers the complex evolution of these coherences and the states involved. PMID:26276179

  9. Dynamics of electronic dephasing in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Dugan; Panitchayangkoon, Gitt; Fransted, Kelly A.; Caram, Justin R.; Wen, Jianzhong; Freed, Karl F.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2010-06-01

    Electronic coherence has been shown to persist in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) antenna complex from green sulfur bacteria at 77 K for at least 660 fs, several times longer than the typical lifetime of a coherence in a dynamic environment at this temperature. Such long-lived coherence was proposed to improve energy transfer efficiency in photosynthetic systems by allowing an excitation to follow a quantum random walk as it approaches the reaction centre. Here we present a model for bath-induced electronic transitions, demonstrating that the protein matrix protects coherences by globally correlating fluctuations in transition energies. We also quantify the dephasing rates for two particular electronic coherences in the FMO complex at 77 K using two-dimensional Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy and find that the lifetimes of individual coherences are distinct. Within the framework of noise-assisted transport, this result suggests that the FMO complex has been locally tuned by natural selection to optimize transfer efficiency by exploiting quantum coherence.

  10. Density functional theory study on the ionization potentials and electron affinities of thymine-formamide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haitao; Tang, Ke; Li, Yanmin; Su, Chunfang; Zhou, Zhengyu; Wang, Zhizhong

    The effect of hydrogen bond interactions on ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) of thymine-formamide complexes (T-F) have been investigated employing the density functional theory B3LYP at 6-311++G(d, p) basis set level. All complexes experience a geometrical change on either electron detachment or attachment, and the change might be facilitated or hindered according to the strength of the hydrogen-bonding interaction involved. The strength of hydrogen bonds presents an opposite changing trend on the two processes. A more important role that H-bonding interaction plays in the process of electron attachment than in the process of electron detachment can be seen by a comparison of the IPs and EAs of complexes with that of isolated thymine. Futhermore, the EAs of isolated thymine are in good agreement with the experimental values (AEA is 0.79 eV, VEA is -0.29 eV [Wetmore et al., Chem Phys Lett 2000, 322, 129]). The calculated total NPA charge distributions reveal that nearly all the negative charges locate on thymine monomer in the anions and even in the cationic states, there are a few negative charges on thymine monomer. An analysis of dissociation energies predicts the processes T-F+→ T++ F and T-F- → T- + F to be the most energetically favorable for T-F+ and T-F-, respectively. Content:text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

  11. Nonlinear Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Electron and Energy Transfer in Molecule Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2006-02-09

    The proposed research program will focus on the development of a unified dynamical theoretical framework for calculating the optical response of molecular assemblies and applying it towards studying the interplay of energy and charge transfer in artificial chromophore-aggregate complexes. Applications will be made to poly (p phenylene vinylene), (PPV) oligomers, several families of stilbenoid aggregates with stacking through a cyclophane group, coupled porphyrin arrays, and energy funneling in phenylacetylene dendrimers. The approach is based on formulating the problem using the density- matrix and developing Liouville-space techniques which provide physical insight and are particularly suitable for computing both coherent and incoherent transport. A physical picture based on collective electronic normal modes which represent the dynamics of the optically-driven reduced single electron density matrix will be established. Femtosecond signals and optical properties will be directly related to the motions of electron-hole pairs in real space, completely avoiding the calculation of many-electron excited-state wavefunctions, thus, considerably reducing computational effort. Vibrational and solvent effects will be incorporated. Guidelines for the synthesis of new donor/bridge/acceptor molecules with desired properties such as carrier transport, optical response time scales and fluorescence quantum yields will be developed. The analogy with Thz emission spectroscopy which probes charge carrier dynamic is in semiconductor superlattices will be explored. A systematic procedure for identifying the electronic coherence sizes which control the transport and optical properties will be developed. Localization of electronic transition density matrices of large molecules will be used to break the description of their optical response into coupled chromophores. The proposal is divided into four parts: (i) Collective-Oscillator Representation of Electronic Excitations in Molecular

  12. Comparison of different substrates for laser-induced electron transfer desorption/ionization of metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnikov, A. A.; Georgieva, V. B.; Donkov, N.; Borodkov, A. S.; Pento, A. V.; Raicheva, Z. G.; Yordanov, Tc A.

    2016-03-01

    Four different substrates, namely, graphite, tungsten, amorphous silicon (α-Si) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) films, were compared in view of the laser-induced electron transfer desorption/ionization (LETDI) of metal coordination complexes. A rhenium complex with 8-mercaptoquinoline, a copper complex with diphenylthiocarbazone and chlorophyll A were studied as the test analytes. The dependencies of the ion yield and the surface temperature on the incident radiation fluence were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The temperature was estimated using the numerical solution of a one-dimensional heat conduction problem with a heat source distributed in time and space. It was found that at the same temperature, the ion yield from the different substrates varies in the range of three orders of magnitude. The direct comparison of all studied substrates revealed that LETDI from the TiO2 and α-Si films offer a better choice for producing molecular ions of metal coordination complexes.

  13. Metal-Dioxygen and Metal-Dinitrogen Complexes: Where Are The Electrons?

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    Transition-metal complexes of O2 and N2 play an important role in the environment, chemical industry, and metalloenzymes. This Perspective compares and contrasts the binding modes, reduction levels, and electronic influences on the nature of the bound O2 or N2 group in these complexes. The charge distribution between the metal and the diatomic ligand is variable, and different models for describing the adducts have evolved. In some cases, single resonance structures (e.g. M-superoxide = M–O2−) are accurate descriptions of the adducts. Recent studies have shown that the magnetic coupling in certain N22− complexes differs between resonance forms, and can be used to distinguish experimentally between resonance structures. On the other hand, many O2 and N2 complexes cannot be described well with a simple valence-bond model. Defining the situations where ambiguities occur is a fertile area for continued study. PMID:20361098

  14. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine. PMID:24943718

  15. Complex Households and the Distribution of Multiple Resources in Later Life: Findings from A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyeon; Link, Arts; Waite, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The availability of social and financial resources has profound implications for health and well-being in later life. Older adults often share resources with others who live with them, sometimes in households including relatives or friends. We examine differences in social support, social connections, money, and the household environment across types of living arrangements, develop hypotheses from two theoretical perspectives, one focusing on obligations toward kin, and one focused on social exchange within households, and test them using data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. We find that availability of resources is not consistently associated with the presence of grandchildren and other young relatives, but often differs with presence of other adults. These findings suggest that a single type of resource tells us little about the distribution of the resources of older adults, and call on us to examine multiple resources simultaneously. PMID:25904682

  16. Complex Households and the Distribution of Multiple Resources in Later Life: Findings From a National Survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyeon; Waite, Linda J

    2016-02-01

    The availability of social and financial resources has profound implications for health and well-being in later life. Older adults often share resources with others who live with them, sometimes in households including relatives or friends. We examine differences in social support, social connections, money, and the household environment across types of living arrangements, develop hypotheses from two theoretical perspectives, one focusing on obligations toward kin, and one focused on social exchange within households, and test them using data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. We find that availability of resources is not consistently associated with the presence of grandchildren and other young relatives, but often differs with presence of other adults. These findings suggest that a single type of resource tells us little about the distribution of the resources of older adults, and call on us to examine multiple resources simultaneously. PMID:25904682

  17. Mechanistic studies of photoinduced spin crossover and electron transfer in inorganic complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenkai; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2015-04-21

    Electronic excited-state phenomena provide a compelling intersection of fundamental and applied research interests in the chemical sciences. This holds true for coordination chemistry, where harnessing the strong optical absorption and photocatalytic activity of compounds depends on our ability to control fundamental physical and chemical phenomena associated with the nonadiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. The central events of excited-state chemistry can critically influence the dynamics of electronic excited states, including internal conversion (transitions between distinct electronic states) and intersystem crossing (transitions between electronic states with different spin multiplicities), events governed by nonadiabatic interactions between electronic states in close proximity to conical intersections, as well as solvation and electron transfer. The diversity of electronic and nuclear dynamics also makes the robust interpretation of experimental measurements challenging. Developments in theory, simulation, and experiment can all help address the interpretation and understanding of chemical dynamics in organometallic and coordination chemistry. Synthesis presents the opportunity to chemically engineer the strength and symmetry of the metal-ligand interactions. This chemical control can be exploited to understand the influence of electronic ground state properties on electronic excited-state dynamics. New time-resolved experimental methods and the insightful exploitation of established methods have an important role in understanding, and ideally controlling, the photophysics and photochemistry of transition metal complexes. Techniques that can disentangle the coupled motion of electrons and nuclear dynamics warrant emphasis. We present a review of electron localization dynamics in charge transfer excited states and the dynamics of photoinitiated spin crossover dynamics. Both electron localization and spin crossover have been investigated by

  18. Entangled Electrons Foil Synthesis of Elusive Low-Valent Vanadium Oxo Complex.

    PubMed

    Schlimgen, Anthony W; Heaps, Charles W; Mazziotti, David A

    2016-02-18

    We examine the recently reported first synthesis of the elusive low-valent vanadium(III) in a vanadium oxo complex with a computation representing 10(21) quantum degrees of freedom. While this computation is intractable with a conventionally constructed wave function, it is performed here by a direct calculation of the system's two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM), where the 2-RDM is constrained by nontrivial conditions, known as N-representability conditions, that restrict the 2-RDM to represent an N electron quantum system. We show that the added (reducing) electron becomes entangled among the five pyridine ligands. While smaller calculations predict a metal-centered addition, large-scale 2-RDM calculations show that quantum entanglement redirects the electron transfer to the pyridine ligands, resulting in a ligand-centered addition. Beyond its implications for the synthesis of low-valent vanadium oxo complexes, the result suggests new possibilities for using quantum entanglement to predict and control electron transfer in chemical and biological materials. PMID:26824140

  19. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE COMPLEX III IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC ELECTRON TRANSFER CHAIN OF CHLOROFLEXUS AURANTIACUS

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xinliu; Xin, Yueyong; Bell, Patrick D.; Wen, Jianzhong; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, which belongs to the phylum of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs, does not contain a cytochrome bc or bf type complex as is found in all other known groups of phototrophs. This suggests that a functional replacement exists to link the reaction center photochemistry to cyclic electron transfer as well as respiration. Earlier work identified a potential substitute of the cytochrome bc complex, now named alternative complex III (ACIII), which has been purified, identified and characterized from C. aurantiacus. ACIII functions as a menaquinol:auracyanin oxidoreductase in the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, and a related but distinct complex functions in respiratory electron flow to a terminal oxidase. In this work, we focus on elucidating the structure of the photosynthetic ACIII. We found that AC III is an integral-membrane protein complex of around 300 kDa that consists of 8 subunits of 7 different types. Among them, there are 4 metalloprotein subunits, including a 113 kDa iron-sulfur cluster-containing polypeptide, a 25 kDa penta-heme c-containing subunit and two 20 kDa mono-heme c-containing subunits in the form of a homodimer. A variety of analytical techniques were employed in determining the ACIII substructure, including HPLC combined with ESI-MS, metal analysis, potentiometric titration and intensity analysis of heme-staining SDS-PAGE. A preliminary structural model of the ACIII complex is proposed based on the analytical data and chemical cross-linking in tandem with mass analysis using MALDI-TOF, as well as transmembrane and transit peptide analysis. PMID:20614874

  20. Distorted tetrahedral nickel-nitrosyl complexes: spectroscopic characterization and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Soma, Shoko; Van Stappen, Casey; Kiss, Mercedesz; Szilagyi, Robert K; Lehnert, Nicolai; Fujisawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    The linear nickel-nitrosyl complex [Ni(NO)(L3)] supported by a highly hindered tridentate nitrogen-based ligand, hydrotris(3-tertiary butyl-5-isopropyl-1-pyrazolyl)borate (denoted as L3), was prepared by the reaction of the potassium salt of the ligand with the nickel-nitrosyl precursor [Ni(NO)(Br)(PPh 3 ) 2 ]. The obtained nitrosyl complexes as well as the corresponding chlorido complexes [Ni(NO)(Cl)(PPh 3 ) 2 ] and [Ni(Cl)(L3)] were characterized by X-ray crystallography and different spectroscopic methods including IR/far-IR, UV-Vis, NMR, and multi-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ni K-, Ni L-, Cl K-, and P K-edges. For comparative electronic structure analysis we also performed DFT calculations to further elucidate the electronic structure of [Ni(NO)(L3)]. These results provide the nickel oxidation state and the character of the Ni-NO bond. The complex [Ni(NO)(L3)] is best described as [Ni (II) (NO (-) )(L3)], and the spectroscopic results indicate that the phosphane complexes have a similar [Ni (II) (NO (-) )(X)(PPh 3 ) 2 ] ground state. PMID:27350153

  1. Structure Determination of the Nuclear Pore Complex with Three-Dimensional Cryo electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Beck, Martin

    2016-05-22

    Determining the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) imposes an enormous challenge due to its size, intricate composition and membrane-embedded nature. In vertebrates, about 1000 protein building blocks assemble into a 110-MDa complex that fuses the inner and outer membranes of a cell's nucleus. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the in situ architecture of the NPC with a specific focus on approaches using three-dimensional cryo electron microscopy. We discuss technological benefits and limitations and give an outlook toward obtaining a high-resolution structure of the NPC. PMID:26791760

  2. Decision Making Under Uncertainty and Complexity: A Model-Based Scenario Approach to Supporting Integrated Water Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Gupta, H.; Wagener, T.; Stewart, S.; Mahmoud, M.; Hartmann, H.; Springer, E.

    2007-12-01

    Some of the most challenging issues facing contemporary water resources management are those typified by complex coupled human-environmental systems with poorly characterized uncertainties. In other words, major decisions regarding water resources have to be made in the face of substantial uncertainty and complexity. It has been suggested that integrated models can be used to coherently assemble information from a broad set of domains, and can therefore serve as an effective means for tackling the complexity of environmental systems. Further, well-conceived scenarios can effectively inform decision making, particularly when high complexity and poorly characterized uncertainties make the problem intractable via traditional uncertainty analysis methods. This presentation discusses the integrated modeling framework adopted by SAHRA, an NSF Science & Technology Center, to investigate stakeholder-driven water sustainability issues within the semi-arid southwestern US. The multi-disciplinary, multi-resolution modeling framework incorporates a formal scenario approach to analyze the impacts of plausible (albeit uncertain) alternative futures to support adaptive management of water resources systems. Some of the major challenges involved in, and lessons learned from, this effort will be discussed.

  3. CC-LR: Providing Interactive, Challenging and Attractive Collaborative Complex Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caballé, S.; Mora, N.; Feidakis, M.; Gañán, D.; Conesa, J.; Daradoumis, T.; Prieto, J.

    2014-01-01

    Many researchers argue that students must be meaningfully engaged in the learning resources for effective learning to occur. However, current online learners still report a problematic lack of attractive and challenging learning resources that engage them in the learning process. This endemic problem is even more evident in online collaborative…

  4. Complex Genetic Effects on Early Vegetative Development Shape Resource Allocation Differences Between Arabidopsis lyrata Populations

    PubMed Central

    Remington, David L.; Leinonen, Päivi H.; Leppälä, Johanna; Savolainen, Outi

    2013-01-01

    Costs of reproduction due to resource allocation trade-offs have long been recognized as key forces in life history evolution, but little is known about their functional or genetic basis. Arabidopsis lyrata, a perennial relative of the annual model plant A. thaliana with a wide climatic distribution, has populations that are strongly diverged in resource allocation. In this study, we evaluated the genetic and functional basis for variation in resource allocation in a reciprocal transplant experiment, using four A. lyrata populations and F2 progeny from a cross between North Carolina (NC) and Norway parents, which had the most divergent resource allocation patterns. Local alleles at quantitative trait loci (QTL) at a North Carolina field site increased reproductive output while reducing vegetative growth. These QTL had little overlap with flowering date QTL. Structural equation models incorporating QTL genotypes and traits indicated that resource allocation differences result primarily from QTL effects on early vegetative growth patterns, with cascading effects on later vegetative and reproductive development. At a Norway field site, North Carolina alleles at some of the same QTL regions reduced survival and reproductive output components, but these effects were not associated with resource allocation trade-offs in the Norway environment. Our results indicate that resource allocation in perennial plants may involve important adaptive mechanisms largely independent of flowering time. Moreover, the contributions of resource allocation QTL to local adaptation appear to result from their effects on developmental timing and its interaction with environmental constraints, and not from simple models of reproductive costs. PMID:23979581

  5. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  6. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J. M.; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2016-01-01

    In complex materials observed electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. Here, we demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. These findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change. PMID:27324948

  7. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Meyers, D; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J W; Middey, S; Kareev, M; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J M; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J W; Ryan, P J; Chakhalian, J

    2016-01-01

    In complex materials observed electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. Here, we demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. These findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change. PMID:27324948

  8. Coherent operation of detector systems and their readout electronics in a complex experiment control environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestner, Stefan

    2009-09-01

    With the increasing size and degree of complexity of today's experiments in high energy physics the required amount of work and complexity to integrate a complete subdetector into an experiment control system is often underestimated. We report here on the layered software structure and protocols used by the LHCb experiment to control its detectors and readout boards. The experiment control system of LHCb is based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS II. Readout boards which are outside the radiation area are accessed via embedded credit card sized PCs which are connected to a large local area network. The SPECS protocol is used for control of the front end electronics. Finite state machines are introduced to facilitate the control of a large number of electronic devices and to model the whole experiment at the level of an expert system.

  9. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J. M.; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2016-06-01

    In complex materials observed electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. Here, we demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. These findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change.

  10. Electronic structure of four-coordinate C3v nickel(II) scorpionate complexes: investigation by high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance and electronic absorption spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Patrick J; Telser, Joshua; Zvyagin, S A; Ozarowski, Andrew; Krzystek, J; Vicic, David A

    2006-10-30

    A series of complexes of formula TpNiX, where Tp*- = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazole)borate and X = Cl, Br, I, has been characterized by electronic absorption spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) region and by high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy. The crystal structure of TpNiCl has been previously reported; that for TpNiBr is given here: space group = Pmc2(1), a = 13.209(2) A, b = 8.082(2) A, c = 17.639(4) A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees , Z = 4. TpNiX contains a four-coordinate nickel(II) ion (3d8) with approximate C3v point group symmetry about the metal and a resulting S = 1 high-spin ground state. As a consequence of sizable zero-field splitting (zfs), TpNiX complexes are "EPR silent" with use of conventional EPR; however, HFEPR allows observation of multiple transitions. Analysis of the resonance field versus the frequency dependence of these transitions allows extraction of the full set of spin Hamiltonian parameters. The axial zfs parameter for TpNiX displays pronounced halogen contributions down the series: D = +3.93(2), -11.43(3), -22.81(1) cm(-1), for X = Cl, Br, I, respectively. The magnitude and change in sign of D observed for TpNiX reflects the increasing bromine and iodine spin-orbit contributions facilitated by strong covalent interactions with nickel(II). These spin Hamiltonian parameters are combined with estimates of 3d energy levels based on the visible-NIR spectra to yield ligand-field parameters for these complexes following the angular overlap model (AOM). This description of electronic structure and bonding in a pseudotetrahedral nickel(II) complex can enhance the understanding of similar sites in metalloproteins, both native nickel enzymes and nickel-substituted zinc enzymes. PMID:17054352

  11. The perspectives of femtosecond imaging and spectroscopy of complex materials using electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Chong-Yu; Duxbury, Phiilp M.; Berz, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of various electronic and structural phases that are close in free-energy is a hallmark in strongly correlated electron systems with emergent properties, such as metal-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, and high-temperature superconductivity. The cooperative phase transitions from one functional state to another can involve entanglements between the electronically and structurally ordered states, hence deciphering the fundamental mechanisms is generally difficult and remains very active in condensed matter physics and functional materials research. We outline the recent ultrafast characterizations of 2D charge-density wave materials, including the nonequilibrium electron dynamics unveiled by ultrafast optical spectroscopy-based techniques sensitive to the electronic order parameter. We also describe the most recent findings from ultrafast electron crystallography, which provide structural aspects to correlate lattice dynamics with electronic evolutions to address the two sides of a coin in the ultrafast switching of a cooperative state. Combining these results brings forth new perspectives and a fuller picture in understanding lightmatter interactions and various switching mechanisms in cooperative systems with many potential applications. We also discuss the prospects of implementing new ultrafast electron imaging as a local probe incorporated with femtosecond select-area diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy to provide a full scope of resolution to tackle the more challenging complex phase transitions on the femtosecond-nanometer scale all at once based on a recent understanding of the spacespace- charge-driven emittance limitation on the ultimate performance of these devices. The projection shows promising parameter space for conducting ultrafast electron micordiffraction at close to single-shot level, which is supported by the latest experimental characterization of such a system.

  12. True Serials: A True Solution for Electronic Resource Management Needs in a Medium-Size Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milczarski, Vivian; Garofalo, Denise A.

    2011-01-01

    A desire for more functionality seemed to clash with the fiscal reality of limited funds, but after investigating alternatives, Mount Saint Mary College was able to provide its faculty and students with a more useful and function-rich electronic resource management through a move to a hosted open source service. (Contains 8 figures.)

  13. Utilization of Electronic Information Resources by Undergraduate Students of University of Ibadan: A Case Study of Social Sciences and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owolabi, Sola; Idowu, Oluwafemi A.; Okocha, Foluke; Ogundare, Atinuke Omotayo

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluated utilization of electronic information resources by undergraduates in the Faculties of Education and the Social Sciences in University of Ibadan. The study adopted a descriptive survey design with a study population of 1872 undergraduates in the Faculties of Education and the Social Sciences in University of Ibadan, from which a…

  14. Impact of Electronic Resources and Usage in Academic Libraries in Ghana: Evidence from Koforidua Polytechnic & All Nations University College, Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akussah, Maxwell; Asante, Edward; Adu-Sarkodee, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    The study investigates the relationship between impact of electronic resources and its usage in academic libraries in Ghana: evidence from Koforidua Polytechnic & All Nations University College, Ghana. The study was a quantitative approach using questionnaire to gather data and information. A valid response rate of 58.5% was assumed. SPSS…

  15. Electron Microscopy Analysis of a Disaccharide Analog complex Reveals Receptor Interactions of Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Spilman, Michael; Meyer, Nancy L.; Lerch, Thomas F.; Stagg, Scott M.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of macromolecular complexes often feature x-ray structures of complexes with bound ligands. The attachment of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) to cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is an example that has not proven amenable to crystallography, because the binding of GAG analogs disrupts lattice contacts. The interactions of AAV with GAGs are of interest in mediating the cell specificity of AAV-based gene therapy vectors. Previous electron microscopy led to differing conclusions on the exact binding site and the existence of large ligand-induced conformational changes in the virus. Conformational changes are expected during cell entry, but it has remained unclear whether the electron microscopy provided evidence of their induction by GAG-binding. Taking advantage of automated data collection, careful processing and new methods of structure refinement, the structure of AAV-DJ complexed with sucrose octasulfate is determined by electron microscopy difference map analysis to 4.8 Å resolution. At this higher resolution, individual sulfate groups are discernible, providing a stereochemical validation of map interpretation, and highlighting interactions with two surface arginines that have been implicated in genetic studies. Conformational changes induced by the SOS are modest and limited to the loop most directly interacting with the ligand. While the resolution attainable will depend on sample order and other factors, there are an increasing number of macromolecular complexes that can be studied by cryo-electron microscopy at resolutions beyond 5 Å, for which the approaches used here could be used to characterize the binding of inhibitors and other small molecule effectors when crystallography is not tractable. PMID:24036405

  16. Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production by an Aluminum(III) Complex: Ligand-Based Proton and Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emily J; Berben, Louise A

    2015-09-28

    Environmentally sustainable hydrogen-evolving electrocatalysts are key in a renewable fuel economy, and ligand-based proton and electron transfer could circumvent the need for precious metal ions in electrocatalytic H2 production. Herein, we show that electrocatalytic generation of H2 by a redox-active ligand complex of Al(3+) occurs at -1.16 V vs. SCE (500 mV overpotential). PMID:26249108

  17. On Rate Limitations of Electron Transfer in the Photosynthetic Cytochrome b6f Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, S. Saif; Cramer, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Considering information in the crystal structures of the cytochrome b6f complex relevant to the rate-limiting step in oxygenic photosynthesis (1–5), it is enigmatic that electron transport in the complex is not limited by the large distance, approximately 26 Å, between the iron-sulfur cluster (ISP) and its electron acceptor, cytochrome f. This enigma has been explained for the respiratory bc1 complex by a crystal structure with a greatly shortened cluster-heme c1 distance (6), leading to a concept of ISP dynamics in which the ISP soluble domain undergoes a translation-rotation conformation change and oscillates between positions relatively close to the cyt c1 heme and a membrane-proximal position close to the ubiquinol electron-proton donor. Comparison of cytochrome b6f structures shows a variation in cytochrome f heme position that suggests the possibility of flexibility and motion of the extended cytochrome f structure that could entail a transient decrease in cluster-heme f distance. The dependence of cyt f turnover on lumen viscosity (7) is consistent with a role of ISP - cyt f dynamics in determination of the rate-limiting step under conditions of low light intensity. Under conditions of low light intensity and proton electrochemical gradient present, for example, under a leaf canopy, it is proposed that a rate limitation of electron transport in the b6f complex may also arise from steric constraints in the entry/exit portal for passage of the plastoquinol and -quinone to/from its oxidation site proximal to the iron-sulfur cluster. PMID:22890107

  18. Mechanistic Study on Electronic Excitation Dissociation of the Cellobiose-Na+ Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqun; Pu, Yi; Yu, Xiang; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2016-02-01

    The recent development of electron activated dissociation (ExD) techniques has opened the door for high-throughput, detailed glycan structural elucidation. Among them, ExD methods employing higher-energy electrons offer several advantages over low-energy electron capture dissociation (ECD), owing to their applicability towards chromophore-labeled glycans and singly charged ions, and ability to provide more extensive structural information. However, a lack of understanding of these processes has hindered rational optimization of the experimental conditions for more efficient fragmentation as well as the development of informatics tools for interpretation of the complex glycan ExD spectra. Here, cellobiose-Na+ was used as the model system to investigate the fragmentation behavior of metal-adducted glycans under irradiation of electrons with energy exceeding their ionization potential, and served as the basis on which a novel electronic excitation dissociation (EED) mechanism was proposed. It was found that ionization of the glycan produces a mixture of radical cations and ring-opened distonic ions. These distonic ions then capture a low-energy electron to produce diradicals with trivial singlet-triplet splitting, and subsequently undergo radical-induced dissociation to produce a variety of fragment ions, the abundances of which are influenced by the stability of the distonic ions from which they originate.

  19. One-electron oxidation chemistry and subsequent reactivity of diiron imido complexes.

    PubMed

    Kuppuswamy, Subramaniam; Powers, Tamara M; Johnson, Bruce M; Brozek, Carl K; Krogman, Jeremy P; Bezpalko, Mark W; Berben, Louise A; Keith, Jason M; Foxman, Bruce M; Thomas, Christine M

    2014-06-01

    The chemical oxidation and subsequent group transfer activity of the unusual diiron imido complexes Fe((i)PrNPPh2)3Fe≡NR (R = tert-butyl ((t)Bu), 1; adamantyl, 2) was examined. Bulk chemical oxidation of 1 and 2 with Fc[PF6] (Fc = ferrocene) is accompanied by fluoride ion abstraction from PF6(-) by the iron center trans to the Fe≡NR functionality, forming F-Fe((i)PrNPPh2)3Fe≡NR ((i)Pr = isopropyl) (R = (t)Bu, 3; adamantyl, 4). Axial halide ligation in 3 and 4 significantly disrupts the Fe-Fe interaction in these complexes, as is evident by the >0.3 Å increase in the intermetallic distance in 3 and 4 compared to 1 and 2. Mössbauer spectroscopy suggests that each of the two pseudotetrahedral iron centers in 3 and 4 is best described as Fe(III) and that one-electron oxidation has occurred at the tris(amido)-ligated iron center. The absence of electron delocalization across the Fe-Fe≡NR chain in 3 and 4 allows these complexes to readily react with CO and (t)BuNC to generate the Fe(III)Fe(I) complexes F-Fe((i)PrNPPh2)3Fe(CO)2 (5) and F-Fe((i)PrNPPh2)3Fe((t)BuNC)2 (6), respectively. Computational methods are utilized to better understand the electronic structure and reactivity of oxidized complexes 3 and 4. PMID:24833117

  20. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex.

    PubMed

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-28

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27094541

  1. Electronic Structure Determination of Pyridine N-Heterocyclic Carbene Iron Dinitrogen Complexes and Neutral Ligand Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structures of pyridine N-heterocyclic dicarbene (iPrCNC) iron complexes have been studied by a combination of spectroscopic and computational methods. The goal of these studies was to determine if this chelate engages in radical chemistry in reduced base metal compounds. The iron dinitrogen example (iPrCNC)Fe(N2)2 and the related pyridine derivative (iPrCNC)Fe(DMAP)(N2) were studied by NMR, Mössbauer, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy and are best described as redox non-innocent compounds with the iPrCNC chelate functioning as a classical π acceptor and the iron being viewed as a hybrid between low-spin Fe(0) and Fe(II) oxidation states. This electronic description has been supported by spectroscopic data and DFT calculations. Addition of N,N-diallyl-tert-butylamine to (iPrCNC)Fe(N2)2 yielded the corresponding iron diene complex. Elucidation of the electronic structure again revealed the CNC chelate acting as a π acceptor with no evidence for ligand-centered radicals. This ground state is in contrast with the case for the analogous bis(imino)pyridine iron complexes and may account for the lack of catalytic [2π + 2π] cycloaddition reactivity. PMID:25328270

  2. Ubisemiquinone is the electron donor for superoxide formation by complex III of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1985-03-01

    Much evidence indicates that superoxide is generated from O2 in a cyanide-sensitive reaction involving a reduced component of complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, particularly when antimycin A is present. Although it is generally believed that ubisemiquinone is the electron donor to O2, little experimental evidence supporting this view has been reported. Experiments with succinate as electron donor in the presence of antimycin A in intact rat heart mitochondria, which contain much superoxide dismutase but little catalase, showed that myxothiazol, which inhibits reduction of the Rieske iron-sulfur center, prevented formation of hydrogen peroxide, determined spectrophotometrically as the H2O2-peroxidase complex. Similarly, depletion of the mitochondria of their cytochrome c also inhibited formation of H2O2, which was restored by addition of cytochrome c. These observations indicate that factors preventing the formation of ubisemiquinone also prevent H2O2 formation. They also exclude ubiquinol, which remains reduced under these conditions, as the reductant of O2. Since cytochrome b also remains fully reduced when myxothiazol is added to succinate- and antimycin A-supplemented mitochondria, reduced cytochrome b may also be excluded as the reductant of O2. These observations, which are consistent with the Q-cycle reactions, by exclusion of other possibilities leave ubisemiquinone as the only reduced electron carrier in complex III capable of reducing O2 to O2-. PMID:2983613

  3. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiguang; Sun, Xiyuan; Jiang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu- O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu-Ligand bonds, like Pu-OH(-), show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu-ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA) energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu-Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI) approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI) complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified. PMID:27077844

  4. Electron collisions with the CH{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O complex

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T. C.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2009-12-15

    We report cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the CH{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O complex. We employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange-polarization approximations for energies from 0.1 to 20 eV. We considered four different hydrogen-bonded structures for the complex that were generated by classical Monte Carlo simulations. Our aim is to investigate the effect of the water molecule on the pi* shape resonance of formaldehyde. Previous studies reported a pi* shape resonance for CH{sub 2}O at around 1 eV. The resonance positions of the complexes appear at lower energies in all cases due to the mutual polarization between the two molecules. This indicates that the presence of water may favor dissociation by electron impact and may lead to an important effect on strand breaking in wet DNA by electron impact.

  5. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiguang; Sun, Xiyuan; Jiang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu–Oyl bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu–Ligand bonds, like Pu–OH−, show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu–ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA) energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu–Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI) approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI) complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified. PMID:27077844

  6. Electron Transfer Reactivity of the Aqueous Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex. Outer-Sphere vs Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, Fe(IV)(H2O)5O(2+) (hereafter Fe(IV)aqO(2+)), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)3(2+) (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS(-)/ABTS(2-), phenothiazines, Co(II)(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. Fe(IV)aqO(2+) oxidizes even Ce(III) (E(0) in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7 V) with a rate constant greater than 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)3(2+) (k = 2.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), IrCl6(3-) (1.6 × 10(6)), ABTS(2-) (4.7 × 10(7)), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 10(7)) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)3(2+) and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H(+)] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of Fe(IV)aqO(2+) and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E(0)Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E(0)Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+) couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1) and thus E(0)(Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+)) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E(0) (Fe(IV)aqO(2+), H(+)/Fe(III)aqOH(2+)) ≥ 1.95 V. PMID:27320290

  7. HARES: an efficient method for first-principles electronic structure calculations of complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waghmare, U. V.; Kim, Hanchul; Park, I. J.; Modine, Normand; Maragakis, P.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2001-07-01

    We discuss our new implementation of the Real-space Electronic Structure method for studying the atomic and electronic structure of infinite periodic as well as finite systems, based on density functional theory. This improved version which we call HARES (for High-performance-Fortran Adaptive grid Real-space Electronic Structure) aims at making the method widely applicable and efficient, using high performance Fortran on parallel architectures. The scaling of various parts of a HARES calculation is analyzed and compared to that of plane-wave based methods. The new developments that lead to enhanced performance, and their parallel implementation, are presented in detail. We illustrate the application of HARES to the study of elemental crystalline solids, molecules and complex crystalline materials, such as blue bronze and zeolites.

  8. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation. PMID:27472379

  9. Electronic Resource Sharing in Community Colleges: A Snapshot of Florida, Wisconsin, Texas, and Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Brian D.

    2000-01-01

    States that several states are establishing networks for resource sharing. Florida offers these resources through the Florida Distance Learning Library Initiative, Wisconsin has BadgerLink and WISCAT, TexShare provides library resource sharing in Texas, and Louisiana has LOUIS and LLN. These are some of the states successfully demonstrating…

  10. Electron transfer from flavin to iron in the Pseudomonas oleovorans rubredoxin reductase-rubredoxin electron transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Basran, J; Scrutton, N S

    1998-11-01

    Rubredoxin reductase (RR) and rubredoxin form a soluble and physiological eT complex. The complex provides reducing equivalents for a membrane-bound omega-hydroxylase, required for the hydroxylation of alkanes and related compounds. The gene (alkT) encoding RR has been overexpressed and the enzyme purified in amounts suitable for studies of eT by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The eT reactions from NADH to the flavin of RR and from reduced RR to the 1Fe and 2Fe forms of rubredoxin have been characterized by transient kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. The reductive half-reaction proceeds in a one-step reaction involving oxidized enzyme and a two-electron-reduced enzyme-NAD+ charge-transfer complex. Flavin reduction is observed at 450 nm and charge-transfer formation at 750 nm; both steps are hyperbolically dependent on NADH concentration. The limiting flavin reduction rate (180 +/- 4 s-1) is comparable to the limiting rate for charge-transfer formation (189 +/- 7 s-1) and analysis at 450 and 750 nm yielded enzyme-NADH dissociation constants of 36 +/- 2 and 43 +/- 5 microM, respectively. Thermodynamic analysis of the reductive half-reaction yielded values for changes in entropy (DeltaS = -65.8 +/- 2.2 J mol-1 K-1), enthalpy (DeltaH = 37.8 +/- 0.6 kJ mol-1) and Gibbs free energy (DeltaG = 57.5 +/- 0.7 kJ mol-1 at 298 K) during hydride ion transfer to the flavin N5 atom. Spectral analysis of mixtures of 1Fe or 2Fe rubredoxin and RR suggest that conformational changes accompany eT complex assembly. Both the 1Fe (nonphysiological) and 2Fe (physiological) forms of rubredoxin were found to oxidize two electron-reduced rubredoxin reductase with approximately equal facility. Rates for the reduction of rubredoxin are hyperbolically dependent on rubredoxin concentration and the limiting rates are 72. 7 +/- 0.6 and 55.2 +/- 0.3 s-1 for the 1Fe and 2Fe forms, respectively. Analysis of the temperature dependence of eT to rubredoxin using eT theory revealed that the reaction is not

  11. The Iron Hill (Powderhorn) Carbonatite Complex, Gunnison County, Colorado - A Potential Source of Several Uncommon Mineral Resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    A similar version of this slide show was presented on three occasions during 2008: two times to local chapters of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME), as part of SME's Henry Krumb lecture series, and the third time at the Northwest Mining Association's 114th Annual Meeting, held December 1-5, 2008, in Sparks (Reno), Nevada. In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a study of the diverse and uncommon mineral resources associated with carbonatites and associated alkaline igneous rocks. Most of these deposit types have not been studied by the USGS during the last 25 years, and many of these mineral resources have important applications in modern technology. The author chose to begin this study at Iron Hill in southwestern Colorado because it is the site of a classic carbonatite complex, which is thought to host the largest known resources of titanium and niobium in the United States.

  12. QM/MM modeling of environmental effects on electronic transitions of the FMO complex.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junkuo; Shi, Wu-Jun; Ye, Jun; Wang, Xiaoqing; Hirao, Hajime; Zhao, Yang

    2013-04-01

    The Fenna-Matthews-Oslon (FMO) light harvesting pigment-protein complex in green sulfur bacteria transfers the excitation energy from absorbed sunlight to the reaction center with almost 100% quantum efficiency. The protein-pigment coupling (part of the environmental effects) is believed to play an important role in determining excitation energy transfer pathways. To study the effect of environment on the electronic transitions in the FMO complex, especially by taking into account the newly discovered eighth extra pigment, we have employed hybrid quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) methods in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The averaged site energies of individual pigments are calculated using the semiempirical ZINDO/S-CIS method considering the protein residues as atomic point charges along the MD trajectories. The exciton energies are calculated from the site energies and excitonic couplings based on MD simulations. The new eighth pigment displays the largest site energy and contributes mainly to the highest exciton level, which may facilitate transfer of excitation energies from the baseplate to the reaction center. Further, the multimode Brownian oscillator (MBO) model is used to fit the linear absorption spectra of the FMO complex, validating the exciton energies obtained from the QM/MM calculations. Our results indicate that the QM/MM method combined with MD simulations is a powerful tool to model the environmental effects on electronic transitions of light harvesting antenna complexes. PMID:23480507

  13. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Ilca, Serban L; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M; Stuart, David I; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  14. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M.; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  15. Proton and Electron Additions to Iron (II) Dinitrogen Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, Zachariah M.; Chen, Shentan; Labios, Liezel AN; Bullock, R. Morris; Walter, Eric D.; Tyson, Elizabeth L.; Mock, Michael T.

    2014-03-10

    We describe a single site cis-(H)FeII-N2 complex, generated by the protonation of an iron-carbon bond of a "reduced" iron complex, that models key aspects of proposed protonated intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase. The influence on N2 binding from the addition of protons to the pendant amine sites in the second coordination sphere is described. Furthermore, the addition of electrons to the protonated complexes results in H2 loss. The mechanism of H2 loss is explored to draw a parallel to the origin of H2 loss (homolytic or heterolytic) and the nature of N2 coordination in intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase.

  16. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal-Cysteine Complexes From X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, B.O.; Jalilehvand, F.; Szilagyi, R.K.

    2009-05-19

    The electronic structures of Hg{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, Cr{sup III}, and Mo{sup V} complexes with cysteine were investigated by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and density functional theory. The covalency in the metal-sulfur bond was determined by analyzing the intensities of the electric-dipole allowed pre-edge features appearing in the XANES spectra below the ionization threshold. Because of the well-defined structures of the selected cysteine complexes, the current work provides a reference set for further sulfur K-edge XAS studies of bioinorganic active sites with transition metal-sulfur bonds from cysteine residues as well as more complex coordination compounds with thiolate ligands.

  17. Synthesis of Tungsten Imido Alkylidene Complexes that Contain an Electron-Withdrawing Imido Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten NArR alkylidene complexes have been prepared that contain the electron-withdrawing ArR groups 2,4,6-X3C6H2 (ArX3, X = Cl, Br), 2,6-Cl2-4-CF3C6H2 (ArCl2CF3), and 3,5-(CF3)2C6H3 (Ar(CF3)2). Reported complexes include W(NArR)2Cl2(dme) (dme = 1,2-dimethoxyethane), W(NArR)2(CH2CMe3)2, W(NArR)(CHCMe3)(OTf)2(dme), and W(NArR)(CHCMe3)(ODBMP)2 (DBMP = 4-Me-2,6-(CHPh2)C6H2). The W(NArR)(CHCMe3)(ODBMP)2 complexes were explored as initiators for the polymerization of 2,3-dicarbomethoxynorbornadiene (DCMNBD). PMID:25328268

  18. Investigation of electron-atom/molecule scattering resonances: Two complex multiconfigurational self-consistent field approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Kousik; Yeager, Danny L.

    2015-01-22

    Resonances are temporarily bound states which lie in the continuum part of the Hamiltonian. If the electronic coordinates of the Hamiltonian are scaled (“dilated”) by a complex parameter, η = αe{sup iθ} (α, θ real), then its complex eigenvalues represent the scattering states (resonant and non-resonant) while the eigenvalues corresponding to the bound states and the ionization and the excitation thresholds remain real and unmodified. These make the study of these transient species amenable to the bound state methods. We developed a quadratically convergent multiconfigurational self-consistent field method (MCSCF), a well-established bound-state technique, combined with a dilated Hamiltonian to investigate resonances. This is made possible by the adoption of a second quantization algebra suitable for a set of “complex conjugate biorthonormal” spin orbitals and a modified step-length constraining algorithm to control the walk on the complex energy hypersurface while searching for the stationary point using a multidimensional Newton-Raphson scheme. We present our computational results for the {sup 2}PBe{sup −} shape resonances using two different computationally efficient methods that utilize complex scaled MCSCF (i.e., CMCSCF). These two methods are to straightforwardly use CMCSCF energy differences and to obtain energy differences using an approximation to the complex multiconfigurational electron propagator. It is found that, differing from previous computational studies by others, there are actually two {sup 2}PBe{sup −} shape resonances very close in energy. In addition, N{sub 2} resonances are examined using one of these methods.

  19. Factors that Control Catalytic Two- vs Four-Electron Reduction of Dioxygen by Copper Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tahsini, Laleh; Lee, Yong-Min; Ohkubo, Kei

    2012-01-01

    The selective two-electron reduction of O2 by one-electron reductants such as decamethylferrocene (Fc*) and octamethylferrocene (Me8Fc) is efficiently catalyzed by a binuclear Cu(II) complex ([CuII2(LO)(OH)]2+ (D1) {LO is a binucleating ligand with copper-bridging phenolate moiety} in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid (HOTF) in acetone. The protonation of the hydroxide group of [CuII2(LO)(OH)]2+ with HOTF to produce [CuII2(LO)(OTF)]2+ (D1-OTF) makes it possible for this to be reduced by two equiv of Fc* via a two-step electron transfer sequence. Reactions of the fully reduced complex [CuI2(LO)]+ (D3) with O2 in the presence of HOTF led to the low-temperature detection of the absorption spectra due to the peroxo complex ([CuII2(LO)(OO)]) (D) and the protonated hydroperoxo complex ([CuII2(LO)(OOH)]2+ (D4). No further Fc* reduction of D4 occurs, and it is instead further protonated by HOTF to yield H2O2 accompanied by regeneration of [CuII2(LO)(OTF)]2+ (D1-OTF) thus completing the catalytic cycle for the two-electron reduction of O2 by Fc*. Kinetic studies on the formation of Fc*+ under catalytic conditions as well as for separate examination of the electron transfer from Fc* to D1-OTF reveal there are two important reaction pathways operating. One is a rate-determining second reduction of D1-OTF, thus electron transfer from Fc* to a mixed-valent intermediate [CuIICuI(LO)]2+ (D2) which leads to [CuI2(LO)]+ which is coupled with O2 binding to produce [CuII2(LO)(OO)]+ (D). The other involves direct reaction of O2 with the mixed-valent compound D2 followed by rapid Fc* reduction of a putative superoxo-dicopper(II) species thus formed, producing D. PMID:22462521

  20. Electronic Structure Description of a Doubly Oxidized Bimetallic Cobalt Complex with Proradical Ligands.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Ryan M; Hazin, Khatera; Thompson, John R; Savard, Didier; Prosser, Kathleen E; Storr, Tim

    2016-01-19

    The geometric and electronic structure of a doubly oxidized bimetallic Co complex containing two redox-active salen moieties connected via a 1,2-phenylene linker was investigated and compared to an oxidized monomeric analogue. Both complexes, namely, CoL(1) and Co2L(2), are oxidized to the mono- and dications, respectively, with AgSbF6 and characterized by X-ray crystallography for the monomer and by vis-NIR (NIR = near-infrared) spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for both the monomer and dimer. Both complexes exhibit a water molecule coordinated in the apical position upon oxidation. [CoL(1)-H2O](+) displays a broad NIR band at 8500 cm(-1) (8400 M(-1) cm(-1)), which is consistent with recent reports on oxidized Co salen complexes (Kochem, A. et al., Inorg. Chem., 2012, 51, 10557-10571 and Kurahashi, T. et al., Inorg. Chem., 2013, 52, 3908-3919). DFT calculations predict a triplet ground state with significant ligand and metal contributions to the singularly occupied molecular orbitals. The majority (∼75%) of the total spin density is localized on the metal, highlighting both high-spin Co(III) and Co(II)L(•) character in the electronic ground state. Further oxidation of CoL(1) to the dication affords a low-spin Co(III) phenoxyl radical species. The NIR features for [Co2L(2)-2H2O](2+) at 8600 cm(-1) (17 800 M(-1) cm(-1)) are doubly intense in comparison to [CoL(1)-H2O](+) owing to the description of [Co2L(2)-2H2O](2+) as two non-interacting oxidized Co salen complexes bound via the central phenylene linker. Interestingly, TD-DFT calculations predict two electronic transitions that are 353 cm(-1) apart. The NIR spectrum of the analogous Ni complex, [Ni2L(2)](2+), exhibits two intense transitions (4890 cm(-1)/26 500 M(-1) cm(-1) and 4200 cm(-1)/21 200 M(-1) cm(-1)) due to exciton coupling in the excited state. Only

  1. Parallel training and testing methods for complex image processing algorithms on distributed, heterogeneous, unreliable, and non-dedicated resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; García, Daniel F.; Molleda, Julio; Sainz, Ignacio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in the image processing field have brought new methods which are able to perform complex tasks robustly. However, in order to meet constraints on functionality and reliability, imaging application developers often design complex algorithms with many parameters which must be finely tuned for each particular environment. The best approach for tuning these algorithms is to use an automatic training method, but the computational cost of this kind of training method is prohibitive, making it inviable even in powerful machines. The same problem arises when designing testing procedures. This work presents methods to train and test complex image processing algorithms in parallel execution environments. The approach proposed in this work is to use existing resources in offices or laboratories, rather than expensive clusters. These resources are typically non-dedicated, heterogeneous and unreliable. The proposed methods have been designed to deal with all these issues. Two methods are proposed: intelligent training based on genetic algorithms and PVM, and a full factorial design based on grid computing which can be used for training or testing. These methods are capable of harnessing the available computational power resources, giving more work to more powerful machines, while taking its unreliable nature into account. Both methods have been tested using real applications.

  2. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Christopher R; Vaughn, Anthony E; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  3. Electronic and optical response of functionalized Ru(II) complexes: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei; Sykora, Milan; Albert, Victor; Badaeva, Ekaterina; Koposov, Alexey

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the Ru(II) complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge -- a carboxyl group -- needs to be added to one or two of the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure affect electronic and optical properties and, consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru(II)-systems. In this study, we analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state properties, respectively, of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solution. In addition, an effective Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states in all molecules. All theoretical results nicely complement and allow for detailed interpretation of experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes that have been done in parallel with our theoretical investigations. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show that deprotonation of the carboxyl group in the Ru-complexes results in a slight blue shift and decrease of oscillator strengths of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotonated complexes demonstrate strong agreement if the theoretical calculations are performed with the addition of a dielectric continuum model. A polar solvent is found to play an

  4. Steric and Electronic Influence on Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactivity of a Mononuclear Mn(III)-Hydroxo Complex.

    PubMed

    Rice, Derek B; Wijeratne, Gayan B; Burr, Andrew D; Parham, Joshua D; Day, Victor W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-08-15

    A mononuclear hydroxomanganese(III) complex was synthesized utilizing the N5 amide-containing ligand 2-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)]amino-N-2-methyl-quinolin-8-yl-acetamidate (dpaq(2Me) ). This complex is similar to previously reported [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+) [Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 7622-7634] but contains a methyl group adjacent to the hydroxo moiety. This α-methylquinoline group in [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) gives rise to a 0.1 Å elongation in the Mn-N(quinoline) distance relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). Similar bond elongation is observed in the corresponding Mn(II) complex. In MeCN, [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) reacts rapidly with 2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol (TEMPOH) at -35 °C by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism (second-order rate constant k2 of 3.9(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Using enthalpies and entropies of activation from variable-temperature studies of TEMPOH oxidation by [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) (ΔH(‡) = 5.7(3) kcal(-1) M(-1); ΔS(‡) = -41(1) cal M(-1) K(-1)), it was determined that [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) oxidizes TEMPOH ∼240 times faster than [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). The [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) complex is also capable of oxidizing the stronger O-H and C-H bonds of 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol and xanthene, respectively. However, for these reactions [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) displays, at best, modest rate enhancement relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). A combination of density function theory (DFT) and cyclic voltammetry studies establish an increase in the Mn(III)/Mn(II) reduction potential of [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+), which gives rise to a larger driving force for CPET for the former complex. Thus, more favorable thermodynamics for [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) can account for the dramatic increase in rate with TEMPOH. For the more sterically encumbered substrates, DFT computations suggest that this effect is mitigated by unfavorable steric interactions between the

  5. Enhanced Electron-Transfer Reactivity of Nonheme Manganese(IV)– Oxo Complexes by Binding Scandium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong-Min; Wu, Xiujuan; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta

    2014-01-01

    One and two scandium ions (Sc3+) are bound strongly to nonheme manganese(IV)–oxo complexes, [(N4Py)MnIV(O)]2+ (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) and [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)]2+ (Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N′,N′-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane), to form MnIV(O)–(Sc3+)1 and MnIV(O)–(Sc3+)2 complexes, respectively. The binding of Sc3+ ions to the MnIV(O) complexes was examined by spectroscopic methods as well as by DFT calculations. The one-electron reduction potentials of the MnIV(O) complexes were markedly shifted to a positive direction by binding of Sc3+ ions. Accordingly, rates of the electron transfer reactions of the MnIV(O) complexes were enhanced as much as 107–fold by binding of two Sc3+ ions. The driving force dependence of electron transfer from various electron donors to the MnIV(O) and MnIV(O)–(Sc3+)2 complexes was examined and analyzed in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer to determine the reorganization energies of electron transfer. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentials of the MnIV(O)–(Sc3+)2 complexes resulted in remarkable enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of the MnIV(O) complexes. Such a dramatic enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of the MnIV(O) complexes by binding of Sc3+ ions resulted in the change of mechanism in the sulfoxidation of thioanisoles by MnIV(O) complexes from a direct oxygen atom transfer pathway without metal ion binding to an electron-transfer pathway with binding of Sc3+ ions. PMID:23742163

  6. Variation of geometries and electron properties along proton transfer in strong hydrogen-bond complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacios, L. F.; Gálvez, O.; Gómez, P. C.

    2005-06-01

    Proton transfer in hydrogen-bond systems formed by 4-methylimidazole in both neutral and protonated cationic forms and by acetate anion are studied by means of MP2/6-311++G(d,p) ab initio calculations. These two complexes model the histidine (neutral and protonated)-aspartate diad present in the active sites of enzymes the catalytic mechanism of which involves the formation of strong hydrogen bonds. We investigate the evolution of geometries, natural bond orbital populations of bonds and electron lone pairs, topological descriptors of the electron density, and spatial distributions of the electron localization function along the process N-H ⋯O→N⋯H⋯O→N⋯H-O, which represents the stages of the H-transfer. Except for a sudden change in the population of electron lone pairs in N and O at the middle N...H...O stage, all the properties analyzed show a smooth continuous behavior along the covalent → hydrogen bond transit inherent to the transfer, without any discontinuity that could identify a formation or breaking of the hydrogen bond. This way, the distinction between covalent or hydrogen-bonding features is associated to subtle electron rearrangement at the intermolecular space.

  7. Systematically Assessing the Situational Relevance of Electronic Knowledge Resources: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland M.; Mysore, Naveen; Knaapen, Loes; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Dawes, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Electronic Knowledge Resources (EKRs) are increasingly used by physicians, but their situational relevance has not been systematically examined. Objective Systematically scrutinize the situational relevance of EKR-derived information items in and outside clinical settings. Background Physicians use EKRs to accomplish four cognitive objectives (C1-4), and three organizational objectives (O1-3): (C1) Answer questions/solve problems/support decision-making in a clinical context; (C2) fulfill educational-research objectives; (C3) search for personal interest or curiosity; (C4) overcome limits of human memory; (O1) share information with patients, families, or caregivers; (O2) exchange information with other health professionals; (O3) plan-manage-monitor tasks with other health professionals. Methods Longitudinal mixed methods multiple case study: Cases were 17 residents’ critical searches for information, using a commercial EKR, during a 2-month block of family practice. Usage data were automatically recorded. Each “opened” item of information was linked to an impact assessment questionnaire, and 1,981 evaluations of items were documented. Interviews with residents were guided by log files, which tracked use and impact of EKR-derived information items. Thematic analysis identified 156 critical searches linked to 877 information items. For each case, qualitative data were assigned to one of the seven proposed objectives. Results Residents achieved their search objectives in 85.9% of cases (situational relevance). Additional sources of information were sought in 52.6% of cases. Results support the seven proposed objectives, levels of comparative relevance (less, equally, more), and levels of stimulation of learning and knowledge (individual, organizational). Conclusion Our method of systematic assessment may contribute to user-based evaluation of EKRs. PMID:17600105

  8. Axial Ligand Effects on the Geometric and Electronic Structures of Nonheme Oxoiron(IV) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy A.; Rohde, Jan-Uwe; Seo, Mi Sook; Sastri, Chivukula V.; DeHont, Raymond; Ohta, Takehiro; Kitagawa, Teizo; Münck, Eckard; Nam, Wonwoo; Que, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    A series of complexes [FeIV(O)(TMC)(X)]+ (where X = OH−, CF3CO2−, N3−, NCS−, NCO−, and CN−) were obtained by treatment of the well characterized nonheme oxoiron(IV) complex [FeIV(O)(TMC)(NCMe)]2+ (TMC = tetramethylcyclam) with the appropriate NR4X salts. Because of the topology of the TMC macrocycle, the [FeIV(O)(TMC)(X)]+ series represents an extensive collection of S = 1 oxoiron(IV) complexes that only differ with respect to the ligand trans to the oxo unit. Electronic absorption, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, and Mössbauer data collected for these complexes conclusively demonstrate that the characteristic spectroscopic features of the S = 1 FeIV=O unit, namely i) the near-IR absorption properties, ii) X-ray absorption pre-edge intensities, and iii) quadrupole splitting parameters, are strongly dependent on the identity of the trans ligand. However, on the basis of EXAFS data, most [FeIV(O)(TMC)(X)]+ species have Fe=O bond lengths similar to that of [FeIV(O)(TMC)(NCMe)]2+ (1.66 ± 0.02 Å). The mechanisms by which the trans ligands perturb the FeIV=O unit were probed using density functional theory (DFT) computations, yielding geometric and electronic structures in good agreement with our experimental data. These calculations revealed that the trans ligands modulate the energies of the Fe=O σ- and π-antibonding molecular orbitals, causing the observed spectroscopic changes. Time-dependent DFT methods were used to aid in the assignment of the intense near-UV absorption bands found for the oxoiron(IV) complexes with trans N3−, NCS−, and NCO− ligands as X−-to-FeIV=O charge transfer transitions, thereby rationalizing the resonance enhancement of the ν(Fe=O) mode upon excitation of these chromophores. PMID:18712873

  9. Electronic Perturbations of Iron Dipyrrinato Complexes via Ligand [beta]-Halogenation and meso-Fluoroarylation

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Austin B.; Betley, Theodore A.

    2012-10-11

    Systematic electronic variations were introduced into the monoanionic dipyrrinato ligand scaffold via halogenation of the pyrrolic {beta}-positions and/or via the use of fluorinated aryl substituents in the ligand bridgehead position in order to synthesize proligands of the type 1,9-dimesityl-{beta}-R{sub 4}-5-Ar-dipyrrin [R = H, Cl, Br, I; Ar = mesityl, 3,5-(F{sub 3}C){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}, C{sub 6}F{sub 5} in ligand 5-position; {beta} = 2,3,7,8 ligand substitution; abbreviated ({sup {beta},Ar}L)H]. The electronic perturbations were probed using standard electronic absorption and electrochemical techniques on the different ligand variations and their divalent iron complexes. The free-ligand variations cause modest shifts in the electronic absorption maxima ({lambda}{sub max}: 464-499 nm) and more pronounced shifts in the electrochemical redox potentials for one-electron proligand reductions (E{sub 1/2}: -1.25 to -1.99 V) and oxidations (E{sub 1/2}: +0.52 to +1.14 V vs [Cp{sub 2}Fe]{sup +/0}). Installation of iron into the dipyrrinato scaffolds was effected via deprotonation of the proligands followed by treatment with FeCl{sub 2} and excess pyridine in tetrahydrofuran to afford complexes of the type ({sup {beta},Ar}L)FeCl(py) (py = pyridine). The electrochemical and spectroscopic behavior of these complexes varies significantly across the series: the redox potential of the fully reversible Fe{sup III/II} couple spans more than 400 mV (E{sub 1/2}: -0.34 to +0.50 V vs [Cp{sub 2}Fe]{sup +/0}); {lambda}{sub max} spans more than 40 nm (506-548 nm); and the {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer quadrupole splitting (|{Delta}E{sub Q}|) spans nearly 2.0 mm/s while the isomer shift ({delta}) remains essentially constant (0.86-0.89 mm/s) across the series. These effects demonstrate how peripheral variation of the dipyrrinato ligand scaffold can allow systematic variation of the chemical and physical properties of iron dipyrrinato complexes.

  10. Structure of haptoglobin and the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wejman, J C; Hovsepian, D; Wall, J S; Hainfeld, J F; Greer, J

    1984-04-01

    The human serum protein, haptoglobin, forms a stable, irreversible complex with hemoglobin. Haptoglobin is composed of two H chains, which are connected via two smaller L chains to give a protein of 85,000 Mr. In the complex, each H chain binds an alpha beta dimer of hemoglobin for a total molecular weight of 150,000. The scanning transmission electron microscope has been used to derive new information about the shape and structure of haptoglobin and hemoglobin, and about their relative orientation in the complex. The micrographs of negatively stained images show that haptoglobin has the shape of a barbell with two spherical head groups, which are the H chains. These are connected by a thin filament with a central knob, which corresponds to the L chains. The overall length of the molecule is about 124(+/- 8) A and the interhead distance is 87 (+/- 7) A. In the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex, the head groups are ellipsoidal and under optimal staining conditions bilobal . Thus, the alpha beta dimers are binding to the H chains, but off the long axis of the barbell by 127 degrees in a trans configuration. This angle considerably restricts the region on the surface of the H chain structure that can contain the hemoglobin binding site. The interhead group distance for complex is 116.5(+/- 6.3) A or 30 A greater than for haptoglobin. The N terminus of the beta chain was located on the trans off-axis configured barbell structure of complex by using a hemoglobin that was crosslinked between the alpha beta dimers in the region of the beta N terminus. The distances and angles that are measured on the micrographs for the native and crosslinked complex molecules permit the directions of two of the alpha beta dimer ellipsoid axes to be assigned. Taken together, these data provide an approximate relative orientation for the binding of the alpha beta dimer to the H chain of haptoglobin. PMID:6716481

  11. Synthesis and electronic structure determination of uranium(vi) ligand radical complexes.

    PubMed

    Herasymchuk, Khrystyna; Chiang, Linus; Hayes, Cassandra E; Brown, Matthew L; Ovens, Jeffrey S; Patrick, Brian O; Leznoff, Daniel B; Storr, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Pentagonal bipyramidal uranyl (UO2(2+)) complexes of salen ligands, N,N'-bis(3-tert-butyl-(5R)-salicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine, in which R = (t)Bu (1a), OMe (1b), and NMe2 (1c), were prepared and the electronic structure of the one-electron oxidized species [1a-c]+ were investigated in solution. The solid-state structures of 1a and 1b were solved by X-ray crystallography, and in the case of 1b an asymmetric UO2(2+) unit was found due to an intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction. Electrochemical investigation of 1a-c by cyclic voltammetry showed that each complex exhibited at least one quasi-reversible redox process assigned to the oxidation of the phenolate moieties to phenoxyl radicals. The trend in redox potentials matches the electron-donating ability of the para-phenolate substituents. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of cations [1a-c]+ exhibited gav values of 1.997, 1.999, and 1.995, respectively, reflecting the ligand radical character of the oxidized forms, and in addition, spin-orbit coupling to the uranium centre. Chemical oxidation as monitored by ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy afforded the one-electron oxidized species. Weak low energy intra-ligand charge transfer (CT) transitions were observed for [1a-c]+ indicating localization of the ligand radical to form a phenolate/phenoxyl radical species. Further analysis using density functional theory (DFT) calculations predicted a localized phenoxyl radical for [1a-c]+ with a small but significant contribution of the phenylenediamine unit to the spin density. Time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations provided further insight into the nature of the low energy transitions, predicting both phenolate to phenoxyl intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) and phenylenediamine to phenoxyl CT character. Overall, [1a-c]+ are determined to be relatively localized ligand radical complexes, in which localization is enhanced as the electron donating ability of the para

  12. Insoluble Fe-humic acid complex as a solid-phase electron mediator for microbial reductive dechlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Zhiling; Akatsuka, Tetsuji; Yang, Suyin; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2014-06-01

    We report that the insoluble Fe-HA complex, which was synthesized with both commercial Aldrich humic acid (HA) and natural HA, functions as a solid-phase electron mediator (EM) for the anaerobic microbial dechlorination of pentachlorophenol. Spectroscopic characterizations and sequential Fe extraction demonstrated that the Fe-HA complex was predominated with Na4P2O7-labile Fe (represented as the organically bound Fe fraction) and poorly ordered Fe fraction (the fraction left in the residue after the sequential extraction), which were associated with different possible binding processes with carboxylate and phenolic groups. The change in the electron-mediating activity caused by Fe extraction indicated that the electron-mediating function of the Fe-HA complex is attributable to the Na4P2O7-labile Fe fraction. The Fe-HA complex also accelerated the microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxide, which suggested the presence of multiple electron-mediating functions in the complex. The electron shuttle assay showed that the Fe-HA complex had an electron-accepting capacity of 0.82 mequiv g(-1) dry Fe-HA complex. The presence of redox-active moieties in the Fe-HA complex was verified by cyclic voltammetry analysis of the sample after electrical reduction, with a redox potential estimated at 0.02 V (vs a standard hydrogen electrode). PMID:24758743

  13. Structure and electronic spectra of purine-methyl viologen charge transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Patwardhan, Sameer; Singh, Arunoday; Simeon, Tomekia; Sarjeant, Amy A; Schatz, George C; Lewis, Frederick D

    2014-01-01

    The structure and properties of the electron donor-acceptor complexes formed between methyl viologen and purine nucleosides and nucleotides in water and the solid state have been investigated using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Solution studies were performed using UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Theoretical calculations were performed within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Energy decomposition analysis indicates that dispersion and induction (charge-transfer) interactions dominate the total binding energy, whereas electrostatic interactions are largely repulsive. The appearance of charge transfer bands in the absorption spectra of the complexes are well-described by time-dependent DFT and are further explained in terms of the redox properties of purine monomers and solvation effects. Crystal structures are reported for complexes of methyl viologen with the purines 2'-deoxyguanosine 3'-monophosphate (DAD'DAD' type) and 7-deazaguanosine (DAD'ADAD' type). Comparison of the structures determined in the solid state and by theoretical methods in solution provides valuable insights into the nature of charge-transfer interactions involving purine bases as electron donors. PMID:24294996

  14. On the Stark Effect in Open Shell Complexes Exhibiting Partially Quenched Electronic Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douberly, Gary E.; Moradi, Christopher P.

    2015-06-01

    The Stark effect is considered for polyatomic open shell complexes that exhibit partially quenched electronic angular momentum. Specifically, a zero-field model Hamiltonian is employed that accounts for the partial quenching of electronic orbital angular momentum in hydroxyl radical containing molecular complexes. Spherical tensor operator formalism is employed to derive matrix elements of the Stark Hamiltonian in a parity conserving, Hund's case (a) basis for the most general case, in which the permanent dipole moment has projections on all three inertial axes of the system. Ro-vibrational transition intensities are derived, again for the most general case; namely, the laser polarization is projected onto axes parallel and perpendicular to the Stark electric field, and the transition dipole moment vector is projected onto all three inertial axes in the molecular frame. The model discussed here is compared to experimental spectra of OH-(C2H2), OH-(C2H4), and OH-(H2O) complexes formed in He nanodroplets. M. D. Marshall and M. I. Lester, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 3019 (2004). G. E. Douberly, P. L. Raston, T. Liang, and M. D. Marshall, J. Chem. Phys. in press

  15. Fort Collins Science Center Ecosystem Dynamics branch--interdisciplinary research for addressing complex natural resource issues across landscapes and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wilson, Juliette T.

    2013-01-01

    The Ecosystem Dynamics Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center offers an interdisciplinary team of talented and creative scientists with expertise in biology, botany, ecology, geology, biogeochemistry, physical sciences, geographic information systems, and remote-sensing, for tackling complex questions about natural resources. As demand for natural resources increases, the issues facing natural resource managers, planners, policy makers, industry, and private landowners are increasing in spatial and temporal scope, often involving entire regions, multiple jurisdictions, and long timeframes. Needs for addressing these issues include (1) a better understanding of biotic and abiotic ecosystem components and their complex interactions; (2) the ability to easily monitor, assess, and visualize the spatially complex movements of animals, plants, water, and elements across highly variable landscapes; and (3) the techniques for accurately predicting both immediate and long-term responses of system components to natural and human-caused change. The overall objectives of our research are to provide the knowledge, tools, and techniques needed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, state agencies, and other stakeholders in their endeavors to meet the demand for natural resources while conserving biodiversity and ecosystem services. Ecosystem Dynamics scientists use field and laboratory research, data assimilation, and ecological modeling to understand ecosystem patterns, trends, and mechanistic processes. This information is used to predict the outcomes of changes imposed on species, habitats, landscapes, and climate across spatiotemporal scales. The products we develop include conceptual models to illustrate system structure and processes; regional baseline and integrated assessments; predictive spatial and mathematical models; literature syntheses; and frameworks or protocols for improved ecosystem monitoring, adaptive management, and program evaluation. The descriptions

  16. Theoretical Studies on the Electronic Structures and Properties of Complex Ceramic Crystals and Novel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2012-01-14

    This project is a continuation of a long program supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science in the Office of Science of DOE for many years. The final three-year continuation started on November 1, 2005 with additional 1 year extension to October 30, 2009. The project was then granted a two-year No Cost Extension which officially ended on October 30, 2011. This report covers the activities within this six year period with emphasis on the work completed within the last 3 years. A total of 44 papers with acknowledgement to this grant were published or submitted. The overall objectives of this project are as follows. These objectives have been evolved over the six year period: (1) To use the state-of-the-art computational methods to investigate the electronic structures of complex ceramics and other novel crystals. (2) To further investigate the defects, surfaces/interfaces and microstructures in complex materials using large scale modeling. (3) To extend the study on ceramic materials to more complex bioceramic crystals. (4) To initiate the study on soft condensed matters including water and biomolecules. (5) To focus on the spectroscopic studies of different materials especially on the ELNES and XANES spectral calculations and their applications related to experimental techniques. (6) To develop and refine computational methods to be effectively executed on DOE supercomputers. (7) To evaluate mechanical properties of different crystals and those containing defects and relate them to the fundamental electronic structures. (8) To promote and publicize the first-principles OLCAO method developed by the PI (under DOE support for many years) for applications to large complex material systems. (9) To train a new generation of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in modern computational materials science and condensed matter physics. (10) To establish effective international and domestic collaborations with both experimentalists and theorists in materials

  17. Cooperative catalysis: electron-rich Fe-H complexes and DMAP, a successful "joint venture" for ultrafast hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Susanne; Hettmanczyk, Lara; Klein, Johannes E M N; Plietker, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A series of defined iron-hydrogen complexes was prepared in a straightforward one-pot approach. The structure and electronic properties of such complexes were investigated by means of quantum-chemical analysis. These new complexes were then applied in the dehydrogenative silylation of methanol. The complex (dppp)(CO)(NO)FeH showed a remarkable activity with a TOF of more than 600 000 h(-1) of pure hydrogen gas within seconds. PMID:24807477

  18. Controlling the two-dimensional electron gas at complex oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janotti, Anderson

    2014-03-01

    Heterostructures of complex oxides have attracted great interest since the demonstration of a high-density two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the SrTiO3/LaAlO3 (STO/LAO) interface. Still, the density of the 2DEG is only one tenth of what was expected from simple electron counting, i.e., 1/2 electron per unit-cell area. Since then, the origin and amount of the charge, the electrical properties of the 2DEG, the role of native defects, and the abrupt variation of the electron density with the thickness of the LAO top layer have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies. More recently, a 2DEG with the full density of 1/2 electron per unit cell area has been observed at the interface between the band insulator STO and the Mott insulator GdTiO3 (GTO), shedding additional light on the origin of the 2DEG, and raising important questions on the differences between the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures. Here we will discuss the similarities of the 2DEG at the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures from the perspective of first-principles simulations. We will address the differences in band alignments in the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures, and how the 2DEG is affected by the surface of the LAO top layer in the STO/LAO, but apparently not in the STO/GTO case. Finally, we will also discuss how heterostructures can be used to drastically alter the electronic structure of STO, transforming it from a band insulator into a Mott insulator. This work was performed in collaboration with Lars Bjaalie, Luke Gordon, Burak Himmetoglu, and Chris G. Van de Walle, and supported by ARO and NSF.

  19. National Aquatic Resource Surveys: Multiple objectives and constraints lead to design complexity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency began conducting the National Aquatic resource Surveys (NARS) in 2007 with a national survey of lakes (NLA 2007) followed by rivers and streams in 2008-9 (NRSA 2008), coastal waters in 2010 (NCCA 2010) and wetlands in 2011 (NWCA). The surve...

  20. International Students Using Online Information Resources to Learn: Complex Experience and Learning Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study that investigated 25 international students' use of online information resources for study purposes at two Australian universities. Using an expanded critical incident approach, the study viewed international students through an information literacy lens, as information-using learners.…

  1. European Social Fund in Portugal: A Complex Question for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to review the application of the funds awarded by the European Social Fund (ESF) to Portugal, since 1986, from a human resource development (HRD) perspective. Design/methodology/approach: Several variables are analyzed: investment, absorption, people, impact of investment, evolution of skills, main programs, supply and…

  2. Electronic and vibronic properties of a discotic liquid-crystal and its charge transfer complex

    SciTech Connect

    Haverkate, Lucas A.; Mulder, Fokko M.; Zbiri, Mohamed Johnson, Mark R.; Carter, Elizabeth; Kotlewski, Arek; Picken, S.

    2014-01-07

    Discotic liquid crystalline (DLC) charge transfer (CT) complexes combine visible light absorption and rapid charge transfer characteristics, being favorable properties for photovoltaic (PV) applications. We present a detailed study of the electronic and vibrational properties of the prototypic 1:1 mixture of discotic 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakishexyloxytriphenylene (HAT6) and 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone (TNF). It is shown that intermolecular charge transfer occurs in the ground state of the complex: a charge delocalization of about 10{sup −2} electron from the HAT6 core to TNF is deduced from both Raman and our previous NMR measurements [L. A. Haverkate, M. Zbiri, M. R. Johnson, B. Deme, H. J. M. de Groot, F. Lefeber, A. Kotlewski, S. J. Picken, F. M. Mulder, and G. J. Kearley, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13098 (2012)], implying the presence of permanent dipoles at the donor-acceptor interface. A combined analysis of density functional theory calculations, resonant Raman and UV-VIS absorption measurements indicate that fast relaxation occurs in the UV region due to intramolecular vibronic coupling of HAT6 quinoidal modes with lower lying electronic states. Relatively slower relaxation in the visible region the excited CT-band of the complex is also indicated, which likely involves motions of the TNF nitro groups. The fast quinoidal relaxation process in the hot UV band of HAT6 relates to pseudo-Jahn-Teller interactions in a single benzene unit, suggesting that the underlying vibronic coupling mechanism can be generic for polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Both the presence of ground state CT dipoles and relatively slow relaxation processes in the excited CT band can be relevant concerning the design of DLC based organic PV systems.

  3. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, a tool for the investigation of complex magnetic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, Andreas; Ohldag, Hendrik; Nolting, Frithjof; Stohr, Joachim; Padmore, Howard A.

    2001-08-30

    X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy unites the chemical specificity and magnetic sensitivity of soft x-ray absorption techniques with the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy. The discussed instrument possesses a spatial resolution of better than 50 nm and is located at a bending magnet beamline at the Advanced Light Source, providing linearly and circularly polarized radiation between 250 and 1300 eV. We will present examples which demonstrate the power of this technique applied to problems in the field of thin film magnetism. The chemical and elemental specificity is of particular importance for the study of magnetic exchange coupling because it allows separating the signal of the different layers and interfaces in complex multi-layered structures.

  4. Gaussian free-energy dependence of electron-transfer rates in iridium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, L.S.; Gray, H.B. ); Kozik, M.; Winkler, J.R. )

    1990-03-02

    The kinetics of photoinduced electron-transfer (ET) reactions have been measured in a series of synthetic donor-acceptor complexes. The electron donors are singlet or triplet excited iridium(I) dimers (Ir{sub 2}), and the acceptors are N-alkylpyridinium groups covalently bound to phosphinite ligands on the Ir{sub 2} core. Rate constants for excited-state ET range from 3.5 {times} 10{sup 6} to 1.1 {times} 10{sup 11} per second, and thermal back ET (pyridinium radical to Ir{sub 2}{sup +}) rates vary from 2.0 {times} 10{sup 10} to 6.7 {times} 10{sup 7} per second. The variation of these rates with driving force is in remarkably good agreement with the Marcus theory prediction of a Gaussian free-energy dependence. 26 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Electron transfer reactions in the alkene mono-oxygenase complex from Nocardia corallina B-276.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, S C; Cammack, R; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    Nocardia corallina B-276 possesses a multi-component enzyme, alkene mono-oxygenase (AMO), that catalyses the stereoselective epoxygenation of alkenes. The reductase component of this system has been shown by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy to contain two prosthetic groups, an FAD centre and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The role of these centres in the epoxygenation reaction was determined by midpoint potential measurements and electron transfer kinetics. The order of potentials of the prosthetic groups of the reductase were FAD/FAD.=-216 mV, [2Fe-2S]/[2Fe-2S].=-160 mV and FAD./FAD.=-134 mV. Combined, these data implied that the reductase component supplied the energy required for the epoxygenation reaction and allowed a prediction of the mechanism of electron transfer within the AMO complex. The FAD moiety was reduced by bound NADH in a two-electron reaction. The electrons were then transported to the [2Fe-2S] centre one at a time, which in turn reduced the di-iron centre of the epoxygenase. Reduction of the di-iron centre is required for oxygen binding and substrate oxidation. PMID:10085230

  6. A general theoretical model for electron transfer reactions in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Amadei, Andrea; Daidone, Isabella; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-28

    In this paper we present a general theoretical-computational model for treating electron transfer reactions in complex atomic-molecular systems. The underlying idea of the approach, based on unbiased first-principles calculations at the atomistic level, utilizes the definition and the construction of the Diabatic Perturbed states of the involved reactive partners (i.e. the quantum centres in our perturbation approach) as provided by the interaction with their environment, including their mutual interaction. In this way we reconstruct the true Adiabatic states of the reactive partners characterizing the electron transfer process as the fluctuation of the electronic density due to the fluctuating perturbation. Results obtained by using a combination of Molecular Dynamics simulation and the Perturbed Matrix Method on a prototypical intramolecular electron transfer (from 2-(9,9'-dimethyl)fluorene to the 2-naphthalene group separated by a steroidal 5-α-androstane skeleton) well illustrate the accuracy of the method in reproducing both the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the process. PMID:22158942

  7. Dimethylamine borane dehydrogenation chemistry: syntheses, X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of 18-electron aminoborane and 14-electron aminoboryl complexes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina Y; Phillips, Nicholas; Bates, Joshua I; Thompson, Amber L; Gutmann, Matthias J; Aldridge, Simon

    2012-08-21

    The reactions of Me(2)NH·BH(3) with cationic Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes have been shown to generate the 18-electron aminoborane adduct [Ir(IMes)(2)(H)(2){κ(2)-H(2)BNMe(2))](+) and the remarkable 14-electron aminoboryl complex [Rh(IMes)(2)(H)-{B(H)NMe(2))](+). Neutron diffraction studies have been used for the first time to define H-atom locations in metal complexes of this type formed under catalytic conditions. PMID:22781307

  8. Electronic structures of cyclometalated palladium complexes in the higher oxidation states.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao N; Adrio, Luis A; Albrecht, Tim; White, Andrew J P; Newton, Mark A; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Figueroa, Santiago J A; Hii, King Kuok Mimi

    2015-10-01

    The electronic and redox properties of a series of cyclometalated Pd complexes with oxidation states of +2, +3 and +4 were examined using a range of currently available spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. Changes in metal-ligand bond lengths were established by X-ray crystallography and correctly predicted by DFT calculations, from which the frontier orbitals and partial atomic charges can be obtained. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed interesting XANES features that suggest a synergistic relationship between metal-ligand interactions. The electrochemical study of the Pd(ii) dimer was found to contain two sequential oxidative potentials indicative of a weak metal-metal interaction. PMID:26332167

  9. A density functional study of the electronic structure and spin Hamiltonian parameters of mononuclear thiomolybdenyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Drew, Simon C; Young, Charles G; Hanson, Graeme R

    2007-04-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters of mononuclear thiomolybdenyl complexes based upon the tris(pyrazolyl)borate ligand, together with their molybdenyl analogues, are calculated using density functional theory. The electronic g matrix and 95Mo hyperfine matrix are calculated as second-order response properties from the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham equations. The scalar relativistic zero-order regular approximation (ZORA) is used with an all-electron basis and an accurate mean-field spin-orbit operator which includes all one- and two-electron terms. The principal values and relative orientations of the g and A interaction matrices obtained from the experimental spectra in a previous EPR study are compared with those obtained from unrestricted Kohn-Sham calculations at the BP86 and B3LYP level, and the latter are found to be in good quantitative agreement. A quasi-restricted approach is used to analyze the influence of the various molecular orbitals on g and A. In all complexes the ground state magnetic orbital is dX2-Y2-based and the orientation of the A matrix is directly related to the orientation of this orbital. The largest single contribution to the orientation of the g matrix arises from the spin-orbit coupling of the dYZ-based lowest-unoccupied molecular orbital into the ground state. A number of smaller, cumulative charge-transfer contributions augment the d-d contributions. A comparison of the theoretical EPR parameters obtained using both crystallographic and gas-phase geometry-optimized structures of Tp*MoO(bdt) (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)borate, bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate) suggests a correspondence between the metal-dithiolate fold angle and the angle of noncoincidence between g and A. PMID:17305330

  10. Tracking the charge and spin dynamics of electronic excited states in inorganic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Kelly

    2015-03-01

    Inorganic complexes have many advantageous properties for solar energy applications, including strong visible absorption and photocatalytic activity. Whether used as a photocatalyst or a photosensitizer, the lifetime of electronic excited states and the earth abundance of the molecular components represent a key property for solar energy applications. These dual needs have undermined the usefulness of many coordination compounds. Isoelectronic iron and ruthenium based complexes represent a clear example. Ru-polypyridal based molecules have been the workhorse of solar energy related research and dye sensitized solar cells for decades, but the replacement of low abundance Ru with Fe leads to million-fold reductions in metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state lifetimes. Understanding the origin of this million-fold reduction in lifetime and how to control excited state relaxation in 3d-metal complexes motivates the work I will discuss. We have used the spin sensitivity of hard x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and the intense femtosecond duration pulses generated by the LCLS x-ray laser to probe the spin dynamics in a series of electronically excited [Fe(CN)6-2N(2,2'-bipyridine)N]2 N - 4 complexes, with N = 1-3. These femtosecond resolution measurements demonstrate that modification of the solvent and ligand environment can lengthen the MLCT excited state lifetime by more than two orders of magnitude. They also verify the role of triplet ligand field excited states in the spin crossover dynamics from singlet to quintet spin configurations. Work supported by the AMOS program within the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Electron-Transfer Pathways in the Heme and Quinone-Binding Domain of Complex II (Succinate Dehydrogenase)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single electron transfers have been examined in complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) by the method of pulse radiolysis. Electrons are introduced into the enzyme initially at the [3Fe–4S] and ubiquinone sites followed by intramolecular equilibration with the b heme of the enzyme. To define thermodynamic and other controlling parameters for the pathways of electron transfer in complex II, site-directed variants were constructed and analyzed. Variants at SdhB-His207 and SdhB-Ile209 exhibit significantly perturbed electron transfer between the [3Fe–4S] cluster and ubiquinone. Analysis of the data using Marcus theory shows that the electronic coupling constants for wild-type and variant enzyme are all small, indicating that electron transfer occurs by diabatic tunneling. The presence of the ubiquinone is necessary for efficient electron transfer to the heme, which only slowly equilibrates with the [3Fe–4S] cluster in the absence of the quinone. PMID:24559074

  12. Errors and electronic prescribing: a controlled laboratory study to examine task complexity and interruption effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simon Y W; Day, Richard O; Coiera, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of interruptions and task complexity on error rates when prescribing with computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, and to categorize the types of prescribing errors. Design Two within-subject factors: task complexity (complex vs simple) and interruption (interruption vs no interruption). Thirty-two hospital doctors used a CPOE system in a computer laboratory to complete four prescribing tasks, half of which were interrupted using a counterbalanced design. Measurements Types of prescribing errors, error rate, resumption lag, and task completion time. Results Errors in creating and updating electronic medication charts that were measured included failure to enter allergy information; selection of incorrect medication, dose, route, formulation, or frequency of administration from lists and drop-down menus presented by the CPOE system; incorrect entry or omission in entering administration times, start date, and free-text qualifiers; and omissions in prescribing and ceasing medications. When errors occurred, the error rates across the four prescribing tasks ranged from 0.5% (1 incorrect medication selected out of 192 chances for selecting a medication or error opportunities) to 16% (5 failures to enter allergy information out of 32 error opportunities). Any impact of interruptions on prescribing error rates and task completion times was not detected in our experiment. However, complex tasks took significantly longer to complete (F(1, 27)=137.9; p<0.001) and when execution was interrupted they required almost three times longer to resume compared to simple tasks (resumption lag complex=9.6 seconds, SD=5.6; resumption lag simple=3.4 seconds, SD=1.7; t(28)=6.186; p<0.001). Conclusion Most electronic prescribing errors found in this study could be described as slips in using the CPOE system to create and update electronic medication charts. Cues available within the user interface may have aided resumption of interrupted tasks

  13. Tracking the Flow of Resources in Electronic Waste - The Case of End-of-Life Computer Hard Disk Drives.

    PubMed

    Habib, Komal; Parajuly, Keshav; Wenzel, Henrik

    2015-10-20

    Recovery of resources, in particular, metals, from waste flows is widely seen as a prioritized option to reduce their potential supply constraints in the future. The current waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) treatment system is more focused on bulk metals, where the recycling rate of specialty metals, such as rare earths, is negligible compared to their increasing use in modern products, such as electronics. This study investigates the challenges in recovering these resources in the existing WEEE treatment system. It is illustrated by following the material flows of resources in a conventional WEEE treatment plant in Denmark. Computer hard disk drives (HDDs) containing neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets were selected as the case product for this experiment. The resulting output fractions were tracked until their final treatment in order to estimate the recovery potential of rare earth elements (REEs) and other resources contained in HDDs. The results further show that out of the 244 kg of HDDs treated, 212 kg comprising mainly of aluminum and steel can be finally recovered from the metallurgic process. The results further demonstrate the complete loss of REEs in the existing shredding-based WEEE treatment processes. Dismantling and separate processing of NdFeB magnets from their end-use products can be a more preferred option over shredding. However, it remains a technological and logistic challenge for the existing system. PMID:26351732

  14. Search complexity and resource scaling for the quantum optimal control of unitary transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Katharine W.; Riviello, Gregory; Rabitz, Herschel; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2011-01-15

    The optimal control of unitary transformations is a fundamental problem in quantum control theory and quantum information processing. The feasibility of performing such optimizations is determined by the computational and control resources required, particularly for systems with large Hilbert spaces. Prior work on unitary transformation control indicates that (i) for controllable systems, local extrema in the search landscape for optimal control of quantum gates have null measure, facilitating the convergence of local search algorithms, but (ii) the required time for convergence to optimal controls can scale exponentially with the Hilbert space dimension. Depending on the control-system Hamiltonian, the landscape structure and scaling may vary. This work introduces methods for quantifying Hamiltonian-dependent and kinematic effects on control optimization dynamics in order to classify quantum systems according to the search effort and control resources required to implement arbitrary unitary transformations.

  15. The effect of pyridinecarboxylate chelating groups on the stability and electronic relaxation of gadolinium complexes.

    PubMed

    Chatterton, Nicholas; Gateau, Christelle; Mazzanti, Marinella; Pécaut, Jacques; Borel, Alain; Helm, Lothar; Merbach, André

    2005-03-21

    The ligand N,N'-bis[(6-carboxy-2-pyridylmethyl]ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (H(4)bpeda) was synthesised using an improved procedure which requires a reduced number of steps and leads to a higher yield with respect to the published procedure. It was obtained in three steps from diethylpyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate and commercially available ethylenediamine-N,N[prime or minute]-diacetic acid with a total yield of approximately 20%. The crystal structure of the hexa-protonated form of the ligand which was determined by X-ray diffraction shows that the four carboxylates and the two amines are protonated. The crystal structure of the polynuclear complex [Gd(bpeda)(H(2)O)(2)](3)[Gd(H(2)O)(6)](2)Cl(3)(2), isolated by slow evaporation of a 1:1 mixture of GdCl(3) and H(4)bpeda at pH approximately 1, was determined by X-ray diffraction. In complex three [Gd(bpeda)(H(2)O)(2)] units, containing a Gd(III) ion ten-coordinated by the octadentate bpeda and two water molecules, are connected in a pentametallic structure by two hexa-aquo Gd(3+) cations through four carboxylato bridges. The protonation constants (pK(a1)= 2.9(1), pK(a2)= 3.5(1), pK(a3)= 5.2(2), and pK(a4)= 8.5(1)) and the stability constants of the complexes formed between Gd(III) and Ca(II) ions and H(4)bpeda (log beta(GdL)= 15.1(3); log beta(CaL)= 9.4(1)) were determined by potentiometric titration. The unexpected decrease in the stability of the gadolinium complex and of the calcium complex of the octadentate ligand bpeda(4-) with respect to the hexadentate ligand edta(4-) has been interpreted in terms of an overall lower contribution to stability of the metal-nitrogen interactions. The EPR spectra display very broad lines (apparent DeltaH(pp) approximately 800-1200 G at X-band and 90-110 G at Q-band depending on the temperature), indicating a rapid transverse electron spin relaxation. At X-band, Gd(bpeda) is among the fastest relaxing Gd(3+) complexes to date suggesting that the presence of pyridinecarboxylate

  16. Rational Design of an Electron-Reservoir Pt(II) Complex for Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water.

    PubMed

    Whang, Dong Ryeol; Park, Soo Young

    2015-10-12

    Herein we report a Pt(II) complex containing a 4,4'-bis[4-(triphenylsilyl)phenyl]-2,2'-bipyridine ligand as a molecular catalyst for water splitting. Systematic studies of the electrochemical and electronic properties of this catalyst, in comparison with two control complexes, reveal electron-reservoir characteristics upon two-electron reduction. A turnover number of 510,000 was recorded by employing this complex as a water reduction catalyst in combination with a state-of-the-art photosensitizer and N,N-dimethylaniline as a sacrificial electron donor, which represents a large improvement over the control complexes that do not contain the tetraphenylsilyl ligand substitution. PMID:26315804

  17. Using fuzzy operators to address the complexity in decision making of water resources redistribution in two neighboring river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ho-Wen; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2010-06-01

    This paper emphasizes the use of fuzzy sets for incorporating objective and subjective uncertainties to address coevolutionary alignment of a suite of water resources redistribution alternatives in a transboundary channel-reservoir system. The highlighted decision making complexity arises from the interactions between two neighboring water systems (i.e., the Tseng-Wen and Kao-Ping River Basins, South Taiwan) where a pending diversion plan has been under intensive debate for over a decade. While the local stakeholders make uncertain science linked with uncertain politics resulting in endless delay of the diversion plan, the environmental advocacy groups stress the increasing concern of loss of biological integrity due to changes of land use when sharing water resources across the boundary. Consequently, there is a need to generate a novel integration that enables us to consider a vast number of internal weirs, water intakes, reservoirs, drainage ditches, and transfer pipelines within the basin and bring out the connectivity via diversion between these two neighboring river basins under uncertainty. To explore the managerial implications with varying risk perception and risk attitude, four types of fuzzy operators tailored for the fuzzy multi-objective decision analysis depict greater flexibility in representing the complexity of possible trade-offs among those alternatives. These trade-offs in the multi-objective evaluation context are constrained by physical, chemical, socioeconomic, managerial, and technical factors reflecting the needs for adaptive water resources management. Findings indicates that the use of fuzzy operators is instructive, which could provide unique guidance for enlightening the potential barriers in sustainable water resources management at the regional scale.

  18. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  19. Ruthenium diimine complexes in unusual charge states formed in collisional electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Anders Baardseth; Hvelplund, Preben; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2004-03-01

    Ruthenium diimine complexes, Ru(L)32+ (L=bipy=2,2'-bipyridine or phen=1,10-phenanthroline), were formed in the gas phase by electrospray ionization and accelerated through a 50-kV electrostatic potential. In collisions between Ru(L)32+ and O2, fragment ions were produced in addition to Ru(L)3+ and Ru(L)33+ formed in collisional electron transfer. Cross-sections for the electron stripping and electron capture reactions are 10+/-0.2 Å2 and 1.7+/-0.1 Å2, respectively, for L=bipy and 3.8+/-0.2 Å2 and 0.8+/-0.1 Å2, respectively, for L=phen. In collisions between Ru(L)32+ and Na electron capture was the major reaction channel and resulted in Ru(L)3+ as well as Ru(L)3- (as a result of multiple-collision conditions). Cross-sections are of the order of 100 Å2 for the formation of one-electron reduced Ru(L)3+ ions. The kinetic energy released by the dissociation of Ru(L)32+ and Ru(L)33+ into Ru(L)2+/2+ and L+ after collisional activation was measured to be 1.5 eV for Ru(bipy)32+, 3.7 eV for Ru(phen)32+, 8 eV for Ru(bipy)33+, and 6 eV for Ru(phen)33+.

  20. Boosting the electron spin coherence in binuclear Mn complexes by multiple microwave pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaripov, R.; Vavilova, E.; Miluykov, V.; Bezkishko, I.; Sinyashin, O.; Salikhov, K.; Kataev, V.; Büchner, B.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate a possibility to enhance the coherence time of electron spins in magnetic molecular complexes by application of the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple microwave pulse sequence. Our theoretical analysis shows that the CPMG sequence can efficiently suppress the spin decoherence channel arising due to spectral diffusion induced by a random modulation of the hyperfine interaction which is an important source of the spin dephasing in molecular magnets. We confirm this by employing the CPMG protocol in pulse electron spin resonance experiments on model binuclear 1,2-diphosphacyclopentadienyl manganese complexes. We show that, compared to the standardly used two-pulse primary spin-echo technique, the CPMG experiment can boost the phase memory time up to one order of magnitude, bringing it to above 10 μs at low temperatures. This finding may be important for the implementation of quantum computation protocols on molecular magnets. We discuss a possible interesting analogy with the Zeno's paradox in quantum theory (the Zeno quantum effect), which could be implicit in the CPMG experiment.

  1. Deconstructing Complexity: Serial Block-Face Electron Microscopic Analysis of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Scott A.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Bushong, Eric A.; Badkoobehi, Ali; Malek, Elmar; Hwang, Minju; Terada, Masako; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) terminal is among the largest and most complex synaptic structures in the brain. Our understanding of the development of this morphologically elaborate structure has been limited because of the inability of standard electron microscopy techniques to quickly and accurately reconstruct large volumes of neuropil. Here we use serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM) to surmount these limitations and investigate the establishment of MF connectivity during mouse postnatal development. Based on volume reconstructions, we find that MF axons initially form bouton-like specializations directly onto dendritic shafts, that dendritic protrusions primarily arise independently of bouton contact sites, and that a dramatic increase in presynaptic and postsynaptic complexity follows the association of MF boutons with CA3 dendritic protrusions. We also identify a transient period of MF bouton filopodial exploration, followed by refinement of sites of synaptic connectivity. These observations enhance our understanding of the development of this highly specialized synapse and illustrate the power of SBEM to resolve details of developing microcircuits at a level not easily attainable with conventional approaches. PMID:23303931

  2. Mechanistic Study on Electron Capture Dissociation of the Oligosaccharide-Mg2+ Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqun; Pu, Yi; Yu, Xiang; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) has shown great potential in structural characterization of glycans. However, our current understanding of the glycan ECD process is inadequate for accurate interpretation of the complex glycan ECD spectra. Here, we present the first comprehensive theoretical investigation on the ECD fragmentation behavior of metal-adducted glycans, using the cellobiose-Mg2+ complex as the model system. Molecular dynamics simulation was carried out to determine the typical glycan-Mg2+ binding patterns and the lowest-energy conformer identified was used as the initial geometry for density functional theory-based theoretical modeling. It was found that the electron is preferentially captured by Mg2+ and the resultant Mg+• can abstract a hydroxyl group from the glycan moiety to form a carbon radical. Subsequent radical migration and α-cleavage(s) result in the formation of a variety of product ions. The proposed hydroxyl abstraction mechanism correlates well with the major features in the ECD spectrum of the Mg2+-adducted cellohexaose. The mechanism presented here also predicts the presence of secondary, radical-induced fragmentation pathways. These secondary fragment ions could be misinterpreted, leading to erroneous structural determination. The present study highlights an urgent need for continuing investigation of the glycan ECD mechanism, which is imperative for successful development of bioinformatics tools that can take advantage of the rich structural information provided by ECD of metal-adducted glycans.

  3. Structure determination of individual electron-nuclear spin complexes in a solid-state matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Pagliero, Daniela; Meriles, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    A spin-based quantum computer will store and process information via ``spin complexes'' formed by a small number of interacting electronic and nuclear spins within a solid-state host. Unlike present electronic circuits, differences in the atomic composition and local geometry make each of these spin clusters distinct from the rest. Integration of these units into a working network thus builds on our ability to determine the cluster atomic structure, a problem we tackle herein with the aid of a magnetic resonance protocol. Using the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond as a model system, we show analytically and numerically that the spatial coordinates of weakly coupled 13C spins can be determined by selectively transferring and retrieving spin polarization. The technique's spatial resolution can reach up to 0.1 nm, limited by the NV spin coherence lifetime. No external magnetic field gradient is required, which makes this imaging scheme applicable to NV-13C complexes buried deep inside the crystal host. Further, this approach can be adapted to nuclear spins other than 13C, and thus applied to the characterization of individual molecules anchored to the diamond surface.

  4. Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer in donor-bridge-nanoparticle acceptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengye; Snoeberger, Robert C; Issac, Abey; Stockwell, David; Batista, Victor S; Lian, Tianquan

    2010-11-18

    Photoinduced interfacial electron transfer (IET) in sulforhodamine B (SRhB)-aminosilane-Tin oxide (SnO(2)) nanoparticle donor-bridge-acceptor complexes has been studied on a single molecule and ensemble average level. On both SnO(2) and ZrO(2), the sum of single molecule fluorescence decays agree with the ensemble average results, suggesting complete sampling of molecules under single molecule conditions. Shorter fluorescence lifetime on SnO(2) than on ZrO(2) is observed and attributed to IET from SRhB to SnO(2). Single molecule lifetimes fluctuate with time and vary among different molecules, suggesting both static and dynamic IET heterogeneity in this system. Computational modeling of the complexes shows a distribution of molecular conformation, leading to a distribution of electronic coupling strengths and ET rates. It is likely that the conversion between these conformations led to the fluctuation of ET rate and fluorescence lifetime on the single molecule level. PMID:20225886

  5. Understanding Intention to Use Electronic Information Resources: A Theoretical Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Donghua

    2008-01-01

    This study extended the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by examining the roles of two aspects of e-resource characteristics, namely, information quality and system quality, in predicting public health students’ intention to use e-resources for completing research paper assignments. Both focus groups and a questionnaire were used to collect data. Descriptive analysis, data screening, and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques were used for data analysis. The study found that perceived usefulness played a major role in determining students’ intention to use e-resources. Perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use fully mediated the impact that information quality and system quality had on behavior intention. The research model enriches the existing technology acceptance literature by extending TAM. Representing two aspects of e-resource characteristics provides greater explanatory information for diagnosing problems of system design, development, and implementation. PMID:18999300

  6. Building and Managing Electronic Resources in Digital Era in India with Special Reference to IUCAA and NIV, Pune: A Comparative Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, H. K.; Singh, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses and presents a comparative case study of two libraries in Pune, India, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics and Information Centre and Library of National Institute of Virology (Indian Council of Medical Research). It compares how both libraries have managed their e-resource collections, including acquisitions, subscriptions, and consortia arrangements, while also developing a collection of their own resources, including pre-prints and publications, video lectures, and other materials in an institutional repository. This study illustrates how difficult it is to manage electronic resources in a developing country like India, even though electronic resources are used more than print resources. Electronic resource management can be daunting, but with a systematic approach, various problems can be solved, and use of the materials will be enhanced.

  7. Electron transfer dissociation provides higher-order structural information of native and partially unfolded protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Lermyte, Frederik; Sobott, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Top-down sequencing approaches are becoming ever more popular for protein characterization, due to the ability to distinguish and characterize different protein isoforms. Under non-denaturing conditions, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) can furthermore provide important information on the exposed surface of proteins or complexes, thereby contributing to the characterization of their higher-order structure. Here, we investigate this approach using top-down ETD of tetrameric hemoglobin, concanavalin A, and alcohol dehydrogenase combined with ion mobility (IM) on a commercially available quadrupole/ion mobility/time-of-flight instrument (Waters Synapt G2). By applying supplemental activation in the transfer cell (post-IM), we release ETD fragments and attain good sequence coverage in the exposed terminal regions of the protein. We investigate the correlation between observed sites of fragmentation with regions of solvent accessibility, as derived from the crystal structure. Ion acceleration prior to ETD is also used to cause collision-induced unfolding (CIU) of the complexes without monomer ejection, as evidenced by the IM profiles. These partially unfolded tetramers show efficient fragmentation in some regions which are not sequenced under more gentle MS conditions. We show that by increasing CIU in small increments and monitoring the changes in the fragmentation pattern, it is possible to follow the initial steps of gas-phase protein unfolding. Fragments from partially unfolded protein complexes are released immediately after electron transfer, prior to IM (they do not share the drift time of their precursor), and observed without the need for supplemental activation. This is further evidence that the higher-order structure in these protein regions has been disrupted. PMID:26081219

  8. Theoretical studies on the electronic structure and properties of complex ceramic crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim.

    1991-01-24

    This progress report summarizes the accomplishment of the DOE-support research program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City for the period July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992. This is the second year of a three-year renewal. The major accomplishments for the year are: (a) Initiation of fundamental studies on the electronic properties of C{sub 60} and related crystals; (b) study of electronic structures and optical properties of several important ceramic crystals, especially on AlN, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; (c) first-principles calculation of total energies and structural phase transitions in oxides, nitrides, and borides; (d) theory of magnetism in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B permanent magnetic alloy. The major focus for the next year's effort will be on the following areas: (1) Continuation of the fundamental studies on the buckminsterfullerene system with particular emphasis on the alkali-doped superconducting fullerides. (2) Fundamental studies on the structure and properties of Boron and B-related compounds. (3) Basic studies on the structural and electronic properties of metallic glasses with particular emphasis on the magnetic glasses. (4) Further development of the first-principles OLCAO method for applications to super-complex systems.

  9. Low Reynolds turbulence model CFD simulation for complex electronic system: an industrial point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, M.

    2014-07-01

    In electronic systems the presence of bluff bodies, sharp corners and bends are the cause of flow separation and large recirculation bubbles. Since the recirculation vortices develop they encapsulate the heat from an electronic component becoming one of the major contributors of malfunction. Going in depth in this, some numerical simulations of conjugate heat transfer for a heat wall-mounted cube have been performed using the commercial CFD code scSTREAM V11 by Software Cradle Co, Ltd. It is well known that the reliability of CFD analysis depends heavily on the turbulent model employed together with the wall functions implemented. The three low- Reynolds k - epsilon turbulent models developed by Abe-Nagano-Kondoh have been validated against experimental data consisting mainly of velocity profiles and surface temperature distributions provided in literature. The performed validation shows a satisfactory agreement between the measured and simulated data. The turbulent model chosen is then used for the CFD simulation of a complex electronic system.

  10. Dynamic localization of electronic excitation in photosynthetic complexes revealed with chiral two-dimensional spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-02-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging because of the small signal and large achiral background. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light-harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic states following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability because of the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments.

  11. Excited electronic states of complex heteroatomic molecules in series and in different aggregation states of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Alexandr E.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the spectroscopic and photophysical properties of new series complex molecules, which is capable of fluorescence and some generating light in solvents of various kinds within the wavelength region 308 - 420 nm with a high fluorescence quantum yield (gamma) equals 0.01 - 0.97 and a low threshold pump density Elp(Plp). We worked from the measured lifetimes and to calculate the rate constants for radiative decay (Kfl) and intercombinational conversion, (KST), the cross section for a stimulated emission ((sigma) 31osc), and the characteristic time tlp in solvents of various types and in the vapor. The latter is the limiting rise time of the pump pulse (tlp) at which the generation of electromagnetic radiation is still possible. The cross sections for the induced singlet-singlet ((sigma) 3S*) and triplet-triplet ((sigma) 2T*) absorption in the generation band, required for calculating tlp, were taken from a variety of sources: experimental and for all other complex molecules, we used results calculated by some semiempirical methods SCF MO LKAO the Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP/CI) and in complete neglect of differential overlap (INDO/S-CI). The results show that the decrease or increase of in the switch from solution to vapor, or as the properties of the solvent change, stems from dynamic separation or overlap of the lasing and induced absorption bands of the S1* yields Sn* and T1 yields Tn transitions. Lasing does not occur in concentrated acids because of the nearly complete overlap of the limiting gain and induced absorption T1 yields Tn transitions (compare it with the behavior of dyes in their chemo absorbed state). Using the density matrix method, we show that the solvent affects the distribution of electron density among the individual atoms and fragments of the complex geteratomic molecule in the ground state, leading to systematic changes in geometry. As a result, there are changes in the distribution of bond lengths in the rings of the azo

  12. Stereochemical Properties of Multidentate Nitrogen Donor Ligands and Their Copper Complexes by Electronic CD and DFT.

    PubMed

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Dezhahang, Zahra; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-07-01

    UV-Vis and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy, complemented with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the structural diversities of three multidentate nitrogen donor ligands and two associated copper complexes in solution directly. The three chiral salen ligands all consist of trans-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine as a chiral scaffold and also of pyridine rings as chromophores, differing only in the linking groups between the two functional groups mentioned above. Very different ECD intensities and somewhat different ECD patterns were observed for these ligands and satisfactorily interpreted theoretically. For the geometry optimization and spectral simulation of the open-shell metal complexes, the LANL2DZ basis set with effective core potential for the Cu and Cl atoms and pure cc-pVTZ for the rest of the atoms was utilized. The performance of the same calculations with the polarization functions (f,g) from the cc-pVTZ basis added to the LANL2DZ basis was compared. While the three ligands exhibit different conformational flexibility, the associated copper complexes show great rigidity imposed by the metal-ligand coordination, taking on a single structure in each case. In addition, dispersion interactions were shown to change the conformational stability ordering of the ligands noticeably and to exert considerable influence on the simulated UV-Vis and ECD spectra. Chirality 28:545-555, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349956

  13. Site-isolated Iridium Complexes on MgO Powder: Individual Ir Atoms Imaged by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, A.; Ortalan, V; D. Browning, N; C. Gates , B

    2009-01-01

    Iridium complexes were synthesized on MgO powder by adsorption of Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(acac) [acac = acetonylacetonate]; images determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy show individual Ir atoms, demonstrating that the supported complexes were site-isolated.

  14. Print and Electronic Resources: Usage Statistics at Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapoor, Kanta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to quantify the use of electronic journals in comparison with the print collections in the Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University Library. Design/methodology/approach: A detailed analysis was made of the use of lending services, the Xerox facility and usage of electronic journals such as Science Direct,…

  15. Excited-State Electronic Structure in Polypyridyl Complexes Containing Unsymmetrical Ligands.

    PubMed

    Omberg, Kristin M.; Smith, Gregory D.; Kavaliunas, Darius A.; Chen, Pingyun; Treadway, Joseph A.; Schoonover, Jon R.; Palmer, Richard A.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    1999-03-01

    Step-scan Fourier transform infrared absorption difference time-resolved (S(2)FTIR DeltaA TRS) and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopies have been applied to a series of questions related to excited-state structure in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states of [Ru(bpy)(2)(4,4'-(CO(2)Et)(2)bpy)](2+), [Ru(bpy)(2)(4-CO(2)Et-4'-CH(3)bpy)](2+), [Ru(bpy)(4,4'-(CO(2)Et)(2)bpy)(2)](2+), [Ru(4,4'-(CO(2)Et)(2)bpy)(3)](2+), [Ru(bpy)(2)(4,4'-(CONEt(2))(2)bpy)](2+), [Ru(bpy)(2)(4-CONEt(2)-4'-CH(3)bpy)](2+), and [Ru(4-CONEt(2)-4'-CH(3)bpy)(3)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine). These complexes contain bpy ligands which are either symmetrically or unsymmetrically derivatized with electron-withdrawing ester or amide substituents. Analysis of the vibrational data, largely based on the magnitudes of the nu(CO) shifts of the amide and ester substituents (Deltanu(CO)), reveals that the ester- or amide-derivatized ligands are the ultimate acceptors and that the excited electron is localized on one acceptor ligand on the nanosecond time scale. In the unsymmetrically substituted acceptor ligands, the excited electron is largely polarized toward the ester- or amide-derivatized pyridine rings. In the MLCT excited states of [Ru(bpy)(2)(4,4'-(CO(2)Et)(2)bpy)](2+) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(4,4'-(CONEt(2))(2)bpy)](2+), Deltanu(CO) is only 60-70% of that observed upon complete ligand reduction due to a strong polarization interaction in the excited state between the dpi(5) Ru(III) core and the excited electron. PMID:11670867

  16. Structural, electronic, and optical properties of phenol-pyridyl boron complexes for light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lu-Yi; Ren, Ai-Min; Feng, Ji-Kang; Ran, Xue-Qin; Liu, Yan-Ling; Sun, Chia-Chung

    The coordination chemistry of polydentate chelating ligands that contain mixed pyridinephenol donor sets has been a sought-after target of study and is a possible extension to the chemistry of polypyridines. In this article, seven compounds, which are the four-coordinate boron complexes containing the mixed phenol-pyridyl group, have been studied by theoretical calculation. They can function as charge transport materials and emitters, with high efficiency and stability. To reveal the relationship between the structures and properties of these bifunctional or multifunctional electroluminescent materials, the ground and excited state geometries were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), HF/6-31G(d), and CIS/6-31G(d) levels, respectively. The ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) were computed. The mobilities of hole and electron in these compounds were studied computationally based on the Marcus electron transfer theory. The lowest excitation energies, and the maximum absorption and emission wavelengths of these compounds were calculated by time-dependent density functional theory method. As a result of these calculations, the values of HOMO, LUMO, energy gaps, IPs, EAs, and the balance between the hole- and electron-transfer are greatly improved with the substitution of carbazole in compound 6. The calculated emission spectra of the seven studied molecules can almost cover the full UV-vis range (from 447.4 to 649.3 nm). Also, the Stokes shifts are unexpectedly large, ranging from 139.4 to 335.1 nm. This will result in the relatively long fluorescence lifetimes.

  17. The electronic structure of vanadium monochloride cation (VCl(+)): tackling the complexities of transition metal species.

    PubMed

    DeYonker, Nathan J; Halfen, DeWayne T; Allen, Wesley D; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2014-11-28

    Six electronic states (X (4)Σ(-), A (4)Π, B (4)Δ, (2)Φ, (2)Δ, (2)Σ(+)) of the vanadium monochloride cation (VCl(+)) are described using large basis set coupled cluster theory. For the two lowest quartet states (X (4)Σ(-) and A (4)Π), a focal point analysis (FPA) approach was used that conjoined a correlation-consistent family of basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCV5Z-DK with high-order coupled cluster theory through pentuple (CCSDTQP) excitations. FPA adiabatic excitation energies (T0) and spectroscopic constants (re, r0, Be, B0, D¯e, He, ωe, v0, αe, ωexe) were extrapolated to the valence complete basis set Douglas-Kroll (DK) aug-cc-pV∞Z-DK CCSDT level of theory, and additional treatments accounted for higher-order valence electron correlation, core correlation, and spin-orbit coupling. Due to the delicate interplay between dynamical and static electronic correlation, single reference coupled cluster theory is able to provide the correct ground electronic state (X (4)Σ(-)), while multireference configuration interaction theory cannot. Perturbations from the first- and second-order spin orbit coupling of low-lying states with quartet spin multiplicity reveal an immensely complex rotational spectrum relative to the isovalent species VO, VS, and TiCl. Computational data on the doublet manifold suggest that the lowest-lying doublet state ((2)Γ) has a Te of ∼11 200 cm(-1). Overall, this study shows that laboratory and theoretical rotational spectroscopists must work more closely in tandem to better understand the bonding and structure of molecules containing transition metals. PMID:25429937

  18. The electronic structure of vanadium monochloride cation (VCl+): Tackling the complexities of transition metal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYonker, Nathan J.; Halfen, DeWayne T.; Allen, Wesley D.; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2014-11-01

    Six electronic states (X 4Σ-, A 4Π, B 4Δ, 2Φ, 2Δ, 2Σ+) of the vanadium monochloride cation (VCl+) are described using large basis set coupled cluster theory. For the two lowest quartet states (X 4Σ- and A 4Π), a focal point analysis (FPA) approach was used that conjoined a correlation-consistent family of basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCV5Z-DK with high-order coupled cluster theory through pentuple (CCSDTQP) excitations. FPA adiabatic excitation energies (T0) and spectroscopic constants (re, r0, Be, B0, bar De, He, ωe, v0, αe, ωexe) were extrapolated to the valence complete basis set Douglas-Kroll (DK) aug-cc-pV∞Z-DK CCSDT level of theory, and additional treatments accounted for higher-order valence electron correlation, core correlation, and spin-orbit coupling. Due to the delicate interplay between dynamical and static electronic correlation, single reference coupled cluster theory is able to provide the correct ground electronic state (X 4Σ-), while multireference configuration interaction theory cannot. Perturbations from the first- and second-order spin orbit coupling of low-lying states with quartet spin multiplicity reveal an immensely complex rotational spectrum relative to the isovalent species VO, VS, and TiCl. Computational data on the doublet manifold suggest that the lowest-lying doublet state (2Γ) has a Te of ˜11 200 cm-1. Overall, this study shows that laboratory and theoretical rotational spectroscopists must work more closely in tandem to better understand the bonding and structure of molecules containing transition metals.

  19. Geometric and Electronic Structures of Nickel(II) Complexes of Redox Noninnocent Tetradentate Phenylenediamine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Ciccione, Jérémie; Leconte, Nicolas; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Thomas, Fabrice

    2016-01-19

    Five tetradentate ligands based on the N,N'-bis(2-amino-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-o-phenylenediamine backbone were prepared, with different substituents at positions 4 and 5 (CH3 (3a), p-CH3O-C6H4 (3b), H (3c), Cl (3d), F (3e)). Their reaction with a nickel(II) salt in air affords the neutral species 4(a-e), which were isolated as single crystals. 4(a-e) feature two antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled diiminosemiquinonate moieties, both located on peripheral rings, and a diamidobenzene bridging unit. Oxidation of 4(a-e) with 1 equiv of AgSbF6 yields the cations 4(a-e)(+), which harbor a single diiminosemiquinonate radical. Significant structural differences were observed within the series. 4b(+) is mononuclear and contains a localized diiminosemiquinonate moiety. In contrast, 4c(+) is a dimer wherein the diiminosemiquinonate radical is rather delocalized over both peripheral rings. 4d(+) represents an intermediate case where the complex is mononuclear, but the radical is fully delocalized. Oxidation of 4(a-e) with 2 equiv of AgSbF6 produces the corresponding mononuclear dications. X-ray diffraction data on 4(b-d)(2+) reveals that the bridging ring retains its diamidobenzene character, whereas both peripheral rings have been oxidized into diiminobenzoquinone moieties. All the complexes were characterized by electrochemistry, EPR, and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. Remarkably, the electronic structures of the complexes differ from those reported by Wieghardt et al. for copper and zinc complexes of a related ligand involving a mixed N2O2 donor set (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1999, 121, 9599). The easier oxidation of phenylenediamine moieties in comparison to aminophenols is proposed to account for the difference. PMID:26689346

  20. Rare earth element mineralogy, geochemistry, and preliminary resource assessment of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Buttleman, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    There is increased concern about the future availability of rare earth elements (REE) because of China's dominance as the supplier of more than 95 percent of world REE output, their decision to restrict exports of rare earth products, and the rapid increase in world-wide consumption of rare earth product. As a result, countries such as the United States, Japan, and member nations of the European Union face a future of tight supplies and high prices for rare earth products unless other sources of REE are found and developed (Long and others, 2010; U.S. Geological Survey, 2011, p. 128-129, 184-185). We report and describe a significant new deposit of light rare earth elements (LREE), estimated at 1 Mt, within the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of south Afghanistan. The potential resource is located in a remote and rugged part of the igneous complex in a region previously identified by Soviet geologists in the 1970s. This report reviews the geologic setting of LREE deposit, presents new geochemical data documenting the grade of LREE mineralization, briefly describes the mineralogy and mineralogical associations of the deposit, and presents a preliminary estimate of LREE resources based on our current understanding of the geology.

  1. Development of a complex groundwater model to assess the relation among groundwater resource exploitation, seawater intrusion and land subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsi Ting, Fang; Yih Chi, Tan; Chen, Jhong Bing

    2016-04-01

    The land subsidence, which is usually irreversible, in Taiwan Pintung Plain occurred due to groundwater overexploitation. Many of the land subsidence areas in Taiwan are located in coastal area. It could not only result in homeland loss, but also vulnerability to flooding because the function of drainage system and sea wall are weakened for the lowered ground surface. Groundwater salinization and seawater intrusion could happen more easily as well. This research focuses on grasping the trend of environmental change due to the damage and impact from inappropriate development of aquaculture in the last decades. The main task is developing the artificial neural networks (ANNs) and complex numerical model for conjunctive use of surface and groundwater which is composed of a few modules such as land use, land subsidence, contamination transportation and etc. An approach based on self-organizing map (SOM) is proposed to delineate groundwater recharge zones. Several topics will be studied such as coupling of surface water and groundwater modeling, assessing the benefit of improving groundwater resources by recharge, identifying the improper usage of groundwater resources, and investigating the effect of over-pumping on land subsidence in different depth. In addition, a complete plan for managing both the flooding and water resources will be instituted by scheming non-engineering adaptation strategies for homeland planning, ex. controlling pumping behavior in area vulnerable to land subsidence and increasing groundwater recharge.

  2. Artificial Intelligence Methods: Choice of algorithms, their complexity, and appropriateness within the context of hydrology and water resources. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, L. A.; Pande, S.

    2009-12-01

    Pattern analysis deals with the automatic detection of patterns in the data and there are a variety of algorithms available for the purpose. These algorithms are commonly called Artificial Intelligence (AI) or data driven algorithms, and have been applied lately to a variety of problems in hydrology and are becoming extremely popular. When confronting such a range of algorithms, the question of which one is the “best” arises. Some algorithms may be preferred because of the lower computational complexity; others take into account prior knowledge of the form and the amount of the data; others are chosen based on a version of the Occam’s razor principle that a simple classifier performs better. Popper has argued, however, that Occam’s razor is without operational value because there is no clear measure or criterion for simplicity. An example of measures that can be used for this purpose are: the so called algorithmic complexity - also known as Kolmogorov complexity or Kolmogorov (algorithmic) entropy; the Bayesian information criterion; or the Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension. On the other hand, the No Free Lunch Theorem states that there is no best general algorithm, and that specific algorithms are superior only for specific problems. It should be noted also that the appropriate algorithm and the appropriate complexity are constrained by the finiteness of the available data and the uncertainties associated with it. Thus, there is compromise between the complexity of the algorithm, the data properties, and the robustness of the predictions. We discuss the above topics; briefly review the historical development of applications with particular emphasis on statistical learning theory (SLT), also known as machine learning (ML) of which support vector machines and relevant vector machines are the most commonly known algorithms. We present some applications of such algorithms for distributed hydrologic modeling; and introduce an example of how the complexity measure

  3. Electron-atom resonances: The complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method for the 2P Be- shape resonance problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsednee, Tsogbayar; Liang, Liyuan; Yeager, Danny L.

    2015-02-01

    We propose and develop the complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator (CMCSTEP) technique for theoretical determination of resonance parameters with electron-atom and electron-molecule systems including open-shell and highly correlated atoms and molecules. The multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator (MCSTEP) method developed and implemented by Yeager and co-workers in real space gives very accurate and reliable ionization potentials and attachment energies. The CMCSTEP method uses a complex-scaled multiconfigurational self-consistent field (CMCSCF) state as an initial state along with a dilated Hamiltonian where all of the electronic coordinates are scaled by a complex factor. The CMCSCF was developed and applied successfully to resonance problems earlier. We apply the CMCSTEP method to get 2P Be- shape resonance parameters using 14 s 11 p 5 d ,14 s 14 p 2 d , and 14 s 14 p 5 d basis sets with a 2 s 2 p 3 d complete active space. The obtained values of the resonance parameters are compared to previous results. Here CMCSTEP has been developed and used for a resonance problem. It appears to be among the most accurate and reliable techniques. Vertical ionization potentials and attachment energies in real space are typically within ±0.2 eV or better of excellent experimental results and full configuration-interaction calculations with a good basis set. We expect the same sort of agreement in complex space.

  4. Electronic transitions of guanine tautomers, their stacked dimers, trimers and sodium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, P. S.; Kumar, Anil; Mishra, P. C.

    2004-02-01

    Planar and nonplanar geometries of the keto-N9H and keto-N7H tautomers of the guanine base of DNA as well as the hydrogen bonded complexes of these species with three water molecules each were optimized using the density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G ∗ ∗ level. Geometries of the isolated bases were also optimized using the ab initio approach at the MP2/6-31G ∗ ∗ level. The isolated keto-N9H and keto-N7H tautomers as well as their hydrogen bonded complexes with three water molecules each were solvated in bulk water employing the polarized continuum model (PCM) of the self-consistent reaction field theory (SCRF). Stacked dimers and trimers of both the tautomers of guanine were generated by placing the planar forms of the species at a fixed distance of 3.5 Å from the neighboring one and rotating one molecule with respect to the other by 110° for the keto-N9H form and 90° for the keto-N7H form which corresponded to total energy minima at the B3LYP/6-31G ∗ ∗ level. Geometry optimization for the cation of the monomer of guanine was performed at the same level of theory, and its solvation in bulk water was treated using the PCM model of the SCRF theory. The geometries of complexes of the two tautomers of guanine with a Na + ion each were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G ∗ ∗ level, and the Na + ion is predicted to bind with the keto-N9H tautomer preferentially. While the complex of the keto-N7H form of guanine with three water molecules in gas phase is slightly more stable than the corresponding complex of the keto-N9H form of guanine, the reverse is true in bulk water. Stacking interactions enhance the relative stability of the keto-N9H tautomer over that of the keto-N7H tautomer, suggesting that in bulk solutions, the former would be dominant. Electronic spectra of the isolated tautomers of guanine, those of their complexes with three water molecules each, the (keto-n9h and keto-n7h) cation of guanine, the complexes of the tautomers with a Na + ion

  5. Predation risk, resource quality, and reef structural complexity shape territoriality in a coral reef herbivore.

    PubMed

    Catano, Laura B; Gunn, Bridgette K; Kelley, Megan C; Burkepile, Deron E

    2015-01-01

    For many species securing territories is important for feeding and reproduction. Factors such as competition, habitat availability, and male characteristics can influence an individual's ability to establish and maintain a territory. The risk of predation can have an important influence on feeding and reproduction; however, few have studied its effect on territoriality. We investigated territoriality in a haremic, polygynous species of coral reef herbivore, Sparisoma aurofrenatum (redband parrotfish), across eight reefs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary that were either protected or unprotected from fishing of piscivorous fishes. We examined how territory size and quality varied with reef protection status, competition, predation risk, and male size. We then determined how territory size and quality influenced harem size and female size to understand the effect of territoriality on reproductive potential. We found that protected reefs trended towards having more large predatory fishes and that territories there were smaller but had greater algal nutritional quality relative to unprotected reefs. Our data suggest that even though males in protected sites have smaller territories, which support fewer females, they may improve their reproductive potential by choosing nutritionally rich areas, which support larger females. Thus, reef protection appears to shape the trade-off that herbivorous fishes make between territory size and quality. Furthermore, we provide evidence that males in unprotected sites, which are generally less complex than protected sites, choose territories with higher structural complexity, suggesting the importance of this type of habitat for feeding and reproduction in S. aurofrenatum. Our work argues that the loss of corals and the resulting decline in structural complexity, as well as management efforts to protect reefs, could alter the territory dynamics and reproductive potential of important herbivorous fish species. PMID:25714431

  6. Predation Risk, Resource Quality, and Reef Structural Complexity Shape Territoriality in a Coral Reef Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Bridgette K.; Kelley, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    For many species securing territories is important for feeding and reproduction. Factors such as competition, habitat availability, and male characteristics can influence an individual’s ability to establish and maintain a territory. The risk of predation can have an important influence on feeding and reproduction; however, few have studied its effect on territoriality. We investigated territoriality in a haremic, polygynous species of coral reef herbivore, Sparisoma aurofrenatum (redband parrotfish), across eight reefs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary that were either protected or unprotected from fishing of piscivorous fishes. We examined how territory size and quality varied with reef protection status, competition, predation risk, and male size. We then determined how territory size and quality influenced harem size and female size to understand the effect of territoriality on reproductive potential. We found that protected reefs trended towards having more large predatory fishes and that territories there were smaller but had greater algal nutritional quality relative to unprotected reefs. Our data suggest that even though males in protected sites have smaller territories, which support fewer females, they may improve their reproductive potential by choosing nutritionally rich areas, which support larger females. Thus, reef protection appears to shape the trade-off that herbivorous fishes make between territory size and quality. Furthermore, we provide evidence that males in unprotected sites, which are generally less complex than protected sites, choose territories with higher structural complexity, suggesting the importance of this type of habitat for feeding and reproduction in S. aurofrenatum. Our work argues that the loss of corals and the resulting decline in structural complexity, as well as management efforts to protect reefs, could alter the territory dynamics and reproductive potential of important herbivorous fish species. PMID

  7. Complex (Nonstandard) Six-Layer Polytypes of Lizardite Revealed from Oblique-Texture Electron Diffraction Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistov, A.P.; Zinchuk, N.N.; Kotel'nikov, D.D.

    2004-11-01

    Association of simple (1T and 3R) and two complex (nonstandard) orthogonal polytypes of the serpentine mineral lizardite from the Catoca kimberlite pipe (West Africa) association is revealed from oblique-texture electron diffraction patterns. A six-layer polytype with an ordered superposition of equally oriented layers (notation 3{sub 2}3{sub 2}3{sub 4}3{sub 4}3{sub 6}3{sub 6} or ++ - -00) belonging to the structural group A and a three-layer (336 or I,I,II) or a six-layer (336366 or I,I,II,I,II,II) polytype with alternating oppositely oriented layers and semi-disordered structure are identified using polytype analysis.

  8. Complex System Assembly Underlies a Two-Tiered Model of Highly Delocalized Electrons.

    PubMed

    Mompeán, Miguel; Nogales, Aurora; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Laurents, Douglas V

    2016-05-19

    Amyloid fibrils are exceptionally stable oligomeric structures with extensive, highly cooperative H-bonding networks whose physical origin remains elusive. While nonpolar systems benefit from both H-bonds and hydrophobic interactions, we found that highly polar sequences containing glutamine and asparagine amino acid residues form hyperpolarized H-bonds. This feature, observed by density functional theory calculations, encodes the origin of these polar oligomers' high stability. These results are explained in a theoretical model for complex amyloid assembly based on two different types of cooperative effects resulting from highly delocalized electrons, one of which is always present in both polar and hydrophobic systems. Experimental electric conductivity measurements, ThT fluorescence enhancement, and NMR spectroscopy support this proposal and reveal the conditions for disassembly. PMID:27139835

  9. Electronic structure of nitrogen square planar copper complexes in Langmuir-Blodgett films

    SciTech Connect

    Carniato, S.; Roulet, H.; Dufour, G.

    1992-08-20

    The Cu 2p and N is X-ray photoelectron spectra of nitrogen square planar copper(II) complex, derived from copper phthalocyanine and especially substituted to produce Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, are reported and compared with those of commercial copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and selected porphyrin compounds. Although the copper atom is found primarily in the Cu(II) state, the authors observe the presence of the reduced Cu(I) form, with a great variety of relative intensities, because of a concomitant ability to reduction. In contrast, in the LB films, the copper atom remains in the Cu(II) state. The authors discuss this different behavior in terms of the reduction degree of the molecule, the localization of the additional electrons on the metal or the macrocycle, and a different nitrogen geometry around copper. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Elucidation of AMPA receptor-stargazin complexes by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Edward C; Yelshanskaya, Maria V; Grassucci, Robert A; Frank, Joachim; Sobolevsky, Alexander I

    2016-07-01

    AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and contribute to high cognitive processes such as learning and memory. In the brain, AMPAR trafficking, gating, and pharmacology is tightly controlled by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). Here, we used cryo-electron microscopy to elucidate the structural basis of AMPAR regulation by one of these auxiliary proteins, TARP γ2, or stargazin (STZ). Our structures illuminate the variable interaction stoichiometry of the AMPAR-TARP complex, with one or two TARP molecules binding one tetrameric AMPAR. Analysis of the AMPAR-STZ binding interfaces suggests that electrostatic interactions between the extracellular domains of AMPAR and STZ play an important role in modulating AMPAR function through contact surfaces that are conserved across AMPARs and TARPs. We propose a model explaining how TARPs stabilize the activated state of AMPARs and how the interactions between AMPARs and their auxiliary proteins control fast excitatory synaptic transmission. PMID:27365450

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer and fluorescence mechanisms in covalently linked polynuclear aromatic-nucleotide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Geacintov, N.E.; Mao, Bing; Zhao, Rushen; Chen, Junxin; Liu, Tong Ming; Ya, Nai-Qi; France, L.L.; Sutherland, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    The fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-nucleic acid complexes is quenched by photoinduced electron transfer mechanisms in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures. These effects are illustrated with the biologically important compound benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), a mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene, which forms covalent mutagenic lesions with 2{prime}-deoxyguanosine (dG) residues in DNA. The dependence of the fluroescence yeild and fluorescence decay times of the covalent model adduct (+)-trans-BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG as a function of temperature and methanol/water composition are described. Because of the sensitivity of the fluorescence of the pyrenyl residue to the polarity of the microenvironment, the magnitude of the fluorescence yield can be used to distinguish between highly hydrophobic (e.g. intercalation) and other more solvent-exposed BPDE-nucleic acid binding sites.

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer and fluorescence mechanisms in covalently linked polynuclear aromatic-nucleotide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Geacintov, N.E.; Mao, Bing; Zhao, Rushen; Chen, Junxin; Liu, Tong Ming; Ya, Nai-Qi . Dept. of Chemistry); France, L.L.; Sutherland, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-nucleic acid complexes is quenched by photoinduced electron transfer mechanisms in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures. These effects are illustrated with the biologically important compound benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), a mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the environmental pollutant benzo(a)pyrene, which forms covalent mutagenic lesions with 2{prime}-deoxyguanosine (dG) residues in DNA. The dependence of the fluroescence yeild and fluorescence decay times of the covalent model adduct (+)-trans-BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG as a function of temperature and methanol/water composition are described. Because of the sensitivity of the fluorescence of the pyrenyl residue to the polarity of the microenvironment, the magnitude of the fluorescence yield can be used to distinguish between highly hydrophobic (e.g. intercalation) and other more solvent-exposed BPDE-nucleic acid binding sites.

  13. Complex temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Sahadev, Nishaina; Bindu, R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Dhar, S. K.; Thamizhavel, A.; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2014-03-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe2As2, which is a parent compound of high temperature superconductors—CaFe2As2 exhibits superconductivity under pressure as well as doping of charge carriers. Photoemission results of CaFe2As2 in this study reveal a gradual shift of an energy band, α away from the chemical potential with decreasing temperature in addition to the spin density wave (SDW) transition induced Fermi surface reconstruction across SDW transition temperature. The corresponding hole pocket eventually disappears at lower temperatures, while the hole Fermi surface of the β band possessing finite p orbital character survives till the lowest temperature studied. These results, thus, reveal signature of complex charge redistribution among various energy bands as a function of temperature.

  14. Electronic Resources for Youth Services: A Print Bibliography and Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amey, Larry; Segal, Erez

    1996-01-01

    This article evaluates 57 World Wide Web sites related to children's literature and youth-oriented library services, in categories including award-winning books; book reviews; reading and storytelling; writing resources; online children's literature; educational entertainment; and authors, publishers, and booksellers. Also included is information…

  15. QR Codes as Finding Aides: Linking Electronic and Print Library Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Danielle; Schneidewind, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    As part of a focused, methodical, and evaluative approach to emerging technologies, QR codes are one of many new technologies being used by the UC Irvine Libraries. QR codes provide simple connections between print and virtual resources. In summer 2010, a small task force began to investigate how QR codes could be used to provide information and…

  16. Helping Patrons Find Locally Held Electronic Resources: An Interlibrary Loan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The University of North Texas Libraries provide extensive online access to academic journals through major vendor databases. As illustrated by interlibrary loan borrowing requests for items held in our databases, patrons often have difficulty navigating the available resources. In this study, the Interlibrary Loan staff used data gathered from the…

  17. Supporting Learning and Information Sharing in Natural Resource Management with Technologies for Electronic Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alem, Leila; McLean, Alistair

    2005-01-01

    Community participation is central to achieving sustainable natural resource management. A prerequisite to informed participation is that community and stakeholder groups have access to different knowledge sources, are more closely attuned to the different issues and viewpoints, and are sufficiently equipped to understand and maybe resolve complex…

  18. MendelWeb: An Electronic Science/Math/History Resource for the WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Roger B.

    This paper describes a hypermedia resource, called MendelWeb that integrates elementary biology, discrete mathematics, and the history of science. MendelWeb is constructed from Gregor Menders 1865 paper, "Experiments in Plant Hybridization". An English translation of Mendel's paper, which is considered to mark the birth of classical and…

  19. Electronic structures of ruthenium and osmium complexes of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Manas Kumar; Patra, Sarat Chandra; Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Adhikary, Nirmal Das; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2012-06-18

    The reaction of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) with [M(II)(H)(CO)(X)(PPh(3))(3)] in boiling toluene leads to the homolytic cleavage of the M(II)-H bond, affording the paramagnetic trans-[M(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X] (M = Ru, X = Cl, 1; M = Os, X = Br, 3) and cis-[M(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X] (M = Ru, X = Cl, 2; M = Os, X = Br, 4) complexes. Single-crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1, 2·toluene, and 4·CH(2)Cl(2), EPR spectra, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have substantiated that 1-4 are 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinone radical (PQ(•-)) complexes of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) and are defined as trans-[Ru(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Cl] (1), cis-[Ru(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Cl] (2), trans-[Os(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO) Br] (3), and cis-[Os(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Br] (4). Two comparatively longer C-O [average lengths: 1, 1.291(3) Å; 2·toluene, 1.281(5) Å; 4·CH(2)Cl(2), 1.300(8) Å] and shorter C-C lengths [1, 1.418(5) Å; 2·toluene, 1.439(6) Å; 4·CH(2)Cl(2), 1.434(9) Å] of the OO chelates are consistent with the presence of a reduced PQ(•-) ligand in 1-4. A minor contribution of the alternate resonance form, trans- or cis-[M(I)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X], of 1-4 has been predicted by the anisotropic X- and Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the frozen glasses of the complexes at 25 K and unrestricted DFT calculations on 1, trans-[Ru(PQ)(PMe(3))(2)(CO)Cl] (5), cis-[Ru(PQ)(PMe(3))(2)(CO)Cl] (6), and cis-[Os(PQ)(PMe(3))(2)(CO)Br] (7). However, no thermodynamic equilibria between [M(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X] and [M(I)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X] tautomers have been detected. 1-4 undergo one-electron oxidation at -0.06, -0.05, 0.03, and -0.03 V versus a ferrocenium/ferrocene, Fc(+)/Fc, couple because of the formation of PQ complexes as trans-[Ru(II)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Cl](+) (1(+)), cis-[Ru(II)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Cl](+) (2(+)), trans-[Os(II)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Br](+) (3(+)), and cis-[Os(II)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Br](+) (4(+)). The trans

  20. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer in a solvated phenol-amine complex.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Puja; Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-02-12

    Photoinduced concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT), denoted photo-EPT, is important for a wide range of energy conversion processes. Transient absorption and Raman spectroscopy experiments on the hydrogen-bonded p-nitrophenylphenol-t-butylamine complex, solvated in 1,2-dichloroethane, suggested that this complex may undergo photo-EPT. The experiments probed two excited electronic states that were interpreted as an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state and an EPT state. Herein mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical nonadiabatic surface hopping dynamics is used to investigate the relaxation pathways following photoexcitation. The potential energy surface is generated on the fly with a semiempirical floating occupation molecular orbital complete active space configuration interaction method for the solute molecule and a molecular mechanical force field for the explicit solvent molecules. The free energy curves along the proton transfer coordinate illustrate that proton transfer is thermodynamically and kinetically favorable on the lower-energy excited state but not on the higher-energy excited state, supporting the characterization of these states as EPT and ICT, respectively. The nonadiabatic dynamics simulations indicate that the population decays from the ICT state to the EPT state in ∼100 fs and from the EPT state to the ground state on the slower time scale of ∼1 ps, qualitatively consistent with the experimental measurements. For ∼54% of the trajectories, the proton transfers from the phenol to the amine in ∼400 fs on the EPT state and then transfers back to the phenol rapidly upon decay to the ground state. Thus, these calculations augment the original interpretation of the experimental data by providing evidence of proton transfer on the EPT state prior to decay to the ground state. The fundamental insights obtained from these simulations are also relevant to other photo-EPT processes. PMID:25545667

  1. Electron transfer in the P450cam/PDX complex. The QM/MM e-pathway.

    PubMed

    Wallrapp, Frank; Masone, Diego; Guallar, Victor

    2008-12-18

    Electron transfer processes are simple but crucial reactions in biochemistry, being one of the main steps in almost all enzymatic cycles. Obtaining an atomic description of the transfer pathway is a difficult task, at both the experimental and theoretical levels. Here we combine protein-protein docking algorithms, protein structure prediction methodologies and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques to map the electron transfer pathway between cytochrome P450 camphor and its redox partner, putidaredoxin. Although the mechanism of interaction and electron transfer for this redox couple has been under investigation for over 30 years, the exact mechanism and electron transfer pathway has not been fully understood, yet. Our results report the first ab initio quantum chemistry description of the electron migration. The obtained electron transfer pathway indicates the key role of Arg112 of P450 and Asp38 of PDX and the existence of slightly different electron transfer pathways for different protein-protein complexes. PMID:18823106

  2. Utilization of central nervous system resources for preparation and performance of complex walking tasks in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David J.; Rose, Dorian K.; Ring, Sarah A.; Porges, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Walking in the home and community often involves performance of complex walking tasks. Understanding the control of such tasks is crucial to preserving independence and quality of life in older adults. However, very little research has been conducted in this area. Here, we assess the extent to which two measures of central nervous system (CNS) activity are responsive to the challenges posed by preparation and performance of complex walking tasks. Prefrontal cortical activity was measured by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and sympathetic nervous system arousal was measured by skin conductance level (SCL). Materials and methods: Sixteen older men and women (age: 77.2 ± 5.6 years) with mild mobility deficits participated in this study. Participants walked at their preferred speed without distractions along an unobstructed, well-lit course (control task) and also walked on the same course under five separate challenging conditions: performing a cognitive verbal fluency task (verbal task), dim lighting (dim task), carrying a tray (carry task), negotiating obstacles (obstacles task) and wearing a weighted vest (vest task). Mean prefrontal activation and SCL were calculated during the preparation and performance phases of each task. Gait spatiotemporal measurements were acquired by an instrumented gait mat. Results: Prefrontal cortical activity and SCL were elevated during the preparation phase of complex walking tasks relative to the control task. During the performance phase, prefrontal activity remained elevated to a similar level as during task preparation. In contrast, SCL continued to increase beyond the level observed during task preparation. A larger increase in prefrontal activity was found to be linked to preserved quality of gait during complex walking tasks. Discussion: These findings indicate that availability and utilization of CNS resources are important for optimizing performance of complex walking tasks in older adults. PMID

  3. Ab initio electronic structure study of a model water splitting dimer complex.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Amendra; Aikens, Christine M

    2015-12-28

    A model manganese dimer electrocatalyst bridged by μ-OH ligands is used to investigate changes in spin states that may occur during water oxidation. We have employed restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF), second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF), and multireference second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MRMP2) calculations to investigate this system. Multiconfigurational methods like CASSCF and MRMP2 are appropriate methods to study these systems with antiferromagnetically-coupled electrons. Orbital occupations and distributions have been closely analyzed to understand the electronic details and contributions to the water splitting from manganese and oxygen atoms. The presence of Mn(IV)O˙ radical moieties has been observed in this catalytic pathway. Multiple nearly degenerate excited states were found close to the ground state in all structures. This suggests competing potential energy landscapes near the ground state may influence the reactivity of manganese complexes such as the dimers studied in this work. PMID:26593689

  4. Noninnocence of Indigo: Dehydroindigo Anions as Bridging Electron-Donor Ligands in Diruthenium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prasenjit; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Paretzki, Alexa; Beyer, Katharina; Kaim, Wolfgang; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-03-21

    Complexes of singly or doubly deprotonated indigo (H2Ind) with one or two [Ru(pap)2](2+) fragments (pap = 2-phenylazopyridine) have been characterized experimentally [molecular structure, voltammetry, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and UV-vis-near-IR spectroelectrochemistry] and by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The compound [Ru(pap)2(HInd(-))]ClO4 ([1]ClO4) was found to contain an intramolecular NH---O hydrogen bond, whereas [{Ru(pap)2}2(μ-Ind(2-))](ClO4)2 ([2](ClO4)2), isolated as the meso diastereoisomer with near-IR absorptions at 1162 and 991 nm, contains two metals bridged at 6.354 Å distance by the bischelating indigo dianion. The spectroelectrochemical study of multiple reversible reduction and oxidation processes of 2(n) (n = 4+, 3+, 2+, 1+, 0, 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-) reveals the stepwise addition of electrons to the terminal π-accepting pap ligands, whereas the oxidations occur predominantly at the anionic indigo ligand, producing an EPR-identified indigo radical intermediate and revealing the suitability of deprotonated indigo as a σ- and π-donating bischelating bridge. PMID:26931407

  5. Making sense of complex electronic records: socio-technical design in social care.

    PubMed

    Wastell, David; White, Sue

    2014-03-01

    Dealing with complex electronic documentation is an integral part of much contemporary professional work. In this paper, we address the design of electronic records for social care professionals in the UK. Recent reforms in UK child welfare have followed a top-down, managerial approach emphasizing conformance to standard processes. The vicissitudes of a major national IT project, the Integrated Children's System, show the limitations of this approach, in particular the detrimental effect it has had on professional autonomy. Following in the foot-steps of Ken Eason, we argue that socio-technical design, by focussing on innovative applications of technology to support users (rather than the interests of the bureaucracy) offers a more promising alternative. A user-centred design exercise is presented to illustrate this approach in action. A novel interface was developed for handling the heterogeneous bundle of documents which make up the social care record, helping social workers make better sense of case-files. The prototype draws on the metaphor of the dining-room table as a way of overcoming the limitations of the computer display. We conclude that socio-technical thinking engenders a shift in mind-set, opening up a radically different design space compared to current design orthodoxy. PMID:23453774

  6. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy. PMID:26857477

  7. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.

  8. Simulated two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the eight-bacteriochlorophyll FMO complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Shu-Hao; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-21

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein-pigment complex acts as a molecular wire conducting energy between the outer antenna system and the reaction center; it is an important photosynthetic system to study the transfer of excitonic energy. Recent crystallographic studies report the existence of an additional (eighth) bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) in some of the FMO monomers. To understand the functionality of this eighth BChl, we simulated the two-dimensional electronic spectra of both the 7-site (apo form) and the 8-site (holo form) variant of the FMO complex from green sulfur bacteria, Prosthecochloris aestuarii. By comparing the spectrum, it was found that the eighth BChl can affect two different excitonic energy transfer pathways: (1) it is directly involved in the first apo form pathway (6 → 3 → 1) by passing the excitonic energy to exciton 6; and (2) it facilitates an increase in the excitonic wave function overlap between excitons 4 and 5 in the second pathway (7 → 4,5 → 2 → 1) and thus increases the possible downward sampling routes across the BChls.

  9. Vibronic properties of organic semiconductors based on phthalocyanine complexes with asymmetrically distributed electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Belogorokhov, I. A.; Martishov, M. N.; Mamichev, D. A.; Dronov, M. A.; Pushkarev, V. E.; Ryabchikov, Yu. V.; Forsh, P. A.; Tomilova, L. G.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2010-06-15

    This study is concerned with the optical properties of organic semiconductors based on lanthanide (III) biphthalocyanine and triphthalocyanine complexes with asymmetrically distributed electron density. The {sup Cl}PcLu{sup tBu}Pc biphthalocyanine and {sup Cl}PcEu{sup Bu}PcLu{sup Bu}Pc triphthalocyanine solid films ({sup Cl}Pc = 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, 23, 24-octachlorophthalocyaninate, {sup tBu}Pc = 2(3), 9(10), 16(17), 23(24)-tetra- tretbutylphthalocyani-nate, {sup Bu}Pc = 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, 23, 24-octabutylphthalo cyaninate) are fabricated, and their transmittance spectra in the middle infrared region are studied. Analysis of the transmittance spectra shows that the addition of complexity to phthalocyanine molecules yields some changes in the spectra. Specifically, the isoindole group can exhibit vibronic properties in the form of four absorption lines in the range 1400-1450 cm{sup -1}. New absorption lines that may be due to chlorine-carbon bonds are observed in the far-infrared region.

  10. An innovative electronic health records system for rare and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There exists a large number of rare and complex diseases that are neglected due to the difficulty in diagnosis and treatment. Being rare, they normally do not justify the costs of developing an especialized Electronic Health Record (EHR) system to assist doctors and patients of these diseases. In this work we propose the use of Computer applications known as Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) to address this issue. Results In this work we describe a fully customizable EHR system that uses a workflow based LIMS with an easy to adapt interface for data collection and retrieval. This system can easily be customized to manage different types of medical data. The customization for a new disease can be done in a few hours with the help of a specialist. Conclusion We have used the proposed system to manage data from patients of three complex diseases: neuromyelitis optica, paracoccidioidomycosis and adrenoleukodistrofy. These diseases have very different symptoms, exams, diagnostics and treatments, but the FluxMED system is able to manage these data in a highly specialized manner without any modifications to its code. PMID:26695733

  11. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-09

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines themore » selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. In conclusion, we suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.« less

  12. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy. PMID:26857477

  13. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  14. Suppression of electron transfer to dioxygen by charge transfer and electron transfer complexes in the FAD-dependent reductase component of toluene dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzong-Yuan; Werther, Tobias; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger

    2012-11-01

    The three-component toluene dioxygenase system consists of an FAD-containing reductase, a Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a Rieske-type dioxygenase. The task of the FAD-containing reductase is to shuttle electrons from NADH to the ferredoxin, a reaction the enzyme has to catalyze in the presence of dioxygen. We investigated the kinetics of the reductase in the reductive and oxidative half-reaction and detected a stable charge transfer complex between the reduced reductase and NAD(+) at the end of the reductive half-reaction, which is substantially less reactive toward dioxygen than the reduced reductase in the absence of NAD(+). A plausible reason for the low reactivity toward dioxygen is revealed by the crystal structure of the complex between NAD(+) and reduced reductase, which shows that the nicotinamide ring and the protein matrix shield the reactive C4a position of the isoalloxazine ring and force the tricycle into an atypical planar conformation, both factors disfavoring the reaction of the reduced flavin with dioxygen. A rapid electron transfer from the charge transfer complex to electron acceptors further reduces the risk of unwanted side reactions, and the crystal structure of a complex between the reductase and its cognate ferredoxin shows a short distance between the electron-donating and -accepting cofactors. Attraction between the two proteins is likely mediated by opposite charges at one large patch of the complex interface. The stability, specificity, and reactivity of the observed charge transfer and electron transfer complexes are thought to prevent the reaction of reductase(TOL) with dioxygen and thus present a solution toward conflicting requirements. PMID:22992736

  15. Kinetics of mediated electron transfer between viologen groups in a self-assembled monolayer and metal complexes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas; Hiley, Shauna; Buttry, Daniel A.

    1993-05-01

    Self-assembled monolayers are used in an experimental configuration which allows the extraction of the cross reaction electron exchange rate constant for the electron transfer between a viologen group embedded within the SAM and a metal complex in solution. This cross reaction rate constant is compared with predictions from the Marcus theory using the cross reaction relation and the known self-exchange rate constants for the two reagents. The results reveal that the intrinsic barrier to the electron transfer is relatively unchanged in the SAM, while the rate constant is somewhat depressed due to the long distance over which the electron must transfer.

  16. Core size determination and structural characterization of intravenous iron complexes by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Petrochenko, Peter; Chen, Lynn; Wong, Sook Yee; Absar, Mohammad; Choi, Stephanie; Zheng, Jiwen

    2016-05-30

    Understanding physicochemical properties of intravenous (IV) iron drug products is essential to ensure the manufacturing process is consistent and streamlined. The history of physicochemical characterization of IV iron complex formulations stretches over several decades, with disparities in iron core size and particle morphology as the major source of debate. One of the main reasons for this controversy is room temperature sample preparation artifacts, which affect accurate determination of size, shape and agglomeration/aggregation of nanoscale iron particles. The present study is first to report the ultra-fine iron core structures of four IV iron complex formulations, sodium ferric gluconate, iron sucrose, low molecular weight iron dextran and ferumoxytol, using a cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) preservation technique, as opposed to the conventional room temperature (RT-TEM) technique. Our results show that room temperature preparation causes nanoparticle aggregation and deformation, while cryo-TEM preserves IV iron colloidal suspension in their native frozen-hydrated and undiluted state. In contrast to the current consensus in literature, all four IV iron colloids exhibit a similar morphology of their iron oxide cores with a spherical shape, narrow size distribution and an average size of 2nm. Moreover, out of the four tested formulations, ferumoxytol exhibits a cluster-like community of several iron carbohydrate particles which likely accounts for its large hydrodynamic size of 25nm, measured with dynamic light scattering. Our findings outline a suitable method for identifying colloidal nanoparticle core size in the native state, which is increasingly important for manufacturing and design control of complex drug formulations, such as IV iron drug products. PMID:27001529

  17. Excited states of M(II,d sup 6 )-4 prime -Phenylterpyridine complexes: Electron localization

    SciTech Connect

    Amouyal, E.; Mouallem-Bahout, M. ); Calzaferri, G. )

    1991-10-03

    The authors spectroscopic and photophysical data of para-substituted phenylterpyridine (ptpy) Ru(II) complexes and molecular orbital studies of the Fe(II), Ru(II), and Os(II) compounds (M(R-ptpy){sub 2}){sup 2+}, R=H, CH{sub 3}, OH, OCH{sub 3}, and Cl. The visible charge-transfer absorption of the (Ru(R-ptpy){sub 2}){sup 2+} is almost twice as intense as observed for the corresponding 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) complex (Ru(bpy){sub 3}){sup 2+}, and it is red shifted by about 50 nm. The luminescence in solution and in membranes (Nafion, cellophane) is very weak at room temperature, and the luminescence decay time is on the order of a few nanoseconds. In a glass at 77K, however, the luminescence quantum yield is 0.4 and the decay time 13 {mu}s. Excited-state absorption spectra measured at room temperature by laser flash spectroscopy support the interpretation that the first excited state is of the MLCT type. The similarity of the excited-state absorptions to those of the ligand radical anions strengthens the idea that the excited electron is localized on a single ligand. The low luminescence quantum yield at room temperature is though to be due to low-energy intramolecular vibrations of the nonrigid complex and not to the coupling with d states. Lowering the temperature results in freezing these intramolecular movements and hence in significantly increasing the luminescence quantum yield. The molecular orbital studies indicate that it is reasonable to describe the MLCT state as ((L)Ru{sup III}(L{sm bullet}{sup {minus}})){sup 2+} because the perpendicular conformation of the two ligands causes all {pi} orbitals to be accidentally 2-fold degenerate and therefore a small asymmetric distortion is sufficient to favor the localized situation.

  18. Pyrogallol red-vanadium complex-a new stain for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Völker, W; Kampsmeyer, H H; Robenek, H

    1996-11-01

    We report on the application of a pyrogallol red-vanadium complex (PR-V) for ultracytochemical staining of proteinaceous structures in animal tissues and cell cultures. This dye may be used as a general purpose stain in electron microscopy. In contrast to osmium tetroxide, the price of the material is low and no toxic vapors are produced. The PR-V complex was prepared by addition of vanadium (IV) oxide sulfate to pyrogallol red dissolved in acetate buffer (pH 5.6). The formation of the complex was indicated by a color change from purple-red (lambda max = 520 nm) to violet (lambda max = 539 nm) which occurred at equimolar concentrations of the dye and the metal salt. Under these conditions PR-V was stable for several days. The mechanism of PR-V binding was checked in dot blots using different proteins as well as heparin for control. While heparin remained unstained, proteins were stained in a dose-dependent manner. Deamination of proteins with nitric oxide strongly reduced PR-V staining in dot blots as well as in cell cultures. Optimal staining results of animal cells and tissues were obtained in specimens that had been mildly fixed for at least 1 h or longer with a mixture of 0.1% glutaraldehyde and 1.0% paraformaldehyde dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.2, washed with acetate buffer, pH 5.6, and subsequently treated with PR-V in the presence of 50% ethanol at room temperature. Control specimens without PR-V but treated en bloc with uranyl acetate or sodium molybdate showed similar contrast but less details in the ultrastructure of the tissue. All specimens were embedded in epoxy resin and ultratain sections were stained conventionally with uranyl and lead salt solutions. In electron micrographs, membrane-associated particles, stress fibers and filaments of the cell cortex, collagen fibrils, tight junctions and desmosomes, and other proteinaceous components were clearly visualized only in the PR-V-treated specimens. In conclusion, the ability to bind

  19. Ligand contributions to the electronic structures of the oxidized cobalt(II) salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Kochem, Amélie; Kanso, Hussein; Baptiste, Benoit; Arora, Himanshu; Philouze, Christian; Jarjayes, Olivier; Vezin, Hervé; Luneau, Dominique; Orio, Maylis; Thomas, Fabrice

    2012-10-15

    Square planar cobalt(II) complexes of salen ligands N,N'-bis(3-tert-butyl-5R-salicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine), where R = OMe (1) and tert-butyl (2), were prepared. 1 and 2 were electrochemically reversibly oxidized into cations [1-H(2)O](+) and [2-H(2)O](+) in CH(2)Cl(2). The chemically generated [1-H(2)O](SbF(6))·0.68 H(2)O·0.82CH(2)Cl(2) and [2-H(2)O](SbF(6))·0.3H(2)O·0.85CH(2)Cl(2) were characterized by X-ray diffraction and NIR spectroscopy. Both complexes are paramagnetic species containing a square pyramidal cobalt ion coordinated at the apical position by an exogenous water molecule. They exhibit remarkable NIR bands at 1220 (7370 M(-1) cm(-1)) and 1060 nm (5560 M(-1) cm(-1)), respectively, assigned to a CT transition. DFT calculations and magnetic measurements confirm the paramagnetic (S = 1) ground spin state of the cations. They show that more than 70% of the total spin density in [1-H(2)O](+) and [2-H(2)O](+) is localized on the metal, the remaining spin density being distributed over the aromatic rings (30% phenoxyl character). In the presence of N-methylimidazole 1 and 2 are irreversibly oxidized by air into the genuine octahedral cobalt(III) bis(phenolate) complexes [1-im(2)](+) and [2-im(2)](+), the former being structurally characterized. Neither [1-im(2)](+) nor [2-im(2)](+) exhibits a NIR feature in its electronic spectrum. 1 and 2 were electrochemically two-electron oxidized into [1](2+) and [2](2+). The cations were identified as Co(III)-phenoxyl species by their characteristic absorption band at ca. 400 nm in the UV-vis spectrum. Coordination of the phenoxyl radical to the cobalt(III) metal ion is evidenced by the EPR signal centered at g = 2.00. PMID:23013360

  20. Single Particle Electron Microscopy Reconstruction of the Exosome Complex Using the Random Conical Tilt Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueqi; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Single particle electron microscopy (EM) reconstruction has recently become a popular tool to get the three-dimensional (3D) structure of large macromolecular complexes. Compared to X-ray crystallography, it has some unique advantages. First, single particle EM reconstruction does not need to crystallize the protein sample, which is the bottleneck in X-ray crystallography, especially for large macromolecular complexes. Secondly, it does not need large amounts of protein samples. Compared with milligrams of proteins necessary for crystallization, single particle EM reconstruction only needs several micro-liters of protein solution at nano-molar concentrations, using the negative staining EM method. However, despite a few macromolecular assemblies with high symmetry, single particle EM is limited at relatively low resolution (lower than 1 nm resolution) for many specimens especially those without symmetry. This technique is also limited by the size of the molecules under study, i.e. 100 kDa for negatively stained specimens and 300 kDa for frozen-hydrated specimens in general. For a new sample of unknown structure, we generally use a heavy metal solution to embed the molecules by negative staining. The specimen is then examined in a transmission electron microscope to take two-dimensional (2D) micrographs of the molecules. Ideally, the protein molecules have a homogeneous 3D structure but exhibit different orientations in the micrographs. These micrographs are digitized and processed in computers as "single particles". Using two-dimensional alignment and classification techniques, homogenous molecules in the same views are clustered into classes. Their averages enhance the signal of the molecule's 2D shapes. After we assign the particles with the proper relative orientation (Euler angles), we will be able to reconstruct the 2D particle images into a 3D virtual volume. In single particle 3D reconstruction, an essential step is to correctly assign the proper orientation

  1. Measuring individuality in habitat use across complex landscapes: approaches, constraints, and implications for assessing resource specialization.

    PubMed

    Fodrie, F Joel; Yeager, Lauren A; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Layman, Craig A; Sherwood, Graham D; Kenworthy, Matthew D

    2015-05-01

    Many mobile marine species are presumed to utilize a broad spectrum of habitats, but this seemingly generalist life history may arise from conspecifics specializing on distinct habitat alternatives to exploit foraging, resting/refuge, or reproductive opportunities. We acoustically tagged 34 red drum, and mapped sand, seagrass, marsh, or oyster (across discrete landscape contexts) use by each uniquely coded individual. Using 144,000 acoustic detections, we recorded differences in habitat use among red drum: proportional use of seagrass habitat ranged from 0 to 100%, and use of oyster-bottom types also varied among fish. WIC/TNW and IS metrics (previously applied vis-à-vis diet specialization) consistently indicated that a typical red drum overlapped >70% with population-level niche exploitation. Monte Carlo permutations showed these values were lower than expected had fish drawn from a common habitat-use distribution, but longitudinal comparisons did not provide evidence of temporally consistent individuality, suggesting that differences among individuals were plastic and not reflective of true specialization. Given the range of acoustic detections we captured (from tens to 1,000s per individual), which are substantially larger sample sizes than in many diet studies, we extended our findings by serially reducing or expanding our data in simulations to evaluate sample-size effects. We found that the results of null hypothesis testing for specialization were highly dependent on sample size, with thresholds in the relationship between sample size and associated P-values. These results highlight opportunities and potential caveats in exploring individuality in habitat use. More broadly, exploring individual specialization in fine-scale habitat use suggests that, for mobile marine species, movement behaviors over shorter (≤weeks), but not longer (≥months), timescales may serve as an underlying mechanism for other forms of resource specialization. PMID:25669451

  2. An Introduction to Internet Resources for K-12 Educators. Part II: Question Answering, Electronic Discussion Groups, Newsgroups, Update 1999. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Nancy A.

    As K-12 schools connect to the Internet, a new method of communication opens up to educators and their students. This ERIC Digest describes some sample services and resources that are available to the K-12 community by electronic mail over the Internet (resources and addresses are subject to change). Question answering services, electronic…

  3. High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy on macromolecular complexes and cell organelles.

    PubMed

    Hoenger, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy techniques and computational 3-D reconstruction of macromolecular assemblies are tightly linked tools in modern structural biology. This symbiosis has produced vast amounts of detailed information on the structure and function of biological macromolecules. Typically, one of two fundamentally different strategies is used depending on the specimens and their environment. A: 3-D reconstruction based on repetitive and structurally identical unit cells that allow for averaging, and B: tomographic 3-D reconstructions where tilt-series between approximately ± 60 and ± 70° at small angular increments are collected from highly complex and flexible structures that are beyond averaging procedures, at least during the first round of 3-D reconstruction. Strategies of group A are averaging-based procedures and collect large number of 2-D projections at different angles that are computationally aligned, averaged together, and back-projected in 3-D space to reach a most complete 3-D dataset with high resolution, today often down to atomic detail. Evidently, success relies on structurally repetitive particles and an aligning procedure that unambiguously determines the angular relationship of all 2-D projections with respect to each other. The alignment procedure of small particles may rely on their packing into a regular array such as a 2-D crystal, an icosahedral (viral) particle, or a helical assembly. Critically important for cryo-methods, each particle will only be exposed once to the electron beam, making these procedures optimal for highest-resolution studies where beam-induced damage is a significant concern. In contrast, tomographic 3-D reconstruction procedures (group B) do not rely on averaging, but collect an entire dataset from the very same structure of interest. Data acquisition requires collecting a large series of tilted projections at angular increments of 1-2° or less and a tilt range of ± 60° or more. Accordingly, tomographic data

  4. Faculty as a community engaged with ongoing curricular development: use of groupware and electronic resources.

    PubMed

    Miller, Judy; Koyanagi, Mark; Morgan, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how technology can facilitate faculty engagement in curriculum development, use faculty time efficiently, and ensure program quality. A plan to initiate an accelerated second-degree bachelor of science in nursing option was the impetus for use of groupware electronic strategies to support faculty as valued members of the academic community, engaged in the undergraduate program and its curriculum. This article describes the two Web-based applications (electronic-based strategies) developed: the curriculum development homepage as a collaborative communication tool, and a curricular tracking tool. PMID:15673171

  5. Sustainable Water Resources Management in a Complex Watershed Under Climate Change Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, J. P.; McPhee, J.

    2007-05-01

    The Aconcagua River Basin in central Chile supplies water for over one million people, high-return agriculture, mining and hydropower industries. The Aconcagua river basin has Mediterranean/semi-arid climate, its hydrologic regime varies along its path from snow- to a rainfall-dominated, and significant stream-aquifer interaction is observed throughout the river path. A complex water market operates in the Aconcagua River Basin, where private owners hold surface and subsurface water rights independently of land ownership and/or intended use. The above yield integrated watershed management critical for the sustainability of basin operations, moreover under conditions of significant precipitation interannual variability and uncertain future climatic scenarios. In this work we propose an integrated hydrologic-operational model for the Aconcagua River in order to evaluate sustainable management scenarios under conditions of climatic uncertainty. The modeling software WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning System) serves as the platform for decision support, allowing the assessment of diverse scenarios of water use development and hydrologic conditions. The hydrologic component of the adopted model utilizes conceptual functions for describing the relations between different hydrologic variables. The management component relies on economic valuation for characterizing the space of efficient operational policies.

  6. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

  7. N2 activation by an iron complex with a strong electron-donating iminophosphorane ligand.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Wasada-Tsutsui, Yuko; Ogawa, Takahiko; Inomata, Tomohiko; Ozawa, Tomohiro; Sakai, Yoichi; Fryzuk, Michael D; Masuda, Hideki

    2015-10-01

    A new tridentate cyclopentane-bridged iminophosphorane ligand, N-(2-diisopropylphosphinophenyl)-P,P-diisopropyl-P-(2-(2,6-diisopropylphenylamido)cyclopent-1-enyl)phosphoranimine (NpNPiPr), was synthesized and used in the preparation of a diiron dinitrogen complex. The reaction of the iron complex FeBr(NpNPiPr) with KC8 under dinitrogen yielded the dinuclear dinitrogen Fe complex [Fe(NpNPiPr)]2(μ-N2), which was characterized by X-ray analysis and resonance Raman and NMR spectroscopies. The X-ray analysis revealed a diiron complex bridged by the dinitrogen molecule, with each metal center coordinated by an NpNPiPr ligand and dinitrogen in a trigonal-monopyramidal geometry. The N–N bond length is 1.184(6) Å, and resonance Raman spectra indicate that the N–N stretching mode ν(14N2/15N2) is 1755/1700 cm–1. The magnetic moment of [Fe(NpNPiPr)]2(μ-N2) in benzene-d6 solution, as measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy by the Evans method, is 6.91μB (S = 3). The Mössbauer spectrum at 78 K showed δ = 0.73 mm/s and ΔEQ = 1.83 mm/s. These findings suggest that the iron ions are divalent with a high-spin configuration and that the N2 molecule has (N═N)2– character. Density functional theory calculations performed on [Fe(NpNPiPr)]2(μ-N2) also suggested that the iron is in a high-spin divalent state and that the coordinated dinitrogen molecule is effectively activated by π back-donation from the two iron ions (dπ) to the dinitrogen molecule (πx* and πy*). This is supported by cooperation between a large negative charge on the iminophosphorane ligand and strong electron donation and effective orbital overlap between the iron dπ orbitals and N2 π* orbitals supplied by the phosphine ligand. PMID:26135343

  8. Atypical behavior in the electron capture induced dissociation of biologically relevant transition metal ion complexes of the peptide hormone oxytocin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J.; Mihalca, Romulus; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Doubly protonated ions of the disulfide bond containing nonapeptide hormone oxytocin and oxytocin complexes with different transition metal ions, that have biological relevance under physiological conditions, were subjected to electron capture dissociation (ECD) to probe their structural features in the gas phase. Although, all the ECD spectra were strikingly different, typical ECD behavior was observed for complexes of the nonapeptide hormone oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, i.e., abundant c/z' and a'/y backbone cleavages and ECD characteristic S-S and S-C bond cleavages were observed. We propose that, although in the oxytocin-transition metal ion complexes the metal ions serve as the main initial capture site, the captured electron is transferred to other sites in the complex to form a hydrogen radical, which drives the subsequent typical ECD fragmentations. The complex of oxytocin with Cu2+ displayed noticeably different ECD behavior. The fragment ions were similar to fragment ions typically observed with low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). We propose that the electrons captured by the oxytocin-Cu2+ complex might be favorably involved in reducing the Cu2+ metal ion to Cu+. Subsequent energy redistribution would explain the observed low-energy CID-type fragmentations. Electron capture resulted also in quite different specific cleavage sites for the complexes of oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. This is an indication for structural differences in these complexes possibly linked to their significantly different biological effects on oxytocin-receptor binding, and suggests that ECD may be used to study subtle structural differences in transition metal ion-peptide complexes.

  9. Data Resource Profile: Cardiovascular disease research using linked bespoke studies and electronic health records (CALIBER)

    PubMed Central

    Denaxas, Spiros C; George, Julie; Herrett, Emily; Shah, Anoop D; Kalra, Dipak; Hingorani, Aroon D; Kivimaki, Mika; Timmis, Adam D; Smeeth, Liam; Hemingway, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The goal of cardiovascular disease (CVD) research using linked bespoke studies and electronic health records (CALIBER) is to provide evidence to inform health care and public health policy for CVDs across different stages of translation, from discovery, through evaluation in trials to implementation, where linkages to electronic health records provide new scientific opportunities. The initial approach of the CALIBER programme is characterized as follows: (i) Linkages of multiple electronic heath record sources: examples include linkages between the longitudinal primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the national registry of acute coronary syndromes (Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project), hospitalization and procedure data from Hospital Episode Statistics and cause-specific mortality and social deprivation data from the Office of National Statistics. Current cohort analyses involve a million people in initially healthy populations and disease registries with ∼105 patients. (ii) Linkages of bespoke investigator-led cohort studies (e.g. UK Biobank) to registry data (e.g. Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project), providing new means of ascertaining, validating and phenotyping disease. (iii) A common data model in which routine electronic health record data are made research ready, and sharable, by defining and curating with meta-data >300 variables (categorical, continuous, event) on risk factors, CVDs and non-cardiovascular comorbidities. (iv) Transparency: all CALIBER studies have an analytic protocol registered in the public domain, and data are available (safe haven model) for use subject to approvals. For more information, e-mail s.denaxas@ucl.ac.uk PMID:23220717

  10. Electronic Resources in a Next-Generation Catalog: The Case of WorldCat Local

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007, the University of Washington Libraries debuted WorldCat Local (WCL), a localized version of the WorldCat database that interoperates with a library's integrated library system and fulfillment services to provide a single-search interface for a library's physical and electronic content. This brief will describe how WCL incorporates a…

  11. Electronic Resources: Are Basic Criteria for the Selection of Materials Changing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holleman, Curt

    2000-01-01

    The four basic criteria for the selection of library materials--quality, library relevancy, aesthetic and technical aspects, and cost--remain the same in the electronic era of information. What they mean and how they are used has changed. But even quality and cost, the two most controversial criteria, carry great importance for the responsible…

  12. Do-It-Yourself Printing: An Introduction to Electronic Publishing. Curriculum and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, W. Tad

    This guide contains a proposed curriculum for an introductory secondary and postsecondary course in electronic publishing. The course is designed to allow students to develop technical competence and knowledge in a real-life, practical environment that fosters the development of problem-solving, decision-making, and creativity. The teacher…

  13. Repetition Errors in Habitual Prospective Memory: Elimination of Age Differences via Complex Actions or Appropriate Resource Allocation

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Bugg, Julie M.; Ramuschkat, Grit M.; Kliegel, Matthias; Einstein, Gilles O.

    2009-01-01

    A challenge in habitual prospective memory tasks (e.g., taking medication) is remembering whether or not one has already performed the action. Einstein, McDaniel, Smith, and Shaw (1998, Psychological Science, 9, 284) showed that older adults were more likely to incorrectly repeat an action on habitual prospective memory tasks. Extending this research, we (a) biased participants either toward repetition or omission errors, (b) investigated whether performing a more complicated motor action can reduce repetition errors for older adults, and (c) examined participants’ resource allocation to the prospective memory task. Older adults committed more repetition errors than younger adults regardless of biasing instructions when ongoing task demands were challenging (Experiment 1). Performing the more complex motor action, however, reduced repetition errors for older adults. Further, when the ongoing task was less demanding, older adults’ repetition errors declined to levels of younger adults (Experiment 2). Consistent with this finding, the resource allocation profiles suggested that older participants were monitoring their output (prospective memory execution) in each trial block. PMID:19479480

  14. Modeling Feasibility of a Proposed Renewable Energy System with Wind and Solar Resources and Hydro Storage in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Koracin, D.; Hamilton, R.; Hagen, D.; King, K. C.

    2012-04-01

    High temporal and spatial variability in wind and solar power brings difficulties in integrating these resources into an electricity grid. These difficulties are even more emphasized in areas with complex topography due to complicated flow patterns and cloudiness evolution. This study investigates the feasibility and efficiency of a proposed renewable energy system with wind and solar resources and hydro storages in western Nevada, U.S.A. The state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used for the prediction of wind fields and incoming solar radiation at the ground surface. Forecast winds and solar radiation were evaluated with observational data from four wind masts and four meteorological towers in two months, July 2007 and January 2010. Based on a hypothetical wind farm and an assumed neighboring solar power plant both located near the hydro storage facility, as well as considering local power demand, the efficiency of the renewable energy system is projected. One of the main questions was how to optimize a schedule of activating pump storages according to the characteristics of several available hydro pumps, and wind and/or solar power predictions. The results show that segmentation of the pump-storage channel provides improved efficiency of the entire system. This modeled renewable energy system shows promise for possible applications and grid integration.

  15. How Electron Spectroscopy with Synchrotron Light Can Help Us Understand High-Tc Superconductivity and Other Complex States of Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Campuzano, Juan Carlos

    2012-03-07

    All the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of materials are controlled by electrons that occupy the highest energy levels in solids, those near the Fermi energy. Many techniques were developed to study those electrons, leading to the great successes of condensed matter physics. Newer and complex materials, such as the high-temperature superconductors, tend to exhibit very large anisotropies in their physical properties, requiring a more detailed knowledge of the behavior of electrons not only as a function of their energy, but also their momentum. Angle-resolved photoemission can contribute to our understanding by providing a great deal of information on many of the momentum-dependent properties of electrons and their interactions. In this talk, I will present a brief overview of how a long-term and focused collaboration between scientists at Argonne and other institutions has contributed to making angle-resolved photoemissions a most useful tool in the study of complex states of matter.

  16. Quantum effects in electron emission from and accretion on negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.; Misra, Shikha

    2012-07-15

    The authors have investigated the electron emissions (thermionic, electric field, photoelectric, and light induced field) from and electron accretion on a charged particle in a complex plasma, on the basis of a three region electrical potential model in and around a charged spherical particle in a complex plasma, characterized by Debye shielding. A continuous variation of the transmission coefficient across the surface of a particle (corresponding to emission and accretion) with the radial electron energy {epsilon}{sub r} has been obtained. It is seen that the numerical values of the emission and accretion transmission coefficients [D({epsilon}{sub r})] are almost the same. This is the necessary and sufficient condition for the validity of Saha's equation for thermal equilibrium of a system of dust and electrons. This is in contrast to the earlier condition, which limited the range of validity of Saha's equation to the range of the applicability of Born approximation. It is seen that D({epsilon}{sub r}) increases with increasing {epsilon}{sub r}, increasing negative electric potential on the surface, decreasing radius, and deceasing Debye length. The electron currents, corresponding to thermionic, electric field, photoelectric and light induced field emission increase with increasing surface potential; this fact may have significant repercussions in complex plasma kinetics. Since numerically D({epsilon}{sub r}) is significantly different from unity in the range of {epsilon}{sub r} of interest, it is necessary to take into account the D({epsilon}{sub r})-{epsilon}{sub r} dependence in complex plasma theory.

  17. Review: Formation of Peptide Radical Ions Through Dissociative Electron Transfer in Ternary Metal-Ligand-Peptide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Laskin, Julia

    2011-12-31

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals including the canonical radical cations, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, radical dications, [M{sup +}H]{sup 2+{sm_bullet}}, radical anions, [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}}. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information on the role of charge and the location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT), and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities, and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of such complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  18. Scrutinizing the Noninnocence of Quinone Ligands in Ruthenium Complexes: Insights from Structural, Electronic, Energy, and Effective Oxidation State Analyses.

    PubMed

    Skara, Gabriella; Gimferrer, Marti; De Proft, Frank; Salvador, Pedro; Pinter, Balazs

    2016-03-01

    The most relevant manifestations of ligand noninnocence of quinone and bipyridine derivatives are thoroughly scrutinized and discussed through an extensive and systematic set of octahedral ruthenium complexes, [(en)2RuL](z), in four oxidation states (z = +3, +2, +1, and 0). The characteristic structural deformation of ligands upon coordination/noninnocence is put into context with the underlying electronic structure of the complexes and its change upon reduction. In addition, by means of decomposing the corresponding reductions into electron transfer and structural relaxation subprocesses, the energetic contribution of these structural deformations to the redox energetics is revealed. The change of molecular electron density upon metal- and ligand-centered reductions is also visualized and shown to provide novel insights into the corresponding redox processes. Moreover, the charge distribution of the π-subspace is straightforwardly examined and used as indicator of ligand noninnocence in the distinct oxidation states of the complexes. The aromatization/dearomatization processes of ligand backbones are also monitored using magnetic (NICS) and electronic (PDI) indicators of aromaticity, and the consequences to noninnocent behavior are discussed. Finally, the recently developed effective oxidation state (EOS) analysis is utilized, on the one hand, to test its applicability for complexes containing noninnocent ligands, and, on the other hand, to provide new insights into the magnitude of state mixings in the investigated complexes. The effect of ligand substitution, nature of donor atom, ligand frame modification on these manifestations, and measures is discussed in an intuitive and pedagogical manner. PMID:26866981

  19. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan Balasubramanian

    2009-07-18

    This is a continuing DOE-BES funded project on transition metal and actinide containing species, aimed at the electronic structure and spectroscopy of transition metal and actinide containing species. While a long term connection of these species is to catalysis and environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes, the immediate relevance is directly to other DOE-BES funded experimental projects at DOE-National labs and universities. There are a number of ongoing gas-phase spectroscopic studies of these species at various places, and our computational work has been inspired by these experimental studies and we have also inspired other experimental and theoretical studies. Thus our studies have varied from spectroscopy of diatomic transition metal carbides to large complexes containing transition metals, and actinide complexes that are critical to the environment. In addition, we are continuing to make code enhancements and modernization of ALCHEMY II set of codes and its interface with relativistic configuration interaction (RCI). At present these codes can carry out multi-reference computations that included up to 60 million configurations and multiple states from each such CI expansion. ALCHEMY II codes have been modernized and converted to a variety of platforms such as Windows XP, and Linux. We have revamped the symbolic CI code to automate the MRSDCI technique so that the references are automatically chosen with a given cutoff from the CASSCF and thus we are doing accurate MRSDCI computations with 10,000 or larger reference space of configurations. The RCI code can also handle a large number of reference configurations, which include up to 10,000 reference configurations. Another major progress is in routinely including larger basis sets up to 5g functions in thee computations. Of course higher angular momenta functions can also be handled using Gaussian and other codes with other methods such as DFT, MP2, CCSD(T), etc. We have also calibrated our RECP

  20. National Information Infrastructure of a Science, Culture and Education: Representation of Resources of Electronic Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filinov, E.; Boychenko, A.

    In the report are given questions concerned the choice of international standards for electronic libraries construction: - The alternative variants of choice standards on electronic catalogs and metacatalogs formats; - The alternative variants of choice standards for interlibrary loan; - The variants of choice standards for information search in online public catalogs (OPAC) and bibliographic databases; - The variants of choice standards for file representation of full text documents, vector and raster images, audio- and video-materials, text of public distributed programs. The questions for public discussion by interested organizations are intended to represent on special web site. The profile of electronic library as a total combination of standards on program interfaces and protocols may be constructed with the conceptual model of EL. This model is offered as a expansion of basic open systems environment / reference model (OSE/RM) for the area of applications to describe the Application Program Interface (APIs). Opinions of the interested organizations, which will be collected on a site by way of discussion of the questions put above, it is supposed to base on formation of a national information infrastructure of Russia for science, culture and education.

  1. A scheme for the uniform mapping and monitoring of earth resources and environmental complexes using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulton, C. E. (Principal Investigator); Welch, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Progress on plans for the development and testing of a practical procedure and system for the uniform mapping and monitoring of natural ecosystems and environmental complexes from space-acquired imagery is discussed. With primary emphasis on ERTS-1 imagery, but supported by appropriate aircraft photography as necessary, the objectives are to accomplish the following: (1) Develop and test in a few selected sites and areas of the western United States a standard format for an ecological and land use legend for making natural resource inventories on a simulated global basis. (2) Based on these same limited geographic areas, identify the potentialities and limitations of the legend concept for the recognition and annotation of ecological analogs and environmental complexes. An additional objective is to determine the optimum combination of space photography, aerial photography, ground data, human data analysis, and automatic data analysis for estimating crop yield in the rice growing areas of California and Louisiana.

  2. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms II. Low-energy program using the method of the exterior complex scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    While collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms pose a well studied and in some sense closed problem, there is still no free computer code ready for “production use”, that would enable applied researchers to generate necessary data for arbitrary impact energies and scattering transitions directly if absent in on-line scattering databases. This is the second article on the Hex program package, which describes a new computer code that is, with a little setup, capable of solving the scattering equations for energies ranging from a fraction of the ionization threshold to approximately 100 eV or more, depending on the available computational resources. The program implements the exterior complex scaling method in the B-spline basis. Catalogue identifier: AETI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 440 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 643 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11. Computer: Any. Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized by OpenMP and MPI. RAM: Depending on input; 4.9 GiB for the test run. Classification: 2.4. External routines: GSL [1], HDF5 [2], UMFPACK [3], FFTW3 [4], optionally with OpenBLAS [5]. Nature of problem: Solution of the two-particle Schrödinger equation in central field. Solution method: The two-electron states are expanded into angular momentum eigenstates, which gives rise to the coupled bi-radial equations. The bi-radially dependent solution is then represented in a B-spline basis, which transforms the set of equations into a large matrix equation in this basis. The boundary condition

  3. Detailed Evaluation of the Geometric and Electronic Structures of One-electron Oxidized Group 10 (Ni, Pd, and Pt) Metal(II)-(Disalicylidene)diamine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Stack, T. Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of a series of one-electron oxidized group 10 metal salens (Ni, Pd, Pt) have been investigated in solution and in the solid state. Ni (1) and Pd (2) complexes of the tetradentate salen ligand N,N’-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (H2Salcn) have been examined along with the Pt (3) complex of the salen ligand N,N’-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-ethylenediamine (H2Salen). All three oxidized compounds exist as ligand radical species in solution and in the solid state. The solid state structures of [1]+ and [3]+ exhibit a symmetric coordination sphere contraction relative to the neutral forms. By contrast, the coordination sphere of the Pd derivative [2]+ exhibits a pronounced asymmetry in the solid state. In solution, the oxidized derivatives display intense low-energy NIR transitions consistent with their classification as ligand radical compounds. Interestingly, the degree of communication between the phenolate moieties depends strongly on the central metal ion, within the Ni, Pd, and Pt series. Electrochemical measurements and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy, in conjunction with DFT calculations provide insights into the degree of delocalization of the one-electron hole in these systems. The Pd complex [2]+ is the least delocalized and is best described as a borderline Class II/III intervalence complex based on the Robin-Day classification system. The Ni [1]+ and Pt [3]+ analogues are Class III (fully delocalized) intervalence compounds. Delocalization is dependent on the electronic coupling between the redox-active phenolate ligands, mediated by overlap between the formally filled metal dxz orbital and the appropriate ligand molecular orbital. The degree of coupling increases in the order Pd < Ni < Pt for the one-electron oxidized group 10 metal salens. PMID:19639970

  4. Electron microscopy of complexes of isolated acetylcholine receptor, biotinyl-toxin, and avidin

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, E.; Wise, D.; Wall, J.; Karlin, A.

    1982-01-01

    The principal curarimimetic toxin of Naja naja siamensis derivatized with biothinyl groups binds specifically both to acetylcholine receptor, isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, and to avidin. Isolated complexes of receptor monomer or dimer, biotinyl-toxin, and avidin were negatively stained and examined in the scanning transmission electron microscope. We measured the angle made by the radius to each avidin bound at the periphery of a monomeric unit in dimer to the axis connecting the centers of the monomers, starting at the crosslink between the monomers. We infer from the distribution of these angles that one toxin binding site is located in the range of 45/sup 0/ to 85/sup 0/ and another at about 100/sup 0/ further from the crosslink between the monomers. Because it is known that there are two toxin binding sites per monomer, associated with the two ..cap alpha.. chains, the bound avidins presumably point to portions of the ..cap alpha.. chains, indicating their positions relative to that portion of the delta chain located at the crosslink between monomers in dimer.

  5. Fermi-orbitals for improved electronic structure calculations on coordination complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Der-You; Pederson, Mark R.; Lee, James D.

    An improved density-functional formalism proceeds by adopting the Perdew-Zunger expression for a self-interaction-corrected (SIC) density-functional energy but evaluates the total energy based on Fermi Orbitals (FOs). Each localized electron is represented by an FO, determined from the occupied Kohn-Sham orbitals and a semi-classical FO descriptor. The SIC energy is then minimized through the gradients of the energy with respect to these descriptors. In addition to providing a review of the methodology, work here identifies the need for an algorithm which thoroughly searches over initial configurations. The strategy for sampling and prioritizing initial configurations is described. Applications on coordination complexes are presented. The FO descriptors and FOs for semi-classical and quantum-mechanical understanding of bondingis discussed. Cohesive energies are improved andthe eigenvalues are shifted downward relative to the standard DFT results.Spin-dependent vibrational spectra, as a possible means for spectroscopic determination of the transition-metal moment, are also presented. DK acknowledges her fellowship from The George Washington University Institude of Nanotechnology.

  6. Photosynthetic electron transfer from reaction center pigment-protein complex in silica nanopores.

    PubMed

    Oda, Ippei; Iwaki, Masayo; Fujita, Daiju; Tsutsui, Yasutaka; Ishizaka, Souji; Dewa, Makiko; Nango, Mamoru; Kajino, Tsutomu; Fukushima, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Shigeru

    2010-08-17

    A photosynthetic reaction center (RC) pigment-protein complex purified from a thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium, Thermochromatium tepidum, was adsorbed to a folded-sheet silica mesoporous material (FSM). The RC has a molecular structure with a 7.0 x 5.0 x 13 nm diameter. The amount of RC adsorbed to the FSM compound with an average internal pore diameter of 7.9 nm (FSM(7.9)) was high at 0.29 gRC/gFSM, while that to the FSM(2.7) (2.7 nm diameter) was low at 0.02 gRC/gFSM, suggesting the specific binding of the RC into the 7.9 nm pores of FSM(7.9). An N(2)-adsorption isotherm study indicated the incorporation of the RC into the 7.9 nm pores. The RC inside FSM(7.9) showed absorption spectra in the visible and infrared regions similar to those of the RC in solution, indicating almost no structural changes induced by the adsorption. The RC-FSM(7.9) conjugate showed the high photochemical activity with the increased thermal stability up to 50 degrees C in the measurements by laser spectroscopy. The conjugates rapidly provided electrons to a dye in the outer medium or showed electric current on the ITO electrode upon the illumination. The RC-FSM conjugate will be useful for the construction of artificial photosynthetic systems and new photodevices. PMID:20695584

  7. Theoretical investigation on the electronic structures and phosphorescent properties of seven iridium(III) complexes with the different substituted 2-phenylpyridinato ancillary ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Deming; Li, Chengyu; Zhao, Lihui; Sun, Xiuping; Zhang, Gang

    2014-03-01

    The geometry structures, electronic structures, absorption, and phosphorescent properties of seven iridium(III) complexes have been investigated by using the DFT/TDDF methods. Calculations of ionization potential and electron affinity were used to evaluate the injection abilities of holes and electrons into these complexes. The lowest energy emissions of these complexes are localized at 662, 583, 502, 518, 527, 536, and 538 nm, respectively, for complexes 1-7, simulated in CH2Cl2 medium at M052X level. The calculated results indicate that the complex 5 possibly possesses the largest kr value among the seven complexes.

  8. The HITECH Act and electronic health records' limitation in coordinating care for children with complex chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jason E

    2014-01-01

    While the HITECH Act was implemented to promote the use of electronic health records to improve the quality and coordination of healthcare, the limitations established to the setting of the hospital or physician's office affect the care coordination for those who utilize many health-related services outside these settings, including children with complex and chronic conditions. Incentive-based support or nationally supported electronic health record systems for allied and other healthcare professionals are necessary to see the full impact that electronic health records can have on care coordination for individuals who utilize many skilled healthcare services that are not associated with a hospital or physician's office. PMID:24925039

  9. Fresh look at electron-transfer mechanisms via the donor/acceptor bindings in the critical encounter complex.

    PubMed

    Rosokha, Sergiy V; Kochi, Jay K

    2008-05-01

    Seminal insights provided by the iconic R. S. Mulliken and his "charge-transfer" theory, H. Taube and his "outer/inner-sphere" mechanisms, R. A. Marcus and his "two-state non-adiabatic" theory, and N. S. Hush and his "intervalence" theory are each separately woven into the rich panoramic tapestry constituting chemical research into electron-transfer dynamics, and its mechanistic dominance for the past half century and more. In this Account, we illustrate how the simultaneous melding of all four key concepts allows sharp focus on the charge-transfer character of the critical encounter complex to evoke the latent facet of traditional electron-transfer mechanisms. To this end, we exploit the intervalence (electronic) transition that invariably accompanies the diffusive encounter of electron-rich organic donors (D) with electron-poor acceptors (A) as the experimental harbinger of the collision complex, which is then actually isolated and X-ray crystallographically established as loosely bound pi-stacked pairs of various aromatic and olefinic donor/acceptor dyads with uniform interplanar separations of r(DA) = 3.1 +/- 0.2 A. These X-ray structures, together with the spectral measurements of their intervalence transitions, lead to the pair of important electron-transfer parameters, H(DA) (electronic coupling element) versus lambdaT (reorganization energy), the ratio of which generally defines the odd-electron mobility within such an encounter complex in terms of the resonance stabilization of the donor/acceptor assembly [D, A] as opposed to the reorganization-energy penalty required for its interconversion to the electron-transfer state [D(+*), A(-*)]. We recognize the resonance-stabilization energy relative to the intrinsic activation barrier as the mechanistic binding factor, Q = 2H(DA)/lambdaT, to represent the quantitative measure of the highly variable continuum of inner-sphere/outer-sphere interactions that are possible within various types of precursor complexes

  10. Charge-transfer complex formation in gelation: the role of solvent molecules with different electron-donating capacities.

    PubMed

    Basak, Shibaji; Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Datta, Ayan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-05-01

    A naphthalenediimide (NDI)-based synthetic peptide molecule forms gels in a particular solvent mixture (chloroform/aromatic hydrocarbon, 4:1) through charge-transfer (CT) complex formation; this is evident from the corresponding absorbance and fluorescence spectra at room temperature. Various aromatic hydrocarbon based solvents, including benzene, toluene, xylene (ortho, meta and para) and mesitylene, have been used for the formation of the CT complex. The role of different solvent molecules with varying electron-donation capacities in the formation of CT complexes has been established through spectroscopic and computational studies. PMID:24677404

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations give insight into the conformational change, complex formation, and electron transfer pathway for cytochrome P450 reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sündermann, Axel; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR) undergoes a large conformational change to allow for an electron transfer to a redox partner to take place. After an internal electron transfer over its cofactors, it opens up to facilitate the interaction and electron transfer with a cytochrome P450. The open conformation appears difficult to crystallize. Therefore, a model of a human CYPOR in the open conformation was constructed to be able to investigate the stability and conformational change of this protein by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Since the role of the protein is to provide electrons to a redox partner, the interactions with cytochrome P450 2D6 (2D6) were investigated and a possible complex structure is suggested. Additionally, electron pathway calculations with a newly written program were performed to investigate which amino acids relay the electrons from the FMN cofactor of CYPOR to the HEME of 2D6. Several possible interacting amino acids in the complex, as well as a possible electron transfer pathway were identified and open the way for further investigation by site directed mutagenesis studies. PMID:23832577

  12. The electron conduction of photosynthetic protein complexes embedded in a membrane.

    PubMed

    Stamouli, A; Frenken, J W M; Oosterkamp, T H; Cogdell, R J; Aartsma, T J

    2004-02-27

    The conductivity of two photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes, a light harvesting 2 complex and a reaction center, was measured with an atomic force microscope capable of performing electrical measurements. Current-voltage measurements were performed on complexes embedded in their natural environment. Embedding the complexes in lipid bilayers made it possible to discuss the different conduction behaviors of the two complexes in light of their atomic structure. PMID:14988007

  13. Charge-transfer complexes formed in the reaction of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane with π-electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlQaradawi, Siham Y.; Mostafa, Adel; Bazzi, Hassan S.

    2013-04-01

    The reactions of the electron donor 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (TACDD) with the π-electron acceptors 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ), 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (CHL) and 2,4,4,6-tetrabromo-2,5-cyclohexadienone (TBCHD) were studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform at room temperature. The electronic and infrared spectra of the formed molecular charge-transfer (CT) complexes were recorded. The obtained results showed that the stoichiometries of the reactions are fixed and depend on the nature of both the donor and the acceptor. Based on the obtained data, the formed charge-transfer complexes were formulated as [(Donor)(Acceptor)2] for the donor (TACDD) and the acceptors TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, CHL and TBCHD. These CT-complexes were isolated as solids and have been characterized through electronic and infrared spectra as well as elemental and thermal analysis measurements. The formation constants (KCT), charge transfer energy (ECT), molar extinction coefficients (ɛCT), free energy change ΔG0, ionization potential Ip and oscillator strength ƒ of the formed CT-complexes were obtained.

  14. The role of non-equilibrium vibrational structures in electronic coherence and recoherence in pigment-protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, A. W.; Prior, J.; Rosenbach, R.; Caycedo-Soler, F.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2013-02-01

    Recent observations of oscillatory features in the optical response of photosynthetic complexes have revealed evidence for surprisingly long-lasting electronic coherences which can coexist with energy transport. These observations have ignited multidisciplinary interest in the role of quantum effects in biological systems, including the fundamental question of how electronic coherence can survive in biological surroundings. Here we show that the non-trivial spectral structures of protein fluctuations can generate non-equilibrium processes that lead to the spontaneous creation and sustenance of electronic coherence, even at physiological temperatures. Developing new advanced simulation tools to treat these effects, we provide a firm microscopic basis to successfully reproduce the experimentally observed coherence times in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, and illustrate how detailed quantum modelling and simulation can shed further light on a wide range of other non-equilibrium processes which may be important in different photosynthetic systems.

  15. Theoretical Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Fe(II) Complexes at Spin-State Transitions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure relevant to low spin (LS)↔high spin (HS) transitions in Fe(II) coordination compounds with a FeN6 core are studied. The selected [Fe(tz)6]2+ (1) (tz = 1H-tetrazole), [Fe(bipy)3]2+ (2) (bipy = 2,2′-bipyridine), and [Fe(terpy)2]2+ (3) (terpy = 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine) complexes have been actively studied experimentally, and with their respective mono-, bi-, and tridentate ligands, they constitute a comprehensive set for theoretical case studies. The methods in this work include density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT), and multiconfigurational second order perturbation theory (CASPT2). We determine the structural parameters as well as the energy splitting of the LS–HS states (ΔEHL) applying the above methods and comparing their performance. We also determine the potential energy curves representing the ground and low-energy excited singlet, triplet, and quintet d6 states along the mode(s) that connect the LS and HS states. The results indicate that while DFT is well suited for the prediction of structural parameters, an accurate multiconfigurational approach is essential for the quantitative determination of ΔEHL. In addition, a good qualitative agreement is found between the TD-DFT and CASPT2 potential energy curves. Although the TD-DFT results might differ in some respect (in our case, we found a discrepancy at the triplet states), our results suggest that this approach, with due care, is very promising as an alternative for the very expensive CASPT2 method. Finally, the two-dimensional (2D) potential energy surfaces above the plane spanned by the two relevant configuration coordinates in [Fe(terpy)2]2+ were computed at both the DFT and CASPT2 levels. These 2D surfaces indicate that the singlet–triplet and triplet–quintet states are separated along different coordinates, i.e., different vibration modes. Our results confirm that in contrast to the case of complexes with mono- and bidentate ligands, the

  16. Electron-microprobe study of chromitites associated with alpine ultramafic complexes and some genetic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Electron-microprobe and petrographic studies of alpine chromite deposits from around the world demonstrate that they are bimodal with respect to the chromic oxide content of their chromite. The two modes occur at 54 ? 4 and 37 ? 3 weight per cent chromic oxide corresponding to chromite designated as high-chromium and high-aluminum chromite respectively. The high-chromium chromite occurs exclusively with highly magnesian olivine (Fo92-97) and some interstitial diopside. The high-aluminum chromite is associated with more ferrous olivine (Fo88-92), diopside, enstatite, and feldspar. The plot of the mole ratios Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) vs. Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) usually presented for alpine chromite is shown to have a high-chromium, high-iron to low-chromium, low-iron trend contrary to that shown by stratiform chromite. This trend is characteristic of alpine type chromite and is termed the alpine trend. However, a trend similar to that for startiform chromite is discernable on the graph for the high-chromium chromite data. This latter trend is well-developed at Red Mountain, Seldovia, Alaska. Analysis of the iron-magnesium distribution coefficient, Kd=(Fe/Mg)ol/(Fe/Mg)ch, between olivine and chromite shows that Kd for the high-chromium chromite from all ultramafic complexes has essentially the same constant value of .05 while the distribution coefficient for the high-aluminum chromite varies with composition of the chromite. These distribution coefficients are also characteristic of alpine-type chromites. The constant value for Kd for the high-chromium chromite and associated high-magnesium olivine in all alpine complexes suggests that they all crystallized under similar physico-chemical conditions. The two types of massive chromite and their associations of silicate minerals suggest the possibility of two populations with different origins. Recrystallization textures associated with the high-aluminum chromite together with field relationships between the gabbro and the chromite pods

  17. Theory of electronic structure and nuclear quadrupole interactions in the BF3-NH3 complex and methyl derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, R. H.; Dubey, Archana; Mahato, Dip N.; Badu, S. R.; Scheicher, R. H.; Mahanti, Mahendra K.; Huang, M. B.; Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    Magnetic Hyperfine and Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions (HPI and NQI) are now important tools for characterization of systems of interest in materials research and industry. Boron-Trifluoride is an inorganic compound that is very important in this respect as a catalyst in chemical physics research and industry, forming complexes in the process with compounds like ammonia, water and methyl alcohol. The present paper deals with the BP3-NH3 complex and methyl derivatives BP3NHx(CH3)3-x for which we have studied the electronic structures, binding energies, and 19F* (I=5/2) nuclear quadrupole interactions using the first-principles Hartree-Fock-Roothaan procedure combined with electron correlation effects. Our results for the 19F* nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (e 2qQ/h) in units of MHz compare well with experiment. Trends in the binding energies and NQI parameters between the complexes are discussed.

  18. Theory of electronic structure and nuclear quadrupole interactions in the BF3 NH3 complex and methyl derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, R. H.; Dubey, Archana; Mahato, Dip N.; Badu, S. R.; Scheicher, R. H.; Mahanti, Mahendra K.; Huang, M. B.; Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic Hyperfine and Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions (HFI and NQI) are now important tools for characterization of systems of interest in materials research and industry. Boron-Trifluoride is an inorganic compound that is very important in this respect as a catalyst in chemical physics research and industry, forming complexes in the process with compounds like ammonia, water and methyl alcohol. The present paper deals with the BF3 NH3 complex and methyl derivatives BF3NHx(CH3)3-x for which we have studied the electronic structures, binding energies, and 19F* ( I = 5/2) nuclear quadrupole interactions using the first-principles Hartree Fock Roothaan procedure combined with electron correlation effects. Our results for the 19F* nuclear quadrupole coupling constant ( e 2 qQ/ h) in units of MHz compare well with experiment. Trends in the binding energies and NQI parameters between the complexes are discussed.

  19. Cobalt(II) "scorpionate" complexes as models for cobalt-substituted zinc enzymes: electronic structure investigation by high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krzystek, J; Swenson, Dale C; Zvyagin, S A; Smirnov, Dmitry; Ozarowski, Andrew; Telser, Joshua

    2010-04-14

    A series of complexes of formula Tp(R,R')CoL, where Tp(R,R'-) = hydrotris(3-R,5-R'-pyrazol-1-yl)borate ("scorpionate") anion (R = tert-butyl, R' = H, Me, 2'-thienyl (Tn), L = Cl(-), NCS(-), NCO(-), N(3)(-)), has been characterized by electronic absorption spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared (near-IR) region and by high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR). Reported here are also crystal structures of seven members of the series that have not been reported previously: R' = H, L = NCO(-), N(3)(-); R' = Me, L = Cl(-), NCS(-), NCO(-), N(3)(-); R' = Tn, L = Cl(-), NCS(-). These include a structure for Tp(t-Bu,Me)CoCl different from that previously reported. All of the investigated complexes contain a four-coordinate cobalt(II) ion (3d(7)) with approximate C(3v) point group symmetry about the metal ion and exhibit an S = (3)/(2) high-spin ground state. The use of HFEPR allows extraction of the full set of intrinsic S = (3)/(2) spin Hamiltonian parameters (D, E, and g values). The axial zero-field splitting parameter, D, for all investigated Tp(R,R')CoL complexes is always positive, a fact not easily determined by other methods. However, the magnitude of this parameter varies widely: 2.4 cm(-1) complexes following the angular overlap model (AOM). This description of electronic structure and bonding in pseudotetrahedral cobalt(II) complexes can enhance the understanding of similar sites in metalloproteins, specifically cobalt-substituted zinc enzymes. PMID:20329727

  20. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of the cytochrome c:cytochrome c oxidase complexes from bovine and Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, S. R.; Copeland, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    The 1:1 complex between horse heart cytochrome c and bovine cytochrome c oxidase, and between yeast cytochrome c and Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase have been studied by a combination of second derivative absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and resonance Raman spectroscopy. The second derivative absorption and CD spectra reveal changes in the electronic transitions of cytochrome a upon complex formation. These results could reflect changes in ground state heme structure or changes in the protein environment surrounding the chromophore that affect either the ground or excited electronic states. The resonance Raman spectrum, on the other hand, reflects the heme structure in the ground electronic state only and shows no significant difference between cytochrome a vibrations in the complex or free enzyme. The only major difference between the Raman spectra of the free enzyme and complex is a broadening of the cytochrome a3 formyl band of the complex that is relieved upon complex dissociation at high ionic strength. These data suggest that the differences observed in the second derivative and CD spectra are the result of changes in the protein environment around cytochrome a that affect the electronic excited state. By analogy to other protein-chromophore systems, we suggest that the energy of the Soret pi* state of cytochrome a may be affected by (1) changes in the local dielectric, possibly brought about by movement of a charged amino acid side chain in proximity to the heme group, or (2) pi-pi interactions between the heme and aromatic amino acid residues. PMID:1338946

  1. Evidence for the role of cyclic electron flow in photoprotection for oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2016-05-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) alleviates PSII photo-inhibition under high light by at least two different mechanisms: one is liked to thermal energy dissipation (qE) and the other one is independent of qE. However, the latter mechanism is unclear. Because the photodamage to PSII primarily occurred at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), and the stability of OEC is dependent on proton gradient across thylakoid membrane (ΔpH), we hypothesize that the CEF-dependent generation of ΔpH can alleviate photodamage to OEC. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effects of antimycin A (AA), methyl viologen (MV), chloramphenicol (CM), nigericin (Nig) on PSII activity and the stability of OEC for leaves of a light-demanding tropical tree species Erythrophleum guineense by the analysis of OKJIP chlorophyll a fluorescence transient. After high light treatment, the stronger decrease in Fv/Fm in the AA-, CM-, MV-, and Nig-treated samples was accompanied with larger photo damage of OEC. The AA-treated samples significantly showed lower CEF activity than the H2O-treated samples. Although the AA-treated leaves significantly showed stronger PSII photo-inhibition and photo-damage of OEC compared to the H2O-treated leaves, the value of non-photochemical quenching did not differ between them. Therefore, CEF activity was partly inhibited in the AA-treated samples, and the stronger PSII photo-inhibition in the AA-treated leaves was independent of qE. Taking together, we propose a hypothesis that CEF-dependent generation of ΔpH under high light plays an important role in photoprotection for the OEC activity. PMID:26968082

  2. First-principles calculation of electronic spectra of light-harvesting complex II.

    PubMed

    König, Carolin; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-06-14

    We report on a fully quantum chemical investigation of important structural and environmental effects on the site energies of chlorophyll pigments in green-plant light-harvesting complex II (LHC II). Among the tested factors are technical and structural aspects as well as effects of neighboring residues and exciton couplings in the chlorophyll network. By employing a subsystem time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach based on the frozen density embedding (FDE) method we are able to determine site energies and electronic couplings separately in a systematic way. This approach allows us to treat much larger systems in a quantum chemical way than would be feasible with a conventional density functional theory. Based on this method, we have simulated a series of mutagenesis experiments to investigate the effect of a lack of one pigment in the chlorophyll network on the excitation properties of the other pigments. From these calculations, we can conclude that conformational changes within the chlorophyll molecules, direct interactions with neighboring residues, and interactions with other chlorophyll pigments can lead to non-negligible changes in excitation energies. All of these factors are important when site energies shall be calculated with high accuracy. Moreover, the redistribution of the oscillator strengths due to exciton coupling has a large impact on the calculated absorption spectra. This indicates that modeling mutagenesis experiments requires us to consider the entire set of chlorophyll molecules in the wild type and in the mutant, rather than just considering the missing chlorophyll pigment. An analysis of the mixing of particular excitations and the coupling elements in the FDEc calculation indicates that some pigments in the chlorophyll network act as bridges which mediate the interaction between other pigments. These bridges are also supported by the calculations on the "mutants" lacking the bridging pigment. PMID:21369568

  3. A Theoretical Study of NO2 Complexes with Aluminium and Gallium Based on Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Electron Localization Function

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, Jaroslaw; Latajaka, Zdzislaw

    2000-12-26

    Results of DFT and MP4 calculations on AlNO2 and GaNO2 molecules are presented. One Cs and two C2v structures (two minima and one TS) are found and their energies and vibrational frequencies are reported and discussed. The minima are close in energy and lie ca. 70 kcal mol-1 below reactants (M+NO2). More insight is obtained via topological analysis of electron density and electron localization function (ELF). It is shown that the molecules are bound mainly via electrostatic interactions, and there is a significant charge transfer from metal atom to the NO2 moiety. Detailed analysis of the ELF shows that the loss of stability of gallium complexes with respect to aluminium structures is best explained by (antibonding) influence of gallium semi-cored electrons.

  4. Coordination Complexes of a Neutral 1,2,4-Benzotriazinyl Radical Ligand: Synthesis, Molecular and Electronic Structures, and Magnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ian S; Mansikkamäki, Akseli; Zissimou, Georgia A; Koutentis, Panayiotis A; Rouzières, Mathieu; Clérac, Rodolphe; Tuononen, Heikki M

    2015-10-26

    A series of d-block metal complexes of the recently reported coordinating neutral radical ligand 1-phenyl-3-(pyrid-2-yl)-1,4-dihydro-1,2,4-benzotriazin-4-yl (1) was synthesized. The investigated systems contain the benzotriazinyl radical 1 coordinated to a divalent metal cation, Mn(II) , Fe(II) , Co(II) , or Ni(II) , with 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonato (hfac) as the auxiliary ligand of choice. The synthesized complexes were fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and electronic structure calculations. The complexes [Mn(1)(hfac)2 ] and [Fe(1)(hfac)2 ] displayed antiferromagnetic coupling between the unpaired electrons of the ligand and the metal cation, whereas the interaction was found to be ferromagnetic in the analogous Ni(II) complex [Ni(1)(hfac)2 ]. The magnetic properties of the complex [Co(1)(hfac)2 ] were difficult to interpret owing to significant spin-orbit coupling inherent to octahedral high-spin Co(II) metal ion. As a whole, the reported data clearly demonstrated the favorable coordinating properties of the radical 1, which, together with its stability and structural tunability, make it an excellent new building block for establishing more complex metal-radical architectures with interesting magnetic properties. PMID:26493885

  5. 3D imaging and quantitative analysis of small solubilized membrane proteins and their complexes by transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Inherently unstable, detergent-solubilized membrane protein complexes can often not be crystallized. For complexes that have a mass of >300 kDa, cryo-electron microscopy (EM) allows their three-dimensional (3D) structure to be assessed to a resolution that makes secondary structure elements visible in the best case. However, many interesting complexes exist whose mass is below 300 kDa and thus need alternative approaches. Two methods are reviewed: (i) Mass measurement in a scanning transmission electron microscope, which has provided important information on the stoichiometry of membrane protein complexes. This technique is applicable to particulate, filamentous and sheet-like structures. (ii) 3D-EM of negatively stained samples, which determines the molecular envelope of small membrane protein complexes. Staining and dehydration artifacts may corrupt the quality of the 3D map. Staining conditions thus need to be optimized. 3D maps of plant aquaporin SoPIP2;1 tetramers solubilized in different detergents illustrate that the flattening artifact can be partially prevented and that the detergent itself contributes significantly. Another example discussed is the complex of G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin with its cognate G protein transducin. PMID:23267047

  6. A resource from 3D electron microscopy of hippocampal neuropil for user training and tool development

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kristen M.; Spacek, Josef; Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Parker, Patrick H.; Lindsey, Laurence F.; Baden, Alexander D.; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Burns, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Resurgent interest in synaptic circuitry and plasticity has emphasized the importance of 3D reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM). Three volumes of hippocampal CA1 neuropil from adult rat were imaged at X-Y resolution of ~2 nm on serial sections of ~50–60 nm thickness. These are the first densely reconstructed hippocampal volumes. All axons, dendrites, glia, and synapses were reconstructed in a cube (~10 μm3) surrounding a large dendritic spine, a cylinder (~43 μm3) surrounding an oblique dendritic segment (3.4 μm long), and a parallelepiped (~178 μm3) surrounding an apical dendritic segment (4.9 μm long). The data provide standards for identifying ultrastructural objects in 3DEM, realistic reconstructions for modeling biophysical properties of synaptic transmission, and a test bed for enhancing reconstruction tools. Representative synapses are quantified from varying section planes, and microtubules, polyribosomes, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and endosomes are identified and reconstructed in a subset of dendrites. The original images, traces, and Reconstruct software and files are freely available and visualized at the Open Connectome Project (Data Citation 1). PMID:26347348

  7. A resource from 3D electron microscopy of hippocampal neuropil for user training and tool development.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kristen M; Spacek, Josef; Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Parker, Patrick H; Lindsey, Laurence F; Baden, Alexander D; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Burns, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Resurgent interest in synaptic circuitry and plasticity has emphasized the importance of 3D reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM). Three volumes of hippocampal CA1 neuropil from adult rat were imaged at X-Y resolution of ~2 nm on serial sections of ~50-60 nm thickness. These are the first densely reconstructed hippocampal volumes. All axons, dendrites, glia, and synapses were reconstructed in a cube (~10 μm(3)) surrounding a large dendritic spine, a cylinder (~43 μm(3)) surrounding an oblique dendritic segment (3.4 μm long), and a parallelepiped (~178 μm(3)) surrounding an apical dendritic segment (4.9 μm long). The data provide standards for identifying ultrastructural objects in 3DEM, realistic reconstructions for modeling biophysical properties of synaptic transmission, and a test bed for enhancing reconstruction tools. Representative synapses are quantified from varying section planes, and microtubules, polyribosomes, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and endosomes are identified and reconstructed in a subset of dendrites. The original images, traces, and Reconstruct software and files are freely available and visualized at the Open Connectome Project (Data Citation 1). PMID:26347348

  8. Nanostructural and Chemical Characterization of Complex Oxide Catalysts by Analytical Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Weihao

    Complex oxide catalysts are used as heterogeneous catalysts for producing various important organic chemicals. In this thesis, three types of complex oxide catalysts prepared using novel preparation methods have been studied. Each of them has been evaluated for its catalytic performance, namely (i) the selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride over vanadium phosphate (V-P-O) materials; (ii) the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane to ethylene over niobium phosphate (Nb-P-O) materials, and (iii) the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over iron molybdate (Fe-Mo-O) materials. Analytical electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and other related characterization techniques have been used to provide useful information regarding the morphology, crystallography and chemical composition of these complex oxide catalysts. The underlying aim of this work is to uncover meaningful synthesis-structure-performance relationships for these three complex catalyst systems. Firstly, a standard methodology for generating V-P-O materials, i.e. the VPD route, has been revisited and modified. A variety of alkanes have been added during the alcohol reduction step of VOPO4·2H2O (dihydrate), which were found to have a remarkable influence on the morphology and structure of the V-P-O materials produced. Either VOHPO4·0.5H2O (hemihydrate) or VO(H2PO4)2 material can be produced depending on the precise alcohol:alkane volume ratio used in the reaction. In addition, the specific order in which the alkane and alcohol are added to VOPO 4·2H2O during the VPD route has a dramatic effect on the morphology of the resultant precursor. Through detailed electron microscopy studies we have been able to unveil the epitaxial relationship between the dihyrate and hemihydrate crystalline phases as being [001]dihydrate // [001]hemihydrate and [100]dihydrate // [110]hemihydrate. A two-step mechanism by which the topotactic transformation from dihydrate to hemihydrate occurs has been proposed

  9. Theoretical study of electronic structure and complexation of PbII(S2COR)2 [R = Me, Et, Ph] complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Deepanwita; Bagchi, Sabyasachi; Das, Abhijit K.

    2012-01-01

    The complexes of PbII(S2COR)2 [R = Me, Et, Ph] having three possible coordination patterns S,S/S,S or S,O/S,S or S,O/S,O are studied. The formation energy and relative energy of these isomers reveal that the order of stability is S,S/S,S > S,O/S,S > S,O/S,O. Complexation energy of the isomers decreases substantially from gas phase to water. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been performed to explore the metal-ligand coordination. Similar types of metal-ligand coordinations are observed for methyl and ethyl substituent. In S/S,S/S coordination, lead mainly uses its 6p sub-shells along with 6d and 7s orbitals to coordinate with 3p sub-shells of the surrounding sulfur atoms. Significant mixing of 6p and 6d orbitals of lead is also observed. In contrast, for phenyl substituent, lead uses only its 6p sub-shells to coordinate with sulfur atoms. In S,O/S,O or S,O/S,S coordination, oxygen uses its 2s and 2p sub-shells while sulfur uses its 3p sub-shells to coordinate with 7s and 6p sub-shells of lead. The binding energy and NBO analysis of these chelates indicate that lead-sulfur (soft-soft) coordination is preferred over lead-oxygen (soft-hard). In all these chelates, valence 6s orbital of lead shows inert pair effect with no participation in chelation.

  10. Design of operating rules in complex water resources systems using historical records, expert criteria and fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel; Macian-Sorribes, Hector; María Benlliure-Moreno, Jose; Fullana-Montoro, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Water resources systems in areas with a strong tradition in water use are complex to manage by the high amount of constraints that overlap in time and space, creating a complicated framework in which past, present and future collide between them. In addition, it is usual to find "hidden constraints" in system operations, which condition operation decisions being unnoticed by anyone but the river managers and users. Being aware of those hidden constraints requires usually years of experience and a degree of involvement in that system's management operations normally beyond the possibilities of technicians. However, their impact in the management decisions is strongly imprinted in the historical data records available. The purpose of this contribution is to present a methodology capable of assessing operating rules in complex water resources systems combining historical records and expert criteria. Both sources are coupled using fuzzy logic. The procedure stages are: 1) organize expert-technicians preliminary meetings to let the first explain how they manage the system; 2) set up a fuzzy rule-based system (FRB) structure according to the way the system is managed; 3) use the historical records available to estimate the inputs' fuzzy numbers, to assign preliminary output values to the FRB rules and to train and validate these rules; 4) organize expert-technician meetings to discuss the rule structure and the input's quantification, returning if required to the second stage; 5) once the FRB structure is accepted, its output values must be refined and completed with the aid of the experts by using meetings, workshops or surveys; 6) combine the FRB with a Decision Support System (DSS) to simulate the effect of those management decisions; 7) compare its results with the ones offered by the historical records and/or simulation or optimization models; and 8) discuss with the stakeholders the model performance returning, if it's required, to the fifth or the second stage

  11. Role of Fe impurity complexes in the degradation of GaN/AlGaN high-electron-mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Puzyrev, Y. S.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Pantelides, S. T.

    2015-02-02

    Recent experiments show that GaN/AlGaN high-electron-mobility transistors suffer from significant current collapse, which is caused by an increase in the concentration of traps with energy levels 0.5–0.6 eV below the conduction-band edge. This increase in trap concentration is consistent with thermally activated defect diffusion, but the responsible defect complexes have not been identified. It has been suggested that the defect complex may contain iron because of the proximity of the Fe-doped GaN substrate. Here, we report first-principles density-functional calculations of substitutional iron complexes, investigate their properties, and show that the Fe{sub Ga}-V{sub N} complex has properties that account for the observed degradation.

  12. Electrostatic Effects on Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Oxomanganese Complexes Inspired by the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M.; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W.; Batista, Victor S.; Gunner, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton-coupled-electron-transfer (PCET) in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII), are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced Multi-Conformer Continuum Electrostatics (MCCE) model, parameterized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKas and oxidation midpoint potentials (Ems) match experimental values for eight complexes indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKas of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6]2+/3+ (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2]3- (2, P = 5,10,15,20- tetrakis (2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato), [Mn(IV,IV)2(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2]4+ (3, terpy = 2,2’:6’,2”-terpyridine) and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2]4+ (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKas of μ-oxo bridges and Mn Ems in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4]2+ (5, bpy = 2,2’-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn= N,N′-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7) and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8) which are most relevant to PCET mechanisms. The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5±0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the Ems due to ligand substituents, such as those in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where PCET plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms. PMID:23570540

  13. Ab initio investigation of electric and magnetic dipole electronic transitions in the complex of oxygen with benzene.

    PubMed

    Valiev, R R; Minaev, B F

    2016-09-01

    The electric dipole transitions between pure spin and mixed spin electronic states are calculated at the XMC-QDPT2 and MCSCF levels of theory, respectively, for different intermolecular distances of the C6H6 and O2 collisional complex. The magnetic dipole transition moment between the mixed-spin ground ("triplet") and the first excited ("singlet") states is calculated by quadratic response at MCSCF level of theory. The obtained results confirm the theory of intensity borrowing and increasing the intensity of electronic transitions in the C6H6 + O2 collision. The calculation of magnetically induced current density is performed for benzene molecule being in contact with O2 at the distances from 3.5 to 4.5 Å. The calculation shows that the aromaticity of benzene is rising due to the conjugation of π-MOs of both molecules. The C6H6 + O2 complex becomes nonaromatic at the short distances (r < 3.5 Å). The computation of static polarizability in the excited electronic states of the C6H6 + O2 collisional complex at various distances supports the theory of red solvatochromic shift of the a → X band. Graphical abstract The C6H6+ O2 collisional complex. PMID:27544142

  14. Synthesis, electronic structure and catalytic activity of ruthenium-iodo-carbonyl complexes with thioether containing NNS donor ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Subrata; Jana, Mahendra Sekhar; Biswas, Sujan; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The ruthenium carbonyl complexes 1 and 2 with redox noninnocent NNS donor ligand, 1-methyl-2-{(o-thiomethyl)phenylazo}imidazole (L) have been synthesized and characterized by various analytical and spectroscopic (IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR) techniques. The complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible one electron Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation couple at 1.11 V for 1 and 0.76 V for 2 along with two successive one electron ligand reductions. Catalytic activity of the compounds has been investigated to the oxidation of PhCH2OH to PhCHO, 2-butanol (C4H9OH) to 2-butanone, 1-phenylethanol (PhC2H4OH) to acetophenone, cyclopentanol (C5H9OH) to cyclopentanone, cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone, cycloheptanol to cycloheptanone and cycloctanol to cycloctanone using N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMO) as oxidant. The catalytic efficiency of 2 is greater than complex 1 and well correlate with the metal oxidation potential. DFT, NBO and TDDFT calculations in DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d)/lanL2TZ(f) method are employed to interpret the structural and electronic features of the complexes.

  15. Four-coordinate cobalt pincer complexes: electronic structure studies and ligand modification by homolytic and heterolytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Semproni, Scott P; Milsmann, Carsten; Chirik, Paul J

    2014-06-25

    A family of cobalt chloride, methyl, acetylide and hydride complexes bearing both intact and modified tert-butyl substituted bis(phosphino)pyridine pincer ligands has been synthesized and structurally characterized and their electronic structures evaluated. Treatment of the unmodified compounds with the stable nitroxyl radical, TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yloxidanyl) resulted in immediate H- atom abstraction from the benzylic position of the chelate yielding the corresponding modified pincer complexes, ((tBu)mPNP)CoX (X = H, CH3, Cl, CCPh). Thermolysis of the methyl and hydride derivatives, ((tBu)PNP)CoCH3 and ((tBu)PNP)CoH, at 110 °C also resulted in pincer modification by H atom loss while the chloride and acetylide derivatives proved inert. The relative ordering of benzylic C-H bond strengths was corroborated by H atom exchange experiments between appropriate intact and modified pincer complexes. The electronic structures of the modified compounds, ((tBu)mPNP)CoX were established by EPR spectroscopy and DFT computations and are best described as low spin Co(II) complexes with no evidence for ligand centered radicals. The electronic structures of the intact complexes, ((tBu)PNP)CoX were studied computationally and bond dissociation free energies of the benzylic C-H bonds were correlated to the identity of the X-type ligand on cobalt where pure σ donors such as hydride and methyl produce the weakest C-H bonds. Comparison to a rhodium congener highlights the impact of the energetically accessible one-electron redox couple of the first row metal ion in generating weak C-H bonds in remote positions of the supporting pincer ligand. PMID:24897302

  16. Resources, resources, resources....

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Several resources provided by different types of organizations are available to transgender people in the New York area. Some of these organizations include the Gender Identity Project, Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Hetrick Martin Institute, SafeSpace and Youth Enrichment Services (YES). Organization telephone numbers, addresses, and their targeted audiences are provided. PMID:11364801

  17. Complex influence of space environment on materials and electronic devices in the conditions of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musabayev, T.; Zhantayev, Zh.; Grichshenko, V.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a new physical model describing the processes in materials and electronic devices under the influence of cosmic rays in microgravity. The model identifies specific features of formation of the area of radiation defects (ARD) in the electronic materials in microgravity. The mechanism of interaction between the ARD and memory modules in microgravity causing malfunction and failure of onboard electronics is considered. The results of failure of memory modules under real conditions are presented.

  18. Influence of electron capture after-effects on the stability of 111In( 111Cd)-complexes with organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpinkova, L. G.; Carbonari, A. W.; Nikitin, S. M.; Mestnik-Filho, J.

    2002-06-01

    The TDPAC technique was applied to verify a hypothesis about the influence of electron capture after-effects on the integrity of radiometal complexes with organic ligands in aqueous solutions. The neutral aqueous solutions of DTPA-complexes with two parent isotopes, 111In(EC) 111Cd and 111mCd, were used for direct comparison of dynamic interaction parameters. Data for the parent 111In-DTPA complexes revealed three fractions with essentially different relaxation constants, including an "unperturbed" fraction, which, according to the hypothesis, is due to small fragments of the initial complexes disintegrated as a result of Auger-process and the following Coulomb fragmentation. Only one fraction with a relaxation constant of 3(1)×10 6 s-1 was observed for the 111mCd-DTPA solution confirming the proposal about the influence of electron capture after-effects. Measurements with the frozen solutions allowed determining the electric field gradient (EFG) at Cd-sites in complexes with DTPA, V zz=6.7(2)×10 21 V/m2 with an asymmetry parameter η=0.75(5).

  19. Electronic Structure and Dynamics of Higher-Lying Excited States in Light Harvesting Complex 1 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Peter D; Ting, Po-Chieh; Massey, Sara C; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-06-23

    Light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms involves efficient transfer of energy from peripheral antenna complexes to core antenna complexes, and ultimately to the reaction center where charge separation drives downstream photosynthetic processes. Antenna complexes contain many strongly coupled chromophores, which complicates analysis of their electronic structure. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) provides information on energetic coupling and ultrafast energy transfer dynamics, making the technique well suited for the study of photosynthetic antennae. Here, we present 2DES results on excited state properties and dynamics of a core antenna complex, light harvesting complex 1 (LH1), embedded in the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The experiment reveals weakly allowed higher-lying excited states in LH1 at 770 nm, which transfer energy to the strongly allowed states at 875 nm with a lifetime of 40 fs. The presence of higher-lying excited states is in agreement with effective Hamiltonians constructed using parameters from crystal structures and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. The energy transfer dynamics between the higher- and lower-lying excited states agree with Redfield theory calculations. PMID:27232937

  20. [F-18]Fluorodihydrorotenone: Synthesis and evaluation of a mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complex I probe for PET

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, H.F.; Enas, J.D.; Hanrahan, S.M.

    1994-05-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) consists of five enzyme complexes (I-V) which participate in the transfer of electrons to oxygen and phosphorylation of ADP (oxidative phosphorylation). ETC dysfunction has been linked to several genetic neurological diseases as well as implicated in Parkinson`s (complex I) and Huntington`s (complex I) disease and normal aging processes. Dihydrorotenone (DHR) is a specific high affinity inhibitor of complex I. In order to develop a PET tracer for complex I, we have labeled DHR with fluorine-18. The tosylate precursor was produced in three steps from commercially available rotenone. Fluorine-18 was introduced by nucleophilic displacement of the tosylate using tetrabutyl-ammonium fluoride. Subsequent oxidation with MnO{sub 2} and HPLC purification gave the desired [{sup 18}F]fluoro-DHR. Initial biodistribution studies were carried out in {approximately}200 g male Sprague-Dawley rats. The tracer was taken up rapidly in the heart, an organ highly enriched with mitochondria, (5.5-6% injected dose (ID)/g at 30 minutes) and in the brain ({approximately}1.5% ID/g at 1 hour).

  1. Electron-Phonon Coupling and CT-Character in the lowest Triplet Excited State of Anthracene EDA-Complex Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, S.; Port, H.

    1987-11-01

    Photoexcitation spectra of triplet (T1← S0) zero-phonon lines and phonon sidebands in different anthracene electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex crystals (A-PMDA, A-TCNB, A-TCPA) have been analyzed between 1.3 K and 50 K at high spectral resolution. From the electron-phonon coupling strength at T = 0 K values of the charge-transfer (CT) character in the range between 6% and 10% are calculated. The differences in these values are found to be correlated with the energetic positions of the triplet state, which are explained within the framework of the Mulliken theory.

  2. A multienzyme complex channels substrates and electrons through acetyl-CoA and methane biosynthesis pathways in Methanosarcina.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Dillon J; Catlett, Jennifer; Madayiputhiya, Nandu; Nandakumar, Renu; Lopez, Madeline M; Metcalf, William W; Buan, Nicole R

    2014-01-01

    Multienzyme complexes catalyze important metabolic reactions in many organisms, but little is known about the complexes involved in biological methane production (methanogenesis). A crosslinking-mass spectrometry (XL-MS) strategy was employed to identify proteins associated with coenzyme M-coenzyme B heterodisulfide reductase (Hdr), an essential enzyme in all methane-producing archaea (methanogens). In Methanosarcina acetivorans, Hdr forms a multienzyme complex with acetyl-CoA decarbonylase synthase (ACDS), and F420-dependent methylene-H4MPT reductase (Mer). ACDS is essential for production of acetyl-CoA during growth on methanol, or for methanogenesis from acetate, whereas Mer is essential for methanogenesis from all substrates. Existence of a Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex is consistent with growth phenotypes of ACDS and Mer mutant strains in which the complex samples the redox status of electron carriers and directs carbon flux to acetyl-CoA or methanogenesis. We propose the Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex comprises a special class of multienzyme redox complex which functions as a "biological router" that physically links methanogenesis and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis pathways. PMID:25232733

  3. Electron microscopic single particle analysis of a tetrameric RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mayanagi, Kouta Fujiwara, Yoshie; Miyata, Tomoko; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2008-01-11

    During the late stage of homologous recombination in prokaryotes, RuvA binds to the Holliday junction intermediate and executes branch migration in association with RuvB. The RuvA subunits form two distinct complexes with the Holliday junction: complex I with the single RuvA tetramer on one side of the four way junction DNA, and complex II with two tetramers on both sides. To investigate the functional roles of complexes I and II, we mutated two residues of RuvA (L125D and E126K) to prevent octamer formation. An electron microscopic analysis indicated that the mutant RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex formed the characteristic tripartite structure, with only one RuvA tetramer bound to one side of the Holliday junction, demonstrating the unexpected stability of this complex. The novel bent images of the complex revealed an intriguing morphological similarity to the structure of SV40 large T antigen, which belongs to the same AAA+ family as RuvB.

  4. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Radaelli, P. G.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2015-01-26

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007–2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  5. A DFT-D study on the electronic and photophysical properties of ruthenium (II) complex with a chelating sulfoxide group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huifang; Zhang, Lisheng; Lin, Hui; Fan, Xiaolin

    2014-06-01

    Electronic and photophysical properties of [Ru(bpy)2(OSO)]+ (bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine; OSO = methylsulfinylbenzoate) were examined theoretically to better understand the differences between S- and O-linked ruthenium sulfoxide complexes. It is found that the strength of Ru-O1 linkage is significantly larger than that of Ru-S linkage, which makes the charge transfer amount from surrounding ligands to central Ru decreased. The energy gap is closed due to the highest occupied molecular orbital energy increases to a larger extent than the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy. Thereby, red shifted absorption and emission maxima in such photochromic ruthenium sulfoxide complexes can be explained.

  6. Two-Electron Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalyzed by Rhenium(I) Bis(imino)acenaphthene Carbonyl Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Portenkirchner, Engelbert; Kianfar, Elham; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Knör, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes carrying substituted bis(arylimino)acenaphthene ligands (BIAN-R) have been tested as potential catalysts for the two-electron reduction of carbon dioxide. Cyclic voltammetric studies as well as controlled potential electrolysis experiments were performed using CO2-saturated solutions of the complexes in acetonitrile and acetonitrile–water mixtures. Faradaic efficiencies of more than 30 % have been determined for the electrocatalytic production of CO. The effects of ligand substitution patterns and water content of the reaction medium on the catalytic performance of the new catalysts are discussed. PMID:24737649

  7. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, P G; Dhesi, S S

    2015-03-01

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007-2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described. PMID:25624510

  8. Multiband electronic characterization of the complex intermetallic cage system Y1 -xGdxCo2Zn20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Baez, M.; Naranjo-Uribe, A.; Osorio-Guillén, J. M.; Rettori, C.; Avila, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed microscopic and quantitative description of the electronic and magnetic properties of Gd3 +-doped YCo2Zn20 single crystals (Y1 -xGdxCo2Zn20 ,0.002 ≲x ≤ 1.00 ) is reported through a combination of temperature-dependent electron spin resonance (ESR), heat capacity, and d c magnetic susceptibility experiments, plus first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The ESR results indicate that this system features an exchange bottleneck scenario wherein various channels for the spin-lattice relaxation mechanism of the Gd3 + ions can be identified via exchange interactions with different types of conduction electrons at the Fermi level. Quantitative support from the other techniques allows us to extract the exchange interaction parameters between the localized magnetic moments of the Gd3 + ions and the different types of conduction electrons present at the Fermi level (Jf s,Jf p, and Jf d). Despite the complexity of the crystal structure, our combination of experimental and electronic structure data establish GdCo2Zn20 as a model RKKY system by predicting a Curie-Weiss temperature θC=-1.2 (2 ) K directly from microscopic parameters, in very good agreement with the bulk value from magnetization data. The successful microscopic understanding of the electronic structure and behavior for the two end compounds YCo2Zn20 and GdCo2Zn20 means they can be used as references to help describe the more complex electronic properties of related materials.

  9. Crucial role of nuclear dynamics for electron injection in a dye–semiconductor complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Monti, Adriano; Negre, Christian F. A.; Batista, Victor S.; Rego, Luis G. C.; de Groot, Huub J. M.; Buda, Francesco

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we investigate the electron injection from a terrylene-based chromophore to the TiO2 semiconductor bridged by a recently proposed phenyl-amide-phenyl molecular rectifier. The mechanism of electron transfer is studied by means of quantum dynamics simulations using an extended Hückel Hamiltonian. It is found that the inclusion of the nuclear motion is necessary to observe the photoinduced electron transfer. In particular, the fluctuations of the dihedral angle between the terrylene and the phenyl ring modulate the localization and thus the electronic coupling between the donor and acceptor states involved in the injection process. The electron propagation shows characteristic oscillatorymore » features that correlate with interatomic distance fluctuations in the bridge, which are associated with the vibrational modes driving the process. The understanding of such effects is important for the design of functional dyes with optimal injection and rectification properties.« less

  10. Crucial role of nuclear dynamics for electron injection in a dye–semiconductor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Monti, Adriano; Negre, Christian F. A.; Batista, Victor S.; Rego, Luis G. C.; de Groot, Huub J. M.; Buda, Francesco

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we investigate the electron injection from a terrylene-based chromophore to the TiO2 semiconductor bridged by a recently proposed phenyl-amide-phenyl molecular rectifier. The mechanism of electron transfer is studied by means of quantum dynamics simulations using an extended Hückel Hamiltonian. It is found that the inclusion of the nuclear motion is necessary to observe the photoinduced electron transfer. In particular, the fluctuations of the dihedral angle between the terrylene and the phenyl ring modulate the localization and thus the electronic coupling between the donor and acceptor states involved in the injection process. The electron propagation shows characteristic oscillatory features that correlate with interatomic distance fluctuations in the bridge, which are associated with the vibrational modes driving the process. The understanding of such effects is important for the design of functional dyes with optimal injection and rectification properties.

  11. Proteomics and Electron Microscopic Characterization of the Unusual Mitochondrial Ribosome-Related 45S Complex in Leishmania Tarentolae

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Dmitri A.; Spremulli, Linda L.; Sharma, Manjuli R.; Bhargava, Kalpana; Grasso, Domenick; Falick, Arnold M.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.; Parker, Carol E.; Simpson, Larry

    2007-01-01

    A novel type of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex has been described from the kinetoplast-mitochondria of Leishmania tarentolae. The complex, termed the 45S SSU*, contains the 9S small subunit rRNA but does not contain the 12S large subunit rRNA. This complex is the most stable and abundant mitochondrial RNP complex present in Leishmania. As shown by tandem mass spectrometry, the complex contains at least 39 polypeptides with a combined molecular mass of almost 2.1 MDa. These components include several homologs of small subunit ribosomal proteins (S5, S6, S8 S9, S11, S15, S16, S17, S18, MRPS29); however, most of the polypeptides present are unique. Only a few of them show recognizable motifs, such as protein-protein (coiled-coil, Rhodanese) or protein-RNA (pentatricopeptide repeat) interaction domains. A cryo-electron microscopy examination of the 45S SSU* fraction reveals that 27% of particles represent SSU homodimers arranged in a head-to-tail orientation, while the majority of particles are clearly different and show an asymmetric bilobed morphology. Multiple classes of two-dimensional averages were derived for the asymmetrical particles, probably reflecting random orientations of the particles and difficulties in correlating these views with the known projections of ribosomal complexes. One class of the two-dimensional averages shows an SSU moiety attached to a protein mass or masses in a monosome-like appearance. The combined mass spectrometry and electron microscopy data thus indicate that the majority 45S SSU* particles represents a heterodimeric complex in which the SSU of the Leishmania mitochondrial ribosome is associated with an additional protein mass. The biological role of these particles is not known. PMID:17292489

  12. Activated-ion electron transfer dissociation improves the ability of electron transfer dissociation to identify peptides in a complex mixture.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Beauchene, Nicole A; McAlister, Graeme C; Syka, John E P; Schwartz, Jae C; Griep-Raming, Jens; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-12-15

    Using a modified electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-enabled quadrupole linear ion trap (QLT) mass spectrometer, we demonstrate the utility of IR activation concomitant with ETD ion-ion reactions (activated-ion ETD, AI-ETD). Analyzing 12 strong cation exchanged (SCX) fractions of a LysC digest of human cell protein extract using ETD, collision-activated dissociation (CAD), and AI-ETD, we find that AI-ETD generates 13 405 peptide spectral matches (PSMs) at a 1% false-discovery rate (1% FDR), surpassing both ETD (7 968) and CAD (10 904). We also analyze 12 SCX fractions of a tryptic digest of human cell protein extract and find that ETD produces 6 234 PSMs, AI-ETD 9 130 PSMs, and CAD 15 209 PSMs. Compared to ETD with supplemental collisional activation (ETcaD), AI-ETD generates ∼80% more PSMs for the whole cell lysate digested with trypsin and ∼50% more PSMs for the whole cell lysate digested with LysC. PMID:21062032

  13. Electronic Structure of a CuII-Alkoxide Complex Modeling Intermediates in Copper-Catalyzed Alcohol Oxidations

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ellen C.; Porter, Thomas R.; Barrows, Charles J.; Kaminsky, Werner; Mayer, James M.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the copper-catalyzed oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, a CuII-alkoxide (CuII-OR) intermediate is believed to modulate the αC-H bond strength of the deprotonated substrate to facilitate the oxidation. As a structural model for these intermediates, we characterized the electronic structure of the stable compound TptBuCuII(OCH2CF3) (TptBu = (hydro-tris (3-tert-butyl-pyrazolyl) borate) and investigated the influence of the trifluoroethoxide ligand on the electronic structure of the complex. The compound exhibits an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum with an unusually large gzz value of 2.44 and a small copper hyperfine coupling Azz of 40·10−4 cm−1 (120 MHz). Single-crystal electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra show that the unpaired spin population is highly localized on the copper ion (≈ 68 %), with no more than 15 % on the ethoxide oxygen. Electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra show weak ligand-field transitions between 5000 and 12000 cm−1 and an intense ethoxide-to-copper charge transfer (LMCT) transition at 24000 cm−1, resulting in the red color of this complex. Resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy reveals a Cu-O stretch mode at 592 cm−1. Quantum chemical calculations support the interpretation and assignment of the experimental data. Compared to known CuII-thiolate and CuII-alkylperoxo complexes from the literature, we found an increased σ interaction in the CuII-OR bond that results in the spectroscopic features. These insights lay the basis for further elucidating the mechanism of copper-catalyzed alcohol oxidations. PMID:26907976

  14. Protein–Protein Interaction Regulates the Direction of Catalysis and Electron Transfer in a Redox Enzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are well-known to regulate enzyme activity in cell signaling and metabolism. Here, we show that protein–protein interactions regulate the activity of a respiratory-chain enzyme, CymA, by changing the direction or bias of catalysis. CymA, a member of the widespread NapC/NirT superfamily, is a menaquinol-7 (MQ-7) dehydrogenase that donates electrons to several distinct terminal reductases in the versatile respiratory network of Shewanella oneidensis. We report the incorporation of CymA within solid-supported membranes that mimic the inner membrane architecture of S. oneidensis. Quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) resolved the formation of a stable complex between CymA and one of its native redox partners, flavocytochrome c3 (Fcc3) fumarate reductase. Cyclic voltammetry revealed that CymA alone could only reduce MQ-7, while the CymA-Fcc3 complex catalyzed the reaction required to support anaerobic respiration, the oxidation of MQ-7. We propose that MQ-7 oxidation in CymA is limited by electron transfer to the hemes and that complex formation with Fcc3 facilitates the electron-transfer rate along the heme redox chain. These results reveal a yet unexplored mechanism by which bacteria can regulate multibranched respiratory networks through protein–protein interactions. PMID:23799249

  15. Effect of axial coordination on the electronic structure and biological activity of dirhodium(II,II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J Dafhne; Lutterman, Daniel A; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M; Dunbar, Kim R; Turro, Claudia

    2007-09-01

    The reactivities toward biomolecules of a series of three dirhodium(II,II) complexes that possess an increasing number of accessible axial coordination sites are compared. In cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(np)2]2+ (1; np=1,8-naphthyridine) both axial sites are available for coordination, whereas for cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(np)(pynp)]2+ (2; pynp=2-(2-pyridyl)1,8-naphthyridine) and cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(pynp)2]2+ (3) the bridging pynp ligand blocks one and two of the axial coordination sites in the complexes, respectively. The electronic absorption spectra of the complexes are consistent with strong metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions at low energy and ligand-centered peaks localized on the np and/or pynp ligands in the UV and near-UV regions. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations were used to aid in the assignments. The three complexes exhibit metal-centered oxidations and reductions, localized on the aromatic ligands. The ability of the complexes to stabilize duplex DNA and to inhibit transcription in vitro is greatly affected by the availability of an open axial coordination site. The present work shows that open axial coordination sites on the dirhodium complexes are necessary for biological activity. PMID:17685607

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of spin-labeled camptothecin derivatives: a different look of the ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Antonio; Marinello, Jessica; Bortolus, Marco; Sánchez, Albert; Grandas, Anna; Pedroso, Enrique; Pommier, Yves; Capranico, Giovanni; Maniero, Anna Lisa; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2011-02-24

    Camptothecin (CPT) derivatives are clinically effective poisons of DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) able to form a ternary complex with the Top1-DNA complex. The aim of this investigation was to examine the dynamic aspects of the ternary complex formation by means of site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR). Two semisynthetic CPT derivatives bearing the paramagnetic moiety were synthesized, and their biological activity was tested. A 22-mer DNA oligonucleotide sequence with high affinity cleavage site for Top1 was also synthesized. EPR experiments were carried out on modified CPT in the presence of DNA, of Top1, or of both. In the last case, a slow motion component in the EPR signal appeared, indicating the formation of the ternary complex. Deconvolution of the EPR spectrum allowed to obtain the relative drug amounts in the complex. It was also possible to demonstrate that the residence time of CPT "trapped" in the ternary complex is longer than hundreds of microseconds. PMID:21254781

  17. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Spacecraft Circuit Diagnostics by Analog and Complex Signature Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Wade, Raymond P.; Izadnegahdar, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is aimed at developing technologies that will enable space-flight crews to perform in situ component-level repair of electronics on Moon and Mars outposts, where there is no existing infrastructure for logistics spares. These technologies must provide effective repair capabilities yet meet the payload and operational constraints of space facilities. Effective repair depends on a diagnostic capability that is versatile but easy to use by crew members that have limited training in electronics. CLEAR studied two techniques that involve extensive precharacterization of "known good" circuits to produce graphical signatures that provide an easy-to-use comparison method to quickly identify faulty components. Analog Signature Analysis (ASA) allows relatively rapid diagnostics of complex electronics by technicians with limited experience. Because of frequency limits and the growing dependence on broadband technologies, ASA must be augmented with other capabilities. To meet this challenge while preserving ease of use, CLEAR proposed an alternative called Complex Signature Analysis (CSA). Tests of ASA and CSA were used to compare capabilities and to determine if the techniques provided an overlapping or complementary capability. The results showed that the methods are complementary.

  18. Heme-Copper/Dioxygen Complexes: Towards Understanding Ligand-Environmental Effects on Coordination Geometry, Electronic Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Halime, Zakaria; Kieber-Emmons, Matthew T.; Qayyum, Munzarin F.; Mondal, Biplab; Puiu, Simona C.; Chufán, Eduardo E.; Sarjeant, Amy A. N.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the ligand is an important aspect of controlling structure and reactivity in coordination chemistry. In connection with our study of heme/copper/oxygen reactivity relevant to cytochrome c oxidase O2-reduction chemistry, we compare the molecular and electronic structure of two high-spin heme-peroxo-copper [FeIII-O22--CuII]+ complexes containing N4-tetradentate (1) or N3-tridentate (2) copper ligands. Combining previously reported and new resonance Raman and EXAFS data coupled to DFT calculations we report a geometric structure and more complete electronic description of the high-spin heme-peroxo-copper complexes 1 and 2, which establish μ-(O22-) side-on to the FeIII and end-on to CuII (μ-η2:η1) binding for the complex 1 but side-on/side-on (μ-η2:η2) μ-peroxo coordination for the complex 2. We also compare and summarize the differences and similarities of these two complexes in their reactivity toward CO, PPh3, acid and phenols. The comparison of a new X-ray structure of μ-oxo complex 2a with the previously reported 1a X-ray structure, two thermal decomposition products respectively of 2 and 1, reveals a considerable difference in the Fe-O-Cu angle between the two μ-oxo complexes (∠Fe-O-Cu = 178.2° in 1a, ∠Fe-O-Cu = 149.5° in 2a). The reaction of 2 with one equivalent of exogenous N-donor axial base leads to the formation of a distinctive low-temperature stable, low-spin heme-O2-Cu complex (2b), but under the same conditions the addition of an axial base to 1 leads to the dissociation of the heme-peroxo-Cu assembly and the release of O2. 2b reacts with phenols performing hydrogen-atom (e– + H+) abstraction resulting in O-O bond cleavage and the formation of high-valent ferryl [FeIV=O] complex (2c). The nature of 2c was confirmed by comparison of its spectroscopic features and reactivity with those of an independently prepared ferryl complex. The phenoxyl radical generated by the hydrogen-atom abstraction was either 1) directly detected

  19. The effectiveness of an electronic security management system in a privately owned apartment complex.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David F; Roush, Jeffrey B

    2009-02-01

    Poisson and negative binomial regression methods are used to analyze the monthly time series data to determine the effects of introducing an integrated security management system including closed-circuit television (CCTV), door alarm monitoring, proximity card access, and emergency call boxes to a large privately-owned complex of apartment buildings in New York City. Crime rates in a control apartment complex under the same ownership, and in the police precinct in which the 2 complexes are located, serve as controls. PMID:19001121

  20. Docking stability and electronic structure of azurin-cytochrome c551 complex system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Ayumu; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Nishikawa, Keigo; Nagao, Hidemi; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi

    We investigate the docking structure between cytochrome c551 and azurin proteins by quantum mechanical calculation and molecular dynamics (MD). A model for the docking structure of the cytochrome-azurin complex is presented. We calculate the charge distribution around the active site for each protein and force field parameters to simulate the complex system by MD. We estimate some physical properties, such as binding free energy and the dynamical cross-correlation map. We discuss the stability of the cytochrome c551-azurin complex system.

  1. Charge-transfer complexes formed in the reaction of 2-amino-4-ethylpyridine with π-electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlQaradawi, Siham Y.; Mostafa, Adel; Bengali, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular charge-transfer complexes (CT) of electron donor 2-amino-4-ethylpyridine (2A4EPy) with π-acceptors tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) and 2,4,4,6-tetrabromo-2,5-cyclohexadienone (TBCHD) have been studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform at 25 °C. These were investigated through electronic, infrared, mass spectra and thermal measurements as well as elemental analysis. All formed complexes exhibit well resolved charge-transfer bands in the regions where neither donor nor acceptors have any absorption. The obtained results show that the formed solid CT-complexes have the structures [(2A4EPy)(TCNE)2], [(2A4EPy)2(DDQ)] and [(2A4EPy)2(TBCHD)] for 2-amino-4-ethylpyridine in full agreement with the known reaction stoichiometries in solution as well as the elemental measurements. The formation constant KCT, molar extinction coefficient εC.T, free energy change ΔG0, CT energy ECT, ionization potential Ip and oscillator strength ƒ have been calculated for these three CT-complexes.

  2. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge.

    PubMed

    de la Llave, Ezequiel; Herrera, Santiago E; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P; Calvo, Ernesto J; Williams, Federico J

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge. PMID:26567676

  3. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J.

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  4. Light-Activated Protein Inhibition through Photoinduced Electron Transfer of a Ruthenium(II)–Cobalt(III) Bimetallic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. These results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers. PMID:25671465

  5. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Llave, Ezequiel; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J.

    2015-11-01

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  6. Spin-orbit effects on electronic delocalization. Aromaticity in a discrete square tetrapalladium sandwich complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Castro, A.; Mac-Leod Carey, D.; Arratia-Pérez, R.

    2010-04-01

    In this article, we report the relativistic electronic structure, including spin-orbit interaction, employing all-electron density functional theory calculations on the multimetallic sandwich compound [(CNT)Pd4(COT)]1+ (1), which can be considered as a [Pd4]2+ fragment flanked by two ring-ligands, namely, cyclononatetraenyl (CNT1-) and cyclooctatetraene (COT), as well as the dimer of 1, hereafter 2. The calculations suggest that the Pd4-ligand interaction is mainly electrostatic, being the main responsible term for the stabilization of the almost fully occupied 4d shell [Pd4]2+ fragment. The ring currents and electronic delocalization estimated via the nuclear independent chemical shifts indices and electron localization function, allow us to describe a significant σ-aromaticity at the center of the Pd4 square in 1, which in conjunction with the aromaticity arising from the ligands induce considerable aromatic character inside of the multimetallic metallocene.

  7. Distribution and dynamics of electron transport complexes in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-03-01

    The cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane represents a system that can carry out both oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration simultaneously. The organization, interactions and mobility of components of these two electron transport pathways are indispensable to the biosynthesis of thylakoid membrane modules and the optimization of bioenergetic electron flow in response to environmental changes. These are of fundamental importance to the metabolic robustness and plasticity of cyanobacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the distribution and dynamics of electron transport components in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes. Global understanding of the principles that govern the dynamic regulation of electron transport pathways in nature will provide a framework for the design and synthetic engineering of new bioenergetic machinery to improve photosynthesis and biofuel production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26619924

  8. Distribution and dynamics of electron transport complexes in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane represents a system that can carry out both oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration simultaneously. The organization, interactions and mobility of components of these two electron transport pathways are indispensable to the biosynthesis of thylakoid membrane modules and the optimization of bioenergetic electron flow in response to environmental changes. These are of fundamental importance to the metabolic robustness and plasticity of cyanobacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the distribution and dynamics of electron transport components in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes. Global understanding of the principles that govern the dynamic regulation of electron transport pathways in nature will provide a framework for the design and synthetic engineering of new bioenergetic machinery to improve photosynthesis and biofuel production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26619924

  9. Multidimensional treatment of stochastic solvent dynamics in photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer processes: sequential, concerted, and complex branching mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hazra, Anirban; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-10-14

    A theoretical approach for the multidimensional treatment of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes in solution is presented. This methodology is based on the multistate continuum theory with an arbitrary number of diabatic electronic states representing the relevant charge distributions in a general PCET system. The active electrons and transferring proton(s) are treated quantum mechanically, and the electron-proton vibronic free energy surfaces are represented as functions of multiple scalar solvent coordinates corresponding to the single electron and proton transfer reactions involved in the PCET process. A dynamical formulation of the dielectric continuum theory is used to derive a set of coupled generalized Langevin equations of motion describing the time evolution of these collective solvent coordinates. The parameters in the Langevin equations depend on the solvent properties, such as the dielectric constants, relaxation time, and molecular moment of inertia, as well as the solute properties. The dynamics of selected intramolecular nuclear coordinates, such as the proton donor-acceptor distance or a torsional angle within the PCET complex, may also be included in this formulation. A surface hopping method in conjunction with the Langevin equations of motion is used to simulate the nonadiabatic dynamics on the multidimensional electron-proton vibronic free energy surfaces following photoexcitation. This theoretical treatment enables the description of both sequential and concerted mechanisms, as well as more complex processes involving a combination of these mechanisms. The application of this methodology to a series of model systems corresponding to collinear and orthogonal PCET illustrates fundamental aspects of these different mechanisms and elucidates the significance of proton vibrational relaxation and nonequilibrium solvent dynamics. PMID:22010706

  10. Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication, Environmental Protection Agency Number ID4890008952

    SciTech Connect

    Holzemer, Michael J.; Hart, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication for the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Partial Permit, PER-116. This Permit Reapplication is required by the PER-116 Permit Conditions I.G. and I.H., and must be submitted to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with IDAPA 58.01.05.012 [40 CFR §§ 270.10 and 270.13 through 270.29].

  11. Sm(II)-Mediated Electron Transfer to Carboxylic Acid Derivatives: Development of Complexity-Generating Cascades.

    PubMed

    Just-Baringo, Xavier; Procter, David J

    2015-05-19

    Reductive electron transfer (ET) to organic compounds is a powerful method for the activation of substrates via the formation of radicals, radical anions, anions, and dianions that can be exploited in bond-cleaving and bond-forming processes. Since its introduction to the synthetic community in 1977 by Kagan, SmI2 has become one of the most important reducing agents available in the laboratory. Despite its widespread application in aldehyde and ketone reduction, it was widely accepted that carboxylic acid derivatives could not be reduced by SmI2; only recently has our work led to this dogma being overturned, and the reduction of carboxylic acid derivatives using SmI2 can now take its place alongside aldehyde/ketone reduction as a powerful activation mode for synthesis. In this Account, we set out our studies of the reduction of carboxylic acid derivatives using SmI2, SmI2-H2O, and SmI2-H2O-NR3 and the exploitation of the unusual radical anions that are now accessible in unprecedented carbon-carbon bond-forming processes. The Account begins with our serendipitous discovery that SmI2 mixed with H2O is able to reduce six-membered lactones to diols, a transformation previously thought to be impossible. After the successful development of selective monoreductions of Meldrum's acid and barbituric acid heterocyclic feedstocks, we then identified the SmI2-H2O-NR3 reagent system for the efficient reduction of a range of acyclic carboxylic acid derivatives that typically present a significant challenge for ET reductants. Mechanistic studies have led us to propose a common mechanism for the reduction of carboxylic acid derivatives using Sm(II), with only subtle changes observed as the carboxylic acid derivative and Sm(II) reagent system are varied. At the center of our postulated mechanism is the proposed reversibility of the first ET to the carbonyl of carboxylic acid derivatives, and this led us to devise several strategies that allow the radical anion intermediates to be

  12. The BRIGHTEN Program: Implementation and Evaluation of a Program to Bridge Resources of an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Health Team via Electronic Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Erin E.; Lapidos, Stan; Eisenstein, Amy R.; Ivan, Iulia I.; Golden, Robyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of the BRIGHTEN Program (Bridging Resources of an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Health Team via Electronic Networking), an interdisciplinary team intervention for assessing and treating older adults for depression in outpatient primary and specialty medical clinics. The BRIGHTEN team collaborates "virtually"…

  13. An Introduction to Internet Resources for K-12 Educators. Part II: Question Answering, Electronic Discussion Groups, Newsgroups, Update 2000. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Nancy A.; Sprague, Carolyn

    The Internet is an international computer network composed of thousands of smaller networks. As K-12 schools connect to the Internet, a new method of communication opens up to educators and their students. This ERIC Digest describes some sample services and resources that are available to the K-12 community by electronic mail over the Internet.…

  14. Charting a Course through CORAL: Texas A&M University Libraries' Experience Implementing an Open-Source Electronic Resources Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Beh, Eugenia; Resnick, Taryn; Ugaz, Ana; Tabacaru, Simona

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, after two previous unsuccessful attempts at electronic resources management system (ERMS) implementation, Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries set out once again to find an ERMS that would fit its needs. After surveying the field, TAMU Libraries selected the University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries-developed, open-source ERMS, CORAL…

  15. Understanding the Electronic Factors Responsible for Ligand Spin-Orbit NMR Shielding in Transition-Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Vícha, Jan; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Pawlak, Tomasz; Munzarová, Markéta L; Straka, Michal; Marek, Radek

    2015-04-14

    The significant role of relativistic effects in altering the NMR chemical shifts of light nuclei in heavy-element compounds has been recognized for a long time; however, full understanding of this phenomenon in relation to the electronic structure has not been achieved. In this study, the recently observed qualitative differences between the platinum and gold compounds in the magnitude and the sign of spin-orbit-induced (SO) nuclear magnetic shielding at the vicinal light atom ((13)C, (15)N), σ(SO)(LA), are explained by the contractions of 6s and 6p atomic orbitals in Au complexes, originating in the larger Au nuclear charge and stronger scalar relativistic effects in gold complexes. This leads to the chemical activation of metal 6s and 6p atomic orbitals in Au complexes and their larger participation in bonding with the ligand, which modulates the propagation of metal-induced SO effects on the NMR signal of the LA via the Spin-Orbit/Fermi Contact (SO/FC) mechanism. The magnitude of the σ(SO)(LA) in these square-planar complexes can be understood on the basis of a balance between various metal-based 5d → 5d* and 6p → 6p* orbital magnetic couplings. The large and positive σ(SO)(LA) in platinum complexes is dominated by the shielding platinum-based 5d → 5d* magnetic couplings, whereas small or negative σ(SO)(LA) in gold complexes is related to the deshielding contribution of the gold-based 6p → 6p* magnetic couplings. Further, it is demonstrated that σ(SO)(LA) correlates quantitatively with the extent of M-LA electron sharing that is the covalence of the M-LA bond (characterized by the QTAIM delocalization index, DI). The present findings will contribute to further understanding of the origin and propagation of the relativistic effects influencing the experimental NMR parameters in heavy-element systems. PMID:26574362

  16. Theoretical Studies on Docking Dynamics and Electronic Structure in Metalloprotein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Ayumu; Nishikawa, Keigo; Yamamoto, Tetsunori; Purqon, Acep; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Nagao, Hidemi

    2007-12-01

    An investigating of docking structure and dynamics between metalloprotein is interested from the viewpoint of searching the function of protein. We investigate the cytochrome c551 and azurin complexes by three computational methods, quantum mechanical calculation, docking searching algorism and molecular dynamics simulation. At first we present the docking structure of the cytochrome c551-azurin complexes expected by ZDOCK searching algorism. Quantum chemical calculation is tools to estimate the charge distrubution around the active site for each protein and force field parameters. From these parameters, we reproduce the protein docking dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation. We analyze some physical properties of complex system such as binding free energy, dynamical cross correlation map, and so on. We discuss the docking stability and dynamical effect of the cytochrome c551-azurin complexes.

  17. Electronic and optical response of Ru(II) complexes functionalized by methyl, carboxylate groups: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge - a carboxyl group - is added to one or two of the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure, indeed, affect electronic and optical properties and consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru-systems. In this study, we apply both theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the Ru(II) bipyridine complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and linear response time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state structures of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase, as well as in acetonitrile solution. In addition, an inelaborate Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states. All theoretical results nicely complement experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes and contribute to their interpretation. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show a high probability of deprotonation of the carbboxyl group in the Ru-complexes resulted in a slight blue shift and decrease of intensities of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotanated complexes demonstrate strong agreement when acetonitrile solvent is used in simulations. A polar solvent is found to play an important role in calculations of optical spectra: it

  18. Molecular determination by electron microscopy of the dynein-microtubule complex structure.

    PubMed

    Narita, Akihiro; Mizuno, Naoko; Kikkawa, Masahide; Maéda, Yuichiro

    2007-10-01

    Dynein is a minus-end-directed microtubule (MT) motor that is responsible for the wide range of MT-based motility in eukaryotic cells. Detailed mechanism of the dynein chemomechanical conversion is still unknown, partly because the structure of dynein is not studied at high resolution. To address this problem and reconstruct the dynein-MT complex at higher resolution, we have developed new procedures based on single particle analysis. To accurately determine the orientation of the dynein-MT complex, we introduced a "dynein track model" to restrict the possible dynein positions on the images. We tested our procedures by reconstructing structures from simulated dynein-MT complex images. Starting from the simulated noisy images generated using three different models of the dynein-MT complex, we have successfully recovered the original three-dimensional (3-D) structure. We also showed that our procedure is robust against fluctuation of the dynein molecules and can determine the structure even when the dynein position fluctuates to a certain extent. Convergence of the final 3-D structure can be tested with a "two-dimensional (2-D) agreement value," which we introduced to see whether the final structure is a result of overfit from fluctuating dynein or not. When the procedures did not work well due to the fluctuation, we could recognize the failure by this 2-D agreement value. Finally, the actual structure of the dynein-MT complex was determined from actual cryoelectron micrographs of Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein-MT complex. This method has revealed the detailed 3-D structures of the dynein-MT complex and will shed light on the motor mechanism of the dynein molecule. PMID:17761194

  19. Complex role of secondary electron emissions in dust grain charging in space environments: measurements on Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Mian; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James; Leclair, Andre C.

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, by electron/ion collisions, and sec-ondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstel-lar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynam-ical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of 0.2 to 13 µm diam-eters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong parti-cle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  20. Measurement of electron density in complex plasmas of the PK-3 plus apparatus on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Yasuaki; Adachi, Satoshi

    2011-07-01

    Dust particles in discharge are often levitated in a sheath region rather than in bulk plasma under gravitational conditions (on Earth). Gravity compresses dust clouds, and the gravitational force restricts the motion of the dust particles. Microgravity gives the plasmas, including dust particles, so-called complex (dusty) plasmas, where dust particles are embedded in a completely charge-neutral region of the bulk plasma. The dust cloud, as an uncompressed strongly-coupled Coulomb system, corresponds to an atomic model with physical phenomena, e.g., crystallization, phase transition, and so on. Since the phenomena are tightly connected to plasma states expressed by plasma parameters, it is significant to estimate the plasma parameters, such as electron density and temperature. The present work shows the electron density measured by the frequency shift probe in the apparatus for microgravity experiments currently boarding on the International Space Station (PK-3 plus). The frequency shift probe measurement gave electron density in the order of 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} as a typical value in the apparatus, and demonstrated the detection of electrons in plasmas with dust particles. The spatial distribution profile of the electron density obtained in this measurement presents an aspect for the void formation of dust clouds under microgravity.