Science.gov

Sample records for complexes petrology genesis

  1. Petrology, Geochemistry and Genesis of Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Hudon, Pierre; Galindo, Charles, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Ureilites are enigmatic achondrites that have some characteristics resulting from high temperature igneous processing, yet retain other characteristics inherited from the solar nebula. They are basalt-depleted ultramafic rocks containing 7-66 mg/g elemental C. They are rich in noble gases and display a correlation between mg# and Delta (17)O. This mishmash of properties has engendered various models for ureilite genesis, from those in which nebular processes dominate to those in which parent body igneous processes dominate. Characterization of new ureilites, especially of new subtypes, is an important part of attempts to unravel the history of the ureilite parent body or bodies. Here we report on the petrology and geochemistry of a suite of ureilites, mostly from Antarctica, and use these data to discuss ureilite petrogenesis. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  2. Petrologic and In Situ Geochemical Constraints on Diogenite Genesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Peng, Z. X.

    2013-01-01

    Diogenites, members of the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) clan, are orthopyroxenite, harzburgite and dunite meteorites [1-3]. Most are breccias, but remnant textures indicate they were originally coarse-grained rocks, with grain sizes of order of cm. Their petrography and compositions support an origin as crustal cumulates from a differentiated asteroid. Astronomical observations, and surface mineralogy and composition of Vesta determined by the Dawn spacecraft suggest that asteroid (4) Vesta is the parent object for HED meteorites [4-6]. The origin of diogenites is an unsettled issue. It is difficult to fit their bulk compositional characteristics into global magma ocean models that successfully describe the compositions of basaltic and cumulate eucrites [7]. Compositional analyses of acid-leached bulk samples have led to the hypothesis that many diogenites were formed late by interaction of their parent melts with a eucritic crust [8]. Those observations may alternatively be explained by subsolidus equilibration of trace elements between orthopyroxene and minor/ accessory phases in the rocks such as plagioclase and phosphate [7]. These competing hypotheses can be tested through in situ measurements of trace and minor elements in orthopyroxene. Our new petrologic observations and in situ minor and trace element data for a suite of diogenites are used to discuss the petrologic evolution of diogenites. Our preliminary data on two diogenites are consistent with the hypothesis that subsolidus element mobilization processes caused unusual trace element signatures seen in some diogenites [7]. We cannot stress strongly enough, however, that the sample set is too small and that additional data are required before definitive conclusions can be made.

  3. The Nabarlek uranium deposit, Northern Territory, Australia: Some petrologic and geochemical constraints on genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ewers, G.R.; Donnelly, T.M.; Ferguson, J.

    1983-08-01

    The Nabarlek uranium deposit, Northern Territory, Australia, is confined to a shear zone in contorted and metasomatized early Proterozoic schists and occurs near an unconformity with overlying middle Proterozoic sandstone. Massive chlorite + or - sericite + or - hematite rocks, breccias, and intensely altered schists are characteristic of the ore zone, and at least three generations of chlorite have been recognized and described. The primary ore mineral assemblage is dominated by uraninite intergrown with chlorite. The orebody was sericitized at or after 920 m.y. ago, resulting in the widespread replacement and breakdown of chlorite, the formation of hematite, and the solution and redeposition of uraninite. Redox reactions involving iron and uranium are evident in sericitized rocks containing hematite and residual uraninite. High U/Th ratios in the ore zone suggest that uranium was transported to the site of deposition as a uranyl complex. Although no carbonaceous material occurs in the ore zone, isotopic data on minor carbonate associated with uraninite suggest that organic material was originally associated with the mineralization and indicate that these carbonates have evolved from the interaction of hydrothermal fluids with this material. Erosion of the middle Proterozoic cover rocks in the recent past has exposed the deposit to the effects of weathering.

  4. Petrology of the Betulia Igneous Complex, Cauca, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Rodriguez, Javier

    2014-12-01

    The Betulia Igneous Complex (BIC) is a group of Late-Miocene (11.8 ± 0.2 Ma) hypabyssal intrusions of intermediate to felsic composition located in the SW of the Colombian Andes. These bodies have a calc-alkaline tendency and are related to the subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American plate. Diorites, quartz diorites and tonalities have porphyritic and phaneritic textures and are composed of plagioclase, amphibole, quartz, biotite, and orthoclase. Plagioclase is mainly of andesine-type and the amphiboles were classified mainly as magnesiohornblendes, actinolites, and tschermakites. BIC rocks have a narrow range of SiO2 content (59-67wt%) and exhibit an enrichment of LILE and LREE relative to HFSE and HREE, respectively. These features are attributed to enrichment of LILE from the source and retention of HFSE (mainly Nb, Ta, and Ti) by refractory phases within the same source. The depletion of HREE is explained by fractionation of mineral phases that have a high partition coefficients for these elements, especially amphiboles, the major mafic phase in the rocks. Nevertheless, the fractionation of garnet in early stages of crystallization is not unlikely. Probably all BIC units were generated by the same magma chamber or at least by the same petrologic mechanism as shown by the similar patterns in spider and REE diagrams; fractional crystallization and differentiation processes controlled the final composition of the rocks, and crystallization stages determined the texture. Isotopic compositions of BIC rocks (87Sr/86Sr: 0.70435-0.70511; 143Nd/144Nd: 0.51258-0.51280; 206Pb/204Pb: 19.13-19.31; 207Pb/204Pb: 15.67-15.76; 208Pb/204Pb: 38.93-39.20) indicate a source derived from the mantle with crustal contamination. The model proposed for the BIC consists of fluids from the dehydration of the subducted slab (Nazca plate) and subducted sediments that generated partial melting of the mantle wedge. These basaltic melts ascended to the mantle-crust boundary

  5. Mineralogy and petrology of complex breccia 14063,14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, I. M.; Smith, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    Breccia 14063,14 is a complex, probably pre-Imbrian, unmetamorphosed breccia dominated almost entirely by mineral clasts. Electron-probe and microscope examination showed at least four distinct lithologies in a centimeter-sized thin-section. Examination of each lithology showed or suggested the following contributing rock types or mineralogies: (1) dunite with minor chromite, very high-Mg ilmenite and bronzite; (2) spinel troctolite with olivine and Mg-Al spinel; (3) high-Ti mare-like basalt with high-Mg ilmenite and coarse pyroxene; (4) low-KREEP noritic breccia; (5) anorthosite; (6) very Ni-rich Fe metal.

  6. Petrological, geochemical, and stable isotope constraints on the genesis of the Miocene igneous rocks of Chetaibi and Cap de Fer (NE Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouar, R.; Boyce, A. J.; Arafa, M.; Ouabadi, A.; Fallick, A. E.

    2005-06-01

    Miocene igneous rocks (diorites, andesites, dacites, rhyolites and microgranites) of Chetaibi and Cap de Fer massif, NE Algeria, are high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic rocks. Fresh diorites have δ 34S and δ 18O values ranging between -2.5‰ and +5.9‰, +6.5‰ and +6.7‰ respectively, indicating a mantle origin. The relatively low δ 34S values (-5.4‰ to -12.2‰) and high δ 18O (+8.3‰ to +9.0‰) of altered diorites indicate the input of a crustal component to the initial magma. The microgranites' I-type signature is indicated by the geochemical data and the δ 34S and δ 18O values of -1.2‰ and -3.6‰, and +7.8‰ to +10.4‰ respectively. The andesites show a large variation of δ 34S, between -33.2‰ and +25.7‰. Massive andesites with δ 34S between +6.8‰ and +7.6‰ preserve a 34S-enriched mantle signature. The δ 34S of the lava flows between +25.7‰ and +25.8‰ are attributed to open system magma degassing, whereas the low δ 34S of two andesitic dyke samples (-13.7‰ and -33.2‰) strongly suggest a crustal sulphur input. High δ 18O (+9.2‰ to +15.7‰) of andesites indicate post-magmatic alteration (mainly silicification); the flyschs with δ 18O between of +13.3‰ and +21.7‰ are most likely the contaminant. Quartz veins within the andesites gave a δ 18O value of +23.0‰ while silica-filling vesicles yielded a value of +13.8‰. Initial Sr-isotope data are rather high for all the rocks (diorites: 0.707-0.708, andesites: 0.707-0.710, and microgranites and rhyolites: 0.717-0.719), and because geochemical and stable isotope data do not indicate a substantial amount of crustal assimilation, an extensive enrichment of the mantle source by subducted sediments is called for. A metasomatized-mantle source, characterized by high radiogenic Sr and relatively high δ 18O, has also been indicated for the genesis of similar Tertiary igneous rocks in the Western Mediterranean basin, e.g. the Volcanic Province of southeasten Spain [Benito, R

  7. Petrologic evolution of divergent peralkaline magmas from the Silent Canyon caldera complex, southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, D.A.; Sargent, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Silent Canyon volcanic center consists of a buried Miocene peralkaline caldera complex and outlying peralkaline lava domes. Two widespread ash flow sheets, the Tub Spring and overlying Grouse Canyon members of the Miocene Belted Range Tuff, were erupted from the caldera complex and have volumes of 60-100 km3 and 200 km3, respectively. Eruption of the ash flows was preceded by widespread extrusion of precaldera comendite domes and was followed by extrusion of postcollapse peralkaline lavas and tuffs within and outside the caldera complex. Lava flows and tuffs were also deposited between the two major ash flow sheets. Rocks of the Silent Canyon center vary significantly in silica content and peralkalinity. Weakly peralkaline silicic comendites (PI 1.0-1.1) are the most abundant precaldera lavas. Postcollapse lavas range from trachyte to silicic comendite; some have anomalous light rare earth element (LREE) enrichments. Silent Canyon rocks follow a common petrologic evolution from trachyte to low-silica comendite; above 73% SiO2, compositions of the moderately peralkaline comendites diverge from those of the weakly peralkaline silicic comendites. The development of divergent peralkaline magmas, toward both pantelleritic and weakly peralkaline compositions, is unusual in a single volcanic center. -from Authors

  8. Metasedimentary melting in the formation of charnockite: Petrological and zircon U-Pb-Hf-O isotope evidence from the Darongshan S-type granitic complex in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Shu-Juan; Li, Xian-Hua; Huang, Hui-Qing; Deng, Xi-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Charnockites are Opx-bearing igneous rocks commonly found in high-grade metamorphic terranes. Despite being volumetrically minor, they show a wide range in both bulk geochemistry and intensive parameters. They form a characteristic component of the AMCG (anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite) suite, but their association with typical S-type granites is less well-known. The Darongshan S-type granitic complex (DSGC) in Guangxi Province, southern China, contains granites varying in mafic silicate mineral assemblages from Bt + Crd (Darongshan suite) to Opx + Grt + Bt + Crd (Jiuzhou suite) and Opx + Crd ± Bt (Taima suite), corresponding to a geochemical transition from magnesian calc-alkalic to ferroan calc-alkalic. However, its genesis, even the accurate age of intrusion, remains highly contentious despite intensive research. In order to understand the genesis of charnockite and its genetic relationship with S-type granite; here, we first determined zircon U-Pb ages of each suite using a SIMS on the basis of a detailed petrological study. Zircon U-Pb ages show that all suites of the complex were emplaced contemporaneously at ca. 249 Ma. Monazite apparent U-Pb ages are indistinguishable from zircon U-Pb ages within analytical error. Further in situ zircon Hf-O isotope analyses reveal that the granitic complex was dominantly derived from reduced melting metasedimentary rocks (δ18Ozircon = ca. 11‰; εHf(t)zircon = ca. - 10; Δlog FMQ ≤ 0; Mn in apatite oxybarometer) with rare material input from the mantle. The variation in δ18O (7.8‰-12.9‰) is more likely a result of hybridization, whereas that in εHf(t) (- 31.9 to - 1.8) is a result of both hybridization and disequilibrium melting. The variation in mineralogy and geochemistry may be interpreted as a result of entrainment of peritectic garnets from biotite-dehydration melting. Nevertheless, heat input from mantle through basaltic intrusion/underplating is considered to play a major role in high

  9. The Dengli (H3.8) Complex Breccia: Petrological and Isotopic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Assonov, S. S.; Kononkova, N. N.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-07-01

    The Dengli meteorite was found in the Karakum desert in July 1976. Previous studies [1] have shown that the meteorite is a complex chondritic breccia containing unusual components of achondritic affinity. In order to understand the origin of the breccia, we studied its mineralogy, petrology, and isotopic composition of noble gases. In addition, in cooperation with Dr. J. N. Goswami, we are now studying minerals in achondritic clasts using an ion microprobe. The Dengli meteorite has a distinct chondritic texture and consists of chondrules and chondrule fragments embedded into a fine-grained matrix. Equilibrated and unequilibrated populations were found among the chondrules, the latter of which are characterized by normal or inverse Mg-Fe zoning. Olivine (Fa19.6, N = 52, C.V. = 19.3) and pyroxene (Fs18.2, N = 27, C.V. = 17.0) displays large compositional variations. Based on textural and chemical characteristics, Dengli can be classified as an H3.8 chondrite. Two objects with unique compositions were identified. One has a round shape and consists of silica, orthopyroxene (Fs18.1 Wo6.2), clinopyroxene (Fs17.6 Wo27.6), and feldspar (An76.2 Ab23.2). The other object is an angular clast, which is composed of olivine (Fa17.2), Al-rich clinopyroxene (Fs6.3 Wo46.8), and feldspar (An44.7 Ab54.7). The presence of clinopyroxene and Ca-rich feldspar in these objects indicates their similarity with an achondritic material. The Ar, Kr, and Xe contents measured in Dengli are very close to those in other ordinary chondrites of petrological types 3 through 5 [2]. The Xe and Kr isotopic compositions at any temperature step differ from those of solar Xe and Kr. High ^38Ar concentrations were found. The exposure age was estimated to be 7.6 Ma, which is close to the average (6.3 +/- 0.2 Ma) exposure age of 350 H chondrites. The Dengli K/Ar age, 3.73 +/- 0.10 Ga, is close to K/Ar ages of the majority of H chondrites. Thus, Dengli is depleted in noble gases as compared to regolith

  10. The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line: Volcanic history, petrological and geochemical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouclet, André; Kagou Dongmo, Armand; Bardintzeff, Jacques-Marie; Wandji, Pierre; Chakam Tagheu, Pulchérie; Nkouathio, David; Bellon, Hervé; Ruffet, Gilles

    2014-09-01

    The volcanic story of Mount Manengouba is related to four chronological stages: (1) forming of the early Manengouba shield volcano between 1.55 and 0.94 Ma, (2) building of the Eboga strato-cone between 0.94 and 0.89 Ma, (3) caldera collapse and silicic extrusions of the Elengoum Complex between 0.89 and 0.70 Ma, and (4) intra-caldera and flank activity between 0.45 and 0.11 Ma. The volume of the volcano is calculated at 320 km3 ± 5%. The volcanic rocks are attributed to two magmatic outputs. The first and main magma generation produced the shield volcano, the strato-cone, and the syn- to post-caldera extrusions, displaying a complete series from basanites to trachytes (magmatic Group 1). The second magma generation is limited to the late and flank activity evolving from basanites to trachy-phonolite (magmatic Group 2). Both magmatic groups belong to the under-saturated alkaline sodic series. Petrological calculations locate the magmatic reservoir between 37 and 39 km in the upper mantle for the Group 1 lavas, and between 42 and 44 km for the Group 2 lavas. Trachytes were generated in a secondary crustal reservoir. Magmatic series evolve with medium to low pressure fractional crystallization of olivine, pyroxene, oxides, feldspar, and apatite. Significant crustal assimilation is evidenced in trachytes. The magma of Group 1 was generated with 3-6% of partial melting of a moderately enriched source containing 3-7% of garnet. Melting took place in the spinel to garnet transition zone located at 70-90 km and around 25 kb. The magma of Group 2 resulted from a slightly higher partial melting from a less garnet-rich source that indicates uprising of the melting column in the upper part of transition zone. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope data of the Manengouba rocks and neighboring lavas are analyzed and compared with those of the mafic lavas of the CVL. Three source components are distinguished: a depleted component originated from the asthenospheric swell, a radiogenic component

  11. Petrological and geochemical constraints on the origin of adakites in the Garibaldi Volcanic Complex, southwestern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillmore, Julie; Coulson, Ian M.

    2013-07-01

    The Garibaldi Volcanic Complex (GVC) is located in southwestern British Columbia and comprises two related but distinct volcanic fields: the Garibaldi Lake and the Mount Garibaldi volcanic fields. The rocks of the GVC range from basalt to rhyolite, and analyses of samples from both fields distinguish these as adakites. The GVC magmas have high Sr/Y, Mg#, and Al2O3; low K2O/Na2O; and fractionated rare earth element compositions. Models of adakite genesis fall into two main groups: slab melting and non-slab melting. Adakites generated by slab melting commonly occur from young subducting crust (≤25 Ma) and are felsic partial melts of the subducting slab that interact with the mantle wedge during ascent. Non-slab melting models vary widely and include basalt fractionation, assimilation, fractional crystallization processes and partial melting of mafic lower crust. Data from the GVC are too limited to fully elucidate the mechanisms of adakite genesis; however, the petrographical and geochemical characteristics of the GVC rocks in this study do not refute an origin by slab partial melts. Variations in trace elements that reflect non-adakitic values (e.g., low La, low Cr) are likely the result of magma mixing at shallow depths within the magma reservoirs of each center, for which there is mineralogical and textural evidence. The adakite rocks of the GVC share geochemical traits akin to both low-SiO2 adakite (LSA) and high-SiO2 adakite (HSA) groups, though additional data are needed to investigate whether LSA- or HSA-type dominates within the GVC, and by extension, which should be the preferred model of adakite genesis.

  12. UNIT, PETROLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON PETROLOGY IS SUITABLE FOR ADAPTATION AT EITHER THE UPPER ELEMENTARY OR THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS. THE UNIT BEGINS WITH A STORY THAT INTRODUCES VOLCANIC ACTION AND IGNEOUS ROCK FORMATION. SELECTED CONCEPTS ARE LISTED FOLLOWED BY SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES. A BIBLIOGRAPHY, FILM LIST, VOCABULARY LIST, AND QUESTION AND…

  13. Petrology, geochemistry and geochronology of the Chilka Lake igneous complex, Orissa state, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amitabha; Bhanumathi, L.; Balasubrahmanyan, M. N.

    1981-04-01

    The Chilka Lake igneous complex of Orissa, the largest known anortosite massif of the Indian Shield, occurs in a catazonal environment of high-grade metamorphics of the Eastern Ghats Precambrian Orogenic Province. The syntectonic massif consists of the anorthositic Balugaon dome, leuconoritic Rambha lobe and quartz-mangeritic Kallikota cover. A completely gradational suite comprising anorthosite-leuconorite-norite-minor jotunite (the anorthositic suite) constitutes most of the complex. The subordinate of suite of acid rocks spatially associated with this is of a broad quartz-mangeritic lithology with minor granitic rocks (the acidic suite). Geochemical evolution of the complex in the sequence anorthosite-leuconorite-norite-jotunite-acidic rocks shows moderate iron enrichment in the noritic-jotunitic stage and is marked by an overall decrease in Al 2O 3, CaO, MgO, Ni/Co, Sr/Ba, K/Rb and increase in SiO 2, K 2O, V/Ni, K/Ba and Rb/Sr. Such progressive variation in geochemical parameters appears (i) essentially gradual and frequently overlapping in rock members of the intergradational anorthositic suite and (ii) rather abrupt across transition zones between the anorthositic suite and the acidic suite due to near absence of intervening intermediate lithologies. RbSr whole rock isochron studies indicate that the complex was emplaced ca. 1400 Ma ago. The initial 87Sr/ 68Sr (0.70661) implies limited hybridisation of the parent magma prior to emplacement. A critical appraisal of all the available evidence suggests that (i) the anorthositic suite of rocks form a perfectly consanguinous and comagmatic assemblage and (ii) the spatially associated acidic suite emerged through a convergence of magmatic and metasomatic processes (the latter brought about by contact anatexis of the host rocks). The complex as well as the host metamorphics are intruded by an atectonic suite of noritic dykes emplaced ca 850 Ma ago.

  14. Petrology, geochemistry and geochonology of the Jacupiranga ultramafic, alkaline and carbonatitic complex (southern Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmyz, Luanna; Arnaud, Nicolas; Biondi, João Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Brazilian carbonatitic complexes are located at the edges of the Paleozoic basins and are usually associated to tectonic crustal flexuring or deep fault zones. The Jacupiranga Complex is a 65 km² ultrabasic-alkaline carbonatitic intrusive body outcroping at the northeastern border of the Paraná Basin, South of São Paulo State (Brazil). The northern portion of the unit is mostly composed of peridotitic rocks, while the southern part contains ijolites, melteigites, clinopyroxenites and carbonatites which host a phosphate deposit, mined since 1966. Even though the carbonatites only represent 1% of the Complex's area, they have concentrated most of the historical petrogenetic studies, leaving almost unknown the petrogenetic and the geochronological characteristics of other rocks. This explains why the few petrogenetic models from the literature are very partial and mostly unsatisfactory. While the peridotitic rocks are largely hindered by the absence of fresh outcrops, the regolith thickness and the high serpentinization degree, field observations and petrographic data notably show a heterogeneous zone around the peridotitic body. That zone is composed of a large variety of lithotypes over a relatively small area (~9 km²), comprising diorites, monzodiorites, alkali feldspar syenites, trachytes, lamprophyres and syenites. Moreover, these rocks present a restricted lateral continuity (decametric) and a lack of the magmatic bedding characteristic of the ijolitic and clinopyroxenitc rocks. The southern clinopyroxenitic zone (~20 km²) is composed of clinopyroxenite and melteigite with prominent magmatic layering, probably of cumulative origin, and a body of carbonatites which outcrops over less than 1 km2 essentially composed of sovite and beforsite, with abundant apatite. The Jacupiranga Complex characteristics indicate that its formation possibly comprises at least five magmatic events which cannot at present be surely ordinated in time: a) the emplacement of the

  15. Petrology of the freetown layered complex, Sierra Leone: part II. Magma evolution and crystallisation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalokwu, C. I.

    2001-04-01

    The Freetown Layered Complex, Sierra Leone, is a 65 km long, 14 km wide and 7 km thick tholeiitic intrusion, which had been intruded in the West African Craton during the Jurassic (˜ 190 Ma) opening of the middle Atlantic Ocean. The complex consists of four zones of rhythmically layered sequences of Pl+Ol+Aug±Tmt-Ol+Opx+Pgt+Ol-Pgt. Cumulus inverted pigeonite first appeared at the bottom of Zone 2 before disappearing in the middle of Zone 3 only to reappear at the top of Zone 4 with cumulus titanomagnetite. Calculated emplacement pressures, based on the compositions of coexisting plagioclase-pyroxene and the CaTs reaction, range from 2.8 to 5.1 kbar. Two-pyroxene geothermometer gives crystallisation temperatures of 972-1305 ± 70°C, which compare favourably with temperatures estimated from O isotope thermometers (1040-1290 ± 60°C) and plagioclase-liquid thermometers (1045-1381°C) applied to the Freetown bulk composition and obtained by geochemical summation for each zone. Fe-Ti oxides have all re-equilibrated during subsolidus cooling of the complex, but yield fO 2 between quartz-fayalite-magnetite and wüstite-magnetite buffers at high pressure. Silica activity, based on the En = Fo + SiO 2 equilibrium, has been calculated for the entire stratigraphic section. Instead of a progressive increase from the bottom to the top of the complex, values of silica activity fluctuate within the zones, with major decreases corresponding to levels of new magma additions or the arrival of cumulus titanomagnetite. Stratigraphic summation of whole rock chemical composition of cumulates for zones 2-4, weighted according to the average density of the zones, indicates the zones were produced by multiple injection of high alumina (18.38-20.47 wt%) low Ti (0.46-0.70 wt%) hypersthene-normative tholeiites with moderately high activities of silica. Numerical simulation using the COMAGMAT computer algorithm indicates zone 4 bulk composition, interpreted as approximating the parental

  16. Petrology, geochemistry, and geochronology of trondhjemites from the Qori Complex, Neyriz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlnia, Abdolnaser; Schenk, Volker; van der Straaten, François; Mirmohammadi, Mirsaleh

    2009-10-01

    Metamorphism, magmatism, and thrusting were the result of subduction of Neotethys beneath the continental-margin arc of the Sanandaj-Sirjan shear zone (SSSZ) during the Mesozoic. The Qori metamorphic complex is a part of the southern SSSZ. Leuco-granitic (trondhjemitic) rocks crop out in the Qori metamorphic complex and are rare rock types in the SSSZ. These rocks have intruded into the marbles and garnet amphibolites, the highest grade metamorphic rocks of the Qori metamorphic complex, and in some outcrops, a transitional boundary between the amphibolites and the granitoids can be distinguished. The granitoids are granular in texture and consist of plagioclase (albite-oligoclase), quartz ± K-feldspar ±muscovite and subordinate garnet, spinel, rutile, and apatite which primarily occur as inclusions in the main phases. The peraluminous trondhjemitic rocks are enriched in Na 2O and SiO 2 and depleted in FeO, MgO, and CaO. Similarities with some trondhjemitic liquids produced through partial melting of amphibolites or hydrous basalts (i.e., low-Al 2O 3 content, less than 15 wt.%; low Ba, Sr, TiO 2, and Eu content, all with negative anomalies; moderately enriched LREEs and Y, and flat HREE patterns) suggest that the evolution of the parental magma was controlled by residual plagioclases during partial melting of a garnet amphibolite source. Concentrations of ferromagnesian elements, Mg, Fe, and Mn, are low, suggesting that the granitic rocks were not produced by high degrees of partial melting. Furthermore, they display low amounts of ferromagnesian components from the protolith (garnet amphibolite). This is supported by consideration of compatible elements, especially Cr, Ni and Ti (and the less robust HREE), which respectively show very high and high bulk partition coefficients for relatively small degrees (< 20%) of partial melting of the source. The partial melting of the garnet amphibolites occurred at pressures and temperatures between 7.5 and 9.5 kbar (at a

  17. Petrogenesis of the Sabongari alkaline complex, cameroon line (central Africa): Preliminary petrological and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njonfang, Emmanuel; Tchoneng, Gilbert Tchuenté; Cozzupoli, Domenico; Lucci, Federico

    2013-07-01

    The petrography, mineral chemistry and geochemical features of the Sabongari alkaline complex are presented and discussed in this paper with the aim of constraining its petrogenesis and comparing it with other alkaline complexes of the Cameroon Line. The complex is mainly made up of felsic rocks: (i) granites predominate and include pyroxene-amphibole (the most abundant), amphibole-biotite, biotite and pyroxene types; (ii) syenites are subordinate and comprise amphibole-pyroxene and amphibole-biotite quartz syenites; (iii) pyroxene-amphibole-biotite trachyte and (iv) relatively abundant rhyolite. The minor basic and intermediate terms associated with felsic rocks consist of basanites, microdiorite and monzodioites. Two groups of pyroxene bearing rocks are distinguished: a basanite-trachyte-granite (Group 1) bimodal series (SiO2 gap: 44 and 63 wt.%) and a basanite-microdiorite-monzodiorite-syenite-granite (Group 2) less pronounced bimodal series (reduced SiO2 gap: 56-67 wt.%). Both are metaluminous to peralkaline whereas felsic rocks bare of pyroxene (Group 3) are metaluminous to peraluminous. The Group 1 basanite is SiO2-undersaturated (modal analcite in the groundmass and 11.04 wt.% normative nepheline); its Ni (240 ppm) and Cr (450 ppm) contents, near mantle values, indicate its most primitive character. The Group 2 basanite is rather slightly SiO2-saturated (1.56 wt.% normative hypersthene), a marker of its high crustal contamination (low Nb/Y-high Rb/Y). The La/Yb and Gd/Yb values of both basanites (1: 19.47 and 2.92; 2: 9.09 and 2.23) suggest their common parental magma composition, and their crystallization through two episodes of partial melting (2% and 3% respectively) of a lherzolite mantle source with <4% residual garnet. The effects of crustal contamination were selectively felt in the values of HFSE/LREE, LREE/LILE and LREE/HFSE ratios, known as indicators. Similar features have been recently obtained in the felsic lavas of the Cameroon Volcanic Line.

  18. Petrological and geochemical constraints on granitoid formation: The Waldoboro Pluton Complex, Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M. . Dept. of Geological Science); Sidle, W.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The Waldoboro Pluton Complex (WPC) comprises seven units ranging from qtz-diorite to aplite. The country rocks are biotite-rich metagraywackes with minor shales mostly belonging to the Proterozoic Z-Ordovician Bucksport Formation. Field evidence strongly suggests that the WPC formed in-situ: contacts with the country rock are cryptic, transitional and concordant; restitic minerals in the granitoids are identical to those in the country rocks; prolific metasedimentary enclaves in the WPC are locally derived. Major and trace element data for country rock and the most voluminous units of the WPC define consistent linear trends suggesting limited melt segregation and retention of a high proportion of restite. Mixing models and partial melting models require 54--76% melting for generation of the gneissic granites and two-mica granites. Garnet-biotite geothermometry and garnet-Al[sub 2]SiO[sub 5]-SiO[sub 2]-plagioclase geobarometry indicate that the WPC formed at T = 740--780 C and P = 0.4--0.7 GPa. Published experimental data show that < 50% melting is likely under these conditions if melting is controlled by dehydration reactions. Bucksport lithologies contain < 20% biotite, suggesting that the maximum amount of melt that could have formed by dehydration melting is < 20%, even if all biotite was consumed during melting. It seems probable that a free fluid phase was required to generate the WPC. Migmatization is apparent in all lithologies (including amphibolites) in the vicinity of the WPC, consistent with fluid-present melting. Fluid may have ingressed along the St. George thrust, but the source of the fluid is unknown.

  19. A petrological and geochemical study of the Surna Nappe (Seve Nappe Complex?) in the Central Scandinavian Caledonides, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, Silvia; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Gasser, Deta

    2016-04-01

    The Seve Nappe Complex, mainly outcropping and investigated in Sweden, comprises relics of Ordovician HP and UHP metamorphic rocks, which were overprinted by upper amphibolite facies metamorphism and anataxis during the Silurian. In Norway, in the hinterland of the Caledonian orogen, rocks of the Surna and Blåhø nappes are generally correlated with the Seve Nappe Complex. However, no detailed metamorphic studies are available from these units to compare it with the Seve Nappe Complex. The Surna and Blåhø nappes are located between the oceanic-derived Støren nappe and the continentally-derived Sætra nappe. Due to a strong post-Caledonian extensional and transtensional overprint and a close proximity to the MTFC (Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex, a prominent post-Caledonian strike-slip fault complex) investigations of the early metamorphic history of the Surna and Blåhø nappes are challenging. In this contribution we present the results of a petrological and geochemical study of the Surna Nappe, from a ca. 10 km wide transect across this nappe west of Trondheim in Norway. The nappe is lithologically very heterogenous, consisting of quartz-rich mica-schists, amphibole-garnet-mica-schists, amphibolites, calcsilicates as well as pegmatites. Geochemically, the whole rock compositions vary from ultrabasic to acidic, but a distinction between metavolcanic and metasedimentary origin of the lithologies is not always straightforward. Although there are metabasic rocks present they do not show a mineral assemblage with a relic eclogite facies. Garnet occurs in several lithologies and is used together with plagioclase and biotite for conventional geothermobarometry using the TWQ and PET software tools. Additionally, Zr-in-rutile and garnet-biotite thermometers were applied. PT calculations from 18 different samples reveal PT conditions of 600 to 700°C and pressures of 10 to 16 kbar. The elevated phengite content in muscovite (Si up to 3.28) in a few samples may indicate

  20. Petrology, geochemistry and geochronology of the magmatic suite from the Jianzha Complex, central China: Petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Mo, Xuanxue; Bader, Thomas; Scheltens, Mark; Yu, Xuehui; Dong, Guochen; Huang, Xiongfei

    2014-12-01

    The intermediate-mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Jianzha Complex (JZC) at the northern margin of the West Qinling Orogenic Belt have been interpreted to be a part of an ophiolite suite. In this study, we present new geochronological, petrological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data and provide a different interpretation. The JZC is composed of dunite, wehrlite, olivine clinopyroxenite, olivine gabbro, gabbro, and pyroxene diorite. The suite shows characteristics of Alaskan-type complexes, including (1) the low CaO concentrations in olivine; (2) evidence of crystal accumulation; (3) high calcic composition of clinopyroxene; and (4) negative correlation between FeOtot and Cr2O3 of spinels. Hornblende and phlogopite are ubiquitous in the wehrlites, but minor orthopyroxene is also present. Hornblende and biotite are abundant late crystallized phases in the gabbros and diorites. The two pyroxene-bearing diorite samples from JZC yield zircon U-Pb ages of 245.7 ± 1.3 Ma and 241.8 ± 1.3 Ma. The mafic and ultramafic rocks display slightly enriched LREE patterns. The wehrlites display moderate to weak negative Eu anomalies (0.74-0.94), whereas the olivine gabbros and gabbros have pronounced positive Eu anomalies. Diorites show slight LREE enrichment, with (La/Yb)N ratios ranging from 4.42 to 7.79, and moderate to weak negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.64-0.86). The mafic and ultramafic rocks from this suite are characterized by negative Nb-Ta-Zr anomalies as well as positive Pb anomalies. Diorites show pronounced negative Ba, Nb-Ta and Ti spikes, and typical Th-U, K and Pb peaks. Combined with petrographic observations and chemical variations, we suggest that the magmatism was dominantly controlled by fractional crystallization and crystal accumulation, with limited crustal contamination. The arc-affinity signature and weekly negative to moderately positive εNd(t) values (-2.3 to 1.2) suggest that these rocks may have been generated by partial melting of the juvenile

  1. Transient Spectroscopic Characterization of the Genesis of a Ruthenium Complex Catalyst Supported on Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Isao; Gates, Bruce C.

    2010-01-12

    A mononuclear ruthenium complex anchored to dealuminated zeolite HY, Ru(acac)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sup 2+} (acac = acetylacetonate, C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sup 2}{sup -}), was characterized in flow reactors by transient infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Ru K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The combined results show how the supported complex was converted into a form that catalyzes ethene conversion to butene. The formation of these species resulted from the removal of acac ligands from the ruthenium (as shown by IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra) and the simultaneous decrease in the symmetry of the ruthenium complex, with the ruthenium remaining mononuclear and its oxidation state remaining essentially unchanged (as shown by EXAFS and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra). The removal of anionic acac ligands from the ruthenium was evidently compensated by the bonding of other anionic ligands, such as hydride from H2 in the feed stream, to form species suggested to be Ru(H)(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +}, which is coordinatively unsaturated and inferred to react with ethene, leading to the observed formation of butene in a catalytic process.

  2. Petrology of the Motaghairat mafic-ultramafic complex, Eastern Desert, Egypt: A high-Mg post-collisional extension-related layered intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Halim, Ali H.; Helmy, Hassan M.; Abd El-Rahman, Yasser M.; Shibata, Tomoyuki; El Mahallawi, Mahmoud M.; Yoshikawa, Masako; Arai, Shoji

    2016-02-01

    The geodynamic settings of the Precambrian mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Eastern Desert of Egypt have important bearing on understanding the geotectonic evolution of the Arabian Nubian Shield. We present a detailed petrological study on a layered mafic-ultramafic intrusion that is located at the contact between the Precambrian continental crust and the Miocene Red Sea oceanic crust. The Motaghairat layered intrusion consists of basal lherzolite, orthopyroxenite, troctolite, olivine gabbro and anorthosite on the top. Variations in modal mineralogy and mineral chemistry along with the chemical composition of these units suggest their derivation from a common high-Mg tholeiitic parent melt through fractional crystallization processes. The parental magma was derived from a metasomatised mantle source. The primitive mantle-normalized patterns of the calculated melts exhibit enrichment in U relative to Th and Ba relative LREE which indicate that the enriched lithospheric mantle source was metasomatised by fluids derived from a subducted oceanic crust rather than by a sediment melt. Geological and petrological evidences suggest that the layered Motaghairat intrusion was emplaced during post-orogenic extension following subduction break-off and lithospheric delamination after the collision between the amalgamated island arc terranes and the Saharan Metacraton. The heat source required to melt the metasomatised lithospheric mantle was derived from the upwelling of hot asthenosphere after the subduction-break-off.

  3. Foliated breccias in the active Portuguese Bend landslide complex, California: bearing on melange genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Larue, D.K.; Hudleston, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    The active portion of the Portuguese Bend landslide complex is approximately 3 km/sup 2/ in area and 30-50 m thick. Measured displacement rates range from less than one to greater than 30 mm/day on different parts of the landslide, with total displacements over the last 30 yrs ranging from about 10 to greater than 150 m. Six types of breccia, each locally with a foliated matrix, were recognized in the active landslide complex and are absent outside the landslide complex. Slide-body breccias are of two types, the first formed by extensional fracturing during bulk pure shear at the top of the landslide (slide-top breccia) and the second by flow of tuffaceous shales and fracture of embedded siliceous shales during simple shear deep in the landslide to the basal decollement (slide-bottom breccias). Slide-margin breccias, also in simple shear, are produced on the lateral margins of individual slide blocks accompanying wrench-fault motion. Other breccias (fault-ramp breccias) are formed during motion over ramps. Colluvial deposits within tension gashes (crack-fill breccias) and at the toe of the slide (slide-toe breccias) represent a fifth breccia type. Diapirs originating from over-pressured zones at the slide base also contain breccia. Recognition of different breccia types in ancient rocks would be difficult, because fabrics in the different types are similar. Foliations are defined by: scaly cleavage, compositional banding and color banding (in shear zones), stretched mud clasts, and aligned hard grains. Foliated breccias are synonymous with melanges. The authors regard the six breccia types described herein as representing the principal types of melange that occur in ancient accretionary settings.

  4. [IMPACT OF RONCOLEUKIN ON BALANCE OF CYTOKINS IN COMPLEX TREATMENT OF OBTURATION JAUNDICE OF NONTUMORAL GENESIS].

    PubMed

    Gajiyev, J N; Tagiyev, E G; Gadjiyev, N J

    2016-02-01

    The results of surgical treatment of 137 patients, suffering obturation jaundice of non-tumoral etiology, were analyzed. In all the patients the cause of obturation jaundice was choledocholithiasis. Roncoleukin was infused intravenously additionally in a complex of therapy. A degree of hepatic dysfunction was determined, taking into account the cholestasis markers. In 23 patients purulent cholangitis have occurred on background of obturation jaundice. Concentration of cytokins TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 in sera were determined, using immunoassay analysis. The cytokins dysbalance severity preoperatively and dynamics of its changes have depended upon the hepatic dysbalance degree and presence of purulent cholangitis; a dysbalance is deeper, when the hepatic dysfunction is higher. Application of pathogenetically substantiated purposeful cytokinotherapy, including roncoleukin, have promoted the cytokins dysbalance elimination and improvement of the patients treatment results. PMID:27244913

  5. A Mantle Genesis for Andesitic Melts of the Shisheisky Complex, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinsk, G.; Bryant, J.; Churikova, T.

    2008-12-01

    Primitive andesites from the Shisheisky Complex, a field of Quaternary-age, monogenetic cones located in the Aleutian-Kamchatka junction, north of Shiveluch Volcano (Portnyagin et al., 2007 Geoph. Monograph 172), are similar to primitive andesites from Mt. Shasta, Piip Volcano, and Setouchi, Japan. They have Mg numbers of 0.66-0.73 at intermediate SiO2 (54-58 wt%), low CaO/Al2O3 (<0.54), and high Ni (184-243 ppm) and Cr (418-880 ppm). Olivine phenocryst core compositions of Fo90 appear to be in equilibrium with whole-rock "melts", consistent with the aphyric to sparsely phyric nature of the lavas. Compared to the Shisheisky andesites, primitive basalts from the region (Alaid, Tolbachik, Kharchinsky) have higher CaO/Al2O3 (0.69-0.86) and lower whole-rock Ni/MgO (10-17) at similar Mg numbers (0.66-.70). Olivine phenocrysts in the basalts have high CaO, low Ni, and low Ni/MgO at Fo88 compared to the andesites. The absence of plagioclase phenocrysts from the primitive andesites strongly contrasts petrographic observations of the plagioclase-phyric basalts, indicating relatively high pre-eruptive water contents for the andesites compared to the basalts. Estimated temperature and water contents range from 984° - 1143° C and 4-7 wt% H2O for andesites and 1149° -1227° C and 2 wt% H2O for basalts. Petrographic and mineral composition data suggest that the primitive andesites were liquids in equilibrium with mantle peridotite, and were not produced by mixing between basalts and rhyolites, contamination of xenocrystic olivine, or crystal fractionation of basalt. Instead, the key features of the Shisheisky primitive andesites appear to have been acquired by interactions between eclogite melts of the torn Pacific plate edge and mantle peridotite. Mixing between these reacted melts and primitive basalts at sub-moho depths produces the range of compositions observed in the Shisheisky lavas.

  6. Geophysical and petrological modelling of the structure and composition of the crust and upper mantle in complex geodynamic settings: The Tyrrhenian Sea and surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panza, G. F.; Peccerillo, A.; Aoudia, A.; Farina, B.

    2007-01-01

    Information on the physical and chemical properties of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system (LAS) can be obtained by geophysical investigation and by studies of petrology-geochemistry of magmatic rocks and entrained xenoliths. Integration of petrological and geophysical studies is particularly useful in geodynamically complex areas characterised by abundant and compositionally variable young magmatism, such as in the Tyrrhenian Sea and surroundings. A thin crust, less than 10 km, overlying a soft mantle (where partial melting can reach about 10%) is observed for Magnaghi, Vavilov and Marsili, which belong to the Central Tyrrhenian Sea backarc volcanism where subalkaline rocks dominate. Similar characteristics are seen for the uppermost crust of Ischia. A crust about 20 km thick is observed for the majority of the continental volcanoes, including Amiata-Vulsini, Roccamonfina, Phlegraean Fields-Vesuvius, Vulture, Stromboli, Vulcano-Lipari, Etna and Ustica. A thicker crust is present at Albani - about 25 km - and at Cimino-Vico-Sabatini — about 30 km. The structure of the upper mantle, in contrast, shows striking differences among various volcanic provinces. Volcanoes of the Roman region (Vulsini-Sabatini-Alban Hills) sit over an upper mantle characterised by Vs mostly ranging from about 4.2 to 4.4 km/s. At the Alban Hills, however, slightly lower Vs values of about 4.1 km/s are detected between 60 and 120 km of depth. This parallels the similar and rather homogeneous compositional features of the Roman volcanoes, whereas the lower Vs values detected at the Alban Hills may reflect the occurrence of small amounts of melts within the mantle, in agreement with the younger age of this volcano. The axial zone of the Apennines, where ultrapotassic kamafugitic volcanoes are present, has a mantle structure with high-velocity lid ( Vs ˜ 4.5 km/s) occurring at the base of a 40-km-thick crust. Beneath the Campanian volcanoes of Vesuvius and Phlegraean Fields, the mantle

  7. Influence of contrasting aspect, lithology, and vegetation on saprolite genesis in complex terrain: Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klos, P. Z.; Link, T. E.; Durrett, W.; Heinse, R.; Seyfried, M. S.; Leonard, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    This study employs a variety of geophysical, biological, hydrological, and pedological methods to expand on the understanding of how contrasting aspects, lithologies, and vegetation influence critical zone structure and evolution. We performed shallow seismic refraction (SSR) and time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys across two geologically distinct valleys within the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory in southwestern Idaho. We also quantified vegetation density, soil pH, and subsurface stratigraphy (by manual sampling) across opposing north-facing (forested) and south-facing (unforested) aspects to better understand the relationship between lithology, vegetation, seasonal moisture dynamics, and saprolite genesis within the critical zone. The first study sub-site, Upper Johnston Draw, resides on late Cretaceous granitic bedrock associated with the Idaho Batholith. The second study sub-site, Upper Sheep Creek, resides on Miocene basaltic bedrock. In the granitic Upper Johnston Draw there is a sharp contrast in depth to unweathered bedrock (regolith thickness) between the north-facing aspect (average depth of 18.6 m) and the south-facing aspect (average depth of 8.2 m). In the basaltic Upper Sheep Creek there is only a marginal contrast in depth to unweathered bedrock between the north-facing aspect (average depth of 14.4 m) and the south-facing aspect (average depth of 12.0 m). These observed relationships between the contrasting lithologies of Upper Johnston Draw and Upper Sheep Creek, coupled with our time-lapse ERT surveys, vegetation density tests, soil pH tests, and subsurface augering data, provide new understanding about the causes of symmetry or asymmetry in saprolite development on north-facing and south-facing slopes. Specifically, these findings suggest that abiotic chemical weathering via hydrolysis may be the dominant control creating the symmetrical pattern of saprolite genesis (north vs. south aspects) observed within the

  8. Assessment of Petrological Microscopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathison, Charter Innes

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a set of procedures designed to check the design, ergonomics, illumination, function, optics, accessory equipment, and image quality of a microscope being considered for purchase. Functions for use in a petrology or mineralogy laboratory are stressed. (CW)

  9. The Beginnings of Experimental Petrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eugster, Hans P.

    1971-01-01

    An account of Van't Hoff's change from theoretical chemistry to petrology provides data on the European intellectual climate of the early 1900's and shows how his work laid the foundation for experimental petrology of hard rocks." (AL)

  10. Petrology and Geochemistry of New Ureilites and Ureilite Genesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Herrin, J. S.; Downes, H.

    2007-01-01

    Ureilites are C-bearing, basalt-depleted olivine+pyroxene achondrites from a differentiated asteroid. The group is heterogeneous, exhibiting ranges in O isotopic composition, Fe/Mg, Fe/Mn, pyx/ol, siderophile and lithophile trace element content, and C content and isotopic composition [1]. Some of these characteristics are nebular in origin; others were strongly overprinted by asteroidal igneous processes. The consensus view is that most ureilites are melt-residues, but some are partial cumulates or have interacted with a melt [1,2]. An "unroofing" event occurred while the parent asteroid was hot that froze in mineral core com-positions and resulted in FeO reduction at olivine grain margins. We have studied several new ureilites, but will focus here on two anomalous stones; LAR 04315 and NWA 1241. LAR 04315 is texturally unusual. It contains olivine with angular subdomains, and low-Ca pyroxene riddled with wormy inclusions of metal+troilite, graphite, and possibly other phases, and irregular inclusions of high-Ca pyroxene. Reduction occurred along olivine grain margins and internal fractures, but not along subdomain boundaries. Although texturally odd, LAR 04351 is a typical ureilite in mineral and bulk composition. The olivine is Fo80.8 and falls on the ureilite Fe/Mn-Fe/Mg trend. Its olivine composition falls within the range of the majority of ureilites, and it is typical of these ureilites in bulk rock lithophile and siderophile element contents.

  11. Stratigraphy, petrology, and geochemistry of the Spurr Volcanic Complex, eastern Aleutian Arc, Alaska. [(Appendix for geothermal fluid chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    The Spurr Volcanic Complex (SVC) is a calcalkaline, medium-K, sequence of andesites erupted over the last quarter of a million years by the easternmost currently active volcanic center in the Aleutian Arc. The ancestral Mt. Spurr was built mostly of andesites of uniform composition (58 to 60% SiO/sub 2/), although andesite production was episodically interrupted by the introduction of new batches of more mafic magma. Near the end of the Pleistocene the ancestral Mt. Spurr underwent Bezyianny-type avalanche caldera formation, resulting in the production of a volcanic debris avalanche with overlying ashflows. Immediately afterward, a large dome (the present Mt. Spurr) was emplaced in the caldera. Both the ashflows and dome are made of acid andesite more silicic than any analyzed lavas from the ancestral Mt. Spurr (60 to 63% SiO/sub 2/), yet contain olivine and amphibole xenocrysts derived from more mafic magma. The mafic magma (53 to 57% SiO/sub 2/) erupted during and after dome emplacement, forming proto-Crater Peak and Crater Peak. Hybrid pyroclastic flows and lavas were also produced. Proto-Crater Peak underwent glacial dissection prior to the formation of Crater Peak in approximately the same location. Appendices II through VIII contain a summary of mineral compositions; Appendix I contains geochemical data. Appendix IX by R.J. Motyka and C.J. Nye describes the chemistry of geothermal fluids. 78 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Plutonic ultramafic-mafic complexes of the Vel'may terrane, eastern Chukotka (Russia): first petrological results and preliminary geodynamic interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledneva, G. V.; Bazylev, B. A.; Kuzmin, D.; Ishiwatari, A.; Kononkova, N. N.; Sokolov, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    The Vel'may terrane (eastern Chukotka) is commonly considered as a continuity of the South Anyui Suture (SAS) zone (western Chukotka) and the Angaucham terrane (Brooks Range, Alaska), which marks the southern boundary of the Arctic Alaska - Chukotka displaced continental microplate (AACM). The correlation of terranes bounding the microplate is based on findings of similar upper Triassic (Norian) faunas (Tynankergav, Bychkov, 1987; Sokolov et al., 2009) and the ubiquitous occurrence of ultramafic-mafic plutonic complexes attributed to be ophiolite fragments. However, plutonic complexes of the Vel'may terrane haven't been petrologically investigated till now. In the study area they spatially associate with upper Jurassic-lower Cretaceous deposits of the Cross Bay zone and upper Triassic sequences of the Kolyuchinskaya Bay zone. In the Cross Bay zone ultramafic and mafic rocks compose small tectonic slices and are represented by non-spreading subduction-related restite spinel harzburgites and shallow-level plagioclase peridotite and gabbro cumulates (crystallization pressure is estimated at 3.5±1 and 1.5±1 kb ((Schmidt, 1992), respectively) closely resembling fragments of an ophiolitic assemblage. In the Kolyuchinskaya Bay zone tectonic slices of ultramafic and mafic rocks are dominated by clinopyroxene-bearing dunites, hornblende wehrlites/olivine clinopyroxenites and hornblende gabbros. This rocks are high-pressure cumulates (crystallization pressure is estimated at 8±1 kb (Schmidt, 1992)) of lower crustal magma-chambers originated in a mature island-arc or an Andean-type active continental margins. Remnants of subduction-related ophiolite and magma-chambers are typical of sutures indicative of an arc-continent collision; and they occur widely in the SAS zone (Lychagin, 1985; Ganelin, Sylantyev, 2008) and the Angayucham terrane (Loney, Himmelberg, 1989). Thus, the Vel'may terrane can be considered as a possible marker of the AACM boundary. This work was supported

  13. The Late Miocene Quaternary Antofalla volcanic complex, southern Puna, NW Argentina: Protracted history, diverse petrology, and economic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Jeremy P.; Ullrich, Thomas; Kerrich, Robert

    2006-04-01

    The Antofalla volcanic complex (AVC) is located on the southern Puna plateau of NW Argentina, ˜100 km east of the main axis of the Cordillera Occidental volcanic arc. It lies on the NW-SE Archibarca lineament, one of several transverse structures that cut across the Andes from Chile, and divert arc magmatism in SE-trending fingers across the Puna. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of volcanic products from the AVC reveals a protracted magmatic history from 10.9 to ≤ 1.6 Ma. Initial volcanism was characterized by eruption of voluminous rhyolitic ignimbrites, deposited directly onto exposed crystalline basement and supracrustal sedimentary rocks. These rhyolites record significant geochemical evidence for crustal contamination, or derivation by crustal melting, which decreases upwards through the pyroclastic sequence. They were followed by extrusion of potassic lavas of the shoshonite-latite-trachydacite suite from 10.1 to 9.5 Ma. Subsequent magmatism (9.1-1.6 Ma) was of basaltic andesite-andesite-dacite composition, with localized, smaller volume, dacitic and rhyolitic ignimbrites. Monogenetic basaltic andesite cinder cones and lava flows were erupted in the Quaternary in response to a change to transtensional tectonics in the Puna. The volcanic sequence is interpreted to record the early development of a lower crustal MASH zone at ˜11 Ma, where mantle-derived arc magmas interacted extensively with felsic lower crustal rocks to produce evolved shoshonitic compositions, and crustal melts that erupted to form rhyolitic ignimbrites (common at this time throughout the Puna). After establishment of a steady-state MASH zone by ˜9 Ma, subsequent basaltic andesite-andesite magmas show less evidence of felsic crustal contamination, and may have developed largely by interaction with previous ultramafic-mafic fractionates of early magmas in the lower crust. More felsic dacitic magmas appear to have evolved largely by fractional crystallization from basaltic andesites and andesites, with

  14. Petrology of the Guenfalabo ring-complex: An example of a complete series along the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL), Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donald Ngonge, E.; Hollanda, Maria Helena B. M.; Nsifa, E. Nkonguin; Tchoua, Felix M.

    2014-08-01

    In the Guenfalabo ring-complex (GRC), two non-comagmatic rock suites have been identified as a result of two volcanic episodes: Suite 1 (68.8 ± 1.7 Ma by K/Ar on trachyte) of peralkaline trachytes and pantellerites cogenetic with alkaline syenites, granites and rhyolitic flows and tuffs; Suite 2 (62 ± 2 Ma by K/Ar on basalt), a bimodal and complete series of alkali olivine basalts and associated microgabbro dykes, diorites, syenites and granites, cross-cutting the former. Kaersutite in the trachytes of Suite 1 has mantle-derived signatures: TiO2 > 4%, MgO < 15%, FeO > 8%, Ti = 0.63 c.p.f.u. and Al = 2, characteristic of kaersutites of HP and HT origin: 13-23 kbar, 1100-1220 °C. The trachytes are probably products of FC of a basaltic parent that did not attain higher crustal levels. The Suite 1 rocks are enriched in Rb, K, Zr, Nb, LREE, alkalis, and (Ce/Yb)N = 7-15 probably due to some effect of metasomatism during the magma ascension. Fe-Ti enrichment is corroborated by the presence of ferropseudobrookite-ilmenite-ulvospinel in the syenites and ilmenite in the pantellerite. The Rb/Ba > 1 in the trachytes (2.44, 26.7), pantellerite (6.33), alkaline granites (0.63-1.8) and the 87Sr/86Sr in the alkaline granites (=0.74060) depict the role of AFC. The ankaramites of the Suite 2 rocks are olivine-phyric (25%), Fo85-88, have 50-52% clinopyroxene (salite), 5% plagioclase (An55-36) and 7% Fe-Ti oxides. Trace element modeling indicates an origin from a basaltic magma of about 25% PM of spinel lherzolite mixed with a magma from <1% PM of garnet lherzolite (3-4% garnet) in a proportion of 1:4. The cogenetic alkali basalts and the microgabbro-diorite-syenite-granite that constitute the Suite 2 rocks, with a Daly gap of 54% > SiO2 < 58%, result from this Early Cenozoic magmatic event. The basalts have: Zr = 225-253, Nb = 98-111, Y = 33-56, typical of FOZO, a HIMU-type OIB related magmas (Sr/Sri = 0.70202-0.7034; Nd/Nd = 0.51282-0.512545; 206Pb/204Pb = 19.13, 207Pb/204Pb = 15

  15. Geology, petrology and geochronology of the Lago Grande layered complex: Evidence for a PGE-mineralized magmatic suite in the Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Antonio Sales; Ferreira Filho, Cesar Fonseca; Giustina, Maria Emilia Schutesky Della; Araújo, Sylvia Maria; da Silva, Heloisa Helena Azevedo Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    ultramafic lithotypes render Nd model ages between 2.94 and 3.56 Ga, with variably negative ɛNd (T = 2.72 Ga) values (-0.32 to -4.25). The crystallization sequence of the intrusion and the composition of cumulus minerals, together with lithogeochemical and Nd isotopic results, are consistent with an original mantle melt contaminated with older continental crust. The contamination of mafic magma with sialic crust is also consistent with intra-plate rifting models proposed in several studies of the CMP. Lithogeochemical and isotopic data from the Lago Grande Complex may also be interpreted as the result of melting an old lithospheric mantle, and alternative models should not be disregarded. PGE mineralizations occur in chromitites and associated with base metal sulfides in the Lago Grande Complex. Chromitite has the highest PGE content (up to 10 ppm) and is characterized by high Pt/Pd ratio (4.3). Mantle-normalized profile of chromitite is highly enriched in PPGE and similar to those from Middle Group (MG) and Upper Group (UG) chromitites from the Bushveld Complex. Platinum group minerals (PGM) occur mainly at the edge of chromite crystals in the Lago Grande chromitite, consisting of arsenides and sulfo-arsenides. Sulfide-bearing harzburgite samples of the Lago Grande complex have PGE content of up to 1 ppm and low Pt/Pd (0.2-0.3) ratios. The 2722 ± 53 Ma U-Pb zircon age determined in this study for the Lago Grande Complex overlaps with the crystallization age of the Luanga Complex. Previous interpretation that the Lago Grande and Luanga layered intrusions are part of a magmatic suite (i.e., Serra Leste Magmatic Suite) is now reinforced by similar fractionation sequences, comparable petrological evolution and overlapped U-Pb zircon ages. The occurrence of the same styles of PGE mineralization in the Lago Grande and Luanga complexes, together with remarkably similar chondrite-normalized PGE profiles and PGE minerals for chromitites of both complexes, support the concept that

  16. Genesis - the middle years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, K. E.; Smith, N. G.; Wiens, R. C.; Rasbach, C. E.

    2003-01-01

    Genesis is the fifth mission of the Discovery program sponsored by NASA. The objective of Genesis is the return of pristine solar wind samples to Earth to expand the understanding of how planets, asteroids, and comets were formed from our original solar nebula.

  17. Petrologic and Chemical Characterization of a Suite of Antarctic Diogenites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Mertzman, S. A.; Peng, Z. X.; Mertzman, K. R.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of diogenites, ultramafic cumulates related to eucrites, is an unresolved problem [1]. Most diogenites are orthopyroxenites, a few are harzburgites [2], and some are transitional to cumulate eucrites [1, 3]. Cumulate eucrites are gabbros formed by crystal fractionation from basaltic eucrites [4]. The consensus view is that basaltic eucrites are residual melts from global-magma-ocean crystallization on their parent asteroid [4] which is plausibly Vesta [5]. However, the petrologic and compositional characteristics of diogenites seem to preclude a magma ocean origin [1, 4]. We are doing a petrologic and chemical study of new or unusual diogenites with the ultimate goals of constraining their genesis, and the geologic evolution of Vesta.

  18. Polymetamorphic evolution of the upper part of the Iezer Complex (Leaota Massif, South Carpathians) constrained by petrological data and monazite ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negulescu, Elena; Săbău, Gavril; Massonne, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    The Leaota Massif in Romania consists of a flat-lying sequence of five structurally concordant units displaying mutual and partly internal lithologic and metamorphic contrasts. The lower part of the lithologic sequence is the Iezer Complex, a medium-grade psammopelitic unit with a structurally concordant thin granite sill located at its upper part. The lower limit of the granite is marked discontinuously by hornfels, also present as enclaves, which experienced intense strain and a subsequent low-pressure thermal overprint. Both granite and hornfels were affected by a medium-temperature, medium- to high-pressure event (Săbău, 2000). This event was also identified in gneisses below the hornfels. These rocks contain the assemblage garnet-phengite-chloritoid-kyanite which had overprinted an older garnet-kyanite-staurolite-biotite-muscovite assemblage. Available U-Th zircon ages indicate 472.7 ± 7.3 Ma (Balintoni et al. 2009) for the granite. Monazite geochronology (Săbău & Negulescu, 2013) reveals for the associated hornfels (1) inherited ages of 528 ± 17.86 Ma overprinted by pervasive Ordovician contact metamorphism (462 ± 4.54 Ma), slightly postdating the age of magmatic zircon in the granite, (2) Silurian to Early Devonian recrystallization episodes, and (3) a Variscan medium- to high-pressure metamorphic overprint responsible for the garnet-phengite-kyanite assemblage. New petrological and geochronological data constraining the polymetamorphic evolution of the upper part of the Iezer Complex were acquired from kyanite-garnet mylonitic gneisses made up of large garnet porphyroclasts embedded in a strongly deformed matrix. Large garnets are rich in quartz, phengite, epidote, kyanite, rutile, and ilmenite inclusions. Biotite, chlorite, apatite, monazite, and Al-cerite inclusions are also present. Garnet porphyroclasts are wrapped by laminae of small garnet - white mica - biotite - quartz or zoisite - kyanite - plagioclase alternating with bands made up of fine

  19. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  20. Petrology of blueschist from the Western Himalaya (Ladakh, NW India): Exploring the complex behavior of a lawsonite-bearing system in a paleo-accretionary setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppo, Chiara; Rolfo, Franco; Sachan, Himanshu K.; Rai, Santosh K.

    2016-05-01

    Although the Himalaya is the archetype of collisional orogens, formed as a consequence of the closure of the Neo-Tethyan ocean separating India from Asia, high-pressure metamorphic rocks are rare. Beside few eclogites, corresponding to the metamorphosed continental Indian crust dragged below Asia or underthrusted beneath southern Tibet, blueschists occur seldom along the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture zone, i.e. the suture marking the India-Asia collision. These blueschists, mostly interpreted as related to paleo-accretionary prisms formed in response to the subduction of the Neo-Tethyan ocean below the Asian plate, are crucial for constraining the evolution of the India-Asia convergence zone during the closure of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. In the Western Himalaya, the best occurrence of blueschist is that of the Sapi-Shergol Ophiolitic Mélange in Ladakh. This unit is dominated by volcanoclastic sequences rich in mafic material with subordinate interbedding of metasediments, characterized by very fresh lawsonite blueschist-facies assemblages. In this paper, the lawsonite blueschist-facies metasediments have been petrologically investigated with the aims of (i) constraining the P-T evolution of the Sapi-Shergol Ophiolitic Mélange, (ii) evaluating the influence of Fe2O3 and of H2O on the stability of the high-pressure mineral assemblages, (iii) understanding the processes controlling lawsonite formation and preservation, and (iv) interpreting the P-T evolution of the Sapi-Shergol blueschists in the framework of India-Asia collision. Our results indicate that (i) the Sapi-Shergol blueschists experienced a cold subduction history along a low thermal gradient, up to peak conditions of ca. 470 °C, 19 kbar; furthermore, in order to preserve lawsonite in the studied lithologies, exhumation must have been coupled with significant cooling, i.e. the resulting P-T path is characterized by a clockwise hairpin loop along low thermal gradients (< 8-9 °C/km); (ii) the presence of ferric

  1. Genesis and evolution of mafic and felsic magmas at Quaternary volcanoes within the Main Ethiopian Rift: Insights from Gedemsa and Fanta 'Ale complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, F.; D'Antonio, M.; Civetta, L.; Tonarini, S.; Orsi, G.; Ayalew, D.; Yirgu, G.; Dell'Erba, F.; Di Vito, M. A.; Isaia, R.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation carried out on young volcanic rocks from the Gedemsa and Fanta 'Ale complexes, located in the Main Ethiopian Rift, the site of an intense magmatism since Eocene-Oligocene. The earlier NW-SE direction of extension of the Rift, which generated NE-SW trending faults, rotated around E-W in Quaternary times, and produced the still active N to N-NE Wonji Fault System. The Gedemsa volcano is located in the central part of the Ethiopian Rift, about 100 km SE of Addis Ababa. It is characterized by a wide central caldera, about 8 km in diameter. The general stratigraphic sequence in the area includes, from base upwards, rift-floor ignimbrites, pantelleritic and subordinate trachytic pyroclastic deposits and lava flows and domes, and widespread basaltic deposits. The Fanta 'Ale volcanic complex is located in the northern part of the Main Ethiopian Rift, where the Afar depression begins. It is characterized by a summit caldera of which the diameter is about 4 km. This volcano erupted trachytic and rhyolitic lavas, whereas the most diffuse unit is an ignimbrite related to the caldera collapse. Explosive activity has occurred inside and outside the caldera, forming tuff cones and thick pumice-fallout deposits. The only mafic unit is represented by a basaltic eruption that occurred in 1870 AD. Historical eruptions and intense fumarolic activity are evidence for the persistence activity of the Fanta 'Ale in this part of the Main Ethiopian Rift. New geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data on representative samples from Gedemsa and Fanta 'Ale volcanoes are presented and discussed in order to shed light on the genesis of mafic and felsic magmas, the genetic link between them, and their possible interaction with the local crust. Volcanic rocks show a typical mafic-felsic bi-modal distribution with few intermediate terms (Daly Gap), as observed at regional scale along the Main Ethiopian Rift as well as on the plateau. Geochemical data

  2. Genesis of emulsion texture due to magma mixing: a case study from Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex of Eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Bibhuti; Saikia, Ashima; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2016-04-01

    The emulsion texture is a rare magma mixing feature in which rounded bodies of one magmatic phase remain dispersed in the other coherent phase (Freundt and Schmincke, 1992). This type of special texture in hybrid rocks can significantly contribute toward understanding the mechanisms facilitating magma mixing and magma chamber dynamics involving two disparate magmas as the exact processes by which mixing occurs still remain unclear. Recent developments in microfluidics have greatly helped us to understand the complex processes governing magma mixing occurring at micro-level. Presented work uses some of the results obtained from microfluidic experiments with a view to understand the formation mechanism of emulsions preserved in the hybrid rocks of the Ghansura Rhyolite Dome (GRD) of Proterozoic Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC), Eastern India. The GRD has preserved hybrid rocks displaying emulsion texture that formed due to the interaction of a phenocryst-rich basaltic magma and host rhyolite magma. The emulsions are more or less spherical in shape and dominantly composed of amphibole having biotite rinds set in a matrix of biotite, plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. Amphibole compositions were determined from the core of the emulsions to the rim with a view to check for cationic substitutions. The amphibole constituting the emulsions is actinolite in composition, and commonly shows tschermakite (Ts) and pargasite (Prg) substitutions. From petrographical and mineral-chemical analyses we infer that when mafic magma, containing phenocrysts of augite, came in contact with felsic magma, diffusion of cations like H+, Al3+and others occurred from the felsic to the mafic system. These cations reacted with the clinopyroxene phenocrysts in the mafic magma to form amphibole (actinolite) crystals. The formation of amphibole crystals in the mafic system greatly increased the viscosity of the system allowing the amphibole crystals to venture into the adjacent felsic

  3. Genesis Failure Investigation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John

    2004-01-01

    The-Genesis mission to collect solar-wind samples and return them to Earth for detailed analysis proceeded successfully for 3.5 years. During reentry on September 8, 2004, a failure in the entry, descent and landing sequence resulted in a crash landing of the Genesis sample return capsule. This document describes the findings of the avionics sub-team that supported the accident investigation of the JPL Failure Review Board.

  4. Generalized galilean genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Sakine; Kobayashi, Tsutomu

    2015-03-31

    The galilean genesis scenario is an alternative to inflation in which the universe starts expanding from Minkowski in the asymptotic past by violating the null energy condition stably. Several concrete models of galilean genesis have been constructed so far within the context of galileon-type scalar-field theories. We give a generic, unified description of the galilean genesis scenario in terms of the Horndeski theory, i.e., the most general scalar-tensor theory with second-order field equations. In doing so we generalize the previous models to have a new parameter (denoted by α) which results in controlling the evolution of the Hubble rate. The background dynamics is investigated to show that the generalized galilean genesis solution is an attractor, similarly to the original model. We also study the nature of primordial perturbations in the generalized galilean genesis scenario. In all the models described by our generalized genesis Lagrangian, amplification of tensor perturbations does not occur as opposed to what happens in quasi-de Sitter inflation. We show that the spectral index of curvature perturbations is determined solely from the parameter α and does not depend on the other details of the model. In contrast to the original model, a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of curvature perturbations is obtained for a specific choice of α.

  5. Review and update of the applications of organic petrology: Part 2, geological and multidisciplinary applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel; Flores, Deolinda; Mendonça Filho, João Graciano; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is focused on organic petrology applied to unconventional and multidisciplinary investigations and is the second part of a two part review that describes the geological applications and uses of this branch of earth sciences. Therefore, this paper reviews the use of organic petrology in investigations of: (i) ore genesis when organic matter occurs associated with mineralization; (ii) the behavior of organic matter in coal fires (self-heating and self-combustion); (iii) environmental and anthropogenic impacts associated with the management and industrial utilization of coal; (iv) archeology and the nature and geographical provenance of objects of organic nature such as jet, amber, other artifacts and coal from archeological sites; and (v) forensic science connected with criminal behavior or disasters. This second part of the review outlines the most recent research and applications of organic petrology in those fields.

  6. Origin of rhythmic anorthositic-pyroxenitic layering in the Damiao anorthosite complex, China: Implications for late-stage fractional crystallization and genesis of Fe-Ti oxide ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li-Xing; Li, Hou-Min; Li, Yong-Zhan; Yao, Tong; Yang, Xiu-Qing; Chen, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The ∼1.7 Ga Damiao anorthosite complex (DAC) in the North China Craton contains abundant Ti-magnetite-dominated ore deposits. Both the Fe-Ti-P-rich silicate rocks and massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores occur as discordant late-stage dikes cross-cutting early-stage anorthosites with irregular but sharp boundaries. Field and petrographic observations indicate that some late-stage dikes are composed of unique oxide-apatite gabbronorites (OAGNs), whereas others comprise well-developed alternating late-stage anorthosites and Fe-Ti-P-rich pyroxenites defining rhythmic layers. Massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores are closely related to the Fe-Ti-P-rich pyroxenites. Plagioclase and whole-rock compositions of different rock types were analyzed to constrain the late-stage magma evolution and genesis of the Fe-Ti oxide ores. The similar mineralogical assemblages, REE and HFSE patterns suggest that the different rock types formed by differentiation from a common parental magma. Early-stage anorthosites are characterized by positive Eu anomalies and low REE contents, whereas the late-stage dike-like rocks display no significant Eu anomalies and high REE contents. Plagioclase compositions in the late-stage rocks show a decrease of An contents when compared to that of the early-stage rocks. Based on field relations, petrography and well-defined linear compositional trends, the sequence of crystallization is inferred as: early-stage anorthosites + leuconorites + norites, OAGNs, late-stage anorthosites + Fe-Ti-P-rich pyroxenites + massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores, and massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores. The OAGNs which underwent relatively rapid crystallization represent an early phase during the residual magma evolution after anorthosite separation, whereas the rhythmic layers formed by slow but extensive fractional crystallization of interstitial melt. High solubility of phosphorous played an important role in the formation of rhythmic layering. Massive Fe-Ti-(P) ores crystallized and segregated directly from the magma of Fe

  7. Genesis Preliminary Examination Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, K. M.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of preliminary examination of the Genesis sample collectors is to provide information on the condition and availability of collector materials to the science community as a basis for allocation requests. Similarly, the information will be used by the Genesis Sample Allocation sub-committee of CAPTEM to determine the optimum allocation scheme, and by the Genesis Curator to determine the processing sequence for allocation production. The plan includes a decision process and detailed examination and documentation protocol for whole arrays and individual collectors (wafers, concentrator targets, bulk metallic glass, gold foil, and polished aluminum). It also includes a plan for communicating the information obtained to the scientific community. The plan does not include a detailed plan for preliminary examination of the SRC lid foil collectors, the process for removal of individual collectors from their frames, or for the subsequent subdivision of collector materials for allocation.

  8. Genesis Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; Skipworth, William C.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft launched on 8 August 2001 sampled solar wind environments at L1 from 2001 to 2004. After the Science Capsule door was opened, numerous foils and samples were exposed to the various solar wind environments during periods including slow solar wind from the streamer belts, fast solar wind flows from coronal holes, and coronal mass ejections. The Survey and Examination of Eroded Returned Surfaces (SEERS) program led by NASA's Space Environments and Effects program had initiated access for the space materials community to the remaining Science Capsule hardware after the science samples had been removed for evaluation of materials exposure to the space environment. This presentation will describe the process used to generate a reference radiation Genesis Radiation Environment developed for the SEERS program for use by the materials science community in their analyses of the Genesis hardware.

  9. Petrology of impactites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel'Dman, Vilen I.

    The book reviews results from petrological studies of astroblemes and the astrobleme-forming structures, impactites. Consideration is given to the distribution of astroblemes on earth in time and space and to the morphology and internal structure of astroblemes, as well as to physical processes responsible for the formation of impactites. A catalog of all known astroblemes and their characteristics is constructed. Attention is given to the geochemical, petrographical, and geophysical characteristics of impactites, and a classification scheme is devised by which impactites are classified according to four characteristics: the source of energy in an impactite formation, the environment in which the impactite was formed, the mechanism of impactite formation, and the pressure/temperature parameters at the moment of impactite formation.

  10. Europa's petrological thermal history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransford, G. A.; Finnerty, A. A.; Collerson, K. D.

    1981-01-01

    A path of geophysical development which takes into account the petrological sequence is presented to describe the thermal evolution of Europa. On the basis of considerations of the likely temperature-pressure conditions in the Europa zone of the circumjovian nebula during the condensation of the satellite on the one hand and of the early thermal evolution on the other, it is argued that most of the water of Europa can be in the form of hydrated silicates in a thick convective boundary layer or throughout the body of the satellite. Such silicates would include the minerals chlorite and/or serpentine, and brucite, and could be maintained in hydrated states by solid state convection within the body. The model predicts that the ice layer on the surface of Europa is considerably thinner than the 150 km that had been estimated before the Voyager mission.

  11. Petrology at Princeton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollister, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology at Princeton has evolved from a course f or junior or senior majors to a course that targets sophomores who might major in geology. The prerequisite is one prior course in geology. The course is constructed around a one-week series of field exercises in the Rio Grand rift of New Mexico. These are taken during our fall break. During the field exercises they collect metamorphic or volcanic rocks that form the basis of a project that they work on in the second half of the semester. They make thin sections of their rocks, learn some microscopy and mineralogy as they examine them, and prepare a final paper with the structure of a research article. The students give oral reports in an "AGU like" session. Part of their grade is based on their questioning of their peers. Prior to the one-week trip, the students are taken on half or full-day field trips to central Atlantic rift features in the vicinity of Princeton. These trips and related labs prepare them for the trip to New Mexico. They must keep a notebook in which they record their field observations. The notebooks for the one-week trip are evaluated and the grade is a significant fraction of the final grade. This course began as an experiment, which was driven by a need to increase the number of majors in Geosciences. The course works best for class sizes of 6 to 10; one or two do not continue in geology, and one or two are already majoring in other sciences. Veterans of former classes come as assistants on the one week trip. Thus, the students considering majoring in Geosciences are mentored by the older students. And the veterans add to their petrology and mineralogy education through instruction of the younger students. The trip is expensive. Costs are covered by income from endowed funds set up to provide field experiences for undergraduates. This course helps tremendously in introducing eastern students to the geology that is so dramatically displayed in the west, and that is

  12. Petrology of metamorphic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, M.

    1983-01-01

    ''Petrology of Metamorphic Rocks'' reviews Central European opinions about the origin and formation of metamorphic rocks and their genetic systems, confronting the works of such distinguished European scientists as Rosenbusch, Becke, Niggli, Sander, Eskola, Barth and others with present-day knowledge and the results of Soviet and American investigations. The initial chapters discuss the processes that give rise to metamorphic rocks, and the main differences between regional metamorphism and other types of alterations, the emphasis being laid on the material characteristic of the processes of metamorphism, metasomatism and ultrametamorphism. Further chapters give a brief characterization of research methods, together with a detailed genetic classification based on the division of primary rocks into igneous rocks, sediments and ore materials. The effects of metamorphic alterations and those of the properties of the primary rocks are analyzed on the basis of examples taken chiefly from the Bohemian Massif, the West Carpathians, other parts of the European Variscides, from the crystalline Scandinavian Shelf in Norway and Finland, and from the Alps. Typical examples are documented by a number of charts, photographs and petrographical - particularly petrochemical - data.

  13. Geology and petrology of the Simav Magmatic Complex (NW Anatolia) and its comparison with the Oligo-Miocene granitoids in NW Anatolia: implications on Tertiary tectonic evolution of the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Erhan

    2009-10-01

    The Oligo-Miocene granitic plutons and their related volcanic-subvolcanic successions form a NW-SE trending magmatic belt along the northern border of the Menderes Massif. This belt evolved within a nappe package consisting of the Menderes metamorphics, Sakarya Continent, Afyon Zone and Tavşanlı Zone and also intruded this nappe package. The Ezine, Evciler, Eybek, Kozak, Alaçam, Koyunoba, Eğrigöz and the Baklan plutons emplaced along this belt and show similarities in their internal structures, emplacement mechanisms, and petrological characteristics. These different granitic plutons cut and stitch various combinations of the nappe package of the above-mentioned tectonic belts, and evolved during and following the Alpine collision. They all show characteristic map patterns of shallow-seated plutons and range from granite to monzogranite. The granitic plutons display calc-alkaline, I-type and post-collisional geochemical characteristics. The Eğrigöz, Koyunoba plutons and their subvolcanic-volcanic phases (Simav Magmatic Complex) were studied in detail. The geochemical characteristics and field occurences of the Simav Magmatic Complex were compared to the other magmatic associations in western Anatolia and it was determined that it is of collisional origin and not related to an extensional tectonic regime as suggested in some recent studies.

  14. Genesis Field Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis mission returned to Earth on September 8, 2004 after a nearly flawless three-year mission to collect solar matter. The intent was to deploy a drogue chute and parafoil high over the Utah desert and to catch the fragile payload capsule in mid-air by helicopter. The capsule would then be opened in a clean-room constructed for that purpose at UTTR, and a nitrogen purge was to be installed before transporting the science canister to JSC. Unfortunately, both chutes failed to deploy, causing the capsule to fall to the desert floor at a speed of nearly 200 MPH. Still, Genesis represents a milestone in the US space program, comprising the first sample return since the Apollo Missions as well as the first return of materials exposed to the space environment outside of low Earth orbit and beyond the Earth s magnetosphere for an extended period. We have no other comparable materials in all of our collections on Earth. The goal of the Genesis Mission was to collect a representative sample of the composition of the solar wind and thus, the solar nebula from which our solar system originated. This was done by allowing the naturally accelerated species to implant shallowly in the surfaces of ultra-pure, ultra-clean collector materials. These collectors included single crystal silicon (FZ and CZ), sapphire, silicon carbide; those materials coated with aluminum, silicon, diamond like carbon, and gold; and isotopically enriched polycrystalline diamond and amorphous carbon. The majority of these materials were distributed on five collector arrays. Three of the materials were housed in an electrostatic concentrator designed to increase the flux of low-mass ions. There was also a two-inch diameter bulk metallic glass collector and a gold foil, polished aluminum, and molybdenum coated platinum foil collector. An excellent review of the Genesis collector materials is offered in reference [1].

  15. Genesis Noble Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    The original thrust of our Genesis funding was to extend and refine the noble gas analytical capabilities of this laboratory to improve the precision and accuracy of noble gas measurements in order to optimize the scientific return from the Genesis Mission. This process involved both instrumental improvement (supplemented by a SRLIDAP instrument grant) and refinement of technique. The Genesis landing mishap shifted our emphasis to the irregular aluminum heat shield material from the flat collector wafers. This has required redesign of our laser extraction cells to accommodate the longer focal lengths required for laser extraction from non-flat surfaces. Extraction of noble gases from solid aluminum surfaces, rather than thin coatings on transparent substrates has required refinement of controlled-depth laser ablation techniques. Both of these bring new problems, both with potentially higher blanks form larger laser cells and the larger quantities of evaporated aluminum which can coat the sapphire entrance ports. This is mainly a problem for the heavy noble gases where larger extraction areas are required, necessitating the new aluminum vapor containment techniques described below. With the Genesis Mission came three new multiple multiplier noble gas mass spectrometers to this laboratory, one built solely by us (Supergnome-M), one built in collaboration with Nu-Instruments (Noblesse), and one built in collaboration with GVI (Helix). All of these have multiple multiplier detection sections with the Nu-Instruments using a pair of electrostatic quad lenses for isotope spacing and the other two using mechanically adjustable positions for the electron multipliers. The Supergnome-M and Noblesse are installed and running. The GVI instrument was delivered a year late (in March 2005) and is yet to be installed by GVI. As with all new instruments there were some initial development issues, some of which are still outstanding. The most serious of these are performance issues

  16. Genesis Recovery Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, E. K.

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft, launched in August 2001 to collect samples of the solar wind, returned to Earth on 8 September 2004. The Sample Return Capsule (SRC) failed to deploy its drogue parachute and parafoil and subsequently impacted the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) at an estimated 310 kph (193 mph). The goal of the Genesis mission to collect and return samples of the solar wind for precise elemental and isotopic analysis provides the scientific community with a unique set of materials to aid in understanding the origin of our solar system. The spacecraft orbited the Earth-Sun L1 point for 29 months exposing a suite of fifteen types of ultrapure, ultraclean materials in several different locations. Most of the materials were mounted on fixed or deployable wafer panels called collector arrays . A few materials were mounted as targets in the focal spot of an electrostatic mirror (the concentrator ). Other materials were strategically placed to maximize the area for solar-wind collection.

  17. 3D numerical modeling of mantle flow, crustal dynamics and magma genesis associated with slab roll-back and tearing: The eastern Mediterranean case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menant, Armel; Sternai, Pietro; Jolivet, Laurent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Gerya, Taras

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between subduction dynamics and magma genesis have been intensely investigated, resulting in several conceptual models derived from geological, geochemical and geophysical data. To provide physico-chemical constraints on these conceptual models, self-consistent numerical simulations containing testable thermo-mechanical parameters are required, especially considering the three-dimensional (3D) natural complexity of subduction systems. Here, we use a 3D high-resolution petrological and thermo-mechanical numerical model to quantify the relative contribution of oceanic and continental subduction/collision, slab roll-back and tearing to magma genesis and transport processes. Our modeling results suggest that the space and time distribution and composition of magmas in the overriding plate is controlled by the 3D slab dynamics and related asthenospheric flow. Moreover, the decrease of the bulk lithospheric strength induced by mantle- and crust-derived magmas promotes the propagation of strike-slip and extensional fault zones through the overriding crust as response to slab roll-back and continental collision. Reduction of the lithosphere/asthenosphere rheological contrast by lithospheric weakening also favors the transmission of velocities from the flowing mantle to the crust. Similarities between our modeling results and the late Cenozoic tectonic and magmatic evolution across the eastern Mediterranean region suggest an efficient control of mantle flow on the magmatic activity in this region, which in turn promotes lithospheric deformation by mantle drag via melt-induced weakening effects.

  18. Genesis Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Julia L.; Lo, Martin W.; Wilson, Roby S.

    2000-01-01

    The Genesis mission will launch in 2001, sending the spacecraft into a halo orbit about the Sun-Earth L1 point to collect and return solar wind samples to the Earth for analysis in 2003. One of the most constraining aspects of the mission design is the requirement to return to the designated landing site (the Utah Test and Training Range, UTTR) during daylight hours. The ongoing mission design has led the development of a family of solutions that characterize a broad range of conditions at Earth entry. Characterizing this family provides insight into the possible existence of additional trajectories while also helping to narrow the search space by indicating where additional solutions are unlikely to exist; this contributes to a more efficient utilization of mission design resources.

  19. Early Jurassic subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean in NE China: Petrologic and geochemical evidence from the Tumen mafic intrusive complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Hongxia; Fan, Weiming; Li, Jingyan; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Miwei; Xu, Wenliang

    2015-05-01

    Subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Oceanic Plate is widely considered to have caused extensive Mesozoic magmatism, lithospheric deformation and mineralization in East Asia. However, it is still unclear when this subduction began. Here we report an Early Jurassic (~ 187 Ma) mafic intrusive complex (including olivine norite, gabbro, and diorite) from the Tumen area in NE China. The olivine norite contains a mineral assemblage of olivine, pyroxene, Ca-plagioclase, and hornblende that crystallized in a water-saturated parental magma. The rocks in the complex show variable degrees of plagioclase and ferromagnesian mineral accumulation as reflected by positive Sr and Eu anomalies in primitive mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns. Mass-balance calculations indicate that the parental magma was calc-alkaline with arc-type trace element features (i.e., large ion incompatible and light rare earth element enrichment and Nb-Ta depletion). It also had Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7042 to 0.7044, εNd(t) = + 2.5 to + 3.5 and εHf(t) = + 8.4 to + 10.5) similar to those of modern arc basalts. The parental magma was likely derived from 5 to 20% melting of a mantle wedge metasomatized by an addition of 3-4% hydrous sediment melt from the subducting Paleo-Pacific Oceanic slab. The Tumen mafic intrusive complex, together with other contemporaneous mafic intrusions, I-type granitoids, and felsic lavas, constitutes an Early Jurassic N-S-trending arc magmatic belt that was formed by westward subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean.

  20. Field, petrologic and detrital zircon study of the Kings sequence and Calaveras complex, Southern Lake Kaweah Roof Pendant, Tulare County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchen, Christopher T.

    U-Pb dating of detrital zircon grains separated from elastic sedimentary rocks is combined with field, petrographic and geochemical data to reconstruct the geologic history of Mesozoic rocks exposed at the southern end of the Lake Kaweah metamorphic pendant, western Sierra Nevada. Identification of rocks exposed at Limekiln Hill, Kern County, CA, as belonging to the Calaveras complex and Kings sequence was confirmed. Detrital zircon populations from two Calaveras complex samples provide Permo-Triassic maximum depositional ages (MDA) and reveal a Laurentian provenance indicating that continental accretion of the northwest-trending Kings-Kaweah ophiolite belt was in process prior to the Jurassic Period. Rock types including radiolarian metachert, metachert-argillite, and calc-silicate rocks with marble lenses are interpreted as formed in a hemipelagic environment of siliceous radiolarian deposition, punctuated by extended episodes of lime-mud gravity flows mixing with siliceous ooze forming cafe-silicate protoliths and limestone olistoliths forming marble lenses. Two samples of the overlying Kings sequence turbidites yield detrital zircons with an MDA of 181.4 +/-3.0 Ma and an interpreted provenance similar to other Jurassic metasediments found in the Yokohl Valley, Sequoia and Boyden Cave roof pendants. Age peaks indicative of Jurassic erg heritage are also present. In contrast, detrital zircon samples from the Sequoia and Slate Mountain roof pendants bear age-probability distributions interpreted as characteristic of the Snow Lake block, a tectonic sliver offset from the Paleozoic miogeocline.

  1. The mafic-ultramafic complex of Aniyapuram, Cauvery Suture Zone, southern India: Petrological and geochemical constraints for Neoarchean suprasubduction zone tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellappa, T.; Venkatasivappa, V.; Koizumi, T.; Chetty, T. R. K.; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, T.

    2014-12-01

    Several Precambrian mafic-ultramafic complexes occur along the Cauvery Suture Zone (CSZ) in Southern Granulite Terrain, India. Their origin, magmatic evolution and relationship with the associated high-grade rocks have not been resolved. The Aniyapuram Mafic-Ultramafic Complex (AMUC), the focus of the present study in southern part of the CSZ, is dominantly composed of peridotites, pyroxenites, gabbros, metagabbros/mafic granulites, hornblendites, amphibolites, plagiogranites, felsic granulites and ferruginous cherts. The rock types in the AMUC are structurally emplaced within hornblende gneiss (TTG) basement rocks and are highly deformed. The geochemical signature of the amphibolites indicates tholeiitic affinity for the protolith with magma generation in island arc-setting. N-MORB normalized pattern of the amphibolites show depletion in HFS-elements (P, Zr, Sm, Ti, and Y) and enrichment of LIL-elements (Rb, Ba, Th, Sr) with negative Nb anomalies suggesting involvement of subduction component in the depleted mantle source and formation in a supra-subduction zone tectonic setting. Our new results when correlated with the available age data suggest that the lithological association of AMUC represent the remnants of the Neoarchean oceanic lithosphere.

  2. The petrology of high-Mg dikes from the Beartooth Mountains, Montana - A search for the parent magma of the Stillwater Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J.; Wooden, J. L.; Coppinger, K. D.

    1983-01-01

    Six geochemically distinct groups of Precambrian high-Mg dikes have been examined to determine if any could have been a sample of or closely related to the parent magma of the Stillwater Complex. Only two groups have sufficiently magnesian olivine and orthopyroxene, but neither of these has sufficiently calcic plagioclase. In terms of major elements there appear to be only two distinct magma types: one has a high orthopyroxene component and is petrographically similar to noritic dikes and sills near the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe and the Bushveld Complex of South Africa; the other is similar to primitive tholeiites with higher plagioclase and diopside components than the first. All of the groups are enriched in light-REE and have unusually high K2O concentrations. Model calculations indicate that crustal contamination of fractionating komatiitic magmas is consistent with the major and trace element characteristics of the first magma type. Less extensive contamination of komatiitic magmas may produce the parental magmas of the large layered intrusions.

  3. The petrology of the layered gabbro intrusion, eastern gabbro, Coldwell alkaline complex, Northwestern Ontario, Canada: evidence for multiple phases of intrusion in a ring dyke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Cliff S. J.

    1997-07-01

    The Coldwell alkaline complex is a large (> 350 km 2) gabbro and syenite intrusion on the north shore of Lake Superior. It was emplaced at 1108 Ma during early magmatic activity associated with the formation of the Mid-Continent Rift of North America. The eastern gabbro forms a partial ring dyke on the outer margin of the complex and consists of at least three discrete intrusions. The largest of these is the layered gabbro that comprises a 300 m thick fine- to medium-grained basal unit overlain by up to 1100 m of variably massive to layered gabbroic cumulates which vary from olivine gabbro to anorthosite. Several xenoliths of Archaean metamorphic rocks that range in size from 10's to 100's of meters are present in the central part of the intrusion. Within discrete horizons in the layered gabbro are many centimeter- to meter-scale, gabbroic xenoliths. The main cumulus minerals, in order of crystallization, are plagioclase, olivine and clinopyroxene ± Fe-Ti oxides. Biotite and Fe-Ti-oxide are the dominant intercumulus phases. Orthopyroxene occurs not as a cumulus phase but as peritectic overgrowths on cumulus olivine. A detailed petrographic and mineral chemical study of samples from two stratigraphically controlled traverses through the layered gabbro indicates that the stratigraphy cannot be correlated along the 33 km strike of the ring dyke. Mineral compositions show both normal and reversed fractionation trends. These patterns are interpreted to record at least three separate intrusions of magma into restricted dilatant zones within the ring dyke possibly associated with ongoing caldera collapse. Calculations of parental melt composition using mineral — melt equilibria show that even the most primitive gabbros crystallized from an evolved magma with mg# of 0.42-0.49. The presence of orthopyroxene overgrowths on cumulus olivine suggests rising silica activity in the melt during crystallization and implies a subalkaline parentage for the layered gabbro.

  4. Petrology and tectonic significance of gabbros, tonalites, shoshonites, and anorthosites in a late Paleozoic arc-root complex in the Wrangellia Terrane, southern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, J.S. ); Barker, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Plutonic rocks intrusive into the late Paleozoic Tetelna Formation of southern Alaska are the underpinnings of the late Paleozoic Skolai arc of the Wrangellia Terrane. There are four groups of intrusive rocks within the Skolai arc: (1) Gabbro-diorite plutons that contain gabbroic to anorthositic cumulates along with a differentiated series of gabbros and diorites of basaltic to andesitic composition; (2) Silicic intrusions including tonalite, granodiorite, and granite; (3) Monzonitic to syenitic plutonic rocks of the Ahtell complex and related dikes and sills; (4) Fault-bounded bytownite anorthosite of uncertain age and association. These anorthosites may be related to post-Skolai, Nikolai Greenstone magmatism. The silicic rocks yield discordant U-Pb zircon ages of 290-320 Ma (early to late Pennsylvanian). The monzonitic rocks of the Ahtell complex have shoshonitic chemistry. Similar shoshonitic rocks are widespread in both the Wrangellia terrane and the neighboring Alexander terrane and intrude the contact between the two. In modern oceanic arcs, shoshonitic rocks are typically associated with tectonic instability occurring during the initial stages of subduction or just prior to or during termination or flip of an established subduction zone. The nature of any tectonic instability which may have led to the cessation of subduction in the Skolai arc is unclear. Possibilities include collision of the arc with a ridge, an oceanic plateau, another arc, or a continental fragment. One possibility is that the shoshonitic magmatism marks the late Paleozoic amalgamation of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane. The scarcity of arc rocks predating the shoshonites in the Alexander terrane supports this possibility, but structural corroboration is lacking.

  5. Geological and petrological aspects of Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization in the early Paleoproterozoic Monchegorsk layered mafic-ultramafic complex, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, E. V.; Chistyakov, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The Early Paleoproterozoic Monchegorsk Complex comprises two independent large layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions: the Monchegorsk pluton and the Main Range massif formed about 2.50 and 2.46 Ga ago, respectively. They are composed of similar cumulates, though they differ somewhat in the isotopic parameters of rocks, cumulate stratigraphy and derived from siliceous high-Mg series melts that arose in the same large long-living volcanic center. The economic syngenetic Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineralization related to the earlier Monchegorsk pluton is represented by two types of ores. The first type, pertaining to fractionation of the primary melt, is opposite to the reef formed due to injection of a special ore-bearing melt into the solidifying intrusive chamber. The primary magmatic mineralization is largely composed of Ni-Fe-Cu sulfides and Pd-Pt sulfides, bismuthides, and tellurides. Only small PGE and probably chromite occurrences are related to the Main Range massif. In the Mid-Paleoproterozoic (2.0-1.9 Ga), the complex was transformed into a collage of tectonic blocks confined to the regional fault zone. The Monchegorsk pluton was retained better, and only rocks of its southern framework were involved into tectonic and metamorphic reworking with the formation of economic metamorphic low-sulfide PGE mineralization with widespread Pd and Pt telluro-bismuthides, arsenides, stannides, antimonides, and selenides. The ore formation was accompanied by PGE redistribution and segregation of lenticular orebodies with diffuse contours. Thus, the Monchegorsk ore cluster is characterized by juxtaposition of unaltered primary magmatic deposits and those formed as a result of their metamorphism and distinguished from the former by structure and composition. The comparative study of these deposits opens up new possibilities for comprehending ore-forming processes in the same situations.

  6. Theoretical petrology. [of igneous and metamorphic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolper, E.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, some areas of growing interest in the American efforts in petrology during the 1975-1978 quadrennium are reviewed. In igneous petrology, studies of structures and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and of kinetics of igneous processes are in a period of rapid growth. Plate tectonic concepts have had (and will no doubt continue to have) an important influence by focusing interest on specific problems and by providing a framework for the understanding of petrogenesis. An understanding of mantle processes and evolution through the integration of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical constraints has been developed over the past 20 years, and will undoubtedly provide direction for future petrological studies.

  7. Geochemistry, Petrology, and Provenance of Magnetite-Rich Ortaklar Cu Deposit Hosting Basalts from Koçali Complex, Gaziantep, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, E.; Lee, I.; Kang, J.; Dönmez, C.; Yildirim, N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite-rich Cyprus type VMS deposit has been recently discovered from the Ortaklar-Gaziantep region within Koçali complex, SE Turkey. Magnetite rich sulfide ore bodies are in close contact with underlying footwall spilitic basalts. These basalts are part of Koçali mélange, which represents an accreted oceanic complex during closing of southern Neotethys. These extrusives are low-K, low alkali tholeiites with Ca rich, partially sericitized plagioclase subophitically enclosed by augite with disseminated Fe-Ti oxides and pyrite. Mineral crystallization sequence of plagioclase followed by augite and opaque is typical of MORB. Major and trace element analyses for least altered basalts based on LOI (1.5~3.6 wt%), Ce/Ce* (0.9~1.1) exhibit limited range of element abundances. Low Mg# (59~60) suggests that basalts were derived from moderately evolved magma with fractional crystallization. HFSE (Th, Nb, Hf, Zr) were used for tectonic discrimination and basalts were plotted within MORB end spectrum, near MORB-IAT boundary. N-MORB normalized La to Lu ranges from 0.4 to 0.9 times N-MORB with LREE depletion [(La/Sm)N = 0.58~0.67] and flat HREE [(Tb/Lu)N = 0.95~1.05]. Chondrite normalized REE patterns resemble those of N-MORB but characterized by severe LREE depletion [(La/Sm)CN = 0.35~0.45]. LREE depletion coupled with high Sm/Nd (0.36~0.43), high CaO/Na2O (5.0~6.2) and low Nb/Yb (0.23~0.39) suggest depleted N-MORB composition derived from the refractory mantle source. Analyzed basalts are similar to those found from other rift (Costa Rica Rift Hole 504b) and intra-transform fault (Siqueiros transform). Magnetite emplacement occurring close to the ore-host boundary and lack of pyrrhotite from hosting basalts imply an involvement of oxidized hydrothermal fluids. Basalts probably have formed by late stage, partial melting of the refractory mantle at low pressure, shallow depth, and H2O rich environment. Possible source of mantle heterogeneity can be identified by isotope

  8. Petrology and Sm-Nd dating of the Genina Gharbia Alaskan-type complex (Egypt): Insights into deep levels of Neoproterozoic island arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmy, Hassan M.; Abd El-Rahman, Yasser M.; Yoshikawa, Masako; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji; Tamura, Akihiro; Kagami, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The deep levels of Neoproterozoic island arcs are poorly known due to limited accessibility. The Genina Gharbia Alaskan-type complex (south Eastern Desert, Egypt) is the remains of a magma chamber that crystallized at the base (crust-mantle boundary) of a mature Neoproterozoic island arc. The rock assemblage comprises hornblende-bearing harzburgite, lherzolite, pyroxenite, norite and gabbro. All lithologies show cumulus texture with evidence of extensive cumulus mineral-melt interactions. Clinopyroxenes from all lithologies have similar rare earth element (REE) patterns with slight medium-rare earth element (MREE) enrichment. Hornblendes are slightly enriched in MREE and light rare earth elements (LREE). Island arc signatures are indicated by high contents of large ion-lithophile elements and low concentration of high field-strength elements. Positive initial εNd (+ 5.7 to + 7.0) and Nd model ages (963 ± 81 Ma) are consistent with the Genina Gharbia magma being extracted from a depleted mantle source. Modeling of estimated parental magma indicates 10% partial melting of a 90% depleted mantle source with a 10% (MORB + sediments)-derived fluid, commencing in the spinel stability field (< 85 km). Relative to Phanerozoic arcs, the Neoproterozoic arcs were more hydrous, had low oxidation states and probably lasted shorter time to build-up. The hydrous nature of the sub-Arabian-Nubian Shield mantle and the long-life of the arcs are among reasons responsible for the vast crustal growth during the Pan-African Orogeny throughout the Gondwana.

  9. Petrology, geochemistry, and metamorphic evolution of meta-sedimentary rocks in the Diancang Shan-Ailao Shan metamorphic complex, Southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Fulai; Liu, Pinghua; Shi, Jianrong; Cai, Jia

    2016-07-01

    Meta-sedimentary rocks are widely distributed within the Diancang Shan-Ailao Shan metamorphic complex in the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Detailed geochemical analyses show that all of them have similar geochemical features. They are enriched in light rare-earth elements (LREEs) and depleted in heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs), with moderately negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.55-0.75). Major and trace element compositions for the meta-sedimentary rocks suggest that the protoliths were probably claystone, siltstone, and greywacke and deposited in an active continental margin. Garnet porphyroblasts in meta-sedimentary rocks have distinct compositional zonation from core to rim. The zonation of garnet in St-Ky-Grt-Bt-Ms schist indicates an increasing P-T trend during garnet growth. In contrast, garnets from (Sil)-Grt-Bt paragneiss show diffusion zoning, implying a decreasing P-T trend. Based on mineral transformations and P-T estimates using conventional geothermobarometers and pseudosection calculations, four metamorphic stages have been determined, including an early prograde metamorphic stage (M1), a peak amphibolite-granulite facies metamorphic stage (M2), a near-isothermal decompression stage (M3), and a late amphibolites-facies retrograde stage (M4). The relic assemblage of Ms + St ± Ky ± Bt ± Kfs + Qz preserved as inclusions in garnet porphyroblasts of the meta-sedimentary rocks belongs to prograde (M1) stage and records P-T conditions of 560-590 °C and 5.5-6.3 kb. Matrix mineral assemblages of Grt + Bt + Ky/Sil + Pl + Qz and Grt + Bt ± Sil + Pl ± Kfs + Qz formed at peak (M2) stage yield P-T conditions of 720-760 °C and 8.0-9.3 kb. M3 is characterized by decompression reactions, dehydration melting of assemblages that include hydrous minerals (e.g., biotite), and partial melting of felsic minerals. The retrograde assemblages is Grt + Bt + Sil + Pl + Qz formed at 650-760 °C and 5.0-7.3 kb. At the amphibolites-facies retrograde (M4) stage, fine

  10. A Digital Approach to Learning Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    In the undergraduate igneous and metamorphic petrology course at Northern Arizona University, we are employing petrographic microscopes equipped with relatively inexpensive ( $200) digital cameras that are linked to pen-tablet computers. The camera-tablet systems can assist student learning in a variety of ways. Images provided by the tablet computers can be used for helping students filter the visually complex specimens they examine. Instructors and students can simultaneously view the same petrographic features captured by the cameras and exchange information about them by pointing to salient features using the tablet pen. These images can become part of a virtual mineral/rock/texture portfolio tailored to individual student's needs. Captured digital illustrations can be annotated with digital ink or computer graphics tools; this activity emulates essential features of more traditional line drawings (visualizing an appropriate feature and selecting a representative image of it, internalizing the feature through studying and annotating it) while minimizing the frustration that many students feel about drawing. In these ways, we aim to help a student progress more efficiently from novice to expert. A number of our petrology laboratory exercises involve use of the camera-tablet systems for collaborative learning. Observational responsibilities are distributed among individual members of teams in order to increase interdependence and accountability, and to encourage efficiency. Annotated digital images are used to share students' findings and arrive at an understanding of an entire rock suite. This interdependence increases the individual's sense of responsibility for their work, and reporting out encourages students to practice use of technical vocabulary and to defend their observations. Pre- and post-course student interest in the camera-tablet systems has been assessed. In a post-course survey, the majority of students reported that, if available, they would use

  11. Petrology and mineralogy of the La Peña igneous complex, Mendoza, Argentina: An alkaline occurrence in the Miocene magmatism of the Southern Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Diego Sebastián; Galliski, Miguel Ángel; Márquez-Zavalía, María Florencia; Colombo, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The La Peña alkaline igneous complex (LPC) is located in the Precordillera (32°41‧34″ S - 68°59‧48″ W) of Mendoza province, Argentina, above the southern boundary of the present-day flat-slab segment. It is a 19 km2 and 5 km diameter subcircular massif emplaced during the Miocene (19 Ma) in the Silurian-Devonian Villavicencio Fm. The LPC is composed of several plutonic and subvolcanic intrusions represented by: a cumulate of clinopyroxenite intruded by mafic dikes and pegmatitic gabbroic dikes, isolated bodies of malignite, a central intrusive syenite that develops a wide magmatic breccia in the contact with clinopyroxenite, syenitic and trachytic porphyries, a system of radial and ring dikes of different compositions (trachyte, syenite, phonolite, alkaline lamprophyre, tephrite), and late mafic breccias. The main minerals that form the LPC, ordered according to their abundance, are: pyroxene (diopside, hedenbergite), calcium amphibole (pargasite, ferro-pargasite, potassic-ferro-pargasite, potassic-hastingsite, magnesio-hastingsite, hastingsite, potassic-ferro-ferri-sadanagaite), trioctahedral micas (annite-phlogopite series), plagioclase (bytownite to oligoclase), K-feldspar (sanidine and orthoclase), nepheline, sodalite, apatite group minerals (fluorapatite, hydroxylapatite), andradite, titanite, magnetite, spinel, ilmenite, and several Cu-Fe sulfides. Late hydrothermal minerals are represented by zeolites (scolecite, thomsonite-Ca), epidote, calcite and chlorite. The trace element patterns, coupled with published data on Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, suggest that the primary magma of the LPC was generated in an initially depleted but later enriched lithospheric mantle formed mainly by a metasomatized spinel lherzolite, and that this magmatism has a subduction-related signature. The trace elements pattern of these alkaline rocks is similar to other Miocene calc-alkaline occurrences from the magmatic arc of the Southern Central Andes. Mineral and whole

  12. The Genesis of SESAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald

    2008-04-01

    On March 23, 1935, a meeting of ``Southern Physicist" was held at the Candler Hotel in Decatur, Georgia. In addition to a scientific program the next day, consisting of the presentation of twenty-five papers (held in the Emory University's chemistry building), an address was given by Professor A. H. Compton on that Friday night during a banquet sponsored by the Georgia Academy of Science. However, the main goal of this meeting was to work out the details of a new organization, which was called the ``Southern Association of Physicists." My talk provides background on the genesis of this gathering and gives a brief summary of the new organization's subsequent activities, including its ``absorption" by the American Physical Society as its Southeastern Section, i.e., SESAPS. In particular, I discuss its management structure; its three awards for teaching, research, and leadership; and the planning process for its annual meeting. My general conclusion is that SESAPS has been very successful in promoting ``physics" in the southeastern states.

  13. Using quantitative phase petrology to understand metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative phase petrology has become one of the mainstay methods for interpreting metamorphic rocks and processes. Its increased utility has been driven by improvements to end-member thermodynamics, activity-composition relationships and computer programs to undertake calculations. Such improvements now allow us to undertake calculations in increasingly complex chemical systems that more closely reflect those of rocks. Recent progress in activity-composition (a-x) relationships is aimed at developing suites of a-x relationships in large chemical systems that are calibrated together, which will allow a more direct application of the method to metamorphic rocks. In addition, considerable progress has been made in how quantitative phase diagrams can be used to understand features, including chemical potential diagrams for reaction textures, methods for fractionating bulk compositions and methods for modelling open system processes. One feature of calculated phase diagrams is that they present us with a great amount of information, such as mineral assemblages, mineral proportions, phase compositions, volume or density etc. An important aspect to using this information is to understand the potential uncertainties associated with these, which are significant. These uncertainties require that calculated phase diagrams be used with caution to interpret observed features in rocks. Features such as mineral zoning and reaction textures should still be interpreted in a semi-quantitative way, even if based on a fully quantitative diagram. Exercises such as the interpretation of reaction overstepping based on relating phase diagrams to observed mineral core compositions are likely to give spurious results given the infelicities in existing a-x models. Despite these limitations, quantitative phase petrology remains the most useful approach to interpreting the metamorphic history of rocks in that it provides a theoretical framework in which to interpret observed features rather

  14. Lunar breccias, petrology, and earth planetary structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, W. I.

    1978-01-01

    Topics covered include: (1) petrologic studies of poikiloblastic textured rocks; (2) petrology of aluminous mare basalts in breccia 14063; (3) petrology of Apollo 15 breccia 15459; (4) high-alumina mare basalts; (5) some petrological aspects of imbrium stratigraphy; (6) petrology of lunar rocks and implication to lunar evolution; (7) the crystallization trends of spinels in Tertiary basalts from Rhum and Muck and their petrogenetic significance; (8) the geology and evolution of the Cayman Trench; (9) The petrochemistry of igneous rocks from the Cayman Trench and the Captains Bay Pluton, Unalaska Island and their relation to tectonic processes at plate margins; and (10) the oxide and silicate mineral chemistry of a Kimberlite from the Premier Mine with implications for the evolution of kimberlitic magma.

  15. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  16. The Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon-borne observatory with an 80-cm solar telescope we observed the active region NOAA 8844 on January 25, 2000 for several hours. FGE was equipped with a vector polarimeter and a tunable Fabry-Perot narrow-band filter. It recorded time series of filtergrams, vector magnetograms, and Dopplergrams at the Ca(I) 6122.2 angstrom line, and H-alpha filtergrams with a cadence between 2.5 and 7.5 minutes. At the time of the observations, NOAA 8844 was located at approximately 5 N 30 W. The region was rapidly growing during the observations; new magnetic flux was constantly emerging in three supergranules near its center. We describe in detail how the FGE data were analyzed and report on the structure and behavior of peculiar moving dipolar features (MDFs) observed in the active region. In longitudinal magnetograms, the MDFs appeared to be small dipoles in the emerging fields. The east-west orientation of their polarities was opposite that of the sunspots. The dipoles were oriented parallel to their direction of motion, which was in most cases towards the sunspots. Previously, dipolar moving magnetic features have only been observed flowing out from sunspots. Vector magnetograms show that the magnetic field of each MDF negative part was less inclined to the local horizontal than the ones of the positive part. We identify the MDFs as undulations, or stitches, where the emerging flux ropes are still tied to the photosphere. We present a U-loop model that can account for their unusual structure and behavior, and it shows how emerging flux can shed its entrained mass.

  17. Petrogenesis of the Late Cretaceous Demirköy Igneous Complex in the NW Turkey: Implications for magma genesis in the Strandja Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacık, Zekiye; Tüysüz, Okan

    2010-02-01

    The Srednogorie Zone in Bulgaria and its eastern continuation in NW Turkey, the Strandja Zone, consist of a Late Cretaceous magmatic belt comprised of plutonic, volcanic and associated volcano-sedimentary rocks. The Demirköy Igneous Complex is the biggest Cretaceous pluton within the Strandja Zone, and its age is between 71 and 84 Ma. The Demirköy pluton and additional smaller plutons are intruded into Triassic and older metamorphic basement rocks. A contact metamorphic aureole with hornblende-hornfels facies conditions was developed around the Demirköy pluton. The WNW-trending Demirköy pluton has an elliptical shape and a concentrically zoned internal structure. In this structure, gabbro/diorites and quartz diorites are only seen in the SW corner of the pluton, while granodiorites form the main body of the pluton surrounded by a zone of granite. The granodiorites contain dioritic mafic microgranular enclaves. Small quartz monzonite lenses and/or bodies and mafic dykes are also observed in the Demirköy Igneous Complex. Geochemically, the Demirköy Igneous Complex has calc-alkaline, metaluminous and medium-K characteristics. There is a significant correlation between the LREE/HREE ratios and SiO 2 values. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are relatively flat (La N/Lu N = 2) in gabbros. This ratio ranges from 3 to 11 for the diorite/granodiorites, and from 14 to 35 for the granites. Dioritic enclaves have REE patterns similar to those of the main body and have La N/Lu N values between 3 and 6. Relatively enriched LILE (Sr, K, Rb, Ba and Th) and relatively depleted HFSE (Ta, Nb and Ti) values indicate the classic subduction-related origin of the complex. The initial isotopic signatures range from ɛNd( i) = - 0.45 to - 2.57 and 87Sr/ 86Sr( i) = 0.7042-0.7064 for gabbros and ɛNd( i) = - 0.43 to - 2.67 and 87Sr/ 86Sr( i) = 0.7048-0.7059 for granodiorites and granites. δ18O values range from + 6.18 to + 7.80‰ (VSMOW) for gabbros and from + 6.86 to + 8.89

  18. Eaton AF5000+Genesis Communication Driver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-05-25

    Communication driver allows the Genesis Control Series software to interact with Eaton AF5000+ frequency drives via RS-232 communications. All Eaton AF5000+ parameters that support communications are supported by the Genesis driver. Multidrop addressing to multiple units is available with the Genesis communication driver.

  19. The Role of Fractional Crystallization and Magma Mixing/Mingling in the Genesis of Karacaali Magmatic Complex (Central Anatolia, Turkey) Fe, Mo-Cu Mineralizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delibas, O.; Genc, Y.; de Campos, C. P.

    2009-05-01

    This work brings into focus different metal associations (Fe and Mo-Cu) characteristic for the Karacaali Magmatic Complex (KMC), in Central Anatolia, Turkey. The Mo-Cu mineralization is widespread hosted in rhyolitic-rhyodacitic/granidoid rocks or is related to N-S striking vertical quartz-calcite veins. The Fe mineralization, on the other hand, is hosted in gabbroic/basaltic rocks. Field relations and geochronologic studies on single zircons (U-Pb) point towards a coeval temporal relation between plutonites and volcanites. The relatively overlapping ages between monzonite (73.1 Ma) and rhyolitic rocks (67 Ma) reflect a long lasting gradual crystallization within a zoned magma chamber. This is confirmed by progressive transitional contacts from plutonites into volcanites. Based on detailed field, textural and petrographic studies, granitic and monzonitic rocks have been subdivided into four different facies. These are: porphyritic quartz monzonites, quartz-monzonites, fine-grained granites and porphyritic leucogranites. Furthermore, highly diverse textures and structures, which are typical for hybrid rocks, reveal important magma mixing/migling and fractional crystalization processes. From additional geochemical studies, granitic rocks show high Rb/Sr (1.52), nearly flat REE patterns and strong Eu negative anomalies. However; monzonitic and hybrid rocks have relatively low Rb/Sr ratios (0.37 and 0.32) and depleted HREE patterns. Thus, in this complex, granitic rocks are considered as evolved products from the felsic magma. Strong positive Mo-correlation within the granitoids can be explained by a high degree of magmatic fractionation (Ishihara and Tani, 2004). Therefore, last evolved granitic melts are enriched in Mo- rich volatiles giving rise to molybdenite-quartz-calcite veins. Field, macro-micro and chemical studies evidence a co-magmatic origin for the gabbroic/basaltic-hosted Fe-mineralization. Despite the very close relation between compositional character

  20. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrite QUE 94484

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites are broadly "eucritic", being composed of ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase, a silica phase, ilmenite and accessory phases. Their characteristics indicate that eucrite-like basalts formed on asteroids of similar composition under similar petrologic conditions (T, P, fO2). Some eucrite-like basalts have isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics consistent with formation on different parent asteroids (e.g., Ibitira, NWA 011). Others show small isotopic differences but no distinguishing petrological characteristics (e.g., Caldera, Pasamonte). We have begun a study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites in an effort to seek resolution to the issues: Did the eucrite parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? How many parent asteroids are represented by these basalts? Here we present preliminary petrologic information on anomalous basaltic eucrite QUE 94484.

  1. Multiple sulfur isotope and mineralogical constraints on the genesis of Ni-Cu-PGE magmatic sulfide mineralization of the Monchegorsk Igneous Complex, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, A.; Grokhovskaya, T. L.; Hiebert, R.; Sharkov, E. V.; Bui, T. H.; Stadnek, K. R.; Chashchin, V. V.; Wing, B. A.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a pilot investigation of multiple sulfur isotopes for the Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineralization of the ˜2.5 Ga Monchegorsk Igneous Complex (MIC). Base Metal Sulfide (BMS) compositions, Platinum Group Element (PGE) distributions, and Platinum Group Mineral (PGM) assemblages were also studied for different types of Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization. The uniformly low S content of the country rocks for the MIC as well as variable Sm-Nd isotope systematics and low-sulfide, PGE-rich mineralization of the MIC suggest that S saturation was reached via assimilation of silicates rather than assimilation of sulfur-rich lithologies. R-factor modeling suggests that the mixing ratio for silicate-to-sulfide melt was very high, well above 15,000 for the majority of our mineralized samples, as might be expected for the low-sulfide, PGE-rich mineralization of the MIC. Small, negative Δ33S values (from -0.23 to -0.04 ‰) for sulfides in strongly metamorphosed MIC-host rocks indicate that their sulfur underwent mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (MIF) in the oxygen-poor Archean atmosphere before it was incorporated into the protoliths of the host paragneisses and homogenized during metamorphism. Ore minerals from the MIC have similar Δ33S values (from -0.21 to -0.06 ‰) consistent with country rock assimilation contributing to sulfide saturation, but, also importantly, our dataset suggests that Δ33S values decrease from the center to the margin of the MIC as well as from early to late magmatic phases, potentially indicating that both local assimilation of host rocks and S homogenization in the central part of the large intrusion took place.

  2. The geochemistry of primitive volcanic rocks of the Ankaratra volcanic complex, and source enrichment processes in the genesis of the Cenozoic magmatism in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melluso, L.; Cucciniello, C.; le Roex, A. P.; Morra, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Ankaratra volcanic complex in central Madagascar consists of lava flows, domes, scoria cones, tuff rings and maars of Cenozoic age that are scattered over 3800 km2. The mafic rocks include olivine-leucite-nephelinites, basanites, alkali basalts and hawaiites, and tholeiitic basalts. Primitive samples have high Mg# (>60), high Cr and Ni concentrations; their mantle-normalized patterns peak at Nb and Ba, have troughs at K, and smoothly decrease towards the least incompatible elements. The Ankaratra mafic rocks show small variation in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70377-0.70446, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51273-0.51280, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.25-18.87). These isotopic values differ markedly from those of Cenozoic mafic lavas of northern Madagascar and the Comoro archipelago, typical Indian Ocean MORB and oceanic basalt end-members. The patterns of olivine nephelinitic magmas can be obtained through 3-10% partial melting of a mantle source that was enriched by a Ca-rich alkaline melt, and that contained garnet, carbonates and phlogopite. The patterns of tholeiitic basalts can be obtained after 10-12% partial melting of a source enriched with lower amounts of the same alkaline melt, in the spinel- (and possibly amphibole-) facies mantle, hence in volumes where carbonate is not a factor. The significant isotopic change from the northernmost volcanic rocks of Madagascar and those in the central part of the island implicates a distinct source heterogeneity, and ultimately assess the role of the continental lithospheric mantle as source region. The source of at least some volcanic rocks of the still active Comoro archipelago may have suffered the same time-integrated geochemical and isotopic evolution as that of the northern Madagascar volcanic rocks.

  3. Regional seismic reflection line, southern Illinois Basin, provides new data on Cambrian rift geometry, Hicks Dome genesis, and the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, C.J.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Taylor, C.D. ); Heigold, P.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Detailed studies of the subsurface structure of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift (RFR) in the Midwestern US provide important insights into continental rifting processes and into the structural fabric of a zone of modern intracratonic seismicity (New Madrid zone). High-quality oil industry seismic reflection data show that in the area of transition between the RFR and the Rough Creek Graben (RCG) the geometry of the Cambrian rift system is that of a half-graben that thickens to the southeast. This contrasts with the northward-thickening half-graben observed to the east in the RCG and with the more symmetric graben to the south in the RFR. An 82.8-km segment of a northwest-southeast seismic reflection profile in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky shows that near Hicks Dome, Illinois, Middle and Lower Cambrian syn-rift sedimentary rocks occupy about 0.35 s (two-way travel time) on the seismic reflection section (corresponding to a thickness of about 970 m). This stratigraphic interval occupies about 0.45 s (1,250 m) near the Ohio river and is thickest against the Tabb Fault System (TFS) in Kentucky, where it occupies 0.7 s (1,940 m). The seismic data show that in this part of the Cambrian rift the master fault was part of the TFS and that normal displacement on the TFS continued through middle Paleozoic time. The seismic data also provide new information on the late Paleozoic development of Hicks-Dome and the surrounding Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky. A series of grabens and horsts in the FAFC document a late Paleozoic reactivation of the RFR. Comparison of the reflection data with surface mineralization patterns shows that in most cases mineralized graben-bounding faults clearly cut basement or are splays from faults that cut basement.

  4. Genesis and Characteristics of Debris Flow Ocurred in 2013 in the Atenquique Ravine, Located on the Eastern Slope of the Colima Volcanic Complex, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Flores-Pena, S.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Arreola-Ochoa, L. C.; Suarez-Gonzalez, B. V.

    2014-12-01

    Hurricane Manuel affected the Pacific coast of Mexico on September 15 and 16, 2013 causing heavy rainfall of about 240 mm in a 24 hour period in the area of the Volcanic Complex (VC). Heavy rainfall led to the beginning of a significant flow of mud and rocks draining from the Atenquique Creek, located on the eastern slope of the VC in a west east direction. The result of this flow was the heavy damage sustained by the local paper plant located next to the town of Atenquique in the distal part of the basin where the stream is gathered by the Tuxpan River. Damages totaling over 15 million dollars affected a large part in their recycled fibers factory, resulting in an 18-month full stoppage of the factory. This in turn caused a heavy setback of the economy located within a large region of the southern state of Jalisco. Once again on November 25, debris flow occurred only at a lower volume than the September rains, without causing any damage. Both flows contained a viscous and solid liquid flow that left deposits of silt-sandy clasts and other abundant materials of reverse gradation. The first flow reached a thickness of 4.5 m in the Tuxpan riverbed over a length of about 15 km, while the November flow left behind 1.3 m of fine materials and few clasts. The Atenquique ravine historically has had debris flow caused by heavy rainfall from hurricanes. On October 1955 debris flow claimed many deaths and heavy damage to the town and local paper mill. These flows are generated in the summer and they are associated to several factors such as weather, steep slopes, unstable volcanic strata, these elements add an important environmental history in the area, as is the use of continuous deforestation. The current land use has resulted in a positive change from forest to intensive agriculture; but having constant wildfires on the high slopes of the VC and the combination of many other factors such as changes on the soil of the slopes and movement of geological material "scarps and

  5. Carbon petrology in cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) are collected in the Earth's stratosphere. There exists an extensive database on major and minor element chemistry, stable isotopes, noble gas abundances and mineralogy of many CP IDP's, as well as infrared and Raman spectroscopic properties. For details on the mineralogy, chemistry and physical properties of IDP's, I refer to the reviews by Mackinnon and Rietmeijer (1987), Bradley et al. (1988) and Sandford (1987). Texture, mineralogy (Mackinnon and Rietmeijer, 1987) and chemistry (Schramm et al., 1989; Flynn and Sutton, 1991) support the notion that CP IDP's are a unique group of ultrafine-grained extraterrestiral materials that are distinct from any known meteorite class. Their fluffy, or porous, morphology suggests that CP IDP's probably endured minimal alteration by protoplanetary processes since their formation. It is generally accepted that CP IDP's are solid debris from short-period comets. The evidence is mostly circumstantial but this notion gained significant support based on the comet Halley dust data (Brownlee, 1990). In this paper, I will accept that CP IDP's are indeed cometary dust. The C/Si ratio in CP IDP's is 3.3 times higher than in CI carbonaceous chondrites (Schramm et al. 1989). The intraparticle carbon distribution is heteorogeneous (Rietmeijer and McKay, 1986). Carbon occurs both in oxidized and reduced forms. Analytical electron microscope (AEM) and Raman spectroscopic analyses have shown the presence of several carbon forms in CP IDP's but the data are scattered in the literature. Carbons in cometary CP IDP's are among the most pristine Solar System carbons available for laboratory study. Similar to a recently developed petrological model for the diversity of layer silicates in CP IDP's (Zolensky, 1991) that is useful to constrain in situ aqueous alteration in comets (Rietmeijer and Mackinnon, 1987a), I here present the first effort to develop a petrological concept of carbons

  6. Genesis Preliminary Examination: Ellipsometry Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft returned to Earth on September 8, 2004, experiencing a non-nominal reentry in which both the drogue and main parachutes failed to deploy causing the capsule to impact the surface of the UTTR desert at a speed of approximately 310 kph (193 mph). The impact caused severe damage to the capsule and a breach of the science canister in the field. The science canister was recovered and transported to the cleanroom at UTTR within approximately 8 hours of reentry. Although the ground water table did not rise to canister level before removal, damp soil and debris from the heat shield and other spacecraft components did enter the canister and contaminate some collector surfaces. The objective of preliminary examination of the Genesis collectors is to provide the science community with the information necessary to request the most useful samples for their analysis.

  7. Reconstruction of the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the findings from a reconstruction analysis of the Genesis capsule entry. First, a comparison of the atmospheric properties (density and winds) encountered during the entry to the pre-entry profile is presented. The analysis that was performed on the video footage (obtained from the tracking stations at UTTR) during the descent is then described from which the Mach number at the onset of the capsule tumble was estimated following the failure of the drogue parachute deployment. Next, an assessment of the Genesis capsule aerodynamics that was extracted from the video footage is discussed, followed by a description of the capsule hypersonic attitude that must have occurred during the entry based on examination of the recovered capsule heatshield. Lastly, the entry trajectory reconstruction that was performed is presented.

  8. Petrologic implications of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Yoder, H S

    1971-07-30

    Petrologists can make significant contributions to the plate tectonic concept. Fixing the stability fields of the principal rock types involved will provide the limits of pressure and temperature of the various environments. Experimental determination of the partition coefficients of the trace elements will be helpful. Studies of the partial melting behavior of possible parental materials in the absence and presence of water, especially the undersaturated region, will contribute to the understanding of magma production. Experimental observations on the rheological properties of the peridotites below and just above the solidus will lead to a better evaluation of the convective mechanism. Measurement of the fundamental properties of rocks, such as the density of solids and liquids at high pressures and temperatures, would contribute to understanding the concepts of diapiric rise, magma segregation, and the low-velocity zone. Broader rock sampling of the oceanic areas of all environments will do much to define the petrologic provinces. The field petrologist specializing in the Paleozoic regions and Precambrian shields can contribute by examining those regions for old plate boundaries and devising new criteria for their recognition. PMID:17770454

  9. Petrology and structural modeling of skarn genesis in the Tange-Hana area (SW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradipoor, Mahshid; Samani, Babak

    2010-05-01

    Tang-e-Hana region is located in the Snandaj-Sirjan structural zone in the Northwestern of Neyriz in the East of Fars province. The area mainly consist of ultramafic (harzburgite, dunite, wehrlite), mafic (gabbro) and marble rocks which partly changed to skarn. Contact of ultramafic rocks and Cretaceous calcite unites cause to form marble and skarn rocks in the study area. The main minerals in skarns are garnet (andradite+grossular), clinopyroxene (diopside, hedenbergite) Vesuvianite, Scapolite, wollastonite and magnetite. The skarn rocks show different temporal compound, so that the formation of wollastonite and garnet show gradual increase and decrease from SE to NW of the study area. The existence of wollastonite in the skarns of northern part of Tang-e-Hana is due to high temperature gradient and Xco2. According to microprobe analysis and field studies the temperature and Xco2 of the skarn rocks at the time of generation was estimated between 600˚-800˚ and 0.03-0.3. Also the effective pressure of Oxygen was changed between 10-12 to 10-28 . In this paper we try to explain the changes of mention parameters with application of structural evolution models.

  10. Petrology, geochemistry, and fluid regime of tectonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letnikov, Feliks Artem'evich; Savel'Eva, Valentina Borisovna; Balyshev, Sergei Olegovich

    The book discusses the petrology, geochemisry, and fluid regime of the tectonite formation in rocks that differ with respect to the composition of their granulitic, amphylitic, and green-shale metamorphic facies. Tectonites in magma and metamorphic rocks of different composition are described in terms of their petrological, geochemical, and fluid-regime characteristics, and the pressure/temperature conditions of their formation. Using chemical and physical parameters, tectonites are classified according to their type models. The ore-generating capacity of tectonites in various rocks is estimated using a large geochemical database.

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy: A promising tool for carbonate petrology

    SciTech Connect

    Vice, M.A.; Bensley, D.F.; Utgaard, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Responses of depositional and diagenetic components in samples of the Mission Canyon Limestone to blue-light excitation vary most noticeably with mineralogy and crystal size. The finely crystalline micrites, dolomicrites and argillaceous carbonates fluoresce more intensely than the more coarsely crystalline sparry calcite cements, dolospar cements and coarsely crystalline dolomites. Low intensity spectral analysis of cherts, anhydrites, and the carbonate phases provides an objective manner for quantifying fluorescence responses and for comparing them statistically. Nineteen of the optical parameters used in organic petrology are evaluated for their utility in carbonate petrology. Results of the discriminant function analysis suggest that red-weighted fluorescence chromaticity indices and yellow-weighted ones are more useful for mineral identification than the blue-weighted or equal-energy chromaticity indices. Statistical analysis of the optical data, mineralogy, and minor element compositions suggests correlations between the fluorescence responses and major minerals, carbonate diagenetic components, and the minor element geochemistry of carbonate components. Although no single element is identified as an activator of fluorescence in this study, the complex correlations of optical indices with Fe suggest that it does act to quench fluorescence. The four fluorescence cy chromaticity indices correlate significantly and positively with mineralogy and negatively with MgCo[sub 3]. In organic petrology, these indices are related to maceral content. The positive correlations of the four fluorescence cx chromaticity indices with Fe and Mn likely reflect fluorescence response to changes in compositions of pore fluids during diagenesis. This trend parallels the increase in cx indices with increasing maturation of organic materials.

  12. Art, Education, and Community: Arts Genesis, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kestler, Carol S.

    Arts Genesis, Inc. (AGI) forms partnerships with diverse communities to assist them in finding fulfillment through the arts by meeting their own self-defined needs; uses arts experiences to encourage discovery, creativity, and diversity; and continually strives for excellence in the arts and education. Arts Genesis grew out of "Project…

  13. [The genesis of crime according to dialectic criminology. II. Comments on the genesis of crime].

    PubMed

    Lyra, R; Ferracuti, F

    1978-01-01

    Prof. Lyra discusses in this article the basic problem of criminological sciences, stating that its essential object of study is the determination of the genesis of crime. The Author states that, before defining the crime genesis, it is necessary to outline, through a synthesis of epistemological restructurization of criminology itself. This way, we can develop a conception of Dialectic Criminology, where the term "dialectic" does not necessarily coincide with a marxist posture, but it extends along much more complex and comprehensive parameters. Dialectic Criminology is defined, in Lyra's conception, as a Classified Criminology, synthetizing both the psychological approach (clinical criminology, or micro-criminology), and the sociological approach (sociological criminology or macro-criminology), according to an anthropological basic frame of reference, which constitutes the new and original prerequisite. To this aim, according to Prof. Lyra, it is necessary to overcome merely biological or psychological theories, and the new sociologisms, which cannot explain deviant behavior without falling into dogmatism or relativism. It is necessary to give back to criminology its original ethico-philosophical roots, and to place the problem of crime within a new "praxis" concept, which takes into account the authentic freedom of man, interracting with historical evolution. This way, through Dialectic Criminology, we can overcome the conception of crime and delinquency viewed as counterparts of the concept of Law. PMID:756568

  14. Petrologic Characteristics of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianmin; Pedrycz, Witold

    2015-11-01

    Petrologic analysis of the lunar surface is critical for determining lunar formation and evolution. Here, we report the first global petrologic map that includes the five most important lunar lithological units: the Ferroan Anorthositic (FAN) Unit, the Magnesian Suite (MS) Unit, the Alkali Suite (AS) Unit, the KREEP Basalt (KB) Unit and the Mare Basalt (MB) Unit. Based on the petrologic map and focusing on four long-debated and important issues related to lunar formation and evolution, we draw the following conclusions from the new insights into the global distribution of the five petrologic units: (1) there may be no petrogenetic relationship between MS rocks and KB; (2) there may be no petrogenetic link between MS and AS rocks; (3) the exposure of the KREEP component on the lunar surface is likely not a result of MB volcanism but is instead mainly associated with the combined action of plutonic intrusion, KREEP volcanism and celestial collision; (4) the impact size of the South Pole-Aitken basin is constrained, i.e., the basin has been excavated through the whole crust to exhume a vast majority of lower-crustal material and a very limited mantle components to the lunar surface.

  15. Petrologic Characteristics of the Lunar Surface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianmin; Pedrycz, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Petrologic analysis of the lunar surface is critical for determining lunar formation and evolution. Here, we report the first global petrologic map that includes the five most important lunar lithological units: the Ferroan Anorthositic (FAN) Unit, the Magnesian Suite (MS) Unit, the Alkali Suite (AS) Unit, the KREEP Basalt (KB) Unit and the Mare Basalt (MB) Unit. Based on the petrologic map and focusing on four long-debated and important issues related to lunar formation and evolution, we draw the following conclusions from the new insights into the global distribution of the five petrologic units: (1) there may be no petrogenetic relationship between MS rocks and KB; (2) there may be no petrogenetic link between MS and AS rocks; (3) the exposure of the KREEP component on the lunar surface is likely not a result of MB volcanism but is instead mainly associated with the combined action of plutonic intrusion, KREEP volcanism and celestial collision; (4) the impact size of the South Pole-Aitken basin is constrained, i.e., the basin has been excavated through the whole crust to exhume a vast majority of lower-crustal material and a very limited mantle components to the lunar surface. PMID:26611148

  16. Petrologic Characteristics of the Lunar Surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianmin; Pedrycz, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Petrologic analysis of the lunar surface is critical for determining lunar formation and evolution. Here, we report the first global petrologic map that includes the five most important lunar lithological units: the Ferroan Anorthositic (FAN) Unit, the Magnesian Suite (MS) Unit, the Alkali Suite (AS) Unit, the KREEP Basalt (KB) Unit and the Mare Basalt (MB) Unit. Based on the petrologic map and focusing on four long-debated and important issues related to lunar formation and evolution, we draw the following conclusions from the new insights into the global distribution of the five petrologic units: (1) there may be no petrogenetic relationship between MS rocks and KB; (2) there may be no petrogenetic link between MS and AS rocks; (3) the exposure of the KREEP component on the lunar surface is likely not a result of MB volcanism but is instead mainly associated with the combined action of plutonic intrusion, KREEP volcanism and celestial collision; (4) the impact size of the South Pole-Aitken basin is constrained, i.e., the basin has been excavated through the whole crust to exhume a vast majority of lower-crustal material and a very limited mantle components to the lunar surface. PMID:26611148

  17. Petrological cycles and caldera-forming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Deering, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Many caldera-forming events can be framed within broad petrological cycles; volcanic stratigraphy typically defines a trend from mafic to more silicic magmas with time, culminating in the catastrophic evacuation of an upper crustal reservoir filled with the silicic magma, followed by a return to the eruption of more mafic magmas shortly after caldera collapse. Understanding how such cycles develop has clear implications for characterizing the current state of an active system. Here, we focus on a detailed examination of the well-exposed Quaternary Kos-Nisyros eruptive sequence (eastern Aegean arc) to frame a potential model for such cycles. On the basis of zircon U/Th/Pb ages, building the upper crustal magma chamber large enough to induce caldera collapse required at least a few hundred thousand years. This timeframe is necessary not only for the accumulation of large amounts of viscous, gas-rich silicic magma, but also to heat the upper crust sufficiently to allow the developing reservoir to be maintained above the solidus. In the Kos-Nisyros volcanic center, small eruptions precede the caldera-forming event and mark this period of thermal maturation as the system transitions from intermediate to silicic magma, reaching the most-evolved state only shortly prior to the caldera-forming event, the Kos Plateau Tuff (> 60 km3 of volatile-rich, high-silica rhyolite). The Kos Plateau Tuff was then followed by small-volume eruptions of more mafic magma (basaltic andesite, andesite, and dacites) that are characterized by a drier mineral assemblage. With time, the system transitioned back to cold, wet, high-SiO2 rhyolite. We suggest that the changes in magma composition and mineralogy following the caldera-forming event are due to a near-complete crystallization of the non-erupted mush in the upper crustal reservoir as it is abruptly decompressed during eruption. This rapid crystallization (1) leads to the formation of a porphyritic texture in the crystalline residual - a

  18. The Genesis of the Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansford, R. F.

    The Institute of Navigation was born on 12 March 1947 in the Boardroom of Lloyds Register of Shipping. More will be said of this later, but the birth is well documented and defined.It will surprise no one that the conception is much less easily defined, but it is certainly no less significant a part of the genesis of the Institute. This article is an attempt to outline the early history of the Institute.During 1944 and 1945 an Institute of Navigation was formed in the United States and, in May 1945, it held its first Annual General Meeting with Professor Sam Herrick as its Executive Secretary. Its meetings were attended by the Navigation Specialist on the British Air Commission in Washington (Squadron Leader D. O. Fraser) and duly reported back, through the Commission, to the Air Ministry in the United Kingdom.

  19. Genesis: Sorting Out the Pieces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, K. M.; Westphal, Andrew; Butterworth, A. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis mission returned to Earth on September 8, 2004, experiencing a non-nominal reentry. The parachutes which were supposed to slow and stabilize the capsule throughout the return failed to deploy, causing the capsule to impact the desert floor at a speed of nearly 200 MPH. The result is that instead of receiving 301 intact solar wind collectors, mission personnel recovered and documented more than 10,000 collector fragments. Most of the fragments were pieces of the collector arrays but were not recovered on their original array locations. These were classified by size (longest dimension), identity (sometimes a guess) and found location (when known). The work took more than one month in Utah, and details are discussed elsewhere[1] The samples were transferred to their permanent home at the Johnson Space Center on October 4, 2004.

  20. Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission.

    PubMed

    Burnett, D S; Team, Genesis Science

    2011-11-29

    Science results from the Genesis Mission illustrate the major advantages of sample return missions. (i) Important results not otherwise obtainable except by analysis in terrestrial laboratories: the isotopic compositions of O, N, and noble gases differ in the Sun from other inner solar system objects. The N isotopic composition is the same as that of Jupiter. Genesis has resolved discrepancies in the noble gas data from solar wind implanted in lunar soils. (ii) The most advanced analytical instruments have been applied to Genesis samples, including some developed specifically for the mission. (iii) The N isotope result has been replicated with four different instruments. PMID:21555545

  1. Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, D. S.; Team, Genesis Science

    2011-01-01

    Science results from the Genesis Mission illustrate the major advantages of sample return missions. (i) Important results not otherwise obtainable except by analysis in terrestrial laboratories: the isotopic compositions of O, N, and noble gases differ in the Sun from other inner solar system objects. The N isotopic composition is the same as that of Jupiter. Genesis has resolved discrepancies in the noble gas data from solar wind implanted in lunar soils. (ii) The most advanced analytical instruments have been applied to Genesis samples, including some developed specifically for the mission. (iii) The N isotope result has been replicated with four different instruments. PMID:21555545

  2. Petrological Mapping of the Crater Boguslawsky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhler, C.; Evdokimova, N. A.; Feoktistova, E. A.; Grumpe, A.; Kapoor, K.; Berezhnoy, A. A.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    An analysis of orbital spectral data of the crater Boguslawsky, the intended target region of the Russian Luna-Glob mission, is performed. We have constructed a high- resolution DEM of the crater Boguslawsky, based on which the temperature regime on the surface is investigated. The depth of the OH absorption feature is analysed.The content of the main elements is estimated, and a petrologic map is constructed accordingly.

  3. Genesis Halo Orbit Station Keeping Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, M.; Williams, K.; Wilson, R.; Howell, K.; Barden, B.

    2000-01-01

    As the fifth mission of NASA's Directory Program, Genesis is designed to collect solar wind samples for approximately two years in a halo orbit near the Sun-Earth L(sub 1) Lagrange point for return to the Earth.

  4. Magmas and magmatic rocks: An introduction to igneous petrology

    SciTech Connect

    Middlemost, E.A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book melds traditional igneous petrology with the emerging science of planetary petrology to provide an account of current ideas on active magmatic and volcanic processes, drawing examples from all igneous provinces of the world as well as from the moon and planets. It reviews the history and development of concepts fundamental to modern igneous petrology and includes indepth sections on magmas, magnetic differentiation and volcanology.

  5. The Genesis of tectonically and hydrothermally controlled industry mineral deposits: A geochemical and structural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölfler, Anke; Prochaska, Walter; Henjes-Kunst, Friedhelm; Fritz, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The study aims to investigate the role of hydrothermal fluids in the formation of talc and magnesite deposits. These deposits occur in manifold geological and tectonical settings such as stockworks and veins within ultramafite hostrocks and monomineralic lenses within marine platform sediments. Along shear zones talc mineralizations may occur as a result of tectonical and hydrothermal activity. To understand the role of the fluids for the genesis of the mineralization, deposits in different geological and tectonical settings are investigated: Talc mineralization within in magnesite in low-grade palaeozoic nappe complexes (Gemerska Poloma, Slovakia): The magnesite body lies within the Gemer unit of the Inner Carpathians consisting of Middle Triassic metacarbonates and Upper Triassic pelagic limestones and radiolarites. The talc mineralization is bound to crosscutting veins. Two metamorphic events can be distinguished, one during Variscan orogeny and one related to the Alpine orogeny leading to the formation of talc along faults in an Mg carbonate body (Radvanec et al, 2004).The origin of the fluids as well as the tectonic events leading to the mineralization is still widely unknown. Talc mineralization in shearzones within Palaeozoic meta sedimentary rocks (Sa Matta, Sardinia): Variscan granitoids intruded Palaeozoic meta sedimentary rocks and were overprinted be NE striking tectonic structures that host talc mineralizations. The origin of Mg and fluids leading to the mineralization is still not answered satisfactorily (Grillo and Prochaska, 2007) and thus a tectonic model for the genesis of the talc deposit is missing. Talc mineralization within UHP pre-Alpine continental crust (Val Chisone, Italy): The talc deposit forms part of the Dora-Maira Massif. Geologicaly the massif derived from a Variscan basement that includes post-Variscan intrusions. The talc mineralization occurs as a sheetlike, conformable body. A possible tectonic emplacement of talc along shear

  6. A genesis of special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messager, Valérie; Letellier, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    The genesis of special relativity is intimately related to the development of the theory of light propagation. When optical phenomena were described, there are typically two kinds of theories: (i) One based on light rays and light particles and (ii) one considering the light as waves. When diffraction and refraction were experimentally discovered, light propagation became more often described in terms of waves. Nevertheless, when attempts were made to explain how light was propagated, it was nearly always in terms of a corpuscular theory combined with an ether, a subtle medium supporting the waves. Consequently, most of the theories from Newton's to those developed in the 19th century were dual and required the existence of an ether. We therefore used the ether as our Ariadne thread for explaining how the principle of relativity became generalized to the so-called Maxwell equations around the 1900's. Our aim is more to describe how the successive ideas were developed and interconnected than framing the context in which these ideas arose.

  7. LCSs in tropical cyclone genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, B.; Montgomery, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic most often occurs at the intersection of the wave trough axis of a westward propagating African easterly wave and the wave critical latitude. Viewed in a moving reference frame with the wave, a cat's eye region of cyclonic recirculation can be seen in streamlines prior to genesis. The cat's eye recirculation region has little strain deformation and its center serves as the focal point for aggregation of convectively generated vertical vorticity. Air inside the cat's eye is repeatedly moistened by convection and is protected from the lateral intrusion of dry air. Since the flow is inherently time-dependent, we contrast the time-dependent structures with Eulerian structures of the wave-relative frame. Time-dependence complicates the kinematic structure of the recirculation region as air masses from the outer environment are allowed to interact with the interior of the cat's eye. LCSs show different boundaries of the cat's eye than the streamlines in the wave-relative frame. These LCSs are particularly important for showing the pathways of air masses that interact with the developing vortex, as moist air promotes development by supporting deep convection, while interaction with dry air impedes development. We primarily use FTLEs to locate the LCSs, and show the role of LCSs in both developing and non-developing storms. In addition, we discuss how the vertical coherence of LCSs is important for resisting the effects of vertical wind shear.

  8. Textural and petrological characteristics of ultrahigh-pressure chromitites, indicating a mantle recycling origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Shoji; Miura, Makoto; Yamamoto, Shinji; Shmelev, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Podiform chromitites, which occur as irregular to lens-like chromite-rich bodies within mantle peridotite in ophiolites, show various petrological characteristics, suggesting various origins. Some of them contain ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) minerals such as diamond, moissanite and Fe silicides (= UHP chromitites) (e.g., Robinson et al., 2004; Yang et al., 2007). Their origin is highly enigmatic, because the podiform chromitites have been widely understood as low-P (uppermost mantle level) products (e.g., Arai and Yurimoto, 1994; Zhou et al., 1994). Ordinary podiform chromitites show various lines of evidence for low-P genesis. Chromian spinel (or chromite) frequently contains solid mineral inclusions, and one of their main phases is pargasite, which is stable up to 3 GPa (e.g., Niida and Green, 1999), one of typical low-P minerals. The melt-harzburgite intereaction is a fundamental process in podiform chromitite genesis (e.g., Arai and Yurimoto, 1994), and associated with incongruent melting of orthopyroxene in harzburgite to form dunite and relatively Si-rich melt, which is operative at low-P conditions (e.g., Kushiro, 1969). We are strongly required to incorporate the genesis UHP chromitite into the framework of podiform chromitite genesis. Arai (2010) proposed a hypothesis of deep mantle recycling of ordinary low-P chromitite for the genesis of UHP chromitite. We try to examine petrographical and petrological characteristics of UHP chromitites to check the hypothesis of Arai (2010). Some peculiar textures of podiform chromities, such as orbicular, nodular and anti-nodular textures, are interpreted to be primary igneous and particular to ordinary low-P igneous chromitites (cf. Nicolas, 1989). To be interesting, the nodular texture, characterized by oval aggregates of chromian spinel (= chromite nodules; ~1 cm across) set in olivine-rich matrix, is also observed in some of UHP chromitites from the Luobusa ophiolite, Tibet (e.g., Yamamoto et al., 2009). We carefully

  9. The Genesis of the AFMLTA and Babel and the Babel of Genesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, David

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the genesis of the Australian Federation of Modern Language Teachers Associations (AFMLTA) and "Babel." With regard to the origin of the title of the journal, its name refers only indirectly to the Tower of Babel in Genesis. It comes in fact from the affectionate nickname that had been given to the building at…

  10. New Results from the Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.; Eaton, H. A.; Keller, C.; Murphy, G. A.; Schmieder, B.

    2000-05-01

    From January 10 to 27, 2000, the Flare Genesis solar telescope observed the Sun while suspended from a balloon in the stratosphere above Antarctica. The goal of the mission was to acquire long time series of high-resolution images and vector magnetograms of the solar photosphere and chromosphere. Images were obtained in the magnetically sensitive Ca I line at 6122 Angstroms and at H-alpha (6563 Angstroms). The FGE data were obtained in the context of Max Millennium Observing Campaign #004, the objective of which was to study the ``Genesis of Solar Flares and Active Filaments/Sigmoids." Flare Genesis obtained about 26,000 usable images on the 8 targeted active regions. A preliminary examination reveals a good sequence on an emerging flux region and data on the M1 flare on January 22, as well as a number of sequences on active filaments. We will present the results of our first analysis efforts. Flare Genesis was supported by NASA grants NAG5-4955, NAG5-5139, and NAG5-8331 and by NSF grant OPP-9615073. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization supported early development of the Flare Genesis Experiment.

  11. Mineralogy, petrology and chemistry of ANT-suite rocks from the lunar highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, M.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    Anorthositic-noritic-troctolitic (ANT) rocks are the oldest and most abundant rocks of the lunar surface, and comprise about 90% of the suite of the lunar highlands. Consideration is given to the mineralogy, petrology, bulk chemistry, and origin of ANT-suite rocks. Problems associated in classifying and labeling lunar highland rocks because of textural complexities occurring from impact modifications are discussed. The mineralogy of ANT-suite rocks, dominated by plagioclase, olivine and pyrozene, and containing various minor minerals, is outlined. The petrology of ANT-suite rocks is reviewed along with the major element bulk composition of these rocks, noting that they are extremely depleted in K2O and P2O5. Various models describing the origin of ANT-suite rocks are summarized, and it is suggested that this origin involves a parental liquid of high-alumina basalt with low Fe/Fe+Mg.

  12. Genesis Capsule Yields Solar Wind Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Burnett, Donald S.; Stansbery, Eileen K.; McNamara, Karen M.

    2004-11-01

    NASA's Genesis capsule, carrying the first samples ever returned from beyond the Moon, took a hard landing in the western Utah desert on 8 September after its parachutes failed to deploy. Despite the impact, estimated at 310 km per hour, some valuable solar wind collector materials have been recovered. With these samples, the Genesis team members are hopeful that nearly all of the primary science goals may be met. The Genesis spacecraft was launched in August 2001 to collect and return samples of solar wind for precise isotopic and elemental analysis. The spacecraft orbited the Earth-Sun Lagrangian point (L1), ~1.5 million km sunward of the Earth, for 2.3 years. It exposed ultrapure materials-including wafers of silicon, silicon carbide, germanium, chemically deposited diamond, gold, aluminum, and metallic glass-to solar wind ions, which become embedded within the substrates' top 100 nm of these materials.

  13. Correlation between petrological, geochemical and tectonic segmentation within the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushchevskaya, N. M.; Cherkashov, G. A.; Tamaki, K.; Belyatsky, B. V.

    2003-04-01

    The possible primary rift melt compositions and its fractionation conditions under the various regions of spreading centers were determined on the base of the detail petrological and geochemical study of quenched glasses and basalts of Mohns-Knipovich Ridge. The forming Knipovich and Gakkel ridges coincide with the coldest zones of the oceanic lithosphere and are characterized by tholeiites enriched in Na, Si and poor in Fe. According lithophile elements distribution normalized to the primitive mantle the tholeiites are weakly enriched with maximum in Nb and minimum in Th, which are characteristic not only for the basalts of Knipovich and Gakkel ridges (Muhe, 1997), but for the Mohns and Kolbeinsey and alkaline basalts of Jan Mayen bank (Haase, 1996). Sr, Nd, Pb isotope data for the melts of Mohns and Knipovich ridges form the single mixing trend of enriched and depleted sources typical for Iceland basalts and differ from the lavas of Kolbeinsey ridge adjacent to Iceland (Mertz et al., 1991). Petrological segmentation of the North Atlantic appears and subordinates to geodynamic conditions, which are the results of global processes of deep diapirs uprising that is reflected in the tectonics of the region, but geochemical features of magmatism are caused by greater number of factors. For the North Atlantic region at the early stages of rift genesis there are determined depleted and weakly enriched tholeiites and the largest anomalies are connected with the regions of nonspreading parts of continental crust (Jan Mayen region). Enriched melts of ultra-slow spreading Knipovich ridge could be formed in the result of involving the low parts of adjacent continental blocks into the melting process with the following enriched melts migration and mantle flows into the spreading zones or due to the burying the formed melts and further melting of enriched mantle during the spreading axes jumping.

  14. Deep Crustal Structure beneath Large Igneous Provinces and the Petrologic Evolution of Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M. A.; Ridley, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ~6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ~5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp~7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hotspots such as Hawaii, the Marquesas, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ~6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ~15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as “underplating,” are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby better

  15. Deep Crustal Structure beneath Large Igneous Provinces and the Petrologic Evolution of Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Mark; Ridley, Victoria

    2010-05-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ~6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ~5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp~7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hotspots such as Hawaii, the Marqueses, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ~6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ~15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as "underplating," are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby better

  16. Deep crustal structure beneath large igneous provinces and the petrologic evolution of flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Victoria A.; Richards, Mark A.

    2010-09-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ˜ 6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ˜5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp ˜ 7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hot spots such as Hawaii, the Marquesas, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ˜6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ˜15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as "underplating," are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby

  17. [Petrological Analysis of Astrophysical Dust Analog Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This project "Petrological analysis of astrophysical dust analog evolution" was initiated to try to understand the vapor phase condensation, and the nature of the reaction products, in circumstellar environments, such as the solar nebula 4,500 Myrs ago, and in the interstellar medium. Telescope-based infrared [IR] spectroscopy offers a broad-scale inventory of the various types of dust in these environments but no details on small-scale variations in terms of chemistry and morphology and petrological phase relationships. Vapor phase condensation in these environments is almost certainly a non-equilibrium process. The main challenge to this research was to document the nature of this process that, based on astrophysical observations, seems to yield compositionally consistent materials. This observation may suggest a predictable character during non-equilibrium condensation. These astrophysical environments include two chemically distinct, that is, oxygen-rich and carbon-rich environments. The former is characterized by silicates the latter by carbon-bearing solids. According to cosmological models of stellar evolution circumstellar dust accreted into protoplanets wherein thermal and/or aqueous processes will alter the dust under initially, non-equilibrium conditions.

  18. Generalized Galileons: instabilities of bouncing and Genesis cosmologies and modified Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libanov, M.; Mironov, S.; Rubakov, V.

    2016-08-01

    We study spatially flat bouncing cosmologies and models with the early-time Genesis epoch in a popular class of generalized Galileon theories. We ask whether there exist solutions of these types which are free of gradient and ghost instabilities. We find that irrespectively of the forms of the Lagrangian functions, the bouncing models either are plagued with these instabilities or have singularities. The same result holds for the original Genesis model and its variants in which the scale factor tends to a constant as t → ‑∞. The result remains valid in theories with additional matter that obeys the Null Energy Condition and interacts with the Galileon only gravitationally. We propose a modified Genesis model which evades our no-go argument and give an explicit example of healthy cosmology that connects the modified Genesis epoch with kination (the epoch still driven by the Galileon field, which is a conventional massless scalar field at that stage).

  19. Interactive Storytelling: From the Book of Genesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Keith Park, advisory teacher for Sense (the National Deafblind Rubella Association) in Greenwich and Lewisham, London, has written about his approach to interactive storytelling for BJSE before. This article describes a series of poetry workshops based on chapters 37 to 45 of the Book of Genesis (the story of Joseph and his family) using the text…

  20. Grants: Genesis of Some Funded Proposal Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazdar, John

    2011-01-01

    While "thinking outside the box" can be an over-used phase at times, in the world of grants it can provide the genesis of ideas. The "box" is the world of academia accepted by most educators, while "thinking outside" is the process that leads to grant ideas. In the grant world, "thinking outside the box" is a process of doing something that has…

  1. Finding the Genesis for a Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caroll, Joyce Armstrong

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a prewriting heuristics strategy that can help students find the genesis of their thesis. The 3 functions of the heuristic procedure are that it aids in retrieving relevant information stored in the mind; draws attention to important information that can be further researched or accessed; and prepares the mind for the…

  2. 2.1-1.85 Ga tectonic events in the Yangtze Block, South China: Petrological and geochronological evidence from the Kongling Complex and implications for the reconstruction of supercontinent Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changqing; Lin, Shoufa; Davis, Donald W.; Zhao, Guochun; Xiao, Wenjiao; Li, Longming; He, Yanhong

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents petrography, zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic data as well as whole-rock Sm-Nd isotopic data for mafic granulites, metapelitic rocks and high-grade marble from the Kongling Complex in the Yangtze Block, South China. Petrographic observations indicate that these three types of rocks experienced high-pressure metamorphism. Their mineral assemblages and P-T conditions define a clockwise P-T path involving isothermal decompression following the peak high-pressure metamorphism, which is considered to record a continent-continent collisional event. This is systematic documentation of the tectonic evolution of the Kongling Complex from 2.1-2.0 Ga deposition (constrained by youngest detrital zircon and metamorphic zircon) through ~ 2.0 Ga collision (high-pressure metamorphism) and syn-collisional partial melting (S-type granite and migmatization of TTG gneiss) to ~ 1.85 Ga post-collisional extension (A-type high-K granite and mafic dyke). These ages are broadly coincident with global collisional events (2.1-1.8 Ga) that led to the assembly of the Palaeo-Mesoproterozoic Columbia (or Nuna) supercontinent. Therefore, this study provides strong evidence that the Yangtze Block in South China was a component of the Columbia supercontinent.

  3. Taos Plateau Volcanic Project: A Vehicle for Integration of Concepts in Igneous Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, D.; Dutrow, B.

    2003-12-01

    Integrating concepts of igneous petrology is generally a challenge, but can be effective in the context of a project based on actual field, geochemical and geochronological data. The final lab project in the igneous portion of petrology involves a series of volcanic and associated rock samples that were collected from the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA. Samples were collected over an area of several tens of km2 throughout the Plateau and represent a spatially and temporally correlated rock suite related to continental rifting. Rift-related magmatism encompasses much of the diversity of terrestrial magma types. Compositions of mafic magmas range from tholeiite to some of the most silica-undersaturated magmas found on the continents. Large effusive eruptions from fissures are typical of some rifts, whereas others may be dominated by central vent cones or even silicic caldera complexes. The injection of mantle-derived magma in extending crust may have a profound effect on the rheology of the crust and, therefore, the style of deformation associated with extension. Most of these aspects of rift volcanism and a wide range of mafic to silicic magma compositions are represented in the Rio Grande rift and the volcanic rocks of the Taos Plateau. In addition, much published data exists for whole rock and trace element geochemistry as well as geochronology. Rock samples and associated information are presented so that the student must integrate multiple lines of evidence, petrographic, petrologic, geochemical and geochronological data in a geospatial framework, to establish a geologic history of the region. The student must also draw on skills learned in mineralogy and structural geology furthering core geoscience education. Subsequent to the petrology course, the students visit the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field during their required field camp, thus reinforcing the linkage between the classroom setting and geologic reality.

  4. Petrology and U/Pb geochronology of the Santa Maria Ipalapa region in the southeastern part of the Xolapa Complex, Mexico: Constrains of the metamorphic evolution of the Xolapa Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez Aguilar, F.; Victoria Morales, A.; Maldonado, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Xolapa Complex is a metamorphic-plutonic basement that forms a large belt with more than 600 km length and 50-100 km wide along the Pacific coast of southeastern Mexico. This Complex is constituted by a high grade sequence of meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous rocks, locally migmatisized, and which are intruded by strongly deformed plutonic rocks. Because of their representative characteristics, two samples were analyzed: 1) Para-schist: this rocks present a mineral assemblage composed of biotite, sillimanite, plagioclase, k-feldspar and garnet, and 2) Amphibolite: which are constituted by amphibole, plagioclase, biotite and garnet. The garnet porphydoblasts in the para-schist are subhedral, presents retrograde compositional zoning, with almandine and pyrope rich core (Alm74-75Sps7.-10.1Pyr12.1-12.5Grs3.8-3.9) and spessartine rich rim (Alm69-71Sps14-19Pyr7.9-9.6Grs3.6-3.7). The garnet in amphibolite, presents a prograde growth zoning with a slight increase in spessartine in the core (Alm59-60Grs24-25Pyr8.0-8.3Sps7.3-7.6), and low content of spessartine component toward the rim (Alm60-62Grs23-24Pyr8.8-9.6Sps5.4-5.5). In order to constrain the P-T evolution of the region, multiequilibria thermobarometry was applied to both samples, the para-schist unit presents P-T data from 706 (ºC) and 7.5 (kbar), in the other hand the garnet amphibolite unit shows P-T data from 734 (ºC) and 7 (kbar). This study provides new geochronological data (U/Pb in zircons) for the amphibolite facies metamorphism and for the migmatitic event in the region that contributes to the understanding of the tectonic evolution of southeastern Mexico.

  5. Petrology and Composition of HED Polymict Breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Herrin, J. S.; Mertzman, S. A.; Mertzman, K. R.

    2010-01-01

    The howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) clan of meteorites forms the largest suite of achondrites with over 900 named members. The HEDs are igneous rocks and breccias of igneous rocks from a differentiated asteroid [1]. The consensus view is that these rocks hail from the asteroid 4 Vesta, which will be the first target of NASA's Dawn mission. When Dawn arrives at Vesta, she will begin remote imagery and spectroscopy of the surface. The surface she will observe will be dominated by rocks and soils mixed through impact gardening. To help with the interpretation of the remotely sensed data, we have begun a project on the petrologic and compositional study of a suite of HED polymict breccias. Here we report on the preliminary findings of this project.

  6. Petrology of brecciated ferroan noritic anorthosite 67215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, James J.

    1988-01-01

    A petrologic study of breccia 67215 is presented, showing that the rock has the bulk composition of a ferroan noritic anorthosite and is a polymict breccia containing several lithic clast types within a crushed, cataclastic matrix. The dominant lithic clasts contained in breccia 67215 are found to be igneous and metamorphic low- and high- Ca pyroxenes and olivine. Other clasts include granulated and sheared clasts, coarse-grained anorthosite with relatively Fe-rich augite, aphanitic, feldspathic microporphyritic melt breccias, and an impact-melt rock with strongly zoned relatively Mg-rich pyroxene. It is concluded that this rock type is relatively common in the highlands regolith excavated by the North Ray Crater.

  7. Altering petrology through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Figueroa, I.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) takes advantage of various microbial metabolisms to increase hydrocarbon and energy yield by improving oil flow and flood water sweep in a reservoir during tertiary recovery. Wormholing at the injection well is believed to be the result of the large drop in pressure when water exits the injection well and enters the unconsolidated reservoir matrix. One possible means of prevent this event is to consolidate the rock matrix immediately around the injection well to create a permeable zone of stable petrology. Many microbial processes are known to result in the precipitation of ionic components into their environment creating solid-phase minerals. Such processes could be judiciously applied to bind unconsolidated matrices in order to form a permeable concreted rock matrix, which would minimize wormholing events and thus improve floodwater sweep. However, to date, apart from the application of urea oxidation creating calcium carbonate precipitation, there has been little investigation of the applicability of these precipitated bioconcretions to MEOR strategies and none to control wormholing events. Here we present a novel approach to altering rock petrology to concrete unconsolidated matrices in the near well environment by the biogenesis of authigenic minerals through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation. Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans, strain FiPS-3 is currently the only isolated organism capable of using phosphite (HPO32-) as an electron donor for growth. This process, known as dissimilatory phosphite oxidation (DPO), can be coupled to either sulfate reduction or homoacetogenesis and leads to the accumulation of inorganic phosphate in the medium. The resulting insoluble mineral phases can coat the rock environment resulting in a concretion binding the unconsolidated matrix particles into a single phase. In this study we demonstrate that DPO can effectively produce calcium or magnesium phosphate minerals in packed glass

  8. Acidic Plutonism in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Mariana (IBM) Arc and Growth of Arc Crust: Petrological and Geochemical Characteristics of the Tonalite at the Komahashi-Daini Seamount and Difference From the Tanzawa Plutonic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, S.; Ishii, T.

    2003-12-01

    Recent seismic refraction and reflection data suggest that the continents are underlain by mafic lower crust and felsic middle crust. Petrogenesis of granitic middle crust layers is important for understanding the formation and evolution of continental crust. In modern tectonic regimes, tonalitic rocks and chemically equivalent volcanic rocks occur in island arcs and active continental margins. Thus, the petrogenesis of tonalite and related rocks in intra-oceanic arc settings is of great importance in understanding the processes of both recent island arc and continental crust formation. The Komahashi-Daini Seamount, in the northern Kyushu-Palau Ridge in the northern Philippine Sea plate, was investigated by the Japanese Geodynamics Project (GDP) cruises in the 1970's, and by the R/V Tansei-maru (Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo) in the 1990's. Plutonic rocks were dredged from the seamount, and have great importance for understanding the processes of island arc and continental crust formation. The petrographical and geochemical characteristics of the Komahashi-Daini Seamount tonalite are summarized as follows: (1) These tonalites are classified into biotite-hornblende tonalite and hornblende tonalite. Phenocrysts, especially plagioclase, show common lamellar twins and oscillatory zoning patterns; (2) This tonalite show low content of bulk LILE, and classified into low-K calc-alkaline, 1 to 8 wt.% MgO with 55 to 75 wt.% SiO2; (3) This tonalite shows roughly parallel and increasing total REE content with increasing SiO2 content, except for increasingly strong negative Eu anomaly at higher SiO2. These factors indicate that the Komahashi-Daini Seamount tonalite was produced by fractional crystallization. The parent magma of this tonalite is considered lower than 56 wt.% SiO2. Based on this relationship, we concluded that the source for the parental magma was arc mantle peridotite. We compared these tonalites with typical tonalite, i.e., Tanzawa Complex

  9. Petrology and Bulk Chemistry of R Chondrites: New Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, J.; Rubin, A. E.; Wasson, J. T.

    2010-03-01

    New INAA data show that R chondrites of all petrologic types are isochemical. R3 PRE 95411 contains numerous awaruite grains; R6 Y 980702 has a fine-grained granoblastic matrix; MET 01149 is reclassified as R3.

  10. A Virtual Petrological Microscope for All Apollo 11 Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillnger, C. T.; Tindle, A. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Quick, K.; Scott, P.; Gibson, E. K.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A means of viewing, over the Internet, polished thin sections of every rock in the Apollo lunar sample collections via software, duplicaing many of the functions of a petrological microscope, is described.

  11. Petrology in Action: Teaching Volcanology in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, K. S.

    2003-12-01

    Most petrology classes include description of volcanic systems as part of igneous petrology. The field of volcanology presents an opportunity for students to apply petrologic principles to physical processes with which they are familiar and to exemplify active magmatic processes that occur on relatively short time scales. As an illustration of the pedagogical connections between physical volcanology and igneous petrology, several classroom and lab exercises are described, including: a) analog experiments to illustrate rheological properties of magmas and how they vary with differing magmatic compositions; b) guided inquiry explorations of the role of magma composition on eruptive style and frequency; c) a sequence of demonstrations to illustrate physical principles of volcanic eruptions; d) problem sets using data from recent eruptions; and e) simulation of a volcanic monitoring crisis. The activities and demonstrations presented here illustrate a variety of applications of petrologic concepts, with an emphasis on the relationship between magmatic composition and its physical properties and how these physical properties in turn dictate the behavior of volcanic systems. They can be easily modified to illustrate magma chamber processes. These exercises are designed primarily for sophomore-level undergraduates and can be carried out in classrooms with a minimum of resources. The emphasis on hands-on inquiry exercises, coupled with the dynamic nature of some of these demonstrations gives students a chance to visualize petrologic processes that drive some of Earth's most dramatic events.

  12. A virtual petrological microscope for teaching and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Simon P.; Whalley, Peter; Tindle, Andrew G.; Anand, Mahesh

    2010-05-01

    Learning to use microscopes for geoscience or life science applications is a crucial part of the practical training offered in many science degrees, but the opportunities to study are often constrained by available laboratory space and time, and sometimes constrained by the number of high quality microscopes available. The alternative, although not replacing physical microscopes, offers the opportunity for enhancement and enrichment of laboratory experience in geoscience. An on-line microscope can also be used to engage the public with access to rare rocks such as meteorites and lunar samples. The focus of petrological microscope study in higher education is not primarily related to learning facts but is concerned with learning how to discriminate and classify within the paradigms of the discipline. In this case, the recognition and measurement of key features in rock samples in hand specimen and thin section. Whilst undertaking the practical exercise of recognition and naming of rock samples students are really being required to develop an understanding of the rock cycle as a model representing the relationship between rock categories and the process of their formation. The problems of teaching with complex visual materials, in effect of teaching learners 'how to see' from the scientific perspective of a particular discipline, are quite general. It could reasonably be expected that lessons learnt from the implementation and detailed evaluation of the proposed web-based system will generalise to many other topics in science education. Thus we focussed on the thin section images rather than reproducing a system that resembled a physical microscope. The virtual petrological microscope developed for a course at the Open University UK enables student acquisition of skills such as mineral and rock recognition using a browser window to explore thin sections of rocks as if they were using a laboratory microscope. The microscope allows students to pan around the thin

  13. From static to dynamic provenance analysis-Sedimentary petrology upgraded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    The classical approach to sandstone petrology, established in the golden years of plate tectonics and based on the axiom that "detrital modes of sandstone suites primarily reflect the different tectonic settings of provenance terranes," has represented a benchmark for decades. The composition of sand and sandstone, however, simply provides us with a distorted image of the lithological structure of source terranes and gives us little clue whether they are allochthonous or autochthonous, orogenic or anorogenic, young or old. What we may able to see reflected in detrital modes is the nature of source terranes (continental, arc, oceanic) and the tectonostratigraphic level reached by erosion in space and time. The proposed new approach to the petrology of sand and sandstone (1) starts with a simple classification scheme circulated since the 1960s, which is purely descriptive, objective, and free of ill-defined ambiguous terms and (2) focuses on the nature and tectonostratigraphic level of source terranes. Further steps are essential to upgrade provenance analysis. Acquiring knowledge from modern settings is needed to properly identify and wherever possible correct for physical and chemical processes introducing environmental and diagenetic bias and thus address nature's complexities with adequate conceptual tools. Equally important is the integration of multiple techniques, ideally including bulk-sediment, multi-mineral, and single-mineral methods. Bulk-sediment petrography remains the fundamental approach that allows us to capture the most precious source of direct provenance information, represented by the mineralogy and texture of rock fragments. Bulk-sediment geochemistry, applicable also to silt and clay carried in suspension, is a superior method to check for hydraulic sorting, chemical weathering, and fertility of detrital minerals in different sediment sources. Detrital geochronology, thermochronology, and isotope geochemistry reveal the diverse time structures

  14. Genesis Reentry Observations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, R. M.; Swift, W. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft reentry represented a unique opportunity to observe a "calibrated meteor" from northern Nevada. Knowing its speed, mass, composition, and precise trajectory made it a good subject to test some of the algorithms used to determine meteoroid mass from observed brightness. It was also a good test of an inexpensive set of cameras that could be deployed to observe future shuttle reentries. The utility of consumer-grade video cameras was evident during the STS-107 accident investigation, and the Genesis reentry gave us the opportunity to specify and test commercially available cameras that could be used during future reentries. This Technical Memorandum describes the video observations and their analysis, compares the results with a simple photometric model, describes the forward scatter radar experiment, and lists lessons learned from the expedition and implications for the Stardust reentry in January 2006 as well as future shuttle reentries.

  15. Genesis and intersubjectivity: levels of mediation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2012-09-01

    I will make a brief comment on the thesis of José C. Loredo-Narciandi and José C. Sánchez-González (2012) "Neither Dichotomies Nor Dualism; Simply Genesis". Denying any reductionism and reification, they insists the importance of inseparable relation between subject and object, then discuss about genesis. I pointed out that their argument lacks an important element, i.e., mediator that differ from mere physical object. After discussing mediators nature, I discriminate the three level of interaction which mediated by mediator. The first is the pre-interaction level, the second is physical interaction level and the third is sign or language interaction level. The last argument of mine is about how we can solve the problem of reification and reductionism. In the argument it is pointed out that intersubjectivity is key concept for understanding and solving the problem appropriately. PMID:22628155

  16. Slip rate and tremor genesis in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, Aaron G.; Bartlow, Noel M.

    2014-01-01

    At many plate boundaries, conditions in the transition zone between seismogenic and stable slip produce slow earthquakes. In the Cascadia subduction zone, these events are consistently observed as slow, aseismic slip on the plate interface accompanied by persistent tectonic tremor. However, not all slow slip at other plate boundaries coincides spatially and temporally with tremor, leaving the physics of tremor genesis poorly understood. Here we analyze seismic, geodetic, and strainmeter data in Cascadia to observe for the first time a large, tremor-generating slow earthquake change from tremor-genic to silent and back again. The tremor falls silent at reduced slip speeds when the migrating slip front pauses as it loads the stronger adjacent fault segment to failure. The finding suggests that rheology and slip-speed-regulated stressing rate control tremor genesis, and the same section of fault can slip both with and without detectable tremor, limiting tremor's use as a proxy for slip.

  17. Cleaning Study of Genesis Sample 60487

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kim R.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allton, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind and brought it back to Earth in order to provide precise knowledge of solar isotopic and elemental compositions. The ions in the solar wind were stopped in the collectors at depths on the order of 10 to a few hundred nanometers. This shallow implantation layer is critical for scientific analysis of the composition of the solar wind and must be preserved throughout sample handling, cleaning, processing, distribution, preparation and analysis. Particles of Genesis wafers, brine from the Utah Testing Range and an organic film have deleterious effects on many of the high-resolution instruments that have been developed to analyze the implanted solar wind. We have conducted a correlative microscopic study of the efficacy of cleaning Genesis samples with megasonically activated ultrapure water and UV/ozone cleaning. Sample 60487, the study sample, is a piece of float-zone silicon from the B/C array approximately 4.995mm x 4.145 mm in size

  18. Petrology and radiogeology of the Stripa pluton

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, Harold; Flexser, Steve; Andersson, Lennart

    1980-12-01

    To better define the character of the rock encompassing the thermomechanical and hydrological experiments at the Stripa mine in central Sweden, and to help determine the size of the Stripa pluton, detailed studies were conducted of the petrology and radiogeology of the quartz monzonite and adjacent rocks. Petrologic studies emphasized optical petrography, with supplementary X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and microprobe analyses. Radiogeologic investigations were based primarily on surface and underground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of uranium, thorium and potassium, supplemented by laboratory gamma spectrometric analyses and fission-track radiographic determinations of the locations and abundance of uranium in the rock matrix. Both the quartz monzonite and the metavolcanic leptite which it intruded are strongly fractured. Two stages of fracture filling are evident; an earlier stage encompassing quartz, sericite, feldspar, epidote, and chlorite, and a later stage dominated by carbonate minerals. The Stripa quartz monzonite is chemically and mineralogically distinct from other plutons in the region. Muscovite is the predominant mica in the quartz monzonite; biotite has been altered to chlorite, hornblende is absent, and accessory minerals are scarce. In contrast, in other plutons in the Stripa region biotite and hornblende are prominent mafic minerals and accessory minerals are abundant. The Stripa quartz monzonite is also considerably more radioactive than the leptite and other plutons in the region. Uranium and thorium abundances are both- 30 ppm, considerably higher than in "normal" granitic rocks where the thorium-to-uranium ratio generally exceeds 2. Potassium-argon dating of muscovite from the Stripa quartz monzonite indicates that this rock may be older, at 1691 million years than granitic rock of the neighboring Gusselby and Kloten massifs, whose ages, based on K-Ar dating of biotite, are respectively 1604 and 1640 m.y. Heat flow and heat

  19. Geology and petrology of the Early Precambrian of the Kodar-Udokan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivenko, Valentin Afanas'evich; Pinaeva, Tat'iana Aleksandrovna

    This book presents the results of studies on the geological structure and petrological characteristics of the layered Archean formations of the western part of the Aldan-Stanovoi region (the Kodar-Udokan region). On the basis of these results, it is concluded that the stratified Archean is in fact a polygenic-polychronous laminated megacomplex that was formed in the course of the Archean and the Early Poterozoic periods. This complex includes major crystalline schists, hypersthenic diorites, enderbites, charnockites, granite and plagiogranite gneisses, blastomylonites, and metasomatites. A novel scheme is proposed for the geological partition of the Kodar-Udokan Early Precambrian.

  20. SNC meteorites - Clues to Martian petrologic evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, H. Y.

    1985-11-01

    Shergottites, nakhlites and the Chassigny meteorites (SNC group) may have originated on Mars. The shergottites are medium-grained basalts, the nakhlites are pyroxenites and the Chassigny is a dunite. The SNC group is petrologically diverse but differs from all other known achondrites in terms of mineral chemistry, the redox state, the oxygen isotopic composition and the radiometric ages. The SNC stones are mafic and ultramafic cumulate rocks with mineralogies that indicate rapid cooling and crystallization from tholeiitic magmas which contained water and experienced a high degree of oxidation. The characteristics suggest formation from a large parent body, i.e., a planet, but not earth. The estimated ages for the rocks match the estimated ages for several mapped Martian volcanoes in the Tharsis region. Additionally, the elemental and isotopic abundances of atmospheric gases embedded in melts in the SNC stones match Viking Lander data for the Martian atmosphere. However, reasons are cited for discounting the possibility that a large meteorite(s) collided with Mars about 180 myr ago and served as the mechanism for ejecting the SNC stones to earth.

  1. Timing and genesis of the adakitic and shoshonitic intrusions in the Laoniushan complex, southern margin of the North China Craton: Implications for post-collisional magmatism associated with the Qinling Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li-Xue; Ma, Chang-Qian; Li, Jian-Wei; Robinson, Paul T.; Deng, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Wang-Chun

    2011-10-01

    The NWW-striking Qinling Orogen formed in the Triassic by collision between the North China and Yangtze Cratons. Triassic granitoid intrusions, mostly middle- to high-K, calc-alkaline, are widespread in this orogen, but contemporaneous intrusions are rare in the southern margin of the North China Craton, an area commonly considered as the hinterland belt of the orogen. In this paper, we report zircon U-Pb ages, elemental geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope data for the Laoniushan granitoid complex that was emplaced in the southern margin of the North China Craton. Zircon U-Pb dating shows that the complex was emplaced in the late Triassic (228 ± 1 to 215 ± 4 Ma), indicating that it is part of the post-collisional magmatism in the Qinling Orogen. The complex consists of, from early to late, biotite monzogranite, quartz diorite, quartz monzonite, and hornblende monzonite, which span a wide compositional range, e.g., SiO 2 = 55.9-70.6 wt.%, K 2O + Na 2O = 6.6-10.2 wt.%, and Mg # of 24 to 54. The biotite monzogranite has high Al 2O 3 (15.5-17.4 wt.%), Sr (396-1398 ppm) and Ba (1284-3993 ppm) contents and relatively high La/Yb (mostly 14-30) and Sr/Y (mostly 40-97) ratios, but low Yb (mostly 1.3-1.6 ppm) and Y (mostly14-19 ppm) contents, features typical of adakitic rocks. The quartz monzonite, hornblende monzonite and quartz diorite have a shoshonitic affinity, with K 2O up to 5.58 wt.% and K 2O/Na 2O ratios averaging 1.4. The rocks are characterized by strong LREE/HREE fractionation in chondrite-normalized REE pattern, without obvious Eu anomalies, and show enrichment in large ion lithophile elements but depletion in high field strength elements (Nb, Ta, Ti). The biotite monzogranite (228 Ma) has initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of 0.7061 to 0.7067, ɛNd(t) values of - 9.2 to - 12.6, and ɛ Hf(t) values of - 9.0 to - 15.1; whereas the shoshonitic granitoids (mainly 217-215 Ma) have similar initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.7065 to 0.7075) but more radiogenic ɛNd(t) (- 12.4 to

  2. Petrology and In Situ Trace Element Chemistry of a Suite of R Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Torrano, Z. A.

    2015-07-01

    Your eyes are not deceiving you: Duck has submitted an abstract to a chondrite session. We will present the results of our petrological and compositional studies of R chondrites of diverse petrological type.

  3. Thermal structure of the lithosphere: a petrologic model.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, I D; Basu, A R

    1974-09-20

    A preliminary evaluation of the thermal history of the upper mantle as determined by petrologic techniques indicates a general correspondence with theoretically derived models. The petrologic data supply direct information which may be used as an independent calibration of calculated models, serve as a base for evaluating the assumptions of the theoretical approach, and allow more careful selection of the variables describing mantle thermal properties and processes. Like the theoretical counterpart, the petrological approach indicates that the lithosphere is dominated by two thermal regimes: first, there is a continental regime which cools at rates of the order of 10(9) years and represents the longterm cooling of the earth. Secondly, superimposed on the continental evolution is the thermal event associated with the formation of an oceanic basin, and which may be thought of as a 10(8) year convective perturbation on the continental cycle. Of special interest is petrologic evidence for a sudden steepening of the thermal gradients across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary not seen in the theoretical models. The unexpected change of slope points to the need for a critical reevaluation of the thermal processes and properties extant in the asthenosphere. The potential of the petrologic contribution has yet to be fully realized. For a start, this article points to an important body of independent evidence critical to our understanding of the earth's thermal history. PMID:17738235

  4. The roles of fractional crystallization, magma mixing, crystal mush remobilization and volatile-melt interactions in the genesis of a young basalt-peralkaline rhyolite suite, the greater Olkaria volcanic complex, Kenya Rift valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macdonald, R.; Belkin, H.E.; Fitton, J.G.; Rogers, N.W.; Nejbert, K.; Tindle, A.G.; Marshall, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Greater Olkaria Volcanic Complex is a young (???20 ka) multi-centred lava and dome field dominated by the eruption of peralkaline rhyolites. Basaltic and trachytic magmas have been erupted peripherally to the complex and also form, with mugearites and benmoreites, an extensive suite of magmatic inclusions in the rhyolites. The eruptive rocks commonly represent mixed magmas and the magmatic inclusions are themselves two-, three- or four-component mixes. All rock types may carry xenocrysts of alkali feldspar, and less commonly plagioclase, derived from magma mixing and by remobilization of crystal mushes and/or plutonic rocks. Xenoliths in the range gabbro-syenite are common in the lavas and magmatic inclusions, the more salic varieties sometimes containing silicic glass representing partial melts and ranging in composition from anorthite ?? corundum- to acmite-normative. The peralkaline varieties are broadly similar, in major element terms, to the eruptive peralkaline rhyolites. The basalt-trachyte suite formed by a combination of fractional crystallization, magma mixing and resorption of earlier-formed crystals. Matrix glass in metaluminous trachytes has a peralkaline rhyolitic composition, indicating that the eruptive rhyolites may have formed by fractional crystallization of trachyte. Anomalous trace element enrichments (e.g. ??? 2000 ppm Y in a benmoreite) and negative Ce anomalies may have resulted from various Na- and K-enriched fluids evolving from melts of intermediate composition and either being lost from the system or enriched in other parts of the reservoirs. A small group of nepheline-normative, usually peralkaline, magmatic inclusions was formed by fluid transfer between peralkaline rhyolitic and benmoreitic magmas. The plumbing system of the complex consists of several independent reservoirs and conduits, repeatedly recharged by batches of mafic magma, with ubiquitous magma mixing. ?? The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  5. Numerical Models of Ophiolite Genesis and Obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilmette, C.; Beaumont, C.; Jamieson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ophiolites are relics of oceanic lithosphere tectonically emplaced in continental settings. They are diagnostic features of continental suture zones, where they mark past plate boundaries. Even after having been studied for more than 40 years, the mechanisms involved in the genesis and subsequent obduction of ophiolites over continental margins are still debated. We present the results of 2D thermal-mechanical numerical models that successfully reproduce characteristics of natural examples like the Semail, Bay of Islands, Yarlung-Zangbo, and Coast Range ophiolites. The numerical models are upper mantle scale and use pressure-, temperature- and strain-dependent viscous-plastic rheologies. Both divergent and convergent velocity boundary conditions are used and tectonic boundary forces are monitored. The models start with the rifting of a stable continent, followed by development of an ocean ridge and accretion of oceanic lithosphere at a total rate of 3 cm/y. Once a specified ocean size/age is achieved, the velocity boundary conditions are reversed leading to convergence and the spontaneous inception of a suduction zone at the mid-ocean ridge. We present results for models including different ages of oceans (40 to 90 Ma) and different convergence velocities (5 to 15 cm/y). The interaction between the lower plate passive margin and the oceanic upper plate results in 5 different tectonic styles. These differ mainly by the presence or absence of oceanic spreading in the upper plate (back-arc basin), leading to supra-subduction zone ophiolites vs. MORB-type, and by the behaviour of the oceanic slab, e.g., slab rollback vs. breakoff. The evolution of effective slab pull is interpreted to be the major control on the resulting tectonic style. Low effective slab pull models (young oceans and fast convergence rates) fail to obduct an ophiolite. Strong effective slab pull models (old oceans and lower convergence rates) result in subduction zone retreat and spontaneous oceanic

  6. 76 FR 73748 - Genesis Capital, LLC and Northern Lights Fund Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Genesis Capital, LLC and Northern Lights Fund Trust; Notice of Application November 21, 2011... approval. Applicants: Genesis Capital, LLC (``Genesis Capital'' or the ``Adviser'') and Northern...

  7. Tropical cyclone genesis products at ECMWF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, F.; Vitart, Frederic

    2009-09-01

    The operational ECMWF forecast system is nowadays able not only to analyse the current location of a tropical cyclone (TC) and predict its subsequent evolution, but also to predict the genesis of tropical cyclones, often several days before they occur. The advent of 4D-Var and assimilation of massive amounts of satellite data, combined with better model physics and an increase of horizontal/vertical resolution are among the numerous important changes made in the past with positive impact in TC forecast skill. Recent changes to the forecast system that have substantially improved the TC predictions are the increase in horizontal resolution in 2006, from T511 (40 km) to T799 (25 km) (T255 to T399 in the EPS), and improved model physics introduced in 2007. ECMWF generates a number of specific products for tropical cyclone forecasts. For each TC observed at initial time, a tracking algorithm is used to identify the successive positions of the TC throughout the forecast range. The tracker is applied to the deterministic T799 model and to each member of the EPS. The EPS tracks are used to generate strike probability maps. The tracking algorithm has recently been extended to identify and track new TCs that are predicted to appear during the forecast. Strike probability products for TC genesis have been developed and some cases will be selected to illustrate this product. Results from the objective verification package, upgraded to include the verification of TC genesis, will be presented and discussed, emphasising the impact on TC performance from recent changes in the forecast system.

  8. Petrologic evolution of the Louisville seamount chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, James W.; Lonsdale, Peter F.; Batiza, Rodey

    mantle source for the LSC seamounts remained remarkably homogeneous through the ˜66 m.y. recorded history of the chain. This is also supported by Nd and Sr isotope data for these samples. The mantle source must have been enriched in elements such as K, Rb, Ba, Y, REE relative to the source for N-MORB or to "primitive" mantle. The LSC seamounts have evolved through a petrologic sequence like that of the Hawaiian and Samoan Chains, but the long term homogeneity of the mantle source of LSC mag mas is in marked contrast to the heterogeneous mantle implied by the petrology of Hawaiian and Samoan volcanoes. A hotspot origin for the LSC seems likely: there may be an active "Loihi counterpart" yet to be found at the southeastern end of the chain.

  9. On the Basic Principles of Igneous Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    How and why Differentiation occurs has dominated Igneous Petrology since its beginning (~1880) even though many of the problems associated with it have been thoroughly solved. Rediscovery of the proverbial wheel with new techniques impedes progress. As soon as thin section petrography was combined with rock and mineral chemistry, rock diversity, compositional suites, and petrographic provinces all became obvious. The masterful 1902 CIPW norm in a real sense solved the chemical mystery of differentiation: rocks are related by the addition and subtraction of minerals in the anciently appreciated process of fractional crystallization. Yet few believed this, even after phase equilibria arrived. Assimilation, gas transfer, magma mixing, Soret diffusion, immiscibility, and other processes had strong adherents, even though by 1897 Becker conclusively showed the ineffectiveness of molecular diffusion in large-scale processes. The enormity of heat to molecular diffusion (today's Lewis no.) should have been convincing; but few paid attention. Bowen did, and he refined and restated the result; few still paid attention. And in spite of his truly masterful command of experiment and field relations in promoting fractional crystallization, Fenner and others fought him with odd arguments. The beauty of phase equilibria eventually dominated at the expense of knowing the physical side of differentiation. Bowen himself saw and struggled with the connection between physical and chemical processes. Progress has come from new concepts in heat transfer, kinetics, and slurry dynamics. The key approach is understanding the dynamic competition between spatial rates of solidification and all other processes. The lesson is clear: Scholarship and combined field, laboratory and technical expertise are critical to understanding magmatic processes. Magma is a limitlessly enchanting and challenging material wherein physical processes buttressed by chemistry govern.

  10. Edge of chaos and genesis of turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chian, Abraham C-L; Muñoz, Pablo R; Rempel, Erico L

    2013-11-01

    The edge of chaos is analyzed in a spatially extended system, modeled by the regularized long-wave equation, prior to the transition to permanent spatiotemporal chaos. In the presence of coexisting attractors, a chaotic saddle is born at the basin boundary due to a smooth-fractal metamorphosis. As a control parameter is varied, the chaotic transient evolves to well-developed transient turbulence via a cascade of fractal-fractal metamorphoses. The edge state responsible for the edge of chaos and the genesis of turbulence is an unstable traveling wave in the laboratory frame, corresponding to a saddle point lying at the basin boundary in the Fourier space. PMID:24329334

  11. The Genesis Mission: Contamination Control and Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, E. K.

    2002-01-01

    The Genesis mission, launched in August 2001, is collecting samples of the solar wind and will return to Earth in 2004. Genesis can be viewed as the most fundamental of NASA's sample return missions because it is expected to provide insight into the initial elemental and isotopic composition of the solar nebula from which all other planetary objects formed. The data from this mission will have a large impact on understanding the origins and diversity of planetary materials. The collectors consist of clean, pure materials into which the solar wind will imbed. Science and engineering issues such as bulk purity, cleanliness, retention of solar wind, and ability to withstand launch and entry drove material choices. Most of the collector materials are installed on array frames that are deployed from a clean science canister. Two of the arrays are continuously exposed for collecting the bulk solar wind; the other three are only exposed during specific solar wind regimes as measured by ion and electron monitors. Other materials are housed as targets at the focal point of an electrostatic mirror, or "concentrator", designed to enhance the flux of specific solar wind species. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has two principal responsibilities for the Genesis mission: contamination control and curation. Precise and accurate measurements of the composition of the solar atoms require that the collector materials be extremely clean and well characterized before launch and during the mission. Early involvement of JSC curation personnel in concept development resulted in a mission designed to minimize contaminants from the spacecraft and operations. A major goal of the Genesis mission is to provide a reservoir of materials for the 21 51 century. When the collector materials are returned to Earth, they must be handled in a clean manner and their condition well documented. Information gained in preliminary examination of the arrays and detailed surveys of each collector will be used to

  12. Genesis Solar Wind Samples: Update of Availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.; Allton, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind atoms for 28 months with a variety of collectors. The array wafer collector availability is displayed in the online catalog. The purpose of this report is to update the community on availability of array wafer samples and to preview other collectors which are in the process of being added to the online catalog. A total of fifteen pure materials were selected based on engineering and science requirements. Most of the materials were semiconductor wafers which were mounted on the arrays.

  13. Research on genesis of pyrite near the Permian-Triassic boundary in meishan, Zhejiang, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, Y.-F.; Tang, Y.-G.; Chou, C.-L.

    2006-01-01

    The content and crystal forms of pyrite and sulfur isotope composition of pyrite sulfur as well as its vertical distribution near the Permian-Triassic (P/T) boundary in the Meishan section, Changxing county, Zhejiang province, China were studied using geological, petrological, mineralogical and geochemical methods (techniques). The result showed that the genesis of abundant pyrites in bed 24e2 at the uppermost part of the Changxing Formation in the Meishan section may be related to volcanic activity. In bed 24e2 of the Meishan section, pyrite has its highest content of 1.84% and the sulfur isotope composition has the highest ??34S value at + 2.2??? which is very similar to that of the average value of volcanic gas. There are some volcanic products such as ??-quartz, siliceous cylinders and siliceous spherules which coexisted with pyrites in beds 24e2 and 24f. It can be concluded that a large quantity of volcanic ash fell into the South China Sea and was incorporated into marine sediments during the formation of limestone at the uppermost part of the Changxing Formation. The volcanic eruption with massive amounts of H2S and S02 gas at the end of the Permian period resulted in the enrichment of H2S in the South China Sea areas. The reaction of H2S with reactive iron minerals formed the mass of abundant pyrites.

  14. The genesis of vertisols with gilgai microtopography: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitrov, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    Different hypotheses about the genesis of gilgai microtopography and corresponding soil complexes with clayey swelling soils are considered in this review. Their diversity is stipulated by specificities of the objects themselves and by the history of studies of the composition, properties, regimes, and landscape conditions of the areas with Vertisols in different countries. Most of the hypotheses about the genesis of Vertisols with the gilgai microtopography suggest that strong swelling-shrinking processes take place in these soils in the course of moistening-drying cycles; the origin of shear stress in the soils, its spatial patterns, and the particular ways of translocation of the soil material are discussed. At the early stage of Vertisol studies, a hypothesis about the leading role of the process of "self-swallowing" of the soils as a result of filling of open cracks with the material from the upper soil horizons was popular. However, numerous facts suggest that the intensity of this process is relatively low, so that it cannot play the major role in the gilgai formation and cyclic changes in the thickness and properties of the soil horizons in Vertisols. Another important mechanism is the uneven moistening and drying of the whole soil volume resulting in the irregular distribution of inner tensions in the soil with the development of shear stress and plastic deformation of the soil mass. The hypotheses suggested in the recent decades are based on the models of soil mechanics. A number of hypotheses consider possible alternation and duration of evolutionary stages of the development of Vertisols with the gilgai microtopography.

  15. Determination of the petrologic type of CV3 chondrites by Raman spectroscopy of included organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, Lydie; Quirico, Eric; Bourot-Denise, Michèle; Montagnac, Gilles

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports the first reliable quantitative determination of the thermal metamorphism grade of a series of nine CV3 chondrites: Allende, Axtell, Bali, Mokoia, Grosnaja, Efremovka, Vigarano, Leoville, and Kaba. The maturity of the organic matter in matrix, determined by Raman spectroscopy, has been used as a powerful metamorphic tracer, independent of the mineralogical context and extent of aqueous alteration. This tracer has been used along with other metamorphic tracers such as Fe zoning in type-I chondrules of olivine phenocrysts, presolar grain abundance and noble gas abundance (bulk and P3 component). The study shows that the petrologic types determined earlier by Induced ThermoLuminescence were underestimated and suggests the following values: PT (Allende-Axtell) >3.6; PT (Bali-Mokoia-Grosnaja) ˜3.6; PT (Efremovka-Leoville-Vigarano) = 3.1-3.4; PT (Kaba) ˜3.1. The most commonly studied CV3, Allende, is also the most metamorphosed. Bali is a breccia containing clasts of different petrologic types. The attribution suggested by this study is that of clasts of the highest petrologic types, as pointed out by IOM maturity and noble gas bulk abundance. CV3 chondrites have complex asteroidal backgrounds, with various degrees of aqueous alteration and/or thermal metamorphism leading to complex mineralogical and petrologic patterns. (Fe,Mg) chemical zoning in olivine phenocrysts, on the borders of type I chondrules of porphyritic olivine- and pyroxene-rich textural types, has been found to correlate with the metamorphism grade. This suggests that chemical zoning in some chondrules, often interpreted as exchanges between chondrules and nebular gas, may well have an asteroidal origin. Furthermore, the compositional range of olivine matrix is controlled both by thermal metamorphism and aqueous alteration. This does not support evidence of a nebular origin and does not necessarily mirror the metamorphism grade through (Fe,Mg) equilibration. On the other hand, it may

  16. Petrologically-based Electrical Profiles vs. Geophysical Observations through the Upper Mantle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, F.; Massuyeau, M.; Sifre, D.; Tarits, P.

    2013-12-01

    Mineralogical transformations in the up-welling mantle play a critical role on the dynamics of mass and heat transfers at mid-ocean-ridgeS. The melting event producing ridge basalts occur at 60 km depth below the ridge axis, but because of small amounts of H2O and CO2 in the source region of MOR-basalts, incipient melting can initiate at much greater depth. Such incipient melts concentrate incompatible elements, and are particularly rich in volatile species. These juices evolve from carbonatites, carbonated basalts, to CO2-H2O-rich basalts as recently exposed by petrological surveys; the passage from carbonate to silicate melts is a complex pathway that is strongly non-linear. This picture has recently been complicated further by studies showing that oxygen increasingly partitions into garnet as pressure increases; this implies that incipient melting may be prevented at depth exceeding 200 km because not enough oxygen is available in the system to stabilize carbonate melts. The aim of this work is twofold: - We modelled the complex pathway of mantle melting in presence of C-O-H volatiles by adjusting the thermodynamic properties of mixing in the multi-component C-O-H-melt system. This allows us to calculate the change in melt composition vs. depth following any sortS of adiabat. - We modelled the continuous change in electrical properties from carbonatites, carbonated basalts, to CO2-H2O-rich basalts. We then successfully converted this petrological evolution along a ridge adiabat into electrical conductivity vs. depth signal. The discussion that follows is about comparison of this petrologically-based conductivity profile with the recent profiles obtained by inversion of the long-period electromagnetic signals from the East-Pacific-Rise. These geophysically-based profiles reveal the electrical conductivity structure down to 400 km depth and they show some intriguing highly conductive sections. We will discuss heterogeneity in electrical conductivity of the upper

  17. ORE's GENeric Evaluation SYStem: GENESYS 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Nancy; And Others

    GENESYS--GENeric Evaluation SYStem--is a method of streamlining data collection and evaluation through the use of computer technology. GENESYS has allowed the Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District to evaluate a multitude of contrasting programs with limited resources. By standardizing methods and…

  18. The genesis of collective health in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira-da-Silva, Ligia Maria; Pinell, Patrice

    2014-03-01

    During the 1970s in Brazil a social space directed towards health problems on the population level, called collective health, was created and institutionalised. To what extent did this Brazilian invention correspond to a specific socio-historical practice? The works published on this topic have considered social medicine as a homogeneous phenomenon without empirically studying the specificities of national experiences. To bridge this gap, a historical study on the genesis of collective health in Brazil was carried out based on Bourdieu's field theory. The interaction between the paths of the founders and the conditions of historical possibilities were researched through documentary and bibliographical sources, as well as through in-depth interviews of the founders. This social space originated from a meeting of agents with different social backgrounds but who interconnected, creating a structure that was independent of each agent considered individually. One of the components of this establishment was the joining of theoretical production and the implementation of health reforms that resulted in the organisation of a universal health system. This study attempts to show how the international political situation and the contradictions of the national crisis created a universe of possibilities, allowing for the genesis of this sui generis space in Brazil. PMID:24111568

  19. Genesis Ultrapure Water Megasonic Wafer Spin Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Stansbery, Eileen K.; Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, Melissa C.

    2013-01-01

    A device removes, with high precision, the majority of surface particle contamination greater than 1-micron-diameter in size from ultrapure semiconductor wafer materials containing implanted solar wind samples returned by NASA's Genesis mission. This cleaning device uses a 1.5-liter/minute flowing stream of heated ultrapure water (UPW) with 1- MHz oscillating megasonic pulse energy focused at 3 to 5 mm away from the wafer surface spinning at 1,000 to 10,000 RPM, depending on sample size. The surface particle contamination is removed by three processes: flowing UPW, megasonic cavitations, and centripetal force from the spinning wafer. The device can also dry the wafer fragment after UPW/megasonic cleaning by continuing to spin the wafer in the cleaning chamber, which is purged with flowing ultrapure nitrogen gas at 65 psi (.448 kPa). The cleaner also uses three types of vacuum chucks that can accommodate all Genesis-flown array fragments in any dimensional shape between 3 and 100 mm in diameter. A sample vacuum chuck, and the manufactured UPW/megasonic nozzle holder, replace the human deficiencies by maintaining a consistent distance between the nozzle and wafer surface as well as allowing for longer cleaning time. The 3- to 5-mm critical distance is important for the ability to remove particles by megasonic cavitations. The increased UPW sonication time and exposure to heated UPW improve the removal of 1- to 5-micron-sized particles.

  20. Reheating and primordial gravitational waves in generalized Galilean genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Sakine; Kobayashi, Tsutomu

    2016-04-01

    Galilean genesis is an alternative to inflation, in which the universe starts expanding from Minkowski with the stable violation of the null energy condition. In this paper, we discuss how the early universe is reheated through the gravitational particle production at the transition from the genesis phase to the subsequent phase where the kinetic energy of the scalar field is dominant. We then study the consequences of gravitational reheating after Galilean genesis on the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves. The resultant spectrum is strongly blue, and at high frequencies Ωgwpropto f3 in terms of the energy density per unit logarithmic frequency. Though this cannot be detected in existing detectors, the amplitude can be as large as Ωgw~ 10‑12 at f~ 100 MHz, providing a future test of the genesis scenario. The analysis is performed within the framework of generalized Galilean genesis based on the Horndeski theory, which enables us to derive generic formulas.

  1. Silicic Magma Genesis in Neogene Central Volcanoes in Northeast Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, S. E.; Troll, V. R.; Riishuus, M. S.; Burchardt, S.; Krumbholz, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on a geological expedition to NE Iceland in August 2011. A comprehensive sample suite of intrusive and extrusive rocks, ranging from basaltic to silicic compositions, was collected from the Neogene silicic central volcanic complexes in the region between Borgarfjörður eystri and Loðmundarfjörður. The area contains the second-most voluminous occurrence of silicic rocks in Iceland, including caldera structures, inclined sheet swarms, extensive ignimbrite sheets, sub-volcanic rhyolites and silicic lava flows. Yet it is one of Iceland's geologically least known areas (c.f. Gústafsson, 1992; Martin & Sigmarsson, 2010; Burchardt et al., 2011). The voluminous occurrence of evolved rocks in Iceland (10-12 %) is very unusual for an ocean island or a mid-oceanic ridge, with a typical signal of magmatic bimodality, often called "Bunsen-Daly" compositional gap (e.g. Bunsen, 1851; Daly, 1925; Barth et al., 1939). The Bunsen-Daly Gap is a long-standing fundamental issue in petrology and difficult to reconcile with continuous fractional crystallization as a dominant process in magmatic differentiation (Bowen, 1928), implying that hydrothermal alteration and crustal melting may play a significant role. Our aim is to contribute to a solution of this issue by unravelling the occurrence of voluminous evolved rhyolites in NE Iceland. We will use a combined petrological, textural, experimental and in-situ isotope approach. We plan to perform major, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-He-O isotope geochemistry, as well as U/Pb and Ar/Ar geochronology on rocks and mineral separates. In addition, high pressure-temperature partial melting experiments aim to reproduce and further constrain natural processes. Using the combined data set we intend to produce a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of rhyolite petrogenesis, and of the temporal, structural and geochemical evolution of the silicic volcanism in NE Iceland. The chosen field area serves as a good analogue for active

  2. Review and update of the applications of organic petrology: Part 1, geological applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suárez-Ruiz, Isabel; Flores, Deolinda; Mendonça Filho, João Graciano; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Organic petrology developed as coal petrology at the beginning of the 20th century dedicated mainly to the study of coals because of their utilization in industry. Coal petrology was then considered a branch of coal science. Later, with the development of specialized nomenclature, classification of coal components, and the standardization and improvement of analytical (microscopical) methods, this discipline expanded in interests and name, becoming organic petrology. Organic petrology carries a broader context, being as well a tool applied in the study of dispersed organic matter in sedimentary rocks due to its importance in exploration for fossil fuel resources. At present, organic petrology is a discipline widely recognized for its role in fundamental and applied research with respect to both coal utilization and in geosciences. Throughout the 20th century several important monographs have been published on the discipline of organic petrology, including “Stach's textbook of coal petrology” (1st edition 1935, 2nd 1975, 3rd 1982), updated as the more general “Organic petrology” by Taylor et al. (1998). More recently, the text “Applied coal petrology: the role of petrology in coal utilization” was published by Suárez-Ruiz and Crelling (2008). This review is the first in a two-part review series that describes and updates the role of organic petrology in geosciences. A second part complementing this one and focused on the applications of organic petrology to other scientific fields will follow.

  3. MitoGenesisDB: an expression data mining tool to explore spatio-temporal dynamics of mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Orgeur, Mickael; Jacq, Claude; Lelandais, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria constitute complex and flexible cellular entities, which play crucial roles in normal and pathological cell conditions. The database MitoGenesisDB focuses on the dynamic of mitochondrial protein formation through global mRNA analyses. Three main parameters confer a global view of mitochondrial biogenesis: (i) time-course of mRNA production in highly synchronized yeast cell cultures, (ii) microarray analyses of mRNA localization that define translation sites and (iii) mRNA transcription rate and stability which characterize genes that are more dependent on post-transcriptional regulation processes. MitoGenesisDB integrates and establishes cross-comparisons between these data. Several model organisms can be analyzed via orthologous relationships between interspecies genes. More generally this database supports the ‘post-transcriptional operon’ model, which postulates that eukaryotes co-regulate related mRNAs based on their functional organization in ribonucleoprotein complexes. MitoGenesisDB allows identifying such groups of post-trancriptionally regulated genes and is thus a useful tool to analyze the complex relationships between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation processes. The case of respiratory chain assembly factors illustrates this point. The MitoGenesisDB interface is available at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/dsimb_tools/mitgene/. PMID:20833631

  4. The Mineralogy and Petrology of Anomalous Eucrite Emmaville

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Ross, D. K.; Greenwood, R. C.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Grady, M. M.; Charlier, B. L. A.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that certain basaltic achondrites share similarities with eucrites. These eucrite-like achondrites have distinct isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics indicative of formation on a separate parent body from the howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller isotopic variations but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The Emmaville eucrite has a delta O-17 value of -0.137 plus or minus 0.024 per mille (1 sigma), which is substantially different from the eucrite mean of -0.246 plus or minus 0.014 per mille (2 sigma), but similar to those of A-881394 and Bunburra Rockhole (BR). Currently little data exist for Emmaville in terms of petrology or bulk composition. Studying anomalous eucrites allows us to more completely understand the numbers of asteroids represented by eucrite- like basalts and thus constrain the heterogeneity of the HED suite. In this study, we present our preliminary petrological and mineral composition results for Emmaville.

  5. A Simulated Research Problem for Undergraduate Metamorphic Petrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amenta, Roddy V.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a laboratory problem in metamorphic petrology designed to simulate a research experience. The problem deals with data on scales ranging from a geologic map to hand specimens to thin sections. Student analysis includes identifying metamorphic index minerals, locating their isograds on the map, and determining the folding sequence. (BC)

  6. Mesosiderites: A Chronologic and Petrologic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. E.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    1992-07-01

    Recent petrologic, chemical, and isotopic analyses of mesosiderite clasts and whole rocks allow construction of the evolutionary history of the mesosiderite parent body (MPB) as shown in the figure. I. Initial Melting ~4.56 Ga Ago. Numerous chronologic measurements indicate that initial melting of the MPB occurred shortly after accretion, at about the same time that the eucrites and angrites formed. For example, a zircon grain from a basaltic clast in Vaca Muerta yielded a Pb-Pb age of 4.563 Ga (Ireland and Wlotzka, 1992). The 4.56-Ga event on the MPB is probably responsible for forming the monogenic basaltic clasts that compositionally resemble typical eucrites (Rubin and Mittlefehldt, 1992). II. Crustal Remelting ~4.47 Ga Ago. Internal Sm-Nd isochron ages of 4.47 Ga have been determined for gabbroic pebble 12 from Vaca Muerta and a basaltic clast from Mt. Padbury (Stewart et al., 1991). Pebble 12 is one of many clasts in mesosiderites that are highly depleted in incompatible elements and probably represent remelted crustal rocks (Rubin and Mittlefehldt, 1992). Because variation of Fe/Mn with Fe/Mg in pyroxenes from these clasts follows a trend defined by FeO reduction from a melt (Mittlefehldt, 1990), and because the reducing agents (e.g., P) were likely to have been introduced during metal-silicate mixing, the age of pebble 12 indicates that metal-silicate mixing had to have occurred >=4.47 Ga ago. III. Localized Impact Melting 4.5-3.9 Ga Ago. Localized impact melting and metamorphism were widespread on the eucrite parent body as indicated by many ages that were partially or totally reset <4.56 Ga ago. Impact melt material is common in mesosiderites of all petrologic types, and ages between 4.5-3.9 Ga are preserved. Quench-textured pebble 5 from Vaca Muerta, which is likely to have formed from a localized impact melt of material resembling a cumulate eucrite (Rubin and Jerde, 1987), has an internal isochron age of 4.42 Ga (Stewart et al., 1992). The high

  7. Possible influence of dust on hurricane genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretl, Sebastian; Reutter, Philipp; Raible, Christoph C.; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    Tropical Cyclones (TCs) belong to the most extreme events in nature. In the past decade, the possible impact of dust on Atlantic hurricanes receives growing interest. As mineral dust is able to absorb incoming solar radiation and therefore warm the surrounding air, the presence of dust can lead to a reduction of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase in atmospheric stability. Furthermore, resulting baroclinic effects and the dry Saharan easterly jet lead to an enhanced vertical shear of the horizontal winds. SST, stability, moisture and vertical wind shear are known to potentially impact hurricane activity. But how Saharan dust influences these prerequisites for hurricane formation is not yet clear. Some dynamical mechanisms induced by the SAL might even strengthen hurricanes. An adequate framework for investigating the possible impact of dust on hurricanes is comparing high resolution simulations (~0.5°x0.5°, 31 vertical levels) with and without radiatively active dust aerosols. To accomplish this task, we are using the general circulation model ECHAM6 coupled to a modified version of the aerosol model HAM, ECHAM6-HAM-Dust. Instead of the five aerosol species HAM normally contains, the modified version takes only insoluble dust into account, but modifies the scavenging parameters in order to have a similar lifetime of dust as in the full ECHAM6-HAM. All remaining aerosols are prescribed. To evaluate the effects of dust on hurricanes, a TC detection and tracking method is applied on the results. ECHAM6-HAM-Dust was used in two configurations, one with radiatively active dust aerosols and one with dust being not radiatively active. For both set-ups, 10 Monte-Carlo simulations of the year 2005 were performed. A statistical method which identifies controlling parameters of hurricane genesis was applied on North Atlantic developing and non-developing disturbances in all simulations, comparing storms in the two sets of simulations. Hereby, dust can be assigned

  8. Petrology and Geochemistry of LEW 88663 and PAT 91501: High Petrologic L Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Field, S. W.

    1993-07-01

    Primitive achondrites (e.g., Acapulco, Lodran) are believed to be highly metamorphosed chondritic materials, perhaps up to the point of anatexis in some types. Low petrologic grade equivalents of these achondrites are unknown, so the petrologic transition from chondritic to achondritic material cannot be documented. However, there are rare L chondrites of petrologic grade 7 that may have experienced igneous processes, and study of these may yield information relevant to the formation of primitive achondrites, and perhaps basaltic achondrites, from chondritic precursors. We have begun the study of the L7 chondrites LEW 88663 and PAT 91501 as part of our broader study of primitive achondrites. Here, we present our preliminary petrologic and geochemical data on these meteorites. Petrology and Mineral Compositions: LEW 88663 is a granular achondrite composed of equant, subhedral to anhedral olivine grains poikilitically enclosed in networks of orthopyroxene and plagioclase. Small grains of clinopyroxene are spatially associated with orthopyroxene. Troilite occurs as large anhedral and small rounded grains. The smaller troilite grains are associated with the orthopyroxene-plagioclase networks. PAT 91501 is a vesicular stone containing centimeter-sized troilite +/- metal nodules. Its texture consists of anhedral to euhedral olivine grains, anhedral orthopyroxene grains (some with euhedral clinopyroxene overgrowths), anhedral to euhedral clinopyroxene, and interstitial plagioclase and SiO2-Al2O3-K2O- rich glass. In some areas, olivine is poikilitically enclosed in orthopyroxene. Fine-grained troilite, metal, and euhedral chromite occur interstitial to the silicates. Average mineral compositions for LEW 88663 are olivine Fo(sub)75.8, orthopyroxene Wo(sub)3.4En(sub)76.2Fs(sub)20.4, clinopyroxene Wo(sub)42.6En(sub)47.8Fs(sub)9.6, plagioclase Ab(sub)75.0An(sub)21.6Or(sub)3.4. Mineral compositions for PAT 91501 are olivine Fo(sub)73.8, orthopyroxene Wo(sub)4.5En(sub)74.8Fs

  9. Genesis Solar Wind Array Collector Cataloging Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, P.J.; Rodriguez, M.C.; Calaway, M.C.; Allton, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Genesis solar wind array collectors were fractured upon landing hard in Utah in 2004. The fragments were retrieved from the damaged canister, imaged, repackaged and shipped to the Johnson Space Center curatorial facility [1]. As of January 2009, the collection consists of 3460 samples. Of these, 442 are comprised into "multiple" sample groupings, either affixed to adhesive paper (177) or collected in jars (17), culture trays (87), or sets of polystyrene vials (161). A focused characterization task was initiated in May 2008 to document the largest samples in the collection. The task consisted of two goals: to document sapphire based fragments greater than 2 cm in one dimension, and to document silicon based fragments greater than 1 cm in one direction.

  10. Genesis: Removing Contamination from Sample Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V.; McNamara, K. M.; Westphal, Andrew; Butterworth, A. L.; Burnett, D. S.; Jurewicz, A.; Woolum, D.; Allton, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    The Genesis mission returned to Earth on September 8, 2004, experiencing a non-nominal reentry. The parachutes which were supposed to slow and stabilize the capsule throughout the return failed to deploy, causing the capsule to impact the desert floor at a speed of nearly 200 MPH. Both the science canister and the major components of the SRC were returned before nightfall on September 8 to the prestaged cleanroom at UTTR , avoiding prolonged exposure or pending weather changes which might further contaminate the samples. The majority of the contaminants introduced as a result of the anomalous landing were in the form of particulates, including UTTR dust and soil, carbon-carbon heat shield material, and shattered collector dust (primarily silicon and germanium). Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. Status of Genesis Mo-Pt Foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Allton, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.; Butterworth, A. L.; Caffee, M. W.; Clark, B.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Komura, K.; Westphal, A. J.; Welten, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 8,000 sq cm of Mo-coated Pt foils were exposed to solar wind for 884 days by the Genesis mission. Solar wind ions were captured in the surface of the Mo. Our objective is the measurement of long-lived radionuclides, such as Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, and Mn-53, and short-lived radionuclides, such as Na-22 and Mn-54, in the captured sample of solar wind. The expected flux of these nuclides in the solar wind is 100 atom/sq cm yr or less. The hard landing of the SRC (Sample Return Capsule) at UTTR (Utah Test and Training Range) has resulted in contaminated and crumpled foils. Here we present a status report and revised plan for processing the foils.

  12. Short-lived radioactivity and magma genesis.

    PubMed

    Gill, J; Condomines, M

    1992-09-01

    Short-lived decay products of uranium and thorium have half-lives and chemistries sensitive to the processes and time scales of magma genesis, including partial melting in the mantle and magmatic differentiation in the crust. Radioactive disequilibrium between (238)U, (230)Th, and (226)Ra is widespread in volcanic rocks. These disequilibria and the isotopic composition of thorium depend especially on the extent and rate of melting as well as the presence and composition of vapor during melting. The duration of mantle melting may be several hundred millennia, whereas ascent times are a few decades to thousands of years. Differentiation of most magmas commonly occurs within a few millennia, but felsic ones can be tens of millennia old upon eruption. PMID:17738278

  13. De Novo Genesis of Enhancers in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Eichenlaub, Michael P.; Ettwiller, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary innovation relies partially on changes in gene regulation. While a growing body of evidence demonstrates that such innovation is generated by functional changes or translocation of regulatory elements via mobile genetic elements, the de novo generation of enhancers from non-regulatory/non-mobile sequences has, to our knowledge, not previously been demonstrated. Here we show evidence for the de novo genesis of enhancers in vertebrates. For this, we took advantage of the massive gene loss following the last whole genome duplication in teleosts to systematically identify regions that have lost their coding capacity but retain sequence conservation with mammals. We found that these regions show enhancer activity while the orthologous coding regions have no regulatory activity. These results demonstrate that these enhancers have been de novo generated in fish. By revealing that minor changes in non-regulatory sequences are sufficient to generate new enhancers, our study highlights an important playground for creating new regulatory variability and evolutionary innovation. PMID:22069375

  14. Geophysical, petrological and mineral physics constraints on Earth's surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2015-04-01

    modeled topography. We also test several viscosity models, either radially symmetric, the V1 profile from Mitrovica and Forte [2004], or more complex laterally varying structures. All the property fields are expanded in spherical harmonics, until degree 24, and implemented in the code StagYY [Tackley, 2008] to perform mantle instantaneous flow modeling and compute surface topography and gravitational field. Our results show the importance of constraining the crustal and mantle density structure relying on a multidisciplinary approach that involves experimentally robust thermodynamic datasets. Crustal density field has a strong effect on the isostatic component of topography. The models that we test, CRUST 1.0 and those in Guerri and Cammarano [2015], produce strong differences in the computed isostatic topography, in the range ±600 m. For the lithospheric mantle, relying on experimentally robust material properties constraints is necessary to infer a reliable density model that takes into account chemical heterogeneities. This approach is also fundamental to correctly interpret seismic models in temperature, a crucial parameter, necessary to determine the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, where static effects on topography leave place to dynamic ones. The comparison between results obtained with different viscosity fields, either radially symmetric or vertically and laterally varying, shows how lateral viscosity variations affect the results, in particular the modeled geoid, at different wavelengths. References: Brocher, T. M. (2005), Empirical Relations between Elastic Wavespeeds and Density in the Earth's Crust, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 95(6), 2081-2092. Cammarano, F., P. J. Tackley, and L. Boschi (2011), Seismic, petrological and geodynamical constraints on thermal and compositional structure of the upper mantle: global thermochemical models, Geophys. J. Int. Connolly, J. A. D. (2005), Computation of phase equilibria by linear programming: A

  15. Aragats stratovolcano in Armenia - volcano-stratigraphy and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliksetian, Khachatur; Savov, Ivan; Connor, Charles; Halama, Ralf; Jrbashyan, Ruben; Navasardyan, Gevorg; Ghukasyan, Yura; Gevorgyan, Hripsime; Manucharyan, Davit; Ishizuka, Osamu; Quidelleur, Xavier; Germa, Aurélie

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution we discuss the geological structure and volcano-stratigraphy of the Quaternary Aragats stratovolcano in Armenia based on recent age determinations as well as petrological and geochemical features of magma generation processes specific for collision zones. Armenia is situated in the NE part of the Anatolian-Armenian-Iranian plateau, an intensely deformed segment of the Alpine-Himalayan belt. The complex geological structure of the region is represented by a mosaic of tectonic blocks comprising fragments of volcanic arcs, continental crust and exhumed oceanic crust. Collision of the Arabian plate with the Eurasian margin in early Miocene resulted in orogenic uplift associated with intense volcanism. Aragats (4090m) is one the largest volcanoes in the entire region and produced central vent (inc. Plinian VEI>4) and monogenetic type flank eruptions and periphery plateaus within a total area greater than 5000 km2, known as Aragats volcanic province (AVP). The Aragats volcanic province (AVP) comprises the composite cone of Aragats volcano, the peak of which is built on a summit plateau, ~45 km in diameter shield structure with dozens of flank vents, scattered monogenetic cinder cones on the adjacent volcanic plateaus as well as the neighboring stratovolcano Arailer. New K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar age determinations of groundmass and separated plagioclase samples indicate that volcanism at AVP began ~2.5 Ma, while most recent volcanic activity is 0.49 Ma for Plinian eruption of dacites from Irind flank vent and basaltic trachyandesite lava flows from Tirinkatar (0.48-0.61 Ma), Kakavasar, (0.52-0.54 Ma) and Ashtarak (0.58 Ma) monogenetic flank centers, as well as trachyandesites of Jrbazhan volcano on the summit plateau of Aragats (0.52 Ma). Based on bulk rock geochemical data (major, minor and low abundance trace elements, Sr and Nd isotopes) and mineral chemistry, we conclude that volcanic rocks of AVP are largely recording a complex mixing between deep

  16. The Genesis Solar Wind Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Burnett, Donald S.; Neugebauer, Marcia; Sasaki, Chester; Sevilla, Donald; Stansbery, Eileen; Clark, Ben; Smith, Nick; Oldham, Lloyd

    1990-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft was launched on August 8 from Cape Canaveral on a journey to become the first spacecraft to return from interplanetary space. The fifth in NASA's line of low-cost Discovery-class missions, its goal is to collect samples of solar wind and return them to Earth for detailed isotopic and elemental analysis. The spacecraft is to collect solar wind for over two years, while circling the L1 point 1.5 million km sunward of the earth, before heading back for a capsule-style re-entry in September, 2004. After parachute deployment, a mid-air helicopter recovery will be used to avoid a hard landing. The mission has been in the planning stages for over ten years. Its cost, including development, mission operations, and sample analysis, is approximately $209M. The Genesis science team, headed by principal investigator Donald Burnett of Caltech, consists of approximately 20 co-investigators from universities and science centers around the country and internationally. The spacecraft consists of a relatively flat spacecraft bus containing most of the subsystem components, situated below a sample return capsule (SRC) which holds the solar-wind collection substrates and an electrostatic solar wind concentrator. Some of the collectors are exposed throughout the collection period, for a sample of bulk solar wind, while others are exposed only to certain solar wind regimes, or types of flow. Ion and electron spectrometers feed raw data to the spacecraft control and data-handling (C&DH) unit, which determines ion moments and electron flux geometries in real time. An algorithm is used to robotically decide between interstream (IS), coronal hole (CH), and coronal mass ejection (CME) regimes, and to control deployment of the proper arrays to sample these wind regimes independently. This is the first time such a solar-wind decision algorithm has been used on board a spacecraft.

  17. Role of lime in salty spoil genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, J.H.; Evangelou, V.P.

    1982-12-01

    Acid pyritic spoils are often limed to facilitate revegetation efforts. Substantial quantities of soluble sulfate salts are associated with such spoils, before and after liming. Such salts can cause revegetation attempts to fail at seeding and/or during drought stress periods. As magnesium sulfate (MgSO/sub 4/) is more soluble than gypsum (calcium sulfate) under field conditions, MgSO/sub 4/ has more often been associated with soluble salt problems. Since lime reaction chemistry can influence salt genesis in spoils, this was evaluated in a incubation study using calcite and dolomite amendments to an acid, pyritic spoil. Rates of 0, 14.4, and 28.8 meq/100 g (rate equal to total potential acidity) of lime were used. Amended spoils were maintained at 30/sup 0/C and -100 cm moisture tension. Samples were taken periodically and a portion suspended in water at a soil:solution ratio of 1:20 for two hours. Unamended spoil extract pH dropped from 4.8 to 3.2 in nine weeks. Soluble magnesium sulfate doubled (from 2.9 to 6.1 meq/100 g) in the unlimed spoil between weeks one and sixteen. Dolomite amended spoils generated twice as much magnesium salt as calcite amended spoils. Pyrite oxidation, acid generation, i.e., salt genesis, was reduced when calcitic lime was used at the recommended rate based on a measure of total potential acidity. A prompt liming program with calcitic lime can substantially alter the quantity and quality of soluble salts released. The results suggest that dolomite is unacceptable as a liming material for sandy spoils with an appreciable pyrite content.

  18. GENESIS: GPS Environmental and Earth Science Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews the GPS ENvironmental and Earth Science Information System (GENESIS). The objectives of GENESIS are outlined (1) Data Archiving, searching and distribution for science data products derived from Space borne TurboRogue Space Receivers for GPS science and other ground based GPS receivers, (2) Data browsing using integrated visualization tools, (3) Interactive web/java-based data search and retrieval, (4) Data subscription service, (5) Data migration from existing GPS archived data, (6) On-line help and documentation, and (7) participation in the WP-ESIP federation. The presentation reviews the products and services of Genesis, and the technology behind the system.

  19. [The role of positive and negative angular accelerations in the genesis of early components of kinesthetic evoked potentials of the first somatosensory area in cats and rhesus monkeys].

    PubMed

    Fedan, V A

    1988-01-01

    Studies have been made on the input of negative and positive angular accelerations in the genesis of early complex of positive waves of kinesthetic evoked potentials in contralateral somatosensory cortex. It is suggested that the initial and final phases of these potentials play key role in the origin of the early complex of waves. PMID:3414221

  20. Magma Genesis in the Hawaiian Hot Spot: From melting experiments on basalt/peridotite hybrid source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, E.

    2003-12-01

    Melting mantle peridotite is one of the central themes in experimental petrology. Melting studies in CMAS, NCMAS and natural peridotites have extensively documented the magma genesis process at Mid Oceanic Ridges (e.g., Presnall et al., 1979). Magma genesis in OIBs and LIPs, on the other hand, has been poorly constrained by experiments. Evidences from isotope geochemistry indicate that the source materials for basalt magmas in these provinces are not peridotite alone. Based on a geological and geochemical reconstruction of 3 Ma old Koolau volcano, I proposed that the size of eclogite blocks in the Hawaiian plume would exceed 1000km3 (Takahashi and Nakajima, 2002) and therefore the melting interaction of eclogite blocks and the surrounding peridotite would play essential roles in magma genesis in the Hawaiian hot spot. Melting experiments on basalt/peridotite composite starting materials were carried out at 2.5 to 3.0 GPa at temperatures from the peridotite dry solidus to that of basalt for 20 to 100 hours. Three layered starting materials consisting of 1 basalt to 2 peridotite (in volume) were placed in graphite/Pt double capsules. Peridotite KLB-1 (Fo89.6) and two basalt-starting materials (CLG-46 and CRB72-31) were used as starting materials. In temperatures ca.50-100 degrees below the peridotite solidus, silica-rich partial melts are produced in the basalt zone and the boundaries between the basalt and peridotite are coated with a 10 to 50 micron thick opx reaction band. The chemical reactions between the basalt and peridotite domains are controlled by solid diffusions across the opx reaction band and are very slow. In temperatures within 50 degrees of the peridotite dry solidus, a time dependent reaction process takes place. The basalt/peridotite boundary gradually partial melts as the chemical reaction lowers the peridotite solidus locally. At 2.8 GPa and 1450-1470C after 50-100 hours, resultant melt in the basalt layer becomes saturated with oliv + opx + cpx

  1. Apollo 14 Lunar glass fragment known as Genesis bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A tiny green glass fragment taken from an Apollo 14 core tube sampling. Because of its scientific significance and shape, the fragment has been nicknamed the 'Genesis bean'. The main constituents are iron and magnesium.

  2. Nuts and Bolts — Techniques for Genesis Sample Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, P. J.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    The Genesis curation staff at NASA JSC provides samples and data for analysis. We are showing: 1) techniques for characterization and measurement of shards; 2) allocation methods; and 3) status of the catalog by collector material, regime, and size.

  3. Genesis Spacecraft Science Canister Preliminary Inspection and Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hittle, J. D.; Calaway, M. J.; Allton, J. H.; Warren, J. L.; Schwarz, C. M.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2006-03-01

    Inspection of the Genesis Science Canister revealed a micrometeorite impact, white paint discoloration, and black residue adhering to the structure. Loose particles were removed with a fine-haired brush and filter-trap vacuum.

  4. The genesis of craniofacial biology as a health science discipline.

    PubMed

    Sperber, G H; Sperber, S M

    2014-06-01

    The craniofacial complex encapsulates the brain and contains the organs for key functions of the body, including sight, hearing and balance, smell, taste, respiration and mastication. All these systems are intimately integrated within the head. The combination of these diverse systems into a new field was dictated by the dental profession's desire for a research branch of basic science devoted and attuned to its specific needs. The traditional subjects of genetics, embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, dental materials, odontology, molecular biology and palaeoanthropology pertaining to dentistry have been drawn together by many newly emerging technologies. These new technologies include gene sequencing, CAT scanning, MRI imaging, laser scanning, image analysis, ultrasonography, spectroscopy and visualosonics. A vibrant unitary discipline of investigation, craniofacial biology, has emerged that builds on the original concept of 'oral biology' that began in the 1960s. This paper reviews some of the developments that have led to the genesis of craniofacial biology as a fully-fledged health science discipline of significance in the advancement of clinical dental practice. Some of the key figures and milestones in craniofacial biology are identified. PMID:24495071

  5. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Martian Meteorites: Petrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Martian Meteorites: Petrology: included the following reports:Volatile Behavior in Lunar and Terrestrial Basalts During Shock: Implications for Martian Magmas; Problems with a Low-Pressure Tholeiitic Magmatic History for the Chassigny Dunite; Fast Cooling History of the Chassigny Martian Meteorite; Rehomogenized Interstitial and Inclusion Melts in Lherzolitic Shergottite ALH 77005: Petrologic Significance; Compositional Controls on the Formation of Kaersutite Amphibole in Shergottite Meteorites; Chemical Characteristics of an Olivine-Phyric Shergottite, Yamato 980459; Pb-Hf-Sr-Nd Isotopic Systematics and Age of Nakhlite NWA 998; Noble Gases in Two Samples of EETA 79001 (Lith. A); Experimental Constraints on the Iron Content of the Martian Mantle; and Mars as the Parent Body for the CI Carbonaceous Chondrites: New Data.

  6. Exploration petrology of Sunoco Felda trend of south Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell-Tapping, H.

    1986-09-01

    The Sunoco Felda oil trend of the South Florida basin has been a prolific oil producer. All the oil is produced from the Cretaceous Sunniland formation, a leached limestone bioherm. Although the producing section has been considered reefal in the literature, petrographic and biostratigraphic analyses of various cores in producing fields have determined that these deposits are composed of particles of fragmented rudist and other fauna deposited in a tidal shoal. Atop this debris an algae and gastropod section has been deposited, typical of a mound deposited on a tidal mud flat. This model is exemplified in the Sunoco Felda and West Sunoco fields and was used in exploring the Sunoco Felda trend. From the petrological analysis of these two fields and from knowledge of other wells in the basin, biostratigraphic and lithologic trends can be determined and extended offshore into the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The author stresses petrology in exploring the Sunniland formation because correlating like responses on electric logs does not always result in correlating the same depositional facies - in fact, correlating like electric log responses in the Sunniland formation often results in correlating different facies. This study endeavors to analyze the Felda trend based on the petrological and petrophysical information obtained from the cores and logs. The author will show that the potential of the Sunniland formation may be greater than expected and that it may be the site of future major discoveries.

  7. Petrological evidence for secular cooling in mantle plumes.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Claude; Gazel, Esteban

    2009-04-01

    Geological mapping and geochronological studies have shown much lower eruption rates for ocean island basalts (OIBs) in comparison with those of lavas from large igneous provinces (LIPs) such as oceanic plateaux and continental flood provinces. However, a quantitative petrological comparison has never been made between mantle source temperature and the extent of melting for OIB and LIP sources. Here we show that the MgO and FeO contents of Galapagos-related lavas and their primary magmas have decreased since the Cretaceous period. From petrological modelling, we infer that these changes reflect a cooling of the Galapagos mantle plume from a potential temperature of 1,560-1,620 degrees C in the Cretaceous to 1,500 degrees C at present. Iceland also exhibits secular cooling, in agreement with previous studies. Our work provides quantitative petrological evidence that, in general, mantle plumes for LIPs with Palaeocene-Permian ages were hotter and melted more extensively than plumes of more modern ocean islands. We interpret this to reflect episodic flow from lower-mantle domains that are lithologically and geochemically heterogeneous. PMID:19340079

  8. On the genesis of the Haumea system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo Bagatin, A.; Benavidez, P. G.; Ortiz, J. L.; Gil-Hutton, R.

    2016-09-01

    The scenarios proposed in the literature for the genesis of the system formed by the dwarf planet 136108 Haumea, its two satellites and a group of some 10 bodies (the family) with semimajor axes, eccentricities and inclinations close to Haumea's values, are analysed against collisional, physical, dynamical and statistical arguments in order to assess their likelihood. All scenarios based on collisional events are reviewed under physical arguments and the corresponding formation probabilities in a collisional environment are evaluated according to the collisional evolution model ALICANDEP. An alternative mechanism is proposed based on the potential possibility of (quasi-) independent origin of the family with respect to Haumea and its satellites. As a general conclusion the formation of the Haumea system is a low-probability event in the currently assumed frame for the evolution of the outer Solar system. However, it is possible that current knowledge is missing some key element in the whole story that may contribute to increase the odds for the formation of such a system.

  9. Magnetic Investigations in the J-M Reef Section of the Stillwater Complex, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnukowski, J. D.; Ferre, E. C.; Butak, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Stillwater J-M reef, the only economic platinum deposit in the USA, consists of a 0.5 to 4 m-thick stratiform zone of platinum group element (PGE)-rich sulfides in a layered mafic intrusion. The origin of this reef, purely magmatic or related to late-stage magmatic fluids, remains ambiguous. I propose to test these two genetic hypotheses using rock magnetism. Fractional crystallization trends deduced from petrological models would produce a sharp increase in magnetite and pyrrhotite content near the solidus. In contrast, percolation of sulfur-rich fluids through a crystal mush would produce a gradual increase in magnetite and pyrrhotite up to a fluid permeability barrier. Continuous logging of the magnetic properties of drillcores, combined with petrographic observations, will allow to test these two models. Petrologic similarities between PGE reefs suggest that they share common physico-chemical origins, therefore, understanding the J-M reef genesis would have implications for other deposits such as the Bushveld Complex and the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe. The J-M reef formation has been explained by two alternative models: 1) magmatic model - magma replenishment causes thermal convection at the interface between two magmas, inducing PGE leaching by a sulfur-saturated magma, followed by precipitation of sulfide droplets; 2) fluid fluxing model - a sulfur-rich residual, late magmatic fluid migrates upward through the crystal mush leading to PGE concentration along a magmatic permeability barrier against the hanging wall. Both models account for the majority of geochemical and petrological observations and may not be fundamentally mutually exclusive. However, understanding the origin of PGE reefs would certainly benefit from new approaches. Preliminary data shows systematic inch-scale cycling variations of magnetic susceptibility (Km) in the hanging-wall that supports the magmatic model. The discovery of this magnetic cyclicity matters because this core does not

  10. The Indus-Yarlung Zangbo (IYZ) ophiolites from Nanga Parbat to Namche Barwa syntaxes, Southern Tibet: First synthesis of the petrology, geochemistry and geochronology of the IYZ ophiolites, and implications for geodynamic reconstructions of Neo-Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Réjean; Bezard, Rachel; Guilmette, Carl; Dostal, Jaroslav; Wang, Chengshan; Liu, Zf

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this first synthesis is to summarize findings on the Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone (YZSZ) ophiolites in Southern Tibet, and to discuss some of thel remaining scientific problems. The YZSZ ophiolites have been studied for almost 30 years and constitute the youngest of the sutures recognized on the Tibet Plateau. It is now acknowledged the YZSZ is a complex assemblage of sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rocks produced during and shortly after the collision between India and Eurasia. The ages of the various lithological units span a time interval from the Jurassic to the Middle Miocene, with some Permian and Devonian exotic blocks in the mélange zone. The YZSZ is characterized by ophiolitic complexes and an ophiolitic mélange. The ophiolites are of two types with complete and incomplete pseudostratigraphies. The complete sections, although tectonically reworked, are observed along the segment from Dazhuqu to Jiding in the Xigaze area and the Spontang ophiolite. The incomplete sequences are found in various locations, including Nidar, Kiogar, Jungbwa, Saga, Sangsang, Xigugabu, Luobusa. The incomplete nature of these ophiolites could be related to intraoceanic or orogenic/collisional origins. The YZSZ ophiolites are also distributed into two groups of ages: the Luobusa, Zedang and Kiogar sequences are Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous in age, whereas all other sequences are of a Lower Cretaceous age. Compilation of geochronological data suggest that some ophiolite sequences might have evolved for over more than 70 m.y. from their inital igneous genesis to obduction, which occurred around 70-90 Ma. Although the YZSZ ophiolites differ in terms of their petrological and geochemical characters, they were all generated in a suprasubduction zone setting, and more specifically in arc (few fore-arc) and back-arc environments. Our synthesis of ~500 geochemical analyses show variable mixing of components from N-MORB-type to IAT-CAB and to OIB end-members. The Jurassic

  11. Genesis of Microfracture Evolution in Epikarst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragila, M. I.; Hay, K.; Weisbrod, N.

    2014-12-01

    Evolution of the epikarst begins with the enlargement of micro-fractures. As hydraulic channels become connected to an exit system, the hydraulic gradient will drive continued development of primary karst channels. But, what is the genesis of micro-fracture evolution into channelized paths? We investigate two mechanisms and their role in the physical and chemical evolution of the microfracture. During liquid drainage, air-water interfacial instability leads to development of capillary droplets embedded in rock surface films. Pressure gradient between capillary droplets and rock surface films drives liquid into droplets via the matrix skin. Droplet paths may predispose the rock phase to greater dissolution relative to paths that experience only film flow. Successive droplets down the same path, as seen in experiments, could lead to linear erosional features that evolve toward pipe development. The rate of geochemical dissolution by these liquid elements depends upon fluid carrying capacity and dissolution kinetics. One of the mechanisms important to calcite dissolution is diffusion of CO2 from fracture air into the liquid elements. Exchange of fracture and atmospheric air can reset gas composition within the fracture system. A mechanism for regular flushing of microfracture air is suggested where nightly inverted thermal gradients in the upper 30 cm of rock near the rock-atmosphere interface, can trigger gas density instabilities within the microfracture that travel deeper into the epikarst, potentially flushing the entire microfracture system with atmospheric air. Such diurnal gas flushing would serve as a reset switch for microfracture-gas-chemistry towards atmospheric values on a daily basis. The net dissolution rate of microfractures, and the rate and spatial distribution of dissolved substances delivered to subsurface caverns, would depend on these two mechanisms of liquid motion and gas venting.

  12. Virtual petrological microscopy: web 2.0 technology for learning microscopy skills outside the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, S. P.; Whalley, P.; Tindle, A.

    2009-12-01

    Learning to use microscopes for geoscience or life science applications is a crucial part of the practical training offered in many science degrees, but the opportunities to study are often constrained by available laboratory space and time, and sometimes constrained by the number of high quality microscopes available. We will demonstrate a new based virtual petrological microscope which offers the opportunity for enhancement and enrichment of laboratory experience in geoscience. The focus of petrological microscope study is not primarily related to learning facts but is concerned with learning how to discriminate and classify within the paradigms of the discipline. In this case, the recognition and measurement of key features in rock samples in hand specimen and thin section. Whilst undertaking the practical exercise of recognition and naming of rock samples students are really being required to develop an understanding of the rock cycle as a model representing the relationship between rock categories and the process of their formation. The problems of teaching with complex visual materials, in effect of teaching learners 'how to see' from the scientific perspective of a particular discipline, are quite general. It could reasonably be expected that lessons learnt from the implementation and detailed evaluation of the proposed web-based system will generalise to many other topics in science education. Thus we focussed on the thin section images rather than reproducing a system that resembled a physical microscope. The virtual petrological microscope developed for a course at the Open University UK enables student acquisition of skills such as mineral and rock recognition using a browser window to explore thin sections of rocks as if they were using a laboratory microscope. The microscope allows students to pan around the thin sections (held as 1GB files on a remote server); zoom in and out, change from plane polarised light to cross polarised light conditions, and

  13. Petrological studies on the mantle peridotites recovered from the ocean floor in the western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, T.; Hirano, N.; Ohara, Y.; Bloomer, S.

    2006-12-01

    Geological and geophysical models for the various oceanic crusts (or lithosphere) have been proposed on the basis of the combined studies between seismic observation for the oceanic crusts and petrological models of the onland ophiolites, which have been assumed as fossil of oceanic crusts. It is very important to collect basement rocks constituting various oceanic crusts and to characterize those petrological features. Ocean floor is commonly covered by effusive volcanic rocks, however occasionally hypabyssal and plutonic rocks are observed among the unique geological environments in the Western Pacific as partly shown in the followings. VOLCANIC DIATREME(?): Very unique volcanic knolls have been recently discovered by N. Hirano at the typical oceanic crust in the Northwestern Pacific, off Tohoku of Northeastern Japan. The constituting rocks for the main volcanic edifice are porous alkaline lavas with 1-5Ma age containing abundant lithic fragments including gabbros as well as mantle peridotites. They are assumed as a volcanic diatreme induced in the Cretaceous oceanic lithosphere . Geological and petrological analyses on those volcano and volcanic rocks can make clear the geological cross (or columnar) section of the typical oceanic lithosphere including crust as well as upper mantle down to 100 km deep asthenospheric mantle. PARECE VERA BASIN: The Parece Vela Basin (PVB) is an extinct backarc basin in the Philippine Sea. The NNE extending escarpments and depressions (maximum depth 7500 m) are fossil fracture zones and extinct segmented spreading axes (first-order segments), respectively. Oceanic core complexes (OCCs), or megamullions, develop at each first-order segment. Recently discovered OCCs at slow-spreading ridges have been interpreted as exhumed footwalls of oceanic detachment faults in magma-starved ridge environments. Godzilla Mullion, one of the OCC in the PVR, is the worlds largest OCC, 10 times larger in area than the normal OCCs in the Mid

  14. Petrology, geochemistry, and tectonic implications of newly collected samples from Babeldaob Island, Republic of Palau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M.; Ishizuka, O.; Hawkins, J.; Bloomer, S.; Fryer, P.; Ishii, T.; Kelley, K.; Kimura, J.; Michibayashi, K.; Ohara, Y.; Stern, R.; Blake, B.; Colin, P.; Colin, L.

    2006-12-01

    The islands of Palau in the Western Pacific mark the southern end of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge, which is the westernmost remnant arc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) system. Because it has extensive subaerial exposures of volcanic rocks, it offers an excellent opportunity for detailed geological and petrological investigation. The largest island of Palau, Babeldaob, is composed largely of volcanic materials erupted between the middle Eocene and Oligocene (Mason et al., 1956; Meijer et al., 1983; Cosca et al., 1998). Previous studies have been hampered by thick laterites but nevertheless have shown that boninites and more typical arc basalts and andesites make up these materials. These studies also suggest that early arc sequences similar to those identified along the IBM forearc to the north are also found here (Hawkins and Castillo, 1998). Road cutting and quarrying for the new "Compact Road" around Babeldaob have recently provided unprecedented exposures of the volcanic units. The scientific party for Cruise YK0612 of the R/V Yokosuka spent one day examining and sampling some of these outcrops. Here, we report geological impressions of these outcrops and preliminary petrological and geochemical data for these newly exposed volcanic rocks. The new outcrops expose volcanic conglomerates, breccias, and finer-grained sediments; lava flows, pillow lavas, dikes, and volcanic plugs. Some of the coarse sediments are massive and matrix- supported, and probably were deposited by debris flows. These are interbedded with normally graded turbidite sequences, suggesting subaqueous deposition. A quarry near the east-central coast exposed a complex of meter-scale dikes cut by fault gouge zones. Shallow dome and breccia deposits as well as a pillow lava sequence cropped out in a quarry and a road-cut respectively along the central spine of the island. Most samples are broadly basaltic to andesitic and boninitic, although hornblende andesites or dacites compose the dome and one section

  15. Innovative genomic collaboration using the GENESIS (GEM.app) platform.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Michael; Falk, Marni J; Gai, Xiaowu; Postrel, Richard; Schüle, Rebecca; Zuchner, Stephan

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing has led to an unparalleled pace of Mendelian disease gene discovery in recent years. To address the challenges of analysis and sharing of large datasets, we had previously introduced the collaborative web-based GEM.app software [Gonzalez et al., ]. Here, we are presenting the results of using GEM.app over nearly 3 years and introducing the next generation of this platform. First, GEM.app has been renamed to GENESIS since it is now part of "The Genesis Project" (501c3), a not-for-profit foundation that is committed to providing the best technology to enable research scientists and to connecting patients and clinicians to genomic information. Second, GENESIS (GEM.app) has grown to nearly 600 registered users from 44 countries, who have collectively achieved 62 gene identifications or published studies that have expanded phenotype/genotype correlations. Our concept of user-driven data sharing and matchmaking is now the main cause for gene discoveries within GENESIS. In many of these findings, researchers from across the globe have been connected, which gave rise to the genetic evidence needed to successfully pinpoint-specific gene mutations that explained patients' disease. Here, we present an overview of the various novel insights that have been made possible through the data-sharing capabilities of GENESIS/GEM.app. PMID:26173844

  16. Petrological Investigations of CAIs from Efremovka and NWA 3118 CV3 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Lorenz, C. A.; Korochantseva, E. V.; MacPherson, G. J.

    2010-03-01

    Several new big CAIs were extracted from the Efremovka and NWA 3118 CV3 chondrites to analyze petrology, chemistry and isotopic compositions. Here we report preliminary results on mineralogy, petrology and bulk chemistry of two CAIs, of Type B1 and of Type A.

  17. Cosmological matching conditions and galilean genesis in Horndeski's theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Sakine; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Tanahashi, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: tsutomu@rikkyo.ac.jp E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2014-03-01

    We derive the cosmological matching conditions for the homogeneous and isotropic background and for linear perturbations in Horndeski's most general second-order scalar-tensor theory. In general relativity, the matching is done in such a way that the extrinsic curvature is continuous across the transition hypersurface. This procedure is generalized so as to incorporate the mixing of scalar and gravity kinetic terms in the field equations of Horndeski's theory. Our matching conditions have a wide range of applications including the galilean genesis and the bounce scenarios, in which stable, null energy condition violating solutions play a central role. We demonstrate how our matching conditions are used in the galilean genesis scenario. In doing so, we extend the previous genesis models and provide a unified description of the theory admitting the solution that starts expanding from the Minkowski spacetime.

  18. Investigation of Backside Textures for Genesis Solar Wind Silicon Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. P.; Burkett, P. J.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Genesis solar wind collectors were comprised of a suite of 15 types of ultrapure materials. The single crystal, pure silicon collectors were fabricated by two methods: float zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ). Because of slight differences in bulk purity and surface cleanliness among the fabrication processes and the specific vendor, it is desirable to know which variety of silicon and identity of vendor, so that appropriate reference materials can be used. The Czochralski method results in a bulk composition with slightly higher oxygen, for example. The CZ silicon array wafers that were Genesis-flown were purchased from MEMC Electronics. Most of the Genesis-flown FZ silicon was purchased from Unisil and cleaned by MEMC, although a few FZ wafers were acquired from International Wafer Service (IWS).

  19. Petrogenesis of the Main Petrologic and Chronologic Volcanic Phases in the Gharyan Province, NW Libya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafeer, A.; Nabelek, P. I.

    2014-12-01

    Cenozoic Libyan volcanic fields are manifestations of tremendous episodic outpourings of basaltic lavas within the East Saharan Craton. The volcanic fields are confined to a NW-SE trend (N140°E) that stretches from the Mediterranean coast in the north to Tibesti (Libya-Chad border) in the south. The four major volcanic fields (Gharyan, As-Sawda, Al-Haruj, and Nuquay) show a systematic decrease in age starting from ~55 Ma in Gharyan (NW) to the Holocene in Nuquay (SE). This apparent trend in ages along with characteristics resembling oceanic island basalts (OIB's) prompted several authors to attribute their origin to the African plate moving over a hot spot (e.g. Conticelli et al. 1995; Woller and Fediuk 1980; Hegazy 1999). In the Gharyan province (GVP), the igneous activity was indeed episodic and lasted for at least 50 Ma. The large span of ages of these volcanic rocks within the same volcanic field makes the hot spot model at least equivocal. Whole rock analyses for the major petrologic and chronologic units suggest that the basaltic and phonolitic suites within the GVP had different primary sources. The basaltic rocks show smooth REE patterns. LREE/HREE fractionations of the eruptive pulses are inconsistent with their ages, suggesting that they represent different melt fractions generated from the same mantle source. Phonolites show very different REE patterns. The patterns are concave-upward with low TbN/YbN ratios (0.6-0.8). The origin of the GVP basaltic rocks is consistent with melts generated from metasomatized lithospheric mantle across the garnet-spinel transition zone. The most primitive (>7 wt % MgO) basalts were used to model mantle melting processes and indicate 3-10% melting of an amphibole-bearing, spinel/garnet mantle source. Rather than being related to a hot spot, the genesis of the Libyan lavas appears to have been caused by reactivation of lithospheric megastructures with asthenospheric upwelling, in relation to the Africa-Europe convergence.

  20. Petrologic and oxygen isotopic study of ALH 85085-like chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, M.; Weisberg, M. K.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Ebihara, M.

    1994-07-01

    Four meteorites (PAT 91546, PCA 91328, PCA 91452, PCA 91467) petrologically similar to ALH 85085 chondrite have now been found. Previous studies of ALH 85085 showed it be a new kind of CR-related microchondrule-bearing chondrite, although one called it a sub-chondrite. The purpose of this study is to learn more about ALH 85085-like meteorites and their relationship to CR and CR-related (LEW 85332, Acfer 182, Bencubbin) chondrites. The methods used included petrology, INA bulk chemical analysis (PAT 91546, PCA 91467), and O isotopic analyses of the whole rocks and separated chondrules and dark inclusions (DIs) from PAT 91546. Since microchondrules and fragments are approximately 20 microns it was necessary to analyze composite samples for O; one was of approximately 100 chondrules, and another was of 5 DIs. Petrologically, the four meteorites are similar to ALH 85085, and there is no basis for determining if all of them, or any combinations, are paired. Mineralogically, olivine and pyroxene are highly magnesian FeNi metal generally has 3-10% Ni, and has a positive Ni-Co correlation similar to that in CR and CR-related chondrites. Refractory inclusions are similar in size to the chondrules and have the following assemblages: (1) hibonite-perovskite, (2) melilite-fassaite-forsterite, (3) grossite (Ca-dialuminate)-melilite-perovskite, (4) spinel-melilite, and (5) spinel-pyroxene aggregates. Chemically, INA analyses indicate that PAT 91546 and PCA 91467 are generally similar to ALH 85085. Oxygen isotopic analyses of the four whole-rock compositions fall along the CR mixing line as does ALH 85085; they are also close to LEW 85332, Acfer 182, and Bencubbin. This supports the concept that these are all CR-related chondrites. Even stronger support is found in the compositions of the chondrules and DIs in PAT 91546, which also plot on or near the CR line.

  1. Linking petrology and seismology of the southwest Greenland lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesher, C. E.; Vestergaard, C.; Brown, E.; Schutt, D.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths from late-Proterozoic diamond-bearing kimberlitic dikes in the Kangerlussuaq, Sarfartoq and Maniitsoq areas of southwestern Greenland provide constraints on the composition and thermal state of lithospheric mantle beneath Greenland to depths of ~200 km [1]. Similarly, surface wave tomography studies carried out as part of the GLATIS project use a range of Rayleigh wave periods sensitive to structures at a similar depth interval within southwestern Greenland lithospheric mantle [2]. Here we link petrologic and seismologic constraints on the mantle lithosphere beneath Greenland utilizing methods of [3] that show that inferred chemical and mineralogical stratification inferred from petrology, showing mantle peridotite transitioning from garnet-free harzburgite to garnet lherzolite between ~70 and 180 km, cannot readily be resolved with fundamental mode Rayleigh waves. On the other hand, comparing phase velocities predicted from xenolith compositions, mineralogy and last equilibration temperatures and pressures, defining the continental geotherm during late-Proterozoic time, with those for the present-day mantle lithosphere suggest significant cooling of the cratonic mantle to a modern geotherm characterized by a heat flux of 30 mW/m2 and average crustal heat production of 0.3 mW/m3 [4]. These preliminary findings point to the weak dependence of shear wave velocities on mantle peridotite composition and mineralogy, and further illustrate its strong temperature dependence. Comparison of ancient and modern continental geotherms made possible by combining petrologic and seismological data, as shown here for southwest Greenland, provide additional constraints on secular cooling of cratonic regions linked to large-scale tectonic processes. [1] Bizzarro et al., 2003, CMP, 146; Sand et al., Lithos, 112. [2] Darbyshire et al., 2004, GJI, 158. [3] Schutt and Lesher, 2006, JGR, 111. [4] Meirerbachtol et al., 2015, JGR/ES, 120.

  2. Geochemical and petrological observations of gas transport at arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; Herd, R. A.; Humphreys, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Guida, R.; Moretti, R.; Christopher, T. E.; Rawson, H.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the abundance and composition of vapour in magma chambers and the mechanisms of vapour transport in volcanic systems is of immense importance. Exsolved vapour in a magma storage area affects eruption style and duration, and influences ground deformation and other geophysical manifestations owing to its compressibility. Ultimately, we wish to understand how much pre-eruptive exsolved vapour exists and what role mafic magma supply at depth plays in supplying it. Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, has become an exceptionally well-monitored volcanic system and there is now an abundance of detailed geochemical and petrological information regarding magma degassing and gas transport processes. The eruption provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of open system mafic magma injection, mingling and degassing, which is occurring on the same time scale as eruption. We examine the geochemical and petrological evidence for magma mingling, degassing and gas fluxing at Soufriere Hills Volcano. We use measurements of gas flux and composition, using DOAS and a multigas sensor. We examine petrological and textural evidence for mafic magma supplying volatiles to the system, including evidence from phenocryst zoning and composition. We show that the mafic magma supplies volatiles as well as heat to the overlying resident andesite. Due to the strong partitioning of sulphur into a vapour phase at depth under oxidising conditions, the sulphur dissolved in the intruding mafic magma becomes segregated into vapour, along with carbon dioxide and water. The vapour is transported to the surface during both eruptive and non-eruptive periods, implying either that significant permeability exists within the system, or that magma convection operates. There is some evidence for gas fluxing, which suggests that gas may be transported through the magma. We draw comparisons with other recent studies of volatile transport in arc systems to show that some observations may be

  3. Learning Mathematics in a CAS Environment: The Genesis of a Reflection about Instrumentation and the Dialectics between Technical and Conceptual Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artigue, Michele

    2002-01-01

    Presents an anthropological approach used in French research and the theory of instrumentation developed in cognitive ergonomics. Shows how these frameworks allow an approach to the educational use of CAS technology, focusing on the unexpected complexity of instrumental genesis, mathematical needs of instrumentation, status of instrumented…

  4. Petrology and stratigraphy of Paleogene nonmarine sandstones, Cascade Range, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frizzell, Virgil A.

    1979-01-01

    The Cascade Range of Washington north of 47? latitude is composed of probable Paleozoic and Mesozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesozoic and Tertiary plutonic rocks. Several Paleogene nonmarine arkosic sandstone units fringe and in part occur within the complex crystalline core. The early to middle Eocene Chuckanut Formation is present on the west side of the crystalline core in the western foothills of the Cascades. The early to middle Eocene Swauk Formation partially encircles the Mt. Stuart massif of the central Cascades. In the western foothills of the Cascades, between the main body of Chuckanut Formation near Bellingham and the main outcrop area of the Swauk Formation south of Mt. Stuart, many smaller bodies of arkosic sandstone have variously been referred to either the Swauk or Chuckanut Formations. The early Eocene Manastash Formation occurs locally in an area south of the Yakima River. The middle to late Eocene Chumstick Formation is mostly confined to the Chiwaukum graben within the crystalline core and is separated from the Swauk Formation on the southwest by the Leavenworth Fault. The Oligocene Wenatchee Formation unconformably over lies the Chumstick Formation near Wenatchee. The middle to late Eocene Roslyn Formation crops out north of the Yakima River and is underlain by the Teanaway Basalt which separates the Roslyn from the older Swauk Formation. The middle Eocene to early Oligocene Naches Formation forms a north-trending body that crosses the Yakima River and is in fault contact with both the Swauk and Manastash Formations. The middle to late Eocene Puget Group underlies the Quaternary deposits of the Puget Lowland southeast of Seattle on the western flank of the Cascades. The various formations are all composed predominantly of fine- to medium-grained sandstones with lesser amounts of interbedded shale, conglomerate and coal. Compositionally, the units are predominantly either feldspathic or litho-feldspathic subquartzose sandstones. Volcanic rocks

  5. Petrology and classification of the Garraf, Spain chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, K.; Conrad, G. H.; King, E. A.; San Miguel, A.

    1986-03-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies indicate that the Garraf meteorite is a highly-recrystallized chondrite of petrologic type 6. Olivine (Fa24.7; PMD 1.1) and low-Ca pyroxene (Fs20.9; PMD 1.1) compositions indicate that it belongs to the L-group. Based on contents of noble gases, pervasive fracturing of silicates, common undulose extinction of olivine and plagioclase, and the lack of melt pockets and maskelynite, Garraf is placed into shock facies b. It is concluded that Garraf is a highly recrystallized L6b chondrite that, after recrystallization, was cataclased and comminuted by shock.

  6. Petrology and classification of the Garraf, Spain chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, K.; Conrad, G. H.; King, E. A.; San Miguel, A.

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies indicate that the Garraf meteorite is a highly-recrystallized chondrite of petrologic type 6. Olivine (Fa24.7; PMD 1.1) and low-Ca pyroxene (Fs20.9; PMD 1.1) compositions indicate that it belongs to the L-group. Based on contents of noble gases, pervasive fracturing of silicates, common undulose extinction of olivine and plagioclase, and the lack of melt pockets and maskelynite, Garraf is placed into shock facies b. It is concluded that Garraf is a highly recrystallized L6b chondrite that, after recrystallization, was cataclased and comminuted by shock.

  7. Petrology of Two Itokawa Particles: Comparison with Equilibrated LL Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, M.; Mikouchi, T.; Arai, T.; Fagan, T. J.; Zolensky, M.; Hagiya, K.; Ohsumi, K.; Karouji, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A strong link between Itokawa particles and LL chondrites was confirmed by preliminary examinations of Hayabusa particles [e.g., 1, 2]. Both poorly equilibrated and highly equilibrated particles have been found among the grains returned from Itokawa [1], and it is suggested that they correspond to LL4 and LL5-6, respectively. Here we report the petrography of two Itokawa particles and TEM study of one, and compare them to Antarctic LL chondrites with variable petrologic types (LL4-LL7) in order to understand the metamorphic history of asteroid Itokawa.

  8. The mineralogy and petrology of the Luna 20 soil sample.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kridelbaugh, S. J.; Weill, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    The lithologic types found in the soil at the Luna site are characterized, and their mineralogical and petrological significance is discussed. Chemically, the Luna 20 and Apollo 16 soil samples are similar, but the Luna 20 soil is slightly depleted in aluminum and calcium and enriched in iron and magnesium relative to the Apollo 16 soils. This slight difference may be a result of the presence of a minor amount of mare material in the Luna 20 soil and its apparent absence in the Apollo 16 soils.

  9. Mineralogy and Petrology of COMET WILD2 Nucleus Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Bland, Phil; Bradley, John; Brearley, Adrian; Brennan, Sean; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald; Butterworth, Anna; Dai, Zurong; Ebel, Denton

    2006-01-01

    The sample return capsule of the Stardust spacecraft will be recovered in northern Utah on January 15, 2006, and under nominal conditions it will be delivered to the new Stardust Curation Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center two days later. Within the first week we plan to begin the harvesting of aerogel cells, and the comet nucleus samples they contain for detailed analysis. By the time of the LPSC meeting we will have been analyzing selected removed grains for more than one month. This presentation will present the first results from the mineralogical and petrological analyses that will have been performed.

  10. Geochemistry of Martian Meteorites and the Petrologic Evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    Mafic igneous rocks serve as probes of the interiors of their parent bodies - the compositions of the magmas contain an imprint of the source region composition and mineralogy, the melting and crystallization processes, and mixing and assimilation. Although complicated by their multifarious history, it is possible to constrain the petrologic evolution of an igneous province through compositional study of the rocks. Incompatible trace elements provide one means of doing this. I will use incompatible element ratios of martian meteorites to constrain the early petrologic evolution of Mars. Incompatible elements are strongly partitioned into the melt phase during igneous processes. The degree of incompatibility will differ depending on the mineral phases in equilibrium with the melt. Most martian meteorites contain some cumulus grains, but nevertheless, incompatible element ratios of bulk meteorites will be close to those of their parent magmas. ALH 84001 is an exception, and it will not be discussed. The martian meteorites will be considered in two groups; a 1.3 Ga group composed of the clinopyroxenites and dunite, and a younger group composed of all others.

  11. Silicate-melt inclusions in magmatic rocks: applications to petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria-Luce

    2001-01-01

    Silicate-melt inclusions in igneous rocks provide important information on the composition and evolution of magmatic systems. Such inclusions represent accidentally trapped silicate melt (±immiscible H 2O and/or CO 2 fluids) that allow one to follow the evolution of magmas through snapshots, corresponding to specific evolution steps. This information is available on condition that they remained isolated from the enclosing magma after their entrapment. The following steps of investigation are discussed: (a) detailed petrographic studies to characterise silicate-melt inclusion primary characters and posttrapping evolution, including melt crystallisation; (b) high temperature studies to rehomogenise the inclusion content and select chemically representative inclusions: chemical compositions should be compared to relevant phase diagrams. Silicate-melt inclusion studies allow us to concentrate on specific topics; inclusion studies in early crystallising phases allow the characterisation of primary magmas, while in more differentiated rocks, they unravel the subsequent chemical evolution. The distribution of volatile species (i.e., H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl) in inclusion glass can provide information on the degassing processes and on recycling of subducted material. In intrusive rocks, silicate melt inclusions may preserve direct evidence of magmatic stage evolution (e.g., immiscibility phenomena). Melt inclusions in mantle xenoliths indicate that high-silica melts can coexist with mantle peridotites and give information on the presence of carbonate melt within the upper mantle. Thus, combining silicate-melt inclusion data with conventional petrological and geochemical information and experimental petrology can increase our ability to model magmatic processes.

  12. The Ezhimala Igneous Complex, southern India: Possible imprint of Late Cretaceous magmatism within rift setting associated with India-Madagascar separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, M. Ram; Shaji, E.; Satyanarayanan, M.; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, T.; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Dhanil Dev, S. G.

    2016-05-01

    The gabbro-granophyre-granite complex of Ezhimala emplaced along the western rifted continental margin of India preserves evidence for bimodal magmatism, with related magma mixing and mingling processes. Here we report petrological, geochemical, zircon U-Pb geochronological and Lu-Hf isotopic data from the Ezhimala Igneous Complex (EIC) that provide insights into the Late Cretaceous magmatic activity. Field investigations and petrographic observations in Zircon U-Pb data from the granophyres show emplacement ages of 93.21 ± 0.6 Ma and 94.26 ± 0.92 Ma. The evolved Lu-Hf isotopic systematics for these rocks are indicative of the involvement of older crustal material during magma genesis. The geochemical systematics together with isotopic data suggest magma generation in a rift-related setting, and interaction with or melting of Neoproterozoic basement rocks. The timing of magmatism broadly correlates with the Late Cretaceous Marion hotspot activity which is considered to be responsible for the break-up of India and Madagascar. We thus interpret the EIC to be one of the rare signatures in southern India for the final phase of rifting of Gondwana.

  13. Towards Predictive Stochastic Dynamical Modeling of Cancer Genesis and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ao, P.; Galas, D.; Hood, L.; Yin, L.; Zhu, X.M.

    2011-01-01

    Based on an innovative endogenous network hypothesis on cancer genesis and progression we have been working towards a quantitative cancer theory along the systems biology perspective. Here we give a brief report on our progress and illustrate that combing ideas from evolutionary and molecular biology, mathematics, engineering, and physics, such quantitative approach is feasible. PMID:20640781

  14. Genesis Solar Wind Collector Cleaning Assessment: 60366 Sample Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goreva, Y. S.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Kuhlman, K. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D.; Jurewicz, A. J.; Allton, J. H.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Burkett, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to recognize, localize, characterize and remove particle and thin film surface contamination, a small subset of Genesis mission collector fragments are being subjected to extensive study via various techniques [1-5]. Here we present preliminary results for sample 60336, a Czochralski silicon (Si-CZ) based wafer from the bulk array (B/C).

  15. Genesis Solar-Wind Sample Return Mission: The Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Burnett, D. S.; Wiens, R. C.; Woolum, D.

    2000-01-01

    This abstract is a brief overview of the Genesis mission. Included is an instrument description, what materials were chosen for capturing solar wind and why, and information as to what will be available for analysis when the samples return to Earth in 2003.

  16. Pristine Igneous Rocks and the Genesis of Early Planetary Crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Our studies are highly interdisciplinary, but are focused on the processes and products of early planetary and asteroidal differentiation, especially the genesis of the ancient lunar crust. The compositional diversity that we explore is the residue of process diversity, which has strong relevance for comparative planetology.

  17. Small Particulate Contamination Survey Of Genesis Flight Sample 61423

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Schmeling, M.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.; Allton, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind and brought it back to Earth in order to provide precise knowledge of solar isotopic and elemental compositions. The ions in the solar wind stop in the collectors at depths on the order of 10 to a few hundred nanometers. This shallow implantation layer is critical for scientific analysis of the composition of the solar wind and must be preserved throughout sample handling, cleaning, processing, distribution, preparation and analysis. We continue to work with the community of scientists analyzing Genesis samples using our unique laboratory facilities -- and, where needed, our unique cleaning techniques -- to significantly enhance the science return from the Genesis mission. This work is motivated by the need to understand the submicron contamination on the collectors in the Genesis payload as recovered from the crash site in the Utah desert, and -- perhaps more importantly -- how to remove it. We continue to evaluate the effectiveness of the wet-chemical "cleaning" steps used by various investigators, to enable them to design improved methods of stripping spacecraft and terrestrial contamination from surfaces while still leaving the solar-wind signal intact.

  18. Geochemical and petrological study of Barberton Greenstone Belt cherts (3.2-3.5 Ga), South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledevin, M.; Arndt, N.; Simionovici, A.

    2011-12-01

    The massive deposition of cherts during Archean time provides important information about conditions on the sea floor during the early history of the Earth. We studied samples from four sites in the Barberton Greenstone Belt (3.2-3.5 Ga), South Africa, including fresh ICDP core samples, to understand their formation. We identified three different origins for cherts: direct precipitation from seawater, precipitation in fractures from silica-rich fluids, and replacement of preexisting rocks (silicification) at or near the surface. To better constrain the various formation processes of cherts, we use a petrological, rheological and geochemical approach: both macro- and micro- structural observations are used to understand early physical behavior of chert, silica precipitation, and silicification processes. Rheological information is obtained by careful field observations: we observe a complex behavior for cherts, with ductile to brittle deformation structures, sometimes both in the same layer, extremely fast diagenetic induration processes, and evidence of an early colloidal silica phase. High-resolution analyses (RAMAN, synchrotron and lab-based X-Ray microfluorescence, cathodoluminescence) are used to link micro-scale element distribution with microstructures, and to understand micro-scale formation processes. These approaches will be complemented by stable isotope (Si and O) and fluid inclusions analyses. Coupling petrological informations and geochemical analyses allow us to define reliable criteria to differentiate the three origins of cherts. When petrological observations show a secondary silicification of previously deposited sediments (e.g. laminations, ripple marks, silicified ashes), samples have trace element patterns with high HREE contents, and strong negative Sr and Li anomalies. In comparison, when cherts seem to be chemically precipitated on the sea floor, patterns show lower HREE and higher LILE contents, with a strong positive Ba anomaly and

  19. Ab initio modelling: Genesis of crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, Axel

    2005-05-01

    Genetic algorithms prove useful to distil a complex quantum mechanical calculation of interatomic interactions down to its simplest mathematical expression. This makes it possible to predict the structure of new compounds from first principles.

  20. Decontamination of Genesis Array Materials by UV Ozone Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Burnett, D. S.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Sestak, S.; Allton, J. H.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    Shortly after the NASA Genesis Mission sample return capsule returned to earth on September 8, 2004, the science team discovered that all nine ultra-pure semiconductor materials were contaminated with a thin molecular organic film approximately 0 to 100 angstroms thick. The organic contaminate layer, possibly a silicone, situated on the surface of the materials is speculated to have formed by condensation of organic matter from spacecraft off-gassing at the Lagrange 1 halo orbit during times of solar exposure. While the valuable solar wind atoms are safely secured directly below this organic contamination and/or native oxide layer in approximately the first 1000 angstroms of the ultra-pure material substrate, some analytical techniques that precisely measure solar wind elemental abundances require the removal of this organic contaminate. In 2005, Genesis science team laboratories began to develop various methods for removing the organic thin film without removing the precious material substrate that contained the solar wind atoms. Stephen Sestak and colleagues at Open University first experimented with ultraviolet radiation ozone (UV/O3) cleaning of several non-flight and flown Genesis silicon wafer fragments under a pure flowing oxygen environment. The UV/O3 technique was able to successfully remove organic contamination without etching into the bulk material substrate. At NASA Johnson Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory, we have installed an UV/O3 cleaning devise in an ambient air environment to further experimentally test the removal of the organic contamination on Genesis wafer materials. Preliminary results from XPS analysis show that the UV/O3 cleaning instrument is a good non-destructive method for removing carbon contamination from flown Genesis array samples. However, spectroscopic ellipsometry results show little change in the thickness of the surface film. All experiments to date have shown UV/O3 cleaning method to be the best non-destructive method

  1. Python as a Federation Tool for GENESIS 3.0

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Hugo; Rodriguez, Armando L.; Coop, Allan D.; Bower, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The GENESIS simulation platform was one of the first broad-scale modeling systems in computational biology to encourage modelers to develop and share model features and components. Supported by a large developer community, it participated in innovative simulator technologies such as benchmarking, parallelization, and declarative model specification and was the first neural simulator to define bindings for the Python scripting language. An important feature of the latest version of GENESIS is that it decomposes into self-contained software components complying with the Computational Biology Initiative federated software architecture. This architecture allows separate scripting bindings to be defined for different necessary components of the simulator, e.g., the mathematical solvers and graphical user interface. Python is a scripting language that provides rich sets of freely available open source libraries. With clean dynamic object-oriented designs, they produce highly readable code and are widely employed in specialized areas of software component integration. We employ a simplified wrapper and interface generator to examine an application programming interface and make it available to a given scripting language. This allows independent software components to be ‘glued’ together and connected to external libraries and applications from user-defined Python or Perl scripts. We illustrate our approach with three examples of Python scripting. (1) Generate and run a simple single-compartment model neuron connected to a stand-alone mathematical solver. (2) Interface a mathematical solver with GENESIS 3.0 to explore a neuron morphology from either an interactive command-line or graphical user interface. (3) Apply scripting bindings to connect the GENESIS 3.0 simulator to external graphical libraries and an open source three dimensional content creation suite that supports visualization of models based on electron microscopy and their conversion to computational

  2. Python as a federation tool for GENESIS 3.0.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Hugo; Rodriguez, Armando L; Coop, Allan D; Bower, James M

    2012-01-01

    The GENESIS simulation platform was one of the first broad-scale modeling systems in computational biology to encourage modelers to develop and share model features and components. Supported by a large developer community, it participated in innovative simulator technologies such as benchmarking, parallelization, and declarative model specification and was the first neural simulator to define bindings for the Python scripting language. An important feature of the latest version of GENESIS is that it decomposes into self-contained software components complying with the Computational Biology Initiative federated software architecture. This architecture allows separate scripting bindings to be defined for different necessary components of the simulator, e.g., the mathematical solvers and graphical user interface. Python is a scripting language that provides rich sets of freely available open source libraries. With clean dynamic object-oriented designs, they produce highly readable code and are widely employed in specialized areas of software component integration. We employ a simplified wrapper and interface generator to examine an application programming interface and make it available to a given scripting language. This allows independent software components to be 'glued' together and connected to external libraries and applications from user-defined Python or Perl scripts. We illustrate our approach with three examples of Python scripting. (1) Generate and run a simple single-compartment model neuron connected to a stand-alone mathematical solver. (2) Interface a mathematical solver with GENESIS 3.0 to explore a neuron morphology from either an interactive command-line or graphical user interface. (3) Apply scripting bindings to connect the GENESIS 3.0 simulator to external graphical libraries and an open source three dimensional content creation suite that supports visualization of models based on electron microscopy and their conversion to computational models

  3. Teaching Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology Through Guided Inquiry Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.

    2003-12-01

    Undergraduate Petrology at New Mexico State University (GEOL 399) has been taught using three, 5-6 week long projects in place of lectures, lab, and exams for the last six years. Reasons for changing from the traditional format include: 1) to move the focus from identification and memorization to petrologic thinking; 2) the need for undergraduate students to apply basic chemical, structural, and field concepts to igneous and metamorphic rocks; 3) student boredom in the traditional mode by the topic that has captivated my professional life, in spite of my best efforts to offer thrilling lectures, problems, and labs. The course has three guided inquiry projects: volcanic, plutonic, and pelitic dynamothermal. Two of the rock suites are investigated during field trips. Each project provides hand samples and thin sections; the igneous projects also include whole-rock major and trace element data. Students write a scientific paper that classifies and describes the rocks, describes the data (mineralogical and geochemical), and uses data to interpret parameters such as tectonic setting, igneous processes, relationship to phase diagrams, geologic history, metamorphic grade, metamorphic facies, and polymetamorphic history. Students use the text as a major resource for self-learning; mini-lectures on pertinent topics are presented when needed by the majority of students. Project scores include evaluation of small parts of the paper due each Friday and participation in peer review as well as the final report. I have found that petrology is much more fun, although more difficult, to teach using this method. It is challenging to be totally prepared for class because students are working at different speeds on different levels on different aspects of the project. Students enjoy the course, especially the opportunity to engage in scientific investigation and debate. A significant flaw in this course is that students see fewer rocks and have less experience in rock classification

  4. Semantically Enabling Knowledge Representation of Metamorphic Petrology Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, P.; Fox, P. A.; Spear, F. S.; Adali, S.; Nguyen, C.; Hallett, B. W.; Horkley, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    More and more metamorphic petrology data is being collected around the world, and is now being organized together into different virtual data portals by means of virtual organizations. For example, there is the virtual data portal Petrological Database (PetDB, http://www.petdb.org) of the Ocean Floor that is organizing scientific information about geochemical data of ocean floor igneous and metamorphic rocks; and also The Metamorphic Petrology Database (MetPetDB, http://metpetdb.rpi.edu) that is being created by a global community of metamorphic petrologists in collaboration with software engineers and data managers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The current focus is to provide the ability for scientists and researchers to register their data and search the databases for information regarding sample collections. What we present here is the next step in evolution of the MetPetDB portal, utilizing semantically enabled features such as discovery, data casting, faceted search, knowledge representation, and linked data as well as organizing information about the community and collaboration within the virtual community itself. We take the information that is currently represented in a relational database and make it available through web services, SPARQL endpoints, semantic and triple-stores where inferencing is enabled. We will be leveraging research that has taken place in virtual observatories, such as the Virtual Solar Terrestrial Observatory (VSTO) and the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO); vocabulary work done in various communities such as Observations and Measurements (ISO 19156), FOAF (Friend of a Friend), Bibo (Bibliography Ontology), and domain specific ontologies; enabling provenance traces of samples and subsamples using the different provenance ontologies; and providing the much needed linking of data from the various research organizations into a common, collaborative virtual observatory. In addition to better

  5. A Magnetic Petrology Database for Satellite Magnetic Anomaly Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, K.; Wasilewski, P.; Didenko, A.; Genshaft, Y.; Pashkevich, I.

    2002-05-01

    A Magnetic Petrology Database (MPDB) is now being compiled at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in cooperation with Russian and Ukrainian Institutions. The purpose of this database is to provide the geomagnetic community with a comprehensive and user-friendly method of accessing magnetic petrology data via Internet for more realistic interpretation of satellite magnetic anomalies. Magnetic Petrology Data had been accumulated in NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, United Institute of Physics of the Earth (Russia) and Institute of Geophysics (Ukraine) over several decades and now consists of many thousands of records of data in our archives. The MPDB was, and continues to be in big demand especially since recent launching in near Earth orbit of the mini-constellation of three satellites - Oersted (in 1999), Champ (in 2000), and SAC-C (in 2000) which will provide lithospheric magnetic maps with better spatial and amplitude resolution (about 1 nT). The MPDB is focused on lower crustal and upper mantle rocks and will include data on mantle xenoliths, serpentinized ultramafic rocks, granulites, iron quartzites and rocks from Archean-Proterozoic metamorphic sequences from all around the world. A substantial amount of data is coming from the area of unique Kursk Magnetic Anomaly and Kola Deep Borehole (which recovered 12 km of continental crust). A prototype MPDB can be found on the Geodynamics Branch web server of Goddard Space Flight Center at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/magnpetr.html. The MPDB employs a searchable relational design and consists of 7 interrelated tables. The schema of database is shown at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/doc.html. MySQL database server was utilized to implement MPDB. The SQL (Structured Query Language) is used to query the database. To present the results of queries on WEB and for WEB programming we utilized PHP scripting language and CGI scripts. The prototype MPDB is designed to search database by major satellite magnetic

  6. Genesis of amorphous calcium carbonate containing alveolar plates in the ciliate Coleps hirtus (Ciliophora, Prostomatea).

    PubMed

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Marin, Frédéric; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Schweikert, Michael; Baier, Johannes; Bill, Joachim; Brümmer, Franz

    2013-02-01

    In the protist world, the ciliate Coleps hirtus (phylum Ciliophora, class Prostomatea) synthesizes a peculiar biomineralized test made of alveolar plates, structures located within alveolar vesicles at the cell cortex. Alveolar plates are arranged by overlapping like an armor and they are thought to protect and/or stiffen the cell. Although their morphology is species-specific and of complex architecture, so far almost nothing is known about their genesis, their structure and their elemental and mineral composition. We investigated the genesis of new alveolar plates after cell division and examined cells and isolated alveolar plates by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR and X-ray diffraction. Our investigations revealed an organic mesh-like structure that guides the formation of new alveolar plates like a template and the role of vesicles transporting inorganic material. We further demonstrated that the inorganic part of the alveolar plates is composed out of amorphous calcium carbonate. For stabilization of the amorphous phase, the alveolar vesicles, the organic fraction and the element phosphorus may play a role. PMID:23228488

  7. JPL Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, P. Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.; Turk, Francis J.; Shen, Tsae-Pyng J.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.; Licata, Stephen J.; Poulsen, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observations can play a very important role in airborne field campaigns, since they provide a comprehensive description of the environment that is essential for the experiment design, flight planning, and post-experiment scientific data analysis. In the past, it has been difficult to fully utilize data from multiple NASA satellites due to the large data volume, the complexity of accessing NASA s data in near-real-time (NRT), as well as the lack of software tools to interact with multi-sensor information. The JPL GRIP Portal is a Web portal that serves a comprehensive set of NRT observation data sets from NASA and NOAA satellites describing the atmospheric and oceanic environments related to the genesis and intensification of the tropical storms in the North Atlantic Ocean. Together with the model forecast data from four major global atmospheric models, this portal provides a useful tool for the scientists and forecasters in planning and monitoring the NASA GRIP field campaign during the 2010 Atlantic Ocean hurricane season. This portal uses the Google Earth plug-in to visualize various types of data sets, such as 2D maps, wind vectors, streamlines, 3D data sets presented at series of vertical cross-sections or pointwise vertical profiles, and hurricane best tracks and forecast tracks. Additionally, it allows users to overlap multiple data sets, change the opacity of each image layer, generate animations on the fly with selected data sets, and compare the observation data with the model forecast using two independent calendars. The portal also provides the capability to identify the geographic location of any point of interest. In addition to supporting the airborne mission planning, the NRT data and portal will serve as a very rich source of information during the post-field campaign analysis stage of the airborne experiment. By including a diverse set of satellite observations and model forecasts, it provides a good spatial and temporal context for the

  8. Apollo 15 yellow impact glasses: Chemistry, petrology, and exotic origin

    SciTech Connect

    Delano, J.W.; Lindsley, D.H.; Ma, M.; Schmitt, R.A.

    1982-11-15

    The Apollo 15 yellow impact glasses are characterized by moderate TiO/sub 2/ (approx.4.8%) and high abundances of the large ion lithophile elements (e.g., K, P, Hf, Th, REE). Since the chemistry of these glasses cannot be duplicated by any combination of local components presently known to occur at the Apollo 15 landing site, these yellow glasses seem to be exotic to that area. Chemical and petrologic constraints suggest that these samples were produced by impact melting of an immature mare regolith developed upon an unusual variety of mare basalt. We speculate that the target basalt were the youngest lava flows known to exist on the moon (i.e., Eratosphenian-age lavas in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium). Specific tests are proposed for evaluating this provocative hypothesis.

  9. Petrological Explanations for the Magnetic Anomalies Detected on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The discovery of crustal magnetization in some locations on Mars, particularly the southern highlands, has major implications for the early evolution of Mars. The east-west-trending linear features in the southern highlands with alternating polarity may be the result of an early seafloor spreading process similar to that seen on Earth today. The larger magnetization of the martian crust compared to the Earth can be attributed to its higher Fe content and the proposed minerals associated with this magnetization are multidomain hematite and pyrrhotite. In this study, we discuss the petrological evolution of basalts on Earth and Mars and suggest processes that may enhance crystallization of magnetic minerals in the martian rocks, thereby accounting for their intense magnetic properties.

  10. Lunar basalt meteorite EET 87521: Petrology of the clast population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenova, A. S.; Nazarov, M. A.; Kononkova, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Elephant Moraine meteorite EET 87521 was classified as a lunar mare basalt breccia which is composed mainly of VLT basalt clasts. Here we report on our petrological study of lithic clasts and monomineralic fragments in the thin sections EET 87521,54 and EET 87521,47,1, which were prepared from the meteorite. The results of the study show that EET 87521 consists mainly of Al-rich ferrobasalt clasts and olivine pyroxenite clasts. The bulk composition of the meteorite can be well modelled by the mixing of these lithic components which appear to be differentiates of the Luna 25 basalt melt. KREEP and Mg-rich gabbro components are minor constituents of EET 87521.

  11. APPLICATIONS OF CATHODOLUMINESCENCE OF QUARTZ AND FELDSPAR TO SEDIMENTARY PETROLOGY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.

    1987-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), the emission of visible light during electron bombardment, was first used in sandstone petrology in the mid-1960's. CL techniques are especially useful for determining the origin and source of quartz and feldspar, two of the most common constituents in clastic rocks. CL properties of both minerals are dependent on their temperature of crystallization, duration of cooling, and/or history of deformation. Detrital quartz and feldspar are typically derived from igneous and metamorphic sources and luminesce in the visible range whereas authigenic quartz and feldspar form at low temperatures and do not luminesce. Quantification of luminescent and non-luminescent quartz and feldspar with the scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, or a commercial CL device can allow for the determination of origin, diagenesis, and source of clastic rocks when used in conjunction with field and other petrographic analyses.

  12. Lunar ferroan anorthosite 60025 - Petrology and chemistry of mafic lithologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, O. B.; Mcgee, J. J.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven splits from the mafic-mineral-rich part of anorthosite 60025 were studied in order to establish the exact nature and causes of compositional variations in the minerals of lunar ferroan anorthosites. All splits were analyzed by INAA, and five were studied intensively by petrologic techniques. All splits were found to have similar cataclastic textures and show textural evidence of at least two episodes of deformation. The whole-rock split contains mafic minerals having a wide range of compositions and is probably polymict. It is suggested that the rare-earth patterns for all splits can be duplicated safactorily, assuming that the equilibrium liquids had flat, or nearly flat, chondrite-normalized rare-earth patterns. The plagioclases in all splits were found to be identical. Data obtained indicate that in ferroan anorthosites An content in plagioclase and mg' of associated mafic minerals are not strongly correlated.

  13. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Odette B.; Flohr, Marta K.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed results of petrologic and compositional studies of three clasts found in thin sections of the Apollo 16 lunar breccia 67975 and of four clasts extracted from the breccia (for instrumental neutron activation analysis) prior to thin sectioning are reported. The alkali gabbronorites of the breccia form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. The magnesian gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase, hypersthene, augite, a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase, pigeonite, augite, Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent REE-rich magmas.

  14. Linking petrology and seismology at an active volcano.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kate; Blundy, Jon; Dohmen, Ralf; Cashman, Kathy

    2012-05-25

    Many active volcanoes exhibit changes in seismicity, ground deformation, and gas emissions, which in some instances arise from magma movement in the crust before eruption. An enduring challenge in volcano monitoring is interpreting signs of unrest in terms of the causal subterranean magmatic processes. We examined over 300 zoned orthopyroxene crystals from the 1980-1986 eruption of Mount St. Helens that record pulsatory intrusions of new magma and volatiles into an existing larger reservoir before the eruption occurred. Diffusion chronometry applied to orthopyroxene crystal rims shows that episodes of magma intrusion correlate temporally with recorded seismicity, providing evidence that some seismic events are related to magma intrusion. These time scales are commensurate with monitoring signals at restless volcanoes, thus improving our ability to forecast volcanic eruptions by using petrology. PMID:22628652

  15. Petrology, chemistry, age and irradiation history of Luna 24 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Mcculloch, M. T.; Huneke, J. C.; Dymek, R. F.; Depaolo, D. J.; Chodos, A. A.; Albee, A. L.; Radicati Di Brozolo, F.

    1978-01-01

    The results of petrological, chemical, isotopic age determination and irradiation studies of sample 24170 from the 170 cm depth of the regolith core returned from Mare Crisium by Luna 24 are presented. The sample is found to be comprised of fragments from a single igneous rock, with mineralogical evidence indicating it to be a mare basalt. The crystallization age is determined by Sm-Nd and Ar(40)-Ar(39) ages to be 3.30 AE, establishing the presence of relatively young flows. All soil samples show low trace element compositions with minimum contamination by KREEPUTh-rich materials. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd relations reflect the absence of significant fractionation at ages younger than 4.5 AE. One soil sample shows extremely large neutron capture effects, imposing a new lower limit to the neutron production rate in the regolith and requiring the addition of irradiated materials from depth.

  16. Petrology of crystalline matrix breccias from Apollo 17 rake samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    The petrology, mineralogy, and composition of 13 crystalline matrix breccias from the Apollo 17 rake samples are described. The breccias have matrices of uniform modal mineralogy (plagioclase, 50-54%; olivine and pyroxene, 41-46%) but diverse textures. Clast characteristics, including the proportion of plagioclase, the composition in comparison with matrix, and the textures of different clast types, are reported. The majority of bulk matrix compositions plot on or very near the plagioclase-olivine cotectic in the system olivine-anorthite-silica. If the matrix compositions represent impact total melts, the inferred cotectic control requires that the source material was itself an igneous differentiate with compositions along the plagioclase-olivine cotectic. Alternatively, the proximity of the matrix compositions to the plagioclase-olivine cotectic could be accounted for if the breccia matrices represent a suite of impact-generated partial melts.

  17. Morphotectonic and petrological variations along the southern Central Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranadhir; Iyer, Sridhar D.; Ray, Dwijesh; Karisiddaiah, S. M.; Drolia, Rajendra K.

    2016-04-01

    In order to ascertain the effect of geomorphic and tectonic domains on the formation, enrichment, and ascension of the ridge axis melt, structural and petrological data from a nearly 300-km-long axial stretch along the slow-to-intermediate-spreading (40-60 mm/year) southern Central Indian Ridge (SCIR) were studied. The stretch, approximately between 20°30'S and 23°07'S, was disturbed by two major tectonic features—Egeria transform fault in the north and the Gemino Fracture Zone in the south—besides eight other discontinuities of variable dimensions. This stretch was chosen to test the petrological variations and mechanisms of magma supply in four distinct geomorphic and tectonic regimes: a Ridge-Crest-Flank-Valley (RCFV), a Neo-Volcanic Zone (NVZ), a large transform discontinuity (LTD), and an overlapping spreading centre (OSC). The major and trace element geochemistry of 44 glass and 47 whole rocks, extent and depth of melting (Na8 and Fe8, respectively), and melt pristinity (Mg#) of the magma indicate that rocks along this stretch were probably sourced from a reasonably primitive melt generated at a relatively greater depth and later got accumulated in pockets at a shallower level before eruption. Petrochemical analysis, and isotopic composition and ratios suggest that in contrast to largely N-MORB type of rocks at RCFV and OSC areas, the rocks from LTD and NVZ locations show signatures of enrichment to transitional (T) and enriched (E) basalts. A model explaining possible processes of enrichment and ascending framework of the melt at different tectonic regimes along SCIR are discussed.

  18. The petrology and petrogenesis of the Swaldale region, Motzfeldt Center, South Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reekie, Callum; Finch, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Motzfeldt is one of several high-level alkaline plutonic centers that collectively define the mid-Proterozoic Gardar Province of South Greenland. Despite pyrochlore-hosted Ta-enrichment (± Nb-Zr-REE), the petrology, geochemistry and petrogenesis across the center remain to be fully constrained. We present petrological and geochemical data for the Swaldale region, an arcuate band of nepheline syenite and associated intrusives on Motzfeldt's NW margin. Work for this present study was undertaken in collaboration with the license holder, Regency Mines plc. Swaldale comprises two geochemically distinct magmatic members. The largest, the Motzfeldt Sø Formation (MSF; EuN/Eu*N = 0.35), is a suite of diverse syenite variants that show significant petrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These rocks have a relatively restricted SiO2 range (57.4-62.9 wt.%) with concurrent variation in (Na+K)/Al (0.75-0.95), Mg/(Mg+Fe) (2.18-19.82) and ΣREE (595.0-3095.9 ppm), emphasizing their evolved but not peralkaline nature. Fractionation is mirrored by pyroxene geochemistry with evolution from aegirine-augite, aegirine-hedenbergite, to aegirine. Accessory pyrochlore, titanite, and zircon are rare; however, anomalous facies of zircon-rich (~2 wt.%) syenite are observed. Intercumulus fluorite is a common accessory within MSF rocks. Hydrothermal alteration, marked by hematized alkali-feldspar, is pervasive and ubiquitous. Further peraluminous syenite of the Geologfjeld Formation ((Na+K)/Al = 0.74; EuN/Eu*N = 1.60) marks the truncated remnant of an early syenite stock to the north of the MSF. These rocks contain salite, which, in addition to a lower ΣREE and higher Mg/(Mg+Fe) (18.01), demonstrates the less-fractionated nature of this stock in comparison with the MSF. Sheeted intrusions of peralkaline syenite ((Na+K)/Al = 1.1; Ta = 32.4 ppm) truncate the MSF across central Swaldale. On a mineralogical basis, it is hypothesized that such intrusions reflect outward sheeting of the

  19. Genesis of Carlin-type gold deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.C.; Lawler, J.P.; Ayres, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Carlin-type deposits are large, disseminated, sediment-hosted gold ore bodies. They are of major economic interest to mining companies because they represent low-cost, bulk-mineable targets. To develop a genetic model for the Carlin-type deposits, the authors have employed a multidisciplinary research program on ten Carlin-type deposits in Nevada and Utah. Studies included rock geochemistry, alteration mineralogy, fluid inclusions, oxygen isotopes, incremental Ar/sup 40/-Ar/sup 38/ age dating, hydrothermal experiments on temperature-stability relationships of gold complexes, and physical properties of host rocks. Their studies demonstrate that Carlin-type deposits are formed at initial temperatures of approximately 250/sup 0/C by acidic, reducing, low salinity, Tertiary, meteoric fluids. Gold is transported as a chloride complex and deposition occurs in response to destabilization of this complex with decreasing temperature. Temperature is the major parameter controlling ore deposition. The physical properties of the host environment place major constraints on ore formation in addition to temperature. In the Carlin systems studied, high porosity host rocks are capped by structural or stratigraphic closures which trap the ore fluid. The deposits do not necessarily form near the surface, and models based solely on analogies to hot springs systems may be misleading.

  20. Learning Activities for an Undergraduate Mineralogy/Petrology Course-"I Am/We Are."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodell, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an entry level mineralogy/igneous petrology course designed for undergraduate students and presents a series of learning activities based on individual and cooperative learning. Includes 18 references. (Author/YDS)

  1. Petrologic constraints on the pressure, temperature, time and composition of the Martian interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, John R.

    1988-01-01

    Petrologic analysis of surface samples has been used to deduce pressure and temperature conditions existing in the crust and upper mantle at specific times in the Earth's history, as well as to estimate the chemical and mineralogical composition of the crust and upper mantle. The same techniques can be applied to samples of the Martian surface to provide P, T, time and composition constraints of the Martian interior. Estimates of P and T conditions existing at a given time would, in turn, provide strong constraints on the thermal evolution of Mars. Knowledge of the chemical and mineralogical composition of the Martian interior is of fundamental importance in assessing the early history of the solar system. A general petrological approach is outlined, describing the kinds of sample required, summarizing current understanding of the Martian interior based on experimental petrology, and outlining some of the important experiments needed to allow a full petrologic interpretation of Martian samples.

  2. Analysis of Molecular Contamination on Genesis Collectors Through Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, K. M.; Stansbery, Eileen K.

    2005-01-01

    Before the spacecraft returned to Earth in September, the Genesis mission had a preliminary assessment plan in place for the purpose of providing information on the condition and availability of collector materials to the science community as a basis for allocation requests. One important component of that plan was the evaluation of collector surfaces for molecular contamination. Sources of molecular contamination might be the on-orbit outgassing of spacecraft and science canister components, the condensation of thruster by-products during spacecraft maneuvers, or the condensation of volatile species associated with reentry. Although the non-nominal return of the Genesis spacecraft introduced particulate contamination to the collectors, such as dust and heatshield carbon-carbon, it is unlikely to have caused any molecular deposition. The contingency team's quick action in returning the damaged payload the UTTR cleanroom by 6 PM the evening of recovery help to ensure that exposure to weather conditions and the environment were kept to a minimum.

  3. EV13 Genesis Reentry Observations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft reentry represented a unique opportunity to observe a "calibrated meteor" from northern Nevada. Knowing its speed, mass, composition, and precise trajectory made it a good subject to test some of the algorithms used to determine meteoroid mass from observed brightness. It was also a good test of an inexpensive set of cameras which could be deployed to observe future shuttle reentries. The utility of consumer grade video cameras was evident during the STS-107 accident investigation and the Genesis reentry gave us the opportunity to specify and test commercially available cameras which could be used during future reentries. This report describes the video observations and their analysis, compares the results with a simple photometric model, describes the forward scatter radar experiment, and lists lessons learned from the expedition and implications for the Stardust reentry in January 2006 as well as future shuttle reentries.

  4. Nuts and Bolts - Techniques for Genesis Sample Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, Patti J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The Genesis curation staff at NASA Johnson Space Center provides samples and data for analysis to the scientific community, following allocation approval by the Genesis Oversight Committee, a sub-committee of CAPTEM (Curation Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials). We are often asked by investigators within the scientific community how we choose samples to best fit the requirements of the request. Here we will demonstrate our techniques for characterizing samples and satisfying allocation requests. Even with a systematic approach, every allocation is unique. We are also providing updated status of the cataloging and characterization of solar wind collectors as of January 2011. The collection consists of 3721 inventoried samples consisting of a single fragment, or multiple fragments containerized or pressed between post-it notes, jars or vials of various sizes.

  5. [Genesis study of omphacite at high pressure and high temperature].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ben-Fu; Yi, Li; Wang, Duo-Jun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Xue-Wu; Liu, Lei; Cui, Yue-Ju

    2013-11-01

    The melting and recrystallizing experiments of alkali basalt powder and mixture of pure oxides mixed as stoichiometry were performed at 3 GPa and 1 200 degrees C. Electronic microprobe analysis and Raman spectra showed that the recrystallized products were omphacites, the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the Raman peak was narrow and its shape was sharp, which is attributed to the stable Si-O tetrahedral structure and the high degree of order in omphacite. Based on the results of previous studies, the influencing factors of omphacite genesis and its primary magma were discussed. The results showed that the formation of omphacite could be affected by many factors, such as the composition of parent rocks, the concentration of fluid in the system and the conditions of pressure and temperature. This result could support some experimental evidences on the genesis studies of omphacite and eclogite. PMID:24555367

  6. Entry Dispersion Analysis for the Genesis Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    2005-01-01

    Genesis will be the first mission to return samples from beyond the Earth-Moon system. The spacecraft will be inserted into a halo orbit about the L1 (Sun-Earth) libration point where it will remain for two years collecting solar wind particles. Upon Earth return, the sample return capsule, which is passively controlled, will descend under parachute to Utah. The present study describes the analysis of the entry, descent, and landing scenario of the returning sample capsule. The robustness of the entry sequence is assessed through a Monte Carlo dispersion analysis where the impact of off-nominal conditions is ascertained. The dispersion results indicate that the capsule attitude excursions near peak heating and drogue chute deployment are within Genesis mission limits. Additionally, the size of the resulting 3-sigma landing ellipse is 47.8 km in downrange by 15.2 km in crossrange, which is within the Utah Test and Training Range boundaries.

  7. Size Distribution of Genesis Solar Wind Array Collector Fragments Recovered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    Genesis launched in 2001 with 271 whole and 30 half hexagonally-shaped collectors mounted on 5 arrays, comprised of 9 materials described in [1]. The array collectors were damaged during re-entry impact in Utah in 2004 [2], breaking into many smaller pieces and dust. A compilation of the number and approximate size of the fragments recovered was compiled from notes made during the field packaging performed in the Class 10,000 cleanroom at Utah Test and Training Range [3].

  8. Genesis of Typhoon Nari (2001) from a mesoscale convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Lin; Tian, Liqing; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the origin and genesis of Typhoon Nari (2001) as well as its erratic looping track, are examined using large-scale analysis, satellite observations, and a 4 day nested, cloud-resolving simulation with the finest grid size of 1.33 km. Observational analysis reveals that Nari could be traced 5 days back to a diurnally varying mesoscale convective system with growing cyclonic vorticity and relative humidity in the lower troposphere and that it evolved from a mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) as moving over a warm ocean under the influence of a subtropical high, a weak westerly baroclinic disturbance, an approaching-and-departing Typhoon Danas to the east, and the Kuroshio Current. Results show that the model reproduces the genesis, final intensity, looping track, and the general convective activity of Nari during the 4 day period. It also captures two deep subvortices at the eye-eyewall interface that are similar to those previously observed, a few spiral rainbands, and a midget storm size associated with Nari's relatively dry and stable environment. We find that (1) continuous convective overturning within the MCV stretches the low-level vorticity and moistens a deep mesoscale column that are both favorable for genesis; (2) Nari's genesis does not occur until after the passage of the baroclinic disturbance; (3) convective asymmetry induces a smaller-sized vortex circulation from the preexisting MCV; (4) the vortex-vortex interaction with Danas leads to Nari's looping track and temporal weakening; and (5) midlevel convergence associated with the subtropical high and Danas accounts for the generation of a nearly upright eyewall.

  9. Initial Subdivision of Genesis Early Science Polished Aluminum Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.; Meshik, A.; See, T. H.; Bastien, R.

    2005-01-01

    A large surface, about 245 square centimeters, of highly polished aluminum 6061 T6 alloy was attached to the science canister thermal panel for the purpose of collecting solar wind noble gases. The analysis of this collector will be part of the Genesis Early Science results. The pre-launch configuration of the collector is shown. The collector sustained some damage during the recovery impact in Utah, September 8, 2004.

  10. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.